F15_BD_Ski Mounting Specs_R2.indd

SKI
MOUNTING
SPECS
FALL 2015
SKIS
FALL 2015 SKI MOUNTING SPECS
Measurements taken from tail, in millimeters.
FREERIDE SERIES
SKI MOUNTAINEERING SERIES
SIZE
ALPINE MID-BOOT (MM)*
195
895
185
849
175
803
818
165
757
172
782
192
870
164
746
184
834
186
812
176
798
176
769
168
761
166
725
160
725
188
846
180
810
172
774
164
738
MODEL
SIZE
ALPINE MID-BOOT (MM)*
Carbon
Megawatt
188
824
178
781
188
855
180
Carbon
Convert
Carbon
Aspect
MODEL
Boundary
115
Boundary
107
Boundary
100
TOURING SERIES
MODEL
Link 105
Link 95
Link 90
SIZE
ALPINE MID-BOOT (MM)*
188
855
180
818
172
782
188
847
180
811
172
775
186
812
176
769
166
725
Use 3.6 Ø x 9.5 mm drill bit for non-metal skis. Also cross reference with binding manufacturer's screw recommendation, if any. For alpine and AT, we recommend
using white wood glue as a sealant. For tele, for maximum screw retention, we recommend 1-hour epoxy.
Please read and know proper telemark-mounting best practices. Among many guidelines, these include using a mandatory 8-10 Nm screw torque with 1-hour epoxy.
Alpine binding screw mounting torques are not enough for telemark binding forces. Any less torque than 8-10 Nm does not create enough clamping force to overcome upward binding force. As a result, your screws can loosen, resulting in the binding ripping out.
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Fall Tech Manual
SKIS
FALL 2015 TELEMARK BINDING MOUNTING SPECS
BOOT MONDO SIZE
BLACK DIAMOND
TELE BOOT SOLE
LENGTH (MM)
ALPINE MID-SOLE MARK TO PIN LINE MEASUREMENT (MM)
PROGRESSIVE MOUNT BOOT CENTER
@ ALPINE MARK
CLASSIC MOUNT BOOT CENTER
25 MM BACK OF ALPINE LOCATION
23
269
128
103
24
280
133
108
25
294
140
115
26
305
146
121
27
315
151
126
28
325
156
131
29
335
161
136
30
346
166
141
Progressive: Modern, twin rockered skis paired with today’s stiffer 3- and 4-buckle freeride telemark boots.
Classic: Traditional ski shapes and sidecuts paired with softer 2- and 3-buckle boot designs.
FINDING BOOT CENTER FOR BOOTS
WITHOUT A CENTER MARK
Progressive
mount
(Pin line is located 14 mm behind front of duckbill)
1) Make a mark 14 mm behind the tip of the duckbill on the outsole of
the boot.
pin line
Classic
mount
14 mm
2) Measure from this line to the back of the heel and divide by 2.
midboot
length
3) This is your pin line to tele mid-boot measurement. Write it down!
Progressive mount: Locate the mounting template so that the pin line
is positioned this same distance in front of the alpine boot center mark
on the ski. Tele mid-boot mark will align with the alpine mid-boot mark.
Classic mount: Subtract 25 mm from this measurement, and locate
the mounting template so that the pin line is positioned this distance
in front ot the alpine boot center mark on the ski. Tele mid-boot mark
will align 25 mm behind the alpine mid-boot mark.
mid-boot
mid-boot
mark on ski
boot heel
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mid-boot
length
less
25 mm
actual
mid-boot
is 25 mm
behind
mid-boot
mark on ski
SKIS
FALL 2015 SKI MOUNTING SPECS
Measure
It’s important that you accurately determine your mounting location based on the recommended specifications (see chart on the Mounting Specs page) with personal
preference adjustments, if applicable or known. Measure twice, drill once.
Alpine: For AT or alpine mid-boot, the ski is marked with our recommendation. We list in our specs what the exact location of this mark is on the ski, so be sure to doublecheck tolerances as it can shift by a few millimeters. We don’t recommend moving the mount location backward from here, but it’s personal preference if you want to
mount select skis forward.
Tele: Things get complicated with tele. Traditionally, telemark mounts were based on chord-center (or some reference point along those lines.) However, different boot sole
lengths will affect the mounting position and its relationship with sidecut and overall length. In the new Tele Binding Mounting Specs chart, you’ll see that we break the
mounting guidelines into two styles: Classic and Progressive. Classic is where our chart traditionally has been locating telemark bindings. Progressive is more appropriate
for today’s modern ski shapes with twin rocker profiles like the Carbon Megawatt. We also break down the mounting location by boot sole length for BD boots. So, choose
you boot size, then your ski style (Progressive or Classic). Now, find the distance in front of the alpine mid mark that you should locate the binding jig (or paper template)
telemark pin line mark.
MOUNTING TIPS
“Standard protocol” varies from shop to shop, so here, in detail, is what we feel makes for a solid binding mount.
Precision
This is paramount for telemark bindings, which have much higher peak loads than an alpine or AT binding. What is often overlooked is that the ISO standard minimum for
binding pull-out strength for alpine skis is 292 pounds per screw, which is fine for alpine binding systems but is not nearly enough for an active tele binding. Our pullout
strength exceeds 440 pounds per screw, but that pullout strength is only achieved with a precision mount. For example, that strength drops 40% if the screw doesn’t
thread in straight. How many times have you chased a screw hole that wasn’t completely in line with the binding and you just kind of forced it in, cocked over, until it
snugged down straight? That's a major no-no.
Torque specs
Most alpine specs have around 4-5 Nm per screw when you are using a TLD (torque limiting device). For an active tele binding you need upwards of 8-10 Nm. Some
company’s skis may not take this much, but for BD skis, feel free to crank it down this much (in fact you must on bindings such as the O1.) In addition, we recommend a
3.6 Ø drill bit to get the best thread retention based on the minor diameter of the screw. This tighter screw fit also mandates a higher torque to get the screw into the ski, so
again, the traditional TLD setting probably would not seat the screw tightly enough.
Cleanliness
Be sure to remove any dust or shards from the drilled hole. It is important to use clean screws, without any chunks of material embedded from a previous mount. A screw
with smooth threads ensures proper thread cutting when you turn the screw in. It is also important to apply adequate downward pressure when starting the screw so the
threads cut immediately and don't spin and grind away the first engagement. Tapping the hole first is never a bad practice regardless of metal or not. When mounting thinner skis that require the screws to be ground down shorter, be extra careful to grind a slight taper and to avoid leaving any sharp burrs which will not cut a smooth thread
into the ski.
Epoxy
We recommend using epoxy for all telemark mounts. Epoxy can increase your overall maximum pullout strength, but most importantly acts as a buffer to decrease screwloosening possibilities. This in turn can lead to a degradation of the ski’s core and increase peak shock loads that will eventually result in the binding ripping out of the
ski. For alpine and alpine touring bindings, if you don’t prefer epoxy, use simple wood glue to seal the hole and lubricate the screw as it is being twisted in to help achieve
suitable clamping force for given torque values.
Jigs
The BD Jig is a great tool for precision tele mounts and keeping the heel block in the prescribed location every time or if you don’t have the actual boot to work with. (Sorry
if you normally mount skis with the tips facing left. Perhaps you can stand on your head or mount behind your back, Jimi style.) Fully support the ski so that when applying
drilling force you don’t flex the ski; this is crucial because it ensures that the holes are perpendicular. Some non-BD skis can get quite thin, so make sure your drill bit and
provided screws are not going to dimple the base, especially at the heel block areas. Be careful on the Fritschi jig in case you have to pull the clamp boots off for maximum
width, as well as making sure you have all four arms with the boots facing the correct direction. We highly discourage any type of paper template mount as you will never
achieve full strength and can also compromise the overall strength of your binding.
Holes and screws
For Fritschi AT and BD tele bindings, 3.6 Ø x 9.5 mm is the recommend drill bit and depth for all of our skis. Each ski manufacturer has a recommended hole diameter and
each binding screw design should have a specific hole diameter recommendation. Confused about which to use? Put down the drill and contact the manufacturer. If all
else fails, use the binding recommendation and tap the hole.
As a rule of thumb, the more expected force on the system, the higher torque the screws are going to need to resist the resulting binding force acting against it. When that
relationship is out of whack, the screws can begin to loosen and even a single loose thread will dramatically affect pullout strength. It can also slowly degrade core-retaining properties by slight movements of the screw over time, again reducing pullout strength.
Using torque limiting power drills is usually a bad idea unless you’re skilled in the art. We recommend hand tightening each screw with a TLD-enabled hand posi-driver,
making sure that each screw goes directly and perpendicularly in and then doing a final torque spec twist on each screw. If for some reason you don’t have a TLD and are
working on BD skis and bindings, hand tighten more than you think—pushing down with all your strength while turning the screw means that you’re probably at around
10 Nm, which is fine for BD’s O1 binding or skis.
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