Kodak Junior

Kodaks Junior
Six-20 and Six-16 Series II
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SERVICE DEPARTMENT
ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR MAKING BETTER PICTURES THOUGH we give in this manual
the essential directions for using the camera it accompanies, there are amateurs who wish for further knowledge of
photography.
The Service Department is at their service, your service.
Do not hesitate to call on us for information on any photographic subject.
We are (it your service, write to us, there is no charge, no obligation.
Address, all Communications
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
ROCHESTER, N. Y.
Picture taking with the Kodaks Junior
Six-20 and Six-16
Series II
Kodak Bimat Lens
Published by
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
ROCHESTER, N. Y., U. S. A.
THE CAMERA
1. Lock for Back
2. Button for Opening Front
3. Bed
4. Vertical Support
5. Shutter
6. Lens
7. View Finder
8. Metal Frame Finder
9. Tripod Sockets
10. Release for Closing Front
11. Winding Key
A-Speed Indicator
B-Stop Opening Pointer
C-Exposure Lever
IMPORTANT
BEFORE loading your Kodak with film, and before taking any pictures with it, read these instructions carefully. Take especial
care to learn how to operate the shutter, see page S.
While loading and unloading, he very careful to keep the protective paper wound tightly around the film to prevent light
striking it. The Kodak can be loaded or unloaded in daylight. This should be done in a subdued light, not in direct sunlight.
To LOAD
Push the button of the lock towards the arrow.
Use film number:
V 620, XX 620, FX 620 or 620 for the Kodak Junior Six-20 Series II.
V 616, XX 616, FX 616 or 616 for the Kodak Junior Six-16 Series II.
Open the back.
Lift up the spool holder in the recess adjoining the hinge of the back and
place the roll of film in it, springing out the flanges until the pins engage
the holes in the spool. The spool should be inserted so that when the
paper is drawn off, the
colored side of the paper will be up,
and the black side will be towards
the lens.
Remove the paper band and pass the protective paper over the two
rollers, and thread it through the longer slit in the empty reel, as far
as it will go.
Turn the winding key once or twice to bind the paper on the reel,
and be sure that the paper is started straight.
Close the back, pressing it so that the spring lock snaps into
place, securely fastening the back.
Push the round slide that covers the red window on the back
of the Kodak in the direction of the arrow.
Turn the winding key, watching the red window. After a few turns, a warning hand will
appear; then turn slowly until the figure 1 is in the center of the window.
Push back the slide over the reel window. This slide prevents fogging the film. The window
should be uncovered only when winding the film.
The film is now in position for the first exposure. After each exposure be sure to wind the
film, bringing the next number into position. This prevents making two pictures on the same
section of film.
OPENING THE FRONT
Press the button 2, page 2, to open
the front; then draw down the bed until it locks. This
brings the lens and shutter into position. The Kodak is adjustable for closeups, near-by views, and distant subjects.
When the lens is revolved so that the white dot on the flange is at the arrow
marked: "Beyond 15 feet," the Kodak is in focus for all subjects beyond
fifteen feet. For groups or near-by views the white dot on the flange should be
at the line marked: "8 to 15 feet." For closeups, revolve the lens until the white
dot is at the arrow marked: "5 to 8 feet."
THE SHUTTER
Instantaneous Exposures
Move indicator A to 25, 50, or 100 (see Exposure Guide on back
cover or table on pages 10 and 11).
Move pointer B to the correct stop opening (see Exposure Guide
on back cover or table on pages 10 and 11).
The Kodon Shutter has the stop openings and shutter speeds
engraved on the top of the shutter as well as on the front, for
greater convenience when making pictures with the Kodak in the
vertical position.
Press lever C to make the exposure.
A-Speed Indicator
B-Stop Opening Pointer
C-Exposure Lever
Time Exposures
Move indicator A to the letter "T."
Move pointer B to f.11, 16, 22 or 32, according to the time of exposure and nature of the subject. See tables on pages 10, 11,
12, 25, 26 and 31.
Press lever C. This opens the shutter. Time the exposure by a watch. Again press lever C. This closes the shutter.
For short time exposures from one half second to ten seconds, "Bulb" Exposures are recommended.
"Bulb" Exposures
Move indicator A to the letter "B."
Move pointer B to f.11, 16, 22 or 32. See pages 10, 11, 12, 25, 26 and 31.
Press lever C to open the shutter which will remain open as long as lever C is held down.
Time and "Bulb" Exposures must never be made with the Kodak held in the hands.
Important: Never oil the shutter.
In case of accident, return the camera to your dealer or to us for repairs.
Cable Release: A cable release (No. 29) can be used with the Kodak if desired, but the camera should not then be closed
without first removing the cable release.
To attach the cable release, remove the screw directly behind the lever C and replace it with the cable release. After using the
cable release, detach it and replace the screw in the opening. The screw may be loosened and tightened with a small coin.
STOP OPENINGS
The stop openings regulate the amount of light passing through the lens. The openings are enlarged or reduced by moving the
pointer B, see page 8.
The largest stop opening is f.11. This opening allows approximately twice the light to enter the lens as f.16; f.16 admits twice
the light of f.22; and f.22 twice the light of f.32. There
fore, if the correct exposure is 1/100 second at f.11 the same amount of exposure would be obtained with f.16 and 1/50 second,
and 1/25 second with f.22.
f.11 For all ordinary outdoor pictures, such as near-by landscapes showing little or no sky, groups and street scenes, when the
subject is in bright sunlight, use speed 25; for moving objects in very bright sunlight, use speed 100.
f.16-For open views, when the sunlight on the subject is unusually strong'and there are no heavy shadows, such as views at the
seashore and on the water, use speed 50; for ordinary landscapes, in bright sunlight, with clear sky overhead, use speed 25; also
for Interior Time Exposures, the time for which is given on page 26.
f.22--For instantaneous exposures of extremely distant landscapes, marines, snow scenes without prominent dark objects in the
foreground, and clouds only, in bright sunlight, use speed 25; also for
Time Exposures.
f.32-For Time Exposures Outdoors on cloudy days, see page 31. For Interior Time Exposures, see pages 25 and 26. 1)u not use
for instantaneous exposures unless using Iyodak Super-AN Panchromatic Film.
The smaller the stop opening the greater the depth or range of sharpness, see tables on page 13.
The exposures given in the table are for hodttk Veiiehronle, Panatonlie-\, and Regular Filnl; with Kodak Super Verichrome
Film,use the second smaller Stop opening than the table recommended in the table, or use the same stop opening with a shutter
speed four times as fast as the one given in the table.
For a subject in the shade, under the roof of a porch or under a tree, a short time exposure should be made, with Kodak
Verichrome, Panatomic-X, or Regular Film ; with Kodak Super-XX Panchromatic film snapshots can be made. When making
time exposures the camera must be placed oil some steady, firm support.
NEARNESS OF SUBJECT
To get everything sharp and distinct in your pictures, the Kodak must not be nearer than a certain number of feet to the subject.
This distance varies according to the focal length of the lens; the adjustment of the lens for close-ups, near-by views or distant
subjects; and the size of the stop opening used-the smaller the opening the greater the range of sharpness. The following tables
give these distances.
Depth of Field Tables
Distance from Lens to Subject
Stop
opening
f.11
f.16
f.22
f.32
With Kodak
focused for
beyond 15 feet
15 ft. &beyond
11,ft.&beyond
9; ft. & beyond
7 ft. &beyond
With Kodak
focused for
8 to 15 feet
8 to 15 ft.
61to24ft.
6 to 47 ft.
5 ft. & beyond
With Kodak
focused for
5 to 8 feet
5 to 8 ft.
4 1/2 to 91 ft.
41/2 to 111, ft.
3 3/4 to 18 ft.
For Kodak Junior Six-16 Series II
Stop
opening
f.11
f.16
f.22
Distance
With Kodak
focused for
beyond 15 feet
15 ft. & beyond
13 1/2 ft. & beyond
11 1/4 ft.&beyond
from Lens to Subject
With Kodak
focused for
8 to 15 feet
8 to 15 ft.
7 1/4 to 18 ft.
6 3/4 to25ft.
With Kodak
focused for
5 to 8 feet
5 to 8 ft.
4 3/4 to 8 1/4 ft.
4 1/2 to 9 1/4 ft.
f.32
8 3/4 ft. & beyond
5 3/4 to 68 ft.
4 to 12 1/4 ft.
These circles are the same size as the stop openings of the
shutters used on the Kodaks. They clearly show the relative
sizes of the various stop openings and how their areas differ.
THE VIEW FINDER
The view finder shows what will appear in the picture, but on a
much reduced scale. It can be turned quickly for either vertical or
horizontal pictures, see diagrams on pages 15 and 17.
Look into the finder from directly over the center of it and include
what is wanted by turning to the right or left, see illustration on
page 16.
To make a vertical picture, hold the Kodak as shown above. Only
what is seen iii that part of the finder shown as white in the
diagram at the right will appear in the picture.
When making instantaneous exposures or snapshots with any Kodak, hold it firmly against the body as shown; or against the
face if using the metal frame finder. When pressing the exposure lever, hold the breath for the instant. If the Kodak is moved
during the exposure, the picture will be blurred.
To make a horizontal picture, turn the finder and hold the
Kodak as shown in the lower illustration on page 15. Only
what is seen in that part of the finder shown as white in the
diagram on this page will appear
in the picture.
THE METAL FRAME FIND
In addition to the brilliant view finder, the camera is equipped with a metal frame finder 8, page 2, attached to the side of the
Kodak. To use this finder, raise the rear frame by the button and both parts of the finder will spring into position. Hold the
camera with the sight or rear frame as close to the eye as possible with the camera held firmly against the face, and frame the
picture within the front frame of the finder. All vertical lines in the subject should be kept parallel with the vertical sides of this
frame, when holding the camera either in the vertical or horizontal position.
MAKING INSTANTANEOUS EXPOSURES OR SNAPSHOTS
When ordinary instantaneous exposures or snapshots are made, the subject should be in the broad, open sunlight, but the
camera must not. The sun should be behind your back or over the shoulder. If it shines directly into the lens, it will blur and fog
the picture. For obtaining back- or side-lighted pictures, use a Kodak Adjustable Lens Hood No. 2.
Special instructions for making portraits are given on pages 27 to 30.
HOLD THE KODAK LEVEL
The Kodak must be held level. If all the subject cannot be included in the finder without tilting the lens upwards, move
backwards until it is all included with the camera held level.
If the subject is below the normal height, like a small child or a dog, the Kodak should be held down level with the center of the
subject.
Unusual effects can be obtained by tilting the Kodak.
Hold the Kodak steady!.
After an exposure has been made, turn the winding key
slowly, a few times, until No. 2 (or the next number) is in
the center of the red window.
CLOSING THE KODAK
Close the Kodak by pressing the bar release 10, page 2, as shown in the illustration at
the top of page 20, raise the bed and snap it shut. The front and bellows fold
automatically. Be sure the finder is in the upright position, and that the lens has been
turned so that the white dot is at the arrow: "Beyond 15 feet."
Remove the cable release before closing the camera.
REMOVING THE FILM
After the last section of film has been exposed, turn the winding key until the
end of the paper passes the red window.
In a subdued light, open the back of the Kodak, see pages 3 and 4.
Hold the end of the paper taut and turn the key until all the paper is on the roll,
see lower illustration on page 20. If the sticker folds under the roll, turn the key
to bring it up.
Take hold of the ends of the paper and sticker to prevent the paper from
loosening. Draw out the key and remove the film. Fold under about half-an-inch
of the protective paper, and fasten it with the sticker.
"Cinch" Marks: After removing the film from the Kodak, do not wind it tightly with a twisting motion, or the film might be
scratched.
Wrap up the exposed film. It is now ready for development. This may be done by a photo finisher, or by yourself. Our Service
Department will be glad to send you, upon request, complete instructions for developing and printing.
Important: Film should be developed as soon as possible after exposure. The quality of the image on all sensitized products is
retained by prompt development after exposure.
Remove the empty spool and place it in the winding end of the camera. The
Kodak is now ready for reloading.
It is a good plan to reload the Kodak as soon as an exposed film has been
removed, to be ready for the next pictures. For the best results, load with
Kodak Film.
TIME EXPOSURES - INDOORS
For time exposures the camera must always be placed on a firm support like a
tripod, Optipod, table or chair, never hold it in the hands. The Kodak has two
tripod sockets for use with a tripod, an Optipod or a Kodapod, with the Kodak
either in the vertical or horizontal position.
Place the Kodak in such a position that the finder will include the view
desired. The above diagram shows three positions for the camera. It should
not be pointed at a window as the glare of light may blur the picture.
If the Kodak is placed on a table, for making a vertical picture, use the vertical
support 4. The camera must not be more than two or three inches from the
edge of the table.
To make a horizontal picture without a tripod, turn the finder and place the
camera in the position shown in the illustration on page 25.
Adjust the shutter for a time exposure as described on page 9.
All being ready, press the exposure lever carefully, once to open, time the
exposure by a watch, and again press the exposure lever to close the shutter.
After making an exposure, turn the winding key until the next number
appears in the red window.
If no more time exposures are to be made, adjust the shutter for an
instantaneous exposure, see page 8.
Exposure Table for Interiors
The table on page 26 gives suitable exposures for varying conditions of light, when using stop f.16.
With stop f.11, give one-half;
"
" f.22, " twice;
"
" f.32, " four times the exposures given in the table.
The smaller the stop opening the greater the range of sharpness, see tables on page 13. Stop f.16 gives the best average results
for Interiors.
To MAKE A PORTRAIT
The subject should be seated in a chair partly facing the light with the body turned slightly away from, and the face turned
towards the Kodak which should be a little higher than an ordinary table. The subject should look at an object level with the
lens or directly at the lens. Compose the picture in the finder. For a three-quarter figure the Kodak should be about eight feet
from the subject; and for a full-length figure, about ten feet. Revolve the lens so that the white dot is
at the line marked: "8 to 15 feet." The background should form a contrast with the subject; a light background usually gives a
better effect than a dark one. To get a good light on the face, follow the arrangement shown in the diagram.
EXPOSURE TABLE FOR INTERIORS USING STOP f.16
Bright sun Hazy sun Cloudy
Cloudy
bright
dull
White walls and more than one win4 sees.
10 sees. 20 sees. 40 sees.
dow.
White walls and only one window.
6 sees.
15 sees. 30 sees. 1 min.
Medium colored walls and furnish8 sees.
20 sees. 40 sees. 1 min.
ings and more than one window.
20 sees.
Medium colored walls and furnish12 sees. 30 sees. 1 min.
2 mins.
ings and only one window.
Dark colored walls and furnishings
20 sees. 40 sees. 1 min.
2 mins.
and more than one window.
20 sees. 40 sees.
Dark colored walls and furnishings
40 sees. 1 min.
2 mins.
5 mins.
and only one window.
20 sees. 40 sees. 20 sees.
These exposures are for rooms where windows get the direct light from the
sky and for hours from three hours after sunrise until three hours before sun
set. If earlier or later the exposures must be longer.
A reflector helps to get detail in the shaded part of the face. A white towel or tablecloth held by an assistant or thrown over a
screen or other high piece of furniture will make a suitable reflector; it should be at an angle and in the position indicated in the
diagram on page 27.
If the above suggestion for lighting is followed, an exposure of about one second at f.11 will be sufficient on a bright day.
Making Portraits Outdoors
When making portraits outdoors, with the sun shining brightly, the subject should be in the shadow of a building or a large tree,
but with clear and unobstructed sky overhead. Place the Kodak on a tripod or other steady support, use stop f.22 or f.32 and
make a Time Exposure ("Bulb") of about one or two seconds. By following this rule unpleasant and distorting shadows on the
face will be avoided. When the subject is five to eight feet from the Kodak, the white dot on the lens must be at the arrow
marked: "5 to 8 feet."
Kodak Portrait Attachment
The Kodak Portrait Attachment makes head and shoulder portraits. It can also be used for photographing flowers and similar
subjects.
Place the Attachment over the lens and compose the picture in the finder. Turn the Kodak just a little to the left, as the short
distance at which the subject must be from the lens makes it necessary to center the subject by eye instead of by the finder.
If the white dot on the lens is at the arrow marked: "Beyond 15 feet," the subject must be 3 feet 10 inches from the lens. Larger
images can be obtained by having the Kodak 3 feet 1 inch from the subject, if the white dot on the lens is at the line marked: "8
to 15 feet," and 2 feet 6 inches from the subject, if the white dot on the lens is at the arrow marked: "5 to 8 feet."
Measure the distance carefully from the lens to the face.
The same exposure is required as without the Attachment.
Use the Kodak Portrait Attachment No. 6A, with the Kodak Junior Six-20 Series II with Kodak Bimat Lens.
With the Kodak Junior Six-16 Series II, use the Kodak Portrait Attachment No. 7A.
Kodak Diffusion Portrait Attachment
The Kodak Diffusion Portrait Attachment is a supplementary lens used in the same manner as the regular Kodak Portrait
Attachment. It produces a true, soft-focus effect.
Use Kodak Diffusion Portrait Attachment No. 6A, with the Kodak Junior Six-20 Series II with the Kodak Bimat Lens.
With the Kodak Junior Six-16 Series II, use Kodak Diffusion Portrait Attachment No. 7A.
"AT HOME WITH YOUR KODAK" is a booklet containing many diagrams and illustrations showing various lighting effects.
It gives suggestions for making pictures in and around the home.
"PICTURE TAKING AT NIGHT" IS a booklet that describes in detail the methods of making pictures by electric light, flashlight exposures, campfire scenes, fireworks, lightning, moonlight effects, silhouettes and other unusual pictures.
These two booklets are free, and copies of them will be sent upon request to our Service Department.
TIME EXPOSURES-OUTDOORS
When the smaller stop openings (f.22 or f.32) are used, the light passing through the lens is so much reduced that very short
time exposures may be made outdoors.
With Light Clouds-From one to three seconds will be sufficient.
With Heavy Clouds-Four seconds to eight seconds will be required.
With Sunshine-Time Exposures should not be made.
When making time exposures the Kodak must be placed on some steady, firm support; do not hold it in the hands or the picture
will be blurred.
CLEAN LENSES
The pictures on page 32 illustrate the difference between results with a dirty and a
clean lens.
Lenses should be cleaned as follows:
Open the back of the Kodak, see pages 3 and 4; then open the front as described on
page 7. Wipe the front and back of the lens with Lens Cleaning Paper or with a
clean handkerchief. Never unscrew the lens.
Keep Dust Out of the Camera
Wipe the inside of the camera and bellows, occasionally, with a slightly damp cloth, especially if the camera has not been used
for some time.
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY,
ROCHESTER, N. Y.
PRICE LIST
KODAK VERICHROME FILM, V 620, for the Kodak Junior Six-20 Series 11, 21/4 x 31/4, eight exposures
.30
KODAK SUPER-XX PANCHROMATIC FILM, XX 620, 2 1/2 x 3 1/4, eight exposures 35
KODAK PANATOMIC-X FILM, FX 620, 2 1/2 x 3 1/4, eight exposures .35
KODAK FILM (REGULAR), 620, 2 1/4x3 1/4, eight exposures .25
KODAK VERICHROME FILM, V 616, for the Kodak Junior Six-16 Series II,
2 1/2 x 4 1/4, eight exposures .35
KODAK SUPER-XX PANCHROMATIC FILM, XX 616, 2 1/2 x 4 1/4, eight exposures .40
KODAK PANATOMIC-X FILM, FX 616, 2 1/2 x 4 1/4, eight exposures .40
KODAK FILM (REGULAR), 616, 2 1/2 x 4 1/4, eight exposures .30
KODAK PORTRAIT ATTACHMENT, No. 6A, for the Kodak Junior Six-20 Series II 1.00
No. 7A for the Kodak Junior Six-16 Series II 1.00
KODAK DIFFUSION PORTRAIT ATTACHMENT, No. 6A 1.75
No. 7A 2.00
KODAK SKY FILTER, No. 6A 1.75
No. 7A 2.00
KODAK COLOR FILTER, No. 6A 1.75
No. 7A 2.00
KODAK PICTORIAL DIFFUSION DISK,
No. 6A 3.00
No. 7A 3.50
KODAK ADJUSTABLE LENS HOOD, No. 2 1.00
KODAK METAL TRIPOD, No. 0 $2.75
No. 1 4.50
No. 2 5.00
OPTIPOD, for attaching camera to the edge of a table, chair, fence, etc 1.25
KODAPOD, for attaching camera to a tree, fence or similar rough surface 1.75
CABLE RELEASE, No. 29, for the Kodak Junior Six-20 or Six-16 Series II 35
KODAK SELF TIMER, fits on the cable release and automatically presses the push-pin, enabling the photographer
to be included in the picture 1.25
KODAK NEGATIVE ALBUM, to hold 100
2 1/2 x 4 1/4, 2 1/2 x 3%, or smaller negatives 1.25
"HOW TO MAKE GOOD PICTURES," an illustrated book of helpful suggestions. It describes various methods of making
exposures, developing, printing, enlarging, coloring, and other interesting subjects .50
All prices subject to change without notice.
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY, ROCHESTER, N. Y.
The Kodak
Portrait Attachment
Fits your Kodak for head and shoulder portraits-it enables you to approach closer to the subject and
get a larger image, sharply focused at short range.
At your dealer's
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
ROCHESTER, N. Y.
IMPORTANT
This manual should be read thoroughly, before you make any pictures.
While loading and unloading the camera, be very careful to keep the protective paper wound tightly around the film to prevent
light striking it.
Before making an exposure be sure that the shutter is adjusted properly, for an instantaneous or time exposure, whichever is
required. Use the correct stop opening and speed. Check the focus. An unexposed section of film must he in position.
The sun must be, behind your back or over the shoulder. II' the sun shines directly into the lens, it will blur and fog the picture.
Hold the camera level.
Hold the camera steady when making instantaneous exposures or snapshots. The camera should he held firmly against the body
(or against the face if using the metal frame finder) and when pressing the exposure lever, hold the breath for the instant. If the
camera is moved during the exposure, the picture will be blurred.
When making a close-up between ,5 and 8 feet, be sure to revolve the lens until the white dot is at the arrow marked: "5 to 8
feet," and that it is turned as far as it will go.
Turn a new section of film into position immediately after making an exposure. This prevents making two pictures on the same
section of film.
Keep the lens and inside of camera clean.
Never oil the shutter.
Instructions for making time exposures, indoors and outdoors, are included in this manual.
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY,
ROCHESTER, N. Y.
6-39-KP-25
Printed in the United States
Outdoor Exposure Guide
for the Kodaks Junior Six-20 and
Six-16 Series II with the
Kodak Bimat Lens
SUBJECT
STOP
SHUTTER
OPENING
SPEED
Near-by landscapes showing little or no sky. Near-by subjects f.1 1
1/25
in open field, park or garden.
_
Street scenes.
Ordinary landscapes showing sky, with a principal object
f.16
1/25
in the foreground.
Marine and beach scenes. Distant landscapes. Snow scenes
f.22
1/25
without prominent dark objects in the foreground. Mountains.
Portraits in the open shade, not under trees or the roof of a
f22
B
porch. Shaded near-by scenes.
,
1 sec.
Narrow and slightly shaded streets.
Moving objects.
f.11
1/100
When photographing a moving object such as a rustler,
train or an automobile, the subject should be moving to
wards or away from tile camera at an angle of about 45
degrees.
Exposures are for the hours from one hour after sunrise until one hour before sunset on days when the sun is shining. If pictures
are made earlier or later, or if it is a slightly cloudy or hazy day, rise a larger stop opening. This table is for Kodak Verichrome
and Panatomic-X Films;, if using Kodak Film (Regular), exposures ma he made from 2 1/2 hours after sun rise until 2 1/2 hours
before sunset.
With Kodak Super-XX Panchromatic Film use the second smaller stop opening than the one given in the table.
lire largest stop opening it .(A 1. The higher the number the smaller the opening.