packet reference manual

PACKET
REFERENCE
MANUAL
Avery Dennison®
Monarch®
9419 Printer
TC9419PR Rev. AA 9/16
© 2016 Avery Dennison Corp.
All rights reserved.
Each product and program carries a respective written warranty, the only warranty on which the
customer can rely. Avery Dennison Corp. reserves the right to make changes in the product, the
programs, and their availability at any time and without notice. Although Avery Dennison Corp.
has made every effort to provide complete and accurate information in this manual, Avery
Dennison Corp. shall not be liable for any omissions or inaccuracies. Any update will be
incorporated in a later edition of this manual.
2016 Avery Dennison Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced,
transmitted, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language in any form by any
means, without the prior written permission of Avery Dennison Corp.
Trademarks
Monarch and MPCL are trademarks of Avery Dennison Retail Information Services LLC.
Avery Dennison® is a trademark of Avery Dennison Corp.
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S
GETTING STARTED ........................................................................................... 1-1
About This Manual .................................................................................................... 1-1
Before You Begin ...................................................................................................... 1-1
Creating an MPCLII Format Packet ............................................................................. 1-2
Sample Batch Packet .............................................................................................. 1-2
Designing a Format ................................................................................................... 1-3
Determining the Print Area ......................................................................................... 1-3
Using Supply Layout Grids ...................................................................................... 1-4
About Field Types .................................................................................................. 1-4
Using the Format Worksheet ...................................................................................... 1-4
Filling in the Format Worksheet ............................................................................... 1-4
CONFIGURING THE PRINTER ............................................................................ 2-1
Setting Serial Communication Parameters .................................................................. 2-1
Using MPCLII Conventions ........................................................................................ 2-1
MPCLII Punctuation ................................................................................................ 2-1
Standard Syntax Guidelines .................................................................................... 2-2
Using Online Configuration Packets ............................................................................ 2-3
Configuration Packet Header ................................................................................... 2-3
Configuration Syntax Guidelines .............................................................................. 2-4
Making Print Adjustments .......................................................................................... 2-5
Defining the System Setup Packet .............................................................................. 2-5
Defining the Supply Setup Packet............................................................................... 2-6
Defining the Print Control Packet ............................................................................... 2-7
Defining the Monetary Formatting Packet .................................................................... 2-8
Defining the Control Characters Packet ...................................................................... 2-9
Resetting Control Characters ................................................................................ 2-10
Using Immediate Commands ................................................................................. 2-10
Enabling Immediate Commands ............................................................................. 2-10
Sending Immediate Commands .............................................................................. 2-10
Defining the Communication Settings Packet ............................................................. 2-12
Defining the Backfeed Control Packet ....................................................................... 2-13
Clearing Packets from Memory ................................................................................. 2-13
Using the Font Packet ............................................................................................. 2-14
Uploading Format Header Information ....................................................................... 2-16
DEFINING FIELDS ............................................................................................. 3-1
Defining the Format Header ....................................................................................... 3-1
Table of Contents i
Defining Text Fields .................................................................................................. 3-2
Defining Bar Code Fields ........................................................................................... 3-7
Defining Non-Printable Text Fields ........................................................................... 3-18
Defining Constant Text Fields .................................................................................. 3-19
Defining Line Fields ................................................................................................ 3-23
Line Types ........................................................................................................... 3-23
Defining Box Fields ................................................................................................. 3-25
DEFINING FIELD OPTIONS ................................................................................ 4-1
Applying Field Options .............................................................................................. 4-1
Combining Field Options ......................................................................................... 4-1
Restrictions ............................................................................................................ 4-1
Using Option 1 (Fixed Data) ....................................................................................... 4-2
Using Option 4 (Copy Data) ....................................................................................... 4-3
Merging Fields ....................................................................................................... 4-3
Sub-Fields ............................................................................................................. 4-4
Using Option 30 (Pad Data) ....................................................................................... 4-4
Sample Use for Padding ......................................................................................... 4-4
Using Option 31 (Calculate Check Digit) ..................................................................... 4-4
Using Option 42 (Price Field) ..................................................................................... 4-5
Using Option 50 (Bar Code Density) ........................................................................... 4-5
Using Option 51 (PDF417 Security/Truncation) ............................................................ 4-6
Using Option 52 (PDF417 Width/Length) ..................................................................... 4-7
Using Option 60 (Incrementing/Decrementing Fields) ................................................... 4-7
Fixing the First Number in the Incrementing Sequence .............................................. 4-7
Using Option 61 (Re-image Field) ............................................................................... 4-8
Using Check Digits .................................................................................................... 4-9
Sum of Products Calculation ................................................................................. 4-10
Sum of Digits Calculation ...................................................................................... 4-11
CREATING GRAPHICS ...................................................................................... 5-1
Overview of Bitmapped Images .................................................................................. 5-1
Determining a Method ............................................................................................. 5-1
Designing Bitmapped Images ..................................................................................... 5-1
Special Considerations ........................................................................................... 5-2
Using the Hex Method ............................................................................................. 5-2
Using the Run Length Encoding Method ................................................................... 5-4
Determining How to Store the Image .......................................................................... 5-5
Using Volatile RAM ................................................................................................. 5-5
Using Temporary Storage ........................................................................................ 5-5
ii Packet Reference Manual
Using a Memory Card ............................................................................................. 5-5
Using Flash ............................................................................................................ 5-5
Creating a Graphic Packet ......................................................................................... 5-6
Positioning the Graphic Image ................................................................................. 5-6
Defining the Graphic Header ...................................................................................... 5-7
Creating Bitmap Fields .............................................................................................. 5-8
Creating Next-Bitmap Fields ...................................................................................... 5-9
Creating Duplicate Fields ........................................................................................... 5-9
Sample Hex Graphic Packet ..................................................................................... 5-10
Sample Run Length Graphic Packet ......................................................................... 5-10
Placing the Graphic in a Format ............................................................................... 5-11
Defining the Graphic Field ....................................................................................... 5-12
Sample Bitmap Graphic Image ................................................................................. 5-12
PRINTING ......................................................................................................... 6-1
Downloading Files ..................................................................................................... 6-1
About Batch Packets (Print Jobs) ............................................................................... 6-2
Defining the Batch Header ......................................................................................... 6-2
Defining the Batch Control Field ................................................................................. 6-3
Defining Batch Data Fields ........................................................................................ 6-4
Using Special Characters in Batch Data ...................................................................... 6-4
Sample Batch Data with Special Characters ............................................................. 6-4
Merged or Sub-Fields ............................................................................................. 6-4
Incrementing Fields ................................................................................................ 6-4
Entering Batch Data for QR Code ............................................................................... 6-5
Structured Append Mode ......................................................................................... 6-6
Structured Append QR Code Packet ........................................................................ 6-6
Downloading Methods ............................................................................................... 6-7
Sequential Method .................................................................................................. 6-7
Batch Method ......................................................................................................... 6-7
Batch Quantity Zero Method .................................................................................... 6-7
Modifying Formats ..................................................................................................... 6-8
Optional Entry Method ............................................................................................ 6-8
Creating Batch Files for Downloading ......................................................................... 6-8
STATUS POLLING ............................................................................................. 7-1
Inquiry Request (ENQ) .............................................................................................. 7-1
Inquiry Response ................................................................................................... 7-1
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #2 ................................................................................. 7-2
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #3 ................................................................................. 7-4
Table of Contents iii
Job Request ............................................................................................................. 7-6
Job Response ........................................................................................................ 7-6
Job Status Responses ............................................................................................ 7-8
DIAGNOSTICS ................................................................................................... 8-1
Printing a Test Label ................................................................................................. 8-1
Using Dump Mode ..................................................................................................... 8-2
If the PC and Printer Are Not Communicating .............................................................. 8-2
Resetting the Printer ................................................................................................. 8-2
Calling Technical Support .......................................................................................... 8-3
PRINTER OPTIMIZATION ................................................................................... 9-1
Adjusting the Print Quality ......................................................................................... 9-1
Reducing Imaging Time ............................................................................................. 9-2
General Format Tips and Hints ................................................................................... 9-3
SAMPLES ........................................................................................................ A-1
Sample Codabar Packet ............................................................................................ A-1
Sample Code 16K Packet .......................................................................................... A-1
Sample Code 39 Packet ............................................................................................ A-1
Sample Code 93 Packet ............................................................................................ A-2
Sample Code 128 Packet ........................................................................................... A-2
Sample Data Matrix Packets ...................................................................................... A-2
Square Data Matrix Packet ...................................................................................... A-2
Rectangular Data Matrix Packet ............................................................................... A-3
Sample Data Matrix with Function 1 ......................................................................... A-3
Sample EAN Packet .................................................................................................. A-3
Sample I 2 of 5 with Barrier Bar Packet ...................................................................... A-3
Sample MaxiCode Packets ......................................................................................... A-4
Mode 0 (Obsolete) Sample ...................................................................................... A-5
Mode 2 Sample ...................................................................................................... A-6
Mode 3 Sample ...................................................................................................... A-7
MaxiCode Compression Sample .............................................................................. A-8
Sample MSI Packet ................................................................................................... A-9
Sample PDF417 Packet ............................................................................................. A-9
Sample POSTNET Packet .......................................................................................... A-9
Sample Quick Response Packets ............................................................................... A-9
Sample QR Code Packet ....................................................................................... A-10
Sample QR Code with URL Packet ......................................................................... A-10
Structured Append QR Code Packet ...................................................................... A-10
Sample UPCA Format Packet ................................................................................... A-10
iv Packet Reference Manual
Sample Batch Packet ............................................................................................ A-10
FONTS ............................................................................................................. B-1
Bitmap Font Information ............................................................................................ B-4
Monospaced Font Magnification ................................................................................. B-4
Proportional Font Magnification .................................................................................. B-4
Scalable Font Information .......................................................................................... B-5
TrueType Font Information ......................................................................................... B-5
Downloading TrueType Fonts .................................................................................. B-5
Using International Fonts ........................................................................................... B-6
Selecting a Symbol Set ........................................................................................... B-6
International Font Sample ....................................................................................... B-7
Licensing Fonts ........................................................................................................ B-7
Locating the Font Number in a Font Packet ................................................................. B-7
SYMBOL SETS/CODE PAGES ........................................................................... C-1
Supported Symbol Sets and Code Pages .................................................................... C-1
Selecting a Symbol Set or Code Page ...................................................................... C-1
Using Code 128 Function Codes ................................................................................ C-1
Entering Extended Characters .................................................................................... C-1
Using International Character Sets/Code Pages ........................................................ C-2
Internal Symbol Set ................................................................................................ C-2
ANSI Symbol Set .................................................................................................... C-3
Bold Character Set ................................................................................................. C-3
OCRA Character Set ............................................................................................... C-4
Code Page 437 (Latin U.S.) ..................................................................................... C-4
Code Page 850 (Latin 1) ......................................................................................... C-5
Code Page 852 (Latin 2) ......................................................................................... C-5
Code Page 855 (Russian) ....................................................................................... C-6
Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish) .................................................................................. C-6
Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese) ..................................................................... C-7
Code Page 1250 (Latin 2) ....................................................................................... C-7
Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic) ....................................................................................... C-8
Code Page 1252 (Latin 1) ....................................................................................... C-8
Code Page 1253 (Greek) ......................................................................................... C-9
Code Page 1254 (Turkish) ....................................................................................... C-9
Code Page 1255 (Hebrew) .................................................................................... C-10
Code Page 1256 (Arabic) ...................................................................................... C-10
Code Page 1257 (Baltic) ....................................................................................... C-11
Code Page 1258 (Vietnamese) .............................................................................. C-11
Table of Contents v
ASCII to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart ................................................................... C-12
Binary to Hex Conversion Chart ............................................................................... C-15
Dot to Run Length Encoding Chart ........................................................................... C-17
ON (Black) Dots ................................................................................................... C-17
Off (White Dots) ................................................................................................... C-17
FORMAT DESIGN TOOLS ................................................................................. D-1
Online Configuration Worksheet ................................................................................. D-2
Batch Worksheet ....................................................................................................... D-3
Check Digit Worksheet .............................................................................................. D-4
Supply Layout Grids (English) .................................................................................... D-5
Supply Layout Grids (Metric) ...................................................................................... D-6
Supply Layout Grids (Dots) ........................................................................................ D-7
Format Worksheet ..................................................................................................... D-8
Sample Format Worksheet ......................................................................................... D-9
GLOSSARY ...................................................................................................... G-1
vi Packet Reference Manual
1
G E T T I N G S TA R T E D
This manual provides the necessary information to design, write and print a
Monarch® Printer Control Language II (MPCLII) format on the Avery Dennison® Monarch® 9419
printer. The 9419 printer supports both thermal direct and thermal transfer printing. Review the
printer information in the Equipment Manual or Online Mode System Administrator’s Guide.
Note:
Formats created for the 9416 and 9416XL printer print on the 9419 printer.
About This Manual
You do not need to be a programmer to use this manual, but you must be familiar with creating
text files and using basic commands. This chapter describes how to
♦ create and download a sample MPCLII packet.
♦ use the Supply Layout Grid and Format Worksheet.
♦ categorize data into field types and select fonts to use in a format.
See “Defining Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for a list of available fonts for the printer. See Chapter 4,
“Defining Field Options,” for a list of available options for the printer.
Before You Begin
1. Connect the printer to the host. Refer to the Online Mode System Administrator’s Guide for
more information.
2. Load supplies in the printer. Refer to the Equipment Manual for more information.
3. Turn on the printer.
4. Set the communication parameters and configure the printer. The communication parameters
at the printer must match those at the host. See Chapter 2, “Configuring the Printer,” for more
information.
5. Design the format. See “Designing a Format” for more information.
6. Download the format to the printer. See Chapter 6, “Printing,” for more information.
Getting Started 1-1
Creating an MPCLII Format Packet
A format defines which fields appear and where the fields are printed on the label. The printer
requires this information in a special form, using Monarch® Printer Control Language II (MPCL).
This section describes how to create a sample MPCLII format packet.
For detailed information about the format header, text, constant text, and bar code fields, see
Chapter 3, "Defining Fields." For information about batch packets, see Chapter 6, “Printing.”
1. Type the following format header in any text editor:
{F,25,A,R,E,200,200,"FMT-25" |
2. Type the following constant text field:
C,140,40,0,1,2,1,W,C,0,0,"SAMPLE FORMAT",0 |
3. Type the following bar code field:
B,1,12,F,85,40,1,2,40,5,L,0 |
4. Type the following text field:
T,2,18,V,50,50,1,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,1 | }
This is an MPCLII format packet. Next, create a batch packet before printing the format.
5. Type the following batch header, after the text field line:
{B,25,N,1 |
6. Type the following bar code data:
1,"02802811111" |
7. Type the following text field data:
2,"TEXT FIELD" | }
8. Save the file as SAMPLE.FMT.
9. Type MODE COM1:9600,N,8,1 at the Command prompt when using serial communications.
This sets the communication parameters at the host. These communication parameters must
match those at the printer. See “Setting Serial Communication Parameters,” in Chapter 2, or
the host’s documentation for more information.
10. Type COPY SAMPLE.FMT COM1. The following 2 inch by 2 inch
label prints:
{F,25,A,R,E,200,200,"Fmt 25" |
C,140,40,0,1,2,1,W,C,0,0,"SAMPLE FORMAT",0 |
B,1,12,F,85,40,1,2,40,5,L,0 |
T,2,18,V,50,50,1,3,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 | }
Sample Batch Packet
{B,25,N,1 |
1,"02802811111" |
2,"TEXT FIELD" | }
1-2 Packet Reference Manual
Designing a Format
Determine the supply size, fonts, bar codes, and graphics being used. Labels are available from
Avery Dennison in a wide variety of sizes. The application and the amount of printed data
determine the supply size. Contact your Account Manager or Technical Support for more
information.
1. Draw a rough sketch of the label. Note any areas that are preprinted on the label, such as a
logo.
2. Identify the field types that appear on the label. See “About Field Types” for more
information.
3. Decide which fonts to use. When working with fonts, there are three considerations: font
appearance, font size (scalable or bitmapped), and font spacing (monospaced or
proportional). The TrueType® scalable font, EFF Swiss Bold™ (font 50) is standard on the
printer. See Appendix B, “Fonts,” for samples of each font.
4. Fill out the Format Worksheet. See “Using the Format Worksheet” for more information.
At this point, send the design to the printer. To do this:
5. Create a format packet, based on the completed format worksheet. See Chapter 3, “Defining
Fields,” for more information.
6. Download the format packet to the printer. See Chapter 6, “Printing,” for more information.
Keep backup copies of the format, batch data, check digit, and graphic packets.
Determining the Print Area
The “bottom” (or leading edge) is the edge that exits the printer first. The 0,0 point is at the
bottom left corner of the label. The print area varies, depending on the size of your supply. When
designing formats, the following non-print zone is recommended: 0.04 inches at the top and
bottom of the label.
Unit of Measure
Min. Supply
(Wid x Len)
Max. Supply
(Wid x Len)
Min. Print Area
(Wid x Len)
Max. Print Area
(Wid x Len)
English
(1/100 inch)
75 x 20
440 x 1000
75 x 20
425 x 1000
Metric (1/10 mm)
191 x 50
1120 x 2540
191 x 50
1079 x 2540
Dots (203)
152 x 41
893 x 2030
152 x 41
863 x 2030
Dots (300)
225 x 60
1320 x 3000
225 x 60
1275 x 3000
Note:
Peel mode minimum feed length is 1.0 inches (25 mm) and the maximum feed length is
6.0 inches (152 mm).
The minimum feed width with 300 dpi is 4.17 inches (106mm)
Use the following formulas to convert inches to dots and metric:
Dots = inches x 203 (or 300 dots per inch)
Metric (1/10mm) = inches x 254
English (1/100 inch) = 100 x (dots/203) or (dots/300)
Dots = Metric (1/10 mm) x 799/1000 (or 1181/1000)
300 dpi depends on the printer.
Getting Started 1-3
Using Supply Layout Grids
A supply layout grid contains measurement markers, which help accurately position information
on the label. Decide whether to design formats using English, Metric, or Dot measurements.
English
The English grid is measured in 1/100 inches.
Metric
The Metric grid is measured in 1/10 millimeters (mm).
Graphic
The printer uses dots to print images on a label. The printhead has 203 dots per inch
(dpi) or an optional 300 dots per inch printhead.
Choose English or Metric units when designing formats to use with different printers. English or
Metric units allow more direct use of formats on printers with different density printheads.
Supply layout grids are in Appendix D, “Format Design Tools.”
About Field Types
Decide what information to print on the format from the following categories.
Field Type
Description
Examples
Text
Contains letters, numbers, or symbols.
item number, item description,
department number, price, date
NonPrintable
Text
Holds data for use later, such as for
merging into another field. The printer
does not print non-printable text fields.
city, state, and zip code to be included in
a bar code
Bar Code
Used for printing bar codes that can be
scanned.
item or serial numbers, zip codes,
information not visible to customers
Constant
Text
Prints fixed characters that do not
change.
company name, company address
Line or Box
Highlights or separates items.
line marking out the regular price, border
around the supply
Graphic
Contains a bitmap image or a
compliance label overlay.
logos
All of the above field types except graphics are discussed in Chapter 3. See Chapter 5,
“Creating Graphics” for information on including graphics in the format.
Using the Format Worksheet
The Format Worksheet is divided into sections that list the field types. Each section has boxes to
fill in with parameters that define a format. A format worksheet is included in Appendix D,
“Format Design Tools.”
Filling in the Format Worksheet
Decide what type of field to use on the label.
1. Make a copy of the Format Worksheet.
2. Define the Format Header. See “Defining the Format Header” in Chapter 3 for more
information.
3. Define all non-printable text fields before defining printable ones. See “Defining NonPrintable Text Fields” in Chapter 3 for more information.
4. Define options (copy data, pad data, etc.) as needed. See Chapter 4, “Defining Field Options”
for more information.
1-4 Packet Reference Manual
2
CONFIGURING THE PRINTER
This chapter discusses how to
♦ set communication parameters.
♦ upload the printers configuration or font information.
♦ configure the printer using online configuration packets.
♦ use immediate commands to control the printers operation at any time.
Setting Serial Communication Parameters
For serial communications, the communication settings at the printer must match those at the
host. Use the Communication Settings Packet to set these parameters.
Use the MODE command (from the Command prompt) to set communication values on the PC.
For example, MODE COM1:9600,N,8,1
Sets the host’s communication values to: 9600 baud, no parity, an 8 bit word length, 1 stop bit.
Using MPCLII Conventions
Follow these guidelines with MPCLII.
MPCLII Punctuation
Use the following default symbols when creating MPCLII packets:
Character
Decimal
Value
Description
{ (left bracket)
123
start of header
} (right bracket)
125
end of header
| (vertical bar)
124
field separator*
, (comma)
044
parameter separator
"ABC" (quotation
marks)
034
Quotation marks enclose character strings. Empty quotes (" ")
identify null strings or unused fields.
‘comment’
(single quotation
marks)
039
Grave accents enclose comments. Any data enclosed in grave
accents is ignored. Do not embed comments within a quoted
string. Grave accents are also used to reject mainframe data.
*
The field separator is the split vertical bar (|). The decimal value is 124. To enter this
character, use the Shift key plus the Split Vertical Bar key on the computer’s keyboard.
Depending on the text editor, it may appear as a solid vertical bar or as a split vertical bar.
Configuring the Printer 2-1
Standard Syntax Guidelines
When creating MPCLII packets:
♦ Begin each packet with a start of header ({).
♦ End each packet with an end of header (}).
♦ Define no more than 1000 fields in a format. Each | indicates one field. However, options are
not counted as fields. The actual number of fields a format can have may be less, because the
number of fields is limited by the available memory.
♦ The field number (0 to 999) must be unique. Start at 1, instead of 0.
♦ Do not use a field number more than once per format.
♦ Define all fields in the order to image/print them. The printer does not print in field number
order.
♦ Separate all parameters with a Parameter Separator (,).
♦ End each field with a Field Separator (|).
♦ Enter all information in CAPITAL letters, except words or phrases within quotation marks.
♦ Include all parameters for a field unless documented as optional.
♦ Define non-printable text fields before the field to which they apply.
♦ Define options immediately after the field to which they apply.
♦ Multiple options can be used with most fields. Options can be used in any combination except
as noted with each definition. Options are processed in the order they are received.
♦ Keep in mind that proportionally spaced fonts need wider fields than monospaced fonts. For
variable field data, use a letter W to determine the maximum field size.
♦ Do not place a new line (return) or any other non-printing character within a field definition.
However, a carriage return or line break after each | makes formats easier to read.
T,1,20,V,30,30,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 |
T,2,10,V,50,30,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 |
♦ Spaces are ignored, except within character strings.
♦ Indenting options improves readability of formats.
T,1,18,V,30,30,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 |
R,42,1 |
♦ Use a tilde (~) followed by a 3-digit ASCII code in a quoted string to send function codes or
extended characters or send the 8-bit ASCII code.
Modify formats and fields with the optional entry method. See “Optional Entry Method” in Chapter
6 for more information.
2-2 Packet Reference Manual
Using Online Configuration Packets
Use online configuration packets to change the printer’s settings. Send an individual
configuration packet or a single packet containing all the configuration packets. Supply all
parameters for each packet. Leave the parameters blank that do not need to change. For
example,
{I,A,,,,1 | }
prints a slashed zero and uses the last sent online System Setup parameters.
Make a copy of the online configuration worksheet in Appendix D, “Format Design Tools,” and
save the original. Packets A-M are listed on the worksheet.
When turning off the printer, all the information in the online configuration packets is saved and
used when the printer is turned back on. After changing the printer’s configuration, resend the
format, batch, or graphic to the printer before the changes take effect.
Configuration Packet Header
Always include an I, immediately after the left bracket { and before the packet identifier (A, B, C,
etc.). The I parameter identifies the data stream as a configuration packet.
Note:
Include the I parameter with each packet if sending them individually. Include it only at
the beginning of a data stream if sending multiple packets.
Use this syntax to create online configuration packets:
Syntax
{
I,
1 - 9 optional records
A, parameter 1...parameter
B, parameter 1...parameter
C, parameter 1...parameter
D, parameter 1...parameter
E, parameter 1...parameter
F, parameter 1...parameter
}
Start of Header
Configuration Header
5
6
7
3
9
5
|
|
|
|
|
|
System Setup
Supply Setup
Print Control
Monetary Formatting
Control Characters
Communication Settings
End of Header
Syntax for single packet
{
I,
A, parameter 1...parameter 5 |
}
Start of Header
Configuration Header
System Setup
End of Header
Add a configuration to RAM or specify units for supply, print, margin, and cut positions. If using
the optional parameters with the I packet, any online configuration packets following the split
vertical bar (|) must specify distances using the selected units. However, the test labels display
the units in dots, even if entered in English or Metrics units.
Configuring the Printer 2-3
Syntax
1. header
2. ID#
3. action
4. device
5. units
Example
{header,ID#,action,device | }
Constant I.
ID. Use 0.
Action. Options:
A Add configuration.
U Upload User Configuration.
Storage Device. Use R (Volatile RAM).
Units. (Optional parameter.) Options:
E English
M Metric
G Dots
{I,0,A,R,E |
C,0,25,0,0,0 | }
Adds a configuration to volatile RAM and specifies English units. It also uses the default contrast,
moves print 0.25 inches closer to the bottom of the supply and does not change the margin
adjustment, prints at the default print speed, and uses the default printhead width.
If optional parameters are not used, the syntax for the online configuration packets does not
change. For example,
{I,C,0,50,0,0,0 | }
uses the default contrast, moves print 50 dots (0.25) inches closer to the bottom of the supply
and does not change the margin adjustment, prints at the default print speed, and uses the
default printhead width.
Example
{I,0,U,R | }
Uploads the printer configuration from volatile RAM and returns the following to the host.
A,0,0,0,0,1 |
B,2,0,0,0,0 |
C,0,0,0,0,0,0 |
D,1,0,2 |
E,"~123~044~034~124~125~126","","~013~010" |
F,3,1,0,0,1 |
The parameters for each packet (A-F) are displayed. See each packet’s description later in this
chapter for more information.
Configuration Syntax Guidelines
When creating a printer configuration packet:
♦ Follow the Standard Syntax Guidelines listed at the beginning of this chapter.
♦ The first character after the start of header ({) is the configuration header (I).
♦ Download multiple configuration packets within one packet or download a single configuration
packet.
♦ If changing any of the online configuration packets, resend the format packet to the printer, so
the configuration changes take effect.
♦ Include the first five ANSI codes, at a minimum, in the control characters packet.
♦ Send configuration packets once per session (each time the printer is turned off and then back
on), not with every format or batch packet.
♦ The printer uses the settings from the printer configuration packets until a new configuration
packet is sent; or a setting is adjusted through the printer’s menu.
2-4 Packet Reference Manual
Making Print Adjustments
Horizontal and vertical adjustments can be made by adjusting the supply, print, or margin
positions. However, keep in mind the following:
♦ Supply adjustments across the width of the supply, such as the margin position, are based in
dots- either 203 dpi or 300 dpi, depending on the printhead density.
♦ Supply adjustments for the length of the supply, such as supply position or print adjustment,
are always measured in 1/203 of an inch, regardless of the printhead density.
Defining the System Setup Packet
Use the system setup packet (A) to select the power up mode, display language, print separators
between batches, print a slashed zero, and select the symbol set.
Syntax
{I,A,powup_mode,language,sep_on,slash_zero,symbol_set | }
A1. A
A2. powup_mode
A3. language
A4. sep_on
A5. slash_zero
A6. symbol_set
System Setup Packet
Printer’s powerup mode. 0 is the default. Options:
0 Online mode. Printer is ready to receive data and print.
1 Offline mode. Operator can select a format and enter data to print.
Display Language. Enter 0. The 9419 displays prompts in 31 languages.
Refer to the Online Mode System Administrator’s Guide for more
information.
Batch Separators. Enter 0. The printer does not print batch separators.
Slash Zero. 0 is the default. Options:
0 Print a standard zero
1 Print a zero with a slash through it
Symbol Set. 0 is the default. Options:
0 Internal
9 Code Page 1255 (Hebrew)
1 ANSI
10 Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
2 Code Page 437 (Latin U.S.)
11 Code Page 1257 (Baltic)
3 Code Page 850 (Latin 1)
12 Code Page 1258 (Vietnamese)
4 Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
13 DOS Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
5 Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic)
14 DOS Code Page 855 (Russian)
6 Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
15 DOS Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish)
7 Code Page 1253 (Greek)
16 DOS Code Page 860 (Portuguese)
8 Code Page 1254 (Turkish)
19 Unicode
Note:
Example
The Standard, Reduced, Bold, OCRA and HR fonts only support
the Internal Symbol Set (0). The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces only
support the ANSI (1) and DOS Code Page 437 (2) and 850 (3)
Symbol Sets. The scalable font (font#50) does not support Code
Page 1256 Arabic (10). Code pages 13-16 and 4-12 are for
downloaded TrueType fonts or the scalable font. Code pages 1926 require a downloaded International TrueType font (stored on a
MicroSD card). TrueType fonts are designed to be regionally
specific; therefore, all code pages may not be supported in a given
font. See Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/ Code Pages” for more
information.
{I,A,0,0,0,0,0 | }
Powers up the printer in the online mode, displays prompts in English, does not print a separator
after each batch, prints standard zeros (without a slash), and uses the internal symbol set.
Configuring the Printer 2-5
Defining the Supply Setup Packet
Use the supply setup packet (B) to select supply type, ribbon, feed mode, supply position, and
cut position.
Syntax
{I,B,supply_type,ribbon,feed_mode,supply_posn,cut_posn,
skip_index,cut_mode | }
B1. B
B2. supply_type
B3. ribbon
B4. feed_mode
B5. supply_posn
B6. cut_posn
Example
Supply Setup Packet
Supply Type. 1 is the default. Options:
0 Black mark
1 Gap/Die Cut
2 Continuous (non-indexed)
Use continuous supply in continuous mode.
Print contrast adjustments may be necessary depending on the supply.
See “Defining the Print Control Packet” for more information.
Ribbon. The printer automatically senses if a ribbon is installed and
switches to thermal transfer mode. 0 is the default. Options:
0 Ribbon not installed (thermal direct)
1 Ribbon installed (thermal transfer)
Feed Mode. 0 is the default. Options:
0 Continuous operation
1 On-demand mode
In peel mode, the minimum label length is 1.0 inches (25 mm) and the
maximum is 6.0 inches (152 mm).
Supply Position. Adjusts the position of the supply relative to the index
marks in the feed direction. Range: -149 to 300 in 1/203 inch or
-222 to 300 in 1/300 inch. 0 is the default. Increase the supply position to
move print up, decrease to move print down on the label. This adjustment
accounts for mechanical tolerances from machine to machine. The supply
position adjustment only needs to be made on the initial machine setup.
You cannot change the supply position while the printer is active.
Changing the supply position affects the print position. Once the supply
position is set, use the print control packet to adjust the printer position.
Cut position. Range: -300 to 300 in 1/203 inch. 0 is the default. Adjusts
where the tag is cut. The printer adjusts the cut position according to the
black marks on the supply. Your supply may need adjustments. Increase
to move the cut up, decrease to move the cut down.
{I,B,0,0,1,10,50 | }
Indicates black mark and thermal direct supply is loaded, causes the printer to operate in ondemand mode, feeds the supply approximately .05 inches up before printing the format on each
label (10/203 inches), and feeds the supply .25 inches (50/203 inches) before cutting.
2-6 Packet Reference Manual
Defining the Print Control Packet
Use the print control packet (C) to set the contrast, print, and margin adjustment, print speed,
and printhead width.
Syntax
{I,C,contrast,print_adj,margin_adj,speed_adj,ph_width,bat_volt | }
C1. C
C2. contrast
C3. print_adj
C4. margin_adj
C5. speed_adj
C6. ph_width
C7. bat_volt
Example
Print Control Packet
Print Contrast. Range: -156 to 156. 0 is the default. You may need to
adjust this value depending on the type of supplies you are using. To make
the print darker, use increments of 13 (for example, 0, 13, 26, 39, 52, etc.).
To make the print lighter, use increments of -129 (for example, -129, -258,
or -387). You need to use these incremental values to see a difference in
the print contrast. For example, values 1 to 13 produce the same result.
This is true for values -1 to -130. Solid black print cannot exceed 25% of
any given square inch of the supply.
Print adjustment (position). Adjusts the image’s position on the supply in
the feed direction. Range: -99 to 99 in 1/203 inch for 203 dpi or 1/300 inch
for 300 dpi. 0 is the default. Increase the print position to move print up,
decrease to move print down.
Margin adjustment (position). Adjusts where the format prints side to side
on the supply. Range: -99 to 99 in 1/203 inch or 1/300 inch for 300 dpi
printers). 0 is the default. Increase the margin position to move print to
the right, decrease to move print to the left. Margin and print position are
format adjustments. They do not affect the supply position.
Print Speed in inches per second (ips). 5 is the default. Options:
15
the printer prints at 1.5 ips
20
uses a print speed of 2.0 ips
30
uses a print speed of 3.0 ips
40
uses a print speed of 4.0 ips
50
uses a print speed of 5.0 ips
60
uses a print speed of 2.0 ips
70
uses a print speed of 2.0 ips (not for 300 dpi)
80
uses a print speed of 2.0 ips (not for 300 dpi
Width of the printhead in dots. Use 0.
Battery voltage. Use 0.
{I,C,0,-20,-10,5,0,0 | }
Uses the default contrast, moves print 0.1 inch closer to the bottom of the supply (20/203 inches)
and .05 inch to the left on the supply (10/203 inches), the printer prints at the default speed (5.0
ips), uses the default printhead width, and battery voltage is ignored.
Configuring the Printer 2-7
Defining the Monetary Formatting Packet
The monetary formatting packet (D) selects the monetary symbols to print for a price field. Use
the monetary formatting packet to select primary and secondary monetary symbols, and
designate the number of digits to appear at the right of a decimal.
Syntax
{I,D,cur_sym,secondary,decimals | }
D1. D
D2. cur_sym
Monetary Formatting Packet
Currency Symbol. 1 is the default. Options:
0 No symbol
9 Finland ( , Markka)
1 USA ($, Dollar)
10 Austria ( , Shilling)
2 UK (£, Pound)
11 India (Rs, Rupee)
3 Japan (¥, Yen)
12 Russian ( , Ruble)
4 Germany ( , Deutsche Mark)
5 France (F, Franc)
13 Korean ( , Won)
6 Spain (P, Peseta)
14 Thai ( , Baht)
7 Italy (L., Lira)
15 Chinese (¥, Yuan)
8 Sweden (Kr, Krona) 16 Euro ( )
Note:
D3. secondary
D4. decimals
Example
To use these symbols, select the internal symbol set.
Secondary Sign. Secondary symbols only print if at least one decimal
place is used. 0 is the default. Options:
0 No secondary sign
1 Print secondary sign
Number of digits to the right of the decimal. 2 is the default. Options:
0 No digits
1 One digit
2 Two digits
3 Three digits
{I,D,1,1,2 | }
Prints the dollar sign, uses a secondary symbol, and places two digits to the right of the decimal.
2-8 Packet Reference Manual
Defining the Control Characters Packet
Use the control characters packet (E) to change the MPCLII control characters, enable and
disable the immediate commands, and change the default terminator character for job requests
and ENQs.
Changes take effect with the first character following the end of header character of the
configuration packet. Each control character must be unique and cannot appear anywhere else in
a packet, except within quotation marks. Customize the trailer characters to work with the host.
Note:
Wait two seconds for the new characters to take effect before sending packets using the
new characters.
Use the following syntax for the control characters packet. Notice all but the first parameter is
within quotation marks.
Syntax
{I,E,"ANSI_cd","string1","string2" | }
E1. E
E2. “ANSI_cd”
Control Characters Packet
~123
Start of header
{
(left bracket)
~044
Parameter separator
,
(comma)
~034
Quoted strings
“
(quotes)
~124
Field separator
|
(vertical bar)
The field separator is the split vertical bar (|). The decimal value
is 124. To enter this character, use the Shift key plus the Split
Vertical Bar key on the computers keyboard. Depending on the
text editor, it may appear as a solid vertical bar or as a split
vertical bar.
~125
End of header
}
(right bracket)
~126
Data escape character (optional) ~~ (double tilde)
def. ch. Immediate command character (optional). Up to any 3
characters in the 0 to 255 decimal range. The character must be
defined before this command can be used. The caret (~094) is
normally used.
Note:
E3. “string 1"
E4. “string 2"
“ANSI_cd” includes seven separate parameters. The first five
parameters are required. The other parameters are optional.
Terminator for status requests and ENQ requests. Up to any 3 characters
in the 0 to 255 decimal range. The default is “013". Sending "" disables
this sequence.
Terminator for job requests and data uploads. Up to any 3 characters in
the 0 to 255 decimal range. The default is none. Sending "" disables this
sequence.
After changing these parameters, all packets, including any future configuration packets, must
use the new control characters. Use the tilde and ASCII character code sequence when sending
this packet multiple times. Also, set the packet delimiters to characters within the 21 hex to 7E
hex range.
Send the control characters packet to enable the immediate commands. An immediate command
executes immediately, even if it is embedded within quotation marks, and all data following the
command in the string is ignored.
Example
{I,E,"~123~063~034~124~125~126~094" | }
Changes the parameter separator character from , to ?. The other control characters remain
unchanged. It also enables the immediate commands by defining the ^ symbol as the command
identifier.
Configuring the Printer 2-9
Resetting Control Characters
Change the characters in the previous example back to their original settings by downloading this
packet:
{I?E?"~123~044~034~124~125~126~094" | }
Notice that the parameter separator is ? in this packet. This is the parameter separator that was
set before this packet. Once the packet is received by the printer, the new parameter separator
(a comma, in this case) is valid.
Be careful when using this feature. If you forget what the control characters were changed to,
print a test label. (The test label lists the current control characters.) See “Printing a Test Label,”
in Chapter 8 for more information.
Using Immediate Commands
Immediate commands effect printer operation as soon as the printer receives them, even if they
are included within a packet or used inside quotation marks.
Use immediate commands to change immediate command or status polling control characters,
reset the printer, or cancel and repeat batches.
Enabling Immediate Commands
When the printer is first turned on, these commands are not available. To use these commands,
send the control characters packet and define the immediate command control character. The
immediate command control character is saved when you turn off the printer. Once the immediate
command control character is defined, the immediate commands are enabled.
Sending Immediate Commands
Immediate commands consist of a three- or four-character sequence sent in a packet or
embedded in an application. Each command must be sent separately.
Syntax
control character_immediate command
The printer can accept only one immediate command at a time. Sending a command before the
previous one is completed results in an error.
Example
^CB
Immediately cancels the batch currently printing unless an error exists in the printer. This
example assumes that the defined immediate command control character is the caret (^).
2-10 Packet Reference Manual
The table represents the defined immediate command control character as ^ and the defined
status polling control character as d. These characters can be redefined if necessary.
Note:
To use the immediate command control character or the status polling character within
data, use the tilde sequence.
Command
Parameter
^CA
Cancels all the batches in the printer's queue unless an error exists on the
printer.
Note: This does not cancel batches in the printer's receive buffer.
^CB
Cancels only the current batch being printed unless an error exists.
^DD or
^DCd
Disables the MPCL data escape character (the tilde) and inhibits MPCL from
acting on ANY data escape sequence from the host. Sets the MPCL data
escape character to the ASCII value given by the d parameter. The value can
be any ASCII character.
^EA
Aborts an error condition. May need to be sent multiple times. Use ^RB to
reprint batch.
CAUTION: This command causes the current batch to stop and the condition
that caused the error to remain uncorrected.
^ER
Resets the error. Normal operation resumes.
^FD
Feeds a label when printer is idle. Simulates the operation of pressing FEED
and dispenses the next label if printer is in the on-demand mode.
Note: Printer ignores this command if printing.
^ID or
^ICd
Disables the Immediate Command feature by turning off the Immediate
Command escape character. Sets the Immediate Command escape character
to the ASCII value given by the d parameter. The value can be any ASCII
character. Use ^IE to enable immediate commands.
^MC
Returns the customer ID or RPQ version to the host. (00 to 99)
^MD
Returns the printhead dot density to the host. 00 = 203 dpi 01 = 300 dpi
^MI
Returns the customer ID or RPQ revision level to the host. (00 to 99)
^MM
Returns the model number to the host. M47 = 9419?
^MP
Returns the prototype number to the host. (00 to 99)
^MR
Returns the revision number to the host. (00 to 99)
^MV
Returns the version number to the host. (00 to 99)
^PR
Resets the printer. This command takes five seconds to complete and then the
printer is ready to receive data. It has the same effect as turning off and then
turning on the printer.
Note: Command should be used only when the printer is not printing.
^RB
Repeats the last printed batch, printing the same number of labels as
specified in the original batch.
Note: Printer ignores this command if printing.
^RS
Resynchronizes supply when supply roll is changed.
Note: Printer ignores this command if printing.
^TP
Prints a test label.
Note: Printer ignores this command if printing.
Configuring the Printer 2-11
Defining the Communication Settings Packet
Use the communication settings packet (F) to set the baud rate, word length, stop bits, parity,
and flow control for serial communications. To set parallel communications, see “Using Parallel
Communications.”
Changing the communication settings takes approximately two seconds. Communications sent
during this interval will be lost. Make sure the host communication values match the values on
the printer and the host is capable of communicating at the selected printer speed.
Do not add any characters, such as a carriage return/line feed, in the communication settings
packet or communications errors may occur.
Syntax
{I,F,baud,word_length,stop_bits,parity,flow_control | }
F1. F
F2. baud
F3. word_length
F4. stop_bits
F5. parity
F6. flow_control
Communication Settings Packet
Baud Rate. 3 is the default. Options:
0 1200
4 19200
1 2400
5 38400
2 4800
6 57600
3 9600
7 115200
Word Length. 1 is the default. Options:
0 7-bit word length
1 8-bit word length
Stop Bits. 0 is the default. Options:
0 1-stop bit
1 2-stop bits
Parity. 0 is the default. Options:
0 None
1 ODD parity
2 EVEN parity
Flow Control. 1 is the default. Options:
0 None
2
(CTS)
1 DTR
3
XON/XOFF
Note:
Example
If using the COPY command to download formats, set Flow Control
to DTR (not XON/XOFF).
{I,F,3,1,0,0,1 | }
Uses 9600 baud, an 8-bit word length, one stop bit, no parity, and the DTR mode.
2-12 Packet Reference Manual
Defining the Backfeed Control Packet
Use the backfeed control packet (G) to enable or disable the backfeed option, set the dispense
position and the backfeed distance. Backfeed works by advancing each printed label to the
desired dispense position. Once that label is removed, the next label to be printed is backed up
underneath the printhead.
In continuous mode, only the last label in the batch is advanced to the dispense position. Adjust
the dispense position to allow labels to be removed, die cut labels to be removed easily, or to
prevent them from falling off. While the printer is active, the backfeed distance cannot be
changed.
The dispense position and backfeed distance are optional parameters that do not have to be
specified. However, they allow for greater precision when positioning the supply.
Syntax
{I,G,action,dis_pos,bkfd_dis | }
G1. G
G2. action
G3. dis_pos
G4. bkfd_dis
Example
Backfeed Control Packet
Action. Options:
0 disable backfeed (default)
1 enable backfeed
Dispense Position. Adjusts the stopping point of the label. Range: 10 to
200 dots (default 65 dots).
Backfeed Distance. Amount to move label backwards. 10 to 200 dots
(default 65 dots). This distance cannot be greater than the dispense
position.
The backfeed distance should equal the dispense position.
When tearing supplies (instead of peeling), the backfeed distance must be
30 dots (.150 inches) less than the dispense position. The 30-dot
difference accounts for improper tearing of butt cut supplies to prevent
exposed adhesive under the printhead. However, that adds a 30 dot nonprint zone on the supply.
{I,G,1,50,20 | }
Enables backfeed and sets the dispense position to 0.25 inches (50/203) and the backfeed
distance to 0.10 inches (20/203).
Clearing Packets from Memory
Remove packets from the printer to increase memory storage capacity or if the formats/fonts are
no longer needed. In some cases, turning the printer off may clear the packets from memory. If
not, send a format clear packet.
Syntax
1. header
2. packet#
3. action
4. device
{header,packet#,action,device | }
Identifies the packet. Options:
A Check Digit Scheme
F Format
G Graphic
W Font
Identification number of the packet to clear (1 to 999) or font number
(0 to 9999). 0 is for all fonts.
Action. Enter C to clear the packet.
Storage device. Options:
F Flash
M Memory card (optional)
R Volatile RAM
Configuring the Printer 2-13
Example
{F,1,C,R | }
Clears Format #1 from volatile RAM.
Using the Font Packet
Use a font packet to add or clear downloaded fonts from memory, upload the font buffer, or
upload the cell size information for a particular font. The font packet is useful when downloading
fonts. If using downloaded fonts, the font number and the number of bytes each downloaded font
uses is listed.
This packet does not list the number of bytes the standard printer fonts use.
Use the MONARCH® MPCL Toolbox Font Utility (available on our Web site) to create the font
header and data. Refer to the online help for more information.
Syntax
{W,font#,action,device,data_length,data_record | }
W1. W
W2. font#
Writable Font Header.
The font identifier from 0 to 32000. 0 is for all fonts. 1 - 5 digits is the font
number.
Example: 3 is the standard printer font, Bold.
Action. Options:
A Adds the specified font.
C Clears all or specified fonts, except ones in flash.
H Uploads font size information.
M Uploads font memory usage information.
W3. action
Note:
W4. device
W5. data_length
W6. data_record
Example
C does not clear (erase) fonts saved in the printer’s flash memory.
To erase ALL fonts from the printer’s flash memory, format flash.
Device. Options:
F Flash
M Memory card (optional)
R Volatile RAM.
Z all devices (use for upload)
The length of the font data. The range is 68 to 16384. This is optional.
When creating fonts, include the font data with this packet.
Multiple data records define the font. The first character is either an H
(hex) or an R (run-length), referring to the algorithm. The rest of the record
is up to 2710 characters of font data in double quotes. Separate the
algorithm and the data with a comma, and end the record with |. This is
optional.
{W,0,M,R | }
Selects all fonts and checks the memory usage in RAM. The printer returns the following to the
host:
{W,0,M,R |
Number of bytes free, Number of bytes used | }
2-14 Packet Reference Manual
Example
{W,0,H,Z | }
Selects all fonts and uploads the font size information for any downloaded fonts.
The printer returns the following to the host:
{W,0,H,Z|
Font S tyle/Number
0,1,0,"Standard",0,0,0,14,22,14,22,3|
S ymbol S et
0,1,437,"Standard",0,0,0,21,33,21,33,5,1|
Font Name
0,2,0,"Reduced",0,0,0,7,14,7,14,1|
S pacing
0,2,437,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0|
T ype
0,3,0,"Bold",0,0,0,24,34,24,34,3|
Cell W idth
0,4,0,"OCRA",0,0,0,13,24,13,24,3|
Nominal W idth
0,5,0,"HR1",0,0,0,12,20,12,20,2|
Cell Height
0,6,0,"HR2",0,0,0,10,16,10,16,1|
Nominal Height
0,10,0,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0|
Inter-Char acter Gap
0,10,1,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0|
Baseline
0,10,437,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0|
0,10,850,"CGTriBd9",1,0,7,25,31,10,15,0|
0,11,0,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0|
0,11,1,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0|
0,11,437,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0|
0,11,850,"CGTriumv6",1,0,5,17,21,5,10,0|
0,15,0,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0|
0,15,1,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0|
0,15,437,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0|
0,15,850,"CGTriumv7",1,0,7,21,28,9,14,0|
0,16,0,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0|
0,16,1,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0|
0,16,437,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0|
0,16,850,"CGTriumv9",1,0,8,28,35,12,18,0|
0,17,0,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0|
0,17,1,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0|
0,17,437,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0|
0,17,850,"CGTriumv11",1,0,9,31,40,13,22,0|
0,18,0,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0|
0,18,1,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0|
0,18,437,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0|
0,18,850,"CGTriumv15",1,0,13,47,59,20,31,0|
0,50,0,"EffSwissBold",1,1,92248 | }
Note:
The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces are trademarks of Monotype Imaging, Inc.
Configuring the Printer 2-15
Spacing
Monospaced (0) or proportional (1).
Type
Bitmapped (0) or scalable (1).
Baseline
Bottom of the font.
Cell Width
Horizontal number of dots to contain the widest character.
Cell Height
Vertical number of dots to contain the tallest character.
Nominal Width
Average width for lower-case letters.
Nominal Height
Average height for lower-case letters.
Inter-Character Gap
Default spacing between characters in monospaced fonts.
Printhead Density
Displays whether a 203 (0) dpi or 300 (1) dpi printhead is used. The
scalable font (font 50) does not display which printhead (203 dpi or
300 dpi) is used.
Uploading Format Header Information
Upload format header information from the formats in memory to check the supply length and
width for each format. Formats stored in flash memory are loaded into RAM when the printer
boots. However, the formats remain in flash memory when the printer is turned off.
Syntax
{header,format#,action,device | }
F1. header
F2. format#
F3. action
F4. device
Example
Format Header
Format number from 0 to 999. 0 is for all formats in memory.
Action. Options:
A Adds the specified format
C Clears the specified format
H Uploads format header information
Device. Options:
F Flash
M Memory card (optional)
R Volatile RAM
Z All devices (use for upload)
{F,0,H,Z | }
Selects all formats in memory and returns the following:
Example
{F,0,H,Z |
Fmt_1,406,406 |
Fmt_10,324,406 |
Fmt_15,812,812 |
Fmt_20,305,609 | }
Displays the format number, supply length and supply width (in dots) for each format in memory.
Example
{F,1,H,Z | }
Selects format1 and returns the following to the host:
{F,1,H,Z |
Fmt_1,406,406 | }
Displays the supply length and supply width (in dots) for format1.
2-16 Packet Reference Manual
3
DEFINING FIELDS
This chapter provides a reference for defining
♦ the format header

bar code fields
♦ text and constant text fields

non-printable text fields

line and box fields
Defining the Format Header
A Format Header begins a format file.
Syntax
F1.
F2.
F3.
F4.
{F,format#,action,device,measure,length,width,"name" |
F
format#
action
device
F5. measure
F6. length
F7. width
F8. “name”
Example
Format Header.
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify the format. 1 is the default.
Action. Enter A to add the format to the printer.
Format storage device. R is the default. Options:
F Flash (saved when the printer is turned off.)
M Memory card (optional)
R Volatile RAM (deleted when the printer is turned off).
Unit of measure. G (dots) is the default.
E (English - in 1/100 inches)
M (Metric -in 1/10 mm)
G (Graphic - in dots)
Printable length of the supply in selected units. 600 is the default.
Measure supply from the leading edge of one label to the leading edge of
the next label.
English
20 – 1000
Metric
50 – 2540
203 Dots
41 – 2030
300 Dots
60 – 3000
Longer lengths are supported up to 1000 inches (25,400mm) maximum for
203 dpi; and 450 inches (11,430mm) maximum for 300 dpi. Contact your
Avery representative for supply recommendations. Hold the leading edge
of peeled labels when printing on supply longer than six inches (152 mm).
In peel mode, the minimum label length is 1.0 inches (25 mm) and the
maximum is 6.0 inches (152 mm). Make sure the format length matches
the actual label size exactly for correct printer performance. This is
especially true for shorter feed length supply and formats. If an error
occurs, recalibrate the supplies in the printer. Refer to your Equipment
Manual for more information.
Print width, from left to right, in selected units. Do not include the liner
(backing paper) in this dimension. 400 is the default.
English
75 – 425
Metric
191 – 1079
203 Dots
152 – 863
300 Dots
225 – 1275
Format name (optional), 0 to 8 characters, enclose within quotation marks.
“” is the default.
{F,1,A,R,E,300,200,"TEXTILES" |
Adds Format 1 (“TEXTILES”) to the printer. It uses a three inch long by two inch wide label.
Defining Fields 3-1
Defining Text Fields
Create a separate definition for each text field. If text falls on two lines, each line of text requires
a separate definition.
Syntax
T,field#,# of char,fix/var,row,column,gap,font,hgt mag,wid
mag,color,alignment,char rot,field rot,sym set |
T1. T
T2. field#
T3. # of char
T4. fix/var
T5. row
Text Field.
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify this field. 1 is the default.
Maximum number of printed characters (0 to 2710) in the field. 30 is the
default.
Fixed or variable length field. V is the default. Options:
F Fixed length
V Variable length
Row location – distance from the bottom of print area to the pivot point.
10 is the default. For monospaced fonts, distance from bottom of print area
to the pivot point. The pivot point varies depending on how text is
justified.
For proportionally spaced fonts, distance from bottom
of print area to baseline of characters in field.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
T6. column
Column location - distance from the left edge of the
print area to the pivot point to find the column
location. 10 is the default.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
3-2 Packet Reference Manual
T7. gap
Number of dots between characters in 203 dpi (or 300 dpi). Range: 0 to
99. 0 is the default.
Note:
For monospaced fonts, the additional spacing is added to the
existing inter-character gap. This is also true for proportionally
spaced fonts; however, the inter-character gap varies with
character combinations.
Any number other than 0 affects the field width. Default spacing:
Standard
3 dots
Reduced
1 dot
Bold
3 dots
OCRA-like
3 dots
HR1
3 dots
HR2
3 dots
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
varies with each letter
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
varies with each letter
EFF Swiss Bold
varies with each letter
Note:
T8. font
T9. hgt mag
T10. wid mag
HR1 and HR2 are only used with the UPC bar code family and
must be numeric.
Style of font. 1 is the default. Options:
1 Standard
10 CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
2 Reduced
11 CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
3 Bold
15 7 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
4 OCRA-like
16 9 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
5 HR1
17 11 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
6 HR2
18 15 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
50 EFF Swiss Bold (scalable)
Or a valid downloaded font selector number.
Fonts 5 and 6 are for numeric data only. The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces
support only the ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets.
The scalable font does not support Code Page 1256 (Arabic). See
Appendix C for more information.
Height magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). 1 is the default. Use a magnifier of 1 with proportionally
spaced fonts, because characters lose smoothness at higher
magnifications. See Appendix B, “Fonts,” for more information about fonts.
Width magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). 1 is the default.Proportionally spaced fonts do not have a
set width. To estimate the size of the field, use the letter “W” for the
widest field or an “L” for an average width field. Find the selected font and
the desired width in Appendix B, “Fonts.”
Defining Fields 3-3
T11. color
Field color overlay attributes. B is the default.
Transparent
The overlay field (text or constant text) does not block out
(or “erase”) existing fields.
Opaque
The overlay field blocks out (or “erases”) existing fields.
Options for standard printer fonts:
B
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
D/R/W
Opaque, Normal, White, Normal
O
Transparent, Normal, Black, Normal
Options for scalable fonts:
A
Opaque, Normal, Black, Bold
B
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
E
Opaque, Italics, Black, Bold
F
Opaque, Italics, Black, Normal
N
Transparent, Normal, Black, Bold
O
Transparent, Normal, Black, Normal
S
Transparent, Italics, Black, Bold
T
Transparent, Italics, Black, Normal
Line field
blocked out
b y opaque
field using
attribute B
Note:
T12. alignment
Line field
not blocked
out b y
tr ansparent
field using
attribute O
Solid black print should not exceed 25% on a given square inch of
the label, or the printhead life may be decreased.
Field placement in the packet is an important consideration when using
field color attributes. If a line field is defined before the overlay (text or
constant text) field, the line field is blocked out by the overlay field,
depending on the overlay field’s color attribute. If a line field is defined
after the overlay field, the line field is not blocked out by the overlay field,
regardless of the overlay field’s color attribute.
Alignment of text in the field. L is the default. Options:
L Align on left side of field
C Center text within field (monospaced fonts only)
R Align on right side of field (monospaced fonts only)
B Align at midpoint of field
E Align at endpoint of the field
Use L, B, or E for any font.
The red dot indicates the field origin and the line indicates the column
position for each field in the following graphic.
3-4 Packet Reference Manual
T13. char rot
Character rotation. 0 is the default. The field or supply does not rotate,
only the characters do. Options:
0 Top of character points to top of field
1 Top of character points to left of field
2 Top of character points to bottom of field
3 Top of character points to right of field
Note:
T14. field rot
Font 50 and downloaded TrueType fonts do not support character
rotation.
Field rotation. 0 is the default. Field rotation rotates the whole field, not
just the characters. Rotation is affected by the pivot point, which varies
depending on how text is justified. Lower left corner of field is the pivot
point. Options:
0 Top of field points to top of supply
1 Top of field points to left of supply
2 Top of field points to bottom of supply
3 Top of field points to right of supply
Defining Fields 3-5
T15. sym set
Symbol set. 0 is the default (Internal Symbol Set).
For scalable or TrueType® fonts, use:
1
ANSI Symbol Set
102 Unicode (user input) for particular mapping
437 DOS Code Page 437 (Domestic)
850 DOS Code Page 850 (International)
852 DOS Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
855 DOS Code Page 855 (Russian)
857 DOS Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish)
860 DOS Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese)
1250 Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
1251 Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic)
1252 Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
1253 Code Page 1253 (Greek)
1254 Code Page 1254 (Turkish)
1255 Code Page 1255 (Hebrew)
1256 Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
1257 Code Page 1257 (Baltic)
1258 Code Page 1258 (Vietnam)
Note:
Example
The Standard, Reduced, Bold, OCRA and HR fonts only support
the Internal Symbol Set (0). The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces only
support the ANSI (1) and DOS Code Page 437 (2) and 850 (3)
Symbol Sets. The scalable font (font#50) does not support Code
Page 1256 Arabic (10).
Code pages 852-860 and 1250-1258 are for downloaded TrueType
fonts or the scalable font. TrueType font. TrueType fonts are
designed to be regionally specific; therefore, all code pages may
not be supported in a given font. See Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/
Code Pages” for more information.
T,2,10,V,250,80,0,1,1,1,B,C,0,0,0 |
Defines a text field (field #2) with a variable length of up to 10 characters. The field begins at
row 250, column 80. There is no additional gap between characters, and the Standard font is
used without any additional magnification. The printing is black on white and centered. No field
or character rotation is used. The internal symbol set is used.
3-6 Packet Reference Manual
Defining Bar Code Fields
Each bar code field requires a separate definition.
Syntax
B,field#,# of char,fix/var,row,column,font,density,height,
text,alignment,field rot |
B1. B
B2. field#
B3. # of char
Bar Code Field.
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify this field. 1 is the default.
Maximum number of characters. If the bar code uses a check digit, allow
an extra character for the check digit. The actual maximum number of
characters is limited by the size of the label and bar code density. Range:
0 to 2710. 30 is the default.
Bar Code
Number of Characters
Codabar (NW7)
0 – 2710
Code 16K
0 – 2710
Code 39 (w/ or w/o CD) or MOD43
0 – 2710
Code 93
0 – 2710
Code 128
0 – 2710
Data Matrix
0 – 2710 numeric; 0 – 2335 alphanumeric
EAN8
8
EAN8+2
10
EAN8+5
13
EAN13
13
EAN13+2
15
EAN13+5
18
EAN13+Price CD
13
Interleaved 2 of 5 or
Interleaved I 2 of 5 with Barrier Bar
0 - 2710
MaxiCode
0 to 93 (alphanumeric)
0 to 128 (numeric)
MSI
0 – 14
PDF417
0 – 2710
POSTNET™
9 or 11
Defining Fields 3-7
Bar Code
Number of Characters
Quick Response (QR) Code Data
Type
Model 1
Model 2
Numeric Data
1167
2710
Alphanumeric data
707
2710
8-byte data
486
2710
Kanji data
299
1817
Note:
The maximum number of characters depends on the selected level of error
correction. When increasing the error correction level, the maximum number of
characters decreases. See “Entering Batch Data for QR Code” in Chapter 6 to enter
data for the QR Code.
Bar Code
Number of Characters
UPCA
12
UPCA+2
14
UPCA+5
17
UPCA+Price CD
12
UPCE
7
UPCE+2
9
UPCE+5
12
Note: For more information about two-dimensional bar codes, see Appendix A, "Samples."
B4. fix/var
Fixed (F) or variable (V) length field.
Bar Code
Fixed or Variable
Bar Code
Fixed or Variable
Codabar (NW7)
Fixed or Variable
Interleaved 2 of 5 or
Interleaved I 2 of 5
with Barrier Bar
Fixed or Variable
Code 16K
Variable
MaxiCode*
Fixed or Variable
Code 39 (w/ or w/o CD)
or MOD43
Fixed or Variable
MSI
Fixed or Variable
Code 93
Variable
PDF417
Fixed or Variable
Code 128
Fixed or Variable
POSTNET™
Fixed
Data Matrix*
Variable
Quick Response*
Variable
EAN8
Fixed
UPCA
Fixed
EAN8+2
Fixed
UPCA+2
Fixed
EAN8+5
Fixed
UPCA+5
Fixed
EAN13
Fixed
UPCA+Price CD
Fixed
EAN13+2
Fixed
UPCE
Fixed
EAN13+5
Fixed
UPCE+2
Fixed
EAN13+Price CD
Fixed
UPCE+5
Fixed
*
For more information about the two-dimensional bar codes, see Appendix A, "Samples.”
3-8 Packet Reference Manual
B5. row
Row location -distance from bottom of the print area to the pivot point of
the field. The pivot point varies, depending on how the field is justified.
10 is the default. Remember to include text or numbers that may appear
with the bar code for the row measurement. Pivot points
Left/Center /Right-Justified Fields
Balanced Fields
English
Metric
203 Dots
300 Dots
B6. column
B7. font
E nd-Justified Fields
0
0
0
0
–
–
–
–
999
2539
2029
2999
Column location - distance from the lower left edge of the
print area to the pivot point. 10 is the default.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
Allow a minimum of 1/10 inch between the scan edge of
bar code and label edges or other data. If using the
optional bar code verifier, allow a minimum of 1.3 inches (33 mm) between
the bar code and the top of the label.
Bar code. 4 is the default. Options:
1
UPCA
11
UPCA +5
32
PDF417
2
UPCE
12
UPCE +2
33
MaxiCode
3
Interleaved 2 of 5
13
UPCE +5
35
Data Matrix (ECC-200)
4
Code 39 (no check digit)
14
EAN8 +2
36
Quick Response
5
Codabar
15
EAN8 +5
40
Code 39 (MOD 43 check digit)
6
EAN8
16
EAN13 +2
41
UPCA & Price CD
7
EAN13
17
EAN13 +5
44
EAN13 & Price CD
8
Code 128
22
POSTNET
50
Interleaved 2 of 5 with Barrier Bar
9
MSI
23
Code 93
10
UPCA +2
31
Code 16K
B8. density
Bar code density. The default varies by bar code type. Use the following
tables.
Defining Fields 3-9
203 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Narrow
Element
to Wide
(dots/mils) Ratio
Data
Length
Appearance
Codes
Char
Set
UPCA +2/+5 2
Price CD
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
11 or 12
14/17
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
UPCE+2/+5
2
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
6 or 7
9/12
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
EAN8+2/+5
2
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
7 or 8
10/13
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
EAN13+2/+5 2
Price CD
4
76%
114%
2/9.9
3/14.8
N/A
12 or 13
15/18
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
Interleaved2
of 5or
I2of5with
Barrier Bar
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
1.1
2.1
3.2
4.2
5.6
6.3
7.5
8.8
9.6
11.2
11.0
12.7
14.5
21/103.4
12/59.1
7/34.5
6/29.6
4/19.7
4/19.7
3/14.8
3/14.8
3/14.8
2/9.9
2/9.9
2/9.9
2/9.9
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:2.3
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
0 to 2710 8
0 to 9
(Code 39 or
MOD43
(Extended
Code 39)
1
2
3
4
6
7
11
12
20
1.4
1.7
3.5
4.2
6.3
7.0
3.9
12.7
3.0
10/49.3
8/39.4
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
2/9.9
4/19.7
1/4.9
5/24.6
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.2
0 to 2710 8
SPACE
$%*+-./
0 to 9
A to Z
Codabar
(NW7)
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
2.1
3.0
4.6
5.1
8.4
9.2
10.1
8/39.4
6/29.6
4/19.7
4/19.7
2/9.9
2/9.9
2/9.9
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
0 to 26
$+-./
0 to 9
a to d
3.5/7.0
4.4/8.7
5.8/11.7
8.7/17.5
5/24.6
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
N/A
0 to 2710 8
Code 128 or 20
4
Code 16K
6
8
Note:
8
00H to
7FH
The start (*) and stop (+) characters are automatically added for Code 39. Code 93,
density 12, produces a one-dot narrow bar. This density is intended for special U.S.P.S.
ACT-tag applications only. Synthetic supplies are recommended to produce scannable bar
codes.
3-10 Packet Reference Manual
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Narrow
Element
to Wide
(dots/mils) Ratio
Data
Length
CODE 93
3
4
5
7
10
3.7
4.5
5.6
7.5
11.2
6/29.6
5/24.6
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
N/A
0 to 2710 8
00H to
7FH
MSI
4
5
7
4.2
5.6
7.2
4/19.7
3/14.8
2/9.9
1:2.0
1:2.0
1:2.5
0 to 14
8
0 to 9
POSTNET
0 (fixed
at 4.3
cpi)
24/118.2
10/49.3
4/19.7
(5 dot
gap)
0,5,6,9 or 8
11
0 to 9
MaxiCode
7
N/A
N/A
N/A
99
8
00H to
FFH
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Element
Width
(dot/mils)
Row
Aspect
Height
Ratio
(dots/mils)
Data
Length
Appearance
Codes
Char Set
PDF417
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
2/9.8
2/9.8
2/9.8
3/14.8
3/14.8
3/14.8
4/19.7
4/19.7
4/19.7
2/9.8
4/19.7
6/29.6
3/14.8
6/29.6
9/44.3
4/19.7
8/39.4
12/59.1
0 to 2709 8
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
Appearance
Codes
Char
Set
00H
toFFH
203/300 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code Type
Density
Selector
Data Length
Quick Response
(QR Code) Models 1
and 2
0
Model 1: 0 - 1167 Numeric;0 - 707 Alphanumeric;
0 - 486 (8-bit); 0 - 299 (Kanji)
Model 2: 0 - 2710 Numeric, Alphanumeric and 8-bit;
0 - 1817 Kanji
Note:
Values in bold indicate the default.
Defining Fields 3-11
203/300 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code
Size
Row x Col.
Density
Selector
Max. Data Length
Num. X Alphanum.
Appearance
Codes
Char
Set
Data Matrix
Square
symbols
10 x 10
12 x 12
14 x 14
16 x 16
18 x 18
20 x 20
22 x 22
24 x 24
26 x 26
32 x 32
36 x 36
40 x 40
44 x 44
48 x 48
52 x 52
64 x 64
72 x 72
80 x 80
88 x 88
96 x 96
104 x 104
120 x 120
132 x 132
144 x 144
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
6 x 3
10 x 6
16 x 10
24 x 16
36 x 25
44 x 31
60 x 43
72 x 52
88 x 64
124 x 91
172 x 127
228 x 169
288 x 214
348 x 259
408 x 304
560 x 418
736 x 550
912 x 682
1152 x 862
1392 x 1042
1632 x 1222
2100 x 1573
2608 x 1954
2710 x 2335
8
00H to
FFH
0 default (bar code size automatically determined by data)
Bar Code
Size
Row x Col.
Density
Selector
Max. Data Length
Num. X Alphanum.
Appearance
Codes
Char
Set
Data Matrix
Rectangular
symbols
8 x 18
8 x 32
12 x 26
12 x 36
16 x 36
16 x 48
25
26
27
28
29
30
10
20
32
44
64
98
8
00H to
FFH
x
x
x
x
x
x
6
13
22
31
46
72
0 default (bar code size automatically determined by data)
Note:
3-12 Packet Reference Manual
The printers support printing a Data Matrix symbol with an Xdimension of 13 mils or greater (3 dots @203 dpi). If using a
denser bar code, make sure the bar code scans in that particular
application. Avery Dennison “premium” supplies and increasing
the print contrast are recommended for denser bar codes.
Depending on the application, additional densities are available.
300 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code
Type
Density
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Narrow
Element
to Wide
(dots/mils) Ratio
Data
Length
Appearance
Codes
Char
Set
UPCA +2/+5 2
Price CD
4
77%
103%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
11 or 12
14/17
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
UPCE+2/+5
2
4
77%
103%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
6 or 7
9/12
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
EAN8+2/+5
2
4
77%
103%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
7 or 8
10/13
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
EAN13+2/+5 2
Price CD
4
77%
103%
3/10
4/13.3
N/A
12 or 13
15/18
1, 5, 6, 7 or
8
0 to 9
Interleaved2
of 5 or I2of5
with Barrier
Bar
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
1.1
2.1
3.3
4.2
5.6
6.2
8.3
9.4
9.9
11.1
11.1
13.0
14.3
31/103.4
18/60.1
10/33.4
9/30.0
6/20.0
6/20.0
4/13.3
4/13.3
4/13.3
3/10
3/10
3/10
3/10
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:2.4
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.3
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.3
1:2.0
0 to 2710 8
0 to 9
(Code 39 or
MOD43
(Extended
Code 39)
1
2
3
4
6
7
11
12
20
1.4
1.7
3.4
4.7
6.2
7.1
3.8
11.5
3.1
15/50.0
12/40.0
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
3/10.0
6/20.0
2/6.7
7/23.4
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:3.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.2
0 to 2710 8
SPACE
$%*+-./
0 to 9
A to Z
Codabar
(NW7)
2
3
4
5
7
8
9
2.3
3.4
5.0
5.6
9.1
10.4
11.1
12/40.0
9/30.0
6/20.0
6/20.0
3/10.0
3/10.0
3/10.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.5
1:2.0
1:3.0
1:2.5
1:2.0
0 to 26
$+-./
0 to 9
a to d
4.5
6.8
9.1
3.9
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
7/23.4
N/A
0 to 2710 8
Code 128 or 4
6
Code 16K
8
20
Note:
8
00H to
7FH
The start (*) and stop (+) characters are automatically added for
Code 39. Code 93, density 12, produces a one-dot narrow bar.
This density is intended for special U.S.P.S. ACT-tag
applications only. Synthetic supplies are recommended to
produce scannable bar codes.
Defining Fields 3-13
300 DPI Bar Code Densities
Bar Code Density
Type
Selector
Density
(% or cpi)
Narrow
Element
(dots/mils)
Narrow to Data
Wide Ratio Length
Appearance Char Set
Codes
CODE 93
3
4
5
7
10
3.7
4.8
5.6
8.3
11.1
9/30.0
7/23.4
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
N/A
0 to 2710
8
00H to
7FH
MSI
4
5
7
4.2
6.2
7.5
6/20.0
4/13.3
3/10.0
1:2.0
1:2.0
1:2.3
0 to 2710
8
0 to 9
POSTNET 0 (fixed at
4.3 cpi)
24/118.2
10/49.3
6/20.0
0, 5, 6, 9
(5 dot gap) or 11
8
0 to 9
MaxiCode 7
N/A
N/A
N/A
99
8
00H to
FFH
Bar Code Density
Type
Selector
Element
Width
(dot/mils)
Row Height Aspect
(dots/mils) Ratio
Data
Length
Appearance Char Set
Codes
PDF417
3/10.0
3/10.0
3/10.0
4/13.3
4/13.3
4/13.3
6/20.0
6/20.0
6/20.0
3/10.0
6/20.0
9/30.0
4/13.3
9/30.0
12/40.0
6/20.0
12/40.0
18/60.0
0 to 2709
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
3-14 Packet Reference Manual
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
1:1
1:2
1:3
00H to
FFH
B9. height
Bar code height, in 1/100 inches, 1/10 mm, or dots. Minimum values:
English
20
Metric
51
203 Dots
40
300 Dots
60
Height
Bar Code Type
Description
0
Code 16K
PDF417
PostNet
MaxiCode
These bar codes have a fixed height. Use 0.
0
Data Matrix
QR Code
The printer determines the size of the symbol, but the
user’s scanner determines the functional size
(minimum height) of the symbol. Small Data Matrix
and QR Codes may not be scannable. The Data
Matrix and QR Code’s height depends on the number
entered for this parameter. For example, 80 means
the symbol could be smaller than 0.80," but it will not
be greater than the amount specified in this
parameter. The symbol arranges the data according
to rows and columns within the specified height.
20
Code 93
20 is the default for Code 93.
40
UPCA/UPCE/EAN
I 2of5
Codabar
Code 39
Code 128
MSI
40 is the default for UPCA/UPCE/EAN, I 2of5,
Codabar, Code 39, Code 128, and MSI.
B10. text
Appearance of text with bar code. Options:
Appear.
Bar Code Type
Description
0
MaxiCode
QR Code
MaxiCode Mode 0 (obsolete)
QR Code Model 2
1
UPC/EAN
QR Code
No check digit or number system
QR Code Model 1
2
MaxiCode
QR Code
MaxiCode Mode 2 (Numeric Postal Code)
QR Code Model 2
3
MaxiCode
MaxiCode Mode 3 (Alphanumeric Postal Code)
5
UPC/EAN
Number system at bottom, no check digit
6
UPC/EAN
Check digit at bottom, no number system
7
UPC/EAN
Check digit and number system at bottom (default)
8
MaxiCode
All other bar
codes
MaxiCode (auto detect modes 0, 2, 3, or for
compressed data) default
No text, bar code only (default)
Defining Fields 3-15
B11. alignment
Choose L, R, C, B or E to align the bar code data correctly in the field. L is
the default.
Alignment
Bar Code Type
Description
L
All
Data Matrix, MaxiCode,
QR Code (Quick
Response)
Align on left side of field.
Must use L for these bar codes.
C
Code 39, Codabar,
I 2of5, MSI
Center within field.
R
Code 39, Codabar,
I 2of5, MSI
Align on right side of field.
B
All except where noted.
Align at midpoint of field; centers variable
width bar codes, which may not allow padcharacter centering.
E
All except where noted.
Align at endpoint of the field; right justifies
variable-width bar codes.
The red dot indicates the field origin and the line indicates the column
position for each field in the following graphic.
3-16 Packet Reference Manual
B12. field rot
Field rotation. Field rotation rotates the whole field, not just the
characters. Rotation is affected by the pivot point, which varies depending
on how text is justified. Lower left corner of field is the pivot point. 0 is the
default. Options:
0 Top of field points to top of supply (use for MaxiCode)
1 Top of field points to left of supply
2 Top of field points to bottom of supply
3 Top of field points to right of supply
Note:
Example
Serial bar codes printed at speeds greater than 3.0 IPS may not
scan properly.
B,3,12,V,50,40,1,2,80,7,L,0 |
Defines a bar code field (field #3) with 12 characters of variable length starting at row 150,
column 40. A UPCA bar code with a density of 2 and a height of 80 is used. The check digit and
number system are shown at the bottom. The bar code is left aligned without any field rotation.
Defining Fields 3-17
Defining Non-Printable Text Fields
Non-printable text fields hold entered data without printing it in its entered form. Typically, nonprintable fields hold data that later combines with other fields to form a merged field. Define nonprintable text fields before defining the field where the information prints.
When copying this field into another field, the maximum number of characters for the final field is
2710. Allow only as many characters as needed, because extra characters use up space. Also,
if copying into a bar code field, the maximum number of characters in the destination bar code is
determined by the bar code specification (UPCA-12, EAN-13, etc.). Apply field options to
manipulate the text entered in this field. Copying data from this field into another field is an
example. See “Using Option 4 Copy Data” in Chapter 4 for more information.
In the following example, data is entered into four non-printable fields and merged to form field 5,
and is then printed as a bar code. See “Merging Fields” in Chapter 4 for more information.
Field
1
2
3
4
5
Data
20374
339
8
15
20374339815
Field Type
Non-printable
Non-printable
Non-printable
Non-printable
Bar Code
Each non-printable text field requires a separate definition.
Syntax
D1. D
D2. field#
D3. # of char
Example
D,field#,# of char |
Non-Printable Text Field.
Unique number from 0 to 999 assigned to this field. 1 is the default.
Maximum number of characters in this field: 0 to 2710. 30 is the default.
D,4,20 |
Defines a non-printable text field (field #4) with a maximum of 20 characters.
3-18 Packet Reference Manual
Defining Constant Text Fields
A constant text field is a set of fixed characters that prints on all labels. Define each constant
text field separately. This field is not assigned a field number, but is counted as a field (keep this
in mind, as the printer allows a maximum of 1000 fields per format). The characters in this field
cannot be changed by batch data. Field options do not apply to constant text fields. Mark the
pivot point of the field, which varies depending on the fields’ justification.
Syntax
C1. C
C2. row
C3. column
C4. gap
C,row,column,gap,font,hgt mag,wid mag,color,alignment,
char rot,field rot,"fixed char",sym set |
Constant Text Field.
Row location – distance from the bottom of print area to
the pivot point. 10 is the default.
For monospaced fonts, distance from bottom of print
area to the pivot point.
For proportionally spaced fonts, distance from bottom
of print area to baseline of characters in the field.
(Bottom exits the printer first.)
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
Column location - distance from the left edge of the
print area to the pivot point to find the column location.
10 is the default.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
Number of dots between characters (203 dots per inch). Range: 0 to 99. 0
is the default.
Any number other than 0 affects the field width. Default spacing:
Standard
3 dots
Reduced
1 dot
Bold
3 dots
OCRA-like
3 dots
HR1
3 dots
HR2
3 dots
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
varies with each letter
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
varies with each letter
EFF Swiss Bold
varies with each letter
Note:
HR1 and HR2 are only used with the UPC bar code family and
must be numeric.
Defining Fields 3-19
C5. font
C6. hgt mag
C7. wid mag
C8. color
Style of font. 1 is the default. Options:
1 Standard
10 CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
2 Reduced
11 CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
3 Bold
15 7 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
4 OCRA-like
16 9 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
5 HR1
17 11 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
6 HR2
18 15 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
50 EFF Swiss Bold (scalable)
Or a valid downloaded font selector number.
Fonts 5 and 6 are for numeric data only. The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces
support only the ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol Sets.
The scalable font does not support Code Page 1256 (Arabic). See
Appendix C for more information.
Height magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). 1 is the default. Use a magnifier of 1 with proportionally
spaced fonts, because characters lose smoothness at higher
magnifications. See Appendix B, “Fonts,” for more information about fonts.
Width magnifier, 1 to 7 times (4 to 255 points for scalable/downloaded
TrueType fonts). 1 is the default. Proportionally spaced fonts do not have
a set width. To estimate the size of the field, use the letter “W” for the
widest field or an “L” for an average width field. Find the selected font and
the desired width in Appendix B, “Fonts.”
There are two types of field color overlay attributes. B is the default.
Transparent
The overlay field (text or constant text) does not block out
(or “erase”) existing fields.
Opaque
The overlay field blocks out (or “erases”) existing fields.
Options for standard printer fonts:
B
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
D/R/W
Opaque, Normal, White, Norma
O
Transparent, Normal, Black, Normal
Options for scalable fonts:
A
Opaque, Normal, Black, Bold
B
Opaque, Normal, Black, Normal
E
Opaque, Italics, Black, Bold
F
Opaque, Italics, Black, Normal
N
Transparent, Normal, Black, Bold
O
Transparent, Normal, Black, Normal
S
Transparent, Italics, Black, Bold
T
Transparent, Italics, Black, Normal
Note:
Solid black print should not exceed 25% on a given square inch of
the label, or the printhead life may be decreased.
Line field
blocked out
b y opaque
field using
attribute B
3-20 Packet Reference Manual
Line field
not blocked
out b y
tr ansparent
field using
attribute O
C9. alignment
C10. char rot
Field placement in the packet is an important consideration when using
field color attributes. If a line field is defined before the overlay (text or
constant text) field, the line field is blocked out by the overlay field,
depending on the overlay field’s color attribute. If a line field is defined
after the overlay field, the line field is not blocked out by the overlay field,
regardless of the overlay field’s color attribute.
Alignment of constant text in the field. L is the default. Options:
L Align on left side of field (default)
C Center text within field (monospaced fonts only)
R Align on right side of field (monospaced fonts only)
B Align at midpoint of field
E Align at endpoint of the field
Use L, B, or E for any font.
The red dot indicates the field origin and the line indicates the column
position for each field in the following graphic.
Character rotation. 0 is the default. The field or supply does not rotate,
only the characters do. Options:
0 Top of character points to top of field
1 Top of character points to left of field
2 Top of character points to bottom of field
3 Top of character points to right of field
Note:
Font 50 and downloaded TrueType fonts do not support character
rotation.
Defining Fields 3-21
C11. field rot
Field rotation. 0 is the default. Field rotation rotates the whole field, not
just the characters. Rotation is affected by the pivot point, which varies
depending on how text is justified. Lower left corner of field is the pivot
point. Options:
0 Top of field points to top of supply
1 Top of field points to left of supply
2 Top of field points to bottom of supply
3 Top of field points to right of supply
C12. “fixed char”
Fixed characters to appear in the field. Maximum 2710 characters. “” is
the default. Enclose in quotation marks.
Symbol set. Use 0 for the Internal Symbol Set. 0 is the default.
For scalable or TrueType® fonts, use:
1
ANSI Symbol Set
102 Unicode (user input) for particular mapping
437 DOS Code Page 437 (Domestic)
850 DOS Code Page 850 (International)
852 DOS Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
855 DOS Code Page 855 (Russian)
857 DOS Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish)
860 DOS Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese)
1250 Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
1251 Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic)
1252 Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
1253 Code Page 1253 (Greek)
1254 Code Page 1254 (Turkish)
1255 Code Page 1255 (Hebrew)
1256 Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
1257 Code Page 1257 (Baltic)
1258 Code Page 1258 (Vietnam)
C13. sym set
Note:
Example
The Standard, Reduced, Bold, OCRA and HR fonts only support
the Internal Symbol Set (0). The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces only
support the ANSI (1) and DOS Code Page 437 (2) and 850 (3)
Symbol Sets. The scalable font (font#50) does not support Code
Page 1256 Arabic (10). Code pages 852-860 and
1250-1258 are for downloaded TrueType fonts or the scalable
font. TrueType fonts are designed to be regionally specific;
therefore, all code pages may not be supported in a given font.
See Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/ Code Pages” for more information.
C,30,10,0,1,1,1,B,L,0,0,"MADE IN USA",0 |
Defines a constant text field starting at row 30, column 10. It does not have any additional intercharacter gap. The Standard font is used without any additional magnification. The printing is
black on white and left justified. No field or character rotation is used. “MADE IN USA” is printed
in this field. The internal symbol set is used.
3-22 Packet Reference Manual
Defining Line Fields
Use lines to form borders and mark out original prices. Define each line separately. This field is
not assigned a field number, but is counted as a field (keep this in mind, as the printer allows a
maximum of 1000 fields per format). Define any line length and a thickness up to 99 dots, as
long as the solid black print does not exceed 25 percent of any given square inch of the label.
Line Types
Create horizontal and vertical lines. There are two ways to define lines.
Segments
Select the starting point and ending point.
Vectors
Select the starting point, the angle, and the length of the line.
Syntax
L,type,row,column,angle/end row,length/end col,
thickness,"pattern" |
L1. L
L2. type
L3. row
Line Field.
Type of line. Only vertical and horizontal lines are supported.
S is the default. Options:
S Segment. Select the starting point and ending point.
V Vector. Select the starting point, angle, and length.
Row location - distance from bottom of print area to
the starting point. 10 is the default.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
L4. column
Column location - distance from left edge of the print
area to line origin. 10 is the default.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
L5. angle/end row
If Using Segments:
Row location of ending point. Measure from bottom of print area. On
horizontal lines, this value must match item L3. 100 is the default.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
If Using Vectors:
Angle of line. Options: 0, 90, 180, or 270.
0 is the default.
Defining Fields 3-23
L6. length/end col
L7. thickness
L8. “pattern”
Example
If Using Segments:
Column location of end point. Measure from left edge
of print area. On vertical lines, this value must match
parameter L4. 100 is the default.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
If Using Vectors:
Length of the line in selected units. 10 is the default.
Using the chart below for reference, write the line thickness
(1 to 99) in box L7. 2 is the default. Line thickness fills upward on
horizontal lines, or to the right on vertical lines. Measured in dots.
Line pattern. Enter "".
L,S,110,30,110,150,10,"" |
Defines a horizontal line field as a segment starting at row 110, column 30 and ending at row
110, column 150. The line thickness is 10 dots.
3-24 Packet Reference Manual
Defining Box Fields
Use boxes to form borders or highlight items of interest. Define each box field separately. This
field is not assigned a field number, but is counted as a field (keep this in mind, as the printer
allows a maximum of 1000 fields per format). Define any line length and a thickness up to 99
dots, as long as the solid black print does not exceed 25 percent of any given square inch of the
label.
Syntax
Q,row,column,end row,end col,thickness,"pattern" |
Q1. Q
Q2. row
Box (Quadrilateral) Field.
Row location - distance from bottom of print area to
lower left corner of box. 10 is the default.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
Q3. column
Column location - distance from left edge of print area to
lower left corner of box. 10 is the default.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
Q4. end row
Distance from bottom of print area to upper right corner of box. 100 is the
default.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots 0 – 2029
300 Dots 0 – 2999
Q5. end col
Distance from
the default.
English
0
Metric
0
203 Dots
0
300 Dots
0
left edge of print area to upper right corner of box. 100 is
–
–
–
–
424
1078
862
1274
Defining Fields 3-25
Q6. thickness
Using the chart below for reference, write the desired line thickness (1 to
99) in box Q6. 2 is the default. Boxes fill inward, so make sure boxes do
not overwrite other fields. Measured in dots.
Q7. “pattern”
Line pattern. Enter "".
Example
Q,240,30,270,150,3,"" |
Defines a box field starting at row 240, column 30. It ends at row 270, column 150. It has a
thickness of 3 dots.
3-26 Packet Reference Manual
4
DEFINING FIELD OPTIONS
This chapter provides a reference for defining
♦ field options in formats
♦ check digit packets.
Note:
When using multiple options in a format, options are processed in the order they are
received.
Applying Field Options
Field options further define text, bar code, and non-printable text fields. The text, constant text,
or bar code field must be previously defined before applying any field option to it.
Note:
Define field options immediately after the field to which they apply.
Combining Field Options
Multiple options can be used with most fields. Options can be used in any combination except as
noted with each definition. Options are processed in the order they are received.
For example, use Option 4 to copy data from another field, and then use Option 30 to pad the
field. When using multiple options for the same field, place the options in the order to apply them
in the format.
Restrictions
Some options cannot be used together. For example, incrementing (Option 60) and price field
(Option 42) options cannot be applied to the same field. See each Option’s section for specific
combinations to avoid.
Option 4 (copy a field) is the only option that can be repeated for a single field.
Syntax
R,option#,parameter...parameter |
R1. R
R2. option#
R3. parameter(s)
Indicates field option header.
Option number:
1 Define fixed characters
4 Copy data from previous field
30 Pad data to left or right with specified character
31 Generate check digit
42 Format as a price field
50 Define bar code densities
51 Define security and truncation of PDF417 bar codes
52 Define width or length of PDF417 bar codes
60 Define incrementing or decrementing field
61 Reimage fields
Varies per option. See the following option descriptions.
Defining Field Options 4-1
Using Option 1 (Fixed Data)
Fixed data is information (a company name or store number) to print on all labels. Define fixed
characters for an entire field or for part of a field.
Syntax
R,1,"fixed char" |
R1. R
R2. 1
R3. “fixed char”
Option Header.
Option 1.
Characters to insert. Enclose in quotation marks. If defining fixed
characters for part of a field, place underscores(_) in non-fixed positions.
Any spaces in the phrase are fixed characters. Range: 0 to 2710.
Note:
Example
Underscore characters are stripped out and the data is
compressed if no data is supplied by the batch and the field length
is variable.
R,1,"_ _ _%$_ _ _ _ _" |
Uses fixed characters (%$) in positions 4 and 5. The other positions are variable.
Example
R,1,"MONARCH" |
“MONARCH” appears as a fixed field in this example.
To fill in the non-fixed portion of the field, see “Defining Batch Data Fields” in Chapter 6. As an
alternative, apply Option 4 to copy data into the non-fixed character positions.
4-2 Packet Reference Manual
Using Option 4 (Copy Data)
Use option 4 to create a field that uses data from another field. This is useful for creating merged
fields or sub-fields. Copy the information from multiple fields into one field by applying the copy
procedure more than once. Copy data is the only option that can be applied to a field more than
once.
The maximum number of characters defined in T3 (# of char) or B3 (# of char) must allow
for the number of characters that will be placed in the field, including any price, check digit, or
fixed characters inserted by the printer. The maximum number of characters in the field into
which data is copied cannot exceed 2710 or the maximum number of characters permitted by the
bar code.
Note: When copying from more than one field, copy into the destination field from left to right.
Syntax
R1.
R2.
R3.
R4.
R,4,src fld,src start,# to copy,dest start,copy code |
R
4
src fld
src start
Option Header.
Option 4.
Field number from which data is copied. Range: 0 to 999. 1 is the default.
Position number in the source field of the first character to be copied.
Character positions are numbered 1 to 2710, starting from the left. 1 is the
default.
Number of characters to copy. Range: 1 to 2710. 1 is the default.
Position number where copied characters are to begin printing in the
destination field. Range: 1 to 2710.
Copy Method. 1 is the default.
1 Copy field as is (including price symbols, pad characters,
check digits, etc.).
2 Copy unformatted data (without price characters, pad
characters, etc.).
R5. # to copy
R6. dest start
R7. copy code
Example
R,4,3,1,3,1,1|
Copies data from field #3, starting at the first position and copying three characters. In the
destination field, the information is placed in position 1 and copied as formatted data.
Merging Fields
Copy data to merge the contents of fields. Use the copy data option as many times as necessary
to copy all the appropriate fields into the merged field.
In the following example, two text and two non-printable fields are shown. Data from these fields
is merged to form field 5, and is then printed as a bar code.
Field
1
2
3
4
5
Data
203
339
8
BLUE
2033398BLUE
Field Type
Non-printable
Non-printable
Text
Text
Bar Code
To create this sequence:
1. Define fields 1, 2, 3, and 4.
2. Define field 5 as a bar code. Allow enough characters in the bar code field to hold all the
copied characters.
3. Apply Option 4 to field 5 once for every source field.
Defining Field Options 4-3
Sub-Fields
Copy a segment of data from one field into a new location, called a sub-field. For example,
extract part of the data in a bar code and display it in text form in a sub-field. Then, use the copy
data option.
Using Option 30 (Pad Data)
Add characters to one side of a field to “pad” the field. Padding fills in the remaining spaces when
entered data does not fill an entire field. If a variable length field is not completely filled with
batch data, this option fills the remaining positions in the field with the character designated by
Option 30.
Syntax
R,30,L/R,"character" |
R1. R
R2. 30
R3. L/R
R4. “character”
Example
Option Header.
Option 30.
Indicates type of padding. R is the default.
L Pad field on left side
R Pad field on right side
Pad character must be within the 0 to 255 decimal range and enclosed
inside quotation marks. “0” is the default. The pad character must be in
ASCII Hex format. Do not use on fixed length fields.
R,30,L,"X" |
Pads data with an “X” on the left side of the field.
Sample Use for Padding
Use pad characters to make a variable length bar code occupy a fixed amount of space on the
supply. If the maximum number of characters in the bar code is 15, but the batch packet only has
10 characters, the padding option fills the remainder of the field with pad characters.
Using Option 31 (Calculate Check Digit)
The printer generates a check digit when Option 31 is applied to the field. Do not use this option
if the field contains a UPC, EAN, or Code 39 (with the MOD43 check digit) bar code.
Syntax
R1.
R2.
R3.
R4.
R,31,gen/ver,check digit # |
R
31
gen/ver
check digit #
Example
Option Header.
Option 31.
Enter G to generate a check digit.
Specifies a check digit scheme. Enter a number that identifies a check
digit scheme that has been defined. For more information, see “Using
Check Digits.” Range: 1 to 10. 1 is the default.
R,31,G,5 |
Generates a check digit using the previously defined check digit scheme 5.
4-4 Packet Reference Manual
Using Option 42 (Price Field)
Apply options to automatically insert monetary symbols. Do not use this option with Option 31
(define a check digit) or Option 60 (increment or decrement a field). This option is not
recommended for bar codes. When determining the maximum number of characters, add the
maximum number of digits and the monetary symbols.
Syntax
R,42,appear_code |
R1. R
R2. 42
R3. appear_code
Example
Option Header.
Option 42.
Enter 1 to print the price field in standard notation, as defined by the
country setting.
Use the monetary formatting packet to select monetary notations and
symbols by country setting. See “Defining the Monetary Formatting Packet”
for more information. See Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/Code Pages,” to
make sure the monetary symbol is printable in the font selected for this
field. For monetary symbols other than the dollar sign, use the internal
symbol set.
R,42,1 |
Uses a price field that prints the monetary symbol and notations as defined in the monetary
formatting packet.
Using Option 50 (Bar Code Density)
Apply this option to bar code fields to create custom densities. This option overrides the density
value in the bar code field. When using this option, set the density parameter in the bar code field
to the default value. Only use this option once for each bar code field. Bar codes produced
using Option 50 may not be scannable. Synthetic supplies are recommended to produce
scannable bar codes.
The additional character gap, narrow space, and wide space parameters are valid only with Code
39 and Codabar. If these parameters are specified for any other bar codes, they will be ignored
by the printer. Do not use Option 50 with fixed density bar codes.
Option 50 can be used with PDF417 bar codes for specific customer ratios. With PDF417 bar
codes, use only the narrow and wide parameters. The narrow parameter defines the individual
bar width in dots and the wide parameter is used to define the height of each individual stacked
bar code. Option 50 can also be used with Option 52 to further customize the dimensions of a
PDF417 bar code. Option 52 allows customization of the number of columns or number of rows
for the bar code.
Syntax
R1.
R2.
R3.
R4.
R5.
R,50,narrow,wide,gap,nar_space,wide_space |
R
50
narrow
wide
gap
R6. nar_space
R7. wide_space
Field Option Header.
Option 50.
Dot width of the narrow element. Range: 1 to 99. 1 is the default.
Dot width of the wide element. Range: 1 to 99. 1 is the default.
Additional dot space between characters. Enter a value of 1 to 99. (Code
39 and Codabar only.) 1 is the default.
Additional dot width of the narrow bar code space. (Code 39 and Codabar
only). Range: 1 to 99. 1 is the default.
Additional dot width of the wide bar code space. (Code 39 and Codabar
only). Range: 1 to 99. 1 is the default.
Defining Field Options 4-5
Example
R,50,4,8,4,4,8 |
Creates a custom bar code density with a narrow element of 4 dots, a wide element of 8 dots, a
gap of 4 dots, 4 additional dot widths for the narrow bar code space, and 8 additional dot widths
for the wide bar code space (if this is a Code 39 or Codabar bar code).
Example
B,1,40,V,100,100,32,1,0,8,L,0 |
R,50,2,10 |
Creates a custom PDF417 bar code density for 203 dpi printers. The narrow element width is 2
dots and the height is 10 dots.
Example
B,1,40,V,100,100,32,1,0,8,L,0 |
50,3,15 |
Creates a custom PDF417 bar code density for 300 dpi printers. The narrow element width is 3
dots and the height is 15 dots.
Using Option 51 (PDF417 Security/Truncation)
Define a security level and choose whether or not to truncate a PDF417 bar code. Higher security
levels add data to a bar code, improving scan reliability. Some damaged bar codes may still be
scannable if the security level is high enough. Use this option to create standard PDF417 bar
codes or use the truncated option to create a narrower bar code. This option can appear only
once per PDF417 field, in any order, following the bar code field.
As the security level is increased, so is the size of the PDF417 bar code. For each level
increased, the bar code doubles in size.
Syntax
R,51,security,stand/default |
R1. R
R2. 51
R3. security
R4. stand/def
Example
Option Header.
Indicates Option 51.
Security level ranges from 0 to 8. 0 is the default.
Higher security levels add data to a bar code, improving scan reliability.
Some damaged bar codes may still be scannable if the security level is
high enough.
Truncation selector. S is the default. Valid values:
S a standard PDF417 bar code
T truncated
R,51,2,S |
Defines a security level of 2 for a standard PDF417 bar code.
4-6 Packet Reference Manual
Using Option 52 (PDF417 Width/Length)
This option defines the image width or length of a PDF417 bar code. If defining a fixed number of
columns (width), the bar code expands in length. If defining a fixed number of rows (length), the
bar code expands in width. Column value does not include start/stop or left/right indicator
columns. If this option does not immediately follow the PDF417 bar code field, the default
settings are used. Use this option once per PDF417 bar code field.
Syntax
R,52,row/column,dimension |
R1. R
R2. 52
R3. row/column
R4. dimension
Example
Option Header.
Indicates Option 52.
Indicates the number of rows or columns. If rows are specified, the bar
code expands in columns, or vice versa.
R Row
C Column
The number of rows or columns defined for the bar code. Valid values:
3-90
for rows. 3 is the default for rows.
1-30
for columns. 1 is the default for columns.
R,52,C,10 |
Defines the column width of 10, which expands the PDF417 bar code length by 10.
Using Option 60 (Incrementing/Decrementing Fields)
Applications such as serial numbers require a numeric field to increment (increase in value) or
decrement (decrease in value) on successive labels within a single batch. Incrementing or
decrementing can be applied to numeric data only. If a field includes letters and digits, apply
incrementing or decrementing to only the portion of the field that contains digits. Do not use with
Option 42 (price field).
Syntax
R,60,I/D,amount,l pos,r pos |
R1. R
R2. 60
R3. I/D
R4. amount
R5. l pos
R6. r pos
Example
Option Header.
Option 60.
Increment or decrement. I is the default.
I
incrementing field
D decrementing field
Amount to increase or decrease. Range: 0 to 999. 1 is the default.
Leftmost position in inc/dec portion of field. If this value is not entered, the
default value is used. Range: 0 to 2710. 1 is the default.
Rightmost position in inc/dec portion of field. If this value is not used, the
entire field length is used as the default. Range: 0 to 2710.
2710 is the default.
R,60,I,5,1,6 |
Increments a field by 5 each time the field is printed. The field increments beginning with the first
left position and ending with the sixth position.
Fixing the First Number in the Incrementing Sequence
There are two ways to enter the first number in the incrementing sequence. Use batch data or
Option 1 to define the first number as a fixed character. The first number in the sequence must
contain the same amount of digits as the highest number to be counted. For example, to count
the numbers 1 to 999, the first number in the sequence must be entered as 001.
Defining Field Options 4-7
Using Option 61 (Re-image Field)
This option redraws (reimages) a constant field when a constant field is next to a variable field. It
can be used on text, constant text, bar code, line, or box fields.
These printers do not redraw an area if the field data does not change. When a field changes,
that area is cleared and the new field data is imaged. However, the new field data may require a
larger area than the previous field did. In some cases, neighboring fields that do not change
(constant fields) may be covered with white space from the changing field’s (variable fields) area.
Use this option to reimage the constant field, or it may appear broken.
Note:
The most common use for this option is with incrementing fields on a label, because they
may cover a constant field.
Syntax
R,61 |
R1. R
R2. 61
Example
Option Header.
Option 61.
R,61 |
Reimages the constant field that appears next to a variable field.
In this example, Option 61 is applied to the bar code field to keep the incrementing field (Box #)
from blocking out the bar code field.
Re-Image ON
4-8 Packet Reference Manual
Re-Image OFF
Using Check Digits
Check digits are typically used to ensure that a text or bar code field scans correctly. The printer
calculates a check digit when Option 31 is applied. A check digit scheme determines how the
printer calculates a check digit. When defining a check digit scheme, assign a number to identify
it. This number is later entered in R4 (check digit #) when applying Option 31 to a field. Use
check digits with text or bar code fields. Check digit calculations are performed on numeric data
only.
Do not use check digits with price fields. Do not define a check digit scheme for UPC, EAN, Code
39 (with the MOD43 check digit), and Code 93 bar codes, because they have predefined check
digits.
Syntax
A1.
A2.
A3.
A4.
{A,selector,action,device,modulus,fld_length, D/P,"weights" | }
A
selector
action
device
Check Digit Header.
Assign a number from 1 to 10 to this check digit formula. 1 is the default.
The action to perform. Enter A to add the check digit scheme.
Format storage device. R is the default . Options:
F Flash
M Memory card (optional)
R Volatile RAM
Note:
A5. modulus
A6. fld_length
A7. D/P
A8. “weights”
Example
Check digits stored in flash are saved when the printer is turned
off.
Number from 2 to 11. The modulus is used to divide the sum of products or
the sum of digits.
The maximum number of characters the field will contain.
Range: 0 to 2710. 2710 is the default.
Algorithm. The algorithm determines how the check digit is calculated.
Options:
D sum of digits
P sum of products
String of digits used for calculation. A weight string is a group of two or
more numbers that is applied to a field. The number of digits in this string
should equal the number in fld_length. Enclose in quotation marks. Range:
0 to 2710. “” is the default.
{A,1,A,R,10,5,P,"65432" | }
Adds check digit scheme number 1 to the printer’s memory. The modulus is 10, the maximum
number of characters in the field is 5. The check digit is calculated by using the Sum of Products
and the string of digits used in the calculation is “65432.”
Defining Field Options 4-9
Sum of Products Calculation
This is an example of how the printer uses Sum of Products to calculate a check digit for this
data:
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
1. Weights are applied to each digit, starting with the last digit in the weight string. They are
applied right to left, beginning at the right-most position of the field. Remember, a weight
string must contain at least two different numbers. This example has a weight string of
1,2,3,4:
field:
weight string:
5
4
2
1
3
2
2
3
4
4
5
1
2
2
1
3
9
4
2. Each digit in the field is multiplied by the weight assigned to it:
field:
weight string:
products:
5
4
2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
20 2 6 6 16 5 4 3 36
3. Next, the product of each digit is added together. This is the sum of the products.
20 + 2 + 6 + 6 + 16 + 5 + 4 + 3 + 36 = 98
4. Divide the sum of the products by the modulus (10 in this case), only to the whole number.
The balance is called the remainder.
9
10 98
90
8
5. Subtract the remainder from the modulus.
The result becomes the check digit. In this case, the check digit is 2.
10 - 8 = 2
4-10 Packet Reference Manual
Sum of Digits Calculation
This is an example of how the printer uses Sum of Digits to calculate a check digit for this data:
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
1. Weights are applied to each digit, starting with the last digit in the weight string. They are
applied right to left, beginning at the right-most position of the field. Remember, a weight
string must contain at least two different numbers. This example has a weight string of
1,2,3,4:
field:
weight string:
5
4
2
1
3
2
2
3
4
4
5
1
2
2
1
3
9
4
2. Each digit in the field is multiplied by the weight assigned to it:
field:
weight string:
products:
5 2 3 2 4 5 2 1 9
4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4
20 2 6 6 16 5 4 3 36
3. Next, the digits of the products are added together. Two-digit products are treated as two
separate digits. This is the sum of the digits.
2 + 0 + 2 + 6 + 6 + 1 + 6 + 5 + 4 + 3 + 3 + 6 = 44
4. Divide the sum of the digits by the modulus (10 in this case), only to the whole number. The
balance is called the remainder.
4
10 44
40
4
5. Subtract the remainder from the modulus. The result becomes the check digit. In this case,
the check digit is 6.
10 - 4 = 6
Defining Field Options 4-11
4-12 Packet Reference Manual
5
C R E AT I N G G R A P H I C S
This chapter provides information on how to
♦ map out the graphic image using the hexadecimal (hex) or run length method.
♦ create a graphic packet using a graphic header, bitmap, duplicate, next-bitmap, text, constant
text, line, and box fields.
♦ place a graphic image into a format.
♦ use the compressed graphics packet.
Use graphic packets to create bitmapped images. To include a graphic packet within a format, the
format must contain a graphic field. See “Placing the Graphic in a Format” for more information.
Overview of Bitmapped Images
A printed image is formed through a series of dots. Each square on the
grid below represents a dot on the printhead. The graphic image is
created by blackening dots in a specific pattern. Print shades of gray
according to the concentration of dots on the image. When the dots are
printed together, the end result is a graphic image.
Determining a Method
Use one of two methods to map out the graphic image:
Hex Method
The dot sequences are segmented into binary numbers and then
converted to hex numbers.
A graphic using gray-scaling, several slanted lines, or several vertical
lines typically translates more efficiently with hex representation.
Run Length
Encoding Method
The dot sequences are segmented into black and white strings within
a row. The total count of each white string is converted to a lowercase letter, corresponding to numeric value. The total count of each
black string is converted to an uppercase letter, corresponding to
numeric value. This method can reduce imaging time for graphics that
contain repetitive rows of dots. A graphic with horizontal lines or very
few white-to-black borders typically translates more efficiently with run
length encoding.
The most efficient encoding method depends on how complicated the graphic image is and
whether or not imaging time is a concern. Experiment with both encoding methods to get optimal
performance.
Designing Bitmapped Images
After determining the encoding method to use, map out the graphic
image.
Note:
The mapped image must be an upside down mirror image of
the final result.
Creating Graphics 5-1
Special Considerations
Solid black print cannot exceed 25% of any given square inch of the supply. If the black print
exceeds this limit, you may lose data or damage the printhead.
In the first label, the large “M” logo and thick black line exceed the allowed black to white print
ratio. In the second label, the large “M” logo does not exceed the black to white print ratio.
2 inches
E xceeds
limit
E xceeds
limit
2 inches
Does not
exceed
limit
0.5”
Does not
exceed
limit
Using the Hex Method
The following steps explain how to derive a hex character string from a bitmapped graphic. Each
square on the grid represents a dot. A black square indicates the dot is ON, and a white square
indicates the dot is OFF. A sequence of binary numbers, called a bit pattern or bitmap,
determines what dots are on and off. The numbers “0" and ”1" are used for this purpose. The
number “1" turns a dot on and ”0" turns a dot off.
All hex numbers must be two digits. For example, write hex 0 as 00, or hex E as 0E.
1. Assign 1 to every black square and 0 to every white square.
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000111111111111111111111111110000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111000000000000000000000000001111111110000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001111110000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000011110000000000000000111111111111111111111111110000000000000001111000000000
00000000000000000000000001111100001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111110000
00000000000000000000000110000011111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111000001100
00000000000000000000000110001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110
00000000000000000000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110
00000000000000000000000111111111111111111111111111111000000000000000000011111111111111111111111111111110
00000000000000000000000111111111111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111111111100
00000000000000000000000001111111100000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000011111111110000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000000000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000010000000000000000000011111110000000000000000000111111111111111111100000000000000000001111111000000
00000011000000000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000000111000000
00000001111000000000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110000111000000
00000000111000000000000000000011111111111111000000000000000000000000000000000000011111111111111000000000
00000000111111000000000000011100000000111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111100000001111000000
00000000111111100000000000000000001111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111110001111000000
5-2 Packet Reference Manual
2. Section off the grid in columns of eight. If any rows are not divisible by 8, add enough 0’s to
complete a column.
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000010
00000011
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11100000
11100000
11111100
11111110
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000011
01111100
10000011
10001111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011100
00000000
00000000
00000001
00111110
11000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
10000000
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
00000011
00111111
00000000
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
11111111
11111111
00111111
11000000
00000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111000
00000000
00000111
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00001111
00000000
11110000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111000
00000111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00000000
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
11111110
11111111
00000000
00000000
11100000
00011110
11100001
11111110
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00111111
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00000011
11100011
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11110000
00001100
11111110
11111110
11111110
11111100
11110000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
3. One row at a time, convert each group of eight binary digits to hex.
starting
00111111
11111111
11111111
11110000
at position 49 ...
= 3F
= FF
= FF
= F0
4. Write the hex values for each row as a continuous string.
row 1, position 49 = 03FFFFFF00000
5. Repeat steps 3 through 4 for each row on the grid.
6. Insert the hex values in syntax format.
Creating Graphics 5-3
Using the Run Length Encoding Method
The following steps explain how to derive a run length character string from a bitmapped graphic.
Each square on the grid represents a dot. A black square indicates the dot is ON, and a white
square indicates the dot is OFF.
Note:
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000010
00000011
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
The following example shows “1" to indicate when a square is ON, and ”0" to indicate
when a square is OFF. Dots do not have to be converted when using the run length
method.
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11100000
11100000
11111100
11111110
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000001
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000011
01111100
10000011
10001111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011111
00011100
00000000
00000011
00011100
00000000
00000000
00000001
00111110
11000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
10000000
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
11000000
00000011
00111111
11111111
00000011
00111111
00000000
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
11111111
11111111
00111111
11000000
00000000
00111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111000
00000000
00000111
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11110000
00001111
00000000
11110000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111111
11111111
00000000
11111000
00001111
00000000
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
01111111
00000000
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
00000000
11111110
11111111
01111111
11111110
11111111
00000000
00000000
11000000
00011110
11100001
11111110
11111111
11111111
11111111
11111111
00111111
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00011111
00000001
11100001
11111110
00000011
11100011
00000000
00000000
00000000
00000000
11110000
00001100
11111110
11111110
11111110
11111100
11110000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
11000000
00000000
11000000
11000000
1. Count the number of consecutive OFF or ON dots in a row. Write the number of consecutive
dots in sequence for the first row on the grid. Write “ON” or “OFF” after each number to
indicate ON or OFF dots.
(row 1, position 50) 26 on
(row 2, position 39) 11 on, 26 off, 9 on
(row 3, position 34) 5 on, 45 off, 6 on
2. Replace each number with its corresponding code from the Dot to Run Length Encoding Chart
provided in Appendix C, “Symbol Sets/Code Pages.” Be sure to use CAPITAL letters for black
dots and lower-case letters for white dots.
26 on (Z)11 on (K), 26 off (z), 9 on (I)..
If the number is greater than 26, write z, followed by the letter corresponding to the
amount over 26. For example, to represent 45 off dots, write zs.
5 on (E), 45 off (zs), 6 on (F)..
3. Write the letter codes in sequence, uninterrupted, for each row.
(row 1,position 50) Z
(row 2,position 39) KzI
(row 3,position 34) EzsF
(row 4,position 30) DpZoD..
Note: If the end of the line specifies OFF dots (lower-case letters), the ending lower-case
letters can be omitted. For example, uZFu can be written as uZF.
4. Repeat steps 1 through 5 for each row on the grid.
5. Insert the code values in syntax format.
5-4 Packet Reference Manual
Determining How to Store the Image
Once the image is mapped out, determine how to store it:
♦ Volatile RAM

Temporary Storage
♦ Memory card (optional)

Flash Memory
Using Volatile RAM
Use RAM when the graphic image is used by several formats, because the graphic is sent once.
This eliminates the need to send the graphic image repeatedly. See “Placing the Graphic in a
Format,” for more information about using the graphic packet in a format. Store graphics smaller
than approximately 1/2 inch by 1/2 inch in printer RAM and reference by the graphic ID number.
Note:
Graphics are stored in the format buffer and remain there until another graphic packet is
sent or the printer is turned off.
Using Temporary Storage
Use temporary storage when the graphic image is used only in one format or the graphic image is
very large. Graphic data in temporary storage is held in the image buffer until the graphic is
printed and then it is cleared from memory. Temporary graphics are also cleared from memory
when a new batch is sent or updated. Use the same graphic image multiple times on a format.
Send the graphic image to the printer after the format to which it applies.
If a graphic is stored in temporary storage, do not place a graphic field in the format. This will
cause an error. Instead, position the graphic image by using the row and column locations in the
graphic packet header. Image memory (temporary storage) will accept a graphic packet 1218
rows long with 811 dots per row.
Using a Memory Card
The 9419 printer has an optional memory card that allows storage of formats, graphics, and
fonts. Graphics stored on the memory card are saved when the printer is turned off. Use M in
the Graphic header. See “Defining the Graphic Header” for more information.
Using Flash
Use flash memory when the graphic image is used by several formats, because the graphic only
has to be sent once. This eliminates the need to send the graphic image repeatedly. See “Placing
the Graphic in a Format,” for more information about using the graphic packet in a format.
Graphics stored in flash memory are saved when the printer is turned off.
Creating Graphics 5-5
Creating a Graphic Packet
A graphic packet can contain
♦ bitmapped fields (for bitmapped images)
♦ constant text fields
♦ lines
♦ boxes
Images using hex representation or run length encoding are bitmapped images. See “Designing
Bitmapped Images” to design a bitmapped image.
Once the image is designed, define a graphic packet. This packet generates the graphic image to
use in a format.
Positioning the Graphic Image
This section explains how to position the graphic image within a graphic packet header, a field of
a graphic packet, or within a format.
Within the Graphic Packet Header
When using RAM, the row and column parameters in the graphic header are usually 0,0, because
placement is controlled by the graphic field in the format. This is especially true when designing a
compliance label overlay.
When using temporary storage, these parameters control the placement of
the graphic image on the supply.
The area enclosed within the dotted lines represents the graphic image
starting at 0,0 (as defined in the graphic header).
To create a fixed amount of white space around the graphic image, use
something other than 0 for row and/or column. The area enclosed within
the dotted lines represents the graphic image starting at 0,0 with a fixed
amount of white space (10,10) around the graphic image.
Within the Field
In a bitmap, constant text, line, or box field, the row and column parameters
control where an individual field or bitmapped row begins in relation to the
coordinates defined in the graphic header.
The bottom of the triangle in this example represents the first field of
the graphic packet starting at 10,0.
5-6 Packet Reference Manual
Within a Format
When defining the graphic field within the format, the row and
column parameters represent where on the format to place the
graphic image.
To place a graphic (a logo, for example) within a certain area on
the supply, enter the starting position (bottom left corner) of the
graphic image.
This label shows the triangle “logo” beginning (the bottom left
corner) at 155, 33 as defined in the graphic field.
Defining the Graphic Header
Every graphic packet must contain a graphic header. It identifies and provides important
measurement and formatting information for the graphic. Bitmap, duplicate, next-bitmap, constant
text, line, and box fields follow the graphic header, if they are used.
Syntax
{G,graphID,action,device,units,row,col, mode,"name" |
G1. G
G2. graphID
G3. action
G4. device
G5. units
G6. row
G7. col
G8. mode
G9. “name”
Graphic Header.
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify the graphic image. 1 is the
default.
Use A to add the graphic to the printer.
Graphic storage device. R is the default.
F Flash (saved when the printer is turned off)
M Memory card (optional)
R Volatile RAM
T Temporary storage
Unit of measure. G (dots) is the default.
E (English - in 1/100 inches)
M (Metric -in 1/10 mm)
G (Graphic - in dots)
Distance between the bottom of the graphic image area and the first
bitmap line. This is usually 0, unless you want a fixed amount of white
space around the graphic image. 10 is the default. See “Positioning the
Graphic Image,” for more information.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
Distance between the left edge of the graphic image area and the left edge
of first bitmap line. This is usually 0, unless you want a fixed amount of
white space around the graphic image. 10 is the default. See “Positioning
the Graphic Image,” for more information.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
Imaging mode. Enter 0.
Graphic name (optional), 0 to 8 characters, enclose within quotation
marks. “” is the default.
Creating Graphics 5-7
Example {G,99,A,R,G,0,0,0,"99Wire" |
Adds a graphic image identified by number 99 to volatile RAM. The graphic uses dot
measurement. The image will be placed according to the row and column parameters in the
graphic field. The imaging mode is 0 and the image is called 99Wire.
Creating Bitmap Fields
This defines one row of dots, starting at a specific row and column within the graphic image.
Each unique row of dots requires a bitmap field. Repeat bitmap fields with a duplicate field.
Syntax
B,row,col,algorithm,"data" |
B1. B
B2. row
B3. col
B4. algorithm
B5. “data”
Bitmap Field.
Distance (in dots) from the graphic image’s bottom margin to the bitmap
line.
10 is the default.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
Distance (in dots) from the graphic image’s left edge to the bitmap line.
10 is the default.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
Coding method for bitmap data:
H Hex Representation
R Run Length Encoding
Character string made up of hex or run length encoding. Do not put spaces
or any other character between the numbers. Range: 0 to 2710. 2710 is
the default.
Example B,39,56,H,"3FFFFFF0" |
Defines a bitmapped graphic field. The image begins 39 dots from the bottom and 56 dots from
the left edge of the graphic area. Hex representation is used.
5-8 Packet Reference Manual
Creating Next-Bitmap Fields
This field uses the previous field’s row and column locations. Use the bitmap or duplicate field
data without having to recalculate row and column locations. This field represents one row of
dots on the image.
Syntax
N,adjdir,adjamt,algorithm,"data" |
N1. N
N2. adjdir
N3. adjamt
N4. algorithm
N5. “data”
Next-Bitmap Field.
Increments or decrements the row count. Inserts the duplicate line after or
before the current row. 0 is the default.
0 Increments (inserts duplicate line after)
1 Decrements (inserts duplicate line before) For example:
B,50,35,R,"GsSsG" |
N,0,1,R,"DpZoD" |
prints a next-bitmap field on row 51 at column 35.
Row adjustment in dot rows. Using 0 overwrites the same line.
Range: 0 to 999.
Coding method for bitmap data:
H Hex Representation
R Run Length Encoding
Character string made up of hex or run length encoding. Do not put spaces
or any other character between the hex numbers or run length code letters.
Range: 0 to 2710. 2710 is the default.
Example B,39,56,H,"3FFFFFF0" |
N,0,1,H,"000000E00000" |
Defines a next-bitmap graphic field beginning on row 40. The row count increments by 1. Hex
representation is used.
Creating Duplicate Fields
If a line of data is identical to a previous bitmap or next-bitmap field, the duplicate field allows
repeating the dot sequence without retyping the data. A duplicate field represents one row of dots
on the image.
Note:
Duplicate fields are useful when a graphic has a lot of repetition.
Syntax
D,adjdir,adjamt,count |
D1. D
D2. adjdir
D3. adjamt
D4. count
Duplicate Field.
Increments or decrements the row count. Inserts the duplicate line after or
before the current row.
0 Increments (inserts after)
1 Decrements (inserts before)
For example:
B,50,35,R,"GsSsG" |
D,0,20,2 |
inserts row 50 again at row 70 and row 90. Rows 70 and 90 do not have to
be defined later.
Amount of row adjustment in dot rows. Range: 0 to 999. 1 is the default.
The above example adjusts the duplicate field to image on row 70 and 90
(adding 20 to the current row count).
Number of times to duplicate the line. Range: 0 to 999.
Creating Graphics 5-9
Example B,117,24,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC" |
D,0,1,2 |
Defines a duplicate field that is imaged after the bitmap line. This field duplicates the preceding
bitmap line twice (at row 118 and 119).
Use constant text, line, or box fields in a graphic packet to create a compliance label overlay.
See Chapter 3, “Defining Fields,” for more information about these fields.
Sample Hex Graphic Packet
{G,99,A,R,G,0,0,0,"99WIRE" |
B,39,48,H,"3FFFFFF0" |
B,40,32,H,"01FFC000000FF8" |
B,41,32,H,"3E00000000000FC0" |
B,42,24,H,"03C0003FFFFFF0000F" |
B,43,24,H,"7C3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1F0 |
B,44,16,H,"0183FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF06" |
B,45,16,H,"018FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE" |
B,46,16,H,"01FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE" |
B,47,16,H,"01FFFFFF80001FFFFFFFFE" |
B,48,16,H,"01FFFFF0000000007FFFFC" |
B,49,24,H,"7F800007FFFF00003FF0" |
B,50,24,H,"1FC00007FFFF00001FC0" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,51,24,H,"1C03FFFFFFFFFFFE01C0" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,52,32,H,"3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1C0" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,53,24,H,"03FFF0000000007FFE" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,70,0,H,"0400001FC00007FFFF00001FC0" |
B,71,0,H,"0600001C03FFFFFFFFFFFE01C0" |
B,72,0,H,"030000003FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1C0" |
B,73,0,H,"01000003FFF0000000007FFE" |
B,74,8,H,"FC001C03FFFFFFFFFFFE00C0" |
B,75,8,H,"FE00003FFFFFFFFFFFFFE0C0" |
B,76,8,H,"1FF803FFF0000000007FFE" |
B,77,8,H,"0FFFCFFC00000000000001C0" |
B,78,16,H,"FFDF000FFFFFFFFF8003C0" |
B,79,16,H,"7FFFC00007FFFF00001FC0" |
B,80,24,H,"1C03FFFFFFFFFFFE01C0" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,81,32,H,"3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE1C0" |
D,0,4,4 |
5-10 Packet Reference Manual
B,82,24,H,"03FFF0000000007FFE" |
D,0,4,3 |
B,83,24,H,"1FC00007FFFF00001FC0" |
D,0,4,3 |
B,98,24,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF0" |
B,99,24,H,"07FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC" |
B,100,24,H,"1FF9FFFFFFFFFFFFFF" |
B,101,24,H,"3FFE0007FFFF8000FF80" |
B,102,24,H,"391E0027FFFF803FFFC0" |
B,103,24,H,"1C7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC0" |
B,104,24,H,"1FC1FFFFFFFFFFFF1FC0" |
B,105,24,H,"0FFDFFFFFFFFFFE0FF" |
B,106,24,H,"FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF8" |
B,107,32,H,"3FFFFFFFFFFFFFE0" |
B,108,32,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFF" |
B,109,48,H,"07FFFF80" |
D,0,1,2 |
B,111,48,H,"FFFFFFFF" |
B,112,32,H,"FFFF00000000FFE0" |
B,113,24,H,"078000FFFFFFFF001F" |
B,114,24,H,"78FFFFFFFFFFFFFFE060" |
B,115,16,H,"0187FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC18"
B,116,16,H,"027FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF2"
B,117,16,H,"03FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC"
D,0,1,2 |
B,120,16,H,"01FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF8"
B,121,24,H,"FEFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE0" |
B,122,24,H,"07FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFC" |
B,123,32,H,"FFFFFFFFFFFFFFC0" |
|
|
|
|
Sample Run Length Graphic Packet
{G,99,A,R,G,0,0,0,"99WIRE" |
B,39,50,R,"Z" |
B,40,39,R,"KzI" |
B,41,34,R,"EzsF" |
B,42,30,R,"DpZoD" |
B,43,25,R,"EdZZEdE" |
B,44,23,R,"BeZZMeB" |
B,45,23,R,"BcZZW" |
B,46,23,R,"ZZZA" |
B,47,23,R,"ZDsZE" |
B,48,24,R,"TzkU" |
B,49,25,R,"HtRqJ" |
B,50,27,R,"GsSsG" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,51,27,R,"ChZWgC" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,52,34,R,"ZZEdC" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,53,30,R,"NzkN" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,70,5,R,"AuGsSsG" |
B,71,5,R,"BtChZWgC" |
B,72,6,R,"DxZZEdC" |
B,73,7,R,"CtNzkN" |
B,74,8,R,"FmChZWhC" |
B,75,8,R,"GsZZEdC" |
B,76,11,R,"JiNzkN" |
B,77,12,R,"NbJzzeC" |
B,78,16,R,"JaElZKmD" |
B,79,17,R,"QsSsG" |
B,80,27,R,"ChZWgC" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,81,34,R,"ZZEdC" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,82,30,R,"NzkN" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,83,27,R,"GsSsG" |
D,0,4,4 |
B,98,30,R,"ZZJ" |
B,99,29,R,"ZZM" |
B,100,27,R,"JbZZE" |
B,101,26,R,"MnToI" |
B,102,26,R,"CbHnTiP" |
B,103,27,R,"CcZZC" |
B,104,27,R,"GeZWcG" |
B,105,28,R,"JaZReH" |
B,106,32,R,"ZZI" |
B,107,34,R,"ZZE" |
B,108,38,R,"ZQ" |
B,109,53,R,"T" |
D,0,1,2 |
B,111,48,R,"ZF" |
B,112,33,R,"PzfK" |
B,113,29,R,"CpZBoE" |
B,114,25,R,"DcZZGfB" |
B,115,23,R,"BdZZMeB" |
B,116,22,R,"AbZZVbA" |
B,117,22,R,"ZZZB" |
D,0,1,2 |
B,120,23,R,"ZZZ" |
B,121,25,R,"ZZV" |
B,122,29,R,"ZZM" |
B,123,32,R,"ZZF" |
B,124,39,R,"ZT" | }
Placing the Graphic in a Format
To include a graphic within a format:
1. Design the graphic image as shown in “Designing Bitmapped Images.”
2. If using RAM, place a graphic field in the format file to reference the graphic. See the
following section, “Defining the Graphic Field,” for more information.
Note:
If using temporary storage, there is no need to add a graphic field to reference the
graphic image.
3. Download all the necessary packets (check digit, format, etc.).
4. Send the graphic file to the printer. See “Creating a Graphic Packet” for more information.
Creating Graphics 5-11
Defining the Graphic Field
The graphic field in a format references the graphic image by the graphID in the graphic header.
This field is required only if the graphic will be stored in RAM.
Syntax
G,graphID,row,col,mode,rotation |
G1. G
G2. graphID
G3. row
G4. column
G5. mode
G6. rotation
Graphic Field.
Unique number from 1 to 999 to identify the graphic image. 1 is the
default.
Distance between the bottom of the print area on the supply to the bottom
of the graphic image. 10 is the default. Measured in selected units.
English
0 – 999
Metric
0 – 2539
203 Dots
0 – 2029
300 Dots
0 – 2999
The row specified in the constant text, bitmap, line, or box field is added to
the row value above to determine the actual position in the format.
Distance between the left edge of the print area on the supply and the left
edge of the graphic. 10 is the default.Measured in selected units. The
column specified in the constant text, bitmap, line, or box field is added to
the col value above to determine the actual position in the format.
English
0 – 424
Metric
0 – 1078
203 Dots
0 – 862
300 Dots
0 – 1274
Imaging mode. Enter 0.
The orientation of the graphic on the supply. Enter 0.
Example G,57,0,0,0,0 |
Defines a graphic field that is identified by the number 57. The image begins at 0,0. The imaging
mode is 0 and there is no rotation.
Sample Bitmap Graphic Image
The following format shows the wire hex graphic packet included.
{F,2,A,R,E,400,400,"FMT2" |
Refer ence to
G,99,227,35,0,0 |
Q,240,15,300,125,10," " |
T,1,5,V,285,137,0,10,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 |
T,2,5,V,255,137,0,10,2,2,B,L,0,0,0 |
T,3,15,V,180,25,0,10,1,2,B,L,0,0,0 |
T,4,15,V,121,35,0,1,3,1,B,L,0,0,0 |
L,S,94,15,94,235,10,"" |
B,5,12,F,50,65,1,2,40,1,L,0 | }
the gr aphic packet
Sample Batch Packet
{B,2,N,1 |
1,"Pat’s" |
2,"Parts" |
3,"3/8 inch Wire" |
5-12 Packet Reference Manual
4,"3.55/8 Pack" |
5,"345911871209" | }
6
PRINTING
This chapter describes how to
 download files to the printer
 define the batch header, batch control, and batch data files
 create batch files.
Turn on the printer and make sure it is ready to receive data before downloading files. See
“Downloading Methods” for information on ways to download.
When downloading, send packets in this order:
1. Configuration packets (A-F)
2. Any of the following:
 Check digit packets (see Chapter 4)
 Format packets (see Chapter 3)
 Graphic packets (see Chapter 5)
3. Batch data (see “Defining the Batch Header”)
Downloading Files
There are several ways to download files to the printer.
Make sure the communication settings at the host match those at the printer.
Port
Connection

Connect the printer to the PC with a serial cable. Send the communication
settings packet to select the printer’s communication settings. See
“Defining the Communication Settings Packet” in Chapter 2 for more
information.
Serial port
Use the Printer Management Utility, Command prompt, or other
communications software to download files.
Command Prompt Example
COPY LABEL1.FMT COM1
Transmits a file called “LABEL1.FMT” to COM1.
COPY LABEL1.BCH COM1
Transmits a batch called “LABEL1.BCH” to COM1.
If using the COPY command to download formats, set flow control to DTR
(not XON/XOFF).

USB port
Connect the printer to the PC with a USB cable. Use the Printer
Management Utility or other communications software to download files.

Ethernet
Connect the printer with an Ethernet cable and use the Printer
Management Utility to download files.

802.11 a/b/g/n
Connect to the printer using our Web Utility or Printer Management Utility
to download files. Refer to the Online Mode System Administrator’s Guide
for more information
Printing 6-1
About Batch Packets (Print Jobs)
A batch packet containing batch data is required for all print jobs.
Batch data is the actual information printed on the supply. Batch data fills in the format’s text, bar
code, and non-printable text fields.
A batch packet consists of the following:
batch header
identifies the format and how many labels to
print.
For example:
{B,1,N,1|
batch control
defines the print job. For example:
For example:
E,0,1,1,1,3,0,0,0,1|
batch data
(optional)
defines the information printed on the label.
For example:
1,”Size 5” | }
Label Design software may create this packet.
To record batch data, make a copy of the worksheet in Appendix D, “Format Design Tools.”
Defining the Batch Header
The batch header specifies which format the batch uses and how many labels to print.
Syntax
{B,format#,N/U,quantity |
B1. B
B2. format#
B3. N/U
B4. quantity
Batch Header.
Format number (1 to 999) to use. 1 is the default.
Controls how image is generated. N is the default.
N New. Erase image and re-image all fields using online data. Any
missing fields will be blank.
U Update last image with one or more fields. All other fields remain the
same as the last queued batch.
Quantity to print (0 to 999). 1 is the default. Using 0 pre-images the field
to reduce the imaging time for labels. See “Batch Quantity Zero Method”
for more information.
Example {B,1,N,5 |
Defines a batch header that uses format #1 and reimages all fields using the online data. Five
labels are printed in this batch.
6-2 Packet Reference Manual
Defining the Batch Control Field
The batch header must precede this field. The batch control field defines the print job and applies
only to the batch that immediately follows.
The batch control field overrides the settings made at the printer. For example, the printer’s
cut mode is set to disabled; however, the batch control field specifies to cut each tag, so each
tag in the batch is cut.
The batch control field also overrides settings made in the online configuration packets.
For example, the Supply Setup Packet is set for liner take-up mode; however, the batch control
field specifies continuous mode, so continuous mode is used for the batch.
Syntax
E,feed_mode,batch_sep,print_mult,multi_part,cut_type,cut_mult |
E1. E
E2. feed_mode
E3.
E4.
E5.
E6.
batch_sep
print_mult
multi_part
cut_type
E7. cut_mult
Batch Control Field.
Feed Mode. 0 is the default. Options:
0 Continuous Feed
1 On-Demand
In peel mode, the minimum label length is 1.0 inches (25 mm) and the
maximum is 6.0 inches (152 mm).
Batch Separator (striped label in between batches). Use 0 (no separator).
Number of tags (1 to 999) with the same image. 1 is the default.
Number of identical parts on one tag (1 to 5). 1 is the default.
Enables or disables the optional cutter. 0 (does not cut) is the default.
Options:
0 Does not cut.
1 Stops to cut each tag.
Number of tags to print before cutting. A cut multiple of one cuts after
each tag. The range is 0 to 999. 0 is the default. The cut multiple is a
multiple of the print quantity. If the cut multiple is three and the print
quantity is 16, then five sets of three tags and one set of one tag is
produced.
Note:
The last tag in the batch is always cut, regardless of the multiple.
Example E,0,0,0,0,1,0 |
Defines a batch control field. Continuous feed mode is used and no separator prints between
batches. The print multiple, multi-part supply, and cut multiple are set to 0 (not used). The cutter
cuts after every tag. The printer stops while the cutter is active.
Example {B,1,N,3 |
Defines a batch header that prints three tags. The batch control field uses continuous feed mode
and no separator prints between batches. The print multiple and multi-part supply are not used.
The knife cuts after the strip of three tags, producing one set of three tags (print quantity = 3; cut
multiple = 3).
Example {B,1,N,3 |
E,0,0,4,2,1,0 |
Defines a batch header that prints 12 tags. The batch control field uses continuous feed mode
and no separator prints between batches. The print multiple is four and batch quantity is three, so
12 tags are printed. There are two identical parts on each tag. The knife cuts after each tag.
Printing 6-3
Defining Batch Data Fields
Batch data fields should be sent in field number order. Use continuation fields for large amounts
of data. If using N (New) in the batch header, list all fields with the data in sequence. If using U,
list only those fields and data that changes from the last printed batch.
Syntax
field#,"data string" |
C,"continuation" |
field#
“data string”
C
“continuation”
Identifies the text, bar code, or non-printable text field in which to insert
the following data. Range: 1 to 999.
Provides the actual information to appear in fields. Enclose in quotation
marks. Length: 0 to 2710 characters. “” is the default.
Identifies information to be appended to the data string. This parameter is
optional.
Provides the actual information to be added to the batch packet. Enclose
in quotation marks. Use this option to break up longer fields. Length: 0 to
2710 characters. “” is the default. This parameter is optional.
Example 1,"Size 12" |
2,"" |
3,"Blue" |
C,"and this would be appended." |
Defines a batch data field. “Size 12" prints in field #1, a blank line appears in field #2, ”Blue and
this would be appended" prints in field #3.
Using Special Characters in Batch Data
There are two ways to specify special characters in batch data:
♦ Place a tilde (~) before each character
♦ Use a tilde with the decimal ASCII equivalent
For example, use “” or ~034 to print the “ character in the batch data; otherwise, the tilde
characters are ignored. You can also use ~XXX where XXX is the decimal equivalent of an
unprintable character.
Sample Batch Data with Special Characters
{B,1,N,1 |
Decimal Character
What Prints
1,"123~034456789" |
~034 is “
123"456789
2,"~094983~’126LG4451" |
~094 is ^~126 is ~
^983~’LG4451
Merged or Sub-Fields
If a field is completely filled by data copied from other fields, use quotation marks without spaces
between them for the “data string” parameter.
Incrementing Fields
In incrementing fields, the first number in the sequence must contain the same number of digits
as the highest number to be counted. For example, to increment the numbers in a field from 1 to
999, enter the starting number in the batch as 001.
6-4 Packet Reference Manual
Entering Batch Data for QR Code
QR Code requires certain parameters at the beginning of all batch data.
Syntax
"error_cor mask# data_input,char"
error_cor
Level of error correction. Some damaged or dirty bar codes may still be
scannable if the error correction is high enough. Options:
H Ultra high reliability level
Q High reliability level
M Standard level
L High density level (more data in the bar code)
Note:
mask#
data_input
Mask number. Undefined. Use 0.
Type of data input. Options:
A Automatic
M Manual
Note:
char
When increasing the error correction level, the maximum number
of characters (in the field) decreases.
When using Automatic, do not end with a comma or specify the
next parameter for char (type of characters).
Type of characters. This parameter is only required when data_input is
Manual. Options:
A Alphanumeric
B Binary
K Kanji
N Numeric
Note:
In binary mode, the number of characters must be represented by
the 4-digit number in decimal.
Example
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"QRURL" |
B,2,200,V,75,50,36,0,100,2,B,0 | }
{B,1,N,1 |
2,"LA testdatainAutomode0987654321" | }
Sets the QR Code’s error correction level to L, which provides high density (more data in bar
code); leaves the mask number blank; sets the data input mode to Automatic and the data is
testdatainAutomode0987654321.
Example 1,"HM,N0123456789012345" |
Sets the QR Code’s error correction level to H, which provides very high reliability; leaves the
mask number blank; sets the data input mode to Manual; the type of characters are Numeric and
the data is 0123456789012345.
Printing 6-5
Structured Append Mode
QR Code offers a mode called structured append (or concatenated) that collects data from
multiple QR Code symbols and uses that data elsewhere. For example, the components of a subassembly can have individual QR Codes and the QR Code for the entire assembly contains all
the data from the individual codes. This mode also requires certain parameters at the beginning
of all batch data.
Syntax
"mode_id code# #of_div parity, error_cor mask# data_input char"
mode_id
code#
#of_div
parity
error_cor
Mode identifier. Use D to indicate the structured append (or concatenated)
mode.
Code number of the individual symbol in the concatenated set. Use a twodigit number in decimal.
Total number of symbols in this concatenated set. Use a two-digit number
in decimal.
Parity byte. Use a two-digit number in hexadecimal. There is no standard
parity byte.
Level of error correction. Some damaged bar codes may still be scannable
if the error correction is high enough. Options:
H Ultra high reliability level
Q High reliability level
M Standard level
L High density level
Note:
mask#
data_input
char
When increasing the error correction level, the maximum number
of characters (in the field) decreases.
Mask number. Undefined. Leave blank or use 0.
Type of data input. When using Automatic, do not specify the next
parameter for char (type of characters). Options:
A Automatic
M Manual
Type of characters. This parameter is only required when data_input is
Manual. Options:
A Alphanumeric
B Binary
K Kanji
N Numeric
Note:
In binary mode, the number of characters must be represented by
the 4-digit number in decimal.
Example 1,"D0205E9,Q0A," |
C,"B006qrcode," | }
Defines the structured append mode (D) for QR Code. This is symbol (02) of a concatenated set
containing (05) symbols. The parity byte is E9. The error correction level is Q, which provides a
high reliability. Use 0 for the mask number. The data input mode is Automatic. The type of
characters are binary (B) and there will be six (06) data characters (qrcode).
Structured Append QR Code Packet
{F,2,A,R,E,200,200,"QRCODE2" |
B,1,200,V,50,50,36,0,100,2,B,0 | }
{B,2,N,1 | 1,"D0202E9,Q0A" |
C,"0123456789ABCD+__âôû
~129~064~159~252~224~064" | }
6-6 Packet Reference Manual
Downloading Methods
Download the format and batch data using one of three methods: sequential, batch, and batch
quantity zero.
Sequential Method
Using the sequential method, send all format and batch data at one time. Use this method when
the application does not require operator intervention to input data. All data is sent down at one
time, and the printer then images each field. As soon as the last field is imaged, labels begin to
print.
Example {Format}
{Batch Packet}
Batch Method
This is similar to the sequential method, but it is used to send multiple batches. All data for the
first batch is sent at one time, and the printer then images each field. As soon as the last field for
the first batch is imaged, labels begin to print. This process is repeated for each subsequent
batch.
Example {Format}
{Batch Packet}
{Batch Packet}
Batch Quantity Zero Method
Use the batch quantity zero method when the application requires operator intervention to enter
data. While the operator is entering data, the previous field is sent with a batch quantity of zero.
The printer images the field, but does not print it. After the operator enters the data for the last
field, the batch quantity can be specified. The last remaining field is imaged, and the label prints
almost immediately.
To use the batch quantity zero method:
1. Send the format and a batch header in one file. The first time the batch header is sent, use
the parameter N (new batch), and the parameter 0 for (zero quantity). This ensures the label
is properly positioned.
The printer images constant text, line, and box fields, but does not print them.
2. Input data for each field, and send it with a batch header using the parameter U (batch
update) and a quantity of zero. When the printer receives the data, it immediately images the
field, but does not print it.
At this time, the printer is imaging all associated fields, including fields that copy from
other fields.
3. Repeat step 2 for each field except the last one.
4. For the last field, input data and send a batch header with the quantity of labels to print. When
the printer receives input for the last field, it immediately prints the labels. See “Reducing
Imaging Time” in Chapter 9 for an example using the batch quantity zero method.
Printing 6-7
Modifying Formats
The optional entry method is a quick way to modify format fields, check digit fields and
configuration packets.
Optional Entry Method
This method resets only the parameters that change. Commas act as placeholders for unchanged
parameters. The optional entry method reduces file size and increases the speed at which files
are sent to the printer.
Creating Batch Files for Downloading
If downloading from a Command prompt, create batch files to set communication values and
download formats. It is a good idea to create a subdirectory to hold the format files.
Here is a batch file that sets a serial port, changes to a subdirectory, and downloads a check
digit file, format file, and batch data file.
MODE COM1: 9600,N,8,1,|
CD\MONARCH
COPY LABEL1.CDS COM1
COPY LABEL1.FMT COM1
COPY LABEL1.BCH COM1
6-8 Packet Reference Manual
S TAT U S P O L L I N G
7
This chapter explains how to use status polling.
There are two types of Status Polling:
♦ Inquiry Request—information about the readiness of the printer.
♦ Job Request—information about the current (or last received) job downloaded to the printer.
Inquiry Request (ENQ)
An ENQ character acts as a request for printer status information. Send an ENQ in front of, in
the middle of, or immediately following any packet downloaded to the printer. An ENQ is a
command that can be executed as part of a packet or sent on its own (using a communications
program). An ENQ is processed immediately. The ENQ character is user defined.
The ENQ character does not appear as a visible character; however, this manual represents the
ENQ character as .
Inquiry Response
Printer status is returned to the host in a 3-byte (3-character) sequence. The first byte is the
non-printable user-defined ENQ character, which is not visible on the response. The second and
third bytes are printer status codes. See the ENQ Reference Tables for the meaning of bytes 2
and 3.
Example:
AB
The status codes (A and B in this case) are ASCII equivalents to the hexadecimal bits that
represent the various types of status responses. This response indicates that the printer is
online (Character A) and that there is a stock fault (Character B).
Example:
??
Indicates that this is the first ENQ response since the printer was turned on. Send another ENQ
immediately to receive the printer’s status.
Example:
@@
Indicates the printer is offline.
The following graphics can be used as a quick reference for the Status of Byte #2 and Byte #3.
Byte #1 is the non-printable user-defined ENQ character.
Status Polling 7-1
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #2
Const.
OFF
Const.
ON
Comp.
Failure
Corr.
Error
Online
Data
Error
Busy
Active
Online
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
@
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
A
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
B
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
C
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
D
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
E
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
F
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
G
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
H
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
I
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
J
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
K
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
L
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
M
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
N
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
O
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
P
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
Q
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
R
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
S
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
T
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
U
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
V
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
W
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
X
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
Y
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
Z
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
[
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
\
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
]
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
^
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
_
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
`
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
Char
Note:
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
7-2 Packet Reference Manual
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #2 (continued)
Const.
OFF
Const. ON
Comp.
Failure
Corr. Error
Online
Data Error
Busy
Active
Online
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
a
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
b
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
c
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
d
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
e
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
f
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
g
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
h
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
i
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
j
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
k
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
l
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
m
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
n
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
o
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
p
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
q
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
r
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
s
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
t
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
u
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
v
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
w
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
x
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
y
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
z
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
{
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
|
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
}
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
~
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
Dec 127
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Char
Note:
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
Status Polling 7-3
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #3
Const.
OFF
Const. ON
Low
Battery
Format
Error
Waiting to
Dispense
Label
Ribbon
Fault
Stock
Fault
Online
Error
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
@
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
A
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
B
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
C
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
D
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
E
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
F
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
G
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
1
H
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
I
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
J
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
K
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
L
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
M
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
N
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
O
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
P
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
Q
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
R
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
S
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
T
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
U
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
V
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
W
0
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
X
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
Y
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
Z
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
[
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
\
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
]
0
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
^
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
0
_
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
`
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
Char
Note:
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
7-4 Packet Reference Manual
ENQ Reference Table - Byte #3 (continued)
Const.
OFF
Const. ON
Low
Battery
Format
Error
Waiting to
Dispense
Label
Ribbon
Fault
Stock
Fault
Online
Error
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
a
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
b
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
c
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
d
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
e
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
f
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
g
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
h
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
i
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
j
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
k
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
l
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
m
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
n
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
o
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
p
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
q
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
r
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
s
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
t
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
u
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
v
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
w
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
x
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
y
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
z
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
{
0
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
|
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
}
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
~
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
Dec 127
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Char
Note:
A “1" indicates the bit is turned on. A ”0" indicates the bit is off.
Status Polling 7-5
Job Request
A Job Request returns status information about the most recently processed print job. Send a
job request after an ENQ or batch. There are two levels of Job Requests:
♦ Numeric Error Codes Only (0, 1, or 2)
♦ Verbose (3 or 4)
Syntax
{J,#}
J1. J
J2. #
Job Request Identifier.
Request number. Options:
0 Returns ASCII coded strings or numeric error codes
1 Returns ASCII coded strings or numeric error codes
2 Returns ASCII coded strings or numeric error codes
3 Returns error number
4 Returns number of labels printed in batch
Example {J,3}
The job response may not be immediate. If the printer has an error (out of supplies, ribbon
problem, etc.), is in pause mode, or has insufficient memory, correct the problem and then
resend the job request. If the problem is not corrected, no response is returned. If a formatting
error has occurred, the job request returns the status. The printer interprets the format and batch
data before returning the response.
An ENQ can clear errors numbered less than 500. Once the error is corrected, a job request can
be sent. The printer cannot accept another job request until the error is resolved.
Job Response
The Job Response varies, depending on the type of request sent to the printer. The following
syntax is the response for a Job 0, 1,or 2 request.
Syntax
{J,Status1,Status2,"FMT-1","BCH-2"}
J1. J
J2. Status1
J3. Status2
J4. “FMT-1”
J5. “BCH-2”
Job Response Identifier.
These errors stop the print job. Examples include out of stock, supply
faults, or data formatting errors. See “Job Status Responses.”
These are errors in the syntax of the MPCL data stream. Printing does not
stop, but the information may not print properly. See “Job Status
Responses.”
Returns the format number.
Returns the batch number.
Here is an example of a response returned to a J 0, 1, 2 request:
{J,8,0,"FMT-1","BCH-2"}
Indicates that a portion of the format extends off the tag in format 1, batch 2. See “Job Status
Responses” for brief explanations for J, 0, 1, 2 requests. In the above example, see error 8 for
an explanation.
7-6 Packet Reference Manual
The following syntax is the response for a Job 3 request. Press FEED (if necessary) to return the
job response.
Syntax
{J,"Status1 A,B","Status2
A,B,C,D,E","FMT-1","BCH-2"}
J1. J
J2. “Status1 A,B”
Job Response Identifier.
Status 1A contains the field number, in the format or batch, where an error
was found. If the error is not in the format or batch, a “0" is returned.
Status1 B contains the error number.
J3. “Status2 A,B,C,D,E” Status2 A contains the packet type, field type, field number, parameter,
and error number:
A The MPCLII packet that has an error - Format (F), Batch (B),
Check Digit (A), Graphic (G), or Font (W).
B The MPCLII field that has an error. If the packet has no fields,
Status2 A is replicated. If the error occurs before the field is
identified a question mark is sent. Since the batch data is
variable, a D is sent to indicate data.
C The field number within each packet. The packet header is the
first field and each subsequent field is indicated by the field
separator.
D The parameter within the field that has an error. The
numbering begins after the field identifier.
E The error number.
J4. “FMT-1”
Returns the format number.
J5. “BCH-2”
Returns the batch number.
Example {J,"2,612",}
2 is the field number where an error was found. 612 is the error number, indicating that data is
missing or does not match the format definition for that field.
Note:
If more than one error occurred, only the most serious error is acknowledged.
Example
{J,"","F,B,4,6,33","FMT-1","BCH-2"}
Indicates that an error occurred on a bar code (B) field within a format (F) packet. The bar code
field is the fourth (4) field in the packet. The error occurred in the sixth (6) parameter of the field.
Error number 33 means the bar code density is invalid.
An ENQ can clear errors numbered less than 500. Once the error is corrected, a job request can
be sent. The printer cannot accept another job request until the error is resolved.
The following syntax is the response for a Job 4 request.
Syntax
{J,printed,total,"FMT-1","BCH-2"}
Printed
Total
“FMT-1/BCH-2"
the number of tags or labels remaining in the batch to print.
the total number of tags or labels to be printed in the current batch.
The format or batch number is returned.
Example {J,8,25,"FMT-3","Bch-2"}
8 out of 25 tags or labels are left to print from format number 3.
Status Polling 7-7
Use a Job Request 4 when printing in the on-demand mode with a large number of tags or labels
from a single batch. A Job Request 4 may not be accurate if tags or labels are printed in
continuous mode, because of the response time involved. A Job Request 4 is not useful in single
ticket batches (printing 1 of 1) or multiple single ticket batches.
Note:
A batch has to be printing when sending the job request. Do not use this job request on
batches with incrementing fields.
Job Status Responses
Status 1 Codes
No.
Description
Status 2 Codes
No.
Description
0
No error
51
Invalid command
1
Stacker Fault
52
Invalid separator value
2
Supply problem
53
Graphic not found
4
Hot printhead
54
Format for batch not found
5
Printhead open
55
Quantity/Multiples out-of-range
6
Insufficient memory
56
Name descriptor too long
7
Ribbon problem
57
Invalid cut value
8
Field number extends off tag
58
Invalid number-of-parts
9
Field number has a bad font/bar code
59
Invalid orientation value
10
Field number contains invalid data
60
Invalid thickness value
11
Field number has a graphic missing
61
Invalid text field
12
Invalid communication channel
62
Invalid bar code file
13
Invalid file type
63
Data string too long
14
All communication channels are busy
64
Invalid data field
15
Receive overrun error
65
Row greater than stock length
16
Receive parity error
66
Row greater than format length
17
Receive framing error
67
Column greater than printhead width
18
Receive buffer full
68
Column greater than format width
19
Label waiting
69
Invalid label length
21
Bad dots (bar code verifier failure)
70
Invalid label width
23
Low battery
71
Invalid increment/decrement value
24
Memory configuration packet error
72
Identifier out-of-range
73
No field to create format
74
Stop location of a line is out of range
75
Syntax error
80
Cannot use offline format for online
batch
81
Cannot queue graphic batch
82
Cannot store online format
83
Cannot queue online batch
84
Cannot queue online clear command
Numbers 25 through 50 are not currently in use.
7-8 Packet Reference Manual
8
DIAGNOSTICS
This chapter explains how to
♦ print diagnostics labels
♦ reset the printer
♦ call Technical Support.
Before calling Service, print a test label. The label contains information to help diagnose
mechanical and setup problems.
To clear an error, follow the directions on the printer: ESCAPE and correct the problem (reload
supply, etc.), then press SELECT to continue. If a formatting error occurs, the label prints; but
data may be missing. Correct the format or batch and resend them to the printer.
Printing a Test Label
The test labels represent the printer’s ONLINE mode settings.
From the Main Menu select Diagnostics, then Test Label. Three test labels print:
Printer Information
Contains generic information, including
speed, contrast, and inch counts.
MPCL Label
Contains the printer’s MPCL packet
configuration. See Chapter 2, “Configuring
the Printer” for more information.
Network Configuration (optional)
Contains the printer’s network/Ethernet
configuration.
Diagnostics 8-1
Using Dump Mode
Data dump mode is available using the Diagnostic menu and selecting Dump mode.
Note:
Dump mode requires 4.0 inch (101.6mm) wide supply.
Download the data stream or file to ‘dump’ (print on a label).
Press Cancel to exit dump mode.
AS CII Data
DOWNLOA
D „TEST2.
DAT“,5,CL
S DOWNLO
AD F,“TES
T4.DAT“,5
,CLS DOW
NLOAD „TE
ST2.DAT”,
5,CLS DO
WNLOAD F,
„TEST4.DA
T”,5,CLS
DOWNLOAD
“TEST2.D
AT”,5,CLS
DOWNLOA
D F,“TEST
4.DAT“,5,
CLS
0D
44
44
53
41
54
2C
4E
53
35
57
22
54
0A
20
41
0D
44
34
43
0A
20
41
0D
44
34
43
4C
54
2C
4E
54
22
44
22
54
0A
20
2E
4C
44
22
54
0A
20
2E
4C
4F
32
43
4C
45
2C
4F
54
22
44
46
44
53
4F
54
22
44
46
44
53
41
2E
4C
4F
53
35
57
45
2C
4F
2C
41
0D
57
45
2C
4F
2C
41
0D
44
44
53
41
54
2C
4E
53
35
57
22
54
0A
4E
53
35
57
22
54
0A
20
41
0D
44
34
43
4C
54
2C
4E
54
22
4C
54
2C
4E
54
22
44
22
54
0A
20
2E
4C
4F
32
43
4C
45
2C
4F
32
43
4C
45
2C
4F
54
22
44
46
44
53
41
2E
4C
4F
53
35
4I
2E
4C
4F
53
35
57
45
2C
4F
2C
41
0D
44
44
53
4I
54
2C
Corr esponding
hexadecimal values of
r ecei ved AS C II data.
If the PC and Printer Are Not Communicating
If the PC is not communicating with the printer, follow these steps:
♦ Check any messages that occur at the printer and at the computer. See the following error
message listing in this chapter for more information.
♦ Use the correct printer cable.
♦ Make sure the cable is plugged into the correct port on the computer.
♦ Compare the printer’s communications settings (especially flow control) with the settings on
the PC. They must match. Print a test label to identify the printer’s communication settings.
♦ Make sure the printer is online (ready to receive data).
If all of the above are correct, reset the printer. Try the function again. Call Technical Support if
the printer does not establish communications.
Resetting the Printer
Sometimes, the printer receives mixed signals and loses its ability to communicate. If this
happens, reset the printer and attempt communication again. To reset the printer, turn off the
printer, wait 15 seconds, and turn it back on.
Whenever the printer is turned off, all the information set through the online configuration packets
(A-F) is saved. See the sections in Chapter 2, “Configuring the Printer,” for more information
about each packet.
8-2 Packet Reference Manual
Calling Technical Support
Technical support representatives are available Monday through Friday during regular business
hours. Follow these steps before calling:
1. Make sure the PC and printer are properly connected.
2. Record any error messages that occurred.
3. Recreate the problem, if possible.
4. Check the communication port settings and change if necessary.
5. List any recent changes to the system. Record what you were doing when the problem
occurred.
6. Reset the printer, see "Resetting the Printer."
7. Reboot the computer. Refer to the computer documentation for specific instructions.
8. Print a test label, see “Printing a Test Label” for more information.
Have the following information ready before calling: computer brand name and model, printer
model, other peripheral devices on your system, support agreement, contract number, or invoice
information, customer number, and printer serial number.
Diagnostics 8-3
8-4 Packet Reference Manual
9
P R I N T E R O P T I M I Z AT I O N
This chapter provides information on how to improve the printer’s performance by
♦ adjusting the print quality
♦ reducing the imaging time for printing
♦ providing general tips and hints for designing formats.
This printer uses “smart imaging” to image and print fields on supplies. Smart imaging remembers
the exact boundaries and locations of each field and places a boundary box (white space) around
each field. When a field changes that particular boundary box is cleared and the new field data is
imaged. However, the new field data may require a larger boundary box than the previous field
did. In some cases, neighboring fields that do not change may be covered with white space from
the changing field’s boundary box. To prevent existing fields from being covered by a changing
field, see “Using Option 61 (Reimage Field)” in Chapter 4.
Note:
Smart imaging is automatically disabled on formats with a Data Matrix bar code.
Adjusting the Print Quality
Many factors affect print quality: type of supplies, print speed, print contrast, and the type of
printer’s application. This printer supports both thermal transfer and thermal direct supplies. The
type of supply should match the printer’s application.
♦ To print at high speeds, use premium supplies. Using premium supplies reduces smudged
images, hard to read labels, and faded print. Supply type, print speed, and print contrast work
together to improve the print quality of labels. Contact your Sales Representative for more
information.
♦ Select the print speed based on desired throughput and print quality. If print quality is more
important, reduce the print speed, because a lower print speed increases the print quality of
labels. If throughput is more important, increase the print speed. See “Increasing Throughput”
for more information.
♦ If the print quality is too light or too dark, adjust the print contrast. The correct contrast setting
is important because it effects how well the bar codes scan and how long the printhead lasts.
Solid black print cannot exceed 25% of any given square inch of the supply.
Check the print quality of bar codes with a bar code verifier or scanner. If you do not have a bar
code verifier or scanner, check the bar code visually. A bar code that is IN SPEC will have
complete bars and clear spaces. Small alphanumeric characters will look complete. A bar code
that is IN SPEC may not look as good as one that is too dark, but it will have the highest scan
rate.
Dark
Note:
IN S PE C
Light
For highest scan rates, make sure there is adequate white space before and after the bar
code. Also, a darker bar code does not mean it will scan better.
Printer Optimization 9-1
Reducing Imaging Time
Imaging time is the time it takes the printer to image the data for the first label after the printer
receives the format and batch packet. There are several ways to reduce the imaging time: send
formats and configurations once, use a batch quantity of zero, or update batch fields.
♦ If the formats use the same check digit scheme, only send the check digit scheme once.
♦ Send formats once and use the batch update field to change information on the label. Using a
batch update field reduces the imaging time, because only the fields that change are imaged.
All other fields remain the same as the last queued batch.
♦ Use the batch quantity zero method when the application requires operator intervention to
enter data. While the operator is entering data, the previous field is sent with a batch quantity
of zero. The printer images the field, but does not print it. After the operator enters the data
for the last field, the batch quantity can be specified. The last remaining field is imaged, and
the label prints almost immediately.
To pre-image a label:
1. Send the format and a batch header in one file. The first time the batch header is sent, use
the parameter N (new batch), and the parameter 0 for (zero quantity).
Example {B,1,N,0 | }
The printer images constant text, line, box, and graphic fields, but does not print them.
2. Input data for each field, and send it with a batch header using the parameter U (update) and
a quantity of zero. When the printer receives the data, it images the field, but does not print it.
Example {B,1,U,0 |
1,"RODGER DIST CTR" | }
{B,1,U,0 |
2,"8292" | }
At this time, the printer is imaging all associated fields, including fields that copy from
other fields.
3. Repeat step 2 for each field except the last one.
{B,1,U,0 |
3,"BROADWAY" | }
{B,1,U,0 |
4,"555 WEST OAK AVE." | }
4. For the last field, input data and send it with the quantity of labels to print. When the printer
receives input for the last field, it immediately prints the labels.
Example {B,1,U,10 |
5,"DAYTON, OHIO" | }
Increasing Throughput
Reducing the imaging time increases throughput. Increase the baud rate to increase the
transmission time and increase throughput. Make sure the communication settings at the printer
match those at the host. Using a baud rate of 19200 is almost twice as fast as 9600 baud. Using
a baud rate of 38400 is almost twice as fast as 19200 baud.
9-2 Packet Reference Manual
General Format Tips and Hints
The following tips and hints are helpful to keep in mind when designing MPCLII formats.
With Packets
♦ Leave parameters blank that do not change when sending online configuration packets. For
example, {I,A,,,,1 | } prints a slashed zero and uses the last sent online system setup
parameters.
Group fields with similar parameters. For example
T,1,10,V,250,50,1,1,1,1,B,C,0,0 |
T,2,15,,,75 |
T,3,,,,100 |
The first text field sets all the parameters for that field. The second text field’s number of
characters and column location changes from what was defined in the first field. In the third text
field, only the column location is changed. This method can be used on bar code and constant
text fields as well.
Note:
Understand the basics of each field before using this method.
After modifying any fields or parameters with the optional entry method, resend the format, batch,
or configuration packet to the printer.
With Bar Codes
♦ Be careful when rotating or placing a UPC/EAN bar code with human readable characters,
because the bottom reference point is at the bottom of the bars, not at the bottom of the
human readable characters.
With Fields
♦ Data that remains the same for each label should be in a constant text field. Data that varies
for each label should be in a text field.
♦ Check for trailing spaces in text or constant text fields if a “field off tag” error appears. An
easy way to see trailing spaces is to print the field in the reverse font.
When fields are magnified, they may go off the label or cover another field. Magnifying a field
increases the distance between the printed character and the edge of the cell.
Printer Optimization 9-3
9-4 Packet Reference Manual
SAMPLES
A
This appendix contains sample formats. Customize any of these formats.
The field separator is the split vertical bar (|). The decimal value is 124. To enter this character,
use the Shift key plus the Split Vertical Bar key on the computer’s keyboard. Depending on the
text editor, it may appear as a solid vertical bar or as a split vertical bar.
Sample Codabar Packet
Codabar is a linear one-dimensional bar code.
{F,101,A,F,E,600,400,"Codabar"|
B,3,12,V,55,50,5,8,85,8,L,0|
R,1,"1234567890" | }
{B,101,N,1|}
Sample Code 16K Packet
Code 16K is a multi-row bar code.
{F,101,A,F,E,600,400,"Code16K"|
B,2,100,V,250,50,31,4,0,8,L,0|
R,1,"1234567890ABCDEF" | }
{B,101,N,1 | }
Sample Code 39 Packet
Code 39 is a linear one-dimensional bar code.
{F,1,A,R,E,300,150,"1LAB1530" |
C,100,90,0,50,10,10,A,L,0,1,"BATTERY PACK",1 |
C,20,130,0,50,10,10,A,L,0,1,"1452-99311",1 |
C,230,128,0,50,12,10,A,L,0,1,"$5.99",1 |
B,1,9,F,75,55,4,7,40,8,L,1 |
R,5,N |
R,1,"031535512" |
T,2,9,V,125,67,0,50,8,8,A,L,0,1,1 |
R,4,1,1,9,1,1 | }
{B,1,N,1|}
Samples A-1
Sample Code 93 Packet
Code 93 is a linear one-dimensional bar code that provides higher density than Code 39.
{F,101,A,F,E,600,400,"EAN"|
B,2,12,V,225,50,23,7,85,8,L,0|
R,1,"1234567890" | }
{B,101,N,1|}
Sample Code 128 Packet
Code 128 is a high density linear bar code for alphanumeric or numeric data.
{F,10,A,R,E,400,200,"1LAB2040" |
C,150,21,0,50,14,12,A,L,0,1,"BATTERY PACK",1 |
C,150,46,0,50,14,12,A,L,0,1,"WAREHOUSE 12",1 |
C,285,70,0,50,10,10,A,L,0,1,"07/14/00",1 |
C,110,70,0,50,10,10,A,L,0,1,"4425",1 |
B,1,13,F,95,165,8,6,90,8,L,1 |
R,5,N |
R,1,"0315355110299" |
T,2,13,V,214,176,0,50,7,9,A,L,0,1,1 |
R,4,1,1,13,1,1 |}
{B,10,N,3|}
Sample Data Matrix Packets
Data Matrix (ECC-200) is a two-dimensional bar code which is made up of square modules
arranged within a perimeter finder pattern. There are 24 square symbol sizes available ranging
from 10 rows by 10 columns to 144 rows by 144 columns. There are six rectangular symbol sizes
available ranging from 8 rows by 8 columns to 16 rows by 48 columns. The symbol size is data
dependent. Data Matrix automatically pads data.
Do not overlay other fields when designing the Data Matrix symbol. Smart imaging is
automatically disabled on formats with a Data Matrix bar code. Allow a three or four-dot “quiet
zone” (blank space around the bar code’s perimeter) for scanning. See “Defining a Bar Code
Field” for more information.
Sample Batch Data with Special Characters
To use this character in the bar
code
enter these characters in the batch data
null character
~~@
~ (tilde)
~126~126
FNC1
~~1
Square Data Matrix Packet
{F,36,A,R,E,400,400,"DTMTRX1" |
B,1,50,V,50,100,35,0,100,8,L,0 | }
{B,36,N,1 |
1,"1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST" | }
This example prints a one-inch wide by one-inch tall (100) square Data Matrix symbol using the
default density (0) without any field rotation (0).
A-2 Packet Reference Manual
Rectangular Data Matrix Packet
{F,36,A,R,E,400,400,"DTMTRX2" |
B,1,400,V,100,200,35,29,50,8,L,1 | }
{B,36,N,1 |
1,"1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST" | }
This example prints a one-inch by a half-inch tall (50) rectangular 16 rows by 36 columns (density
29) Data Matrix symbol rotated 90 (1).
Sample Data Matrix with Function 1
{F,36,A,R,E,400,400,"DTMTRX1" |
B,1,50,V,10,50,35,0,50,8,L,0 | }
{B,36,N,1 |
1,"~~110012345678902" | }
This example prints a 0.50-inch wide by 0.50-inch tall (50) square Data Matrix symbol using the
default density (0) without any field rotation (0). FNC1 appears in the batch data as ~~1.
Sample EAN Packet
European Article Number is a linear bar code for numeric data.
{F,101,A,F,E,600,400,"EAN"|
B,1,10,F,395,50,14,2,85,7,L,0|
R,1,"1234567890" | }
{B,101,N,1|}
Sample I 2 of 5 with Barrier Bar Packet
Interleaved Two of Five is a linear bar code for numeric data.
{F,45,A,R,E,200,400,"SHIPPER" |
C,190,8,0,2,1,1,B,L,0,0,"SHIPPING CONTAINER CODE",0 |
B,1,14,V,17,60,50,5,130,8,L,0 |
T,2,30,V,161,080,0,3,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 |}
{B,45,N,1|
1,"10028028662854" |
2,"1 00 28028 66285 4" |}
Samples A-3
Sample MaxiCode Packets
MaxiCode is a two-dimensional bar code developed by UPS (United Parcel Service, Inc.). Data
must be defined in a specific way for UPS. Refer to the Guide to Bar Coding with UPS or the AIM
MaxiCode Specification for more details about data requirements.
The printer supports modes 0, 1, 2, and 3. Contact Avery Dennison for information about
additional MaxiCode modes.
Mode
Description
0
Obsolete
1
Obsolete
2
Structured Message
3
Structured Message
Select which mode to use in the bar code field or allow the printer to auto-select the mode (0, 2,
or 3) based on the data. See “Defining a Bar Code Field” for more information. MaxiCode
automatically pads data with the “!” character.
Note:
MaxiCode does not support the NULL character.
Modes 2 and 3 are defined by the way the postal code, class of service, and country code fields
are arranged. (The postal code, class of service, and country code are required fields.) Begin
with the message header, then the primary data (15 characters), followed by the secondary
message (up to 78 characters). Or, begin with the primary data, then the message header,
followed by the secondary data. If the postal code data characters are all numeric then the
MaxiCode symbol is set to Mode 2. If the characters are alphanumeric, or only contain ASCII
characters 65 to 90, then the MaxiCode symbol is set to Mode 3.
If error 612 appears, check the MaxiCode data. It may not be correctly structured or missing one
of the three required fields (postal code, class of service, and country code) or the “~029"
character.
A-4 Packet Reference Manual
Mode 0 (Obsolete) Sample
{F,1,A,R,E,0200,0200,"MAXICODE" |
B,1,93,V,020,20,33,7,0,8,L,0 | }
MaxiCode bar code (33)
{B,1,N,1 |
Batch header
1,"450660000" |
Postal code- zip code
(This field determines Mode)
C,"001" |
Country code
C,"840" |
Class of service
C,"[)~030" |
Message header
C,"01~02996" |
Transportation header
C,"1Z12345678~029" |
Tracking number
C,"UPSN~029" |
Origin carrier SCAC
C,"12345A~029" |
UPS shipper number
C,"070~029" |
Julian day of pickup
C,"~029" |
Shipment ID (empty)
C,"1/1~029" |
Package count
C,"15~029" |
Weight (lb.)
C,"Y~029" |
Address validation
C,"60 SADDLEBROOK CT.~029" |
Street address (empty)
C,"DAYTON~029" |
City (empty)
C,"OH~030" |
State
C,"~004" | }
EOT
Samples A-5
Mode 2 Sample
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"MAXI_M2" |
B,1,93,V,020,020,33,7,0,8,L,0 | }
MaxiCode bar code (33)
{B,1,N,1 |
1,"[)~030" |
Message header
C,"01~02996" |
Transportation header
C,"068100000~029" |
Postal Code
(This field determines Mode)
C,"840~029" |
Country code
C,"001~029" |
Class of service
C,"1Z12345675~029" |
Tracking number
C,"UPSN~029" |
Origin carrier SCAC
C,"12345E~029" |
UPS shipper number
C,"089~029" |
Julian day of pickup
C,"~029" |
Shipment ID (empty)
C,"1/1~029" |
Package count
C,"10~029" |
Weight (lb.)
C,"Y~029" |
Address validation
C,"~029" |
Street address (empty)
C,"~029" |
City (empty)
C,"CT~030" |
State
C,"~004" | }
EOT
A-6 Packet Reference Manual
Mode 3 Sample
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"MAXI_M3" |
B,1,93,V,020,020,33,7,0,8,L,0 |
}
{B,1,N,1 |
MaxiCode bar code (33)
1,"[)~030" |
Message header
C,"01~02996" |
Transportation header
C,"M5E1G45~029" |
Postal Code
(This field determines Mode)
C,"124~029" |
Country code
C,"066~029" |
Class of service
C,"1Z12345679~029" |
Tracking number
C,"UPSN~029" |
Origin carrier SCAC
C,"12345E~029" |
UPS shipper number
C,"089~029" |
Julian day of pickup
C,"~029" |
Shipment ID (empty)
C,"1/1~029" |
Package count
C,"10~029" |
Weight (lb.)
C,"Y~029" |
Address validation
C,"~029" |
Street address (empty)
C,"TORONTO~029" |
City (empty)
C,"ON~030" |
State
C,"~004" | }
EOT
Samples A-7
MaxiCode Compression Sample
Once the data is properly encoded per the compressed format, the UPS scanners and software
do the translating of the compressed data when reading the symbol. Our printers take the input
data as-is and encode it as a standard MaxiCode symbol. Standard scanners interpret the
encoded data exactly as it appears in the symbology without decompressing its contents.
Note:
Compressed data can not contain carriage return or line feed (CRLF) characters.
{F,1,A,R,E,600,400,"Compress"|
B,01,120,V,272,15,33,7,0,8,L,0|}
appearance (8) for compressed data
{B,1,N,1|
1,"[)>~030"|
C,"01~029"|
C,"96453420000~029"|
C,"840~029"|
C,"013~029"|
C,"1Z12121212~029"|
C,"UPSN~029"|
C,"564W65~030"|
start of compressed data
C,"07'4N%KKL8X5~029"|
C,"9T#VO:Z+Z 0~029"|
C,"SFBH3R#&ZAT/~029"|
C,"87EPJ)~029"|
end of compressed data
C,"S~013"|
C,"~030"|
C,"~004"|}
Batch data can also be included as one long string without carriage return or line feed (CRLF)
characters.
{B,1,N,1|
1,"[)>~03001~02996142010000~029840~029003~0291Z00000014~029UPSN~029111111~
03007#P36 (AWO'$6,X3&W6HMJAL-7WK0 8YU,)92+'#I%~029#S~013~030~004"|}
A-8 Packet Reference Manual
Sample MSI Packet
MSI is a linear bar code for numeric data.
{F,101,A,F,E,600,400,"MSI"|
B,3,12,V,55,50,9,7,85,8,L,0|
R,1,"1234567890" | }
{B,101,N,1 | }
Sample PDF417 Packet
PDF417 is two-dimensional barcode that contains alphanumeric or numeric data.
{F,101,A,F,E,600,400,"POSTNET"|
B,2,100,V,225,50,32,7,0,8,L,0|
R,1,"1234567890Thisisasamplepdf417barcodeAveryDennison2015" | }
{B,101,N,1 | }
Sample POSTNET Packet
POSTNET (Postal Numeric Encoding Technique) is a barcode that contains numeric data.
{F,101,A,F,E,600,400,"POSTNET"|
B,1,9,F,395,50,22,0,0,8,L,0|
R,1,"123456789" | }
{B,101,N,1 | }
Sample Quick Response Packets
Quick Response (QR Code) is a two-dimensional bar code, which is made up of square modules
arranged in an overall square pattern. A unique finder pattern is located at three corners of the
symbol. Four levels of error correction are available, along with a wide range of symbol sizes.
♦ Model 1 is the original specification.
♦ Model 2 is an enhanced form that includes additional features.
The maximum number of characters depends on the type of characters entered for the batch data
and differs for the two models of QR Code.
Data Type
Model1
Model2
Numeric Data
1167
2710
Alphanumeric Data
707
2710
8-Bit data
486
2710
Kanji data
299
1817
QR Code can accommodate Japanese Kana and Kanji characters and has a variety of
applications, including marking spark plugs, radiators, printed circuit boards, and test tubes.
Refer to the AIM International Symbology Specification for more details about data requirements.
Samples A-9
Sample QR Code Packet
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"QRCODE" |
B,1,200,V,75,50,36,0,100,2,B,0 |
{B,1,N,1 |
1,"HM,N0123456789012345" |}
}
Sample QR Code with URL Packet
{F,1,A,R,E,200,200,"QRURL" |
B,2,200,V,75,50,36,0,100,2,B,0 | }
{B,1,N,1 |
2,"MA,http://www.monarch.averydennison.com" | }
Structured Append QR Code Packet
{F,2,A,R,E,200,200,"QRCODE2" |
B,1,200,V,50,50,36,0,100,2,B,0 | }
{B,2,N,1 | 1,"D0202E9,Q0A" |
C,"0123456789ABCD+__âôû
~129~064~159~252~224~064" | }
Sample UPCA Format Packet
{F,1,A,R,E,200,150,"1LAB1520" |
T,1,20,V,44,40,0,50,9,9,A,L,0,0,1 |
B,2,12,F,125,25,1,2,50,7,L,0 |
R,1,"028400067362" |
T,3,20,V,20,34,0,50,8,8,A,L,0,0,1 |
C,84,45,0,50,14,14,A,L,0,0,"$1.19",1 | }
Sample Batch Packet
{B,1,N,1 |
1,"PEANUTS"|
3,"*SALT FREE*"|}
A-10 Packet Reference Manual
B
FONTS
Our printers support two types of fonts: Bitmapped (traditional printer fonts such as
Standard and Reduced) and Scalable/TrueType® (Font 50). This appendix gives a brief overview
of each type of font and how the printer interprets fonts. It also shows examples of the printer’s
installed fonts.
*
Number
Font Size and
Appearance
Type of
Spacing
# of Dots Between
Characters
1
Standard
Monospaced
3 (203 dpi)
5 (300 dpi)
2
Reduced
Monospaced
1 (203 dpi)
2 (300 dpi)
3
Bold
Monospaced
3 (203 dpi)
5 (300 dpi)
4
OCRA-like
Monospaced
3 (203 dpi)
5 (300 dpi)
5
HR1 – only for numeric data
Monospaced
2 (203 dpi)
3 (300 dpi)
6
HR2 – only for numeric data
Monospaced
1 (203 dpi)
2 (300 dpi)
10*
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
(9pt. at 203 dpi or 8 pt. at 300 dpi)
Proportional
Varies with each letter
11*
6 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
Proportional
Varies with each letter
15*
7 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
Proportional
Varies with each letter
16*
9 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
Proportional
Varies with each letter
17*
11 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
Proportional
Varies with each letter
18*
15 pt. CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
Proportional
Varies with each letter
50
EFF Swiss Bold
Scalable
Varies with each letter
The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces support only ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol
Sets. The scalable font does not support Code Page 1256 (Arabic). The Euro symbol( ) at
position ~192 is only available in the Standard, Reduced, and Bold fonts.
Fonts B-1
These samples were printed using the Internal Symbol set.
Standard Font
Reduced Font
OCRA-like Font
EFF Swiss Bold Font*
* Printed with ANSI Symbol Set
B-2 Packet Reference Manual
Bold Font
These samples were printed using Code Page 437.
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface Bold
CG Triumvirate™ Typeface
Fonts B-3
Bitmap Font Information
Our bitmap fonts are either monospaced (each character occupies the same amount of space) or
proportional (each character is a different width). Use monospaced fonts for price fields and data
to list in a column. With proportionally spaced fonts, more characters may be placed per line.
Experiment with these fonts and adjust field measurements as necessary. The bitmapped fonts
(either monospaced or proportional) appear jagged when magnified. The magnification range is 1
to 7.
Use the MONARCH® MPCL™ Toolbox (Font Utility), available on our Web site, to convert a
bitmap font to Hex or Run-Length encoding for the printer. Select the point size and characters
to print. Bitmap fonts may image faster than a TrueType font, but they are limited to the
downloaded point size and characters.
Monospaced Font Magnification
Monospaced characters occupy the same amount of space within a magnification. Use
monospaced fonts for price fields and data to list in a column. Decide how wide and tall the
characters should appear on the labels.
Only the 1x width can be scanned with the OCRA-like font. Using a printhead with 203 dpi, the
character widths are as follows: 7.9 (English), 20.1 (Metric), and 16 (Dots).
To calculate other font widths, multiply the font dots (14 dots for Standard, 7 dots for Reduced,
24 dots for Bold) by the magnification and add the default spacing (3 dots for Standard, 1 dot for
Reduced, 3 dots for Bold) between characters.
Example
14 (Standard font dots) x 5 (magnification) = 70 + 3 (default spacing between characters). There
are 73 dots in the Standard font at 5x.
Proportional Font Magnification
Each character in a proportionally spaced font is a different height and width. More characters
may be placed per line. Experiment with these fonts and adjust field measurements as
necessary. The bitmapped fonts (either monospaced or proportional) appear jagged when
magnified. The magnification range is 1 to 7.
To calculate other font widths, multiply the font dots (3 dots for Minimum, 13 dots for Average, 22
dots for Maximum) by the magnification.
Example
13 (Average font dots) x 5 (magnification) = 65 dots in an average letter of the CG Triumvirate™
Typeface Bold at 5x.
B-4 Packet Reference Manual
Scalable Font Information
The scalable font is smooth at any point size. There are no jagged edges because the font is
created from an equation every time it is used. The field width varies with each letter.
When defining formats using scalable fonts, set the character rotation to 0 (it is not supported).
However, field rotation is supported for text or constant text fields using the scalable font. The
scalable font does not print a slashed zero.
Scalable fonts perform better in constant text fields, because those fields are imaged only once
per batch, not once per label as in text fields. The transparent overlay allows closer field
placement when using scalable fonts.
The height and width magnification are defined in point size. 72 points = one inch.
One inch = cell size. The cell size is the built-in space around the individual characters of the
scalable font. The point size range is 4 to 255. If the height and width are not set to the same
point size, the printed characters look tall and thin or short and thick, which allows for greater
flexibility in the appearance of the font.
The 72 point EFF Swiss Bold sample shows the one inch cell size.
6pt
S ampl e
10pt
Sample
24pt Sample
48pt Sample
72pt Sample
1”
TrueType Font Information
TrueType fonts follow the TrueType outline font standard. These fonts are smooth at any point
size. There are no jagged edges, because the font is created from an equation every time it is
used. The height and width magnification are defined in point size.
72 points = one inch. One inch = cell size. The cell size is the built-in space around the
individual characters of the scalable font. The point size range is 4 to 255. The field width
varies with each letter. The printer accepts downloaded TrueType fonts.
Downloading TrueType Fonts
The MONARCH® MPCL™ Toolbox (Font Utility) is available on our Web site and converts
TrueType fonts to Hex or Run-Length encoding for the printer.
When downloading a TrueType font, download the entire font, not particular characters or one
point size. A variety of symbol sets can be printed with International (Turkish, Latin, Spanish,
etc.) characters. TrueType fonts are designed to be regionally specific; therefore, all symbol sets
may not be supported in a given font.
Save the fonts to flash memory for optimal performance with downloaded fonts. No memory
configuration packets are necessary since flash memory cannot be reallocated.
Fonts B-5
Using International Fonts
International fonts are available as bitmap or TrueType fonts. See "Bitmap Font Information" or
"TrueType Font Information" for more details. Purchase the optional memory card and download
the font to the memory card.
To use International fonts, consider the following information:
♦ All fonts contain an internal character mapping. The mapping is organized by one or more
standards, such as BIG5. These mapping standards can provide over 65,000 characters,
which are not represented in this manual. The printer supports several mapping standards:
Unicode (UCS-2), BIG5, KSC, GB2312, and SJIS.
♦ Specify a symbol set based on the characters to print and one that is compatible with the
font's character mapping. For example, to print Japanese characters, select symbol set 932
(Japanese Shift JIS) and a font compatible with that symbol set.
Enter batch data specified by the font's character mapping and compatible symbol set.
Selecting a Symbol Set
Specify a symbol set based on the characters to print and one that is compatible with the font's
character mapping. The symbol set parameter identifies the character mapping used in the text
field or constant text field, for example, Unicode, BIG5, etc. If no symbol set is selected, the
default symbol set (Internal Symbol Set) is used.
The printer automatically translates some character mappings to others. For example, if you
need a BIG5 font, it is possible to use Unicode text data. Use Unicode in the symbol set
parameter to indicate the text mapping and select the BIG5 font needed in the font parameter (T8
or C5). The printer automatically translates the Unicode character values into BIG5 values
before printing the character.
The following table lists the compatible mappings and symbol sets.
Font Character Mapping
Batch Data*
True Type Font
Character Mapping
Unicode
BIG5
Unicode
SJIS
Unicode
KSC5601
Unicode
GB2312
Unicode
Unicode
Symbol Set Parameter (T15, C13, or A6)
Use in text or constant text fields
102 – Unicode
Use this symbol set, because the printer automatically
translates the character mappings.
*
Characters in batch data must be entered based on their mapping (Unicode, BIG5, etc.).
Note:
Symbol set 102 requires a downloaded International TrueType font.
B-6 Packet Reference Manual
International Font Sample
{F,3,A,R,E,150,200,"SIMPLE" |
T,1,5,V,10,10,0,100,30,30,B,L,0,0,102 | }
{B,3,U,1 |
1,"~125~000~125~002~125~004~125~005" | }
S ymbol S et Par ameter
Font Number
This example prints these four characters with Unicode batch data of ~125~000, ~125~002,
~125~004 and ~125~005.
Refer to the Internet for a listing of the characters in each code page. Search on a particular
code page, such as “codepage 936" to view the characters in that code page.
Licensing Fonts
Avery Dennison provides tools to create and download TrueType fonts. However, it is your
responsibility to purchase and license any fonts you download to the printer. Contact a font
supplier for licensing information. Additional fonts that are compatible with the printer can be
purchased from:
The Electronic Font Foundry
thefonts.com
DynaComware (Korean, Chinese, and Japanese fonts)
www.dynalab.com
Locating the Font Number in a Font Packet
The font number is the second parameter in the packet. Software is available to create the font
data and packet. Call Technical Support for more information.
Font Number
Example {W,200,A,M,68 |
font data |
font data | }
Use this number in T8 (font) or in C5 (font). See “Defining Text Fields” or “Defining Constant
Text Fields” in Chapter 2 for more information.
Font Number
Example T,1,10,V,30,10,0,200,1,1,B,L,0,0,0 |
C,50,30,0,200,1,1,B,L,0,0,"MONARCH",0 |
Font Number
Defines a text and constant text field using the downloaded (#200) font.
Fonts B-7
B-8 Packet Reference Manual
C
S Y M B O L S E T S / C O D E PA G E S
This appendix contains a listing of the symbol sets, code pages, and extended
character sets the printer supports.
Use the charts in this appendix to convert dot sequences from the image dot pattern to codes
usable in the fields. Use the Binary to Hex Conversion Chart to convert Binary dot sequences to
Hexadecimal numbers for bitmap files. Use the Dot to Run Length Encoding Chart to convert dot
sequences to alphabetic characters for bitmap files.
Supported Symbol Sets and Code Pages
The printers support these symbol sets and code pages: Internal, ANSI, Bold, OCRA Character
Set, DOS Code Page 437 and 850. Additional Code Pages are supported with downloaded
TrueType or Unicode (International) fonts.
The printer defaults to the internal symbol set. See “Defining the System Setup Packet” in
Chapter 2 to change the symbol set.
Selecting a Symbol Set or Code Page
The CG Triumvirate™ typefaces support only the ANSI and DOS Code Page 437 and 850 Symbol
Sets. These fonts print a slashed zero when using the ANSI symbol set.
Internal
Use this symbol set to print international monetary symbols, the
trademark (™) symbol, and for formats that may be used on other
MPCLII printers.
ANSI
Use this symbol set with proportionally spaced fonts.
DOS CP 437/850
Use this symbol set for extended and international characters with
proportionally spaced fonts.
Using Code 128 Function Codes
This table lists the characters for Bar Code 128 function codes. These functions are used with
scanners.
Code
Function Code
~201
F1
~202
F2
~203
F3
~204
F4
Entering Extended Characters
When using extended characters in batch data file, type a tilde in front of the three-digit code.
For example, to include the character Ä in a text field using the Internal Symbol Set, type:
1,"~142" |
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-1
Using International Character Sets/Code Pages
Symbol sets 852-860, and 1250-1258 may only be used with the scalable font (font#50) or
downloaded TrueType fonts. TrueType fonts are designed to be regionally specific; therefore, all
symbol sets may not be supported in a given font. For example, to print Hebrew characters, find
a font (such as Arial) that supports Hebrew characters; convert, and then download the font to
the printer. Make sure the correct symbol set for Hebrew characters is selected.
Font 50 does not print the slashed zero or support Code Page 1256 (Arabic). The Euro symbol at
position ~192 is only available in the Standard, Reduced, and Bold fonts.
Code pages 102 contains thousands of characters, which are not represented in this manual.
These code pages require the memory expansion option and a downloaded International
TrueType font.
The Code Pages (437 and greater) on the following pages were printed using Arial or a similar
downloaded TrueType font.
Internal Symbol Set
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ™ character with the Internal character set,
press Alt 255 (column 15 + row 240) or use ~255 in the data stream.
C-2 Packet Reference Manual
ANSI Symbol Set
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ÿ character with the ANSI character set, press
Alt 255 (column 15 + row 240) or use ~255 in the data stream.
Bold Character Set
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-3
OCRA Character Set
Code Page 437 (Latin U.S.)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the û character with the Code Page 437 character
set, press Alt 150 (column 6 + row 144) or use ~150 in the data stream.
C-4 Packet Reference Manual
Code Page 850 (Latin 1)
Code Page 852 (Latin 2)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ľ character with the Code Page 852 character
set, press Alt 150 (column 6 + row 144) or use ~150 in the data stream.
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-5
Code Page 855 (Russian)
Code Page 857 (IBM Turkish)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the û character with the Code Page 857 character
set, press Alt 150 (column 6 + row 144) or use ~150 in the data stream.
C-6 Packet Reference Manual
Code Page 860 (MS-DOS Portuguese)
Code Page 1250 (Latin 2)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ü character with the Code Page 1250 character
set, press Alt 252 (column 12 + row 240) or use ~252 in the data stream.
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-7
Code Page 1251 (Cyrillic)
Code Page 1252 (Latin 1)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ü character with the Code Page 1252 character
set, press Alt 252 (column 12 + row 240) or use ~252 in the data stream.
C-8 Packet Reference Manual
Code Page 1253 (Greek)
Code Page 1254 (Turkish)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ü character with the Code Page 1254 character
set, would press Alt 252 (column 12 + row 240) or use ~252 in the data stream.
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-9
Code Page 1255 (Hebrew)
Code Page 1256 (Arabic)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ü character with the Code Page 1256 character
set, press Alt 252 (column 12 + row 240) or use ~252 in the data stream.
C-10 Packet Reference Manual
Code Page 1257 (Baltic)
Code Page 1258 (Vietnamese)
Note:
To determine the character code, add the column number and row number for the
character. For example, to produce the ü character with the Code Page 1258 character
set, press Alt 252 (column 12 + row 240) or use ~252 in the data stream.
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-11
ASCII to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart
Use the chart below to translate the characters printed on the test label. The chart lists ASCII
characters and their hexadecimal and decimal equivalents.
Char.
Hex
Decimal
Char.
Hex
Decimal
NUL
00
0
DC2
12
18
SOH
01
1
DC3
13
19
STX
02
2
DC4
14
20
ETX
03
3
NAK
15
21
EOT
04
4
SYN
16
22
ENG
05
5
ETB
17
23
ACK
06
6
CAN
18
24
BEL
07
7
EM
19
25
Backspace
08
8
SUB
1A
26
Tab
09
9
Escape
1B
27
Linefeed
0A
10
File separator
1C
28
Vertical tab
0B
11
Group separator
1D
29
Form feed
0C
12
Record
separator
1E
30
Carriage
return
0D
13
Unit separator
1F
31
SO
0E
14
Space
20
32
SI
0F
15
!
21
33
DLE
10
16
„
22
34
DC1
11
17
#
23
35
C-12 Packet Reference Manual
Char.
Hex
Decimal
Char.
Hex
Decimal
$
24
36
;
3B
59
%
25
37
<
3C
60
&
26
38
=
3D
61
‚
27
39
>
3E
62
(
28
40
?
3F
63
)
29
41
@
40
64
*
2A
42
A
41
65
+
2B
43
B
42
66
‚
2C
44
C
43
67
-
2D
45
D
44
68
.
2E
46
E
45
69
/
2F
47
F
46
70
0
30
48
G
47
71
1
31
49
H
48
72
2
32
50
I
49
73
3
33
51
J
4A
74
4
34
52
K
4B
75
5
35
53
L
4C
76
6
36
54
M
4D
77
7
37
55
N
4E
78
8
38
56
O
4F
79
9
39
57
P
50
80
:
3A
58
Q
51
81
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-13
ASCII to Hexadecimal Conversion Chart (continued)
Char.
Hex
Decimal
Char.
Hex
Decimal
R
52
82
i
69
105
S
53
83
j
6A
106
T
54
84
k
6B
107
U
55
85
l
6C
108
V
56
86
m
6D
109
W
57
87
n
6E
110
X
58
88
o
6F
111
Y
59
89
p
70
112
Z
5A
90
q
71
113
[
5B
91
r
72
114
\
5C
92
s
73
115
]
5D
93
t
74
116
^
5E
94
u
75
117
_
5F
95
v
76
118
`
60
96
w
77
119
a
61
97
x
78
120
b
62
98
y
79
121
c
63
99
z
7A
122
d
64
100
{
7B
123
e
65
101
|
7C
124
f
66
102
}
7D
125
g
67
103
~
7E
126
h
68
104
Delete
7F
127
C-14 Packet Reference Manual
Binary to Hex Conversion Chart
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
00000000
0
01000000
40
10000000
80
11000000
c0
00000001
1
01000001
41
10000001
81
11000001
c1
00000010
2
01000010
42
10000010
82
11000010
c2
00000011
3
01000011
43
10000011
83
11000011
c3
00000100
4
01000100
44
10000100
84
11000100
c4
00000101
5
01000101
45
10000101
85
11000101
c5
00000110
6
01000110
46
10000110
86
11000110
c6
00000111
7
01000111
47
10000111
87
11000111
c7
00001000
8
01001000
48
10001000
88
11001000
c8
00001001
9
01001001
49
10001001
89
11001001
c9
00001010
a
01001010
4a
10001010
8a
11001010
ca
00001011
b
01001011
4b
10001011
8b
11001011
cb
00001100
c
01001100
4c
10001100
8c
11001100
cc
00001101
d
01001101
4d
10001101
8d
11001101
cd
00001110
e
01001110
4e
10001110
8e
11001110
ce
00001111
f
01001111
4f
10001111
8f
11001111
cf
00010000
10
01010000
50
10010000
90
11010000
d0
00010001
11
01010001
51
10010001
91
11010001
d1
00010010
12
01010010
52
10010010
92
11010010
d2
00010011
13
01010011
53
10010011
93
11010011
d3
00010100
14
01010100
54
10010100
94
11010100
d4
00010101
15
01010101
55
10010101
95
11010101
d5
00010110
16
01010110
56
10010110
96
11010110
d6
00010111
17
01010111
57
10010111
97
11010111
d7
00011000
18
01011000
58
10011000
98
11011000
d8
00011001
19
01011001
59
10011001
99
11011001
d9
00011010
1a
01011010
5a
10011010
9a
11011010
da
00011011
1b
01011011
5b
10011011
9b
11011011
db
00011100
1c
01011100
5c
10011100
9c
11011100
dc
00011101
1d
01011101
5d
10011101
9d
11011101
dd
00011110
1e
01011110
5e
10011110
9e
11011110
de
00011111
1f
01011111
5f
10011111
9f
11011111
df
00100000
20
01100000
60
10100000
a0
11100000
e0
00100001
21
01100001
61
10100001
a1
11100001
e1
00100010
22
01100010
62
10100010
a2
11100010
e2
00100011
23
01100011
63
10100011
a3
11100011
e3
00100100
24
01100100
64
10100100
a4
11100100
e4
00100101
25
01100101
65
10100101
a5
11100101
e5
00100110
26
01100110
66
10100110
a6
11100110
e6
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-15
Binary to Hex Conversion Chart (continued)
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
Binary
Hex
00100111
27
01100111
67
10100111
a7
11100111
e7
00101000
28
01101000
68
10101000
a8
11101000
e8
00101001
29
01101001
69
10101001
a9
11101001
e9
00101010
2a
01101010
6a
10101010
aa
11101010
ea
00101011
2b
01101011
6b
10101011
ab
11101011
eb
00101100
2c
01101100
6c
10101100
ac
11101100
ec
00101101
2d
01101101
6d
10101101
ad
11101101
ed
00101110
2e
01101110
6e
10101110
ae
11101110
ee
00101111
2f
01101111
6f
10101111
af
11101111
ef
00110000
30
01110000
70
10110000
b0
11110000
f0
00110001
31
01110001
71
10110001
b1
11110001
f1
00110010
32
01110010
72
10110010
b2
11110010
f2
00110011
33
01110011
73
10110011
b3
11110011
f3
00110100
34
01110100
74
10110100
b4
11110100
f4
00110101
35
01110101
75
10110101
b5
11110101
f5
00110110
36
01110110
76
10110110
b6
11110110
f6
00110111
37
01110111
77
10110111
b7
11110111
f7
00111000
38
01111000
78
10111000
b8
11111000
f8
00111001
39
01111001
79
10111001
b9
11111001
f9
00111010
3a
01111010
7a
10111010
ba
11111010
fa
00111011
3b
01111011
7b
10111011
bb
11111011
fb
00111100
3c
01111100
7c
10111100
bc
11111100
fc
00111101
3d
01111101
7d
10111101
bd
11111101
fd
00111110
3e
01111110
7e
10111110
be
11111110
fe
00111111
3f
01111111
7f
10111111
bf
11111111
ff
C-16 Packet Reference Manual
Dot to Run Length Encoding Chart
ON (Black) Dots
# of Dots
Code
# of Dots
Code
1
A
14
N
2
B
15
O
3
C
16
P
4
D
17
Q
5
E
18
R
6
F
19
S
7
G
20
T
8
H
21
U
9
I
22
V
10
J
23
W
11
K
24
X
12
L
25
Y
13
M
26
Z
# of Dots
Code
# of Dots
Code
1
a
14
n
2
b
15
o
3
c
16
p
4
d
17
q
5
e
18
r
6
f
19
s
7
g
20
t
8
h
21
u
9
i
22
v
10
j
23
w
11
k
24
x
12
l
25
y
13
m
26
z
Off (White Dots)
Symbol Sets/Code Pages C-17
C-18 Packet Reference Manual
D
F O R M AT D E S I G N T O O L S
Use copies of these worksheets and grids to create formats, batch data, and check
digit schemes. Keep copies of the completed forms:
♦ Online Configuration Worksheet
♦ Batch Worksheet
♦ Check Digit Worksheet
♦ Supply Layout Grids (English, Metric, Dots)
♦ Format Worksheet
♦ Sample Format Worksheet
Format Design Tools D-1
Online Configuration Worksheet
D-2 Packet Reference Manual
Batch Worksheet
Format Design Tools D-3
Check Digit Worksheet
D-4 Packet Reference Manual
Supply Layout Grids (English)
Format Design Tools D-5
Supply Layout Grids (Metric)
D-6 Packet Reference Manual
Supply Layout Grids (Dots)
Format Design Tools D-7
LINES
G
G
G
G
R
R
R
R
51
51
51
51
R
R
R
R
52
52
52
52
Incrementing
Data
R2 CODE #
OPTION #60
R2 CODE #
61
61
61
61
61
61
61
61
61
R
R
R
R
61
61
61
61
R3 INPUT ( )
R1 HEADER
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R3 INPUT ( )
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
R3 APP CODE
R1 HEADER
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R1 HEADER
R 60
R 60
R 60
R 60
R5 L POS
PDF417
Aspect Ratio
R2 CODE #
Pad Data
R6 R POS
OPTION #52
R4 CHARACTER
OPTION #30
R4 AMOUNT
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
R3 I /D
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R3 L / R
R2 CODE #
Copy Data
from Previous Field
R2 CODE #
R1 HEADER
R7 COPY CODE
R6 DEST. START
R5 # TO COPY
R4 SRC START
OPTION #4
R1 HEADER
OPTION #51
R4 DIMENSION
NUMBER
PDF417 Security /
Truncation
R3 ROW /COLUMN
R2 CODE #
R2 CODE #
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
R3 SRC FIELD
R1 HEADER
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R1 HEADER
R4 STANDARD
/DEFAULT
R3 SECURITY LEVEL
R1 HEADER
R2 CODE #
R7 ADDITIONAL
WIDE SPACE
R3 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
R2 CODE #
Fixed Characters
G6 ROTATION
G5 MODE
R6 DEST. START
Bar Code Densities
R7 COPY CODE
R6 ADDITIONAL
NAR. SPACE
OPTION #50
Define
Check Digit
R5 # TO COPY
R5 ADDITIONAL
CHAR. GAP
R4 DOT WIDTH
WIDE ELEMENT
OPTION #31
G4 COLUMN
4
4
4
4
R4 SRC START
OPTION #1
G3 ROW
R
R
R
R
R3 SRC FIELD
Fixed Characters
G2 GRAPH ID
R2 CODE #
R1 HEADER
T15 SYM. SET
T14 FIELD ROT.
T13 CHAR. ROT.
T12 ALIGNMENT
T11 COLOR
T10 WID. MAG.
T9 HGT. MAG.
T8 FONT
T7 GAP
T6 COLUMN
T5 ROW
T4 FIX/VAR
T3 # OF CHAR.
T2 FIELD #
T1 HEADER
R8 NAME.
("IN QUOTES")
F7 WIDTH
F6 LENGTH
F5 MEASURE
F4 DEVICE
F3 ACTION
F2 FORMAT #
F1 HEADER
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
R1 HEADER
R2 CODE #
50
50
50
50
R3 DOT WIDTH
NAR. ELEMENT
R1 HEADER
R4 CHECK DIGIT #
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
G1 HEADER
31
31
31
31
R3 GEN/VER
R2 CODE #
R
R
R
R
Q7 PATTERN
1
1
1
1
R3 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
R
R
R
R
R4 CHARACTER
Pad Data
R1 HEADER
OPTION #30
Q6 THICKNESS
30
30
30
30
Q5 END
COLUMN
D
D
D
D
R2 CODE #
R2 CODE #
R
R
R
R
R3 L / R
R1 HEADER
Copy Data
from Previous Field
R1 HEADER
D3 # OF CHAR.
D2 FIELD #
R7 COPY CODE
R6 DEST. START
R5 # TO COPY
TEXT
FIELDS
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
GRAPHICS
FIELDS
Q
Q
Q
Q
R4 SRC START
OPTION #4
Q4 END ROW
4
4
4
4
D1 HEADER
R
R
R
R
R3 SRC FIELD
R2 CODE #
Fixed Characters
Q3 COLUMN
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
NON PRINTABLE
TEXT FIELDS
1
1
1
1
R1 HEADER
OPTION #1
Q2 ROW
R
R
R
R
R3 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
R2 CODE #
B12 FIELD ROT.
B11 ALIGNMENT
B10 TEXT
B9 HEIGHT
B8 DENSITY
B7 FONT
B6 COLUMN
B5 ROW
R1 HEADER
B
B
B
B
C13 SYM. SET
C12 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
C11 FIELD ROT.
C10 CHAR. ROT.
C9 ALIGNMENT
C8 COLOR
C7 WID. MAG.
C6 HGT. MAG.
C5 FONT
C4 GAP
C3 COLUMN
B4 FIX/VAR
B3 # OF CHAR.
B2 FIELD #
B1 HEADER
FORMAT
HEADER
R
Q1 HEADER
L8 PATTERN
L7 THICKNESS
L6 LENGTH/
END COL.
L5 ANGLE/
END ROW
L4 COLUMN
L3 ROW
C2 ROW
C1 HEADER
BAR CODE
FIELDS
F
BOXES
L
L
L
L
L2 TYPE
L1 HEADER
CONSTANT
TEXT
FIELDS
OPTION #1
OPTION
#42
OPTION
#61
Price Field
Reimage
Field
Reimage
Field
OPTION
#61
OPTION #4
Copy Data
from Previous Field
FORMAT
WORKSHEET
Format Name
Format #
Date
Supply Size
Supply Type
Customer Name
Software Version
TCMPCL2FW 10/94
LINES
G
G
G
G
Copy Data
from Previous Field
R
R
R
R
51
51
51
51
R
R
R
R
52
52
52
52
R
R
R
R
60
60
60
60
Incrementing
Data
R2 CODE #
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
61
61
61
61
61
61
61
61
61
R
R
R
R
61
61
61
61
R3 INPUT ( )
R1 HEADER
OPTION
#42
R3 INPUT ( )
OPTION #60
R2 CODE #
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
R3 APP CODE
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R6 R POS
R1 HEADER
Price Field
R1 HEADER
PDF417
Aspect Ratio
R2 CODE #
Pad Data
R5 L POS
OPTION #52
R4 CHARACTER
OPTION #30
R4 AMOUNT
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
R3 I /D
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R3 L / R
R2 CODE #
Copy Data
from Previous Field
R2 CODE #
R1 HEADER
R7 COPY CODE
R6 DEST. START
R5 # TO COPY
R4 SRC START
OPTION #4
R1 HEADER
R4 DIMENSION
NUMBER
OPTION #51
R3 ROW /COLUMN
PDF417 Security /
Truncation
R2 CODE #
R2 CODE #
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
R3 SRC FIELD
R1 HEADER
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R1 HEADER
R4 STANDARD
/DEFAULT
OPTION #50
R3 SECURITY LEVEL
R1 HEADER
R3 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
R2 CODE #
Fixed Characters
G6 ROTATION
Fixed Characters
R2 CODE #
R7 ADDITIONAL
WIDE SPACE
R6 ADDITIONAL
NAR. SPACE
R5 ADDITIONAL
CHAR. GAP
Bar Code Densities
G5 MODE
OPTION #4
R7 COPY CODE
R6 DEST. START
R5 # TO COPY
R4 SRC START
OPTION #1
G4 COLUMN
4
4
4
4
G3 ROW
R
R
R
R
R3 SRC FIELD
OPTION #31
G2 GRAPH ID
R4 DOT WIDTH
WIDE ELEMENT
Define
Check Digit
R2 CODE #
R1 HEADER
T15 SYM. SET
T14 FIELD ROT.
T13 CHAR. ROT.
T12 ALIGNMENT
T11 COLOR
T10 WID. MAG.
T9 HGT. MAG.
T8 FONT
T7 GAP
T6 COLUMN
T5 ROW
T4 FIX/VAR
T3 # OF CHAR.
T2 FIELD #
T1 HEADER
R8 NAME.
("IN QUOTES")
F7 WIDTH
F6 LENGTH
F5 MEASURE
F4 DEVICE
F3 ACTION
F2 FORMAT #
F1 HEADER
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
R1 HEADER
R2 CODE #
50
50
50
50
R3 DOT WIDTH
NAR. ELEMENT
R1 HEADER
R4 CHECK DIGIT #
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
G1 HEADER
31
31
31
31
R3 GEN/VER
R2 CODE #
R
R
R
R
Q7 PATTERN
1
1
1
1
R3 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
R
R
R
R
R4 CHARACTER
Pad Data
R1 HEADER
OPTION #30
Q6 THICKNESS
30
30
30
30
R3 L / R
R2 CODE #
R
R
R
R
Q5 END
COLUMN
D
D
D
D
R2 CODE #
R1 HEADER
Copy Data
from Previous Field
R1 HEADER
D3 # OF CHAR.
D2 FIELD #
R7 COPY CODE
R6 DEST. START
R5 # TO COPY
TEXT
FIELDS
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
T
GRAPHICS
FIELDS
Q
Q
Q
Q
R4 SRC START
OPTION #4
Q4 END ROW
4
4
4
4
D1 HEADER
R
R
R
R
R3 SRC FIELD
R2 CODE #
Fixed Characters
Q3 COLUMN
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
NON PRINTABLE
TEXT FIELDS
1
1
1
1
R1 HEADER
OPTION #1
Q2 ROW
R
R
R
R
R3 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
R2 CODE #
B12 FIELD ROT.
B11 ALIGNMENT
B10 TEXT
B9 HEIGHT
B8 DENSITY
B7 FONT
B6 COLUMN
B5 ROW
R1 HEADER
B
B
B
B
C13 SYM. SET
C12 FIXED CHAR.
("IN QUOTES")
C11 FIELD ROT.
C10 CHAR. ROT.
C9 ALIGNMENT
C8 COLOR
C7 WID. MAG.
C6 HGT. MAG.
C5 FONT
C4 GAP
C3 COLUMN
B4 FIX/VAR
B3 # OF CHAR.
B2 FIELD #
B1 HEADER
FORMAT
HEADER
R
Q1 HEADER
L8 PATTERN
L7 THICKNESS
L6 LENGTH/
END COL.
L5 ANGLE/
END ROW
L4 COLUMN
L3 ROW
C2 ROW
C1 HEADER
BAR CODE
FIELDS
F
BOXES
L
L
L
L
L2 TYPE
L1 HEADER
CONSTANT
TEXT
FIELDS
OPTION #1
OPTION
#61
Reimage
Field
Reimage
Field
OPTION
#61
(SAMPLE)
FORMAT
WORKSHEET
Format Name
Format #
Date
Supply Size
Supply Type
Customer Name
Software Version
TCMPCL2FW 10/94
D-10 Packet Reference Manual
G
GLOSSARY
Batch Data
2,"Monarch" |
Defines the actual information (as fields within { }) printed on the
label.
Batch Control
E,0,0,4,2,1,0 |
Defines the print job (as a field).
Batch Header
{B,1,N,1 | }
First line of a batch, immediately following ({). Identifies the format
and batch quantity.
Batch Packet
{B,1,N,1 |
2,"Monarch" | }
Contains a batch header and the batch data. Enclose within { }.
Bitmapped Fonts
Reside in the printer’s memory. If the point size is changed, so has
the font. Magnifying these fonts causes jaggedness to occur.
Buffer
Storage area in the printer’s memory that holds specific data (images,
formats, etc).
EPC
The Electronic Product Code, which is a numbering standard for
items, similar to the UPC code for bar coding. The EPC is divided
into several sections: Header, Manager Number, Object Class, and
Serial Number. One of the memory fields reserved for EPC
programming. This memory is separate from the user memory and
the amount of EPC memory varies with the tag types.
Field
Can be text, bar codes, lines, boxes, constant, or non-printable text. It
is the result of a field definition.
Downloaded Fonts
Reside in the printers RAM and deleted when the printer is turned off.
Field Definition
Any string of parameters that pertain to one field. A field definition
begins with a field identifier (such as T, B, D, C, etc.).
T,1,10,V,250,50,0,1,1,1,B,C,0 |
Parameters that apply to a field and are separated by commas. (In the
above example, B is a field element for black print on a white
background.)
Field Parameters
Flash Memory
Contains information that is SAVED when the printer is turned off.
Flash memory needs to be formatted before it can be used.
Format
Layout or design for a printed label.
Format Header
First line of a format, immediately following the start of packet ({). A
format header must begin with F, followed by various header
elements.
F,1,A,R,E,600,400,”Fmt-1” |
All characters have the same width and are easy to center justify.
(Standard, bold, and reduced are monospaced.)
Monospaced Fonts
Non-volatile RAM
Contains information that is SAVED when the printer is turned off.
Glossary G-1
Option
R,4,6,1,3,1 |
Any line within a format that applies special formatting to a field. This
line begins with R and must immediately follow the field it applies to.
Packet
B,1,N,1 |
2,”Monarch" |
Any string of characters within ({ }).
Pre-image
A way to optimize the printer, because it images the fields while data
is collected. After the last field is imaged, the label prints almost
immediately.
Proportionally
Spaced Fonts
All characters have different widths and are difficult to center justify
(CG Triumvirate™ Typefaces).
Scalable Fonts
All characters are scalable and smooth at any point size. There are no
jagged edges at any point size because the font is created from an
equation every time it is used.
TrueType Fonts
All characters follow the TrueType outline font standard. All
characters are scalable and smooth at any point size.
User Memory
One of the memory fields reserved for user programming. This
memory is separate from the EPC memory and the amount of
programmable user memory varies with the tag types.
Volatile RAM
Contains information that is LOST when the printer is turned off.
G-2 Packet Reference Manual
AMERICAS
170 Monarch Lane
Miamisburg, OH 45342
937 865 2123 (direct)
Tel +800 543 6650
(8:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., EDT)
Fax +937 865 6663
ASIA
No. 7 Chun Ying Street
Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate
New Territories, Hong Kong
Tel +852 2372 3169
Fax +852 2995 0014
WESTERN EUROPE
1 Thomas Road
Wooburn Green
Bucks HP10 0PE
Tel +(44) 1628 859500
Fax +(44) 1628 859567
ASIA PACIFIC
NEW SOUTH WALES
61 Vore Street
Silverwater NSW 2128
Tel +(02) 9647 1833
Fax +(02) 9647 1914
Toll free (Outside Sydney only)
averydennison.com/printers
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