Go Batty! - Girl Scouts of Nassau County

“Go Batty!” Discovering Bats on Long Island
Look up in the sky. It’s a bird, it’s a plane … no it’s a BAT!
BATS are one of the most misunderstood creatures in the world.
Find out more about this interesting and unique animal.
Are they birds, flying mice or mammals?
Learn more about the BATS living in New York.
Discover what factors are threatening them.
Why they are important to humans?
What information is fact or fiction?
Age Level Requirements:
Girl Scout
Daisy
Brownie
Junior
Cadette,
Senior and
Ambassador
Discover
2 Activities
3 Activities
3 Activities
3 Activities
Connect
1 Activity
1 Activity
2 Activities
3 Activities
Take Action
1 Activity
1 Activity
1 Activity
2 Activities
GIRL SCOUTS OF NASSAU COUNTY, INC
“Go Batty!” Discovering Bats on Long Island
DISCOVER:
1.
View the DVD “The Secret World of Bats”* (a live action DVD about the mysterious world of
BATS) or another DVD/program about BATS.
2.
Read a BAT-themed book.
Suggested books include:
Stellaluna*; Bat Loves the Night: Read and Wonder; Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats;
Silverwing; Bat Summer; Bats of the World*; Stokes Beginner’s Guide to Bats*;
Amazing Bats; Bats! (Time for Kids Series)*.
3.
Find out all you can about BATS. Go to your local library or visit any of the websites listed
on the resource page to find out the following information:
-What BATS live in our area?
-What are some of the different kinds of BATS?
-Are BATS in the bird family?
-How do BATS navigate?
-What do BATS eat?
-How do BATS care for their young?
-How are BATS helpful?
-Describe BAT anatomy.
4.
Listen to a CD of nighttime sounds and learn to identify different species of animals by the
noises they make at night. Use the CD/book A Guide to Night Sounds: The Nighttime
Sounds of 60 Mammals, Birds, Amphibians, and Insects* or other resource about night
sounds.
5.
Learn about BAT safety. What should you do if you come across a BAT? What should you
do if you have been in contact with a BAT? How do you find a BAT rehabilitator? Research
information on www.batworld.org.
*Resources available in Girl Scouts of Nassau County (GSNC) Resource Room “Go Batty!” Program
Resource Box.
CONNECT:
1.
What is echolocation? Play the Echolocation Game in packet or come up with your own
game about echolocation and play it.
2.
Create a poem about BATS using the information you’ve learned and read it to your
Troop or other group. Draw a picture to go with your poem.
3.
As a Troop, make up a play about BATS and put on the play for another troop or group to
teach them about BATS.
4.
Build a model or craft of a BAT. Or do an activity such as a word search, crossword or
other puzzle.*
5.
Find out about field equipment such as BAT detectors, mist nets and radio telemetry,
used for studying BATS.
6.
Should we be afraid of BATS? What are some myths and misconceptions about BATS?
7.
Learn more about vampire BATS. Where do they live and what animals provide blood
for them?
8.
Learn more about nocturnal animals. Select one and learn how it has adapted to living
in the night as opposed to diurnal animals.
9.
Learn how nocturnal animals, like BATS, use echolocation to find food and navigate the
night sky. Discuss how some animals learn to depend on other senses (rather than
sight) for nocturnal life.
*Resources available in GSNC Resource Room “Go Batty!” Program Resource Box.
TAKE ACTION:
1.
Make a poster and display about BATS and put it up in a school, library or other place
where people can learn more about BATS.
2.
Build a BAT house and find out what is the best location for BAT houses.
3.
Learn more about BATS by visiting a park or other site and participate in a BAT program.
See Resource Guide for suggested site visits.
4.
Find a BAT or wildlife rehabilitator in the New York area. Ask them what they do to take
care of BATS? Why do they rehabilitate BATS? What do you have to do to be a BAT or
wildlife rehabilitator? See www.batworld.com
5.
Find out what diseases BATS can carry. How can we stay safe? What about diseases that
are affecting BAT populations, like White Nose Syndrome? Which populations are
affected by this disease? What can be done to protect BAT populations from this disease?
What other factors are affecting BAT populations?
6.
Find out about organizations and efforts for BAT conservation. Look up information
about Bat Conservation International, a non-profit organization dedicated to BAT
conservation, research, and education. Their phone number is 1-800-538-2287.
http://www.batcon.org
*Resources available in GSNC Resource Room “Go Batty!” Program Resource Box.
(Program adapted from Girl Scouts of Central Texas - Troops 1210 & 1107 of the Lone Star
Council Program)
Books/Magazines:*
RESOURCE GUIDE
New York State Conservationist, BATS, February , 2008
Stellaluna by Janell Canon
Bats by Gail Gibbons
Bats of the World by Gary L. Graham & Fiona A. Reid
Stokes Beginner’s Guide to Bats by Kim Williams, Rob Mies, Lillian Stokes
A Guide to Night Sounds: The Nighttime Sounds of 60 Mammals, Birds, Amphibians and Insects
by Lang Elliott (book and cd)
Bats! (Time for Kids Series) by the Editors of TIME for Kids with Nicole Iorio
The Bat Poet by Randall Jarrell
A Simple Guide to Bat House Designs distributed by The Organization for Bat Conservation.
Websites:
Organization for Bat Conservation, www.batconservation.org
Bat Conservation International, www.batcon.org
Bat World Sanctuary, www.batworld.org
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, www.fws.gov/northeast
Bats4Kids, www.bats4kids.org
Crafts:
About.com Family Crafts, http://familycrafts.about.com
The Kids Wildlife Book, page 13 available in the GSNC Resource Room
DLTK Growing Together, www.dltk-kids.com
Suggested site visits:
Connetquot River State Park in Oakdale, NY, (631) 581-1005
Tackapausha Museum and Preserve in Seaford, NY, (516) 571-7443
Central Park with the New York City Audubon Society, www.nycaudubon.org
American Museum of Natural History in New York City, www.amnh.org
*Resources available in GSNC Resource Room “Go Batty!” Program Resource Box.
ECHOLOCATION GAME
Although BATS do have good vision, this game will illustrate how they use sound to locate an
object.
What you’ll need:
A few blind folds
A group of people
A space to move around in that doesn’t have any obstacles.
OBJECT OF THE GAME: To find the person the sound came from.
HOW TO PLAY:
Put a blind fold on one person (the BAT) and place them in one part of the area you will
play in.
Turn them around a few times.
Have the rest of the group (insects to be eaten) pick a spot in the area and stand still.
Quietly select a player to be the insect who will echo the BAT’s sound.
Start the game by having the BAT make a sound (any sound).
Then the previously selected person (insect) will echo the same sound as best they can.
Have the blind folded person (bat) try to locate where the sound came from and find the
person (insect).
The BAT can continue to make the sound. Every time the BAT makes the sound the other
player should echo the BAT’s sound.
Once located, the person making the sound takes a turn at being blind folded, listening
and locating the sound of a new player.
TO MAKE THE GAME MORE CHALLENGING:
Have two or three blind folded people (BATS) make three different sounds one at a time.
Three different players will echo an assigned BAT. For example: Bat 1 makes a sound, Insect 1
echoes the sound; Bat 2 makes a sound, Insect 2 echoes sound; Bat 3 makes a sound, Insect 3
echoes sound. After the BATS and insects sounds have been established, they can all make the
sounds together as BATS would flying at night. When the BAT has located their insect, the insect
can take its’ turn being the BAT. You can add as many BATS as you want to
continue the insect feeding frenzy.
“GO BATTY!” PATCH PROGRAM RESOURCE BOX
The “Go Batty!” Discovering Bats on Long Island Patch Program Resource Box is available in the
GSNC Resource Room and contains:
Program Description
Description of Echolocation Game
Articles on White Nose Syndrome and Owls
“The Secret World of Bats” DVD
Books: Stellaluna by Janell Canon; Bats by Gail Gibbons; Bats of the World by Gary L. Graham
and Fiona A. Reid; Stokes Beginner’s Guide to Bats by Kim Williams, Rob Mies and Lillian
Stokes; Bats! (Time for Kids Series) by the Editors of TIME for Kids with
Nicole Iorio; The Bat Poet by Randall Jarrell.
A Guide to Night Sounds: The Nighttime Sounds of 60 Mammals, Birds, Amphibians and Insects
(book and cd)
A Simple Guide to Bat House Designs by The Organization for Bat Conservation.
Magazine: NYS Conservationist, February, 2008
List of websites to research BATS:
www.batcon.org
www.batconservation.org
www.batworld.org
www.fws.gov/northeast
www.bats4kids.org
Bat poems
Bat craft ideas and games
Red Bat plush toy
Bats: Fact or Fiction game
Take a Look at a Bat - mini-poster