1 Learning Objectives After completing this chapter, you will be able to

Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter, you will be able to:
1. Define operating system.
2. Define enhancements.
3. Explain the function and purpose of OS
version numbers.
4. List some of the types of system configurations.
5. Explain the need and procedure for booting
the system.
6. Explain the function of disk files.
7. Explain the function of and rules for file
specifications.
8. List and explain the importance of the two
types of computer files.
9. Describe the function and purpose of commands.
10. Compare and contrast internal and external
commands.
11. Explain the function and purpose of the DIR,
VER, and CLS commands.
12. Explain the purpose of and the procedure for
using the DATE and TIME commands.
13. Explain the legal and ethical ramifications of
copying disks that were not purchased.
14. Explain the purpose and function of the
DISKCOPY command.
15. Explain the necessary steps to end a work
session.
Student Outcomes
1. Identify your system configuration.
2. Boot the system.
3. Use the DIR command to display the files on
the screen.
4. Use the VER command to determine which
version of Windows is being used.
5. Use the CLS command to clear the screen.
6. Use the DATE and TIME commands to set or
change the date and time on the computer.
7. Make a copy of a disk.
8. End a computer work session.
Chapter Overview
Most people who use computers are really
interested in application software. They want
programs that are easy to use and that help them
solve specific problems. However, before you can
use application software, you must know at least
the basics of using the operating system. No
computer can work without an operating system
in RAM. The Windows operating system takes
care of mandatory functions for computer
operations such as handling the input and output
of the computer, managing computer resources,
and running application software. It enables the
user to communicate with the computer.
In this chapter you will learn about loading the
operating system into the computer, use some
basic commands, make a copy of the ACTIVITIES
disk to use in future activities, learn your system
configuration, and identify the version of Windows you are using.
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1.1
What Is an Operating System?
An operating system is a software program. If you have a microcomputer, commonly referred to as a PC, that conforms to the standards developed by IBM and
uses a microprocessor in the Intel family, you are probably using a version of the
Windows operating system. In fact, these computers are sometimes called Wintel
machines because they use the Intel processor and run the Windows operating
system.
You need to load the Windows operating system (the OS) into memory (RAM)
before you can use other software programs. The OS is in charge of the hardware
components of the computer—the monitor, the keyboard, the printer, etc. You, the
user, communicate what you want the computer to do through the OS. These
commands are issued by pointing and clicking when in the GUI (Graphical User
Interface) or by keying in commands such as TYPE or CLS at the command line
prompt.
1.2
Versions of the Operating System (OS)
Microsoft periodically releases new versions of the OS to take advantage of new
technology. These new upgrades contain enhancements. The term enhancements
simply means that more functions and/or commands are available. In addition, new
versions of software and operating systems fix problems, called bugs, that appeared
in earlier versions. To keep track of these versions, each new version is assigned a
number. The first version of Windows 95 was Windows 95 4.00.950, released in 1995.
The last Windows 95 version was 95 4.00.1111, known as Windows 95B or OSR2.
Also available is a major update of Windows 95 called Windows 98, SE version
4.10.1998. The next version of Windows was Windows Millennium Edition, referred
to as Windows Me. These versions of Windows are and were primarily used on
personal desktop computers.
Windows NT Workstation was a desktop operating system designed primarily
for software developers and “power users,” such as engineers who worked on large,
powerful applications such as CAD (Computer-Aided Design). Microsoft’s network
operating system, Windows NT Server, was primarily used in large corporate
environments where it provided network administrators with the ability to manage
many networked computers with various security needs.
Windows 2000 Professional was the replacement for Windows NT Workstation 4.
It was used as a desktop operating system in a networked environment or as a
stand-alone operating system.
The current version of the Windows operating system is Windows XP. It comes in
two distinct versions—Windows XP Home Edition and Windows XP Professional.
The two versions are very similar with the primary difference being that in Windows XP Home Edition, certain features are disabled. There are also some cosmetic
changes that make it easier for the home user. The major differences in the Windows
XP Home Edition are:
n Backup—Must be installed separately.
n Multiprocessor support—Not supported.
n Domain-based network support—Not supported.
1.3
OVERVIEW OF FILES AND DISKS
n User Administration—Less control over user accounts. Windows XP Home
Edition does provide the ability to set up user accounts for multiple users on the
same computer as well as providing levels of security. However, Windows XP
Professional has a much more robust set of user account administration.
n File Encryption—Not supported on NTFS formatted disks.
n Remote Desktop—Not supported. This feature allows a user to see the desktop
of another computer.
n Offline Files and Folders—Not supported. This feature allows you to copy files
from a server to a notebook computer or to work offline from a server.
n Upgrades—Cannot upgrade to Windows XP Home Edition from Windows NT
or 2000. You can upgrade from Windows 98 or Windows Me to either version of
Windows XP.
There are also other versions of XP designed either for very fast processing of
large amounts of data or for server-based computing. These include Windows XP
64-bit Edition which runs on the (now) new version of Intel’s 64-bit Itanium processor. The 64 Bit Edition supports not only 32-bit applications but provides a much
more efficient environment for the processing of very large amounts of data, such as
those used on high-end engineering, scientific, and graphics workstations. In this
light are the releases of the Windows .NET Server and Advanced Server. These are
designed to run on servers rather than on workstations. Servers are those computers
that provide services to other computers on network. There will be releases of 32-bit
server versions as well but they will be labeled Windows .NET Servers.
This text will focus on Windows XP Professional, though much of the information
is applicable to most versions of the Windows operating system. It is assumed in
this textbook that Windows XP Professional is installed on your computer. If you are
working on your own computer and have not installed or upgraded to Windows XP
Professional, refer to the documentation that came with the Windows software so
you can initiate the installation or upgrade. If you are in a laboratory environment, a
version of Windows will be available for you.
1.3
Overview of Files and Disks
You need a way to store information permanently. In the computer world, the
primary way to save data and programs permanently is to store them on a disk.
After you have booted your computer, the OS reads the programs or data it needs
from the disk into its memory. However, in order for Windows to find this information, it has to have a way of organizing it, which it does by keeping programs and
data in files on the disk. Just as you organize your written work in files, Windows
organizes computer information in disk files.
A disk file is much like a file folder stored in a file cabinet. The file cabinet is the
floppy disk or the hard disk. A file consists of related information stored on the disk
in a “folder” or directory with a unique name. Information with which a computer
works is contained and stored in files on the disk. (See Figure 1.1.)
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GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Trees
Oak
Yew
Trees
Fir
Rocks
Oa
k
Ye
w
Fir
Figure 1.1—Disks and Files
1.4
File Names, File Types, and Folders
Because computers must follow very specific rules, there is a specific format for file
names. Technically, a file name is called the file specification. The first rule is that
the file specification must be unique. Second, the file specification is broken into two
parts, a file name and a file extension. The file name typically describes or identifies
the file, and the file extension typically identifies the kind of data in the file. Since
the term “file specification” is rather awkward, most people simply refer to the file
name, meaning both the file name and its extension. In versions of the OS before
Windows, referred to simply as DOS, the file name size was limited by what was
called the 8.3 (eight-dot-three) rule, which was a limit of eight characters for the file
name and three characters for the file extension). In Windows, the 8.3 rule is gone.
Now file names can have a maximum of 255 characters, referred to as LFNs (long
file names). The three-letter file extension, known as the file type, remains in Windows. However, some software does not recognize long file names (LFNs), and
some network operating systems have difficulty dealing with them. Because storing
long file names takes additional space, consider using the 8.3 rule when saving to
floppy disks with limited capacity.
There are two major types of computer files: data files and program files. Data
files contain information that is usually generated by an application program. Most
often, only an application program can use a data file directly. Program files are
application programs that allow a user to perform specific tasks, for example, a
payroll program that lets you create and maintain a payroll system for a company.
You do not purchase a computer to run the Windows operating system. You
purchase a computer so that you may use application packages to help with tasks
such as gaining access to the Internet, writing letters, managing your checkbook,
doing your taxes, or creating a budget. If you needed to employ someone to do
these tasks for you, you might go to a temporary employment agency and hire a
secretary to write your letters or an accountant to manage your checkbook and
taxes.
In the computer world, you purchase application packages, so that you can do
the work. These application packages fall into generic categories such as wordprocessing or spreadsheet programs. In the same way you would choose a specific
temporary employee such as Mr. Woo for your letter writing, in the computer
world, you choose application packages by their names. They have brand names
1.4
FILE NAMES, FILE TYPES, AND FOLDERS
such as Word, Quicken, or Excel. These application packages are “employees” you
choose to do the work.
In order for these application programs to do work, they must be copied from
where they are installed (usually the hard drive, or the network drive) into RAM,
the workspace of the computer. They are “temporary” employees because you call
on them only when you need to do a specific task that they can accomplish. Windows is like an office manager who goes to the disk to get the correct file and place
it in RAM. This process is known as loading the program from disk into memory.
Windows then lets the program do its job. This process is known as executing the
program. Program files are step-by-step instructions that direct the computer to do
something.
Even though Word can create letters for anyone, you are interested only in the
letters you create—the information that you want. Once you create your data, you
also want to keep it. Remember, all the work occurs in RAM, and RAM is volatile
(temporary). In order to keep information permanently, you direct Word to write
(save) the information to a disk as a data file. Word actually does not save the data;
instead, it turns to the operating system, which does the actual work of writing the
file to disk. When you need to retrieve the information to alter it, Word again turns
to the OS to retrieve the file. Windows then reads the disk to retrieve the appropriate data file and gives it to Word.
A unique name must be assigned to each file so that it can be identified by the
OS. Program files have predetermined names such as WINWORD.EXE for Word,
QW.EXE for Quicken, or EXCEL.EXE for Excel. WINWORD is the file name and
.EXE is the file extension. Clicking on the application icon tells Windows to retrieve
the program from the disk and place it in memory so you may work. When you
install the application program you wish to use, it creates the icon, which actually is
a reference to the name and location of the program file so that Windows can find
and load it. Data files, on the other hand, are named by you, the user. You may call
the files anything you want. For instance, a file name for a letter to your sister might
be SISTER.LET or a name for your budget file might be BUDGET02.JAN. Typically,
in the Windows environment, application programs assign a file extension such as
.DOC or .XLS to identify the data file as a document file belonging to a specific
application program. So, the filename SISTER.LET would be saved as
SISTER.LET.DOC and BUDGET02.JAN would be filed as BUDGET02.JAN.XLS. The
Word and Excel programs would assign their own file extensions—.DOC and .XLS,
respectively.
A file name is mandatory, but a file extension is not. A file name typically identifies the file, such as WP for word processing or SISTER for your letter. The file name
tells you about the file, and the file type (extension) identifies the kind of data in a
file. For instance, .EXE is reserved for programs so that Windows knows the file is a
worker; in a program like WINWORD.EXE, the extension .EXE stands for executable code.
Data files are generated by specific application programs, and the information or
data in them can be altered or viewed only within the application package. You
would not give your tax information to an administrative assistant to make changes.
You would give that data to the accountant, who knows how to make the changes.
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Data files do not stand alone. They can be used only in conjunction with an
application program. Again, the job of the operating system is to fetch and carry
both program files and data files in and out of memory and to and from the disk
(reading and writing). In addition, since the OS is the “office manager,” you may
also use it to do office-related tasks such as copying or deleting a file. The OS does
not know what is in the file folder, nor can it make changes to the information in the
file folder. It can manipulate the file folder by such tasks as copying the information
in it or throwing it away.
To assist you in organizing your information further, the OS can divide or structure your disks into what are called folders or directories. Technically they are
subdirectories, but the terms directory, subdirectory, and folder are used interchangeably. Folders allow you to group related program or data files so they will be easy to
locate later. For instance, all the files related to a spreadsheet program such as Excel
could be stored in a folder named EXCEL. You might then group any data files you
created with EXCEL, such as BUDGET02.XLS and APRIL01.XLS, in another folder
called BUDGETS.
A primary directory (root) is automatically created when you prepare a disk to
store information. It is named and called the root directory, but its symbol is \ (the
backslash). You can create additional folders (subdirectories) for storing related files.
Directories, including the root, will be discussed in full detail in later chapters.
1.5
Identifying Your System Configuration
All computers come with disk drives: the floppy disk drive, the hard or fixed disk
drive, usually a CD-ROM drive or a DVD drive, and sometimes a large capacity
removable drive, such as a Zip drive. Today there are many ways that computer
systems can be configured:
n One hard disk drive, one CD-ROM drive, and one floppy disk drive.
n One hard disk drive, one CD-ROM drive, one floppy disk drive, and one Zip
drive.
n Two hard disk drives, one CD-ROM drive, and one floppy disk drive.
n One hard disk drive, one CD-ROM drive, one read-write CD-ROM drive, and
one floppy disk drive.
The possibilities are numerous. Computers are configured to suit the needs of the
individual user.
1.6
Computer Configuration Guide
This textbook is based on a specific computer configuration model—one that is most
common to PC users. However, there are some differences depending on whether
you upgraded from a previous version of Windows or whether you have a new, or
fresh, install of Windows XP Professional. These are:
1.7
Location and
Prompts
All Versions
Hard disk
C:\
Floppy disk drive
A:\
BOOTING THE SYSTEM
Upgrade from Previous
Versions of Windows
New Version of
Windows XP
Location of Windows
utility files
C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\
SYSTEM32
Other Windows files
C:\WINNT
C:\WINDOWS
Displayed prompt
for Drive C
C:\>
Activities folder on
Drive C
C:\WUGXP
Displayed prompt
for floppy disk
A:\>
Note:
When you open a Command Line session, your initial displayed screen
prompt will probably be something like C:\Documents and Settings\
YourName. This will vary, depending on how your system was set up by
your lab administrator. Again, if your administrator upgraded from a
previous version of Windows, your initial displayed screens might be
C:\WINNT\Profiles\YourName.
If your computer configuration conforms to the above, you can follow the
textbook without making any adjustments. However, computer configuration
setups vary, particularly on network systems. Thus, your system configuration may
be different, and you might have to substitute what is on your system for the setups
used in this textbook. Complete the following table so that the substitutions will be
readily identifiable for your computer:
1.7
Description
Book Reference
Hard drive
C:
Floppy drive
A:
Location of OS utility files
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
Displayed prompt for Drive C
C:\>
Activities folder on Drive C
C:\WUGXP
Prompt for floppy disk
A:\>
Your System
Booting the System
You need to know how to get the operating system files from the bootable disk into
memory (RAM) so that you can use the computer. With the Windows operating
system, this happens automatically when you turn the system on. This process is
known as booting the system. These files reside on the hard disk. The following
activity allows you to have your first hands-on experience with the computer. You
are going to load Windows or “boot the system.”
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CHAPTER 1
Note:
1.8
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Since laboratory procedures will vary, check with your instructor before
proceeding with these activities. A special process may be needed to boot
the system if you are on a network.
Activity: Booting the System
1
Check to see if the monitor has a separate on/off switch. If it does, turn on the
monitor.
2
Be sure there is no disk in Drive A. If your Drive A has a door that shuts or
latches, be sure it is open. (Remember that your instructions may be different if
you are booting to a network. You will need to get your user name and password from your instructor if you are in a lab environment.) Power on the computer by locating the Power button and pressing it. The Power button location
can vary, depending on the design of the computer.
Power button
Figure 1.2—Powering on the Computer
In Windows XP Professional, the startup sequence when booting
from the primary hard disk is as follows:
n The BIOS initiates the Power-on self-test (POST)
n The BIOS finds the boot device (usually the C drive)
n The BIOS loads the first physical sector of the booting device into memory
n The executable code in the Master Boot Record finds, and loads Ntldr (the file
that loads the operating system files from the boot volume)
n Ntldr loads Ntdetct.com for hardware detection
n Hardware configuration selection if the user is using more than one hardware
profile (boot.ini)
n Ntldr loads the Windows Kernel Ntoskrnl.exe into memory, which also loads
the support files it needs
n Hardware scanning files, which ask which Plug and Play devices are installed
as well as their capabilities
n Media support files for the hard drive and other media storage devices
n Any special video drivers are loaded
1.8
ACTIVITY: BOOTING THE SYSTEM
n It then loads drivers for all the services your system supports. A service, in this
case, refers to a program, routine, or process that performs a specific system
function to support other programs, particularly at a low level (hardware).
n Operating system logon process
The POST determines the amount of memory and checks that the hardware
devices are present and working. Then the computer system BIOS (Basic Input
Output System) begins the process of starting the operating system. The normal
search order is for the system to first look in Drive A and then, if no disk is present
in Drive A, to look to Drive C. It may also look to your CD drive. The BIOS looks for
the active partition of the hard drive and reads the MBR (Master Boot Record) into
memory. The MBR then looks for the system partition information. The Windows XP
partition boot sector reads the file system to find the bootstrap loader. It then loads
the bootstrap loader into memory and starts the bootstrap loader (ntldr—NT
loader). The hidden system file NTLDR uses another file, BOOT.INI, which identifies the location of the default operating system to load or gives you a choice of
which operating system you wish to use if you have multiple operating systems
installed. The NTLDR loads and executes another hidden system file called
NTDETECT.COM. This file checks your hardware so that Windows XP Professional
can configure the computer correctly. Then the core components of the operating
system are loaded into memory, such as the kernel (NTOSKRNEL.EXE) and the
Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL.DLL). Lastly, the Windows subsystem automatically starts WINLOGON.EXE, which presents the dialog box for you to enter your
user name and password. Depending on how your system is configured, you may
first have to press c + a + d in order to log on to the system.
3
Press c + a + d if necessary.
4
Enter your user name and password.
5
Click OK.
You have successfully booted the system. Your opening screen
may appear as one of the above, or it may look quite different. Windows XP has
endless combinations of possible desktop appearances.
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1.9
Shutting Down the System
It is very important that you shut down Windows XP Professional computers
correctly every time. When you go through the shut-down process, Windows writes
certain information to the disk. If you just turn off the computer, Windows will not
have an opportunity to take care of the process it needs to go through to shut down.
Simply turning off the computer could “crash” the system and it might be unable to
boot the next time it is turned on.
1.10
Activity: The Windows
Shut-Down Procedure
1
Click the Start button on the lower-left corner of the screen. (“Click” means to
place the point of the arrow over the word Start and press the left button on the
mouse once.)
2
Click Turn Off Computer.
Your dialog box may vary, depending on the version of Windows
you are using or if you are on a network. If Shut down does not appear in the dropdown window, click and hold on the down arrow and slide down to Shut down. On
many computers today, the power will shut off automatically. On a computer that
automatically shuts down, the screen will simply go blank, and you may not have to
physically turn the computer off. You will probably, however, have to turn off the
monitor.
3
Turn off the Power switch if necessary. Turn off the monitor.
You have successfully shut down Windows.
1.11
Why DOS?
Since Windows is a GUI (graphical user interface), when you boot the system, you
open the desktop with icons, menus, and pictures. You will run your programs and
open your data files by clicking or double-clicking icons or menu choices. You
accomplish tasks such as copying a file by opening the Windows Explorer window,
selecting a file with your mouse, and dragging it to a different location, a procedure
known as drag-and-drop. These are the reasons why a GUI is so popular. It is “user
friendly.”
In character-based operating systems, with DOS being the most common, all you
would see on the screen after you booted would be a prompt such as C:\>—no
1.11
WHY DOS?
picture, no icons, no drag-and-drop. In order to accomplish any task, you need to
know what command to use. For instance, to copy a file in a character-based operating system, you would need to key in COPY THIS.FIL THAT.FIL. This means you
would need to know the command and how to use it. Hardly as easy as a drag-anddrop operation!
Why then, you may ask yourself, would you ever need to learn the “hard, archaic
way” of using your computer when you can easily use the new, improved way? In
fact, if you talk to many people, they would say to you, “DOS is dead; long live
Windows.” They would also say, “You don’t need to know DOS anymore because it
is all Windows.” Those people are only somewhat right. They are correct in saying
that DOS as a stand-alone operating system is dead. A new computer comes with
Windows as its operating system, not DOS. But they are wrong in assuming that
you do not need to know DOS.
What they do not understand, and you will after completing this text, is that
what they refer to as DOS is really the Command Line interface. In fact, the GUI is
simply a pretty face on top of what is really going on under the hood. Windows is
like the gauges on the dashboard of an automobile. When the red light goes on,
there is trouble under the hood. The red light only alerts you to a problem. Sometimes, you may fix the problem simply by responding to the evidence given. For
instance, if you see the red oil light come on, that information only requires you to
put oil in your engine. Other times, you must dig deeper to solve the problem. You
must go to the engine and run diagnostic tests to identify the problem. Then you can
fix the problem.
The same is true in Windows. Windows will alert you to a problem like the red
light on the dashboard. Sometimes you can fix it at the GUI level, and other times
you must open the hood and go to the command line interface to run diagnostic
software to identify the problem. Once you have identified the problem, you can fix
it either by running the problem-solving software you are given with Windows or
by making small fixes at the system level.
Microsoft, even though it expects you to use the GUI for your day-to-day computer operations, still knows the importance of a character-based interface—the
command line. That is why, with Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Me, Windows
NT, Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Professional, and Windows XP, one of the
choices is the availability of the command line interface. In Windows Me, it is a
menu choice called the MS-DOS Prompt. In Windows 2000 and Windows XP
Professional, it is simply called the Command Prompt. You open what used to be
called a DOS window and is now called a Command Prompt window, but where
you really are is right back to a character-based interface.
Why, then, did Microsoft leave this option available to the user? There are many
reasons. For instance, you will find that there are many tasks that still cannot be
accomplished from the GUI. In addition, Windows provides utility programs that
can only be run at the command line to help you solve problems with Windows
itself. Furthermore, there are other tasks that, although they can be done from the
GUI, are accomplished easier and faster from the command line, and most users
will use the command line in those instances. You will also find that even in the
Windows environment, there is an assumption that the user “knows” DOS. For
instance, you will find that error messages you receive are couched in DOS terms,
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GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
such as “The system can not find the path specified.” Likewise, you will still find
that there are programs, especially if you are involved in developing Web pages for
use on the Internet, that can only be run from the DOS system level (another way of
saying command line interface or command line prompt).
Additionally, if you are a user of the Internet, which often runs on Unix- or
Linux-based computers, you often will be once again at the command line. Although Unix and Linux (both of which are command line interface operating
systems—Linux is based on Unix-like commands) do not use commands identical to
DOS commands, they are in fact similar enough that, if you know one, you can
figure out the other.
If you work with networks or plan a career in network administration, knowledge of the command line is a necessity. Network operating systems rely on the
command line interface. Even the Windows family of operating systems, Microsoft’s
GUI networking operating system, absolutely relies on command line interfaces.
Windows XP Professional provides you with an expanded list of commands that are
available to you from the command line. In addition, Windows Operating systems
allow you to write batch files, which are usually written, tested, and run at the
command line interface, to automate many routine tasks. In fact, Windows XP
Professional has even more powerful batch file commands available to you than
Windows Me and Windows 98. Furthermore, if a career in a computer-related field
is in your future, you must know the command line interface. Almost all networking
classes have as a prerequisite a working knowledge of DOS. Remember that “DOS”
is a shorthand way of saying “command line interface.” If you are working towards
A+ Certification, knowing “DOS” is a must. It is much easier to say “go to DOS”
than to say “go to the command prompt” or “the command line interface.”
You will also find that the knowledge that you gain in this text by learning the
command line interface will help you understand what is going on in the Windows
environment. Perhaps an analogy might be your automobile. Most of us are not auto
mechanics and do not know how to do engine repair. Nonetheless, if you have an
understanding of what is going on under the hood, you may be able to do minor
repairs and preventative maintenance so you can avoid more costly major repairs.
At the very least, you will be able to explain problems to professional auto technicians in intelligent terms that will allow them to identify problems so that they may
spend their expensive time fixing, not identifying, problems. In this text, you are
going to use the command line prompt, and you will learn what’s under the hood of
Windows. This will give you, as with an automobile, the ability to do minor repairs
and preventative maintenance as well as to explain complex problems to a software
technician.
1.12
Accessing the Command Line Prompt
In order to use the command line interface, you first need to access it. You must
open the Command Line window from a menu, or you may create a shortcut to it.
One thing you must remember is not to turn off the computer when you are in a
Command Line window. You must exit the window and then follow the Windows
shut-down procedure.
1.13
Note:
1.13
ACTIVITY: THE COMMAND LINE PROMPT
What you see on your screen may differ from the examples shown in this
book. While almost all of the examples shown are done on a computer with
a standard installation of Windows XP Professional, some may be from
another version of Windows. You can ignore these minor differences. If
there is a significant difference, it will be noted and explained.
Activity: The Command Line Prompt
1
Boot the system.
2
Click Start. Click Programs. Click Accessories. Click Command Prompt.
Note:
If you do not see the title bar, press a + e
You have opened the Command Prompt window. This is the
character-based interface. You may close this window and return to the desktop.
3
Click the
on the title bar in the right corner.
You have returned to the desktop. You can also create a shortcut to
the command line. A shortcut is an icon on the desktop that points to an application
or command.
Note:
If you are in a lab environment, check with your administrator or lab
technician to see if there are any special instructions for creating shortcuts.
4
Right-click the desktop.
5
Point to New.
13
14
CHAPTER 1
6
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Click Shortcut.
You opened the dialog box for the Create Shortcut wizard. A
wizard is a tool that leads you through the steps you need to take to accomplish
your goal. In order to create a shortcut, you need to know the name and location of
the program of interest.
7
In the text box, key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CMD.EXE
(Remember, if you have upgraded from Windows 2000, all references to the
WINDOWS directory will be WINNT on your system.)
8
Click Next.
You may use any name you wish for your shortcut. However, in
this example, Windows automatically gives the shortcut the name of CMD.EXE. In
this way, Windows is telling you that CMD.EXE is the Command Prompt.
9
Key in the following: Command Prompt
10 Click Finish.
You have created a shortcut and placed it on the desktop. By
double-clicking it, you can go to the command line, referred to as the “Command
Prompt.”
11 Double-click the Command Prompt shortcut.
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
C:\Windows\System32>_
The Command Prompt window opens with the default prompt (in
this example, that is C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32). You would prefer it to open with
the prompt C:\. You may alter this.
1.13
12 Click the
dow.
ACTIVITY: THE COMMAND LINE PROMPT
on the title bar in the right corner to close the Command Line win-
13 Right-click the Command Prompt shortcut. Click Properties.
In Windows XP Professional, when you open the shortcut, you
may be taken to either C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 or to C:\, depending on how
your lab technician set up your environment. This is determined by the entry in the
Start in: text box. In this example, the Command Prompt window will open in
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32.
14 Select the text in the Start in: text box.
15 Key in the following: C:\
You have altered the properties of the Command Prompt window
so that it will always start at C:\.
16 Click OK.
15
16
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
17 Double-click the Command Prompt icon.
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
C:\>_
Now your shortcut will open with C:\> as the default.
18 Click the
1.14
on the title bar in the right corner.
Controlling the Appearance of
the Command Line Window
In the Windows environment, everything initially appears in a window with a title
bar and a toolbar, but this look can be changed. You can leave the Command Prompt
in a window. When it is in a window, you can use the Minimize button ( ), the
Maximize button ( ), or the Restore button ( ), all on the right side of the title bar.
The Minimize button will make the window a button on the taskbar. The Maximize
button will fill the entire screen with the window, and the Restore button will return
the window to its previous size. While in window view, you may alter the size of the
text in the window. You may also dispense with the window altogether and view
the command line in full-screen mode by clicking on the icon on the far left side of
the title bar, selecting Properties, selecting Options, and selecting Full Screen under
Display Options. To toggle (switch) between a window and full-screen mode, you
may press the a and e keys.
1.15
Activity: Altering the
Command Line Window
1
Double-click the Command Prompt shortcut on the desktop.
2
Place and hold your mouse pointer over the Minimize button in the upper-right
corner of the Command Prompt window.
When you do not know what an icon represents, placing the
mouse pointer over the object causes a brief description of the object to appear. This
description is called a ToolTip.
3
Click the Minimize button on the title bar.
1.15
ACTIVITY: ALTERING THE COMMAND LINE WINDOW
17
The Command Prompt window has become a button on the
taskbar. It is still open but not active.
4
Click the Command Prompt button on the taskbar.
5
Click the Maximize button on the title bar.
Now the Command Prompt window is at its maximum size.
Depending on the resolution of your monitor and the text size setting, the display
may fill the entire screen.
6
Click the Restore button.
7
Click on the icon in the upper-left corner of the Command Prompt screen,
You will open a menu.
8
Select Properties from the menu. Click on Font.
.
18
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
While you are in this window, you may choose a font size. The
fonts that have Tt in front of them are called TrueType fonts. The other choice is
raster or bit-mapped fonts. Typically, a bit-mapped font will be clearer and sharper
in a Command Prompt window, and a TrueType font is better for use in application
programs such as Word or Excel. Your choices of font sizes will depend on your
monitor and available resolutions.
9
Click Cancel to close the Properties box.
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
C:\>_
You have returned the display to a window. The actual displays
you will see on the screen are white text on a black background, but in this text,
dark text on a lighter background will be used for easier reading. Remember never
turn off the computer when at the Command Prompt. You must first close the
Command Prompt window and return to the Windows desktop or type EXIT at the
prompt to return to the desktop. Then you must shut down the computer using the
Windows shut-down procedure, learned previously.
10 Key in the following: C:\>EXIT e
You have closed the Command Prompt window and returned to
the desktop.
1.16
The Default Drive and Default Directory
The command prompt is where you key in your commands. You normally do not
use a pointing device when in command prompt mode. Command prompt mode is
character-based, which means that you must explicitly tell the operating system
1.17
ACTIVITY: CHANGING THE DEFAULT DRIVE
what you want it to do by keying in the instruction (command). Where you key in
your command is indicated by a blinking cursor following the prompt. The prompt
usually looks like C:\>_ or sometimes [C:\]_. (The _ represents the blinking cursor.)
The letter and colon behind the greater-than sign or in brackets is the default drive.
The \ has two functions. It indicates the root directory when proceeded by a colon
(:) and acts as a separator between directories, in a prompt such as
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>. The default drive and directory is your current
location. This will change depending on where you are. The default drive and
directory that is displayed when you go to the command line prompt depends on
the setup of your particular computer, how many hard drives you have, and what
software is currently running. The most common prompt will be C:\>,
C:\WINDOWS>, or C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>, but many other variations are
possible. The operating system names drives using a letter followed by a colon, such
as A:, C:, or J:. All drives, no matter the type—CD-ROM drives, floppy drives,
removable drives such as Zip drives or Jaz drives, and hard drives—follow this
naming rule. The default drive is the one where the operating system is currently
pointing. It can be changed easily.
1.17
Activity: Changing the Default Drive
Note 1:
Note 2:
You should be at the Windows desktop.
Though your Command Line window may open to a different default
drive and directory, in this text, the prompt used will be C:\>.
1
Click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, and click Command
Prompt or double-click the Command Prompt shortcut on the desktop.
2
Get the disk labeled Activities that came with the textbook.
3
To insert a 3½-inch disk properly into the disk drive, place your thumb on the
label with the metal shutter facing away from you and toward the floppy disk
drive (see Figure 1.3). On some computers, the floppy disk drive is installed
vertically. To determine which way to insert the disk it is helpful to know that the
side of the disk with the circular metal disk is the bottom of the disk. The bottom
of the disk always faces the button on the drive. Slip the disk into the slot and
gently push the disk into the drive until you hear it click and/or feel it snap into
place. When the disk is properly in place, the small rectangular button on the
floppy drive will pop out.
Figure 1.3—Inserting a Disk
19
20
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Remember, when you see the notation e, it means to press the e
key located towards the right side of the keyboard and labeled “Enter”
and/or “Return.”
Note 2: The prompt will be in the following font: C: What you key in will be in the
following font: C: Key in only what follows the prompt, not the prompt
itself.
Note 3: You will need to refer to your Configuration Table in Section 1.6 from time
to time to ensure that your operating procedures for this, and all other
activities, are correct for the computer you are using.
Note 1:
4
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
C:\>A:
A:\>_
You have changed the default drive to the A drive.
1.18
Understanding Commands
Windows operating system commands are programs. Like application programs,
they perform specific tasks. OS commands are of two types: internal or external.
When you boot the system, internal commands are automatically loaded and stored
into memory (RAM). These internal commands are built into the command processor, CMD.EXE. This file, and hence, these internal commands, are always placed in
memory and remain in RAM the entire time your computer is on.
To use an internal command, you key in the command name at the command line
or click the command’s icon. For an internal command, Windows checks memory,
finds the program, loads it into RAM, and executes it. Internal commands are also
called resident commands because they reside in memory or inside the computer.
Internal commands are limited in number because they take up valuable space in
memory.
External commands are stored as files on a disk. When you wish to use an
external command, you call upon the operating system to load the program into
RAM by keying in the program’s name or clicking its icon. Since it is an external
command, the OS cannot find the program internally, so it must go to the disk,
locate the file, load it into RAM, and then execute it. If the OS cannot find the file,
the program cannot be run. These commands are called external or transient commands because they reside in a file on a disk and must be read into RAM each time
you key them in.
Windows loads and executes programs such as Word or Quicken. Clicking or
double-clicking a program icon or choosing a program from a menu loads an
external command. You do not have to key in a command name, but the process is
the same. For instance, the icon for Word stores the location and name of the program file such as C:\PROGRAM FILES\MICROSOFT OFFICE\WINWORD.EXE.
The operating system looks first for the program in memory. When it cannot find it
in memory, it goes to the specified location, including the disk drive as well as the
1.19
ACTIVITY: USING THE DIR COMMAND
directory. In the example given, Windows looks to Drive C in a folder called
MICROSOFT OFFICE, which is in a folder called PROGRAM FILES, for a file called
WINWORD.EXE. When it finds it, it loads it, and you have Word available to you.
You are letting the GUI do the work. You could do the work yourself at the command prompt by simply keying in WINWORD.EXE. The end result would be the
same. The OS would find and load Word for you. If the icon were set up incorrectly,
Windows would not load (execute) the program you wanted, no matter how often
you chose the icon or the menu choice. The icon or menu choice is only a pointer to
the program file.
If the icon had stored incorrect information, such as an incorrect program location, Windows would give you the error message that it could not load Word
because it could not find it. If you did not understand this process, you would not
be able to use Word because all you would see would be the error message. If you
did understand the operating system process, you would either correct the pointer
or run Word from the command prompt.
Although all program files are external, including application programs, the term
external command is reserved for the group of programs that perform operating
system functions. These programs are files that come with Windows and are copied
to a subdirectory called C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 on the hard disk when Windows is installed. This group of files is generically referred to as the command line
utility files or system utility files.
In the Command Prompt window, unlike the Windows GUI environment, you
have no icons. In order to use commands, you must know their file names. The DIR
command, an internal command that stands for directory, is provided so that you
may look for files on a disk from the command line. In Windows, Explorer is the
equivalent of the DIR command. When you key in DIR and press the Enter key, you
are asking the operating system to run the directory program. The purpose or task
of the DIR command is to display the names of all the files in a directory on the disk
onto the screen. You see what could be described as a table of contents of the disk.
The DIR command is the first internal command you will use.
1.19
Activity: Using the DIR Command
Note:
1
Be sure the disk labeled ACTIVITIES is in Drive A and you are at the A:\>
prompt.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
11/24/2001
10/30/2001
07/31/2000
10/31/2001
05/14/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
05/30/2000
11:24
03:18
04:32
07:08
08:07
01:46
09:28
07:08
05:37
09:10
04:50
04:32
AM
PM
PM
PM
AM
PM
AM
PM
PM
AM
PM
PM
194
758
260
478
64
148
<DIR>
478
383
294
138
182
PLANETS.TXT
RIGHT.UP
STATE.CAP
VEN.NEW
WILD2.YYY
ASTRO.TMP
DATA
VEN.TMP
EARTH.THR
EXP02JAN.dta
FILE3.SWT
OLDAUTO.MAK
21
22
CHAPTER 1
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/12/2002
05/14/2001
05/27/2001
11/16/2002
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
12/31/2001
10/31/2001
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
12:00 PM
12:13 AM
09:31 AM
<DIR>
11:28 AM
10:08 PM
09:36 AM
<DIR>
01:08 PM
12:25 AM
12:53 PM
07:08 PM
04:32 PM
06:40 PM
91 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
115 RIGHT.RED
138 AWARD.MOV
SPORTS
4,843 GO.BAT
76 LONGFILENAME
LEVEL-1
406 MER.99
465 person.fil
46 STEVEN.FIL
478 VENUS.TXT
93 WILDONE
188 ZODIAC.FIL
47,396 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
This graphic represents the last part of the screen you will see (91
files and 7 directories will be listed). You may see more or fewer files displayed,
depending on how your Command Prompt window is set up. Nonetheless, you will
see text moving vertically on the screen. This movement is known as scrolling, the
result of executing the DIR command. The operating system is displaying, or listing,
all the files on the root of the disk in Drive A and stops scrolling when the list ends.
The last subdirectory on the list is LEVEL-1. You can tell it is a subdirectory by the
<DIR> entry to the left of the name. The last file listed is called ZODIAC.FIL. The
file name is ZODIAC. The file extension is FIL.
The order of the file information differs significantly from some versions of
Windows. You will use the file ZODIAC.FIL as your example. First, you will see the
date that the file was created, 10/31/2001; and the time, 06:40 PM. The date and time
indicate either when this file was created or when it was last modified. Next is the
number 188, the size of the file in bytes. Then you will see the file name.
Now look at the bottom two lines of the screen. One line states: 91 File(s) 47,396
bytes. This line indicates how many files are in the current directory and how much
room they occupy. The next line, 7 Dir(s) 287,744 bytes free, indicates first how
many directories are below the current directory and second how much room is left
on the disk for more files. All the files listed on the disk are practice files so that you
may practice using the operating system commands without harming any of your
own files.
1.20
Software Versions
Software companies regularly release new versions of software to take advantage of
new technology. These upgrades also contain enhancements. The term enhancements
simply means more features. In addition, new versions of software fix problems in
older versions. This process is known as fixing bugs. To keep track of the versions,
companies assign them version numbers. For instance, there is WordPerfect 8 and
WordPerfect 9 and Word 2000 and Word 2002.
As previously explained, version numbers are also assigned to operating systems. For MS-DOS, 1.0 was the first version, released in 1981, and DOS 6.22 was the
last stand-alone, character-based operating system. Windows 95 replaced DOS 6.22.
Windows Millennium Edition replaced Windows 98 and Windows 95, and
1.24
THE DATE AND TIME COMMANDS
Windows 2000 Professional replaced Windows NT. Windows XP Home Edition is an
UpGrade of Windows Millennium and Windows XP Professional is an upgrade to
Windows 2000 Professional. Beginning with Windows 95, DOS has been integrated
into the Windows operating system.
1.21
1
Activity: Using the VER Command
Key in the following: A:\>VER e
A:\>VER
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
A:\> _
In this example, the computer is running the operating system
Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]. The version number you see depends on the version
of Windows you have on your computer.
1.22
The CLS Command
Your screen is filled with the display of the directory from the DIR command that
you keyed in. You may want to have a “fresh” screen, with nothing displayed except
the C:\> prompt and the cursor in its “home” position (the upper left-hand corner
of the screen). The internal command CLS clears the screen. Whatever is displayed
on the screen will go away, as if you erased a chalkboard. The command erases the
screen display, not your files.
1.23
1
Activity: Using the CLS Command
Key in the following: A:\>CLS e
A:\>_
The screen is now cleared, and the A:\> is back in the upper lefthand corner.
1.24
The DATE and TIME Commands
The computer, via a battery, keeps track of the current date and time. Date and time
are known as the system date and the system time. The system date and time are
the date and time the computer uses when it opens and closes files (last date/time
accessed) or when another program asks for the date and time. Today’s computers
have a built-in clock. It is simply a built-in, 24-hour, battery-operated clock that sets
23
24
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
the date and time automatically when you boot the system. You can change or check
the system date and system time whenever you wish by using the internal DATE
and TIME commands at the command line, or from within the Windows desktop by
clicking the time displayed at the far right of the taskbar.
1.25
Activity: Using DATE/TIME
Commands at the Command Line
WARNING: If you are logged on to a DOMAIN be SURE and return the date and
time to the current date and time before you shut down. If you do not do this, you
may not be able to log on to that station.
1
Key in the following: A:\>DATE e
A:\>DATE
The current date is: Wed 01/30/2002
Enter the new date: (mm-dd-yy)
The date displayed on your screen is the current date, not the
above example. If you did not wish to change the date, you would just press <Enter>, retaining the date displayed and returning you to A:\>. However, if you do
want to change the date, respond to the prompt. You must key in the date in the
proper format, such as 11-15-02. You may not key in character data such as November 15, 2002. Furthermore, you are allowed to use some other separators that are not
stated. You may key in 11/15/02 using the forward slash, or you may use periods
such as 11.15.02. No other characters can be used.
2
Key in the following: 12-31-02 e
A:\>DATE
The current date is: Wed 01/30/2002
Enter the new date: (mm-dd-yy) 12-31-02
A:\>_
You did change the date, and we will examine this change in a
moment. You can also change the time in the same fashion with the TIME command.
3
Key in the following: A:\>TIME e
A:\>TIME
The current time is: 10:45:47.15
Enter the new time:
The time displayed on your screen is the current time, not the
above example. If you did not wish to change the time, you would just press e,
1.25
ACTIVITY: USING DATE/TIME COMMANDS AT THE COMMAND LINE
retaining the time displayed and returning you to A:\>. However, if you do want to
change the time, you respond to the prompt. You may use only the colon (:) to
separate the numbers. Although in this case you are going to key in the seconds,
most people usually key in only the hour and minutes. If you wish the time to be in
the P.M., you add a “p” after the time. You may also use a 24-hour clock.
4
Key in the following: 23:59:59 e
A:\>TIME
The current time is: 10:45:47.15
Enter the new time: 23:59:59
A:\>_
You have just reset the computer clock with the DATE and TIME
commands. These are internal commands. How do you know the system date and
time have been changed? You can check by keying in the commands using a parameter that displays only the date and time.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DATE /T e
6
Key in the following: A:\>TIME /T e
A:\>DATE /T
Wed 01/01/2003
A:\>TIME /T
12:02 AM
A:\> _
Your time display numbers may be slightly different. What have
you done? You have changed the system date and time. You entered the date of
December 31, 2002 (12-31-02), prior to changing the time. The date now displayed is
Wed, January 1, 2003. How did that happen? Why is the displayed date different
from the keyed-in date? After you entered the date of 12/31/02, you entered the
time of 11:59 p.m. (23:59:59). Seconds went by; the time passed midnight, and, when
you are passed midnight, you are into a new day. Hence, the day “rolled over” from
December 31, 2002 to January 1, 2003. In other words, the system keeps the date and
time current based on the information you give. The /T parameter used with the
DATE and TIME commands displayed the system date and time.
The day of the week is displayed in the date. You can experiment with the DATE
and TIME commands. For instance, you can find the day of your birthday in any
future or past year by using the DATE command and entering your birthday.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DATE e
8
At the prompt on the screen key in your birthday for 2002:
A:\> 12-11-02 e
(In this example, I used my birthday.)
25
26
CHAPTER 1
9
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Key in the following: A:\>DATE /T e
A:\>DATE
The current date is: Wed 01/01/2003
Enter the new date: (mm-dd-yy) 12-11-02
A:\>DATE /T
Wed 12/11/2002
A:\>_
The screen display shows you the day of your birthday in 2002. In
this case, my birthday falls on a Wednesday. If you wish to see or change the system
date or time, you can also use the clock on the taskbar.
10 Click the Close button in the Command Prompt window.
1.26
1
Activity: Changing the Date
and Time Using the Taskbar
Right-click the time display on the right of the taskbar. Click Adjust Date/Time.
Drop-down list
Spin box
You have opened the Date/Time Properties dialog box. You can
change the date by clicking on any one of the numbers in the calendar. You can
change the time either by clicking in the spin box under the clock, deleting any part
of the time, and keying in the correct time, or by using the up and down arrows in
the spin box. A spin box is a control that allows you to move (“spin”) through a set
of fixed values such as dates or times. In a spin box, you may also key in a valid
value in the box. You can change the month or year by using the drop-down list box.
You may either key in the new value or use the up or down arrows. A drop-down
list box is a control that has the current value in it. When you click the up or down
arrow, you open the drop-down list box to display a pre-determined list of choices,
from which you can make a seletion.
2
Change the date, month, and time to the current values. (Do not skip this step.)
1.27
MEDIA OBJECTS: THEIR PROPERTIES AND VALUES
You have returned the system time and date to the current values.
A feature of the clock on the taskbar is to show you the current date without opening the dialog box.
3
Click OK.
4
Place the mouse pointer over the time on the taskbar. Do not click, just point the
arrow.
The day and date are briefly displayed. The display remains only
for a few seconds and then disappears.
1.27
Media Objects: Their
Properties and Values
What is an object? What is a property? To Windows, everything is an object. This is
true for all versions of Windows. A file, the keyboard, a disk drive—all are objects.
Each object has properties, and the properties may have values.
To explain the object-property-value relationship, you can use a person. A person
is an object. All objects of that same type (human) have the same properties. Some
properties of this person object are name, height, and eye color. The values of person
objects, however, differ. One person’s name property value is John Jones; another
person’s name property value is Olivia Wu. A newborn person has the property of
name, but no value has been assigned to that property.
To discover information about an object in Windows, you examine that object’s
property sheet. Most objects’ property sheets can be displayed by right-clicking on
the object icon and choosing Properties from the shortcut menu. For example, when
you copy a disk, it is very important that you know what type of media you are
using. Furthermore, it is important to know what type of floppy disk drive or hard
drive you have on your system. You need to know the “native” format of the disk
drive, whether or not you have a high-density disk drive, and which drive is
27
28
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Drive A. In Windows, this information is ascertained by examining a drive’s property sheet.
1.28
1
Activity: Examining Disk
Properties and Values
Click the Start menu. Click My Computer. (If you have the My Computer icon
on your desktop, you may double-click the icon.)
You have opened the My Computer window. In this example, the
system is logged onto a Domain, and there are many network drives shown, as well
as the local drives. In My Computer, you see all the drives available on your system.
You can identify the type of drive by its icon:
Floppy drive icon:
(Drives A and B, shows removable disk)
Local hard drive icon:
(Drives C through E)
Network drive icon:
(Remaining drives, shows cable designating
network drive)
Local compact disc drive:
Local Zip drive:
This view is the default view for Windows XP Professional. You may also see the
following display as shown in Figure 1.1, where the Folder options have been
changed to a classic Windows display.
1.28
ACTIVITY: EXAMINING DISK PROPERTIES AND VALUES
Figure 1.1—My Computer in a Classic Windows Display
In this text, different views on different computer systems will be shown. The
appearance of your desktop and windows will depend on your particular lab or
home computing environment.
2
Right-click the A drive icon.
A drop-down menu has opened. The last item on the menu is
Properties. Depending on the configuration of your system, your drop down menu
may have more or less options available to you.
3
Click Properties.
29
30
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
The property sheet for the A drive displays the properties of the
ACTIVITIES disk. You can see many things about the disk: the label or electronic
name, the amount of used space, and the amount of free space displayed in numbers and in a graphic pie chart. You can also see the disk type and its total capacity.
This is a 3½-inch diskette with a total capacity of 1,457,664 bytes.
4
Click Cancel.
5
Close My Computer.
1.29
Ethical Considerations in Copying Disks
It is unethical and illegal to make a copy of a program or a disk that you did not
purchase and do not own. Making a copy of a program or receiving a copy of a
program is stealing someone else’s work. If you did not personally purchase the
program, even if you are using it at work, it is still illegal to copy it and use it.
However, most software manufacturers allow you and encourage you to make
backup copies of program disks for your own personal use in case something
happens to the original. Remember, however, you need to have purchased the
program or have permission to copy the disk in order for the copy to be both legal
and ethical. If your program came on a CD-ROM, as is most usual today, it is
possible to copy it if you have a recording CD-ROM (CDRW) drive, but once again,
this is legal only if you purchased the CD.
In the following activity, you are going to copy the ACTIVITIES disk that comes
with this book so that you have a working copy of it. You will work from a copy of
the ACTIVITIES disk so that, if anything happens, you can use the original ACTIVITIES disk to make another copy. Whenever possible, always work from a copy,
never an original. This copy of the ACTIVITIES disk will be used in all future
exercises. It is legal to make a copy for your personal use only. If you are in a
computer lab, check with your instructor for the procedures in your specific lab.
1.30
Making a Copy of the ACTIVITIES
Disk: DISKCOPY
When making an exact copy of a disk, you must have like media. This means the
disk you are copying from and the disk you are copying to must be exactly the same
type and capacity. You are now going to make a working copy of the ACTIVITIES
disk. You will use an external program called DISKCOPY. It is stored as a file called
DISKCOPY.COM in the WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 (or WINNT\SYSTEM32)
subdirectory. It does exactly what it says; it copies all the information from one
floppy disk to another. Before it copies a disk, it formats it. You can never use the
DISKCOPY command to copy from a hard disk to a floppy disk or from a floppy
disk to a hard disk. You could copy the disk from the desktop. Notice the menu in
the previous Activity 1.28, step 2. One of the options is Copy Disk. . . In the following activity however, you will use the command line method. Please follow the
instructions precisely. The ACTIVITIES disk is a high-density, 3½-inch floppy disk.
Your blank disk must be the same media type in order to do the next activity.
1.31
1.31
Activity: Using DISKCOPY
Note:
1
ACTIVITY: USING DISKCOPY
If you are in a lab environment, check with your instructor to see if there
are any special procedures.
Get a new paper label. On the label write “ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy” and
your name. Make sure you are using either a new disk or one that you no longer
want the information on, and that is the same type and capacity as the ACTIVITIES disk. Affix the label to the disk. See Figure 1.5 for the correct location of the
label.
Label
Figure 1.5—Floppy Disk Label Placement
2
Place the ACTIVITIES disk that came with the textbook in Drive A.
3
Click Start. Point to Programs. Point to Accessories. Click Command
Prompt.
4
Key in the following: C:\ >CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 e
Note:
Refer to your configuration table, if necessary, to locate the correct directory.
5
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DISKCOPY A: A: e
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DISKCOPY A: A:
Insert SOURCE disk in drive A:
and press ENTER when ready . . .
By keying in DISKCOPY, you asked the command processor to
find a program called DISKCOPY. It first looked in memory in the internal table of
commands. When it could not find a match, it went to the disk in Drive C and the
subdirectory WINDOWS\SYSTEM32, found the program, loaded it into memory,
and started executing it. This program has some prompts, which are instructions to
follow. The program asks you to put the SOURCE disk that you wish to copy in
Drive A. In this case, the ACTIVITIES disk, which you want to copy, is already in
Drive A. You are telling the operating system to make a copy from the disk in
31
32
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Drive A to the disk in Drive A. To make the copy or begin executing the command
DISKCOPY, press the e key.
6
Press e
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DISKCOPY A: A:
Insert SOURCE disk in drive A:
and press ENTER when ready . . .
Copying 80 tracks
18 sectors per track, 2 side(s)
Track and sector numbers will vary depending on the type of disk
used. The DISKCOPY command tells the operating system to copy everything on
the disk in Drive A (the SOURCE) to RAM. While this program is doing the copying,
the cursor flashes onscreen. When the command is completed or the copying is
finished, you will need to take another step. You see the following prompt:
Insert TARGET disk in drive A:
and press ENTER when ready . . .
This prompt tells you to remove the SOURCE disk from Drive A
and insert the blank or TARGET disk in Drive A so the operating system has a place
to copy the information.
7
Remove the master ACTIVITIES disk from Drive A. Insert the blank disk labeled
“ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy” into Drive A. Close or latch the drive door.
Press e
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DISKCOPY A: A:
Insert SOURCE disk in drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
Copying 80 tracks
18 sectors per track, 2 side(s)
Insert TARGET disk in drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
-
Again, you see the flashing cursor. After DISKCOPY formats the
TARGET disk, whatever was copied into RAM is copied or written to the blank disk
in Drive A. When the process is complete, you will see the following message:
1.33
ACTIVITY: ENDING THE WORK SESSION
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Copy another disk (Y/N)?_
The system wants to know if you wish to copy another disk.
8
Press N e
Copy another disk (Y/N)? N
The prompt tells you that the program has finished executing. The
volume serial number changes with each DISKCOPY command and will not be the
same as the example.
Volume Serial Number is 1508-0C25
Copy another disk (Y/N)? N
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You are returned to the C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32> prompt. The
operating system is now ready for a new command.
9
Close the Command Prompt window.
1.32
How to End the Work Session
You can stop working with the computer at any time. Since your programs are
stored on disks, you will not lose them. Remember, if you stop in the middle of an
Activity, you will have to remember what the prompt was when you stopped, and
return to it when you begin again. For example, if the default prompt was A:\>
when you stop, it would be helpful to write that down. Then, when you begin again,
you will be able to return to the place you were when you stopped. You must
always exit Windows properly and completely; otherwise you could do serious,
sometimes irreparable, damage to the system.
1.33
Note:
Activity: Ending the Work Session
Check with your lab instructor to see what special procedures you might
need to follow in your lab environment.
1
Close any remaining open windows, including the Command Prompt window.
2
Click Start.
3
Click Shut Down. Be sure Shut down is the choice on the drop-down menu.
33
34
CHAPTER 1
4
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Click OK.
You have initiated the shut-down procedure.
5
New computers may be set to power down automatically, but if this does not
happen, wait until you see the screen telling you it is safe to turn off the computer.
6
Turn off the system unit and (if necessary).
Chapter Summary
1. An operating system is a software program that is required in order to run
application software and to oversee the hardware components of the computer
system.
2. Windows is the major operating system in use today on Wintel microcomputers.
3. All microcomputers come with disk drives. There three basic types of disk
drives are the floppy disk drive, the hard disk drive, and the CD-ROM drive.
4. Computer systems are configured in various ways, such as: One hard disk
drive, one CD-ROM drive, and one floppy disk drive; one hard disk drive, one
CD-ROM drive, one floppy disk drive, and one Zip drive; two hard disk drives,
one CD-ROM drive, and one floppy disk drive, one hard disk drive, one CDROM drive, one read-write CD-ROM drive, and one floppy disk drive.
5. Booting the system, also known as a cold start, means more than powering on
the system. It loads the operating system into memory and executes the selfdiagnostic test routine.
6. Internal commands are programs loaded in CMD.EXE with the operating
system. They remain in memory until the power is turned off.
7. External commands are stored on a disk and must be loaded into memory each
time they are used. They are transient and do not remain in memory after being
executed.
8. Programs and data are stored on disks as files. The formal name for this is file
specification, which includes the file name and the file extension.
9. A command is a program. A program is the set of instructions telling the computer what to do.
10. Programs (commands) must be loaded into memory in order to be executed.
11. To load a program into memory, the user can key in the command name at the
system prompt or click on the command’s icon.
12. The DIR command is an internal command that displays the directory (table of
contents) of a disk.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
13. Internal commands include VER, CLS, DATE, and TIME.
n VER displays the current version of the OS that is in memory
n CLS clears the screen.
n DATE and TIME allow you to look at and/or change the system date and
system time, a process that can also be done from the desktop taskbar. Using
the /T parameter with the DATE or TIME command will display the system
date or time.
14. DISKCOPY is an external command that makes an identical copy of any disk,
track for track, sector for sector. It was used to make a working copy of the
ACTIVITIES disk but can be used to make exact copies with any two floppy
disks that are the same media type. It formats a disk prior to copying to it.
15. To end a work session with the computer, Windows must be shut down in the
proper sequence and shouldn’t be turned off until a message on the screen tells
you it is safe to do so.
Key Terms
booting the system
bug
command
cursor
data file
disk file
file extension
file name
file specification
function key
LFN
operating system
program file
system date
system time
ToolTip
Discussion Questions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
What is an operating system?
What are enhancements?
Define system configuration.
List two common ways that computer systems are configured.
Why is it necessary to boot the system?
How would you boot the system?
What is an object?
What is a property?
What is a value?
Identify and explain the function and purpose of the two parts of a file specification.
What is the difference between a command and a program?
Compare and contrast internal and external commands.
What is the purpose of the DIR command?
What is the function of the VER command?
What is the function of the CLS command?
How can you set the date and time?
How do you set the time when using the TIME command?
What is the purpose of making a backup copy of a program?
Why should you work with a copy of a program rather than with the original?
Why is it important to know what type of media you are using when copying
disks?
35
36
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
21. What is the purpose of the DISKCOPY command?
22. What are the necessary steps to ending a work session?
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true and the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. To identify what version of the operating system you are using,
you could, at the command line, use the VER command.
T
F
2. A correct way to key in a date would be 2/4/01.
T
F
3. When you see the computer notation c + C, it means you
should key in the word Control and then the letter C.
T
F
4. LFN is an acronym for Last File Noted.
T
F
5. DISKCOPY.COM is a program that is stored on the disk as a file.
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. One way to communicate with the computer is by _______________ commands
on the keyboard.
7. Programs, data, and text are stored on disks as _______________.
8. The operating system is in charge of the _______________ components of the
computer.
9. If you wanted to see the table of contents of a disk in the Command Prompt
window, you would key in _______________.
10. When you wish to end your computer session, you would first click on the
_______________ button.
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. To display the contents of a disk, key in the following command:
____
a. TOC
b. DIR
c. DIS
d. Directory
12. To change the date to May 7, 2001, after you key in DATE, you could
____
key in:
a. 5/7/01
b. 5-7-01
c. 5.7.01
d. any of the above
13. To clear the screen, key in:
____
a. CLS
b. CLR
c. CLEAR
d. Clear the screen
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
____
14. Which of the following is a type of disk drive?
a. hard disk drive
b. soft disk drive
c. both a and b
d. neither a nor b
15. To copy all the information from one floppy disk to another, you may
use the command:
a. DISKCOPY
b. COPY
c. DISKCMP
d. D-COPY
Homework Assignments
Problem Set I—At the Computer
Problem A
A-a
Boot the system, if it is not booted.
A-b
Go to the Command Prompt window.
A-c
Make sure the prompt is C:\>.
A-d
Change the date to 5/8/01.
A-e
Re-enter the same command.
____
A-f
____
1. The day of the week that appears on the screen is:
a. Tue
b. Wed
c. Thu
d. Fri
Change the date to the current date.
2. The command you used was:
a. DISKCOPY
b. TIME
c. DATE
d. none of the above
A-g
Key in Time e
A-h
At the time prompt, key in 27:00 e
____
A-i
3. What error message is displayed on the screen?
a. Not a valid time.
b. The system cannot accept the time entered.
c. Please key in the correct time.
d. Do not use a colon.
Press e
37
38
CHAPTER 1
GETTING STARTED WITH THE OPERATING SYSTEM
Problem B
B-a
Place the working copy of the ACTIVITIES disk in Drive A.
B-b
Key in C:\>A: e
B-c
Key in A:\>DIR e
____
4. What date is listed for WILD2.YYY?
a. 8/12/1999
b. 5/14/2002
c. 8/12/1998
d. 8/12/2000
B-d
If the Command Prompt is not in a window, place it in one now.
B-e
Click on the icon at the left of the title bar. Select Properties.
____
5. What Property sheet is on the top?
a. Options
b. Font
c. Layout
d. Colors
B-f
Click Cancel.
B-g
Close the Command Prompt window.
____
B-h
____
B-i
6. You may close the Command Prompt window by clicking the
a.
button on the title bar.
b.
button on the title bar.
c.
on the title bar and click Close.
d. either a or c
Exit Windows properly.
7. The fastest way to exit Windows correctly is to
a. turn off the computer.
b. click Start, then click Shut Down.
Be sure to remove your ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy from Drive A.
Problem Set II—Brief Essay
1. When DOS was a stand-alone operating system, file specifications were limited
to the 8.3 file-naming rules. Windows 95 introduced the use of LFNs. Compare
and contrast these two sets of rules. List any reasons for still retaining the use of
8.3 file names.
2. You can change the system time and date either from the command line or from
Windows. List the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Which do
you prefer? Explain your answer.
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter you will be able to:
1. Define command syntax.
2. Explain what parameters are and how they
are used.
3. Explain the purpose and use of the DIR
command.
4. Define prompts and explain how they are
used.
5. Explain the purpose of the CD command.
6. Explain the purpose and function of a device.
7. Explain the purpose and function of device
names.
8. Explain the purpose and function of defaults.
9. Explain the function and purpose of
subdirectories (paths).
10. Explain the use and purpose of wildcards.
11. Define global specifications and identify their
symbols.
12. Explain the purpose and function of redirection.
Student Outcomes
1. Read a syntax diagram and be able to name
and explain what each part signifies.
2. Use both fixed and variable parameters with
the DIR command.
3. Give the names of the disk drives on your
computer.
4. Change the default drive and the directory.
5. Use subdirectories (paths) with the DIR
command.
6. Use global specifications with the DIR
command.
7. Use wildcards with the DIR command.
8. Redirect the output of the DIR command to
either a file or a printer.
9. Use online Help.
Chapter Overview
To communicate with the computer at the command line prompt, you need to learn the
computer’s language. You must follow the syntax
of the language and use punctuation marks the
computer understands. As in mastering any new
language, new vocabulary words must be
learned, word order (syntax) must be determined, and the method of separating statements
into syntactic units must be understood. The
computer has a very limited use of language, so it
is very important to be precise when you are
speaking to it.
In this chapter, you will learn some basic
computer commands, the syntax or order of these
commands, and where the commands begin and
end. You will learn how to make your commands
specific, how to use wildcards to affect a command, and how to determine which disk you
want to write to or read from. You will also learn
how to use the online Help feature.
39
40
2.1
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
Command Syntax
All languages have rules or conventions for speaking and writing. The syntax, or
word order, and punctuation of a language is important. For example, in English the
noun (person, place, or thing) is usually followed by the verb (the action). In Latin
the verb most often ends a sentence, because Latin had no punctuation marks and
the subject could be anywhere in the sentence, even within the verb. When you
learn a language, you learn its syntax.
Anything you key into the computer must be in a language and syntax that the
computer understands. The words you key in are actually commands ordering the
computer to perform a specific task. These commands must also be in the correct
order; that is, they must have the proper syntax. The computer cannot guess what
you mean. People can understand “Going I store,” but if you key in an incorrect
word or put correct words in the wrong order, a computer will not understand.
In computer language, a command can be compared to a verb, the action you
wish to take. In Chapter 1, you used the command DIR. In other words, when you
keyed in DIR, you were asking the system to take an action: run the program called
DIR that lets you see the directory (table of contents) of a disk.
Using the graphical user interface in the Windows OS does not change things—
there are still syntax and rules. An icon that points to a program is based on the
rules of syntax. Certainly, it is easier from a user ’s perspective to click an icon to
accomplish a task rather than having to know the command and the appropriate
syntax. However, it is important to understand what is actually taking place so
when things do not work, you the user know how to go under the hood, so to speak,
and fix the problem so that you can “click” on your desktop successfully.
2.2
What Are Parameters?
A parameter is information you can use to modify or qualify a command. Some
commands require parameters, while other commands let you add them when
needed. Some parameters are variable. A variable parameter is one to which you the
user supply the value. This process is similar to a math formula. For instance,
x + y = z is a simple formula. You can plug in whatever values you wish for x and y.
If x = 1 and y = 2, you know the value of z, which is 3. These values can change or
are variable so that x can equal 5 and y can equal 3, which makes z equal to 8. These
variables can have any other numerical value you wish. You can also have z = 10,
x = 5, and mathematically establish the value of y. No matter what numbers x, y, or z
are, you will be able to establish the value of each.
Other parameters are fixed. For instance, if the formula reads x + 5 = z, then x is
the variable parameter and 5 is the fixed parameter. You can change the value of x
but not the value of 5.
When you are working with some command line commands, you are allowed to
add one or more parameters to make the action of a command more specific. This
process is the same in English. If I give my granddaughter my Visa card and tell her,
“Go buy,” I have given her an open-ended statement—she can buy anything (making her one happy camper!). However, if I add a qualifier, “Go buy shoes,” I have
2.4
USING FIXED PARAMETERS WITH THE DIR COMMAND
limited what she can do. The word “shoes” is the parameter. This pattern exemplifies precisely what parameters do to a command.
2.3
Reading a Syntax Diagram
A command line interface is a language that has a vocabulary, grammar, and syntax.
To use the language of the command line, you must learn the vocabulary (commands) and understand the grammar (punctuation) and syntax (order). The syntax
information is provided through online Help. The command syntax diagrams tell
you how to enter a command with its optional or mandatory parameters. However,
you need to be able to interpret these syntax diagrams.
Here is the formal command syntax diagram for the DIR command you used
earlier:
DIR [drive:][path][filename] [/A[[:]attributes]] [/B] [/C] [/D] [/L]
[/N] [/O[[:]sortorder]] [/P] [/Q] [/S] [/T[[:]timefield]] [/W]
[/X] [/4]
The first entry is the command name, DIR. You must use this name only. You
cannot substitute another word such as DIRECTORY or INDEX. The parameters
that follow the command are in brackets [ ]. Brackets indicate that these parameters
are optional—not required for the command. The DIR command has optional
parameters only. There are no required, or mandatory, parameters for the DIR
command.
2.4
Using Fixed Parameters
with the DIR Command
The DIR command is one of the oldest commands available to the command line. It
has changed significantly since the “old days” of the 1980’s but it has not changed at
all from Windows 2000. DIR is a command with optional parameters. Most often, a
fixed parameter is referred to as a switch and typically begins with / (the slash).
In the DIR command syntax diagram, /W and /P are in brackets. You never key in
the brackets, only / (the forward slash or slash) and the W or P. You must be careful;
there is only one slash—the forward slash /. The \ is a backslash and is always
referred to as the backslash. When a mark is referred to as a slash, it always means
the forward slash.
When you key in DIR and the files scroll by, they move so quickly that you
cannot read them. There is an efficient way to solve this problem by using the /P
parameter. The /P parameter will display one screen of information at a time. It will
also give you a prompt that you must respond to before it will display another
screenful of information.
Note 1: There are times you may find it necessary to quit before you have completed the entire chapter. Each activity begins with a note indicating which
diskette is in the drive and the current directory and drive. Thus, if you
complete an activity, you may pick up where you left off. When you stop
working, be sure to return to the Windows desktop and initiate the Windows shut-down procedure.
41
42
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
Note 2: Be sure you know what your computer laboratory procedures are.
Note 3: If your system varies from the textbook, refer to the Configuration Table in
Chapter 1, section 1.6.
2.5
Activity: Using Fixed Parameters
with the DIR Command
Note:
Whenever the textbook refers to the ACTIVITIES disk, you will use the
working copy that you made in Chapter 1 and labeled “ACTIVITIES
Disk—Working Copy.”
1
If it is not on, turn on the computer.
2
Open a Command Prompt window.
3
Key in the following: C:\>CD \ e
4
Key in the following: C:\>CLS e
C:\>_
You have successfully booted the system. To ensure that you were
at the root of Drive C, you keyed in CD \. You are at the root directory of Drive C.
You have also cleared the screen.
5
Insert the “ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy” in Drive A. (Remember, this means
your working copy.)
6
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
C:\>A:
A:\>_
The default drive is now Drive A. The default directory is the root
of A.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /P e
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
07:08
01:46
02:10
04:03
05:32
09:10
09:10
04:50
04:51
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
PM
PM
478
148
121
72
259
295
294
138
137
VENUS.TMM
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
DANCES.TXT
EARTH.TWO
EXP02FEB.dta
EXP03JAN.dta
FILE2.SWT
FILE4.FP
2.5
ACTIVITY: USING FIXED PARAMETERS WITH THE DIR COMMAND
05/02/1994 12:57 AM
26 GETYN.COM
05/30/2000 04:32 PM
53 HELLO.TXT
05/07/2002 07:41 AM
190 JUPITER.TMP
05/27/2001 10:09 PM
122 LONGFILENAME.EXTENSION
08/12/2000 04:12 PM
73 MARK.FIL
10/31/2001 01:08 PM
406 MERCURY.TMP
05/14/2001 10:16 AM
2,273 NAME.BAT
10/31/2001 01:49 PM
219 ORION.NEB
10/31/2001 02:16 PM
11,264 QUASARS.DOC
11/16/2000 12:00 PM
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
10/31/2001 02:43 PM
529 TITAN.TXT
10/30/2001 01:46 PM
148 AST.99
05/14/2002 08:07 AM
64 WILD3.ZZZ
12/31/2001 04:32 PM
182 WILDTWO.DOS
12/06/2001 09:14 AM
<DIR>
GAMES
11/16/2000 12:00 PM
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
10/31/2001 06:51 PM
125 BLUE.JAZ
08/12/2000 04:12 PM
314 CASES.FIL
10/31/2001 05:28 PM
165 EARTH.ONE
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
295 EXP01FEB.dta
Press any key to continue . . .
Note:
The number of files displayed will vary, depending on the size of your
command line window.
You keyed in the command DIR followed by a slash / and the
parameter P. The slash, which must be included with a fixed parameter, is commonly referred as a switch. However, the slash (/) is really a delimiter. A delimiter is
a signal that one thing is ending and another is beginning. The number of files on
your screen may differ from the figure above, depending on the size of your open
Command Prompt window. Command line commands use different punctuation
marks, such as delimiters, but the punctuation marks that they use are very specific.
Remember, / is used only with fixed parameters.
In this example, the slash is the signal to the DIR command that additional
instructions follow. The parameter P is the additional instruction. There can be no
space between the slash and the P. The slash and the P stop the directory from
scrolling. Thus, /P told the DIR command to fill the screen and then pause until the
user takes some action. The message at the bottom of the screen tells you to press
any key to continue.
8
Press e
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
05/27/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
07/31/2000
10/30/2001
07/31/2000
10/31/2001
09:10
04:51
04:51
12:53
11:57
07:41
12:02
10:08
01:08
03:05
12:53
01:38
04:32
01:46
04:32
07:08
AM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
292
137
137
44
1,334
190
166
81
406
193
2,672
4,064
2,307
148
1,228
478
EXP02MAR.dta
FILE2.FP
FILE3.FP
FRANK.FIL
GRAMMY.REC
JUP.TMP
LEFT.RED
LONGFILENAME.TXT
MER.NEW
MIDDLE.UP
NEWPRSON.FIL
NEW-SUVS.XLS
PERSONAL.FIL
AST.NEW
STATES.USA
VEN.99
43
44
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
05/14/2002 08:07 AM
12/31/2001 04:32 PM
08/12/2000 04:12 PM
12/06/2001 09:18 AM
<DIR>
12/06/2001 09:18 AM
<DIR>
10/30/2001 02:47 PM
07/31/1999 12:53 PM
10/30/2001 03:03 PM
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
10/31/2001 02:49 PM
10/31/2001 02:49 PM
10/31/2001 11:33 AM
10/31/2001 06:52 PM
10/30/2001 03:42 PM
10/30/2001 03:42 PM
12/06/2001 12:15 AM
10/31/2001 01:08 PM
Press any key to continue . . .
64 WILD1.XXX
181 WILDTHR.DOS
3 Y.FIL
TEST
MUSIC
86 BONJOUR.TMP
47 CAROLYN.FIL
286 DRESS.UP
294 EXP01JAN.dta
295 EXP03FEB.dta
138 FILE2.CZG
138 FILE3.CZG
152 GALAXY.TMP
105 GREEN.JAZ
190 JUP.NEW
190 JUPITER.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
406 MER.TMP
When you pressed e, the display continued scrolling. Because there are still more files, the DIR command asks you to press any key again to
continue the display. As you can see, the display stops each time the screen fills.
9
Press e
10 Continue pressing e until you reach the end of the display.
10/30/2001 03:18 PM
758 RIGHT.UP
07/31/2000 04:32 PM
260 STATE.CAP
10/31/2001 07:08 PM
478 VEN.NEW
05/14/2002 08:07 AM
64 WILD2.YYY
10/30/2001 01:46 PM
148 ASTRO.TMP
08/01/2002 09:28 AM
<DIR>
DATA
10/31/2001 07:08 PM
478 VEN.TMP
10/31/2001 05:37 PM
383 EARTH.THR
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
294 EXP02JAN.dta
10/31/2001 04:50 PM
138 FILE3.SWT
05/30/2000 04:32 PM
182 OLDAUTO.MAK
10/31/2001 12:00 PM
115 RIGHT.RED
12/06/2001 12:13 AM
138 AWARD.MOV
10/12/2002 09:31 AM
<DIR>
SPORTS
05/14/2001 11:28 AM
4,843 GO.BAT
05/27/2001 10:08 PM
76 LONGFILENAME
11/16/2002 09:36 AM
<DIR>
LEVEL-1
10/31/2001 01:08 PM
406 MER.99
12/06/2001 12:25 AM
465 person.fil
07/31/1999 12:53 PM
46 STEVEN.FIL
10/31/2001 07:08 PM
478 VENUS.TXT
12/31/2001 04:32 PM
93 WILDONE
Press any key to continue . . .
10/31/2001 06:40 PM
188 ZODIAC.FIL
91 File(s)
47,396 bytes
7 Dir(s)
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
You kept pressing e until there were no more files to display.
The system prompt (A:\>) appears to signal that there are no more files on this disk
and that the OS is waiting for you to key in the next command. There is another way
2.5
ACTIVITY: USING FIXED PARAMETERS WITH THE DIR COMMAND
to display the files on the screen. You may use the /W parameter to display the
directory in a wide format.
11 Key in the following: A:\>DIR /W e
EXP03JAN.dta
GETYN.COM
LONGFILENAME.EXTENSION
NAME.BAT
Sandy and Patty.txt
WILD3.ZZZ
Sandy and Nicki.txt
EARTH.ONE
FILE2.FP
GRAMMY.REC
LONGFILENAME.TXT
NEWPRSON.FIL
AST.NEW
WILD1.XXX
[TEST]
CAROLYN.FIL
EXP03FEB.dta
GALAXY.TMP
JUPITER.TXT
MIDDLE.RED
WILDONE.DOS
EXP03MAR.dta
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
RIGHT.UP
WILD2.YYY
VEN.TMP
FILE3.SWT
AWARD.MOV
LONGFILENAME
person.fil
WILDONE
91 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
FILE2.SWT
FILE4.FP
HELLO.TXT
JUPITER.TMP
MARK.FIL
MERCURY.TMP
ORION.NEB
QUASARS.DOC
TITAN.TXT
AST.99
WILDTWO.DOS
[GAMES]
BLUE.JAZ
CASES.FIL
EXP01FEB.dta
EXP02MAR.dta
FILE3.FP
FRANK.FIL
JUP.TMP
LEFT.RED
MER.NEW
MIDDLE.UP
NEW-SUVS.XLS
PERSONAL.FIL
STATES.USA
VEN.99
WILDTHR.DOS
Y.FIL
[MUSIC]
BONJOUR.TMP
DRESS.UP
EXP01JAN.dta
FILE2.CZG
FILE3.CZG
GREEN.JAZ
JUP.NEW
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
MER.TMP
AST.TMP
[MEDIA]
BORN.TYP
EXP01MAR.dta
GALAXY.TXT
JUP.99
MERCURY.TXT
PLANETS.TXT
STATE.CAP
VEN.NEW
ASTRO.TMP
[DATA]
EARTH.THR
EXP02JAN.dta
OLDAUTO.MAK
RIGHT.RED
[SPORTS]
GO.BAT
[LEVEL-1]
MER.99
STEVEN.FIL
VENUS.TXT
ZODIAC.FIL
47,396 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
The directory display is now across the screen, three columns
wide. In addition, the information about the files is not as comprehensive. All you
see is the file specification—the file name and its extension. You do not see the file
size, date, or time, but you still see the total number of files and the number of bytes
free. You can also identify the directories by the brackets around them such as
[MEDIA]. Thus, /W allows you to see the files side by side. You can use more than
one parameter at a time. Since there are so many files on this disk, the entire directory does not fit on one screen.
12 Key in the following: A:\>DIR /P /W e
A:\>DIR /P /W
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
45
46
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
VENUS.TMM
ASTRO.TXT
DANCES.TXT
EARTH.TWO
EXP03JAN.dta
FILE2.SWT
GETYN.COM
HELLO.TXT
LONGFILENAME.EXTENSION
MARK.FIL
NAME.BAT
ORION.NEB
Sandy and Patty.txt
TITAN.TXT
WILD3.ZZZ
WILDTWO.DOS
Sandy and Nicki.txt
BLUE.JAZ
EARTH.ONE
EXP01FEB.dta
FILE2.FP
FILE3.FP
GRAMMY.REC
JUP.TMP
LONGFILENAME.TXT
MER.NEW
NEWPRSON.FIL
NEW-SUVS.XLS
AST.NEW
STATES.USA
WILD1.XXX
WILDTHR.DOS
[TEST]
[MUSIC]
CAROLYN.FIL
DRESS.UP
EXP03FEB.dta
FILE2.CZG
GALAXY.TMP
GREEN.JAZ
JUPITER.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
MIDDLE.RED
AST.TMP
WILDONE.DOS
BORN.TYP
EXP03MAR.dta
GALAXY.TXT
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
MERCURY.TXT
RIGHT.UP
STATE.CAP
WILD2.YYY
ASTRO.TMP
VEN.TMP
EARTH.THR
FILE3.SWT
OLDAUTO.MAK
Press any key to continue . . .
BORN.TXT
EXP02FEB.dta
FILE4.FP
JUPITER.TMP
MERCURY.TMP
QUASARS.DOC
AST.99
[GAMES]
CASES.FIL
EXP02MAR.dta
FRANK.FIL
LEFT.RED
MIDDLE.UP
PERSONAL.FIL
VEN.99
Y.FIL
BONJOUR.TMP
EXP01JAN.dta
FILE3.CZG
JUP.NEW
MER.TMP
[MEDIA]
EXP01MAR.dta
JUP.99
PLANETS.TXT
VEN.NEW
[DATA]
EXP02JAN.dta
RIGHT.RED
By using these parameters together, you could see the files in a
wide display, one screenful at a time.
13 Press e
MIDDLE.RED
AST.TMP
[MEDIA]
WILDONE.DOS
BORN.TYP
EXP01MAR.dta
EXP03MAR.dta
GALAXY.TXT
JUP.99
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
MERCURY.TXT
PLANETS.TXT
RIGHT.UP
STATE.CAP
VEN.NEW
WILD2.YYY
ASTRO.TMP
[DATA]
VEN.TMP
EARTH.THR
EXP02JAN.dta
FILE3.SWT
OLDAUTO.MAK
RIGHT.RED
Press any key to continue . . .
AWARD.MOV
[SPORTS]
GO.BAT
LONGFILENAME
[LEVEL-1]
MER.99
person.fil
STEVEN.FIL
VENUS.TXT
WILDONE
ZODIAC.FIL
91 File(s)
47,396 bytes
7 Dir(s)
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
You have returned to the system prompt.
2.6
2.6
USING FILE NAMES AS VARIABLE PARAMETERS
47
Using File Names as Variable Parameters
In the previous activities, you used the DIR command with two different optional
fixed parameters, /P and /W. These optional fixed parameters have specific meanings. There is another parameter you can use with the DIR command: the name of
the file.
File names are formally called file specifications. A file specification is broken
into two parts, the file name and the file extension. When people refer to a file or file
name, they really mean the file specification: the file name and file extension
together. It is much like a person’s name. When someone refers to Ramon, he
usually means someone specific such as Ramon Rodreiquez. In the computer world,
when you refer to a file name, you must give both its first name (file name) and its
last name (file extension). When you create files in an application program, you are
allowed to name the file. On this disk the files already exist and are already named.
You cannot call them anything else. However, when you have the opportunity for
naming files, you must follow the rules. Windows has rules called naming conventions for naming files. They are the same in Windows XP as they were in
Windows 2000. These are:
1. All files in a directory (subdirectory) must have unique names.
2. File names are mandatory. All files must have file names less than but no more
than 256 characters long. However, it is recommended that you do not use very
long file names, as most programs cannot interpret them.
3. File extensions are usually three characters long.
4. The following are illegal characters, and may not be used in a file name:
\ / : * ? " < > ¦
5. All other characters, including periods and spaces, are legal in Windows file
names.
Typically, a file name reflects the subject of the file, for example, EMPLOYEE or
TAXES. The file extension is usually given by the application creating the file. For
example, Microsoft Word uses .DOC for its extension, Lotus 1-2-3 uses .WK1, and
Microsoft Excel uses .XLS.
Keep in mind that many older, 16-bit application packages created before Windows 95 cannot deal with long file names (LFN’s), spaces in file names, or periods
in file names. These packages adhere to the older DOS rules, which limit the name
to eight characters and the optional extension to three characters, and cannot
include spaces. You will also find that files on the Internet tend to adhere to the
older DOS rule—also called the 8.3 (eight-dot-three) rule.
When you key in the DIR command, you get the entire table of contents of the
disk, known as the directory. Usually, you do not care about all the files. Most often,
you are interested only in whether or not one specific file is located or stored on the
disk. If you use one of the parameters /P or /W, you still have to look through all
the files. You can locate a specific file quickly by using the file name. Simply give the
DIR command specific information about what file you seek. Look at the syntax
diagram:
DIR [drive:][path][filename] [/P] [/W]
48
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
The file name, indicated above in brackets, is a variable optional parameter. To use
the optional parameter, you must plug in the value or the name of the file for
[filename]. In some syntax diagrams, you will see [filename[.ext]]. The .ext is in
separate brackets within the file name brackets because it is part of the file name
syntax. A file may not have an extension, but if it does have an extension, you must
include it. When you include it, there must be no spaces between the file name and
the file extension.
The delimiter that is used between a file name and a file extension is a period, or
what is called the dot. A dot, as a delimiter, is used between a file name and a file
extension. To verbalize a file name keyed in as MYFILE.TXT, you would say “MY
FILE dot TEXT.”
2.7
Activity: Using a File Name
as a Variable Parameter
Note:
1
You should be at the command line at the A:\> prompt.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR VENUS.TXT e
A:\>DIR VENUS.TXT
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
07:08 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
478 VENUS.TXT
478 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
The DIR command returned exactly what you asked for—a single
file that met your criteria. This command did find the file VENUS.TXT on the disk
in Drive A. VENUS.TXT is the variable parameter. You substituted VENUS.TXT for
[filename]. You are told the Volume name is ACTIVITIES. The generic name for
drives is Volume. The date and time VENUS.TXT was last updated appears first (10/
31/2001 07:08 PM), then the size of the file is listed in bytes (478) followed last by
the file name (VENUS.TXT). The line beneath (1 File(s) 478 bytes) told you that you
only have one file that matched that criteria. The last line states that there are no
directories (0 Dir (s)) and how much space is free on the disk for more data (287,744
bytes free). What if the system could not find the file you asked for?
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR NOFILE.TXT e
A:\>DIR NOFILE.TXT
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
2.7
ACTIVITY: USING A FILE NAME AS A VARIABLE PARAMETER
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
File Not Found is a system message. Sometimes it is referred to as
an error message. DIR is telling you that it looked through the entire list of files in
the root directory of the disk in Drive A and could not find a “match” for the file
called NOFILE.TXT. You may also enter more than one file specification with the
DIR command.
3
Key in the following:
A:\>DIR STEVEN.FIL C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DISKCOPY.COM e
A:\>DIR STEVEN.FIL C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DISKCOPY.COM
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
07/31/1999
12:53 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
46 STEVEN.FIL
46 bytes
287,232 bytes free
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WINNT\SYSTEM32
08/23/2001
12:00 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
7,168 diskcopy.com
7,168 bytes
8,539,275,264 bytes free
A:\>_
The Command Prompt allows you to enter more than one parameter at a time when using the DIR command. This feature was introduced in Windows 2000 Professional. You asked the Operating System to display two files from
two different locations. Both were displayed with their individual file names and
file information listed under their respective locations (Directory of A:\ and Directory of C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32).
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR LONGFILENAME e
A:\>DIR LONGFILENAME
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
05/27/2001
A:\>_
10:08 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
76 LONGFILENAME
76 bytes
287,744 bytes free
49
50
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
As you can see, you may use the DIR command with long file
names.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR LONGFILENAME.EXTENSION e
A:\>DIR LONGFILENAME.EXTENSION
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
05/27/2001
10:09 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
122 LONGFILENAME.EXTENSION
122 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
You may also have a file extension that is longer than three
characters, as is shown here.
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR Sandy and Patty.txt e
A:\>DIR Sandy and Patty.txt
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
Directory of A:\
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
It appears that the file you requested could not be found. Note
that Directory of A:\ appears three times. This is a long file name with spaces in it.
The DIR command read or parsed (interpreted the parameters) as three separate
files—first “Sandy,” then “and,” and last “Patty.txt.” It could find no files by those
names. If you want a long file name with spaces in it treated as one unit, you must
enclose the file name in quotation marks.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR "Sandy and Patty.txt" e
A:\>DIR "Sandy and Patty.txt"
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
11/16/2000
12:00 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
59 bytes
287,744 bytes free
2.7
ACTIVITY: USING A FILE NAME AS A VARIABLE PARAMETER
A:\>_
The parameter you used was very specific. By enclosing the
filename in quotes, called “quoting,” the operating system did not treat the spaces
as delimiters, but as part of one file name. Every file that has a long file name also
has a name that adheres to the 8.3 naming convention. This name is called an alias.
Windows assigns this alias automatically. If you want to see the 8.3 names, you must
use the /X parameter.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /X /P e
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001 07:08 PM
478
VENUS.TMM
10/30/2001 01:46 PM
148
ASTRO.TXT
10/30/2001 02:10 PM
121
BORN.TXT
12/11/1999 04:03 PM
72
DANCES.TXT
10/31/2001 05:32 PM
259
EARTH.TWO
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
295
EXP02FEB.dta
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
294
EXP03JAN.dta
10/31/2001 04:50 PM
138
FILE2.SWT
10/31/2001 04:51 PM
137
FILE4.FP
05/02/1994 12:57 AM
26
GETYN.COM
05/30/2000 04:32 PM
53
HELLO.TXT
05/07/2002 07:41 AM
190
JUPITER.TMP
05/27/2001 10:09 PM
122 LONGFI~1.EXT LONGFILENAME.EXTENSION
08/12/2000 04:12 PM
73
MARK.FIL
10/31/2001 01:08 PM
406
MERCURY.TMP
05/14/2001 10:16 AM
2,273
NAME.BAT
10/31/2001 01:49 PM
219
ORION.NEB
10/31/2001 02:16 PM
11,264
QUASARS.DOC
11/16/2000 12:00 PM
59 SANDYA~1.TXT Sandy and Patty.txt
10/31/2001 02:43 PM
529
TITAN.TXT
10/30/2001 01:46 PM
148
AST.99
05/14/2002 08:07 AM
64
WILD3.ZZZ
12/31/2001 04:32 PM
182
WILDTWO.DOS
12/06/2001 09:14 AM
<DIR>
GAMES
11/16/2000 12:00 PM
53 SANDYA~2.TXT Sandy and Nicki.txt
10/31/2001 06:51 PM
125
BLUE.JAZ
08/12/2000 04:12 PM
314
CASES.FIL
10/31/2001 05:28 PM
165
EARTH.ONE
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
295
EXP01FEB.dta
Press any key to continue . . .
A:\>_
The 8.3 file name is always derived from the long file name by
removing any spaces from the file name, taking the first six characters of the file
name, and adding a tilde (~) and a number. When there is more than one file with
the same first six characters in its name, Windows handles it. If you look at the
display for the two files that begin with “Sandy” (Sandy and Nicki.txt and Sandy
and Patty.txt), the first file placed on the disk is given the number 1 following the
tilde, and the second file, the number 2.
51
52
CHAPTER 2
9
COMMAND SYNTAX
Continue pressing the e key, paying attention to the files that begin with
LONGFILE and end with .TXT, until you reach the end of the display.
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
292
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
292
10/31/2001 11:37 AM
253
10/30/2001 03:42 PM
190
12/06/2001 12:16 AM
99 LONGFI~3.TXT
10/31/2001 01:08 PM
406
11/24/2001 11:24 AM
194
10/30/2001 03:18 PM
758
07/31/2000 04:32 PM
260
10/31/2001 07:08 PM
478
05/14/2002 08:07 AM
64
10/30/2001 01:46 PM
148
08/01/2002 09:28 AM
<DIR>
10/31/2001 07:08 PM
478
10/31/2001 05:37 PM
383
12/11/2002 09:10 AM
294
10/31/2001 04:50 PM
138
05/30/2000 04:32 PM
182
10/31/2001 12:00 PM
115
12/06/2001 12:13 AM
138
10/12/2002 09:31 AM
<DIR>
05/14/2001 11:28 AM
4,843
05/27/2001 10:08 PM
76 LONGFI~1
11/16/2002 09:36 AM
<DIR>
10/31/2001 01:08 PM
406
12/06/2001 12:25 AM
465
07/31/1999 12:53 PM
46
10/31/2001 07:08 PM
478
12/31/2001 04:32 PM
93
Press any key to continue . . .
10/31/2001 06:40 PM
188
91 File(s)
47,396 bytes
7 Dir(s)
287,744 bytes free
EXP01MAR.dta
EXP03MAR.dta
GALAXY.TXT
JUP.99
LONGFILENAMING.TX
MERCURY.TXT
PLANETS.TXT
RIGHT.UP
STATE.CAP
VEN.NEW
WILD2.YYY
ASTRO.TMP
DATA
VEN.TMP
EARTH.THR
EXP02JAN.dta
FILE3.SWT
OLDAUTO.MAK
RIGHT.RED
AWARD.MOV
SPORTS
GO.BAT
LONGFILENAME
LEVEL-1
MER.99
person.fil
STEVEN.FIL
VENUS.TXT
WILDONE
ZODIAC.FIL
A:\>_
There are three files that begin with LONGFILE and end with the
TXT (LONGFILENAME.TXT, LONGFILENAMING.TXT, and
LONGFILENAMED.TXT). The first file, LONGFLENAME.TXT, is assigned the 8.3
name of LONGFI~1.TXT. The second file, LONGFILENAMING.TXT, is assigned
the next number—LONGFI~2.TXT. And the last file, LONGFILENAMED.TXT, is
assigned the next number—LONGFI~3.TXT.
If you cannot see the long file names, these names become very confusing, as it is
difficult to distinguish one file from another. You want to be able to identify the
contents of a file quickly by looking at the file names. Older versions of DOS and
older application software will not allow you to use or view long file names. In the
real world, the more you have to key in, the more likely you will make a typographical error. Thus, even though you can use spaces and long names, it may be a
better idea to keep the file names short and concise. This is especially important
when using floppy disks. Long file names take up needed room on floppies.
2.8
2.8
COMMAND LINE EDITING
Command Line Editing
You may reuse the last command you keyed in on a line without re-keying it. When
you key in a command, it is stored in a memory buffer until it is replaced by the
next keyed in command. The last command line you keyed in can be recalled to the
screen so you may edit it. To recall the command line one letter at a time, press the
1 key once for each keystroke you wish to repeat. To recall the entire command
line, press the 3 key. In addition, Windows lets you use the up and down arrow
keys to recall commands used in a command prompt session. Furthermore, you may
also recall command lines by number, edit them, keep a command history, find
commands by number, and so on. The following table illustrates the keys you may
use to edit a command history. This feature functions in the same way it did in
Windows 2000.
Key
Editing Function
7
Displays a list of commands.
a+7
Clears the list of commands.
U
Allows you to scroll up through the commands.
D
Allows you to scroll down through the commands.
8
Searches the list for the command that starts with the text you
provided before pressing the function key.
9
Selects the command from the list by number.
u
Displays the oldest command in the list.
p
Displays the newest command in the list.
x
Erases the displayed command from the screen.
h
Moves the cursor to the beginning of the displayed command.
n
Moves the cursor to the end of the displayed command.
L
Moves the cursor back one character.
R
Moves the cursor forward one character.
c+L
Moves the cursor back one word.
c+R
Moves the cursor forward one word.
b
Moves the cursor back one character and deletes the character
preceding the cursor.
d
Deletes the character at the cursor.
c+n
Deletes all characters from the cursor to the end of the line.
c+h
Deletes all characters from the cursor to the beginning of the
line.
i
Toggles between insert and overstrike mode.
Table 2.1—Editing Keys Command Summary
53
54
CHAPTER 2
2.9
Activity: Using Command Line Editing
Note:
1
COMMAND SYNTAX
The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy is in Drive A. You are at the Command Prompt screen. A:\> is the default drive and directory.
Key in the following, including the error: A:\>DIIR /p e
A:\>DIIR
‘DIIR’ is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.
A:\>_
Your command was keyed in incorrectly and was not understood
by the system. You received the error message “‘DIIR’ is not recognized as an
internal or external command, operable program or batch file.” This error message
informs you that the OS did not understand what it is you asked for. It is important
to read the messages so that you understand what is happening.
2
Press the 1 key twice.
A:\>DIIR
‘DIIR’ is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.
A:\>DI_
The characters that you keyed in previously are being recalled
from the buffer. If you were to press the 1 key once more, the incorrectly entered
second “I” would appear, the character error you want to eliminate.
3
Press the x key to cancel the command.
4
Press a + 7 to clear the memory of the command line editor.
5
Key in the following: A:\>CLS e
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR FRANK.FIL e
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR VEN.99 e
8
Key in the following: A:\>VOL e
9
Key in the following: A:\>DIR JUP.99 e
10 Key in the following: A:\>DIR ORION.NEB e
11 Key in the following: A:\>DIR DRESS.UP RIGHT.UP e
A:\>DIR ORION.NEB
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
2.9
ACTIVITY: USING COMMAND LINE EDITING
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
01:49 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
219 ORION.NEB
219 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>DIR DRESS.UP RIGHT.UP
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
03:03 PM
286 DRESS.UP
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
03:18 PM
2 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
758 RIGHT.UP
1,044 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
(This graphic represents the tail end of what you see scroll by on
your screen.) You have executed several commands and can now use the editing
keys to recall and edit commands.
12 Press the U key twice.
A:\>DIR ORION.NEB
You have recalled, in descending order, the commands you
previously entered.
13 Press the D key once.
A:\>DIR DRESS.UP RIGHT.UP
You recalled, in ascending order, the last command you keyed in.
14 Press c + L once.
A:\>DIR DRESS.UP RIGHT.UP
Your cursor is now on the R in RIGHT.UP. Using the c and L
keys moved you back one word.
15 Press the i key.
A:\>DIR DRESS.UP RIGHT.UP
55
56
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
When you pressed the i key, you toggled into what is called
overstrike mode. Overstrike will replace each character as you key in data. The
cursor also changed to a thicker block underline.
16 At the cursor, key in FILE3.FP.
A:\>DIR DRESS.UP FILE3.FP
Notice how you did not have to delete the RIGHT.UP characters.
As you keyed in data, it replaced what was there.
17 Press e. Press U twice.
A:\>DIR DRESS.UP RIGHT.UP
You recalled the prior command you keyed in.
18 Press c + L once. Key in FILE3.FP.
A:\>DIR DRESS.UP FILE3.FPRIGHT.UP
When you are in insert mode, you are “inserting” data at the
cursor.
19 Press 7
Pressing the 7 key lists all the commands that you have keyed
in. You may edit any line you wish by selecting the line number, but you must press
the 9 key first.
20 Press 9. Press the number that appears before DIR VEN.99 (in this
example, it is 2). Press e
2.10
DRIVES AS DEVICE NAMES
A:\>DIR VEN.99_
By pressing 9, you saw the Enter command number: prompt.
You then keyed in the line number (2) of the command you wished to edit. You can
edit this line or simply execute it again. If you wish to delete a line quickly, there is a
shortcut—the x key. You can also search for a previously entered command by
pressing the first letter or letters of the command you are interested in.
21 Press x. Press D. Press 8
A:\>DIR FRANK.FIL
You selected a command by keying in the first letter and then
pressing 8. If you continued to press 8, you would cycle through all the commands that begin with D.
22 Press x. Press a + 7. Press U once.
A:\>_
By pressing a + 7, you cleared the commands that were in the
buffer. There are no commands to scroll through or to edit. When you are working at
the Command Prompt, remember these editing commands. They can save you
many keystrokes.
23 Close the Command Prompt window.
You have returned to the desktop.
2.10
Drives as Device Names
A disk drive is an example of a device. A device is a place to send information
(write) or a place from which to receive information (read). Disk drives have
assigned device names. These are letters of the alphabet followed by a colon. Using
these names, Windows knows which disk drive to read from or write to. When you
are at the command prompt, the prompt displayed on the screen tells you where the
system is currently pointing and from which device data will be read from or written
to. If you are using a stand-alone computer, your drive names will typically be A:
and C: and then drive letters from D on, depending on what devices you have
attached to your system. However, if you are on a network, disk drive letters can
vary. They can include such drive letters as J: or P: or W: and represent storage areas
that are somewhere on the network, not on your local system. Again, the displayed
prompt will tell you on what drive (device) the operating system is going to take an
57
58
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
action. Disk drives are not the only places where the system sends or receives
information. Other common devices are the keyboard, the printer, and the monitor.
2.11
Defaults
In addition to understanding names of devices, it is also important to understand
the concept of defaults. Computers must have very specific instructions for everything they do. However, there are implied instructions that the system falls back on
or defaults to in the absence of other instructions. Default, by computer definition, is
the value used unless another value is specified. If you do not specify what you
want, the system will make the assumption for you. For example, when A:\> is
displayed on the screen, it is called the A prompt, but it is also the default drive.
When you want any activity to occur but do not specify where you want it to
happen, the system assumes the activity will occur on the default drive, the A:\>
that is displayed on the screen.
When you key in DIR after A:\>, how does the operating system know that you
are asking for a table of contents of the disk in Drive A? When a specific direction is
given, the operating system must have a specific place to look. A:\>, the default
drive, is displayed on the screen. Since you did not specify which disk you wanted
DIR to check, it defaulted to the default drive—the drive displayed in the prompt on
the screen. It deduced that you want the table of contents or directory listing for the
default drive, the disk in Drive A.
The prompt displayed on the screen is also known as the designated drive or the
logged drive. All commands, if given no other instructions to the contrary, assume
that all reads and writes to the disk drive must take place on the default drive, the
drive indicated by the prompt on the screen. When you are not in the Command
Prompt window, the same rules apply. There is indeed a default drive, and in
Windows Explorer it is indicated on the title bar, if you have set the Folder option to
“Display the full path in the title bar.”
2.12
Activity: Working with Defaults
Note:
The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy should be in Drive A. You should
be at the Windows desktop.
1
Click Start. Point at Programs. Point at Accessories. Click Command
Prompt.
2
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
C:\>A:
A:\>_
2.12
ACTIVITY: WORKING WITH DEFAULTS
You have opened the Command Prompt window and changed the
default drive to A. Opening this window is often referred to as “shelling out to
DOS” or “shelling out to the command line.”
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
10/31/2001
05/14/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/12/2002
05/14/2001
05/27/2001
11/16/2002
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
12/31/2001
10/31/2001
07:08 PM
08:07 AM
01:46 PM
09:28 AM
<DIR>
07:08 PM
05:37 PM
09:10 AM
04:50 PM
04:32 PM
12:00 PM
12:13 AM
09:31 AM
<DIR>
11:28 AM
10:08 PM
09:36 AM
<DIR>
01:08 PM
12:25 AM
12:53 PM
07:08 PM
04:32 PM
06:40 PM
91 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
478 VEN.NEW
64 WILD2.YYY
148 ASTRO.TMP
DATA
478 VEN.TMP
383 EARTH.THR
294 EXP02JAN.dta
138 FILE3.SWT
182 OLDAUTO.MAK
115 RIGHT.RED
138 AWARD.MOV
SPORTS
4,843 GO.BAT
76 LONGFILENAME
LEVEL-1
406 MER.99
465 person.fil
46 STEVEN.FIL
478 VENUS.TXT
93 WILDONE
188 ZODIAC.FIL
47,396 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
Displayed on the screen is the result of the DIR command you
executed. (The graphic represents the tail end of that listing.) Since you did not
specify which disk drive DIR should look into, it assumed or defaulted to the disk in
Drive A. Review the syntax diagram: The syntax diagram has [drive:], which is
another optional variable parameter. You can substitute the letter of the drive you
wish DIR to look into.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR A: e
10/31/2001
05/14/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/12/2002
05/14/2001
05/27/2001
11/16/2002
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
07:08
08:07
01:46
09:28
07:08
05:37
09:10
04:50
04:32
12:00
12:13
09:31
11:28
10:08
09:36
01:08
12:25
12:53
PM
AM
PM
AM
PM
PM
AM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
AM
PM
AM
PM
AM
PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
478 VEN.NEW
64 WILD2.YYY
148 ASTRO.TMP
DATA
478 VEN.TMP
383 EARTH.THR
294 EXP02JAN.dta
138 FILE3.SWT
182 OLDAUTO.MAK
115 RIGHT.RED
138 AWARD.MOV
SPORTS
4,843 GO.BAT
76 LONGFILENAME
LEVEL-1
406 MER.99
465 person.fil
46 STEVEN.FIL
59
60
CHAPTER 2
10/31/2001
12/31/2001
10/31/2001
COMMAND SYNTAX
07:08 PM
04:32 PM
06:40 PM
91 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
478 VENUS.TXT
93 WILDONE
188 ZODIAC.FIL
47,396 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
You substituted A: for the variable optional parameter, [drive:]. The
display, however, is exactly the same as DIR without specifying the drive because
A:\> is the default drive. It is unnecessary to key in A:, but not wrong to do so. (The
graphic represents the tail end of your listing.) If you want to see what files are on
Drive C or Drive R, you must tell DIR to look on the drive you are interested in.
Note:
Remember that if you are on a network, your hard drive letter may not be
C:. Refer to your Configuration Table in Chapter 1 for the correct drive
letter for your system.
5
Key in the following: A:\>C: e
6
Key in the following: C:\>CD \ e
A:\>C:
C:\>CD \
C:\>_
You have changed the default drive to the hard disk, Drive C. You
then changed the directory to the root of C. In this example, you were already at the
root of C. Keying in CD \ confirmed that location.
7
Key in the following: C:\>DIR A: e
11/24/2001
10/30/2001
07/31/2000
10/31/2001
05/14/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/12/2002
05/14/2001
05/27/2001
11/16/2002
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
12/31/2001
10/31/2001
11:24
03:18
04:32
07:08
08:07
01:46
09:28
07:08
05:37
09:10
04:50
04:32
12:00
12:13
09:31
11:28
10:08
09:36
01:08
12:25
12:53
07:08
04:32
06:40
AM
PM
PM
PM
AM
PM
AM
PM
PM
AM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
AM
PM
AM
PM
AM
PM
PM
PM
PM
194
758
260
478
64
148
<DIR>
478
383
294
138
182
115
138
<DIR>
4,843
76
<DIR>
406
465
46
478
93
188
PLANETS.TXT
RIGHT.UP
STATE.CAP
VEN.NEW
WILD2.YYY
ASTRO.TMP
DATA
VEN.TMP
EARTH.THR
EXP02JAN.dta
FILE3.SWT
OLDAUTO.MAK
RIGHT.RED
AWARD.MOV
SPORTS
GO.BAT
LONGFILENAME
LEVEL-1
MER.99
person.fil
STEVEN.FIL
VENUS.TXT
WILDONE
ZODIAC.FIL
2.12
91 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
ACTIVITY: WORKING WITH DEFAULTS
47,396 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\>_
(The graphic represents the tail end of your listing.) The display of
files, which scrolled by quickly, is still of the files on Drive A, but this time you had
to specify the drive because the default drive was no longer A. Keying in DIR and a
drive letter, A:, told the command line, “I want a display of the directory (DIR), but
this time I don’t want you to display the files on the default drive. I want you to
look only on the disk that is in Drive A.” As long as you tell the command DIR
where you want it to look, you can work with and from any drive you wish. If you
are not specific, the command will execute on the default drive shown by the
prompt on the screen (A:\>, B:\>, C:\>, etc.).
8
Key in the following: C:\>DIR HELLO.TXT e
9
Key in the following: C:\>DIR A:HELLO.TXT e
C:\>DIR HELLO.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\
File Not Found
C:\>DIR A:HELLO.TXT
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
05/30/2000
04:32 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 HELLO.TXT
53 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\>_
You first asked DIR to look on the default drive for a file called
HELLO.TXT. The default drive is Drive C. The prompt displayed on the screen,
C:\>, is the default drive. Since you did not specify which drive to check for the file
called HELLO.TXT, DIR assumed the default drive. DIR could not find the
HELLO.TXT file on the default drive, so it responded with File Not Found. The
operating system is not smart enough to say, “Oh, this file is not on the default
drive. Let me go check the ACTIVITIES disk in a different disk drive.” The operating system followed your instructions exactly.
Your next step was more specific. You made a clearer request: “Look for a file
called HELLO.TXT.” However, you first told DIR what disk drive to look into—A:.
The drive designator (A:) preceded the file name (HELLO.TXT) because you always
tell DIR which “file cabinet” to look in (the disk drive A:) before you tell it which
“folder” you want (HELLO.TXT). By looking at the syntax diagram, you see that
you can combine optional variable parameters. You gave DIR [drive:][path][filename]
61
62
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
some specific values—DIR A:HELLO.TXT. The A: was substituted for the [drive:],
and HELLO.TXT was substituted for [filename]. So far, you have used the optional
variable parameters [drive:] and [filename] and the optional fixed parameters [/P]
and [/W]. You have not used [path].
2.13
A Brief Introduction to
Subdirectories: The Path
Subdirectories are used primarily, but not exclusively, with hard disks and other
large storage media such as read/writable-CDs or Zip disks. Hard disks have a
large storage capacity (current common values are from 8 to 20 GB or more), and are
therefore more difficult to manage than floppy disks. This is also true of RW-CDs and
Zip disks. In general, users like to have similar files grouped together. Subdirectories
allow a disk to be divided into smaller, more manageable portions. Windows refers
to subdirectories as folders, and they are graphically represented with folder icons. In
the command line shell, folders are referred to as directories and subdirectories.
C:\
MYFILES
LETTERS
REPORTS
MISC
The full path name of a file called REP.DOC that is in the REPORTS directory is
C:\MYFILES\REPORTS\REP.DOC. The first \ (backslash) always represents the
root directory. The following backslashes without spaces are delimiters—separators
between elements in the path, elements being subdirectories and the ending file.
Subdirectories can be used on floppy disks. If you think of a disk as a file cabinet,
a subdirectory can be thought of as a drawer in the file cabinet. These file cabinet
drawers (subdirectories) also hold disk files. Just as disk drives have a name, such as
A:, B:, or C:, subdirectories must also have names so the system will know where to
look. Since subdirectories are part of a disk, their names should not be a single letter
of the alphabet. Single letters of the alphabet should be reserved for disk drives.
Every disk comes with one directory that is named by the operating system. This
directory is called the root directory and is indicated by the backslash (\). The
prompt displays the default directory as well as the default drive, as in A:\> or
C:\>. Technically, there is only one directory on any disk—the root directory, referred
to only as \. All others are subdirectories. However, the terms directories and
subdirectories, folders and subfolders are used interchangeably. This textbook will also
use the terms directory and subdirectory interchangeably. All subdirectories on a disk
have names such as UTILITY or SAMPLE, or any other name you choose or a
program chooses. The rules for naming subdirectories are the same as for naming
files, although subdirectory names do not usually have extensions.
When working with files on a disk, you need to perform certain tasks that can be
summarized as finding a file, storing a file, and retrieving a file. Because there are
subdirectories on a disk, simply supplying the DIR command with the drive that the
file might be on is insufficient information. You must also tell DIR the path to the
file. The path is the route followed by the operating system to locate, save, and
2.14
ACTIVITY: USING PATH WITH THE DIR COMMAND
retrieve a file. Thus, in a syntax diagram, the path refers to the course leading from
the root directory of a drive to a specific file. Simply stated, when you see path in a
syntax diagram, you substitute the directory name or names. In essence, you are
being very specific by telling the DIR command not to go just to the file cabinet (the
disk) but to go to a drawer (subdirectory) in the file cabinet.
Utility
Utility
le
mp
Sa
Sample
Figure 2.1—File Cabinets and Subdirectories
2.14
Activity: Using Path with
the DIR Command
Note:
1
You are at the command line screen. The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy
is in Drive A. C:\> is displayed as the default drive and the default directory.
Key in the following: C:\>DIR A: e
08/01/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/12/2002
05/14/2001
05/27/2001
11/16/2002
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
12/31/2001
10/31/2001
09:28 AM
<DIR>
07:08 PM
05:37 PM
09:10 AM
04:50 PM
04:32 PM
12:00 PM
12:13 AM
09:31 AM
<DIR>
11:28 AM
10:08 PM
09:36 AM
<DIR>
01:08 PM
12:25 AM
12:53 PM
07:08 PM
04:32 PM
06:40 PM
91 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
DATA
VEN.TMP
EARTH.THR
EXP02JAN.dta
FILE3.SWT
OLDAUTO.MAK
RIGHT.RED
AWARD.MOV
SPORTS
4,843 GO.BAT
76 LONGFILENAME
LEVEL-1
406 MER.99
465 person.fil
46 STEVEN.FIL
478 VENUS.TXT
93 WILDONE
188 ZODIAC.FIL
47,396 bytes
287,744 bytes free
478
383
294
138
182
115
138
C:\>_
(The graphic represents the tail end of your listing.) On the screen
display there are entries with <DIR> following their name, indicating
subdirectories. How do you know what files are inside a subdirectory? Look at the
beginning of the syntax diagram: DIR [drive:][path][filename]. You will substitute the
specific drive letter for [drive:] and substitute the specific subdirectory name for
63
64
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
[path]. You include \ to indicate that you want to begin at the top of the directory
and look down. You want to see what is in the DATA subdirectory.
2
Key in the following: C:\>DIR A:\DATA e
C:\>DIR A:\DATA
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\DATA
08/01/2002
08/01/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
09:28 AM
<DIR>
09:28 AM
<DIR>
02:47 PM
09:43 AM
03:26 PM
09:43 AM
03:33 PM
03:29 PM
09:43 AM
7 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
.
..
86 BONJOUR.TXT
75 GOOD.TXT
111 HIGHEST.TXT
256 MOTHER.LET
201 TEA.TAX
274 THANK.YOU
129 THIN.EST
1,132 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\>_
You keyed in the command you wanted to execute, the drive letter
you were interested in, the backslash to indicate that you wanted to start at the root
directory, and finally the name of the subdirectory. Remember, the first backslash
always indicates the root directory. The screen display shows you only what files are
in the subdirectory (file drawer) called DATA. The third line of the display (Directory of A:\DATA) tells you the subdirectory you are looking in. What if you wanted
to look for a specific file in a subdirectory? Once again, look at the syntax diagram:
DIR [drive:][path][filename]. You will substitute the drive letter, the path name, and
the file name you wish to locate. You need to use a delimiter to separate the file
name from the directory name. The delimiter reserved for path names is the
backslash. It separates the path name from the file name so that DIR knows which is
which.
Note:
It is very important to remember that the first backslash always represents
the root directory, and any subsequent backslashes are delimiters separating file names from directory names. The command in Step 2 above tells
the operating system (in English) to do a DIRectory of the files found by
starting at the root of Drive A, and going down one level into the
subdirectory DATA.
3
Key in the following: C:\>DIR A:\DATA\THIN.EST e
C:\>DIR A:\DATA\THIN.EST
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\DATA
08/01/2002
09:43 AM
129 THIN.EST
2.16
ACTIVITY: CHANGING THE DEFAULT DRIVE
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
129 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\>_
You keyed in the command you wanted to execute, the drive letter
you were interested in, the first backslash indicating the root directory, the name of
the subdirectory, then a backslash used as a delimiter, and finally the name of the
file. The screen display shows you only the file called THIN.EST located on the
ACTIVITIES disk in the subdirectory DATA.
2.15
Changing Defaults
Since you generally work on a specific drive, instead of keying in the drive letter
every time, you can change the default drive so that the operating system automatically uses the drive displayed on the screen as the default drive.
Refer to your Configuration Table in Chapter 1.6, or consult your instructor to see
where the Windows system utility files are located. If they are in a subdirectory
other than C:\Windows\system32, you will have to know the name of that location,
and you will have to substitute that path for C:\Windows\System32. For example,
if your system command files are located on a network in
F:\APPS\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32, you would substitute that drive and path each
time you see C:\Windows\system32 in this text. (Also, remember it does not matter
if you key in C:\WINDOWS or c:\windows. The command line is not case sensitive.)
During the writing of this text book, different computers with Windows XP
installed in different ways are used, and the appearance of the prompt will vary.
Your own prompt may show in a different case, depending on whether you have
upgraded to Windows XP from Windows 2000, upgraded from Millennium or
Windows 98, are using a version installed by the computer manufacturer (called an
OEM [Original Equipment Manufaturer] version) or have installed from a full
version onto an empty computer. In addition, if you are in a lab environment, the
display may vary depending on how the network was set up. If you have not filled
out the information on your Configuration Table in Chapter 1, you may wish to do
so at this time.
2.16
Activity: Changing the Default Drive
Note:
1
You are in the Command Prompt window. The “ACTIVITIES Disk—
Working Copy” is in Drive A. C:\> is displayed as the default drive and
the default directory.
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
C:\>A:
A:\>_
65
66
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
By simply keying in a letter followed by a colon, you are telling
the system that you want to change your work area to that designated drive. Thus,
when you keyed in A:, you changed the work area from the hard disk, Drive C, to
the floppy disk in Drive A. You have now made A: the default drive. The assumption the DIR command will make is that all files will come from the disk in Drive A.
It will not look at the hard disk, Drive C.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR DISKCOPY.COM e
A:\>DIR DISKCOPY.COM
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
Because the default drive is the drive with the ACTIVITIES disk,
DIR looked for this file only on the ACTIVITIES disk in Drive A. You must be aware
of where you are (what the default drive and subdirectory are) and where your files
are located.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\DISKCOPY.COM e
A:\>DIR C:\DISKCOPY.COM
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
Although you did tell DIR to look on Drive C, you were not
specific enough. DIR looked only in the root directory of C and could not find the
file of interest.
4
Key in the following:
A:\>DIR C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DISKCOPY.COM e
Note:
Substitute your drive and/or subdirectory that contains your system utility
files if it is different from this example.
C:\>DIR C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\DISKCOPY.COM
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
2.18
08/23/2001
12:00 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
ACTIVITY: CHANGING DIRECTORIES
7,168 diskcopy.com
7,168 bytes
8,572,444,672 bytes free
C:\>_
The dates and times for the diskcopy.com file may vary depending
on which version of Windows you are using. In this case, because you specified the
drive and subdirectory as well as the file name, DIR knew where to look and located
the file. You asked DIR not only to look on Drive C, but more specifically to look on
Drive C in the subdirectory called \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 for the file called
DISKCOPY.COM.
2.17
Changing Directories
In addition to changing drives, you can also change directories. When you work on
a hard disk, it is usually divided into subdirectories. Once you establish your
default drive, you can also establish your default directory. Then, instead of keying
in the path name every time, you can change the default directory so that the
operating system will use the directory displayed on the screen as the default
directory. To change directories, you key in the command CD (which stands for
“change directory”) followed by the directory (path) name. The partial command
syntax is: CD [/D] [drive:][path].
If you key in CD with no parameters, it tells you the directory that is currently
the default directory. If you wish to change the default, you follow CD with a path
name such as CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32. If you wish to change drives at the
same time you change directories, you use the /D parameter. Thus, if your default
prompt were A:\> and you keyed in CD /D C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32, you
would change drives as well as directories.
2.18
Activity: Changing Directories
Note:
You are at the command line screen. The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working
Copy is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive and the default
directory.
1
Key in the following: A:\>C: e
2
Key in the following: C:\>CD e
A:\>C:
C:\>CD
C:\
C:\>_
When you keyed in CD, C:\ displayed, telling you that your
current default drive is C and the current default directory is the root or \. In the
67
68
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
last activity, when you wanted to locate the file called DISKCOPY.COM, you had to
precede it with the path name \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\. If you change to that
directory, the only place that DIR will look for that file is in the current default
directory.
3
Key in the following: C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 e
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You told Windows to change from the current directory to a
directory called SYSTEM32 under a directory called WINDOWS under the root (\)
of the default drive (C:). You changed directories so that WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 is
now the default directory. Notice how the prompt displays both the default drive
and directory. Whenever you execute any command, the command will look only in
the current directory for the file of interest.
4
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR DISKCOPY.COM e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR DISKCOPY.COM
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
08/23/2001
12:00 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
7,168 diskcopy.com
7,168 bytes
8,572,444,672 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
The command DIR looked only in the \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
directory and located the file called DISKCOPY.COM. Look at the line that states
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32. DIR always tells you where it has
looked. This procedure works with any directory.
5
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \ e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \
C:\>_
Whenever you key in CD \, it always takes you to the root directory of the drive you are on.
6
Key in the following: C:\>CD /D A:\DATA e
7
Key in the following: A:\DATA>DIR e
2.19
GLOBAL FILE SPECIFICATIONS: WILDCARDS, THE ?, AND THE *
C:\>CD /D A:\DATA
A:\DATA>DIR
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\DATA
08/01/2002
08/01/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
09:28 AM
<DIR>
09:28 AM
<DIR>
02:47 PM
09:43 AM
03:26 PM
09:43 AM
03:33 PM
03:29 PM
09:43 AM
7 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
.
..
86 BONJOUR.TXT
75 GOOD.TXT
111 HIGHEST.TXT
256 MOTHER.LET
201 TEA.TAX
274 THANK.YOU
129 THIN.EST
1,132 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\DATA>_
You used two commands. With the first command, you changed
the default drive to A and the default directory to DATA on Drive A. You could do
this because you used the /D parameter. Then you changed from the root of the A
drive to the DATA directory. With the second command, you executed the DIR
command. All files in the DATA directory are displayed. You could have looked for
a particular file, but, since there are only a few files in the DATA directory, you
could find any file you are looking for easily.
8
Key in the following: A:\DATA>CD \ e
A:\DATA>CD \
A:\>_
You have now returned to the root directory of Drive A.
2.19
Global File Specifications:
Wildcards, the ?, and the *
Using the DIR command and a file specification, you can find one specific file that
matches what you keyed. Every time you wish to locate a file, you can key the entire
file specification. Often, however, you wish to work with a group of files that have
similar names or a group of files whose names you do not know. There is a “shorthand” system that allows you to operate on a group of files rather than a single file.
This system is formally called global file specifications; informally, it is called using
wildcards. Sometimes it is referred to as using ambiguous file references. Conceptually, they are similar to playing cards, where the joker can stand for another card of
69
70
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
your choice. In Windows, the question mark (?) and the asterisk (*) are the
wildcards. These symbols stand for unknowns. The * represents or substitutes for a
group or string of characters; the ? represents or substitutes for a single character.
Many commands allow you to use global file specifications. You will use the DIR
command to demonstrate the use of wildcards. You will find that the techniques you
learn here will also apply when you use Search in the GUI (the Windows desktop).
2.20
Activity: DIR and Wildcards
Note:
The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as
the default drive and the default directory.
1
Key in the following: A:\>C: e
2
Key in the following: C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 e
Note:
Remember that if the system utility files are in a subdirectory with a
different name, you will have to substitute your subdirectory name.
A:\>C:
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You have changed the default directory to where the system utility
files are located. If you wanted to locate a file and all you remembered about the file
name was that it began with the letter G and that it was located on the default drive
and subdirectory, you would not be able to find that file. You have insufficient
information.
3
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR G e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR G
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\system32
File Not FoundC:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
First, note how the prompt reflects the subdirectory
\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32. When you keyed in DIR G, you were correct, but only
somewhat. You first entered the work you wanted done, the command DIR. You did
not need to enter the drive letter. DIR assumed both the default drive and default
subdirectory. However, DIR specifically looked for a file called G. There was no file
called G; that was simply the first letter of the file name. You could find files that
begin with G by using the wildcard symbol * to represent all other characters—both
the file name (*) and the file extension (.*).
2.20
4
ACTIVITY: DIR AND WILDCARDS
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR G*.* e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR G*.*
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
12/07/1999
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
12/07/1999
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/11/1998
08/11/1998
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
04:00 AM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
02:04 AM
02:04 AM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
24 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
1,591 getstart.gif
111,616 gpresult.exe
76,800 gcdef.dll
24,576 gdi.exe
24,772 geo.nls
116,736 glu32.dll
34,871 gpedit.msc
101,888 gpkcsp.dll
9,728 gpkrsrc.dll
37,888 grpconv.exe
26,112 graftabl.com
19,694 graphics.com
21,232 graphics.pro
250,880 gdi32.dll
41,472 g711codc.ax
605,696 getuname.dll
24,006 gb2312.uce
57,344 gpupdate.exe
488,960 gpedit.dll
315,904 glu.dll
154,624 glut.dll
55,296 getmac.exe
285,184 glmf32.dll
178,688 gptext.dll
3,065,558 bytes
8,571,920,384 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
The files listed in the subdirectory vary, depending on the release
or version of the OS, so do not worry if your screen display is different. You asked
DIR to find files beginning with the letter G on the default drive and default
subdirectory. You did not know anything else about the file names or even how
many files you might have that begin with the letter G. You represented any and all
characters following the letter G with the asterisk, separated the file name from the
file extension with a period, and represented all the characters in the file extension
with the second asterisk. Thus, G*.* (read as “G star dot star”) means all the files
that start with the letter G having any or no characters following the letter G, and
can have any or no file extension. Now DIR could look for a match.
In this example, the first file DIR found that had the G you specified was
getstart.gif. DIR returned this file because the asterisk (*) following the G matched
the remainder of the file name, etstart. Remember, * represents any group of characters. The second *, representing the file extension, matched gif because, again, the *
represents any group of characters. The second file DIR found that began with G
was gpresult.exe. DIR displayed this file because the * following the G matched the
remainder of the file name, presult. The second * representing the file extension
matched exe because, again, the * represents any group of characters. The third file
71
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COMMAND SYNTAX
matches G*.* for the same reasons. You could have more or fewer files listed in very
different order depending on how your system is set up.
There are other ways of requesting information using the *. If all you know about
a group of files on the disk in the default drive is that the group has the common file
extension .SYS, you could display these files on the screen using wildcards.
5
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR *.SYS e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR *.SYS
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
08/23/2001
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
17 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
27,097 country.sys
9,029 ansi.sys
42,537 keyboard.sys
1,799,552 win32k.sys
29,370 ntdos411.sys
14,592 watchdog.sys
33,808 ntio.sys
34,528 ntio404.sys
35,632 ntio411.sys
35,392 ntio412.sys
34,528 ntio804.sys
29,146 ntdos404.sys
27,866 ntdos.sys
29,274 ntdos412.sys
29,146 ntdos804.sys
4,768 himem.sys
42,809 key01.sys
2,259,074 bytes
8,571,904,000 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
The * represented any file name, but all the files must have .SYS
as a file extension. Again, the number of files displayed may vary. In addition, if
your hard disk is using the NTFS file system, your display will be in alphabetical
order by file name. The next activities will demonstrate the differences between the
two wildcards, * and ?.
6
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\*.TXT e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:*.TXT
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
10/31/2001
11/16/2000
01:46
02:10
04:03
04:32
12:00
02:43
12:00
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
148
121
72
53
59
529
53
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
DANCES.TXT
HELLO.TXT
Sandy and Patty.txt
TITAN.TXT
Sandy and Nicki.txt
2.20
05/27/2001
10/30/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
10:08 PM
03:42 PM
12:15 AM
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
01:08 PM
11:24 AM
07:08 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
ACTIVITY: DIR AND WILDCARDS
81 LONGFILENAME.TXT
190 JUPITER.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
2,833 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You asked DIR what files had an extension of .TXT and were
located on the ACTIVITIES disk. You did not know anything about the file names,
only the file extension. DIR searched the table of contents in Drive A since you
placed an A: prior to *.TXT. It looked only in the root directory of the disk since you
preceded *.TXT with \. The command found 15 files that matched *.TXT. Now, how
does the question mark differ from the asterisk?
7
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\?????.TXT e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\?????.TXT
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
01:46 PM
02:10 PM
04:32 PM
02:43 PM
07:08 PM
5 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 ASTRO.TXT
121 BORN.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
529 TITAN.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
1,329 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
This time you asked your question differently. You still asked for
files that had the file extension of .TXT in the root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk.
However, instead of using the asterisk representing “any number of characters,”
you used the question mark (?) five times. You asked for a file name with five
characters and DIR displayed files with five or fewer characters in their file name.
You then separated the file name from the file extension with a period saying that
the file not only needed to have that size name, but also the extension .TXT. This
time five files matched your request. Note how the above screen display differs
from the screen display in Step 6. This time you do not see the files PLANETS.TXT,
GALAXY.TXT, JUPITER.TXT, DANCES.TXT, Sandy and Nicki.txt, Sandy and
Patty.txt, LONGFILENAME.TXT, LONGFILENAMING.TXT, MERCURY.TXT, or
LONGFILENAMED.TXT on the screen. Those file names were longer than five
characters.
8
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\EXP*.* e
73
74
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\EXP*.*
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
9 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
295 EXP02FEB.dta
294 EXP03JAN.dta
295 EXP01FEB.dta
292 EXP02MAR.dta
294 EXP01JAN.dta
295 EXP03FEB.dta
292 EXP01MAR.dta
292 EXP03MAR.dta
294 EXP02JAN.dta
2,643 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
This time you asked to see all the files located on the ACTIVITIES
disk (Drive A) in the root directory (\) that start with the letters EXP (EXP*.*). The
*.* following the EXP represents the rest of the file name and the file extension.
These file names were created with a pattern in mind. All the files having to do with
the Budget start with EXP, which stands for “expenses,” followed by the last two
digits of the year (99, 00, or 01), followed by the month (JANuary, FEBruary, or
MARch). The file extension is .dta to indicate these are data files, not program files.
However, often you are not interested in all the files. You want only some of them.
For example, you might want to know what expense files you have on the ACTIVITIES disk for the year 2001.
9
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\EXP01*.* e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\EXP01*.*
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
3 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
295 EXP01FEB.dta
294 EXP01JAN.dta
292 EXP01MAR.dta
881 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
Here you asked for all the files (DIR) on the ACTIVITIES disk in
Drive A in the root directory that were expense files for 2001 (EXP01). The rest of the
file names were represented by *.*. On your screen display you got only the 2001
files. However, suppose your interest is in all the January files. You no longer care
which year, only which month.
2.21
REDIRECTION
10 Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\EXP??JAN.* e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:\EXP??JAN.*
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
09:10 AM
3 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
294 EXP03JAN.dta
294 EXP01JAN.dta
294 EXP02JAN.dta
882 bytes
287,744 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
The two question marks represented the two characters within the
file name. The characters could have been any characters, but they would be limited
to two characters. You could have also keyed in DIR A:\exp*jan.* because remember, Windows is not case sensitive, and will recognize characters entered after a
wildcard. Previous versions of the operating system would have ignored all characters after the asterisk, allowing any and all characters to fill the remaining spaces. In
those versions, the command DIR *JAN.* would have resulted in the same display
as DIR *.*. Both Windows XP and Windows 2000 Professional, however, recognize
characters following the asterisk wildcard, and the resulting display shows you the
files you were looking for.
11 Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \ e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \
C:\>_
You have returned to the root directory of C.
2.21
Redirection
The system knows what you want to do when you key in commands. In the Command Prompt window, input is expected from the keyboard, which is considered
the standard input device. In addition, the results of a command’s execution are
written to the screen. The screen, or monitor, is considered the standard output
device.
You can change where input is coming from, and where output is going to
through a feature called redirection. Redirection allows you to tell the operating
system to, instead of writing the output to the standard output device (the screen),
write the information somewhere else. Typically, this is to a file or printer. For
redirection to work with a printer, the printer must be a local printer—a printer that
is attached directly to the computer you are working with—and not a network
75
76
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
printer. Redirection does not work with all commands, only with those commands
that write their output to standard output. Redirection does work with the DIR
command because DIR gets its input from the standard input device, the keyboard,
and writes to the standard output device, the screen. The syntax for redirection is
COMMAND > DESTINATION. The command is what you key in, such as DIR
*.TXT. You then use the greater-than symbol (>) to redirect the results of that command to where you specify, instead of to the screen. The command would be keyed
in as DIR *.TXT > MY.FIL to send the results, or output of the DIR command, to a
file named MY.FIL. The command would be keyed in as DIR *.TXT > LPT1 if you
wanted the output to go to the printer attached to the first printer port. You must
use the actual device name for the printer, PRN for the default printer, or LPT1,
LPT2, or LPT3 for a printer attached to a specific port on your computer. If you are
using a network printer, you cannot redirect unless you know the name of the
network printer.
2.22
Activity: Redirecting Output to a File
Note:
The system is booted. You have shelled out to the command prompt screen.
The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy is in Drive A. C:\> is displayed as
the default drive and the default directory.
1
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.NEW e
C:\>A:
A:\>DIR *.NEW
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
03:42 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
406 MER.NEW
148 AST.NEW
190 JUP.NEW
478 VEN.NEW
1,222 bytes
287,744 bytes free
A:\>_
You changed the default drive to the A drive. You then asked for
all the files on the ACTIVITIES disk that have the file extension of .NEW. You saw
the output displayed on the screen. You have four files that meet the criteria. You
keyed in a command and the results were sent to the screen.
You are now going to create a file on your ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy
using redirection. Remember that when the instructions in this text say “ACTIVITIES disk,” they mean the copy of the ACTIVITIES disk you made in Chapter 1. It is
this disk that is in the A drive.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.NEW > MY.HW e
2.23
REDIRECTING OUTPUT TO THE PRINTER
A:\>DIR *.NEW > MY.HW
A:\>_
This time you instructed the system to send the output of the DIR
command to a file called MY.HW, instead of sending the output to the screen.
Redirection is an “instead of” procedure. You either have the results of the DIR
command displayed on the screen, or you send it to a file.
Note:
If you see a dialog box that says “The disk cannot be written to because it is
write protected. Please remove the write protection from the volume
ACTIVITIES in drive A:,” your disk is write protected. Remove the disk
and move the sliding tab to cover the small hole in the corner to unprotect
it. Reinsert the disk and click Try Again in the dialog box to complete the
task.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR MY.HW e
A:\>DIR MY.HW
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
02/06/2002
03:24 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
384 MY.HW
384 bytes
287,232 bytes free
A:\>_
You now have a file that contains the output from the DIR command stored on your disk.
2.23
Redirecting Output to the Printer
You have seen that you can redirect output to a file. You can also redirect output to a
local printer. Since the DIR command normally writes to the screen, you can redirect
the output of the DIR command to the printer to get a printout of what normally
would be written to the screen. However, you cannot use just any name with a
device, as you can with a file name. Windows has very specific names for its devices. You already know that a letter of the alphabet followed by a colon (:) is always
a disk drive. Printers have names also. The printer device names are PRN, LPT1,
LPT2, and sometimes LPT3. PRN is the default printer, usually LPT1. These are the
names for local printers. Network printers also have specific names. The network
administrator assigns the network printer name. Unless you know your network
printer name, you may not be able to redirect output to the printer.
CAUTION: Before doing the next activity, check with your lab instructor to see if
you have a local printer. If you have access to only a network printer, you may not
77
78
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
be able to do the next activity unless you have received other instructions. If you
do have a local printer, and you use LPT1, be sure to use the number one, not the
lowercase L.
2.24
Activity: Redirecting the
Output to the Printer
Note 1: DO NOT do this activity until you have checked with your lab instructor
for any special instructions. In fact, you may be unable to do the activity. If
you cannot do it, read the activity.
Note 2: The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as
the default drive and the default directory. Be sure the printer is turned on
and online before beginning this activity.
1
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TXT e
A:\>DIR *.TXT
Volume in drive A is ACTIVITIES
Volume Serial Number is 08D4-2897
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
10/31/2001
11/16/2000
05/27/2001
10/30/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
01:46 PM
02:10 PM
04:03 PM
04:32 PM
12:00 PM
02:43 PM
12:00 PM
10:08 PM
03:42 PM
12:15 AM
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
01:08 PM
11:24 AM
07:08 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 ASTRO.TXT
121 BORN.TXT
72 DANCES.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
529 TITAN.TXT
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
81 LONGFILENAME.TXT
190 JUPITER.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
2,833 bytes
287,232 bytes free
A:\>_
You asked to see a listing of all the files on the ACTIVITIES disk
that had the file extension of .TXT.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TXT > PRN e
You instructed the operating system to send the output to an
alternate output device, specifically the printer, instead of displaying it on the
screen. The printer should be printing, and nothing should be on the screen. Remember, redirection is an “instead of” procedure. You either display the results of
the DIR command on the screen, or send the results to the printer. See Figure 2.2.
2.25
INPUT
Standard OUTPUT
from DIR command
displays on
screen
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
10/31/2001
11/16/2000
05/27/2001
10/30/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
02:10 PM
04:03 PM
04:32 PM
12:00 PM
02:43 PM
12:00 PM
10:08 PM
03:42 PM
12:15 AM
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
01:08 PM
11:24 AM
07:08 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
GETTING HELP
121 BORN.TXT
72 DANCES.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
529 TITAN.TXT
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
81 LONGFILENAME.TXT
190 JUPITER.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
2,833 bytes
287,232 bytes free
Redirected
OUTPUT
Figure 2.2—Redirected Output
Your page may not have ejected from your local printer. If you have a dot-matrix
printer, it printed the lines in the file and then it stopped. The printer did not
advance to the beginning of a new page.
You have to go to the printer and roll the platen until the perforated line appears
so that you can tear off the page. If you have an inkjet printer or a laser printer, the
situation is even stranger. No paper appears at all. In order to feed the paper
manually with an inkjet printer, you have to press the Reset button. With a laser
printer, you have to go to the printer, turn the Online button off, press the form feed
(FF) button, and then turn the Online button back on. In all these cases, you are
doing what is called a hardware solution to a problem. You are manipulating the
hardware to get the desired results.
2.25
Getting Help
As you begin to use commands, their names, purposes, and proper syntax become
familiar. Initially, however, these commands are new to users. Prior to DOS 5.0, the
only way to become familiar with a command or to check the proper syntax was to
locate the command in the manual. The reference manual that comes with any
software package is called documentation. The completeness of the documentation
can vary from software package to software package. The documentation that
comes with an operating system consists of at least the installation instructions and
occasionally a command reference manual, which is a list of commands with a brief
description and syntax for each. For the Windows operating systems, documentation is in the form of text files on the CD. In DOS 6.0 and above, the documentation
has been provided less and less in written form, and more and more online. There is
a very good database of information that can be accessed via the Help choice on the
Start menu from the desktop, but this help is for procedures and methods used in
79
80
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
the Windows GUI. You may also get help on command line commands in the GUI
help. But to get help with a command and its syntax within the DOS environment,
key in the name of the command followed by a space, a forward slash (/), and a
question mark (?). You may also use HELP followed by the command name, such as
HELP DIR. For reference, the commands and syntax are listed in Appendix B.
2.26
Activity: Getting Help with a Command
Note:
1
The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as
the default drive and the default directory.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /? e
A:\>DIR /?
Displays a list of files and subdirectories in a directory.
DIR [drive:][path][filename] [/A[[:]attributes]] [/B] [/C] [/D] [/L] [/N]
[/O[[:]sortorder]] [/P] [/Q] [/S] [/T[[:]timefield]] [/W] [/X] [/4]
[drive:][path][filename]
Specifies drive, directory, and/or files to list.
/A
attributes
Displays files with specified attributes.
D Directories
R Read-only files
H Hidden files
A Files ready for archiving
S System files
- Prefix meaning not
/B
Uses bare format (no heading information or summary).
/C
Display the thousand separator in file sizes. This is the
default. Use /-C to disable display of separator.
/D
Same as wide but files are list sorted by column.
/L
Uses lowercase.
/N
New long list format where filenames are on the far right.
/O
List by files in sorted order.
sortorder
N By name (alphabetic)
S By size (smallest first)
E By extension (alphabetic) D By date/time (oldest first)
G Group directories first
- Prefix to reverse order
/P
Pauses after each screenful of information.
/Q
Display the owner of the file.
/S
Displays files in specified directory and all subdirectories.
/T
Controls which time field displayed or used for sorting
timefield
C Creation
A Last Access
W Last Written
/W
Uses wide list format.
/X
This displays the short names generated for non-8dot3 file
names. The format is that of /N with the short name inserted
before the long name. If no short name is present, blanks are
Press any key to continue . . .
This will display the complete syntax explanation for the DIR
command. Previously, you looked at only a partial syntax diagram for the DIR
command. Notice the first line of the complete diagram:
DIR [drive:][path][filename] [/A[[:]attributes]] [/B] [/C] [/D] [/L] [/N].
The entire line is in brackets, [ ], meaning that all of the parameters or switches are
optional. The DIR command can stand alone—it requires no parameters. You may
include the drive, path, and file name, and you may specify the order (/O) in which
you wish the files displayed. Look at the diagram at the line that begins with /O List
2.26
ACTIVITY: GETTING HELP WITH A COMMAND
by files in sorted order. Below that are the orders available. N is by name, S by size,
E by extension, D by date, and so on.
2
Touch the e key see the remaining few lines of the DIR syntax.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /ON e
10/31/2001
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
07/31/2000
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
11/16/2000
11/16/2000
10/12/2002
07/31/2000
07/31/2000
07/31/1999
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
05/14/2002
05/14/2002
05/14/2002
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
08/12/2000
10/31/2001
01:38 PM
04:32 PM
01:49 PM
12:25 AM
04:32 PM
11:24 AM
02:16 PM
12:00 PM
03:18 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
09:31 AM
<DIR>
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
12:53 PM
09:18 AM
<DIR>
02:43 PM
07:08 PM
07:08 PM
07:08 PM
07:08 PM
07:08 PM
08:07 AM
08:07 AM
08:07 AM
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
04:12 PM
06:40 PM
92 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
4,064
182
219
465
2,307
194
11,264
115
758
53
59
NEW-SUVS.XLS
OLDAUTO.MAK
ORION.NEB
person.fil
PERSONAL.FIL
PLANETS.TXT
QUASARS.DOC
RIGHT.RED
RIGHT.UP
Sandy and Nicki.txt
Sandy and Patty.txt
SPORTS
260 STATE.CAP
1,228 STATES.USA
46 STEVEN.FIL
TEST
529 TITAN.TXT
478 VEN.99
478 VEN.NEW
478 VEN.TMP
478 VENUS.TMM
478 VENUS.TXT
64 WILD1.XXX
64 WILD2.YYY
64 WILD3.ZZZ
93 WILDONE
181 WILDONE.DOS
181 WILDTHR.DOS
182 WILDTWO.DOS
3 Y.FIL
188 ZODIAC.FIL
47,780 bytes
287,232 bytes free
A:\>_
(As with previous examples, this graphic represents the tail end of
your listing.) Notice that the files are displayed in alphabetical order. You can
reverse the order.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /O-N e
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
12/11/2002
04:51
02:49
09:10
09:10
09:10
09:10
09:10
09:10
09:10
09:10
09:10
PM
PM
AM
AM
AM
AM
AM
AM
AM
AM
AM
137
138
292
294
295
292
294
295
292
294
295
FILE2.FP
FILE2.CZG
EXP03MAR.dta
EXP03JAN.dta
EXP03FEB.dta
EXP02MAR.dta
EXP02JAN.dta
EXP02FEB.dta
EXP01MAR.dta
EXP01JAN.dta
EXP01FEB.dta
81
82
CHAPTER 2
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
08/01/2002
12/11/1999
08/12/2000
07/31/1999
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
COMMAND SYNTAX
05:32 PM
05:37 PM
05:28 PM
03:03 PM
09:28 AM
<DIR>
04:03 PM
04:12 PM
12:53 PM
02:10 PM
02:10 PM
02:47 PM
06:51 PM
12:13 AM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
92 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
259
383
165
286
EARTH.TWO
EARTH.THR
EARTH.ONE
DRESS.UP
DATA
72 DANCES.TXT
314 CASES.FIL
47 CAROLYN.FIL
121 BORN.TYP
121 BORN.TXT
86 BONJOUR.TMP
125 BLUE.JAZ
138 AWARD.MOV
148 ASTRO.TXT
148 ASTRO.TMP
148 AST.TMP
148 AST.NEW
148 AST.99
47,780 bytes
287,232 bytes free
A:\>_
The file names scrolled by quickly, but they were in reverse
alphabetical order, from Z to A. Thus, by using the parameters /O-N (O for order,
the - for reverse, and N for file name), you accomplished your task.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /S e
12/25/1999
12/25/1999
11:36 AM
11:36 AM
5 File(s)
227 FOOT-COL.TMS
207 FOOT-PRO.TMS
1,089 bytes
Directory of A:\LEVEL-1
11/16/2002
11/16/2002
09/09/2000
11/16/2002
09:36 AM
<DIR>
09:36 AM
<DIR>
04:39 PM
09:36 AM
<DIR>
1 File(s)
.
..
80 HELLO.TXT
LEVEL-2
80 bytes
Directory of A:\LEVEL-1\LEVEL-2
11/16/2002
11/16/2002
09/09/2001
11/16/2002
09:36 AM
<DIR>
09:36 AM
<DIR>
04:39 PM
09:36 AM
<DIR>
1 File(s)
.
..
76 HELLO.TXT
LEVEL-3
76 bytes
Directory of A:\LEVEL-1\LEVEL-2\LEVEL-3
11/16/2002
11/16/2002
08/08/2000
09:36 AM
<DIR>
09:36 AM
<DIR>
04:39 PM
1 File(s)
Total Files Listed:
189 File(s)
45 Dir(s)
A:\>_
.
..
80 HELLO.TXT
80 bytes
1,107,655 bytes
287,232 bytes free
2.26
ACTIVITY: GETTING HELP WITH A COMMAND
This time the file names scrolled by for a much longer time. This is
because the /S in the command said you wanted to see a DIRectory of not only the
files on the root of A (A:\) but also in all of the Sub directories ( /S) The /S parameter displays all the files from the default or specified directory and all its
subdirectories.
Using the different parameters available with the DIR command, you can display
files sorted by their attributes (covered in a later chapter), display only the names of
the files with no additional information (/B), or display the information in lower
case (/L). However, if you use more than one parameter, each parameter must be
preceded by the forward slash.
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /blp e
A:\>DIR /BLP
Parameter format not correct - "BLP".
A:\>_
As you can see, although B, L, and P are all valid parameters, they
must be separated.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /B /L /P e
8
Press e until you reach the end of the display.
born.typ
Press any key to continue . . .
exp01mar.dta
exp03mar.dta
galaxy.txt
jup.99
longfilenaming.txt
mercury.txt
planets.txt
right.up
state.cap
ven.new
wild2.yyy
astro.tmp
data
ven.tmp
earth.thr
exp02jan.dta
file3.swt
oldauto.mak
right.red
award.mov
sports
go.bat
longfilename
level-1
mer.99
83
84
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
person.fil
steven.fil
venus.txt
wildone
zodiac.fil
my.hw
A:\>_
Now that you have separated the parameters, you have the
directory listing you wanted—a bare listing in lower case letters that pauses so you
can see one screenful of information at a time.
9
Key in the following: A:\>EXIT e
10 Initiate and complete the Windows shut-down procedure.
Chapter Summary
1. Command syntax means the correct command and the proper order for keying
in commands.
2. A parameter is some piece of information that you want to include in a command. It allows a command to be specific.
3. A delimiter indicates where parts of a command begin or end. It is similar to
punctuation marks in English.
4. Some commands require parameters. They are called mandatory or required
parameters. Other commands allow parameters; these are called optional
parameters.
5. A variable parameter or switch is one that requires the user to supply a value. A
fixed parameter or switch has its value determined by the OS.
6. A syntax diagram is a representation of a command and its syntax.
7. The DIR command is an internal command that displays the directory (table of
contents) of a disk.
8. DIR has many parameters, all of which are optional.
9. A file specification has two parts, the file name and the file extension. A file
name is mandatory; however, a file extension is optional. If you use a file
extension, separate it from the file name by a period, called a dot.
10. A valid file name contains legal characters, most often alphanumeric characters.
It cannot contain illegal characters.
11. You may use keys such as the <up arrow> or <Down arrow> to perform command line editing.
12. Every device attached to the computer has a reserved, specific, and unique
name so that the operating system knows what it is communicating with.
13. Disk drives are designated by a letter followed by a colon, as in A:.
14. A local printer is connected directly to your computer and has the device name
of PRN, LPT1, LPT2, or LPT3.
15. Defaults are implied instructions the operating system falls back to when no
specific instructions are given.
16. The root directory’s name is represented by the \ (backslash).
17. With some commands, such as DIR, parameters are preceded by a / (slash).
KEY TERMS
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
32.
Subdirectories allow a disk to be divided into areas that can hold files.
Subdirectories are named by the user or by an application program.
The system prompt displayed on the screen is the default drive and directory.
You can change the default drive and default subdirectory.
To change the default drive, you key in the drive letter followed by a colon, as in
A: or C:.
To change the default subdirectory, you key in CD followed by the subdirectory
name, such as CD \DATA or CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32.
To change directories and drives at the same time, you use the /D parameter,
such as CD /D A:\DATA.
The subdirectory that contains the system utility files is usually
\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 or \WINNT\SYSTEM32.
You can look for files on drives and subdirectories other than the default if you
tell the OS where to look by prefacing the file names with a drive designator
and/or path name.
If the file is in a subdirectory, the file specification must be prefaced by the drive
designator and followed by the subdirectory name. If the default
drive\directory is different than the location of the needed file, a user must
include the subdirectory name in the command, as in
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\FILENAME.EXT.
Global file specifications (* or ?) allow a user to substitute a wildcard for unknown characters.
The ? represents one single character in a file name; the * matches a string of
characters.
A command’s output that normally is displayed on the screen may be redirected
to a file. You key in the command, add the redirection symbol (>), and then key
in the file name.
A command’s output that is normally displayed on the screen may be redirected
to a local printer. You key in the command, add the redirection symbol (>), and
then key in the device name (PRN or LPTn).
To get help on a command, key in the name of the command followed by a
forward slash and a question mark, such as DIR /?.
The DIR command allows you to sort the directory listing by use of the parameter /O followed by the sort order letter you are interested in. For instance, to
sort by name, you would key in DIR /ON.
Key Terms
alias
attributes
backslash
command line editing
convention
default
default drive
delimiter
designated drive
device
device name
documentation
eight-dot-three
extension
FF button
fixed parameter
folders
global file specifications
GUI
illegal characters
insert mode
logged drive
mandatory parameter
OEM
online button
optional parameter
overstrike mode
parameter
path
redirection
85
86
CHAPTER 2
reset button
root directory
standard input
standard output
COMMAND SYNTAX
subdirectory
subfolders
switch
syntax
syntax diagram
variable parameter
volume
wildcards
Discussion Questions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Define command syntax.
Why is syntax important when using a command?
Define parameters.
What is the difference between a variable and a fixed parameter?
How would you use a syntax diagram? Why is the diagram important?
Name two parameters that can be used with the DIR command. Explain why
you would use the parameters.
Define delimiters. Give an example of a delimiter.
Define file specifications.
How do you separate a file name and a file extension?
What is used to separate a file specification from a path name?
What is the function and purpose of a device?
Explain the function and purpose of the default drive.
How can you tell which drive is the default drive?
Define default subdirectory.
How can you tell which directory is the default subdirectory?
What steps must be done to change the default drive? Why would you change
drives?
What does A:\> mean?
If you keyed in 10 commands and wanted to reuse a command previously
keyed in, what could you do?
What steps must be done to change a directory? Why would you change a
directory?
What is the significance of the first backslash in a command?
Define global file specifications.
How are wildcards used?
If you see C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32> on the screen, what does it mean?
What is the purpose and function of redirection?
What would you do if you forgot the parameter for a wide DIR display?
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true and the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. Command syntax is the proper order or sequence for keying in
commands.
T
F
2. When working at the Command Prompt, you are allowed to add
one parameter to every command.
T
F
3. The standard input device is the monitor or screen.
T
F
4. The * is a wildcard that represents a group of characters.
T
F
5. If you see brackets in a syntax diagram, you do not use the
parameters.
WRITING COMMANDS
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. A variable parameter is one in which the _______________ provides the value.
7. A mark that separates characters (much like a punctuation mark in English) is
known as a(n) _______________.
8. All files in a directory must have a(n) _______________ name.
9. The first \ symbol represents the _______________.
10. If you keyed in _______________, you would see all the files displayed across
the screen, rather than down the screen.
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. Which of the following is a global file specification?
____
a. "
b. /
c. *
d. .
12.
In
a Command line window, the prompt displayed on the screen will
____
display
a. the only drive the computer can ever use.
b. the default drive.
c. always the floppy disk drive.
d. always the hard disk drive.
13.
To
display the directories for Drive A and Drive C at the same time,
____
key in:
a. DIR A: C:
b. DIR A:/C
c. DIR A: /DIR C:
d. none of the above
14.
The
default drive can be changed by
____
a. pressing e twice.
b. using the DIR command.
c. entering the new drive letter followed by a colon.
d. The default drive cannot be changed.
15. If the system prompt is A:\> and you wanted to display all the files
____
that are in the subdirectory called CHAIRS on Drive C, you would
key in:
a. CHAIRS
b. DIR C:\CHAIRS
c. DIR CHAIRS
d. DIR A:\CHAIRS
Writing Commands
Write the correct steps or commands to perform the required action as if you were at
the computer. The scenarios do not necessarily represent actual files on the disk. The
prompt will indicate the default drive and directory.
87
88
CHAPTER 2
COMMAND SYNTAX
16. A directory of all files that have the extension of .TXT on the root of Drive A.
C:\>
17. A directory listing of the file called MYFILE.TXT located in the subdirectory
NEWS on Drive C.
A:\>
18. Clear the screen.
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>
19. Display all the file names on the default drive and directory so only the file
names and extensions are listed. (Hint: See the syntax diagram.)
A:\>
20. Display all the files on the default drive that begin with the letter E, are five or
fewer characters in length, and have no extension.
A:\>
Homework Assignments
Problem Set I—At the Computer
Open a Command Prompt window. Insert the ACTIVITIES Disk—Working
Copy in Drive A.
____
1. On the ACTIVITIES disk in the root directory, find the file called
PERSONAL.FIL. What is its size in bytes?
a. 3
b. 315
c. 2307
d. 3055
____
2. On the ACTIVITIES disk in the root directory, find all the files that have the
file extension .NEW. How many files are there?
a. one
b. two
c. three
d. four
____
3. On the ACTIVITIES disk in the subdirectory called GAMES, find the file
called LS.PAS. What is the file date?
a. 6-23-89
b. 8-13-98
c. 3-1-97
d. none of the above
____
4. Do a paused, wide display of the root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk. The
fourth file down in the second column is:
a. FILE2.FP
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
b. MAR.NEW
c. HELLO.TXT
d. DRESS.UP
____
5. Display the syntax diagram and help for the DIR command. What command
could you have used?
a. DIR /HELP
b. HELP DIR
c. DIR /?
d. either b or c
____
6. From the root of the ACTIVITIES disk, change the default directory to
SPORTS. What command did you use?
a. CD :
b. CD ..
c. CD SPORTS or CD \SPORTS
d. DIR \SPORTS
____
7. On the ACTIVITIES disk, change back to the root from the SPORTS directory. What command did you use?
a. CD ROOT
b. CD \
c. CD \ROOT
d. none of the above
____
8. On the hard disk in the WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory, locate the file
called MEM. What is the file extension?
a. .BAT
b. .COM
c. .EXE
d. .SYS
____
9. On the ACTIVITIES disk in the root directory, find all the files that have a file
name that is at most four characters long and have the file extension .TXT.
Which of the following files is displayed?
a. BORN.TXT
b. YOUR.TXT
c. TEST.TXT
d. NAME.TXT
____
10. On the ACTIVITIES disk in the root directory, how many files have a file
name that is two characters or fewer in length and have any file extension?
a. two
b. three
c. six
d. none of the above
____
11. On the ACTIVITIES disk in the subdirectory \DATA, find all the files that
have names beginning with the letter T and have any extension. What files
are displayed?
a. THIN.EST and TEA.TAX
b. TEA.TAX and THANK.YOU
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COMMAND SYNTAX
c. THIN.EST and TEA.TAX and THANK.YOU
d. none of the above
____
12. On the hard disk in the WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory, what file
extension does not appear?
a. .CZG
b. .SYS
c. .COM
d. .EXE
____
13. When using the sort order parameter (/O), what additional parameter lets
you sort files by file extension?
a. X
b. N
c. D
d. E
____
14. On the ACTIVITIES disk in the root directory, display all the files by file
name in alphabetical order and pause the display. Which file appears first?
a. AWARD.MOV
b. BLUE.JAZ
c. AST.99
d. VENUS.TMM
____
15. Key in the command to display the syntax and help for the DATE command.
What is the last line in the first paragraph that appears on the screen?
a. Displays or sets the date.
b. current date, without prompting for a new date.
c. Press ENTER to keep the same date.
d. DATE [date]
Problem Set II—At the Computer
Note 1: Before proceeding with these assignments, check with your lab technician
or instructor to see if there are any special procedures for your lab environment.
Note 2: The ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy disk is in Drive A. The A:\>
prompt is displayed as the default drive and directory. All work will occur
from the root of the ACTIVITIES disk. You may not change drives or
directories.
Note 3: The first homework activity may seem confusing and unclear. It is just a
way to create a file containing your name and class information, which you
will use for turning in your homework.
1
Key in the following: NAME e
READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS!
Key in your name and press the "<Enter>" key.
Key in any other information your instructor requested
such as class meeting time or section number.
Each piece of information should go on a separate line.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
Press the "<Enter>" key each time you are done with a line.
When you are completely through keying in information,
press the F6 key and the "<Enter>" key.
Once you press "<Enter>", you cannot return to a previous
line to make corrections. Later you will be given an
opportunity to correct errors.
You will see a blank screen. Begin keying in data at the
blinking cursor.
_
2
Here is an example to key in, but your instructor will have other specific information that applies to your class. Key in the following:
Bette Peat e
(Your name goes here)
CIS 55 e
(Your class goes here)
M-W-F 8-9 e
(Your day and time go here)
Chapter 2 e
(Your assignment goes here)
3
Press 6 e
You will see the following on the screen:
Your name and other information are
Bette Peat
CIS 55
M-W-F 8-9
Chapter 2
Mon 05/28/2002
Is this information correct? If it is, press Y for Yes.
If it is incorrect, press N for No.
If you press N, you will be given a chance to correct your
errors.
This program gives you a chance to check your data entry—what you have
keyed in. The current date is inserted automatically. If it is correct, you press Y. If it
is incorrect, you press N. In this case, the printout was correct.
4
Press Y.
A:\>_
You have completed the program and returned to the command
line prompt. You now have a file called NAME.FIL in the root directory of the
working copy of the ACTIVITIES disk that contains the above data. (Hint: Remember redirection; see 2.21 and 2.22 to refresh your memory.) Now you are ready to
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COMMAND SYNTAX
complete Problem Set II. Remember to pay attention to the default directory. All the
homework files need to be created in the root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk. If
you do not create them there, you will not be able to find or print them.
To Create 1.HW
1
The root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk is the default.
2
Locate all the files in the root directory that have a .99 file extension.
3
Place the output in a file called 1.HW.
To Create 2.HW
1
The root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk is the default.
2
Locate all the files in the GAMES directory that begin with the letter A and have
any file extension.
3
Place the output in a file called 2.HW.
To Create 3.HW
1
The root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk is the default.
2
Find the files in the root directory that have file names up to five characters in
length and have the file extension of .TMP.
3
Place the output in a file called 3.HW.
To Create 4.HW
1
The root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk is the default.
2
Display all the files in the MUSIC directory across the screen.
3
Place the output in a file called 4.HW.
To Create 5.HW
1
The root directory of the ACTIVITIES disk is the default.
2
Display all the files with the file extension of .TXT in sorted order by file name.
3
Place the output in a file called 5.HW.
CAUTION: Do not proceed with this step unless it is okayed by your lab instructor.
To Print Your Homework
1
Be sure the printer is on and ready to accept print jobs from your computer.
2
Key in the following (be very careful to make no typing errors):
GO NAME.FIL 1.HW 2.HW 3.HW 4.HW 5.HW e
If one of the files you requested, 1.HW, 2.HW, etc., does not exist
in the default directory, you will see the following two-line message on the screen:
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
File Not Found
The system cannot find the file specified.
Followed by this message:
Is there a message that says "File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified."
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
The operating system is telling you that the file cannot be found. If you see the
first two-line message at any time, press Y to see what could be wrong, and repeat
the print procedure after you have corrected the problem. You will go through this
sequence for each .HW file. If you have made no errors, you will not see the “File
Not Found” message at all. For Chapter 2, you have five .HW files, so you will see
the second message that begins “Is there a message . . .” five times.
3
Keep pressing N, and follow the messages on the screen until the Notepad
program opens with a screen similar to the following:
All the requested files have been found and placed in a Notepad
document. Your homework is now ready to print.
4
On the Notepad menu bar, click File. Click Print.
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The print dialog box opens. If you have more than one printer, all
your printer choices will be displayed. The default printer is the highlighted printer.
5
Click the Print button. Click Close.
6
In the Notepad window, click File. Click Exit.
The following will appear on the Command Prompt screen:
You are about to delete any file with the .HW extension.
Before you delete your homework files, check your hard
copy or print out.
If your homework printout is correct, press Y to delete the
files.
If your homework printout is incorrect, press N.
Pressing N will prevent your homework files from
being deleted. You can then begin again.
At this point, look at your printout. If it is correct, you can press Y to delete the
homework files for this chapter. If your printout is incorrect, you can press N. That
will preserve your homework and you will need to redo only the problem that was
incorrect, not all the homework assignments.
7
Press Y e
8
Close the Command Prompt session.
9
Execute the shut-down procedure.
Problem Set III—Brief Essay
1. Although the Windows operating system is a graphical user environment, it is still
important to learn how to use the command line interface.
Agree or disagree with the above statement and explain your answer.
2. You have keyed in the following commands:
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \
C:\>A:
A:\>DIR HOUSE\*.TXT
Describe the output and purpose of each command you keyed in. Could you
have accomplished this task by using any other commands? If so, write the
command(s).
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter you will be able to:
1. Explain the need for formatting a disk.
2. Describe the structure of a disk.
3. Name and explain the purpose of each
section of a disk.
4. Define formatting.
5. Explain the difference between internal and
external commands.
6. List and explain the steps in formatting a
floppy disk.
7. Explain the purpose and function of the /Q
parameter and other parameters used with
the FORMAT command
Student Outcomes
1. Format a floppy disk.
2. Use the LABEL command to change the
volume label on a disk.
3. View the current volume label using the VOL
command.
4. Use the /Q parameter to format a disk.
Chapter Overview
Disks are the mainstays of the computer workstation. They are used for storing data and programs
and for distributing data from one computer to
another. In order to be used, disks must be
formatted, a process by which an operating
system sets up the guidelines for reading from
and writing to a disk. In Windows, you can still
format a disk by using the FORMAT command
from the command line.
In this chapter you will learn how a disk is
structured, how the operating system uses disks,
and how to format and electronically label a disk.
In addition, you will learn how to change the
electronic label. Throughout, remember that
formatting a disk is a dangerous operation
because it removes all existing data from the disk.
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Why Format a Disk?
So far, the disks you have used with this text have been already prepared for your
environment. Although most floppy disks come preformatted, you may still purchase unformatted disks. And if you purchase a new hard disk, it too must be
formatted. When you want to prepare a disk for use, you will use a system utility
command called FORMAT.COM. But prior to using the format command, which
can also be accessed from the GUI, you should have some understanding of what
this process is all about.
3.2
Partitioning and Formatting Disks
Before Windows XP Professional can use a disk, the disk must be prepared for use.
A hard disk requires a special process. It must first be partitioned, or divided, into
one or more logical divisions and then formatted with a file system. A primary
partition is a section of a hard disk. When a disk is partitioned, it allocates a fixed
amount of space for each primary partition. This information is stored in what is
called a partition table that is located in the first physical sector of a hard disk. The
partition table tells where each partition begins and ends. The physical locations of
the partitions are given as the beginning and ending head, sector, and cylinder
number. In addition, the partition table identifies the type of file system used for
each partition and identifies whether the partition is bootable. Note that each
partition on a drive is called a Volume, and has its own volume label.
One partition is marked as the active partition, and you may boot from only the
active partition. Hard disks are limited to a maximum of four primary partitions per
physical disk. Only one primary partition can be designated as an extended partition. An extended partition can contain logical drives (volumes). Thus, if you had
two physical drives, each could be partitioned as one primary partition and would
be assigned the drive letters C and D. Drive C would be partitioned, formatted, and
bootable. Drive D would be partitioned and formatted but not bootable. If you had
one hard drive, as many users do, the hard drive might be partitioned as only one
primary partition, Drive C, that, of course, would be bootable. In another instance,
the single hard drive could be partitioned with one primary partition and an
extended partition. In that case, you would then have Drive C (the bootable drive)
and logical drive D. Each drive would have to be formatted.
Only one operating system can be active at a time. If you had a dual-booting
system, (a system with two operating systems) using, for example, Windows XP
Professional and Linux, you could create a partition for each operating system. You
would then choose and boot the computer from the active partition where the
operating system you wished to use was located. Each operating system formats
disks in its own, unique way. Depending on the operating system you use and the
file system you select, the operating system you are using might be able to recognize
the other drive, but not read the files on it.
If you are interested in running multiple operating systems on a single computer,
there are precautions you need to be aware of. For example, there are some operating systems that are not compatible. You cannot have both Windows 95 and Windows 98 in a multiple-boot configuration. Windows 98 was intended to be an
3.2
PARTITIONING AND FORMATTING DISKS
upgrade to Windows 95, and both systems will attempt to use the same boot file.
Also, the order in which the Operating Systems are installed is important. The
combinations are numerous and varied. The necessary, specific information to install
multiple-operating systems is beyond the scope of this text.
Each operating system has a unique way of recording information on a disk. The
organizational scheme is known as a file system. One factor that makes one computer compatible with another is not the brand name such as Apple, IBM, or
Compaq, but rather the operating system, part of which is the file system that each
operating system brand uses. Disk formatting is based almost entirely on which
operating system the computer uses. Operating systems prepare disks so that
information can be read from and written to them. The disk manufacturers cannot
prepare a disk in advance without knowing what kind of operating system will be
used. The process of preparing a disk so that it will be compatible with an operating
system is known as formatting or initializing the disk.
Since this textbook is for Windows XP Professional users, the only kind of
formatting that you are interested in is Windows-based. Although there are many
file systems in use for readable/writable disks, such as Unix and HPFS (OS2),
Windows XP Professional supports four file systems for readable/writable disks,
the NTFS file system and three FAT file systems (FAT12, FAT16, and FAT32). FAT12
is used only on floppy disks. Essentially, you have two file system types to choose
from—FAT and NTFS. FAT is an acronym for file allocation table, and NTFS is an
acronym for New Technology File System. Windows XP also supports two types of
file systems on CD-ROM and DVD (Compact Disc File systems [CDFS] and Universal Disk Format [UDF]). The CDFS and UDF file systems are beyond the scope of
this text.
All disks, including hard disks, must be formatted. In general, when you purchase a computer, the hard drive or drives have already been partitioned and
formatted. When you purchase floppy disks for a Wintel computer (a computer that
has an Intel or clone-Intel processor and is running the Windows operating system),
the floppy disks are almost always preformatted, although non-formatted disks are
also available. Even if you purchase preformatted disks, it is inevitable that you will
want to reuse them. Disks that have been used and possess information that is no
longer needed can be erased or re-prepared with the FORMAT command. Hard
disks are typically formatted once, when they are new, and are rarely reformatted
because formatting eliminates what is on the disk. Although you may format both
hard and floppy disks, this textbook deals only with formatting floppy disks using
the FORMAT command in Windows XP Professional.
Windows XP provides two types of disk storage configurations, basic disk and
dynamic disk. Basic disk is a physical disk that contains primary partitions and/or
extended partitions with logical drives and a partition table. Windows XP, by
default, initializes all disks as basic. New to the operating system with the Windows
2000 version are dynamic disks. Dynamic disks are physical disks that have been
upgraded by and are managed by the Disk Management utility program. Dynamic
disks do not use partitions or logical drives, and only computers running Windows
2000 and above can use dynamic disks. Dynamic disks are beyond the scope of this
text. Discussion will be limited to basic disks.
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3.2.1
The Structure of a Disk
Formatting a disk consists of two parts: low-level formatting, or physical formatting, and high-level formatting, or logical formatting. Low-level (physical) formatting creates and sequentially numbers tracks and sectors for identification purposes.
Tracks are concentric circles on a disk. Each track is divided into smaller units called
sectors. A sector, which is the smallest unit on a disk, is usually 512 bytes, the
industry standard. The number of tracks and sectors varies depending on the type
of disk. When data needs to be written to or read from a disk, the identification
number of the track and sector tells the read/write head where to position itself.
This process accounts for every space on the disk. It is similar to assigning every
house a unique address so that it can be instantly identifiable. However, even after a
disk is physically prepared to hold data, it is not ready for use.
The second part of formatting is high-level (logical) formatting. In logical formatting, the operating system creates a file system on a disk so it can keep track of the
location of files. Formatting a hard disk involves only logical formatting. Low-level
formatting of a hard disk is usually done as part of the manufacturing process. Lowlevel formatting can also be done by the computer system vendor, or you may
purchase special software programs to low-level format your hard disk, although
this is a rare occurrence. Most commonly, when you purchase a computer system,
the high-level and low-level formatting of the hard disk are done. However, when
you format a floppy disk, both the physical and logical formatting processes occur.
Logical formatting determines how the operating system uses a disk by building
a structure to manage files on the disk so they can be easily saved and retrieved. The
FORMAT command performs both high- and low-level formatting on a floppy disk.
On a hard disk, only high-level formatting is performed.
Windows XP Professional needs to monitor the status of all of a disk’s data
sectors so it can answer critical questions. Does a sector already have information in
it? Is it damaged? In either case, it cannot be used. Is it an empty sector, available for
data storage? Since there can be many sectors on a disk, particularly on a hard disk,
it would be too time-consuming for Windows XP Professional to manage them one
sector at a time. Instead, it combines one or more sectors into logical units called
clusters, also called allocation units since these units allocate disk space. When
Windows XP Professional writes a file to a disk, it copies the file’s contents to
unused clusters in the data sectors. The smallest unit that Windows XP Professional
works with when reading or writing to a disk is a cluster. To be able to read from
and write files to a disk, Windows tracks locations in the file system you have
chosen, either the FAT file system or the NTFS file system.
Floppy disks only use FAT. Thus, since the smallest unit Windows can deal with
is a cluster, a file that is only 100 bytes long saved to a 3½-inch, 1.44-MB disk will
actually occupy 512 bytes on the floppy disk. If you were using the FAT file system
and the file were saved to a 2-MB hard disk, it would actually occupy 32,768 bytes.
The portion of a cluster that is not being used by the data in the file is still allocated
to the file; that space can be claimed by no other file. It is wasted space on your disk
and is called cluster overhang. Furthermore, as you can imagine, a data file is rarely
ever exactly one cluster in size, nor would its size necessarily be an even number.
How the data is managed depends on whether you are using FAT or NTFS.
3.2
3.2.2
PARTITIONING AND FORMATTING DISKS
The Master Boot Record and the Boot Sector
The first part of any hard disk is the master boot record (MBR). The master boot
record is the mechanism required to find a hard disk and launch any necessary code
to load drivers located on the boot record. The MBR of a hard disk resides at the first
physical sector of the disk. The boot sector is the first sector on every logical drive.
It contains a table of that drive’s characteristics and contains a short program, called
the bootstrap loader, that begins loading Windows, copying the necessary system
files from the disk into memory. If you are using FAT, and the disk the system is
trying to boot from is not a system disk, you see the message:
Non-System disk or disk error
Replace the disk and press any key when ready
If you are using NTFS, and the disk the system is trying to boot from is not a system
disk, you may see one of the following messages:
n Invalid partition table
n Error loading operating system
n Missing operating system
If you have a floppy disk in Drive A that is not a system disk, you may see the
message
NTLDR is missing
Press any key to restart
Some computers have a setting called Boot Device Priority that will boot the
system from any disk that has the operating system on it and will ignore a nonbooting disk in the floppy disk drive. Even if a disk is not a system disk (one
capable of booting the system), it still has a boot sector. (There is no MBR on a
floppy disk. The first sector on a floppy disk is the boot sector.) On any disk, the
boot sector contains information about the physical characteristics of the disk: the
number of tracks, the number of bytes per sector, the number of sectors per track,
the version of the operating system used to format the disk, the root directory, the
volume serial number, etc. The boot sector allows Windows to identify the type of
disk.
3.2.3
FAT16, VFAT, and FAT32
When you format a disk using FAT, the formatting program creates three critical
elements: the boot record, the file allocation table (two copies), and the root directory. These elements occupy the first portion of the disk and take only about one to
two percent of the disk space. The remainder of the disk is used for file storage. See
Figure 3.1.
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BOOT RECORD
FILE ALLOCATION TABLE
(FAT)
FILE ALLOCATION TABLE
(FAT)
ROOT DIRECTORY
FILES AREA
(DATA SECTORS)
Figure 3.1—The Logical Structure of a Disk
The order of the sections is always the same. The boot record, two copies of the FAT,
and the root directory table are always located in the first sectors. These elements
control how the files are stored on a disk and how Windows saves and retrieves
files. The data sectors are where the data or files are actually stored.
A map of a disk’s data clusters, the FAT, is made up of entries that correspond to
every cluster on the disk. The number of clusters varies from one type of disk to
another. Cluster size on a hard disk is not determined by the disk’s overall capacity,
but by the partition size. Table 3.1 indicates the relationship between cluster size
and disk size.
Disk Size
Number of Sectors
in a Cluster
Cluster Size
in Bytes
Cluster Size in KB
3½-inch 1.44 MB
1 sector
512 bytes
½KB
3½-inch 2.88 MB
2 sectors
1,024 bytes
1KB
33 MB–64 MB
2 sectors
1,024 bytes
1KB
65 MB–128 MB
4 sectors
2,048 bytes
2KB
129 MB–256 MB
8 sectors
4,096 bytes
4KB
257 MB–512 MB
16 sectors
8,192 bytes
8KB
513 MB–1,024 MB
32 sectors
16,384 bytes
16KB
1,025 MB–2,048 MB
64 sectors
32,768 bytes
32KB
Table 3.1—Cluster Size and Disk Size
To manage the data, each entry in the FAT is a number that indicates the status of
a cluster. A 0 (zero) in the FAT means the cluster is empty and available for use.
Other specific numbers indicate that a cluster is reserved (not available for use) or
bad (also not available for use). Any other number indicates that a cluster is in use.
To follow the trail of a data file longer than one cluster, the number in the FAT is a
pointer to the next cluster that holds data for that file. That entry becomes a pointer
to the next cluster that holds data in the same file. A special entry in the FAT indicates where the file ends and that no more data is in the file. Thus, the numbers in
3.2
PARTITIONING AND FORMATTING DISKS
the FAT are used to link, or chain, clusters that belong to the same file. The FAT
works in conjunction with the root directory table. Since the FAT is used to control
the entire disk, two copies of the FAT are kept on the disk in case one is damaged.
The FAT occupies as many sectors as it needs to map the disk. The FAT is always
located on the first sectors of the disk.
Windows 95 introduced a special version of FAT called VFAT, or virtual file
allocation table, which allowed Windows 95 to maintain backward compatibility
and to accommodate long file names. VFAT is a variation of the original 16-bit FAT.
It is a virtual 32-bit FAT, meaning that it is not really a 32-bit FAT. A reserved area of
the VFAT keeps directory block information for long file names. In Windows 2000
and Windows XP, the 32-bit VFAT is the primary file system. The VFAT is still
referred to as the FAT and you rarely hear the term “VFAT.” The FAT file system can
maintain a maximum of 65,536 clusters, which means that the largest hard drive
that can be supported is 2.1 GB. When you purchase a new computer today, it is
common to have a hard drive of 20, 40, 60, or more GB. On older computer systems
can get around this limitation by partitioning a hard drive into 2-GB sizes and
creating the logical drive letters C, D, E, and F (for an 8-GB drive, for instance).
To overcome this limitation, FAT32 was introduced in Windows 95 OSR2, which
is also referred to as Windows 95 B. It was enhanced in Windows 98. FAT32 is an
enhancement of the FAT file system and is based on 32-bit file allocation table
entries, rather than the 16-bit file entries the FAT file system used in DOS and the
first version of Windows 95. FAT16 is usually referred to simply as FAT on disks
greater than 5 MB. As a result, FAT32 will support larger hard drives (up to 2
terabytes). A terabyte is a trillion bytes, or 1,000 billion bytes. An 8-GB drive would
simply be Drive C under FAT32. FAT32 also uses smaller clusters than the FAT file
system. However, FAT32 is for drives over 512 MB and does not apply to floppy
disks. See Table 3.2 for a comparison.
Drive Size
FAT Cluster Size
FAT32 Cluster Size
257 MB–512 MB
8KB
4 KB
513 MB–1,024 MB
16KB
4KB
1,025 MB–2 GB
32KB
4KB
2GB–4GB
64KB
4KB
4 GB–8 GB
Not supported
4KB
8 GB–16 GB
Not supported
8KB
16 GB–32 GB
Not supported
16KB
Greater than 32 GB
Not supported
Not supported
Table 3.2—Comparison of FAT and FAT32
FAT32 provides some further enhancements. It allows a moveable root directory,
the ability to use the backup copy of the file allocation table (FAT maintains two
copies of the table but can use only one of them), and an internal backup copy of
some critical FAT data structures. Unlike FAT, FAT32 does impose a restriction on
the number of entries in the root directory table, but the number is over 64,000 and
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thus, does not restrict users as the 512 file limit did. It also allows the root directory
table to be located anywhere on the hard disk.
There are advantages and disadvantages to both FAT and FAT32. With FAT32,
you have smaller clusters. Therefore, there are more clusters on a partition, and you
can store more data on your hard disk. However, the more clusters there are, the
bigger the FAT must be. It takes Windows longer to search the table in order to find
the information that it needs so it can access a file. On the other hand, with larger
clusters, the table is much smaller and Windows needs less time to search to locate
the information it needs to access a file. Unfortunately, you also increase the amount
of wasted disk space from cluster overhang.
If you have many small files, using FAT32 is probably best. If you have mostly
large files such as graphics or video files, then FAT is fine. You could have one drive
FAT and another FAT32, depending on your needs. Remember, FAT32 can be used
only on drives larger than 512 MB. In addition, DOS, Windows 3.1, Windows NT,
and the original version of Windows 95 will not recognize FAT32 and cannot boot or
use files on any drive that has FAT32. However, Windows 2000 and Windows XP
can recognize FAT 32. If, for example, your C drive used FAT32 and you wanted to
use another operating system such as DOS 6.22 to boot from the A drive, you would
not be able to “see” the C drive at all. Remember as well, floppy disks are always
FAT and can be read by all of the above operating systems.
3.2.4
The Root Directory
The root directory is a table that records information about each file on a disk. When
you use Windows Explorer or My Computer, the information displayed on the
screen comes from this root directory table.
In order to make Windows XP Professional compatible with older Windows and
DOS programs, some changes had to be made in the root directory table. The DOS
directory structure only recognized 8.3 file names. Windows 95, Windows 98,
Windows 2000, and Windows XP needed to allow long file names while still permitting the use of DOS or Windows 3.1 or 3.11 programs with the 8.3 file name limitation. The DOS root directory stores information in a table about every file on a disk,
including the file name, the file extension, the size of the file in bytes, the date and
time the file was last modified, and the file’s attributes. The Windows 2000 and
Windows XP, root directory tables still include this information, but they also use
previously unused areas in the table, particularly the file attribute, to handle long
file names. In addition to the file attributes you have learned about, Windows uses a
special combination of attributes to signal that an entry is the first of a series of
directory entries. This feature allows a series of directory entries to be chained
together so that long file names can be used.
To maintain compatibility with DOS or Windows 3.1 or 3.11 programs, Windows
XP gives every file both a long file name and a short file name. The short file name,
an alias, is based on the long file name and is stored in the first directory entry using
the DOS 8.3 name. Neither a user nor an application can control the name created
by the alias process.
Another critical entry in the root directory table is the starting cluster number.
This number indicates which cluster holds the first portion of the file, or the first
3.2
PARTITIONING AND FORMATTING DISKS
FAT address. In this way, the root directory tells the operating system what is on the
disk, and the FAT tells the operating system where data is on the disk.
3.2.5
The FAT and the Root Directory
Imagine a book on computers with a table of contents. Like the root directory, the
table of contents tells you what is in the book. One chapter could be listed as “The
Hard Disk” starting on page number 30. The page number is a pointer to the place
you must go to find the information about the hard disk. The page number is similar
to the FAT.
You must turn to page 30 to begin reading about the hard disk. However, the
information about the hard disk is not located only on page 30. You must read
page 31, then page 32, and so on, until you have all the information about the hard
disk. The pages are linked, or have a trail. If a book were like a disk, the table of
contents (the root directory) would be followed by a chart (the FAT) instructing you
to begin on page 30, then go to page 31, then to page 32, and so on. The number in
the FAT is a pointer to the next cluster that holds data in the file, enabling the system
to follow the trail of a file longer than one cluster. A special entry in the FAT, called
an EOF (end-of-file) marker, indicates when there is no more data in the file. Other
data indicates when the cluster is available or has bad sectors in it. See Figure 3.2.
File Name
File Extension
ROOT DIRECTORY
Date
Time
File Size
Starting Cluster
MYFILE
TXT
1/23/98
11:13 PM
41,364
1
YOUR
XLS
11/7/99
1:00 AM
98,509
3
THIS
DOC
5/7/00
2:13 AM
38,949
7
FAT
Data in Cluster
Cluster
Pointer
1
2
MYFILE.TXT
2
EOF
MYFILE.TXT
3
4
YOUR.XLS
4
5
YOUR.XLS
5
6
YOUR.XLS
6
EOF
YOUR.XLS
7
8
THIS.DOC
8
EOF
THIS.DOC
9
0
Unused
10
BAD
Contains bad sectors
Figure 3.2—The Root Directory and the FAT
The FAT works in conjunction with the root directory table. The FAT can occupy
as many sectors as it needs to map out the disk.
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3.2.6
The Data Portion or the Files Area
The rest of the disk, which is the largest part, is used for storing files or data. As far
as Windows XP is concerned, all files, programs, and data are chains of bytes laid
out in sequence. Space is allocated to files on an as-needed basis, one cluster at a
time. When a file is written to a disk, Windows begins writing to the first available
cluster. It writes in adjacent, or contiguous, clusters if possible, but, if any adjacent
sectors are already in use (allocated by the FAT), Windows skips to the next available (unallocated) space. Thus, a file can be noncontiguous, physically scattered
around a disk.
3.2.7
Understanding the FAT and
the Root Directory Table
To illustrate how the root directory table and the FAT work, imagine you want to
create a file called MYFILE.TXT, which will occupy three clusters on a disk. Let us
say that clusters 3, 4, and 6 are free. The operating system first creates an entry in
the root directory table and fills in the file information (file name, file extension,
date, time, etc.). Then data is written to the first free cluster, number 3, as the
starting cluster number in the root directory table. Windows knows it will need
three clusters and must link or chain them. It does this by placing a 4 (a pointer) in
the number 3 cluster pointing to the next available cluster. When it gets to cluster 4,
it places a 6 (another pointer) pointing to the next available cluster. The FAT continues to cluster 6. When it gets to cluster 6, it places an end-of-file marker, a note
indicating that the file ends there.
To make an analogy, imagine a self-storage facility comprised of storage bins that
hold things (the data). The front office that manages the self-storage facility does not
care what is in the bins. The front office only has to know how many bins there are,
where they are located, and if they are in use. The front office has a map of all its
numbered storage bins (the FAT). The bins are numbered so that the front office
knows where the bins are located. The front office also needs a list (the root directory) of all the people who have rented bins. Thus, I walk in and say that I want the
boxes stored for Gillay. The front office first looks up Gillay in the list to be sure they
have stored my boxes. In this case, they find the name Gillay, so they know that the
user Gillay has rented at least one bin. Besides having the name in their directory,
their list points to another list that says to go to the map (the FAT), starting with
bin 3. The front office goes to the map (the FAT) and sees that storage bin 3 is linked
to storage bin 4, which is linked to storage bin 6. Storage bin 6 has no links. Now the
front office knows that Gillay has bins 3, 4, and 6 full of boxes. The front office can
send someone (rotate the disk) to bins 3, 4, and 6 to retrieve the boxes. To look at this
process graphically, see Figure 3.3.
3.2
PARTITIONING AND FORMATTING DISKS
1
See 4
1
6
2
1. Saxon
2
3
3. Gillay
3
5
See 6
5. Engel
4
No More
5
6
4
Directory
File Allocation Table
Data Sectors
Figure 3.3—Storing Files
This analogy gives you some of the basic information you need in order to understand the FAT structure of a disk.
3.2.8
NTFS
The file system that you use with Windows XP determines which of the operating
system’s advanced features that you can use. If you are concerned with disk security, performance, and efficiency, or are using very large hard drives, you may want
to choose to use the NTFS (New Technology File System). NTFS, first introduced in
Windows NT, is the preferred file system to FAT, VFAT, and FAT32. What NTFS
offers, besides the performance needed for the much larger disk drives seen today, is
a secure file system. With NTFS, you can manage the security of files and folders for
your machine. NTFS also offers other major advantages. These include:
n The ability to assign permissions to each file and folder on the disk.
n More efficient storage of data on large hard disks.
n Faster access to files and folders.
n Better data recovery because a log file is kept of disk activities. Thus, if there is a
disk failure, Windows can restore the disk based on the log file.
n Ability to compress files, allowing more data to be stored on a disk.
n Ability to assign disk quotas, which allow you to set limits on how much disk
space a user may have.
n Encryption of files for better security.
3.2.9
Clusters and NTFS
NTFS uses the cluster scheme that you have seen in FAT for allocating data, but for
a given drive, it has less overhead. Every business has expenses that do not directly
make a profit, such as rent or utilities, and the business must pay these costs so it
can stay in business. These expenses are known as overhead. A computer system’s
overhead is its cost of doing business because it must use processing time and
memory to run the operating system. Computer overhead does not directly relate to
the task at hand, but is mandatory so that the computer system can operate. In
business, reducing overhead means that you can make a larger profit. With computers, reducing operating overhead means that you can allocate more computer
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resources to the work you wish to do. Table 3.3 shows the cluster sizes for NTFS
volumes.
Partition Size
Cluster Size in Bytes
Sectors in a Cluster
7 MB–512 MB
512
1
513 MB–1,024 MB
1,024 (1 KB)
2
1,025 MB–2 GB
2,048 (2 KB)
4
2 GB–2 TB*
4,096 (4 KB)
8
*A terabyte is 1,099,511,627,776 bytes or 1,024 gigabytes and is abbreviated as TB.
Table 3.3—NTFS Cluster Size
The structure of an NTFS volume looks similar to FAT, but there are differences,
as you can see in Figure 3.4.
Partition boot
information
Master File Table
(MFT)
System files
and folders
Figure 3.4—Structure of an NTFS Volume
3.2.10 Master File Table (MFT)
The MFT is the first file on an NTFS volume. Instead of using the FAT, NTFS uses a
special file called the Master File Table (MFT) that tracks all the files and directories
in a volume. The MFT is really a database file of all the files on the system. A
database is a way of finding information quickly. For instance, libraries, long before
computers, used databases. The card catalog was a database. The card catalog did
not have books in it, but it instead had a card that pointed to the physical location of
the book on a shelf. Databases are used heavily in the computer world. When using
NTFS, the MFT is dynamic and will change size when necessary. The first 16
records, called the metadata files, contain information about the volume itself and
are considered the overhead for maintaining the file system. The MFT has an entry
for the MFT itself (just another file) and other metadata files such as the log file,
marked bad clusters, and the root directory.
After the volume information, each record in the MFT corresponds to one file or
one folder in the file system. The record for the file or folder contains the attributes
of the file or folder, including such attributes as the file name, the status of the readonly bit, the file creation and last accessed date, and so on. One major attribute that
MFT adds to the file system is the security descriptor. The security descriptor
provides information on who has what access to what files or folders and what they
can or cannot do to the file or folder, i.e., who can read the file, write to the file, and
so on. NTFS is considered a secure file system, and you can assign a permission for
every file and folder on your system.
In addition, and very different from FAT, the data in the file is considered just an
attribute in the file and, if the amount of data is small enough, the entire file will fit
in the MFT. This feature not only allows very fast access to files but also eliminates
file fragmentation. However, there is a limit to how much data will fit into the MFT
(about 750 bytes) and most files are too large to have all their data fit into the MFT.
3.4
ACTIVITY: FORMATTING A FLOPPY DISK
In that case, NTFS also allocates files in cluster units. If any attribute (usually the
data) does not fit into the MFT record, NTFS stores it a new, separate set of clusters,
called a run or an extent. Any attribute stored in the MFT is considered a resident
attribute and any attribute forced out to an extent is called a nonresident attribute.
When the extent needs to become larger (usually because data is added to a file),
NTFS again tries to allocate contiguous clusters to the same extent. If that is not
possible, then NTFS will allocate an extent somewhere else on the disk. This process
continues as the file becomes larger.
Folders (directories) are treated much as files are in NTFS. If the folder is small
enough, the index to the files in the folder is kept in its entirety in the MFT. This too
is an attribute called the Index Root attribute. If the folder entries are larger than
what will fit into the MFT, then NTFS creates a new extent with a nonresident
attribute called an index buffer. The index buffer contains a data structure called a btree. A b-tree stores indexes to information in a sorted order. This makes locating
information on the volume much quicker because the entry is more easily found.
3.2.11 Deciding on a File System
You may choose your file system when you install Windows XP Professional. You
may also convert a FAT file system to FAT32 or NTFS at any time with special utility
programs that come with Windows XP Professional. However, these are one way
conversions. You cannot convert from NTFS or FAT32 to FAT. When you format a
floppy disk, it will always be the FAT file system. With a hard disk, you make the
decision. Remember, every disk has a file system assigned to it. If you look at the
properties of a disk, you will see which file system has been assigned to it.
3.3
Clarifying Procedures
1. System utility files subdirectory. You will be at the command prompt screen.
You may have to change your directory so that you are in the subdirectory that
has the system utility files. Remember to refer to your Configuration Table in
Chapter 1 to ensure that all substitutions have been made before you begin this
activity.
2. A blank or new disk. Whenever a new or blank disk is referred to, you may use
a brand new disk or an old disk containing information you no longer wish to
keep. Any information will be written over in the format process.
3. If you are in a lab environment, you need to check with your instructor to see if
there are any particular procedures that need to be followed in your lab. For
instance, in some networked environments, you cannot format a floppy disk in
Drive A.
3.4
Activity: Formatting a Floppy Disk
WARNING: Never format an application disk or a disk that has data you wish to
keep. Also, if you have a hard disk, you must be exceedingly careful. Never,
never key in C:\>FORMAT C:. If you do, you may completely erase, forever, all
the information on the hard disk.
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1
Shell out to the command prompt screen. (This means to open a Command
Prompt window.) Make certain that you have no disk in your A drive.
Note:
Your starting prompt may differ from the examples in this text. Your initial
prompt upon shelling out to the Command Prompt screen may be
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32> or perhaps a network drive, such as G:\>.
2
Key in the following: C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 e
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You have changed the default directory to the
\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory. The prompt should now display
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>.
To format a disk, you use the FORMAT command. FORMAT is another example
of a system utility program, also called an external command, stored as a file in the
WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory. The default drive and subdirectory, in this
situation, become very important. Whenever you use an external command, you are
telling the operating system to look for a file that matches what you keyed in.
Remember that the prompt on the screen represents the default drive and
subdirectory. When the operating system looks for an external command, it will look
on the default drive only (in this case, Drive C) and in the default subdirectory (in
this case, \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32) for the command or file name that you keyed
in. You can instruct the operating system to look or do something on a different disk
drive or different subdirectory, but you must specify that disk drive and/or
subdirectory. In this case, you are looking for the command FORMAT. You can see
whether or not this command, stored as a file called FORMAT.COM, is located on
the disk in the default drive and in the default subdirectory.
3
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR FORMAT.COM e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR FORMAT.COM
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
08/23/2001
12:00 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
25,600 format.com
25,600 bytes
8,222,244,864 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
The screen display tells you that the FORMAT command, stored as
the file named FORMAT.COM, is located on the default drive, Drive C. In addition,
since your system utility files are in a subdirectory, you will not only be on Drive C
but also in a subdirectory called \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32. To use (or execute or
run) the FORMAT program, you key in the name of the command.
3.4
4
ACTIVITY: FORMATTING A FLOPPY DISK
Key in the following (be sure to include the drive letter A):
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A: e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A:
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
In step 3 you used the DIR command to locate the file. You called
the program by keying in the name of the file. When you do that, you are asking the
operating system to find the file called FORMAT.COM and load it into memory.
FORMAT is the command that tells the system what work you want it to do. The A:
tells the system that the disk you want to format is in Drive A. If you did not specify
a lettered drive, A:, B:, or C:, you would receive a message that you were missing a
parameter—the drive letter. In earlier versions of DOS, the FORMAT command
would not ask for a drive letter and would format the default drive. Since the
default drive is C and C is the hard disk, FORMAT would have unintentionally
erased everything on the hard disk. You never want this to happen. Never!
In addition, you get a message or prompt that tells you what to do. Before you
get involved in the following activity, it is exceedingly important that you know
what kind of disk drive you have so that you can choose the correct disk with the
correct format. It is assumed that you have a 3½-inch high-density disk drive and
floppy disk. If you have any other type of floppy disk or drive, ask your instructor
for further instructions. If you are not sure, refer to your Configuration Table in
Chapter 1.6. If you do not use the correct floppy disk, you will have problems.
5
Get a blank disk out and prepare a sticky paper label for it. Do not use either the
ACTIVITIES disk or the ACTIVITIES Disk—Working Copy. Write your name and
the words “DATA disk” on the label. Place the label on the disk. Insert the disk
into Drive A. Be sure that this disk either is blank or contains data you no longer
want. Everything on the disk will be eliminated after you press e.
6
Press e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A:
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
The type of the file system is FAT.
Verifying 1.44M
2 percent completed..
The light on the floppy disk drive is glowing, indicating that
activity is taking place on the disk. The FORMAT command displays what media
type it is formatting. The message will vary depending on whether the disk has or
has not been formatted before. You are informed that your file system is FAT. All
floppy disks are formatted as FAT. The Verifying 1.44M that appears in the above
screen display will vary depending on the type of floppy disk you are formatting.
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The message “nn percent completed” tells you that the formatting is taking place
and, at that moment, nn percent of the formatting process is completed (the nn
represents a number that changes as the disk is formatted) until it reaches 100 percent.
Do not do anything until you see the following message displayed on the screen:
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A:
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
The type of the file system is FAT.
Verifying 1.44M
Initializing the File Allocation Table (FAT)...
Volume label (11 characters, ENTER for none)?
You are being asked for a volume label, an electronic name. However, you are not
going to place a volume label on the disk at this time.
7
Press e
Format complete.
1,457,664 bytes total disk space.
1,457,664 bytes available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 allocation units available on disk.
12 bits in each FAT entry.
Volume Serial Number is 5442-CAF1
Format another (Y/N)?
You are being asked if you wish to format another disk.
8
Press N. Press e
Format another (Y/N)?N
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You have completed formatting your disk. The FORMAT command was executed, formatting the disk in Drive A. The bytes available will vary
depending on what your disk capacity is. You also see a report that FAT12 is being
used. You also receive a status report that tells you how many spots were bad on the
disk, if any. In addition, the report tells you about the allocation units on the disk. In
this case, the allocation unit—the cluster—is 512 bytes, so you know that one sector
on a 3½-inch high-density disk is a cluster. If you multiplied the size of the allocation unit by the number of allocations units available, you would come up with the
number of available bytes (512 * 2,847 = 1,457,664 bytes). The OS can now read from
and write to this disk because it has set up the tracks and sectors, the boot record,
3.5
FORMATTING A DISK WITH A VOLUME LABEL
the FAT, the root directory, and the data section as needed. Notice the line Volume
Serial Number is 5442-CAF1. This is a hexadecimal number, randomly generated
by the formatting process. Each volume serial number is unique. It is used for disk
identification by application programs. For example, if you open a WordPerfect
document file from a floppy disk and, while it is in memory, replace that disk with
another, WordPerfect will be aware of the disk change by virtue of this number.
Programmers can use volume serial numbers to identify the disks they use to
distribute their programs.
9
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \ e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \
C:\>_
You have returned to the root directory. The root directory of any
disk is always the \.
3.5
Formatting a Disk with a Volume Label
You can use parameters other than the disk drive letter with the FORMAT command. The FORMAT command has many parameters, some of which are used more
than others. The syntax for the FORMAT command is:
Formats a disk for use with Windows XP.
FORMAT
FORMAT
FORMAT
FORMAT
FORMAT
volume
volume
volume
volume
volume
[/FS:file-system] [/V:label] [/Q] [/A:size] [/C] [/X]
[/V:label] [/Q] [/F:size]
[/V:label] [/Q] [/T:tracks /N:sectors]
[/V:label] [/Q]
[/Q]
volume
/FS:filesystem
/V:label
/Q
/C
/X
/A:size
Specifies the drive letter (followed by a colon),
mount point, or volume name.
Specifies the type of the file system (FAT, FAT32, or NTFS).
Specifies the volume label.
Performs a quick format.
NTFS only: Files created on the new volume will be compressed
by default.
Forces the volume to dismount first if necessary. All opened
handles to the volume would no longer be valid.
Overrides the default allocation unit size. Default settings
are strongly recommended for general use.
NTFS supports 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, 16K, 32K, 64K.
FAT supports 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, 16K, 32K, 64K,
(128K, 256K for sector size > 512 bytes).
FAT32 supports 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8192, 16K, 32K, 64K,
(128K, 256K for sector size > 512 bytes).
Note that the FAT and FAT32 files systems impose the
following restrictions on the number of clusters on a volume:
FAT: Number of clusters <= 65526
FAT32: 65526 < Number of clusters < 4177918
Format will immediately stop processing if it decides that
the above requirements cannot be met using the specified
cluster size.
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NTFS compression is not supported for allocation unit sizes
above 4096.
/F:size
/T:tracks
/N:sectors
Specifies the size of the floppy disk to format (1.44)
Specifies the number of tracks per disk side.
Specifies the number of sectors per track.
Although this syntax diagram may look intimidating, it really is not. The parameters that are important to remember are as follows are the /V for Volume name,
and /Q for Quick.
FORMAT volume [/V:label] [/Q]
Beginning with MS-DOS version 3.3, the volume: or drive letter is mandatory. It
must be included. This mandatory drive letter prohibits you from accidentally
formatting the disk in the default drive. In addition, many of the options such as /C
(compressed), /X (dismount), and /A (cluster size) are really only relevant when
managing a network.
The /V allows you to place a volume label on a disk, but as you have already
seen, the FORMAT command asks you for a volume label even if you don’t include
the /V. The /Q performs a quick format, but a quick format can be used only on a
disk that has been previously formatted. It is “quick” because it simply deletes the
entries from the FAT and the root directory and essentially leaves the files area
untouched.
The /F:size parameter is an easy way to format floppy disks that do not match
the capacity of a floppy disk drive. For instance, if you have a high-density disk
drive but wish to format a 720KB disk, you would inform the FORMAT command
using /F:720. However, /F:size does not solve all your mismatching problems. If you
have a 720KB disk drive, you cannot format a high-density, 1.44-MB floppy disk in
that drive. The 720KB disk drive is older technology and does not recognize the new
high-density media type. Do not format a floppy disk at a size higher than it was
designed for. This means, for example, if you have a 720KB disk, do not format it as
a 1.44-MB disk. Table 3.4 shows the valid numbers to use with a 720KB disk. In
general, however, the older capacity disks are disappearing and you will rarely, if
ever, have the need to use these numbers.
In the next activity, you are going to use the /V parameter to place a volume
label on the disk you are formatting. A volume label is an electronic name. It is very
much like labeling a file drawer so you know what it contains. The switch is /V,
which tells the FORMAT command that it is to format a disk and place an electronic
volume label on it. Whenever you format a disk in recent versions of the OS, you are
automatically asked for a volume label, even if you do not include /V, so why use
the parameter at all? When you don’t use it, the formatting process stops and asks
you for the volume label. When you use the /V (a fixed parameter), you can provide the label itself (a variable parameter) at the time you enter the command,
rendering it unnecessary for the FORMAT command to ask you to enter it after the
formatting process. In the partial command diagram, FORMAT A: /V[:label] notice
that the bracketed item [:label] includes both the colon and the label with no spaces
between.
3.6
3.6
Activity: Using the /V Option
Note:
1
ACTIVITY: USING THE /V OPTION
Your default directory is the root of C and C:\> is displayed. The disk just
formatted is in Drive A.
Key in the following: C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 e
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You made \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 the default subdirectory.
2
Key in the following:
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A: /V:SAMPLEDATA e
C:\>CD \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A: /V:SAMPLEDATA
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
The FORMAT command was loaded from the disk into memory.
The data contained in any files on the disk is not actually deleted, but instead the
FAT and the root directory table are “zeroed out.” Also, the disk area is scanned for
bad surfaces that might have appeared since the last time you formatted the disk.
3
Press e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A: /V:SAMPLEDATA
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
The type of the file system is FAT.
Verifying 1.44M
10 percent completed.
You have begun the process of formatting the DATA disk.
Initializing the File Allocation Table (FAT) . .
Format complete.
1,457,664 bytes total disk space
1,457,664 bytes available on disk
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 allocation units available on disk.
12 bits in each FAT entry.
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Volume Serial Number is A067-7C79
Format another (Y/N)?
You were not asked to enter the volume label, as the label was
provided within the command.
4
Key in the following: N e
Format another (Y/N)?N
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
Since you do not want to format another disk, you pressed N for
“no.” You named your disk SAMPLEDATA because on this disk you are going to
store samples. Whenever you use a volume label, make it as meaningful as possible
so that you do not have to look at all the files on the disk to know what is on the
disk. Examples of meaningful names (volume labels) could include ENGLISH to
indicate the disk is for your English homework or INCOMETAX for a disk that
contains your income tax data. There are two ways to see your volume label.
5
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A: e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR A:
Volume in drive A is SAMPLEDATA
Volume Serial Number is A067-7C79
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You can see displayed the label you entered, SAMPLEDATA. The
internal command VOL lets you look at the volume label on any disk or check to see
if there is a label. By using this command, you can quickly see what is on a disk
without having to execute the directory command. The syntax is:
VOL [drive:]
6
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
C:\>WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
3.8
ACTIVITY: USING THE LABEL COMMAND
The volume label on your hard disk will be different depending
on whether a volume label was entered when the hard disk was formatted. In this
example, a volume label was placed on the hard disk, so you see the message
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504. When you used the VOL command, the operating system looked only on Drive C, the default drive. To look at the volume label on
Drive A, you must specifically request Drive A by giving VOL another parameter,
the variable parameter [drive:], which represents the drive letter.
7
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A: e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A:
Volume in drive A is SAMPLEDATA
Volume Serial Number is A067-7C79
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
Since you placed a volume label on the DATA disk, you can see it
with the VOL command. If a volume label is meaningful, it clearly identifies what
files are on the disk.
3.7
The LABEL Command
It would be very inconvenient if every time you wanted to change the volume label
on a disk you had to reformat the disk. Not only is this fatal to your data, but it
takes time to format disks. In MS-DOS version 3.3, the LABEL command was
introduced. It is an external command that lets you change the volume label without
reformatting the disk. Remember, VOL, an internal command, lets you see the
volume label, but LABEL lets you change the volume label. Bracketed items are
always optional. The partial syntax is:
LABEL [drive:][label]
3.8
Activity: Using the LABEL Command
Note:
1
Your default directory is the \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory on
Drive C, and you have C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32> displayed. The disk
you just formatted is in Drive A.
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>LABEL A: e
Note:
Be certain to include the A: parameter, or the OS will assume you want to
change the electronic name of the C drive. This action can cause problems
on networked computers.
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>LABEL A:
Volume in drive A: is SAMPLEDATA
Volume Serial Number is A067-7C79
Volume label (11 characters, ENTER for none)?
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This message looks exactly like the one you saw when you used
the FORMAT command without the /V parameter. At this point, you can key in a
new volume label.
2
Press e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>LABEL A:
Volume in drive A: is SAMPLEDATA
Volume Serial Number is A067-7C79
Volume label (11 characters, ENTER for none)?
Delete current volume label (Y/N)?
The LABEL command knows that you already have a volume
label, so it is asking you if you want to remove it.
3
Key in the following: Y e
Delete current volume label (Y/N)? Y
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You deleted the current volume label.
4
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A: e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A:
Volume in drive A has no label
Volume Serial Number is A067-7C79
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
You no longer have a volume label on the disk. In the next step
you are going to place a volume label on the DATA disk, but you are going to take a
shortcut. You are going to use the volume label SAMPLE DATA. Since you already
know what you want to key in, you do not have to wait for the LABEL command to
ask you what label you want. The LABEL command allows the use of spaces,
whereas the /V parameter with FORMAT does not allow spaces.
5
Key in the following:
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>LABEL A:SAMPLE DATA e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>LABEL A:SAMPLE DATA
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
3.10
ACTIVITY: USING THE /Q PARAMETER
You are returned to the system level prompt. Did your volume
label change on the DATA disk?
6
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A: e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A:
Volume in drive A is SAMPLE DATA
Volume Serial Number is A067-7C79
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
Using the VOL command, you can see the new volume label.
3.9
Formatting a Disk Using
the /Q Parameter
Often you will want to clear a disk totally to ensure that there is really nothing on
the disk and you know the tracks and sectors are already there from a previous
formatting. There is no need to take the time to reformat the disk. You can use the /
Q parameter. The /Q parameter stands for “quick” format. The /Q works only on a
disk that has been previously formatted. It works like the usual FORMAT command, but skips the low-level formatting. It clears the FAT and root directory as it
prepares a disk for new files. However, in order to clear the disk rapidly, /Q will not
check for bad sectors on a disk. Using /Q is a very fast way to erase a disk.
3.10
Activity: Using the /Q Parameter
Note:
1
Your default directory is the \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory on
Drive C, and C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32> is displayed. The SAMPLE
DATA disk is in Drive A.
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A: /Q e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A: /Q
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
FORMAT is asking you for a disk to format. Since you already
have a disk in the drive, you may proceed.
2
Be sure the DATA disk is in Drive A. Then press e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>FORMAT A: /Q
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
The type of the file system is FAT.
QuickFormatting 1.44M
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Initializing the File Allocation Table (FAT) . . .
Volume label (11 characters, ENTER for none)?
Notice how fast the formatting occurred. FORMAT is asking you
for a volume label. You will use this disk throughout the remainder of this test for
the DATA disk.
3
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DATA e
4
Key in N e
Volume label (11 characters, ENTER for none)? DATA
Format complete.
1,457,664 bytes total disk space.
1,457,664 bytes available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 allocation units available on disk.
12 bits in each FAT entry.
Volume Serial Number is 0C80-099C
QuickFormat another (Y/N)?N
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
The FORMAT command wanted to know if you had any more
disks to quick format. You responded N for “no.” You returned to the system
prompt. What happened to the volume label?
5
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A: e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>VOL A:
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 0C80-099C
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>_
As you did not press enter, but entered the new volume label
DATA, your disk has been electronically “renamed” to DATA. You have finished
creating the disk you will use each time the instructions tell you to be sure your
DATA disk is in the drive.
6
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \ e
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \
C:\>_
CHAPTER SUMMARY
You returned to the root directory of the hard disk.
7
Key in the following: C:\>EXIT e
You have closed the Command Prompt window and have returned to the desktop. Remember, the appearance of the desktop will differ from
computer to computer.
8
Click Start. Click Turn Off Computer. Click Turn Off.
You have completed the Windows shut-down procedure.
Chapter Summary
1. Floppy disks that are purchased are sometimes not ready to use. They must first
be prepared for use.
2. Each type of computer has its own specific way of recording information on a
disk. This text is only concerned with Windows-based computers.
3. Disks are the means to store data and programs permanently.
4. All disks must be formatted by a utility program stored as a file called
FORMAT.COM so that data and programs can be read from and written to
them.
5. Disks that have information on them can be formatted again.
6. If a disk has files on it, formatting the disk will remove all of those files.
7. Since the FORMAT command removes all data, formatting a hard disk can be
dangerous.
8. Formatting a disk means that the physical layout of the disk is defined to
determine how the information is stored on the disk so that the OS can locate
what is stored.
9. Each operating system has a unique way of recording information on a disk.
This is known as a file system.
10. The OS uses sections of a disk, whether it is a hard disk or a floppy disk. A disk
is divided into concentric circles called tracks. Each track is divided into sectors.
The number of tracks, sectors, and sides of a disk determine the capacity of the
disk.
11. The two major types of files systems that Windows XP Professional supports is
FAT and NTFS.
12. All floppy disks are formatted as FAT disks.
13. The smallest unit that the operating system will read from or write to is a
cluster. A cluster is made up of one or more adjacent sectors, depending on the
type of disk.
14. Each disk that is formatted with FAT has a root directory and two copies of a file
allocation table (FAT).
15. All disks that are formatted with FAT have a boot record, a FAT, a directory, and
data sectors.
16. All FAT-formatted disks use the file allocation table. The FAT (file allocation
table) is a map of every track and sector on the disk. The FAT tells the OS where
files are on the disk. The FAT links a file together by pointing to the next cluster
that holds the file’s data.
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17. On a FAT-formatted disk, the root directory has information about files including the file name and the file’s starting cluster entry in the FAT.
18. The data sectors are where files are actually stored.
19. Files are chains of bytes laid out in sequence.
20. NTFS is the preferred file system for Windows XP Professional.
21. Major advantages of using NTFS include that it is a secure file system that
provides more efficient storage of data on hard disks and faster access to files
and folders.
22. Insead of using FAT, NTFS uses a special file called the Master File Table (MFT)
that tracks all the files and directories in a volume. It is a database of all the files
on the system.
23. Files are written to a disk in the first available cluster and, if possible, in adjacent or contiguous clusters. If the adjacent clusters are already in use, the OS
skips to the next available noncontiguous cluster.
24. A disk is formatted with the FORMAT command, an external utility program.
25. The basic syntax of the FORMAT command is:
FORMAT volume: [/V:label] [/Q] [/F:size]
26. The internal VOL command allows you to view the internal electronic label.
27. The external LABEL command allows you to change the internal electronic
label.
28. The /Q parameter performs a quick format that does not check for bad sectors
on a disk. In addition, it can be used only on a disk that has been previously
formatted.
29. Always use the correct media type when formatting disks.
Key Terms
active partition
allocation unit
bad sectors
basic disk
boot sector
cluster
cluster overhang
contiguous
dynamic disk
end-of-file (EOF) marker
extended partition
extent
file allocation table
(FAT)
file system
formatting
high-level formatting
initializing the disk
logical formatting
low-level formatting
master boot record
(MBR)
master file table (MFT)
noncontiguous
New Technology File
System (NTFS)
partition
partition table
physical formatting
primary partition
run
virtual file alloction
table (VFAT)
volume label
volume serial number
Discussion Questions
1. What purpose do disks serve?
2. Why must you format a disk?
3. Compare and contrast physical (low-level) formatting with logical (high-level)
formatting of a disk.
4. Define tracks, sectors, and clusters.
COMPLETION QUESTIONS
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
What is the purpose and function of the boot record?
Define FAT. How is it used on a disk?
Compare and contrast FAT, FAT32, and NTFS.
What is the purpose and function of the root directory in a FAT file system?
How is space allocated to files in FAT? In NTFS?
FORMAT can be a dangerous command. Explain.
What does the prompt on the screen represent?
Compare and contrast internal and external commands.
What steps can you take when you see error messages ?
What is a volume label?
When formatting a disk, the drive letter is a mandatory parameter. Why?
Give the basic syntax for the FORMAT command and explain each item.
Explain the purpose and function of a quick format.
When using the FORMAT command, what are the purpose and function of the
parameter /V?
19. What is the purpose and function of the VOL command?
20. What is the purpose and function of the LABEL command?
21. When using the FORMAT command, when would you use the /Q parameter?
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true or the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. Each track is divided into smaller units called sectors.
T
F
2. You may format any disk with the FORMAT command.
T
F
3. DIR FORMAT.COM will execute the command FORMAT and
format a disk.
T
F
4. The DOS directory structure only recognized 8.3 file names.
T
F
5. All floppy disks are formatted as FAT.
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. The smallest unit of disk space the operating system will work with is called
a(n) _______________.
7. The information in files is stored in the _______________ sectors of a disk.
8. In a FAT-formatted disk, where a file is located is kept track of by the
_______________, while the _______________ keeps track of the files and
attributes.
9. NTFS keeps track of all its files and directories in the _______________.
10. In order to be usable, a disk must first be _______________.
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Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. When you format a disk, you
____
a. erase everything on that disk.
b. prepare it so the operating system can read from and write to it.
c. both a and b
d. neither a nor b
12.
On
a hard disk, you may only boot from the _______ partition.
____
a. active
b. extended
c. expanded
d. primary
13. To name a disk when you are formatting it, you can use
____
a. the /V parameter Volume.
b. the VOL command.
c. /L for label.
d. /N for name.
14.
NTFS
and FAT are examples of
____
a. operating systems.
b. partition tables.
c. file systems.
d. none of the above
15. To change the volume label of the disk currently in Drive A without
____
eliminating any information on it, key in:
a. LABEL A:
b. VOL A:
c. VOLUME A:
d. none of the above
Writing Commands
Write the correct steps or commands to perform the required action as if you were at
the computer. The prompt will indicate the default drive and directory.
16. View the name of the disk in the default drive.
A:\>
17. Format and place the volume label MYDISK on the disk in Drive A, in one step.
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>
18. Display the volume label on Drive A.
C:\>
19. Locate the FORMAT command on the hard drive.
A:\>
20. Change the label on the disk in Drive A from DATA to ACTION.
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
Homework Assignments
Problem Set I—At the Computer
Note 1: Your DATA disk is in Drive A. C:\> is displayed as the default drive
and the default directory.
Note 2: Remember, be very careful when using the FORMAT command. Never
issue the command without a drive parameter specified, A: or B:, and
do not use the C drive as a parameter.
Problem A
A-a
Format the DATA disk the fastest way.
A-b
Key in the following at the volume label prompt: MYDATA DISK
____
A-c
1. In addition to the drive letter, what parameter did you use with the
FORMAT command?
a. /U
b. /Q
c. /S
d. none of the above
Display the volume label of the DATA disk.
____
2. In addition to the drive letter, what command did you use?
a. VOL
b. NAME
c. FORMAT
d. all of the above
____
3. What volume label is displayed?
a. MY DATA DISK
b. MYDISK
c. MYDATADISK
d. none of the above
Problem B
B-a
Change the name of the disk in the A drive without using the FORMAT
command.
B-b
Use the name CLASSDISK.
____
B-c
4. Which command did you use?
a. NAME
b. LABEL
c. VOL
d. none of the above
Check to see that the name has actually changed.
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____
5. What volume label is displayed?
a. DATA
b. CLASSDISK
c. MYDATADISKVERY_OWN
d. none of the above
B-d
Change the volume label to DATA.
____
6. In addition to the drive letter, what command did you use?
a. VOL
b. FORMAT
c. LABEL
d. none of the above
Problem Set II—Brief Essay
1. You have taught a friend how to format a disk, and she is happy to find that the
process is simple. However, she does not understand why she must format a
disk and what is happening when it is formatted. Briefly answer her questions.
Include an explanation of the purpose of the boot record, the directory table, the
FAT, and the data sectors.
2. You have just keyed in FORMAT A:/V:CLEAN. What is it that you did, and
why did you do it?
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter you will be able to:
1. List and explain the major reasons for
learning about the operating system.
2. Explain the difference between program files
and data files.
3. Explain the difference between freeware and
shareware programs.
4. Define “real mode” and “protected mode”
operations.
5. Explain the hierarchical filing system of a
tree-structured directory.
6. Define the CD, MD, and RD commands.
7. Explain the purpose and function of a root
directory and tell how and when it is created.
8. Explain what subdirectories are and tell how
they are named, created, and used.
9. Explain the purpose and use of subdirectory
markers.
10. Identify the commands that can be used with
subdirectories.
11. Explain the purpose of the PROMPT command.
12. Explain the purpose and function of the
MOVE command.
13. List the steps to remove a directory.
14. Explain the purpose of the path.
Student Outcomes
1. Understand the difference between data files
and program files.
2. Create subdirectories using the MD command.
3. Understand Hierarchical Filing Systems
4. Display the default directory using the CD
command.
5. Change directories using the CD command.
6. Use subdirectory markers with commands.
7. Use the PROMPT command to change the
display of the prompt.
8. Rename a directory using the MOVE command.
9. Use the RD command to eliminate a directory.
10. Explain how to remove an entire tree structure.
11. Understand the purpose of the path command.
Chapter Overview
You do not purchase a computer to use the
operating system. You purchase a computer to
help you be more efficient in doing work you
want to do. Work on a computer is comprised of
two aspects—the programs that do the work and
the information you create. When you work with
a computer, you accumulate many programs and
data files. If you are going to be an efficient user,
you must have a way to manage these files. Part
of the power of the Windows operating system is
its ability to manage files. From the desktop, you
can use Windows Explorer and My Computer to
view the location of your files and to manage
them. In this text, you will learn how to manage
your files from the command prompt. There are
things that you cannot do easily (and some things
you cannot do at all) from the Windows GUI.
In this chapter you will learn to use a program
file and a data file. You will also learn the
subdirectory commands to help you manage
your files.
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CHAPTER 4
PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
Why Use the Command Prompt Window?
So far, you have used commands to prepare a disk for use (FORMAT), to copy a disk
(DISKCOPY), to see what files are on a disk (DIR), and to clear the screen (CLS).
Each of these commands is useful, but no one buys a computer to use the operating
system. You purchase a computer to assist you in work, and the way you work on a
computer is by using application programs. The major categories of application
programs include word processors to make writing easier, spreadsheets to manage
budgets and do financial projections, databases to manage and manipulate collections of data, and graphics to create artistic drawings and designs. The application
programs that use graphics include CAD (computer-aided design), desktop publishing, photo-editing programs, and scanning or camera programs. Each program has
its own instructions that must be learned. If this is true, why are you learning about
the operating system? There are two important reasons.
First and foremost, you cannot run an application program without Windows. It
is the manager of the system, supervising the hardware and software components
and allowing you to load and execute specific application packages. All application
programs run under the supervision of the operating system.
The second reason for learning about the operating system is that application
programs are stored as files on disks and usually generate data files. Windows has a
variety of commands that allow you to manage and manipulate program and data
files. Be aware that the operating system manages the files—their location, movement, etc.—but not the information you put into files.
4.2
Program Files, Data Files,
and the Operating System
On the hard disk is a subdirectory called WUGXP. This subdirectory was created by
installing the files and directories from the ACTIVITIES disk to the hard disk. It was
placed on the hard disk or network server by the lab technician or the instructor. If
you are using your own computer, you will have to create the directory and place
the files there yourself—see Appendix A for instructions on how to do this. The
subdirectory WUGXP contains other subdirectories, among which is GAMES. This
subdirectory has a subdirectory called BOG2 in which there is an application
program called BOG that will help you understand how operating systems work in
the “real world.” BOG is a simple game program. The object of Bog 2 is to find as
many words as possible in the grid, formed from adjacent cubes.
The Windows operating system, because it is downward compatible, allows for
the use of older software, referred to as legacy software. You are going to use the
Command Prompt window to execute this program by loading the program file.
An application or program file is an executable file that is loaded from disk into
memory. The operating system then turns control over to the application program.
With software written for DOS or earlier versions of Windows, when the application
program needed to interface with the hardware, such as when it wanted to write a
character to the screen, print, or respond to mouse movement, there were two
choices. The application program could “talk” directly to the device or it could talk
4.3
SHAREWARE
to DOS and let DOS do the actual labor of writing to the screen or sending a job to
the printer. This is called real mode operation. With software written for the Windows operating system, this is not the case. Windows software runs in protected
mode. In protected mode, no communication exists between the application software and the actual hardware itself. Device drivers (the software that comes with
peripheral devices, such as a mouse or a modem) are also called mini-drivers.
Instead of having the manufacturer’s device drivers talk to the hardware or to the
core of the operating system itself, these drivers talk to virtual device drivers, which
are part of the Windows operating system. These virtual device drivers are outside
of the core operations of the operating system, which remains “protected” from the
actions of the devices and device drivers.
As an example, assume you bought a fancy ACME video card with all the new
bells and whistles. It has the magic words “Plug and Play” on the package. When
you install it, you may have to insert the disk that came with it in order to install a
mini-driver that talks to the Windows virtual video card driver and tells it how to
blow the whistles and ring the bells. The core of the Windows operating system,
however, is not touched by the software driver written by ACME. The Windows
virtual video driver will make sure nothing gets through to the core of the operating
system that could cause problems. Thus the term “protected mode.”
An application program cannot load itself into memory. The operating system is
the means by which the application program gets loaded into memory. Remember
that work takes place only in memory. The operating system also assists in loading
the data file into memory so that the application program can use the data. Ensuring
the cooperative effort between the OS and the application program and its data files
is the work of the operating system. You, the user, do not directly interface with the
operating system at the application level.
There is another component: the command line commands that Windows provides. Commands are also programs. These commands allow you, the user, to
interface directly with the operating system to manage your program and data files.
4.3
Shareware
Some of you may have already purchased commercial application packages such as
WordPerfect, Word, or PageMaker. There are hundreds of different programs to
choose from that will meet almost any computer user’s needs, from managing a
checkbook (Quicken) to playing a game (Flight Simulator).
The subdirectory WUGXP contains data files, freeware programs, and shareware
programs. Freeware and shareware programs are available from a wide variety of
sources. One of the most common sources today is the Internet. Friends and acquaintances may pass programs to you; members of computer clubs share their
programs; or you can receive them from a source such as this textbook.
Freeware is software that is in the public domain. The authors (programmers) of
these programs have donated the programs to anyone who wants to use them with
the understanding that people will use them but not alter them. The programmers
do not expect to be paid in any way—although sometimes they will ask for a small
donation for expenses.
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
Shareware is a trial version of a program. The program is not distributed through
commercial channels, thus saving the programmer the costs of marketing and
distribution. After you purchase commercial software, if you do not like it or it does
not meet your needs, you usually cannot return it. On the other hand, shareware is
something you can try out. If you like it, you then register it with the programmer
for a nominal fee. If you do not like it, you simply delete the file or files from your
disk. Trying these programs costs you nothing. If you decide to retain and use the
program, the programmer does expect to be paid. The programmer or programmers
who write shareware are professional programmers, students, and people who just
enjoy programming.
Sometimes, to encourage people to register, the program will be a limited version
without all the features of the shareware program. Sometimes called “crippleware,”
it may lose features after a certain date or have annoying screens that pop up to
remind you to register it. When you do register it, you receive the full version or the
latest version of the program, the documentation (a manual of commands and
instructions), and notices of updates and technical support. The update notices will
provide you with the latest version of corrections to the program. Technical support
means you can call the programmer(s) for help if something is not working correctly.
This textbook includes both freeware and shareware. Appendix A lists all the
shareware programs with the fees and addresses necessary to register them. If, after
you complete the textbook, you wish to continue using the shareware programs,
please pay the appropriate fees and register the programs. Otherwise, delete the
files. Shareware provides some really great programs and by registering them, you
are encouraging the programmer to write shareware. Who knows, you may be
assisting the next Bill Gates or Steve Jobs.
4.4
Activity: Using DIR to
Locate the BOG Program
Note 1: Check with your lab technician or network administrator to be sure that
the subdirectory WUGXP has been installed for you, either on the C:\
drive or on a network drive. Be sure to fill in your Configuration Table in
Chapter 1 with your specific location of this subdirectory. This text is
written with the assumption that the WUGXP subdirectory is directly off
the root of the C drive. If you are working on your own computer, you will
have to install the subdirectory WUGXP. Complete instructions on how to
do this are in Appendix A.
Note 2: It is assumed that your computer is booted and Windows is loaded. You
have shelled out to the Command Prompt. You have changed the directory
to the root directory of C. C:\> is displayed on the screen as the default
drive and directory.
Note 3: When keying in commands, you may use the command line editing keys to
correct typographical errors, as shown in Chapter 2.
1
Key in the following: C:\>DIR WUG*.* e
4.4
ACTIVITY: USING DIR TO LOCATE THE BOG PROGRAM
C:\>DIR WUG*.*
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\
02/04/2002
09:20 AM
<DIR>
WUGXP
0 File(s)
0 bytes
1 Dir(s)
7,946,362,880 bytes free
C:\>_
You are verifying that you have a subdirectory called WUGXP. In
this example, only one entry matches the criterion you requested. You asked DIR to
find any file or any directory on the hard disk that begins with WUG and has any
other characters in the file name and any file extension. Your display may vary
depending on how many other files you have that begin with WUG. If the entry
named WUGXP is not displayed, refer to Appendix A and take the necessary steps
before continuing.
2
Key in the following: C:\>CD \WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2 e
3
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2\>DIR BOG.EXE e
C:\>CD WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>DIR BOG.EXE
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
04/23/1995
07:45 AM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
165,376 BOG.EXE
165,376 bytes
7,946,354,688 bytes free
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>_
You changed the default directory to WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
subdirectory where the BOG program is located. You used the DIR command to see
if the file called BOG.EXE is on the hard disk C: off of the root directory (\) in the
subdirectory called WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2. DIR is the command,
WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2 is the path, and BOG.EXE is the file name of the program. The DIR command just allows you to see if the file is on the disk; it does not
let you use the program. The name of the file is BOG. The name of the extension is
.EXE. The .EXE file extension has a special meaning: executable code. This informs
the OS the file is a program. The file extension .EXE always indicates an executable
program.
4
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>DIR BOG.DAT e
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C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>DIR BOG.DAT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
02/22/2002
11:21 AM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
23,501 BOG.DAT
23,501 bytes
7,946,346,496 bytes free
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>_
You used the DIR command to see if the file called BOG.DAT is in
this subdirectory. DIR is the command, BOG is the file name, and DAT is the file
extension. DIR does not let you use the data; it just lets you see if it is there.
4.5
Using Application Programs
and Data Files
In the above activity, you used the command DIR to see if there were two files on
the disk, BOG.EXE and BOG.DAT. All DIR did was let you know that these files
exist. To make use of these files, you have to load them into memory. Remember that
the application program is BOG.EXE, which has the instructions to tell the computer
what to do. The BOG.DAT data file cannot be used by itself. You must load the
application program first, then the program will be able to get to and use the data.
4.6
Activity: Using Application
Programs and Data Files
Note:
1
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2> is displayed on your screen.
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>BOG.DAT e
You opened up a dialog box that warned you against trying to
open the file. The file called BOG.DAT is a data file. It is not a program, so it cannot
execute. It does not have a program file extension .EXE, .COM, or .BAT. It is a data
file. Data files cannot execute.
2
Click Cancel. Key in the following: C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>BOG e
4.6
ACTIVITY: USING APPLICATION PROGRAMS AND DATA FILES
When you keyed in BOG, the operating system looked for a file
with the name of BOG and an extension of .COM, .EXE, or .BAT or other executable
file extensions because those are the extensions that mean “execute.” Because BOG
is a file with an .EXE file extension, it was found. The operating system took an
image copy of the program from the disk and loaded it into memory. Control was
turned over to the BOG program. BOG is a shareware game program with its own
commands and instructions. It is a word programs where the user tries to make up
lots of words from a random group of letters. The program’s data file (BOG.DAT) is
a long list of words from which the letters are gathered, and against which your
words are compared. If you like this program, remember to register it with the
author.
3
Click Exit Program.
C:\>CD WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>BOG.DAT
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>BOG
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>_
You have returned to the Command prompt window. Most
programs today are written to run under the Windows GUI system. Most computer
systems today have Microsoft Office installed, which includes the program Word.
The following assumes you have Word on your computer.
4
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>CD \ e
5
Key in the following: C:\>DIR WINWORD.EXE /S e
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>CD \
C:\>DIR WINWORD.EXE /S
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10
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06/01/2001
PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
10:07 AM
1 File(s)
10,578,248 WINWORD.EXE
10,578,248 bytes
Total Files Listed:
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
10,578,248 bytes
7,906,836,480 bytes free
C:\>_
You have used the DIR command with an optional parameter, /S,
to discover if the Word program is installed on your system. The directory found in
this example is the standard directory for Microsoft Word, but your system may be
different.
WARNING: If you found something other than the directory found in this
exercise, take careful note of what you found and use that directory instead of the
one listed here. If the directory you found was not on your local system (not on
the C:\ drive), be sure and check with your lab administrator to be sure you may
complete this exercise.
WARNING: If WINWORD was not found on your system, go directly to step 11.
6
Key in the following:
C:\>CD PROGRAM FILES\MICROSOFT OFFICE\OFFICE10 e
C:\>CD PROGRAM FILES\MICROSOFT OFFICE\OFFICE10
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10>_
You have changed directories to the directory where the Word
program (Winword.exe) is located.
7
Key in the following:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10>WINWORD e
4.6
ACTIVITY: USING APPLICATION PROGRAMS AND DATA FILES
You have opened the Word Program. Word is not a shareware
program, and you must purchase it to be able to use it on your system. (Your
display may be very different from the one shown, depending on your version of
Word installed in your lab.)
8
Click the
in the upper-right corner of the window to close the Word Program.
9
Key in the following:
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10>CD \ e
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10>WINWORD
C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office10>CD\
C:\>_
You have returned to the root drive.
10 Key in the following: C:\>CD WUGXP e
11 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>QUASARS.DOC e
WARNING: If Winword was not found on your system, this will bring up the
WordPad program—the applet that comes with Windows XP Professional—
instead of Microsoft Word, as shown in the image below. The exercise will still
work for you.
The Windows operating system knew which program you wanted
to enter because the .DOC file extension is associated with the Word program, if
Microsoft Word is installed, or the WordPad program if it is not. This association
process happens during program installation. The operating system found the
associated program and used it to open the requested file QUASARS.DOC.
12 Click the
in the right corner to close the Word (or WordPad) program.
133
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4.7
CHAPTER 4
PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
Managing Program and Data
Files at the Command Prompt
In the last few activities, you moved around the hard disk and loaded both program
files and data files. Although you did not spend much time working with each
program, the experience should give you some idea of how many different types of
programs there are. With each new program, you generate new data files. Windows
does a very good job managing your program files so that you can launch them
from the Start/Programs menu. You need to manage the data files you create in
these programs so that you can quickly locate what you need and get to work.
As an example of what you are faced with, imagine that you own 10 books. By
reading each spine, you can quickly peruse the authors and titles and locate the
book you wish to read. Suppose your library grows, and you now have 100 books.
You do not want to read every author and title looking for just one book, so you
classify the information. A common classification scheme is to arrange the books
alphabetically by the author’s last name. Now you have shortened your search time.
If you are looking for a book by Peat, you go to the letter P. You may have more than
one book by an author that begins with P, but, by going to the letter P, you have
narrowed your search. Now imagine you have 10,000 books—arranging alphabetically by author is still not enough. You may have 200 books by authors whose last
names begin with P. So you further classify your books. You first divide them into
categories like computer or fiction. Then, within the category, you arrange alphabetically by last name. So, if you wanted a computer book by Peat, you would first
go to the computer section, then to the letter P. If you wanted a novel by Peters, you
would first go to the fiction section and then the letter P. As you can see, you are
classifying and categorizing information so that you can find it quickly.
This process is exactly what you want to do with files. Remember, you have
many data files. You want to be able to locate them quickly by grouping them
logically. The way you do this in the OS is by the means of subdirectories.
Some programs, upon installation, create a directory for your files. For example,
Microsoft Office places all the files you create with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, to
a directory called My Documents. On this system, My Documents is a subdirectory
under C:\Documents and Settings\bpeat. However, if you save all of your documents to this single folder, it will soon become very crowded and your documents
will be very, very hard to find. Most programs will allow you to specify a default
folder to use for saving your files, and will also allow you to save to a folder other
than the default during the saving process.
4.8
Hierarchical Filing Systems or
Tree-structured Directories
As shown in Chapter 3, every disk must be formatted. Formatting a disk automatically creates a directory known as the root directory. Every disk must have a root
directory so that files can be located on the disk. The root directory table is the area
of the disk that contains information about what is stored there. It is like an index to
the disk. However, there is a limit to the number of files or entries that can be placed
4.8
HIERARCHICAL FILING SYSTEMS OR TREE-STRUCTURED DIRECTORIES
in the root directory table if your disk is formatted as FAT16. See Table 4.1. Under
FAT16, the root directory is a fixed size and location on the disk. This is no longer
true with FAT32. Under FAT32 the root directory is now free to grow as necessary
and can be located anywhere on a disk. There is no longer a limit on the number of
directory entries in the root directory because the root directory is now an ordinary
cluster chain and can grow as large as needed, limited only by the physical size of
your disk.
Disk Size
Number of Root Directory Entries
3½-inch DS/DD disks
112
Hard disk
512
Table 4.1—FAT16 Root Directory File Limits
Although the limits of the root directory table on a floppy disk may be adequate,
the limits on a FAT16 root directory of a hard disk were not. If you had a 1-GB hard
disk, 512 entries were not enough space to store all the files the drive can accumulate. Normally, people work more efficiently when they group files and programs
together logically. Subdirectories give you the capability of “fooling” the system so
that you can create as many file entries as you need. The only limitation is the
capacity of the disk. Even though FAT32 no longer limits the size of the root directory, subdirectories are still an important part of organizing a disk. This is also true
if you are using the NTFS file system. It too no longer limits how many files or
directories are located in the root directory.
This capability is called the hierarchical or tree-structured filing system. In this
system, the root directory has entries not only for files but also for other directories
called subdirectories, which can contain any number of entries. Windows refers to
the subdirectories as folders.
The root directory is represented by a backslash. (Do not confuse the backslash \
with the forward slash /.) All directories other than the root directory are technically
called subdirectories, yet the terms directory and subdirectory are used interchangeably. Windows uses the terms folders and subfolders. All of these terms—folders,
subfolders, directories, and subdirectories—are used interchangeably. Subdirectories are
not limited to a specific number of files. Subdirectories may have subdirectories of
their own. Subdirectories divide the disk into different areas.
The directory structure of a disk is like an inverted family tree with the root
directory at the top and the subdirectories branching off from the root. The root
directory is the point of entry in the hierarchical directory structure. In Figure 4.1,
the example on the left is a family tree showing a parent who has two children; the
one on the right is a root directory with two subdirectories. The two subdirectories
contain all files and programs having to do with sales and accounting. Again, what
you are doing is classifying and further classifying information.
Root Directory
Mother
Son
Daughter
Figure 4.1—A Directory Is Like a Family Tree
Sales
Accounting
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A child can have only one biological mother, but a child can become a parent and
have children. Those children can also become parents and have children. Likewise,
ACCOUNTING can be a child directory of the root directory, but also a parent
directory to subdirectories beneath it (see Figure 4.2).
Root Directory
Mother
Son
Son
Sales
Daughter
Daughter
Son
Son
Travel
Son
Budgets
Accounting
Entertainment
Accounts
Receivable
Old Accounts
Figure 4.2—Hierarchical Structure of a Directory
The children are dependent on the parent above. Each subdirectory is listed in its
parent directory, but not in any directory above the parent. Note the absolute
hierarchical structure. You cannot skip a subdirectory any more than you can have a
grandparent and grandchild with no parent in between. You move around in the
directories via the path that tells the operating system where to go for a particular
file.
Think of a disk as a building. When a structure is built, it has a finite size, which
is also true of a disk. For example, you can have a 1.44-MB floppy disk or a 20-GB
hard disk. The size is fixed. You cannot make it larger or smaller, but you can divide
it into rooms. However, you first have to get inside. To open the door, you need a
drive letter (volume). Once inside, you are in a room that is equivalent to the fixed
size of a disk. This undivided room is the root directory. Every disk has a root
directory that may or may not be subdivided. The name of the root directory is
always \ (backslash). Thus, the structure could look like Figure 4.3.
\Root directory
C:
Figure 4.3—A Disk as a Building
4.8
HIERARCHICAL FILING SYSTEMS OR TREE-STRUCTURED DIRECTORIES
Since it is difficult to find things when they are scattered about a large room, you
want to put up walls (subdirectories) so that like things can be grouped together.
When the walls go up, the root directory becomes the main lobby—backslash (\). In
the rooms (subdirectories) you plan to have games, names and addresses in phone
books, and the operating system commands. You post a sign (label) indicating what
you plan to put inside each room (see Figure 4.4).
GAMES
WINDOWS
PHONEBK
\Root directory—lobby
C:
Figure 4.4—Subdirectories as Rooms
Each room is off the main lobby, the \. You cannot go from the GAMES room to
the PHONEBK room without first going through the main lobby (\). Furthermore,
the lobby (\) sees only the entryways to the rooms. It does not know what is in the
rooms, only that there are rooms (subdirectories). In addition, each room can be
further divided (see Figure 4.5).
KIDS
ADULTS
GAMES
SOCIAL
WINDOWS
WORK
PHONEBK
\Root directory—lobby
C:
Figure 4.5—More Subdirectories
Each new room (subdirectory) is off another room (subdirectory). The GAMES
room, for example, now has two new rooms—KIDS and ADULTS. The GAMES
room (subdirectory) now becomes a lobby. You can get to the KIDS and ADULTS
rooms (subdirectories) only through the GAMES lobby. Furthermore, in order to get
to the GAMES room, you must pass through the main lobby \ (root directory).
137
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
The GAMES lobby knows that there are two new rooms but does not know what
is inside each. The main lobby (\) knows the GAMES room but does not know what
is inside GAMES. The KIDS and ADULTS rooms know only the GAMES lobby.
The same relationship exists for all other new rooms (subdirectories). A
subdirectory knows only its parent lobby and any children it may create. There are
no shortcuts. If you are in the KIDS room and wish to go the SOCIAL room, you
must return to the GAMES lobby, then you must pass through the main lobby (root
directory) to the PHONEBK lobby. Only then can you enter the SOCIAL room.
You do not have to subdivide rooms. GAMES is subdivided, while Windows is
not. Remember, you are not changing the size of the structure; you are merely
organizing it. Presently, these rooms have nothing in them, but they are ready to
receive something. That something is files. The files are like the furniture (see
Figure 4.6).
tag
poker
mary
ibm
chutes
bridge
bob
trw
KIDS
ADULTS
SOCIAL
WORK
jeopardy
GAMES
WINDOWS
PHONEBK
\Root directory—lobby
C:
Figure 4.6—Files in Subdirectories
You now have not only created the rooms (subdirectories), but you have also
filled them with furniture (files). Thus, using subdirectories is a way to manage the
numerous files and programs you collect and create. Again, this is a classification
scheme, and you expect there to be some logic to it. Just as you would not expect to
find a stove in a room called bedroom, you would not expect to find a file called
WINWORD.EXE in a subdirectory called GAMES. This does not mean there cannot
be a mistake—that someone could, indeed place the stove in the bedroom—but that
would make the stove very hard to find.
There is another component to using subdirectories. When you use
subdirectories, you can change your work area, much like using a room. If you are
going to cook, you will go to the kitchen because you expect the tools that you need
to be in that location. You expect not only the stove to be there but also all the tools
you need—the sink, the spices, and the pots and pans. If you want to go to sleep,
you will go to the bedroom because that is where you expect to find the bed.
Subdirectories have names that you or a program choose. The only exception is the
root directory, which is created when you format the disk and is always known as \
(backslash). The root directory always has the same name on every disk (\).
Because computers are so rigid, they must follow certain rules when naming
anything. Subdirectories follow the same naming conventions as files. Usually,
4.10
ACTIVITY: HOW TO CREATE SUBDIRECTORIES
subdirectory names do not have extensions. Although the Windows operating
system treats subdirectories as files, the subdirectories themselves cannot, for the
most part, be manipulated with the standard file manipulation commands.
Subdirectories have their own special commands. Table 4.2 lists the directory
management commands.
Command
Function
CHDIR or CD
Changes a directory.
MKDIR or MD
Makes or creates a directory.
RMDIR or RD
Removes or erases a directory and its subdirectories.
PATH
Defines the search paths.
PROMPT
Changes the look of the prompt to identify what subdirectory is
the default.
MOVE
Allows you to rename a directory.
Table 4.2—Directory Management Commands
4.9
Creating Subdirectories
When you create a subdirectory, you are setting up an area where files can be stored.
There is nothing in the subdirectory initially. The internal MD command creates a
subdirectory. When you format a disk, you are preparing it to hold files. When you
set up a subdirectory, you are preparing it to hold a logical group of files. The syntax
of the command is:
MKDIR [drive:]path
or
MD [drive:]path
MD and MKDIR perform exactly the same function. You will use MD, because it
requires fewer keystrokes. In the following activity, you will create two
subdirectories under the root directory on the DATA disk. These subdirectories will
be for two classes: one in political science and the other in physical education.
4.10
Activity: How to Create Subdirectories
Note:
Make sure you are at the Command Prompt. C:\> is displayed as the
default drive and directory.
1
Place the DATA disk created in Chapter 3 into Drive A.
2
Key in the following: C:\>FORMAT A: /Q /V:DATA e
C:\>FORMAT A: /Q /V:DATA
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
You are going to format the DATA disk again. In addition to using
the /Q parameter to format the disk quickly, you also used a shortcut to place a
volume label on the disk, so you do not have to wait for the volume label prompt. If
you want to include a volume label on a disk, you can do it at the time of issuing the
FORMAT command. However, when you use /V (followed by a colon), you cannot
have spaces in the volume label name.
3
Press e
C:\>FORMAT A: /Q /V:DATA
Insert new disk for drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
The type of the file system is FAT.
QuickFormatting 1.44M
Initializing the File Allocation Table (FAT)...
Format complete.
1,457,664 bytes total disk space.
1,457,664 bytes available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 allocation units available on disk.
12 bits in each FAT entry.
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
QuickFormat another (Y/N)?
You formatted the disk and placed a volume label on it.
4
Press N e
5
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
QuickFormat another (Y/N)? N
C:\>A:
A:\>_
You told the operating system you did not wish to format any
more disks. You have changed the default drive. However, you are in more than a
default drive, you are in a default directory—the root of A. This is the only directory
on this disk and was created when you formatted it. You can tell that you are in the
root directory because when you look at the prompt, it displays not just A: but also
\, indicating the root.
6
Key in the following: A:\>MD ASTRONOMY e
7
Key in the following: A:\>MD PHYSED e
4.10
ACTIVITY: HOW TO CREATE SUBDIRECTORIES
A:\>MD ASTRONOMY
A:\>MD PHYSED
A:\>_
You created two subdirectories called ASTRONOMY and
PHYSED under the root directory on the DATA disk. ASTRONOMY will hold all
the files that involve classes in astrological science, and PHYSED will hold files that
involve classes in physical education. Although you have created the subdirectories
to hold the files, they are now “empty” file cabinets. When you used the MD
command, all you saw on the screen was the system prompt. How do you know
that you created subdirectories? You can see the subdirectories you just created by
using the DIR command.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
11:04 AM
<DIR>
PHYSED
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,456,640 bytes free
A:\>_
The DIR command displayed the contents of the disk. In this case,
there are only the two subdirectory files you just created. It is the <DIR> after each
file name that indicates a subdirectory. ASTRONOMY and PHYSED are
subdirectories. It is also important to note that the \ following the Directory of A:
on the screen indicates the root directory of the disk.
One of the parameters for the DIR command is /A for attributes. The only
attribute you are interested in is D for directories. If you look at the syntax diagram,
it indicates the /A followed by a list of the attributes you can request. The D is for
directories:
/A
Displays files with specified attributes.
attributes
D Directories
R Read-only files
H Hidden files
A Files ready for archiving
S System files
- Prefix meaning not
9
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /AD e
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
A:\>DIR /AD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
11:04 AM
<DIR>
PHYSED
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,456,640 bytes free
A:\>_
You see displayed only the directories on the DATA disk because
that is all that the disk contains. What if you want to look at a disk that already has
directories and files on it?
10 Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP e
05/14/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/11/2002
10/31/2001
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
05/14/2001
05/27/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
12/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
08/01/2002
10/12/2002
11/16/2002
08:07 AM
64 WILD2.YYY
01:46 PM
148 ASTRO.TMP
07:08 PM
478 VEN.TMP
05:37 PM
383 EARTH.THR
09:10 AM
294 EXP02JAN.dta
04:50 PM
138 FILE3.SWT
04:32 PM
182 OLDAUTO.MAK
12:00 PM
115 RIGHT.RED
12:13 AM
138 AWARD.MOV
11:28 AM
4,843 GO.BAT
10:08 PM
76 LONGFILENAME
01:08 PM
406 MER.99
12:25 AM
465 person.fil
12:53 PM
46 STEVEN.FIL
07:08 PM
478 VENUS.TXT
04:32 PM
93 WILDONE
06:40 PM
188 ZODIAC.FIL
09:14 AM
<DIR>
GAMES
09:18 AM
<DIR>
TEST
09:18 AM
<DIR>
MUSIC
09:24 AM
<DIR>
MEDIA
09:28 AM
<DIR>
DATA
09:31 AM
<DIR>
SPORTS
09:36 AM
<DIR>
LEVEL-1
91 File(s)
47,396 bytes
9 Dir(s)
7,899,627,520 bytes free
A:\>_
(This graphic represents the tail end of your listing.) As you can
see, using DIR with no parameters shows you all files, not just directories. Notice
the subdirectories are at the bottom of the listing. This is the way Windows XP, by
default, shows you directory listings. Windows XP Professional showed the directory listings as they were stored in the directory entry table, which, to the viewer,
was in no particular order. However, if you are using NTFS, the files and directories
4.10
ACTIVITY: HOW TO CREATE SUBDIRECTORIES
are listed alphabetically by default. Remember, the displayed results from DIR will
be very different if you have a FAT16 or NTFS file system. Most displays in this text
are on a FAT32 system.
11 Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP /AD e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP /AD
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
02/04/2002
02/04/2002
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
08/01/2002
10/12/2002
11/16/2002
09:20 AM
<DIR>
.
09:20 AM
<DIR>
..
09:14 AM
<DIR>
GAMES
09:18 AM
<DIR>
TEST
09:18 AM
<DIR>
MUSIC
09:24 AM
<DIR>
MEDIA
09:28 AM
<DIR>
DATA
09:31 AM
<DIR>
SPORTS
09:36 AM
<DIR>
LEVEL-1
0 File(s)
0 bytes
9 Dir(s)
7,898,628,096 bytes free
A:\>_
The above command listed only the directories on the hard disk in
the subdirectory called WUGXP. Do not be concerned if the order is different on
your computer. What if you wish to see the names of the files inside the directory?
Since ASTRONOMY is a subdirectory on the A drive, not just a file, you can display
the contents of the directory with the DIR command. Remember, the terms directory
and subdirectory are interchangeable. Actually there is only one directory—the root
directory. Although others may be called directories, they are really subdirectories.
Again, the syntax of the DIR command is DIR [drive:][path]. You use the
subdirectory name for path.
12 Key in the following: A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY e
A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,456,640 bytes free
A:\>_
The directory line, Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY, tells you the
path. You are looking from the root directory into the subdirectory called
ASTRONOMY. Even though you just created the subdirectory ASTRONOMY, it
143
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
seems to have two subdirectories in it already, . (one period, also called the dot) and
. . (two periods, also called the double dot). Every subdirectory, except the root
directory, has two named subdirectories, always. The subdirectory named . is
another name or abbreviation for the current directory, ASTRONOMY. The
subdirectory name . . is an abbreviation for the parent directory of the current
directory, in this case the root directory \. The . (dot) and . . (double dot) are called
subdirectory markers or dot notation. This always holds true—the single dot is the
name of the subdirectory you are currently in, the default directory, and the double
dot is the name of the directory immediately above the current directory, the parent
directory.
13 Key in the following: A:\>DIR PHYSED e
A:\>DIR PHYSED
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\PHYSED
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,456,640 bytes free
A:\>_
The line that reads Directory of A:\PHYSED tells you the path.
You are looking from the root directory into the subdirectory called PHYSED, the
same way you looked when you asked for a directory on another drive. If, for
instance, you asked for a directory of the disk in Drive B, that line would read
Directory of B:\. If you had asked for a directory of Drive C, that line would have
read Directory of C:\. It tells you not only what drive but also what subdirectory is
displayed on the screen.
4.11
The Current Directory
Just as the operating system keeps track of the default drive, it also keeps track of
the current directory, or default directory of each drive. When you boot the system,
the default drive is the drive you load the operating system from, usually C, and the
default directory is the root directory of the current drive. You can change the
directory just as you can change the drive. Doing so makes a specific subdirectory
the default. In previous chapters you used the CD command to change the default
directory to the \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory on the hard disk. It was
important to have that as the default subdirectory so that you could use the external
commands.
The change directory command (CHDIR or CD) has two purposes. If you key in
CD with no parameters, the name of the current default directory is displayed. If
you include a parameter after the CD command, the default directory will be
changed to the directory you request. The CD command does not use spaces as
4.12
ACTIVITY: USING THE CD COMMAND
delimiters, so it is possible to change to a directory that contains a space in its name,
such as My Documents, without using quotes. This process is similar to changing
drives by keying in the desired drive letter followed by a colon, e.g., A:, B:, and C:.
However, do not be fooled. If your default drive and directory is the root of A so
that the displayed prompt is A:\> and you key in CD C:\WUGXP, you will not
change drives. What you will do is change the default directory on Drive C to
\WUGXP. Your current default drive and directory will still be the root of A and
your displayed prompt will still be A:\>. However, if you change to the C drive by
keying in C:, you will go to the current default directory on the C drive, which is
now C:\WUGXP. But if you use the /D parameter with the CD command, you will
change drives and directories with one command. The command would be CD /D
C:\WUGXP. The commands CHDIR and CD are exactly the same. You will use CD
because it requires fewer keystrokes. The syntax for the CD command is as follows:
CD [/D] [drive:][path]
4.12
Activity: Using the CD Command
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. The default drive is Drive A, and A:\> is
displayed on the screen.
Key in the following: A:\>CD e
A:\>CD
A:\
A:\>_
This display tells you that you are in the root directory of the
DATA disk and that any command you enter will apply to this root directory, which
is also the default directory. You can change this default using the CD command.
You are going to change the default subdirectory from the root to the subdirectory
called ASTRONOMY.
2
Key in the following: A:\>CD ASTRONOMY e
3
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>CD e
A:\>CD ASTRONOMY
A:\ASTRONOMY>CD
A:\ASTRONOMY
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
In step 2, CD followed by the name of the subdirectory changed
the default from the root directory to the subdirectory ASTRONOMY. Since you
changed the default directory, the prompt then said A:\ASTRONOMY>. However,
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
you can always confirm that you changed the default directory by keying in CD.
CD with no parameters always displays the default drive and default subdirectory.
When you keyed in CD, it displayed A:\ASTRONOMY, which tells you that you
are in the subdirectory \ASTRONOMY on the DATA disk in Drive A and that any
command you enter with no parameters will apply to this default subdirectory. You
can think of the command this way: CD with no parameters shows you the current
drive and directory; CD followed by a subdirectory name changes the subdirectory.
CD alone cannot be used to change drives.
4
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR e
A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,456,640 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
You are displaying the contents of the current default directory,
\ASTRONOMY. When you use a command, in this case DIR, it always assumes the
default drive and default subdirectory, unless you specify another drive and/or
subdirectory.
5
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>CD \ e
A:\ASTRONOMY>CD \
A:\>_
By keying in CD \, you moved to the root directory of the DATA
disk. The first backslash always means the root directory.
4.13
Relative and Absolute Paths
You are going to add subdirectories to the tree structure so that the levels will look
like those in Figure 4.7. To create these additional subdirectories, you use the MD, or
make directory, command. The command syntax allows these parameters: MD
[drive:]path.
4.14
ACTIVITY: CREATING MORE SUBDIRECTORIES
ROOT
ROOT
ASTRONOMY
MERCURY
VENUS
JUPITER
PHYSED
OTHER
GOLF
TENNIS
DANCE
BIKE
Figure 4.7—Directory with Subdirectories
The drive: is the letter of the drive that contains the disk on which the
subdirectory is to be created (such as A:, B:, or C:). If you omit the drive designator,
the subdirectory will be created on the default or current drive. The path is the path
name of the directory in which the subdirectory is to be created. If you omit the path
name, the subdirectory is created in the default or current subdirectory.
It is important to understand the concept of absolute path and relative path. The
absolute path is the complete and total hierarchical structure. You start at the top
and work your way down through every subdirectory without skipping a directory.
The absolute path is always absolutely correct.
As an analogy, if you were living in Los Angeles, California, you could get a bus
ticket to Santa Barbara. It would not be necessary to use the absolute path to ask for
a ticket—the United States, California, Los Angeles, and then Santa Barbara—you
could use the relative path of just Santa Barbara. If you were in London, England,
and were flying to Los Angeles and needed to buy your connecting bus ticket from
the airport to Santa Barbara before you left England, you would indeed need to give
the English ticket broker complete information about the ticket that you wanted.
You would need to give the absolute path of where you wanted to leave from and
where you wanted to go to—you would ask for a ticket to the United States, state of
California, city of Los Angeles, and then a bus ticket from the airport to the city of
Santa Barbara.
Just as the ticket salesperson in Los Angeles knows where Santa Barbara is, the
current directory also knows information about its immediate surroundings.
However, a directory knows only about the files and subdirectories within itself and
the files and directory immediately above it. There can be many directories beneath
it (many child directories) but only one directory above it (the parent directory).
Each directory knows only its immediate child directories and its parent directory—
no more. If you want to move to a different parent subdirectory, you must return to
the root. The root is the common “ancestor” of all the directories on the disk.
Thus, if you wanted to go from the subdirectory GOLF in the above figure to the
subdirectory VENUS, you would need to go via ROOT. Once you get to the root,
you can choose where you want to go. There are many places to go. It is like a
subway—you must pass through all the stations along the path to get to your
destination.
4.14
Note:
1
Activity: Creating More Subdirectories
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive and the
default directory.
Key in the following: A:\>CD e
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
A:\>CD
A:\
A:\>_
You confirmed that the default directory is the root of the DATA
disk. To create three subdirectories under ASTRONOMY, you will use the MD
command along with the subdirectory names. The subdirectories will be called
MERCURY, VENUS, JUPITER, and OTHER. You will begin with an absolute path
and then use a relative path.
2
Key in the following: A:\>MD A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY e
A:\>MD A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
A:\>_
You have given absolute instructions as to where to create the
directory. You issued the command MD (make a directory) followed by the location
(go to Drive A, under the root directory (\), under the directory called ASTRONOMY). The next backslash is a delimiter to separate ASTRONOMY from the
next entry. Then you can add your new subdirectory called MERCURY. You could
not create MERCURY until you created ASTRONOMY because it is a hierarchy.
Looking at the screen, however, nothing seems to have happened.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY e
A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:20 PM
<DIR>
MERCURY
0 File(s)
0 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,456,128 bytes free
A:\>_
You indeed have a subdirectory called MERCURY under the root,
under ASTRONOMY. You are now going to create the subdirectory called VENUS.
Here you can use a relative path. The default prompt shows you that you are
already in Drive A. If you are already in Drive A, it is the default directory. Therefore, you do not need to include the drive letter because the operating system
assumes the default drive, unless you tell it otherwise. The default directory is the
root. The \ is shown in the prompt, which tells you that you are in the root directory
4.14
ACTIVITY: CREATING MORE SUBDIRECTORIES
and that it is your default. Since you are already in the root, you do not need to
include it. The first backslash is implied.
4
Key in the following: A:\>MD ASTRONOMY\VENUS e
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY e
A:\>MD ASTRONOMY\VENUS
A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:20 PM
<DIR>
MERCURY
12:32 PM
<DIR>
VENUS
0 File(s)
0 bytes
4 Dir(s)
1,455,616 bytes free
A:\>_
You created the subdirectory VENUS under ASTRONOMY and
then you used the DIR command to see that VENUS was, indeed, created. As you
can see, in step 2, you used the absolute path to create the directory. In step 4, you
used the default values and created a subdirectory using the relative path.
6
Key in the following: A:\>CD ASTRONOMY e
A:\>CD ASTRONOMY
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
You have changed the default directory to ASTRONOMY, which
is under the root directory. Using the relative path, you are going to create two more
subdirectories, JUPITER and OTHER , under ASTRONOMY. Remember, you are
in ASTRONOMY under the root on the DATA disk, so all you need to use is a
relative path name—relative to where you are.
7
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>MD JUPITER e
8
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>MD OTHER e
9
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR e
A:\ASTRONOMY>MD JUPITER
A:\ASTRONOMY>MD OTHER
A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
149
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:20 PM
<DIR>
MERCURY
12:32 PM
<DIR>
VENUS
12:34 PM
<DIR>
JUPITER
12:34 PM
<DIR>
OTHER
0 File(s)
0 bytes
6 Dir(s)
1,454,592 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
You needed only to key in the subdirectory names, JUPITER and
OTHER. The path was assumed from the position relative to where you were. In
other words, as the current directory displayed, A:\ASTRONOMY was where the
new directories were added. Because you gave no other path in your command, the
default drive and directory were assumed.
10 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>MD \PLANETS e
11 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR e
A:\ASTRONOMY>MD \PLANETS
A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:20 PM
<DIR>
MERCURY
12:32 PM
<DIR>
VENUS
12:34 PM
<DIR>
JUPITER
12:34 PM
<DIR>
OTHER
0 File(s)
0 bytes
6 Dir(s)
1,454,080 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
You created the subdirectory PLANETS, but where is it? Here is a
common mistake users make. When you keyed in \PLANETS, you were keying in
an absolute path. Remember, the first backslash always means the root. You created
the directory called PLANETS under the root (\), not under ASTRONOMY. The
term first backslash can be misleading. In the path statement
ASTRONOMY\MERCURY, some users would think that the first backslash is the
one separating ASTRONOMY from MERCURY. This is not true. You are separating
ASTRONOMY from MERCURY; hence, this backslash is a delimiter. The first
backslash is the one that begins any path statement such as
\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY. The backslash preceding ASTRONOMY is the first
backslash.
12 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR \ e
4.14
ACTIVITY: CREATING MORE SUBDIRECTORIES
A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR \
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
11:04 AM
<DIR>
PHYSED
12:37 PM
<DIR>
PLANETS
0 File(s)
0 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,454,080 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
By keying in DIR \, you asked to look at the root directory. As you
can see, looking at the screen display of the DATA disk, PLANETS is under the root
directory. Windows simply followed your instructions. Remember, there are no files
in the newly created subdirectories. You have made “rooms” for “furniture.” As of
now, they are empty. You can create subdirectories wherever you wish as long as the
proper path is included. You must pay attention to where you are and whether you
are keying in an absolute path or a relative path. If you key in an absolute path of
the directory you want to create, you will always be correct. If you key in a relative
path, you must remember that you will create the subdirectory relative to where you
are.
13 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>MD \PHYSED\TENNIS e
A:\ASTRONOMY>MD \PHYSED\TENNIS
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
Since the default, or current, directory is ASTRONOMY, you first
had to tell the operating system to return to the root (\) and then go to the
subdirectory called PHYSED. Remember, the relative path only looks down or
under ASTRONOMY. Thus, the path is \PHYSED. You told the system that under
PHYSED the name for the new subdirectory was TENNIS. The second backslash
(PHYSED\TENNIS) is a separator or delimiter, separating the first subdirectory
name from the second subdirectory name. The first backslash indicates the root. Any
other backslash in the line is a delimiter. This is always true. The MD command does
not change the current or default directory. You can verify that you created the
subdirectory TENNIS under the subdirectory \PHYSED by using the DIR command with the path name.
14 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR \PHYSED e
A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR \PHYSED
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
151
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Directory of A:\PHYSED
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:42 PM
<DIR>
TENNIS
0 File(s)
0 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,453,568 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
The subdirectory PHYSED is displayed with the TENNIS
subdirectory listed. It was very important to key in the backslash in \PHYSED in
order to tell DIR to go up to the root and then down to the subdirectory PHYSED. If
you had not included the backslash (\) and had keyed in DIR PHYSED only, you
would have seen the message “File Not Found” because DIR would have looked
below ASTRONOMY only. PHYSED is under the root directory, not under the
subdirectory ASTRONOMY.
4.15
Knowing the Default Directory
Since Windows, and any operating system, always uses default values unless you
specify otherwise, knowing the current default is very important. Recognizing the
default drive and directory is easy because the screen displays the prompt or disk
drive letter, A:\ or C:\. You know the default directory or subdirectory the same
way. The screen displays the full path, but that was not always the case. In versions
of DOS prior to DOS 6, the default prompt did not display the path—only the drive.
If you were currently in C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>, all you would have seen was
C>—no path indicators at all. You change the way the prompt appears with the
PROMPT command. In operating systems prior to Windows XP Professional, the
PROMPT command, issued without any parameters, returned only the current
drive and the greater-than sign (>). It eliminated the path display from the prompt.
Now, the prompt command issued without parameters has no effect.
4.16
The PROMPT Command
The system or command prompt is a letter of the alphabet designating the default or
disk drive, followed by the greater-than sign, such as A> or C>. As previously
noted, this was the prompt displayed automatically in versions of DOS prior to DOS
6.0. Since the introduction of DOS 6.0, if no prompt is specified, the prompt includes
the path as well as the greater-than sign, such as A:\> or C:\>. However, the
prompt can be changed to reflect what you want to be displayed during a command
line session. All you are changing with the PROMPT command is the way the
prompt looks, not the function of the prompt. PROMPT is an internal command—it
is contained in CMD.EXE. The syntax for the PROMPT command is as follows:
PROMPT [text]
text
Specifies a new command prompt.
The PROMPT command also has some special characters, called metastrings,
that mean specific things. When you include one of these metastrings, it establishes
4.17
ACTIVITY: CHANGING THE PROMPT
a specific value. Metastrings always have the syntax $x where x represents any of
the values in the following table:
Character
Description
$A
& (Ampersand)
$B
¦ (Pipe)
$C
( (Left parenthesis)
$D
Current date
$E
Escape code (ASCII code 27)
$F
) (Right parenthesis)
$G
> (Greater-than sign)
$H
Backspace (Erases previous character)
$L
< (Less-than sign)
$N
Current drive
$P
Current drive and path
$Q
= (Equal sign)
$S
(Space)
$T
Current time
$V
Windows XP version number
$_
Carriage return and linefeed
$$
$ (Dollar sign)
The following activity allows you to change the prompt and use text data as well
as metastrings. PROMPT, when keyed in without any parameters, returns the
default prompt value (A:\>, B:\>, or C:\>) and will include the current path.
4.17
Activity: Changing the Prompt
Note 1:
Note 2:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. The default drive is Drive A. The default
subdirectory is ASTRONOMY. The prompt A:\ASTRONOMY> is displayed.
This uses the letter G, not the letter Q.
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>PROMPT HELLO$G e
A:\ASTRONOMY>PROMPT HELLO$G
HELLO>_
You changed the way the prompt looks. You no longer see
A:\ASTRONOMY> but, instead, the text you supplied, HELLO. The greater-than
sign, >, appeared because you keyed in $G. When the operating system sees $G, it
returns the metastring value for G, which is >. The function of the prompt has not
153
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
changed, only its appearance. The new prompt works just as if A>, B>, or C> were
displayed. Any command keyed in works the same way.
2
Key in the following: HELLO>VOL e
HELLO>VOL
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
HELLO>_
As you can see, the VOL command works the same way. What if
you change drives?
3
Key in the following: HELLO>C: e
HELLO>C:
HELLO>_
You changed the default drive to C, but, by looking at the screen,
there is no way to tell what the default drive is.
4
Key in the following: HELLO>VOL e
HELLO>VOL
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
HELLO>_
You can now see that you changed the designated drive. This
exercise shows you that having the default drive letter displayed on the screen is
very important. You can return the prompt to the default value by keying in the
command with no parameters.
5
Key in the following: HELLO>PROMPT e
HELLO>PROMPT
C:\>_
Now you know what drive you are in. You can see the default
drive, which is Drive C, displayed in the prompt.
6
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
4.19
ACTIVITY: USING SUBDIRECTORY MARKERS
C:\>A:
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
With the prompt back to the default value, you know what drive
you are in, and you know what subdirectory you are in.
4.18
Subdirectory Markers
The single . (one period) in a subdirectory is the specific name of the current directory, which is a way to refer to the current subdirectory. The . . (two periods) is the
specific name of the parent directory of the current subdirectory. The parent directory is the one immediately above the current subdirectory. You can use . . as a
shorthand version of the parent directory name to move up the subdirectory tree
structure. You can move up the hierarchy because a child always has only one
parent. However, you cannot use a shorthand symbol to move down the hierarchy
because a parent directory can have many child directories, and the operating
system will have no way of knowing which child directory you are referring to.
4.19
Activity: Using Subdirectory Markers
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. The default drive is Drive A. The default
subdirectory is ASTRONOMY. The prompt A:\ASTRONOMY> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>CD .. e
Note:
With the CD or MD commands, the space after the command (CD) and
before the backslash (\) or the directory marker (. or . .) is optional.
A:\ASTRONOMY>CD ..
A:\>_
You used . . to move up to the root directory. The root directory is
the parent of the subdirectory \ASTRONOMY.
2
Key in the following: A:\>MD PHYSED\GOLF e
A:\>MD PHYSED\GOLF
A:\>_
You created a subdirectory called GOLF under the subdirectory
called PHYSED. Since you were at the root directory of the DATA disk, you needed
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
to include the relative path name, PHYSED\GOLF. Had you keyed in MD \GOLF,
the GOLF subdirectory would have been created in the root directory because the
root directory is the default directory. However, you do not need to include the path
name of PHYSED if you change directories and make PHYSED the default directory.
3
Key in the following: A:\>CD PHYSED e
A:\>CD PHYSED
A:\PHYSED>_
PHYSED is now the default directory. Any activity that occurs will
automatically default to this directory, unless otherwise specified. You may use a
relative path name.
4
Key in the following: A:\PHYSED>MD DANCE e
5
Key in the following: A:\PHYSED>DIR e
A:\PHYSED>MD DANCE
A:\PHYSED>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\PHYSED
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:42 PM
<DIR>
TENNIS
02:14 PM
<DIR>
GOLF
02:16 PM
<DIR>
DANCE
0 File(s)
0 bytes
5 Dir(s)
1,452,544 bytes free
A:\PHYSED>_
You used the relative path name. You did not have to key in the
drive letter or the first backslash (the root), only the name of the directory DANCE
that now is under the subdirectory called PHYSED.
6
Key in the following: A:\PHYSED>CD DANCE e
A:\PHYSED>CD DANCE
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>_
You used the relative path to move to the subdirectory DANCE
under PHYSED, which is under the root. You are going to create one more directory
4.19
ACTIVITY: USING SUBDIRECTORY MARKERS
under PHYSED called CYCLING, but you are going to use the subdirectory markers.
7
Key in the following: A:\PHYSED\DANCE>MD ..\CYCLING e
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>MD ..\CYCLING
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>_
You used the markers to move up to the parent directory of
DANCE, which is PHYSED, and you created the directory CYCLING in that directory.
8
Key in the following: A:\PHYSED\DANCE>DIR e
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\PHYSED\DANCE
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02:16 PM
<DIR>
.
02:16 PM
<DIR>
..
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,452,032 bytes free
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>_
When you keyed in the DIR command, you were looking at the
default directory DANCE. CYCLING does not appear there because you did not
put it there.
9
Key in the following: A:\PHYSED\DANCE>DIR .. e
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>DIR ..
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\PHYSED
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:42 PM
<DIR>
TENNIS
02:14 PM
<DIR>
GOLF
02:16 PM
<DIR>
DANCE
02:18 PM
<DIR>
CYCLING
0 File(s)
0 bytes
6 Dir(s)
1,452,032 bytes free
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>_
157
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
When you keyed the DIR command followed by . . you looked at
the parent directory of DANCE, which was PHYSED. CYCLING, indeed, appears
there.
10 Key in the following: A:\PHYSED\DANCE>CD .. e
A:\PHYSED\DANCE>CD ..
A:\PHYSED>_
You used the subdirectory marker to move to the parent of
DANCE, which is PHYSED.
11 Key in the following: A:\PHYSED>CD\ e
A:\PHYSED>CD\
A:\>_
You moved to the root directory of the DATA disk. (You did not
use a space between CD and \, as you did in the prior example; the space is optional.) Using the command CD\ or CD \ will always take you to the root directory
of the default disk. The following figures demonstrate what the DATA disk now
looks like.
ROOT
DIRECTORY
A:\
PLANETS
PHYSED
ASTRONOMY
OTHER
MERCURY
CYCLING
DANCE
VENUS
GOLF
JUPITER
Figure 4.8—Structure of the DATA Disk
TENNIS
4.21
ACTIVITY: USING MOVE TO RENAME A DIRECTORY
Another way to illustrate the subdirectory structure pictorially is as follows:
ROOT DIRECTORY (A:\)
ASTRONOMY
PHYSED
PLANETS
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
SUBDIRECTORY (A:\ASTRONOMY)
SUBDIRECTORY (A:\PHYSED)
subdirectories
subdirectories
MERCURY
JUPITER
VENUS
OTHER
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
TENNIS
GOLF
DANCE
CYCLING
PLANETS
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
A:\POLYSCI\MERCURY
A:\PHYSED\TENNIS
A:\POLYSCI\JUPITER
A:\PHYSED\GOLF
A:\POLYSCI\VENUS
A:\PHYSED\DANCE
A:\POLYSCI\OTHER
A:\PHYSED\CYCLING
Figure 4.9—Subdirectories: Another View
4.20
Changing the Names of Directories
Prior to MS-DOS version 6.0, the only way the operating system had to rename a
directory was to eliminate the old directory and create a new one. Beginning with
MS-DOS version 6.0, you could use the MOVE command. In the Windows operating system, you can rename a file or a directory from Windows Explorer. To rename
a directory from the Command Prompt, you can still use the MOVE command,
though MOVE is not often used for this purpose. The syntax of the MOVE command to rename a directory is:
To rename a directory:
MOVE [/Y ¦ /-Y] [drive:][path]dirname1 dirname2
4.21
Note:
Activity: Using MOVE
to Rename a Directory
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive and the
default directory.
1
Key in the following: A:\>MOVE PHYSED GYM e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
159
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
A:\>MOVE PHYSED GYM
1 file(s) moved.
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
11:04 AM
<DIR>
GYM
12:37 PM
<DIR>
PLANETS
0 File(s)
0 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,452,032 bytes free
A:\>_
You used the MOVE command to change the name of the
PHYSED directory to GYM. You got a confirmation message on the screen that the
renaming process was successful. You then used DIR to confirm that the directory
name was changed. Indeed, PHYSED is no longer there, but GYM is.
3
Key in the following: A:\>MOVE GYM\CYCLING GYM\BIKING e
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR GYM e
A:\>MOVE GYM\CYCLING GYM\BIKING
1 file(s) moved.
A:\>DIR GYM
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\GYM
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:42 PM
<DIR>
TENNIS
02:14 PM
<DIR>
GOLF
02:16 PM
<DIR>
DANCE
02:18 PM
<DIR>
BIKING
0 File(s)
0 bytes
6 Dir(s)
1,452,032 bytes free
A:\>_
You used the MOVE command to change the name of the CYCLING directory under GYM to BIKING. Although the message says 1 file(s)
moved, you actually renamed the directory. As long as you give the correct path
name, either absolute or relative, you can be anywhere and rename a directory. You
got a confirmation message on the screen that the renaming process was successful.
You then used DIR to confirm the name change. Indeed, CYCLING is no longer
there, but BIKING is.
4.23
4.22
ACTIVITY: USING THE RD COMMAND
Removing Directories
In the same way a disk can be cluttered with files, so can it be cluttered with
subdirectories. Removing subdirectories requires a special command, the remove
directory command (RD or RMDIR). As with CD and CHDIR, RD and RMDIR are
exactly the same. RD is used because it requires fewer keystrokes. You cannot use
the RD command to delete a directory that contains hidden or system files. Using it
alone, without parameters, limits its use to empty subdirectories. In addition, you
can never remove the default directory—the current directory. In order to remove a
subdirectory, you must be in another directory. Furthermore, since you created the
directories from the top down, you must remove them from the bottom up. This
means using RD one directory at a time unless you use the /S parameter. The /S
parameter allows you to traverse the directory tree from the top down. You cannot
use wildcards with RD. The command syntax is:
RMDIR [/S] [/Q] [drive:]path
RD [/S] [/Q] [drive:]path
/S
Removes all directories and files in the specified
directory in addition to the directory itself. Used to
remove a directory tree.
/Q
Quiet mode, do not ask if ok to remove a directory tree
with /S
If you do not include the drive designator, the default drive will be used. The
remove directory command will not remove the directory you are currently in (the
default directory), nor can it ever remove the root directory.
4.23
Activity: Using the RD Command
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive and the
default directory.
1
Key in the following: A:\>RD PLANETS e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
A:\>RD PLANETS
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
A:\>_
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
11:04 AM
<DIR>
GYM
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,452,544 bytes free
161
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
You, indeed, removed the directory called PLANETS from the
root directory of the DATA disk.
3
Key in the following: A:\>CD ASTRONOMY\OTHER e
4
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\OTHER>RD OTHER e
A:\>CD ASTRONOMY\OTHER
A:\ASTRONOMY\OTHER>RD OTHER
The system cannot find the file specified.
A:\ASTRONOMY\OTHER>_
RD did not remove the directory \ASTRONOMY\OTHER. You
got an error message. In this case, the path is valid. OTHER is a directory. A directory is simply a special type of file. But the OS is looking for a directory (file) named
OTHER in the current directory. The current directory is \ASTRONOMY\OTHER.
There is no OTHER directory in OTHER. You cannot remove a directory you are in.
RD will never remove the default directory. Remember, the root directory can also
never be removed.
5
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\OTHER>CD .. e
6
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR e
7
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>RD OTHER e
8
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR e
A:\ASTRONOMY\OTHER>CD..
A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
.
11:04 AM
<DIR>
..
12:20 PM
<DIR>
MERCURY
12:32 PM
<DIR>
VENUS
12:34 PM
<DIR>
JUPITER
12:34 PM
<DIR>
OTHER
0 File(s)
0 bytes
6 Dir(s)
1,452,544 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY>RD OTHER
A:\ASTRONOMY>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
11:04 AM
12:20 PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
.
..
MERCURY
4.25
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
ACTIVITY: USING RD WITH THE /S PARAMETER
163
12:32 PM
<DIR>
VENUS
12:34 PM
<DIR>
JUPITER
0 File(s)
0 bytes
5 Dir(s)
1,453,056 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY>_
You moved to the parent of OTHER, which is ASTRONOMY. You
used the DIR command to see that OTHER was there. You then used the RD command to remove OTHER and the DIR command again. The subdirectory entry
OTHER was not displayed. You did, indeed, remove it. Remember, you create
directories in a hierarchical fashion, top down, and you must remove directories
bottom-up using RD without parameters. If OTHER had a subdirectory beneath it,
such as OTHER\ASTEROIDS, you would have needed to remove the ASTEROIDS subdirectory before you could remove the OTHER subdirectory.
9
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY>CD \ e
A:\ASTRONOMY>CD \
A:\>_
You have moved to the root directory of the DATA disk.
4.24
Deleting a Directory
and Its Subdirectories
The RD command is useful for deleting an empty directory, but what if you want to
delete a directory and its contents with a single command? This can be done by
using the parameter /S with the RD command. The syntax is as follows:
RMDIR [drive:]path [/S] [/Q]
or
RD [drive:]path [/S] [/Q]
The variable /S will remove the specified directory and all subdirectories,
including any files. It is used to remove a tree. The variable /Q means to run RD in
quiet mode. Adding this variable will make your system delete directories without
confirmation.
4.25
Note:
1
Activity: Using RD with the /S Parameter
The DATA disk is in Drive A. The Command Prompt window is open, and
A:\> is displayed as the default drive and the default directory.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR GYM /S e
164
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
A:\>DIR GYM /S
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\GYM
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
11:04 AM
<DIR>
12:42 PM
<DIR>
02:14 PM
<DIR>
02:16 PM
<DIR>
02:18 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
.
..
TENNIS
GOLF
DANCE
BIKING
0 bytes
Directory of A:\GYM\TENNIS
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
12:42 PM
<DIR>
12:42 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
.
..
0 bytes
Directory of A:\GYM\GOLF
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02:14 PM
<DIR>
02:14 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
.
..
0 bytes
Directory of A:\GYM\DANCE
02/25/2002 02:16 PM
<DIR>
Press any key to continue . . .
02/25/2002 02:16 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
.
..
0 bytes
Directory of A:\GYM\BIKING
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02:18 PM
<DIR>
02:18 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
Total Files Listed:
0 File(s)
14 Dir(s)
.
..
0 bytes
0 bytes
1,453,056 bytes free
A:\>_
In your display, the beginning information will have scrolled off
the screen. You can see that there are no files in GYM or any of its subdirectories.
Therefore, there is nothing in GYM that you wish to keep.
2
Key in the following: A:\>RD GYM /S e
A:\>RD GYM /S
GYM, Are you sure (Y/N)? _
You get a chance to back out of the RD /S command by pressing N
for “No.” In this case, you do want to proceed.
4.27
3
ACTIVITY: USING MULTIPLE PARAMETERS WITH MD AND RD
Press Y e
GYM, Are you sure (Y/N)? Y
A:\>_
The RD /S command deleted GYM. You can use the DIR command to confirm that GYM is gone.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
0 File(s)
0 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,455,616 bytes free
A:\>_
You removed GYM and all its subdirectories with one command.
RD /S is very useful, very fast, very powerful, and very dangerous.
4.26
Using Multiple Parameters
with MD and RD
You can make or remove more than one directory on the same command line. Both
RD and MD allow you to create or remove more than one directory with one
command line. In addition, the MD command allows you to create a parent and a
child directory with one command. If the parent directory does not exist, the OS will
create the child directories and any necessary intermediate directories.
4.27
Activity: Using Multiple
Parameters with MD and RD
1
Key in the following: A:\>MD FIRST SECOND e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
A:\>MD FIRST SECOND
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
165
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Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
03:05 PM
<DIR>
FIRST
03:05 PM
<DIR>
SECOND
0 File(s)
0 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,454,592 bytes free
A:\>_
Both subdirectories were created.
3
Key in the following: A:\>RD FIRST SECOND e
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
A:\>RD FIRST SECOND
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
0 File(s)
0 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,455,616 bytes free
A:\>_
Both subdirectories were removed.
5
Key in the following: A:\>MD THIS\THAT\WHAT e
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR THIS /S e
A:\>DIR THIS /S
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\THIS
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
03:07 PM
<DIR>
03:07 PM
<DIR>
03:07 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
.
..
THAT
0 bytes
Directory of A:\THIS\THAT
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
03:07 PM
<DIR>
03:07 PM
<DIR>
03:07 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
.
..
WHAT
0 bytes
Directory of A:\THIS\THAT\WHAT
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
03:07 PM
<DIR>
03:07 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
.
..
0 bytes
4.28
Total Files Listed:
0 File(s)
8 Dir(s)
UNDERSTANDING THE PATH COMMAND
0 bytes
1,454,080 bytes free
A:\>_
When you created the child directory WHAT, it had no existing
parent directories (THIS\THAT). Since THIS and THAT had to exist before WHAT
could be created, the OS created them for you.
7
Key in the following: A:\>RD THIS /S /Q e
8
Key in A:\>DIR e
A:\>RD THIS /S /Q
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
06/27/2002
02:17 PM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
0 File(s)
0 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,455,616 bytes free
A:\>_
You used the /S parameter to remove the entire directory structure for the THIS directory. In addition, you used the /Q parameter so that you
would not be prompted for confirmation of the deletion of the directories. Note, you
could also have stated the command RD /S /Q THIS as in the case of the RD
command, the order does not matter.
4.28
Understanding the PATH Command
You have, so far, changed the current or default subdirectory using the CD command, which works well for locating various data files. In addition, in this chapter
you executed the application program, BOG. You changed to the subdirectory where
program file was located. You needed to do this in order to execute or run the
program.
The process of executing a program is simple and always the same. You key in
the file name of the program, and the operating system looks for the file first in
memory. If you keyed in DIR, for example, that program is in memory, and, since it
is an internal program, the OS would look no further. If you keyed in BOG, it would
not find it in memory, and the operating system would look for the file only in the
current default drive and directory. First, it would look for BOG.COM. If no file by
that name existed, it would look for BOG.EXE. If it found no file by that name, its
last search would be for BOG.BAT. If it found no file by any of those names, it
would return an error message. That would be the operating system’s way of telling
you it could not find a file by one of those names in the current drive or directory.
167
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
If the OS found a file with the correct name, as it did with BOG.EXE, it would
take a copy of the file, place it in memory, and turn control over to that application
program. A program is executed at the command prompt in this way. In the Windows GUI, you double-click the icon or choose an item off a menu to execute a
program. However, the GUI is just a pretty face that does exactly what you did from
the command prompt. When you work from the Windows interface, the Windows
operating system first looks in memory and then on the disk for the program. The
only difference is that when a program is installed through the GUI interface, the
program tells the Windows operating system where it is being installed and what
the path to the program is. Windows then keeps track of the location of the file. If
there were an error in installation or a program file was somehow moved, Windows
would not be able to execute the program because the path would be incorrect.
Windows has a hard time fixing its mistakes; that is why managing Windows at the
system level is so important.
The operating system’s search for the correct file is limited to the following file
extensions in the order listed:
Extension
Meaning
.COM
Command file
.EXE
Executable file
.BAT
Batch file
.CMD
Command script file
.VBS
VBScript file (Visual Basic)
.VBE
VBScript Encoded Script file (Visual Basic)
.JS
JScript file (JavaScript)
.JSE
JScript Encoded Script file (JavaScript)
.WSF
Windows Script file
.WSH
Windows Script Host Settings file
If the command interpreter does not find any of these in your default drive and
directory, it then searches your search path as set in the PATH statement, in the file
extension order listed above. If your file name does not meet any of these criteria,
then you see the error message, “Filename is not recognized as an internal or
external command, operable program or batch file.”
These are the only file extensions that indicate programs and are sometimes
called executables. You have previously executed programs. You have also used
external commands such as FORMAT, DISKCOPY, and MOVE, which, being
external commands, are also programs stored as files with either a .COM or .EXE
file extension. These are examples of the system’s utility files. They are just programs you want to execute (executables). When you use these programs, you do not
have to key in C: and then CD\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 in order to execute them.
Why, then, when the root of the directory was the default drive and default
directory, did those commands work? The files were not on the DATA disk. Based
on this information, since those files were not in the default drive and subdirectory,
you should have seen an error message. Why didn’t this happen? Because of the
PATH command.
4.29
ACTIVITY: USING THE PATH COMMAND
The PATH command sets a search path to other drives and directories. This
command tells the system what other drives and directories you want it to look in
for a program file not in the current drive or directory. The PATH command looks
only for program files that can be executed. All this means is that, when you key in a
command and you have set the path, the operating system will search for the
program first in memory, second in the current directory, and then in the
subdirectories you have specified with the PATH command. When it finds the
program, it will load and execute it. You can set the path for command files to
another subdirectory or disk drive. In the Windows operating system, the default
PATH includes the subdirectory where the system utility files are located—
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32. The command syntax for the path command is as
follows:
PATH [[drive:]path[;...][;%PATH%]]
PATH ;
Type PATH ; to clear all search-path settings and direct cmd.exe to
search only in the current directory.
Type PATH without parameters to display the current path.
Including %PATH% in the new path setting causes the old path to be
appended to the new setting.
PATH is the command. PATH with no parameters displays the current path.
Choosing a drive: indicates which drive designator you want the path to follow. If
you omit the drive designator, the default drive will be used. You can have more
than one subdirectory in the search path by using the semicolon (;) between each
path element (with no spaces between the semicolon and the paths). The semicolon
(;) used as the only parameter, without the drive or path, cancels any paths you have
set. The current path is represented by %PATH%.
4.29
Activity: Using the PATH Command
WARNING: Do not do this activity if you are on a network unless instructed to
do so or until you have cleared it with your lab technician.
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive and the
default directory.
Key in the following: A:\>PATH > HOLDPATH.BAT e
A:\>PATH > HOLDPATH.BAT
A:\>_
You have captured the current path and placed it in a batch file
called HOLDPATH.BAT. Doing activities with the PATH command will destroy the
path that is set up in your lab environment. By placing the current path in a batch
file, you will be able to return to the proper path when the activities are done. Batch
files will be discussed later in this text.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
169
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A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 14A8-B0A2
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
03/04/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
08:15 AM
56 HOLDPATH.BAT
1 File(s)
56 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,455,104 bytes free
A:\>_
You now have the file HOLDPATH.BAT on the root of the DATA
disk. With this file, you will later be able to return the path to where it was set by
your lab administrator.
3
Key in the following: A:\>PATH e
A:\>PATH
PATH=C:\WINDOWS\system32;C:\WWINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\system32\WBEM
A:\>_
You have displayed the current search path. Your display may be
different depending on what programs you have on your disk and their locations.
4
(Note that a semicolon follows the command PATH in this step.) Key in the
following: A:\>PATH; e
5
Key in the following: A:\>PATH e
A:\>PATH;
A:\>PATH
PATH=(null)
A:\>_
By using the semicolon (;) following the command word PATH,
you eliminated all possible existing search paths. The second PATH command, with
no parameters, showed that there is now no path set.
6
Key in the following: A:\>PATH C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32 e
Note:
Remember, if the system utility programs are in a subdirectory on the hard
disk other than C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32, you must key in the appropriate path name. Refer to your Configuration Table in Chapter 1,
section 1.6.
7
Key in the following: A:\>PATH e
4.29
ACTIVITY: USING THE PATH COMMAND
A:\>PATH C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32
A:\>PATH
PATH=C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32
A:\>_
When you first keyed in the PATH C:\WUGXP\GAMES\
MATCH32 command, it appeared that nothing happened, but something did. The
second PATH command shows that you have set a path the operating system will
search. If it does not find a command (file) in the default drive and subdirectory, in
this case A:\, it will go to the path set, the subdirectory called \WUGXP\
GAMES\MATCH32 under the root directory of Drive C.
8
Key in the following: A:\>BOG e
A:\>BOG
‘BOG’ is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.
A:\>_
Bog is a game program, but it is not located in the root of the A
drive nor in the \WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32 subdirectory. So, even though the
search path is set, it is not set to the directory that holds the BOG.EXE file. In the
beginning of this chapter, you found that this program was located in the
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2 directory and was called BOG.EXE. You had to
change drives and directories in order to execute the program. If you do not want to
change the default drive and subdirectory to use this program, you can use the
PATH command instead.
9
Key in the following: A:\>MATCH32 e
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You set the search path to the C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32
subdirectory on the hard disk, and so the Match32 game was found and executed.
10 Click File. Click Exit.
A:\>MATCH32
A:\>_
You exited the MATCH32 program. By setting the path to
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32, you canceled the path that included the
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory, where the utility files reside. You do not
have to replace an existing PATH to change it. You can add to, or append to the
path.
11 Key in the following: A:\>HOLDPATH e
12 Key in the following: A:\>PATH e
A:\>HOLDPATH
A:\>PATH=C:\WINDOWS\system32;C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\system32\WBEM_
By executing the HOLDPATH batch file, you returned the path to
the default.
13 Key in the following:
A:\>PATH=%PATH%;C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32 e
Note:
Elements of the path are separated by a semi-colon (;) %PATH% is the way
you refer to the existing path.
14 Key in the following: A:\>PATH e
A:\>PATH=%PATH%;C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32
A:\>PATH
PATH=C:\WINDOWS\system32;C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\system32\WBEM;C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MATCH32
A:\>_
You have added the directory where the game MATCH32 is stored
to the existing path.
15 Click the
in the upper-right corner of the Command window to close it.
16 Open another Command line window.
17 Key in the following: C:\>A: e
18 Key in the following: A:\>PATH e
CHAPTER SUMMARY
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
C:\>A:
A:\>PATH
PATH=C:\WINDOWS\system32;C:\WINDOWS;C:\WINDOWS\system32\WBEM
A:\>_
You are back to the default path. Paths set in a command line
window are in effect only through that session. When you close the window, the
session ends, and the path returns to the default.
19 Key in the following: A:\>DEL HOLDPATH.BAT e
20 Key in the following: A:\>C: e
A:\DEL HOLDPATH.BAT
A:\>C:
C:\>_
You have deleted the HOLDPATH.BAT file and changed the
default directory to the hard drive C.
21 Execute the Windows shut-down procedure.
Chapter Summary
1. Software designed for use with Windows operates in protected mode.
2. When running software created for older versions of DOS or Windows 3.x,
Windows operates in real mode.
3. Subdirectories are created to help organize files on a disk as well as to defeat the
number-of-files limitation of the root directory imposed by FAT16.
4. Whenever a disk is formatted, one directory is always created. It is called the
root directory.
5. MD is an internal command that allows the user to create a subdirectory.
6. Subdirectory-naming conventions follow Windows file-naming conventions.
Programs written for previous versions of DOS and Windows follow the “eightdot-three” file-naming convention.
7. A <DIR> next to a file name indicates that it is a subdirectory.
8. CD is an internal command that, when keyed in by itself, will show the user the
current or default directory.
9. CD followed by a directory name will change the current directory to the named
directory.
10. CD used with the /D parameter will allow you to change drives at the same
time you change directories.
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11. When managing subdirectories and file names, you must use the backslash (\)
as a delimiter to separate subdirectory and/or file names.
12. You may use either an absolute path name or a relative path name. The absolute
path name is the entire subdirectory name or names. The relative path requires
only the path name relative to your current directory.
13. The way the prompt looks can be changed using the PROMPT command. The
PROMPT command followed by a text string will show that text.
14. The PROMPT command has metastrings. When included following the
PROMPT command, the metastrings will return a value. For instance, the
metastrings $P$G will set the prompt to display the default drive and
subdirectory. To return the prompt to the default value, key in PROMPT with no
parameters.
15. Subdirectory markers, also called dot notation, are shortcuts to using
subdirectories. The single dot (.) represents the current directory itself. The
double dot (..) represents the name of the parent directory.
16. You can move up the tree with subdirectory markers, but not down the tree.
17. The MOVE command allows you to rename subdirectories.
18. RD is an internal command that allows users to eliminate subdirectories.
19. Subdirectories must be empty of files before you can use the RD command
without parameters.
20. The root directory can never be eliminated.
21. RD used with the /S parameter allows you to remove an entire directory,
including all its files and subdirectories, with one command.
22. PATH is an internal command that allows you to tell the operating system on
what disk and in what subdirectory to search for command files.
23. PATH keyed in by itself will display the current path.
24. PATH keyed in with a semicolon following it will cancel the path.
Key Terms
absolute path
child directory
current directory
device driver
dot (.)
dot notation
double dot (..)
executable
hierarchical structure
legacy software
metastring
parent directory
path
protected mode
real mode
relative path
root directory
search path
subdirectory marker
tree structure
Discussion Questions
1. List three of the major categories of application software and briefly explain
their functions.
2. What is the purpose and function of a program file (application program)?
3. Explain the purpose and function of the operating system when working with
program files and data files.
4. Briefly explain the difference between real-mode and protected-mode operation.
5. Explain documentation, update notices, and technical support.
6. Name at least three file extensions that indicate an executable program.
COMPLETION QUESTIONS
7. What is the purpose and function of the root directory? What symbol is used to
represent the root directory?
8. What is a subdirectory?
9. Why would you want to create a subdirectory?
10. What is a parent directory?
11. Explain the purpose and function of three directory management commands.
12. Give the syntax for creating a subdirectory.
13. Give the syntax for the CD command.
14. What is the difference between an absolute path and a relative path?
15. If you wanted to create a subdirectory called JAIL under the subdirectory called
COURT on Drive A:, would you get the same result by keying in either MD
A:\COURT\JAIL or MD A:\JAIL? Why or why not?
16. What are subdirectory markers? How can they be used?
17. What are metastrings?
18. How can you return the prompt to the default value? Would you want to? Why
or why not?
19. Explain the purpose and function of the MOVE command. Explain each part of
the syntax.
20. Why will the RD command without parameters not remove a directory if there
is a file in it?
21. What steps must be followed to remove a directory with RD?
22. What is the purpose and function of the PATH command?
23. How can you cancel the current path?
24. How can you set a multiple search path?
25. What is the difference between the path to a file and using the PATH command?
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true and the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. A subdirectory can hold a maximum of 112 files.
T
F
2. The RD /S command deletes a specified directory structure and
all the files and subdirectories beneath it.
T
F
3. The MOVE command allows you to delete subdirectories.
T
F
4. If the default directory is the root directory, you do not need to
include the path name for creating a new subdirectory under a
subdirectory called MEDIA.
T
F
5. The double dot is a shorthand name for the parent directory.
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. Two files can have the same name on the same disk so long as they are in
_______________ subdirectories.
7. When using MOVE to rename a directory, you need to use two parameters: the
old directory name and the _______________ directory name.
8. If the current default subdirectory is MEDIA, the directory above MEDIA is
known as the _______________ directory.
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9. When looking at a directory display, you can identify a subdirectory because the
name appears with _______________ by it.
10. To place the current path in a batch file called HOLDPATH.BAT, you would key
in _______________.
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. Formatting a floppy disk automatically creates
____
a. subdirectories.
b. a root directory.
c. command files.
d. none of the above
12.
A
subdirectory is created by using the
____
a. MD command.
b. CD command.
c. MAKEDIR command.
d. both a and c
13. When you create subdirectories under existing subdirectories,
____
a. omitting the drive designator or path name means that the operating system will perform the task using the default values.
b. omitting the new subdirectory name means that the operating
system will name the new subdirectory after its parent directory.
c. you must return to the root directory.
d. no more than 32 subdirectories may be contained in any one
subdirectory.
14. One of the major purposes in creating subdirectories is to be able to
____
a. use the DIR command.
b. use relative and absolute paths.
c. group files together logically.
d. none of the above
15.
When
you create subdirectories, you are allowed
____
a. eight characters in the subdirectory name.
b. to use the same naming conventions as for files.
c. to save as many files as the disk space will allow.
d. both b and c
Writing Commands
Write the correct steps or commands to perform the required action as if you were at
the computer. The prompt will indicate the default drive and directory. Use the
relative path whenever possible.
16. Locate the file called BETTE.TXT in the ARCHIE directory that is under
COMICS.
A:\COMICS>
17. Display the name of the current directory.
A:\TEXT>
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
18. Change the prompt to = followed by the greater-than sign.
A:\>
19. Locate the file called FISH.FIL in the parent directory of the default directory
using subdirectory markers.
C:\ZOO\AQUARIUM>
20. Set up a search path that will look in the root directory of Drive C, and then the
\BOOK directory also located on Drive C.
A:\TEXT>
Homework Assignments
Note 1:
Note 2:
Remember, if you are logged on to a network, do not use the PATH command without instructions and/or assistance from your lab administrator.
You will format a new disk, the HOMEWORK disk.
CAUTION: You will not use the DATA disk. The DATA disk will be used only for
the chapter activities. You will format a new disk, called the HOMEWORK disk,
and this disk will be used for the Homework Assignments.
Note 3:
Note 4:
Note 5:
The homework problems will use Drive A as the drive where the
HOMEWORK disk is located.
The homework problems will use the WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
subdirectory as the directory where the operating system utility files are
located. If you have a different drive or directory, substitute that drive or
directory.
Windows is running, and you have shelled out to the Command Prompt
window. The visible prompt is C:\>.
Problem Set I—At the Computer
Problem A
A-a
Do not use the DATA disk for these homework problems.
A-b
Write your name and the word “HOMEWORK” on a label for a blank disk or a
disk you no longer want; then insert the disk in Drive A. Be sure either the
disk is blank or you no longer need the data that it contains. Everything on it
will be eliminated after you press the e key.
A-c
Key in the following: C:\>FORMAT A: /V:HOMEWORK e
A-d
Press e
A-e
When the message appears asking if you wish to format another disk, press
Ne
A-f
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
A-g
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, use the relative
path to create a directory called NEW on the HOMEWORK disk.
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____
A-h
____
A-i
____
A-j
____
PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
1. What command did you use to create the directory?
a. MD NEW
b. MD C:\NEW
c. CD NEW
d. CD C:\NEW
Using the relative path, make NEW the default directory.
2. What command did you use to make NEW the default directory?
a. MD NEW
b. MD C:\NEW
c. CD NEW
d. CD C:\NEW
Do a directory listing of the default directory.
3. Look at the directory display. How many bytes do the two directories
occupy?
a. 2,048
b. 1,024
c. 512
d. none of the above
Remove the NEW directory.
4. What command did you execute first?
a. RD NEW
b. CD NEW
c. RD \
d. CD \
Problem B
B-a
____
B-b
____
B-c
Change the prompt so it reads only HELLO THERE.
5. What command did you use?
a. PROMPT $P$G
b. PROMPT HELLO THERE
c. PROMPT $HELLO $THERE
d. none of the above
Key in the following: PROMPT $V$G e
6. What word is included in the prompt?
a. Version
b. Date
c. Time
d. Volume
Key in the following: PROMPT e
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
Problem C
C-a
____
C-b
____
Get help on the PROMPT command.
7. What symbol will display the = sign in the prompt?
a. $D
b. $E
c. $Q
d. $T
Key in the following: PROMPT $D$_$P$G e
8. What appears in the prompt?
a. the current OS version
b. the current date
c. the current time
d. the current volume label
C-c
Key in the following: PROMPT e
C-d
Key in the following: CD ASTRONOMY e
____
9. What message appears?
a. Incorrect DOS version.
b. Invalid subdirectory.
c. The system cannot find the path specified.
d. Invalid command.
Problem D
D-a
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, create a
directory called HISTORY off the root.
D-b
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, create two
subdirectories under HISTORY. One will be called US, and the other will be
called EUROPE.
D-c
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, create a
directory called OLD off the root.
D-d
Make OLD the default directory.
D-e
With OLD as the default directory, create a subdirectory called LETTERS
under the \HISTORY\US subdirectory.
____
10. What command did you use?
a. MD LETTERS
b. MD HISTORY\LETTERS
c. MD HISTORY\US\LETTERS
d. MD \HISTORY\US\LETTERS
D-f
With OLD as the default directory, remove the subdirectory called LETTERS
that you just created.
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
____
11. The command you used was:
a. CD LETTERS
b. CD HISTORY\LETTERS
c. RD HISTORY\US\LETTERS
d. RD \HISTORY\US\LETTERS
D-g
Use the subdirectory markers to move to the parent directory of OLD.
____
12. The command you used was:
a. CD ..
b. CD \
c. MD..
d. MD \
____
13. The parent of OLD is:
a. HISTORY
b. LETTERS
c. the root of the HOMEWORK disk—the \
d. the root of the hard disk—the \
D-h
Remove the directory OLD.
____
14. Which of the following command(s) could you have used?
a. RD OLD
b. RD \OLD
c. both a and b
d. neither a nor b
Problem E
E-a
Create a directory called PHONE under the root directory of the HOMEWORK
disk.
E-b
With the root directory as the default directory, create two subdirectories
under the PHONE directory called BUSINESS and PERSONAL.
____
15. The command you used to create PERSONAL was:
a. MD PERSONAL
b. MD \PERSONAL
c. MD PHONE\PERSONAL or MD \PHONE\PERSONAL
d. MD PERSONAL\PHONE or MD \PERSONAL\PHONE
E-c
Do a directory listing of the PHONE directory.
____
16. How many files and directories are listed?
a. 0 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
b. 0 File(s)
4 Dir(s)
c. 4 File(s)
4 Dir(s)
d. 2 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
E-d
Using the relative path, change the default directory to PHONE.
____
17. The command you used was:
a. CD PHONE
b. MD PHONE
c. RD PHONE
E-e
With PHONE as the current default directory, use the relative path to change
the default directory to BUSINESS.
____
18. The command you used was:
a. CD \PHONE
b. CD \BUSINESS
c. CD BUSINESS
d. RD BUSINESS
E-f
Use the subdirectory markers to move to the parent directory of BUSINESS.
____
19. The command you used was:
a. CD ..
b. CD \
c. MD ..
d. MD \
____
20. The parent of BUSINESS is:
a. PERSONAL
b. PHONE
c. the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk—the \
d. none of the above
E-g
Move to the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
____
21. The command you used was:
a. CD ROOT
b. CD \..
c. CD ..\
d. CD \
Problem F
F-a
With the root directory as the default directory, create a directory called
BOOKS under the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
____
22. Which of the following command(s) could you have used?
a. MD BOOKS
b. MD \BOOKS
c. either a or b
d. neither a nor b
F-b
With the root directory as the default directory, create two subdirectories
under the BOOKS directory called MYSTERY and LITERATURE.
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PROGRAM FILES, DATA FILES, AND SUBDIRECTORIES
____
23. Which of the following command(s) could you have used to create the
MYSTERY subdirectory?
a. MD BOOKS\MYSTERY
b. MD \BOOKS\LITERATURE\MYSTERY
c. either a or b
d. neither a nor b
F-c
With the root directory as the default directory and using the method learned
in this chapter, rename the LITERATURE directory to AM_LIT.
____
24. Which of the following command(s) could you have used to rename
LITERATURE?
a. MOVE \BOOKS \BOOKS\AM_LIT
b. MOVE LITERATURE MYSTERY
c. MOVE BOOKS\LITERATURE BOOKS\AM_LIT
d. either a or c
F-d
Use the RD command to remove the BOOKS directory in one step.
____
25. What parameter did you use?
a. /N
b. /O
c. /S
d. none
____
26. If you wanted to know what the current path was on your system, what
command would you use?
a. DIR
b. PATH
c. PATH /?
d. PATH ?/
Problem Set II—At the Computer
Problem A
A-a
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, create a
directory called CLASS.
1. Write the command(s) you used to create the directory.
A-b
Make CLASS the default directory.
2. Write the command(s) you used to change the default directory to CLASS.
A-c
Change the default directory to the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
A-d
With the root of the HOMEWORK disk as the default directory, using the
relative path, rename CLASS to ORDERS.
3. Write any message(s) that appeared on the screen.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
4. Write the command(s) you used to rename the directory.
A-e
Remove the directory called ORDERS.
5. Write the command(s) you used to remove the directory.
Problem B
B-a
Key in the following: A:\>PROMPT $T$P$G e
6. Look at the screen display and write the displayed prompt.
B-b
Key in the following: PROMPT e
7. Look at the screen display and write the displayed prompt.
Problem Set III—Brief Essay
1. A friend is watching you work at the command line. You key in the following:
C:\WINDOWS>CD \
C:\>A:
A:\>CD HOUSE\UTILS
A:\HOUSE\UTILS>DIR
A:\HOUSE\UTILS>DIR \HOMEWORK\PROBLEM
Your friend asks you how you know when and where to place the backslashes.
Explain to her how to determine the positioning of the backslashes and the
differences between the placements. Include a brief description of relative and
absolute paths.
2. Windows, and thus the command prompt, uses a hierarchical filing system.
Briefly describe this system and justify why it is used.
183
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter you will be able to:
1. Explain the purpose and function of internal
commands.
2. Explain the purpose and function of the
COPY command.
3. List the file-naming rules.
4. Explain the purpose and function of the
TYPE command.
5. Explain when and how to use wildcards with
the COPY command.
6. Explain the purpose and use of subdirectory
markers.
7. Identify the commands that can be used with
subdirectories.
8. Explain when and how files are overwritten.
9. Explain the function, purpose, and dangers of
concatenating files.
10. Explain setting up Command Line printing in
a network lab environment.
11. Compare and contrast printing files using the
TYPE and COPY commands.
Student Outcomes
1. Copy a file on the same disk using the COPY
command.
2. Use wildcards with the COPY command to
copy files on the same disk.
3. Display a text file using the TYPE command.
4. Use the COPY command to make additional
files on the same disk but in different
subdirectories.
5. Use wildcards with the COPY command to
copy files on the same disk to a different
subdirectory.
6. Use the COPY and DIR commands with
subdirectories.
7. Use subdirectory markers with commands.
8. Overwrite a file using the COPY command.
9. Combine the contents of two or more files
using the COPY command.
10. Explain setting up Command Line printing in
some networked lab environments.
11. Print files.
Chapter Overview
In this chapter you will review the Windows
operating system rules used to create unique
names for files and learn some essential internal
commands that will help you manage and
manipulate your files. You will learn about the
COPY command, which allows you to make
additional copies of files and to back up files by
copying them to another disk or directory. You
will learn the consequences of overwriting files
and of combining the contents of files. You will
copy dummy files that are in the WUGXP directory to your DATA disk so that you can have
experience in naming, managing, manipulating,
viewing, and printing files.
184
5.1
5.1
WHY LEARN COMMAND LINE COMMANDS?
Why Learn Command Line Commands?
In the last chapter, you learned how to manipulate subdirectories. You learned MD,
CD, and RD, which are directory management commands that handle
subdirectories. However, directories are places to hold files. With the directory
management commands, you have built the bookshelves, but you have not as yet
put any books on them. If shelves are directories, books are files. In a library, you are
interested in locating, reading, and using books, not admiring the shelves. In the
same way, on your computer, you are interested in locating, reading, and using files,
not admiring the directories you created.
You will have many files and directories on a disk. The directories will be used to
organize both your program and data files. Directories are the largest units of
information management, but you need to manage information in smaller quantities—at the file level. You will generate many data files with your programs. You
will need a way to perform “housekeeping tasks” such as copying files from one
directory or one disk to another and eliminating files you no longer need. These
tasks are different from creating or changing the data within the files. You must use
the application program that created a data file to change the data in that file.
For instance, if you are the accountant who created Ms. Woo’s tax return, you
know how to manage the information correctly in her tax return. You also have
other clients for whom you perform the same service. You, the accountant, are
analogous to an application program such as TurboTax. The data for Ms. Woo’s tax
return is in a data file created by TurboTax. The other clients such as Mr. Rodriguez
and Mr. Markiw need separate data files, also generated in TurboTax. Those data
files have to be named according to the rules of the operating system in which
TurboTax works. If your version of TurboTax was created for the Windows OS, you
will be able to use up to 255 characters in a file name, including blank spaces. If
your version was created for DOS 6.22 or older operating systems, you will be
limited to eight-character names with three-character extensions.
In addition to the accounting work, there are other tasks that must be performed.
For instance, Ms. Woo might get married and want her data file under her married
name. This does not require a change to the accounting data itself. You, as the
accountant, do not need to perform these low-level tasks. You hire a clerk to perform
them. In the computer world, you use the operating system to perform these tasks.
In Windows, you can use Windows Explorer and My Computer to manage your
files. You can drag files from one place to another, cut and paste them, rename them,
and delete them with the click of a mouse button. Using the command line will help
you understand file manipulation as well as disk and subdirectory structure. You
will also learn that there are some tasks that you can accomplish more easily and
quickly at the command line than in the GUI. For instance, in the GUI, in order to
copy a file and give it a new name, you must take two steps—first copy the file,
second rename it. At the command line, you can accomplish this task with one step.
The COPY command allows you to change the name of the destination file as it is
copied.
In addition, several major internal commands will help manage your files on
disks and in directories. These file-management commands include DIR, COPY,
REN, DEL, and TYPE. These commands are internal, meaning that once you have
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CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
booted the system and opened a Command line session, they are always available
to use. They are contained within the file CMD.EXE, which is in the
WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory; they are not separate files. These commands
deal only with files as objects; you are not working with the contents of files, just
manipulating the files. The commands allow you to see what files you have on a
disk or in a directory (DIR), copy files from here to there (COPY), change their
names (REN), throw files away (DEL), and take a quick peek at what is inside a file
(TYPE). The following activities in this chapter will show you how to use the COPY
and TYPE commands.
5.2
The COPY Command
COPY, one of the most frequently used internal commands, is used to copy files
from one place to another. COPY does exactly what it says—it takes an original
source file, makes an identical copy of that file, and places the copy where you want
it: its destination. In a sense, it is similar to a photocopy machine. You place your
original on the copy plate, press the appropriate button, and receive a copy of your
document. Nothing has happened to your original document. If it has a smudge on
it, so does your copy. The same is true with the COPY command—it makes an exact
copy of the file, and the original file remains intact. Copying a file does not alter the
original file in any way.
Why might you want to copy files? You might want to copy a file from one disk
to another. For example, you might create an inventory of all your household goods
for your homeowner’s insurance policy. It would be stored as a file on your disk. If
your home burned down, so would your disk with your inventory file. It makes
sense to copy this file to another disk and store it somewhere else, perhaps in a safedeposit box.
You might want to make a second copy of an existing file on the same disk. Why
would you want to do this? If you are going to be making changes to a data file with
the program that created it, you might like a copy of the original just in case you do
not like the changes you make. You cannot have two files with the same name in the
same directory, but you can have them in different directories.
You might want to copy a file to a device. One of the most common devices is the
printer. You can use the COPY command to copy a file to the printer to get a hard
copy, but the file must be an ASCII file, a special kind of text file that contains no
codes such as bold or italic—just keyed in characters.
You have used the BOG program and the MATCH32 program. You might wish to
make another copy of those program files in case something happens to the original,
presuming you are the legal owner. Those programs also had data files with information in them. You might like to have another copy, a backup copy of the various
data files, so that if anything goes wrong, you still have a copy to work with.
COPY has a very specific syntax. Its basic syntax is always:
COPY [parameters][drive:][path]filename [drive:][path]filename
[parameters]
or conceptually:
COPY source destination
5.3
REVIEW OF FILE-NAMING RULES
COPY is the command or the work you want the system to do. The source is what
you want copied, your original. The destination is where you want it copied to. The
command, the source, and the destination are separated by spaces. In the formal
syntax, the variables are as follows: [drive:] stands for the drive letter where the file
is located; [path] is the subdirectory where the file is located; and filename is the
name of the file you wish to copy. The file name is made up of two parts: the file
name and the file extension. If a file has an extension, it is separated from the file
name by the period or dot at the command line. If you are using a version of the
operating system prior to Windows 95, when you key in a file name, you must have
no spaces between the file name and the file extension. In Windows, if you wish to
use a long file name that includes spaces, you must enclose the entire name in
quotes. All three portions of the command—COPY, source, and destination—are
mandatory. Drive and path do not need to be specified if you are using the default
drive and subdirectory.
You use file-management commands to manage files. When you are learning
how to use these commands, you do not want to worry about harming “real”
programs or “real” data files. The WUGXP subdirectory, therefore, contains practice
data files and program files. In the following activities, you will write data to your
DATA disk only. You will never write to the hard disk. In this way you can enjoy the
next activities and not worry about making mistakes. Mistakes are part of the
learning process.
5.3
Review of File-naming Rules
To name any file, whether it is an application or a data file, you must follow the
operating system file-naming rules. A file name is technically called a file specification. The file specification is comprised of two parts: the file name itself and the file
extension. The file-naming rules are:
1. The names of files in a directory must be unique.
2. No file name can be longer than 256 characters, including the file extension.
3. File extensions are optional.
4. A file name must be separated from its extension with a period, called a dot.
5. All alphanumeric characters can be used in file names and file extensions except
the following nine illegal or forbidden characters:
" / \ : ¦ < > * ?
You cannot alter the rules. Usually, you will not get an opportunity to name
program files. You purchase these programs, and the file names are those that were
assigned by a programmer. Remember, a program file commonly has the file
extension of .COM, .EXE, or .BAT. However, you will be naming your data files all
the time. You name a data file from within the application program, usually when
you save it to a disk.
You should apply some common sense when you are naming files. For instance,
naming a file ABCDEF.GHI does not tell you much about the contents of the file, but
a file named TAXES99.XLS does give you a clear idea of what is in the data file. File
names should reflect file contents. However, you must know how your application
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program works. Most application programs let you assign the file name, but not the
file extension. The programs themselves usually assign the extension to data files.
5.4
Activity: Making Copies of Files
Note 1: The DATA disk is in Drive A. Be sure it is the DATA disk and not the
HOMEWORK disk.
Note 2: You have opened a Command Prompt window, and changed (if necessary)
the default directory to the root of the hard drive so that C:\ > is displayed
as the default drive and the default directory. Remember to check your
Configuration Table in Chapter 1.6 if your system configuration varies
from the textbook.
Note 3: It is assumed that the WUGXP directory with its files has been installed on
the hard disk. If it has not, refer to Appendix A for instructions on how to
install it at home or see your lab administrator.
Note 4: When keying in commands, you may use the editing keys to correct
typographical errors and to recall previously used commands. Refer to
Chapter 2 for details.
1
Key in the following: C:\>CD WUGXP e
2
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR *.TMP e
C:\>CD WUGXP
C:\WUGXP>DIR *.TMP
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
07:41 AM
02:47 PM
11:33 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
9 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUPITER.TMP
406 MERCURY.TMP
190 JUP.TMP
86 BONJOUR.TMP
152 GALAXY.TMP
406 MER.TMP
148 AST.TMP
148 ASTRO.TMP
478 VEN.TMP
2,204 bytes
7,495,450,624 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
You changed the default directory to WUGXP. You then used the
DIR command to see what files had a .TMP file extension in this directory. If your
file system is NTFS, your files will be displayed in alphabetic order. You want to
make a copy of the file called JUP.TMP and place it on the DATA disk. You are going
to use the absolute path for both the source file and the destination file.
3
Key in the following:
C:\WUGXP>COPY C:\WUGXP\JUP.TMP A:\JUP.TMP e
5.4
ACTIVITY: MAKING COPIES OF FILES
C:\WUGXP>COPY C:\WUGXP\JUP.TMP A:\JUP.TMP
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP> _
You see a message on the screen telling you that the file was
copied. If you look at your command, following the syntax diagram, COPY is the
command and JUP.TMP is the source file or what you want to copy. It is located in
the subdirectory called WUGXP, which is under the root directory of the hard disk.
C: was substituted for [drive:]. The subdirectory name \WUGXP was substituted for
[path] (remembering that \ indicates the root directory). The next \ is a delimiter
separating the subdirectory name from the file name. The second backslash (\) is
only a separator. JUP.TMP was substituted for filename. A . (dot), not a space,
separates the file name from the file extension.
The destination file also followed the syntax diagram. A: was substituted for
[drive:]; \ was substituted for [path]; JUP.TMP was substituted for filename. Each file
followed the file-naming rules; each is a unique name with no illegal characters.
Each file extension has no illegal characters. You used a period to separate the file
name from the file extension. The period is not part of the file specification. It is a
delimiter telling the operating system that you are done with the file name; get
ready for the file extension. Thus, JUP is the source file name and .TMP is the source
file extension. JUP is the destination file name, and .TMP is the destination file
extension.
4
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A: e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
07:41 AM
190 JUP.TMP
1 File(s)
190 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,455,104 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
You used the DIR command to confirm that you copied JUP.TMP
to the DATA disk. You have one file and one subdirectory in the root directory of the
DATA disk. In step 3, you used the absolute path name. You can save yourself a lot
of time by using relative path names.
5
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY MER.TMP A: e
6
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY AST.TMP A: e
7
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY VEN.TMP A: e
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CHAPTER 5
8
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A: e
C:\WUGXP>COPY MER.TMP A:
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>COPY AST.TMP A:
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>COPY VEN.TMP A:
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
07:41 AM
190 JUP.TMP
01:08 PM
406 MER.TMP
01:46 PM
148 AST.TMP
07:08 PM
478 VEN.TMP
4 File(s)
1,222 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,453,568 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
You executed several COPY commands and used DIR to confirm
that you copied the files. You copied the file called MER.TMP to the root directory
of the DATA disk, but you did not need to key in all the information. Since the
default drive and directory are already C:\WUGXP, the command will always look
in the default drive and directory and no place else, unless you tell it otherwise.
Since the destination you wanted the file copied to was the DATA disk, which in this
case is Drive A, you had to key in the drive letter followed by a colon. The colon lets
the operating system know the destination is a drive. If you just keyed in A, the
COPY command would think that you wanted to name the file A. You did not give
the destination file a name, because if you do not supply a file name, the COPY
command will use the source file name as the destination file name. In this case the
source file name was MER.TMP, and that is what the copy of the file on the DATA
disk is called. You then proceeded to perform the same task with AST.TMP and
VEN.TMP. Next, you will give the destination file a different name and override the
defaults. Remember, in Windows Explorer or My Computer, you can copy files, but
you cannot give them a new name when you copy them. Hence, you must copy the
files, then rename each one. At the command line, you can copy and give the files a
new name in one command. This is one of the reasons users like the command line.
9
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY AST.TMP A:\ASTROLGY.FIL e
10 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A: e
5.5
USING LONG FILE NAMES
C:\WUGXP>COPY AST.TMP A:\ASTROLGY.FIL
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
07:41 AM
190 JUP.TMP
01:08 PM
406 MER.TMP
01:46 PM
148 AST.TMP
07:08 PM
478 VEN.TMP
01:46 PM
148 ASTROLGY.FIL
5 File(s)
1,370 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,453,248 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
You executed the COPY command and used DIR to confirm that
you copied the file. Following the syntax diagram, COPY is the command.
AST.TMP is the source file or what you want to copy. ASTROLGY.FIL is the new
destination file name. The destination file name followed the file-naming rules; it is
a unique name with no illegal characters. You used a period to separate the file
name from the file extension. The period is a delimiter, not part of the file specification. You did not need to use the drive letter or path name (subdirectory name) in
the source file, but you did need to specify the drive letter in the destination. The
default drive and subdirectory are always assumed unless you specify otherwise. In
this case, you overrode the defaults by telling the COPY command to call the
destination file on the DATA disk ASTROLGY.FIL.
5.5
Using Long File Names
You may consider using long files names (LFNs) with files on floppy disks, but only
when really necessary. On a 1.44-MB floppy disk, the directory entry table has room
for only 224 file names. Floppy disks use the old FAT filing system. In reality, you
can rarely save more than 212 actual files or subdirectory names on the root of a
floppy disk. Floppy disks were “designed” to hold files that complied with the old
eight-dot-three naming convention based on the FAT. Even if the files are very small
(without much data in them) and there is still ample room in the data sectors on the
diskette for information, once the directory entry table is filled, you can no longer
place more files on the disk, even though there is room. Once the root directory table
is full, as far as the operating system is concerned, the disk is full regardless of how
much actual space remains on the disk.
For example, assume you saved two files to the root of a floppy disk. One file is
named FIRST.FIL, and the second is named TWENTY.FIL. If you saved the same
files to another floppy disk, but with the names FIRST.FIL and TWENTYFIRST.FIL,
the amount of space taken up by the actual data files would be the same. However,
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INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
there would be a difference in the root directory table entries. Compare the two
directory entry tables in Figure 5.1.
Disk 1 Directory Table
Disk 2 Directory Table
FIRST.FIL
TWENTY.FIL
FIRST.FIL
TWENTYF
IRST.FIL
Figure 5.1—Two Directory Entry Tables
Notice that on the second disk, the long file name took two entries in the directory
entry table. Disk 2 will “fill” faster than Disk 1, even though the amount of data is
identical! A file with 20 characters in its name can take the space of three eight-dotthree named files. Although it is possible to have files with up to 255 characters in
their names, you can see how quickly the root directory entry table of a floppy disk
could be filled, thus limiting your ability to save files to a disk.
When referring to files that contain spaces in their long file name at the command
line, you need to enclose the entire file specification in quotes. To see both the short
and long name in a directory listing, you need to use the /X parameter with DIR.
See Figure 5.2.
05/27/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
10:08 PM
12:15 AM
12:16 AM
81 LONGFI~1.TXT LONGFILENAME.TXT
97 LONGFI~2.TXT LONGFILENAMED.TXT
99 LONGFI~3.TXT LONGFILENAMING.TXT
Figure 5.2—Directory Listing Showing Short and Long File Names
Notice the second file listed. The file LONGFILENAME.TXT has an alias of
LONGFI~1.TXT. The digit is assigned by the operating system. The
LONGFILENAMED.TXT file is assigned the digit 2 following the tilde. The digit is
assigned by the operating system. The third file, LONGFILENAMING.TXT, in the
same directory, gets another digit, 3.
When dealing with long file names, it is helpful to have meaningful, unique
characters within the first six characters of the name to avoid this confusion when
using short file names.
5.6
Activity: Copying Files
with Long File Names
Note: The DATA disk is in Drive A. C:\WUGXP is displayed.
1
Key in the following:
C:\WUGXP>COPY "SANDY AND NICKI.TXT" A: e
C:\WUGXP>COPY "SANDY AND NICKI.TXT" A:
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>_
5.8
ACTIVITY: USING WILDCARDS WITH THE COPY COMMAND
You have successfully copied the file to the DATA disk.
2
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A: /X e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A: /X
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
11/16/2000
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRON~1
07:41 AM
190
01:08 PM
406
01:46 PM
148
07:08 PM
478
01:46 PM
148
12:00 PM
53 SANDYA~1.TXT
6 File(s)
1,423 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,452,544 bytes free
ASTRONOMY
JUP.TMP
MER.TMP
AST.TMP
VEN.TMP
ASTROLGY.FIL
Sandy and Nicki.txt
C:\WUGXP>_
Notice the display on the right contains the entire directory and
file names, ASTRONOMY and Sandy and Nicki.txt, whereas the display in the
center does not. The operating system has assigned the directory ASTRONOMY an
alias in the eight-dot-three file name format of ASTRON~1, and the file Sandy and
Nicki.txt the alias SANDYA~1.
5.7
Using Wildcards with
the COPY Command
In Chapter 2, you used global file specifications, or wildcards (* and ?), with the DIR
command so that you could display a group of files. You can also use wildcards to
copy files. In the previous activity you copied one file at a time. You then proceeded
to key in a command line for each file you copied. Since each of the files you wished
to copy had the same file extension, instead of keying in each source file and destination file, you could have used the wildcards to key in the command line and
reduced three commands to one. You can also use wildcards when changing the
destination name.
5.8
Activity: Using Wildcards
with the COPY Command
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. C:\WUGXP> is displayed.
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY *.TMP A:*.NEW e
193
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CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
C:\WUGXP>COPY *.TMP A:*.NEW
JUPITER.TMP
MERCURY.TMP
JUP.TMP
BONJOUR.TMP
GALAXY.TMP
MER.TMP
AST.TMP
ASTRO.TMP
VEN.TMP
9 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>_
As each file is copied, it is displayed on the screen. Your command
line instructed the operating system to copy any file in the WUGXP subdirectory
that has the file extension .TMP, regardless of its file name, to a new set of files that
will have the same file name but a different extension, .NEW. The * represented any
file name. The operating system knew that you were referring to file extensions
because you preceded the file extension with the delimiter, the period. These files
will be copied to the DATA disk.
You could have keyed in the absolute path name,
COPY C:\WUGXP\*.TMP A:\*.NEW
but once again, it is unnecessary to specify the source drive (default drive) and
source subdirectory (default directory). Since you did not tell it otherwise, the COPY
command assumed the default drive and subdirectory for the source. You needed to
key in the destination drive and the destination file extension since you were not
using the default values.
2
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:*.NEW e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:*.NEW
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
C:\WUGXP_
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
07:41 AM
02:47 PM
11:33 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
9 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUPITER.NEW
406 MERCURY.NEW
190 JUP.NEW
86 BONJOUR.NEW
152 GALAXY.NEW
406 MER.NEW
148 AST.NEW
148 ASTRO.NEW
478 VEN.NEW
2,204 bytes
1,447,936 bytes free
5.9
THE TYPE COMMAND
You keyed in the command DIR A:*.NEW. You used the wildcards
to display the .NEW files, instead of displaying the entire directory. You also used
the wildcard * to make copies of the .TMP files. The file names are identical, but the
extensions are different. You successfully copied nine files with the extension .TMP
to nine new files with the extension .NEW from the hard disk to the DATA disk.
However, the directory display merely shows that the files are there. How can you
tell if the contents of the files are the same? You will also see a difference in the order
of the display. If you are using NTFS as your file system, copy will copy the files in
alphabetic order to the disk you are copying to. The files are the same. It is simply
the order that is different. You can use the TYPE command.
5.9
The TYPE Command
The DIR command allowed you to determine that, indeed, there are files with the
.TMP and .NEW extensions on the DATA disk. Using the DIR command is like
opening your file drawer (the disk) and looking at the labels on the files. DIR does
not show you what is in the files. An internal command called TYPE opens a file
and displays the contents of the file on the screen. However, although the TYPE
command will display the contents of any file on the screen, a file must be an ASCII
file for the data to be meaningful. The TYPE command displays the file on the
screen without stopping (scrolling). If the file is longer than one full screen, you can
stop the scrolling using the MORE filter (which will be explained fully in a later
chapter.) The syntax for the TYPE command is:
TYPE [drive:][path]filename
To stop the scrolling when using TYPE with a long file, add:
TYPE [drive:][path] filename ¦ more
TYPE is the command (the work) you want the system to perform. The brackets, [
and ], indicate that what is between the brackets is optional. You do not key in the
brackets, only what is inside them. [drive:] represents the drive letter. You must
substitute the drive letter where the file is located (A:, B:, or C:). Another name for
the drive letter is the “designated disk drive.” This letter tells the command on
which disk drive to look for the information. [path] is the name of the subdirectory
where the file is located. You do not key in “path.” You substitute the name of the
path or subdirectory name, as in \WINDOWS \SYSTEM32 or \PHONE. The file
name is mandatory. If the file has an extension, it must be included as part of the file
name. You do not key in “filename” but substitute the actual name of the file.
Filename is the parameter that the TYPE command expects. In addition, the file must
be a text file to be readable. The TYPE command will not display the contents of a
document file created with a word-processing program such as WordPerfect or Word.
It is interesting to note that although the TYPE command works in the same
manner in Windows XP Professional as it did in Windows 2000 Professional, it
behaves quite differently than it did in versions of the operating system previous
Windows 2000 Professional. In previous versions, you could not use multiple files
with TYPE, nor could you use wildcards. Both of these options came available with
Windows 2000 Professional.
195
196
CHAPTER 5
5.10
Activity: Displaying Files
Using the TYPE Command
Note:
1
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
The DATA disk is in Drive A. C:\WUGXP> is displayed.
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TYPE e
C:\WUGXP>TYPE
The syntax of the command is incorrect.
C:\WUGXP>_
The message displayed on the screen tells you that TYPE does not
know what to do. The operating system is asking you, “TYPE or display what?”
Since you did not give a file name, as the syntax mandates, the TYPE command
cannot show the contents of a file.
2
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TYPE GAMES\MLINK\MLOTRA.EXE e
C:\WUGXP>TYPE GAMES\MLINK\MLOTRA.EXE
MZ ] -?¦ ???«-¶ @ °) ?
¤
?
+
9
G
U
¦
¦
?? .? A? T? ¦?
î? ƒ? +?
µ? ÷? ?? §? $? 3? B? Q? _? m? ¦? ï? Ü? ¬? +? ¦? ¦? =? ??
+? 9? I?
z? ê? P? ¦? -? +? Ù¦ ²¦ >¦ #¦ 0¦ {¦ ç? ¡? +? ð¦ -¦ ^¦ ê? É?
¦? -? +?
-¦ æ ·¦
+ ¦ ¦
- 2 8 a ü ù á + + ·
*
~
&
I
\
+
±
?? ,? ?? I? S? ]? g? q? {? Ç? +? ?? Ö? ¦? +? =? ?
C:\WUGXP>_
Your display may be slightly different, depending on your system.
What you see on screen is, indeed, the contents of a file named MLOTRA.EXE in
the GAMES\MLINK subdirectory. This program or executable code is in machine
language and not meaningful to you in this format. However, the TYPE command
will display the contents of any file, even if it looks like nonsense characters to you.
Using the TYPE command on an executable file has no value, as the results are not
meaningful.
Programs or executable code files are recognized by their file extensions, such as
.COM, .EXE, or .SYS, as well as those extensions listed in Chapter 4. COM stands
for command file. EXE stands for executable code. SYS stands for system file. There
are also other support files that programs need such as those files that have the .DLL
(dynamic link library) extension. These types of files are not text files and not
readable using the TYPE command. However, the TYPE command will do whatever
you ask, even if it means displaying nonsense. Remember, a file must be a text file to
be readable.
5.10
ACTIVITY: DISPLAYING FILES USING THE TYPE COMMAND
197
Another name for a text file is an ASCII (pronounced “ask-ee”) file. ASCII is an
acronym for American Standard Code for Information Interchange. ASCII is a code
that translates the bits of information into readable letters. All you need to remember is that an ASCII file is a readable text file. Another name for an ASCII file is an
unformatted text file. ASCII files are in a common language that almost all programs can recognize.
The data files that programs use or generate are usually not readable either. Each
program has a special way of reading and writing the information in a data file so
that the program knows what to do with the data. Usually, no other program can
read the data file except the program that generated it. It would be like wanting to
write a letter in Japanese if you didn’t speak, read, or write Japanese. You would
hire a translator (the program). He would write the letter (the data file). You still
could not read the letter. You would give it to the translator to know what is in the
letter. Furthermore, if you had another translator—say a French translator (another
program)—you could not give your Japanese letter (data file) to the French translator. She would not be able to read it either.
3
Key in the following:
C:\WUGXP>TYPE GAMES\MATCH32\TUNE1.MID e
C:\WUGXP>TYPE GAMES\MATCH32\TUNE1.MID
MThd
¦ O ¦OáMTrk
, ¦¦ A O¦Seq-1 T¦‘
X¦¦ Q¦b¡ / MTrk ¦[ Od#7
Harpsichord [P+??¦dÄyÉ(B?¦@ üpÉ47?¦@¦ümÉ;@üpÉ<>¶Ç;@ü\ÉA>üZÇ<@¶É;üoÉ<@)Ç;@üJÉ9@(Ç(@¶Ç4@:ÇA@pÉ(@üp¦@ É
47?Ç9@zÇ<@X¦@¦ É;?ürÉ<>üpÉA>¶Ç;@üYÉ;7§Ç<@ü\É<?>Ç;@ü2É9<(Ç(@PÇA@¶Ç4@f¦@
É(@üHÇ9@?Ç<@?¦@¦ É
Ç<@üaÉ<9#Ç;@üHÉ98<Ç(@(Ç4@ü¤É(@?¦@ ükÉ4??¦@¦?Ç9@?Ç@@(Ç<@ü?É;CüpÉ<<üpÇ;@?¦@
?É@@üi¦@¦?É;9¤Ç<
@ü^É<:&Ç;@üJÉ98(Ç@@ Ç(@¶Ç4@ü4É(>?¦@ üiÉ45?¦@¦#Ç9@*Ç<@ü É;DüpÉ<9?¦@ ümÇ;@
É?4?¦@¦ükÇ<@?É;7ü
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+?ünÉ7>?¦@¦&Ç<@ü?ÇE@<É>G%Ç@@üKÉ@>üpÇ>@ ÉEBüpÉ>B?Ç@@ü\É@>(Ç>@ü?Ç7@(Ç+@?É<>üp¦@
É)Büp¦@¦ É5
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/ MTrk
á O0#104
Star Theme ¦[P¤g?¦xܧæL<ç7æTüL@ç6æS>?üT@ÄjæJ<(üS@ç?æS?¤üJ@ç,üS@?æQ=ÄeüQ@?æH9ç>üH@ æQ7çBüQ
üM@ç.üL@?æH:û;üH@?æG9ÄxüG@?æJ@ÄiüJ@?æM@ç,üM@?æLBĦæJ@(üL@ç?æH<%üJ@åsüH@&æQ7ÆaæP"üQ@îjüP@
/
C:\WUGXP>_
198
CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
You are looking at a music file for the MATCH32.EXE program.
This is a file is formatted so that it can be read and used by the MATCH32 game.
This program has its data in a somewhat recognizable form, in that you can at least
read some of it. There is a Seq1, which you may assume means Sequence 1, and the
word Harpsichord suggests that this file sounds like a Harpsichord, but that is
about the extent of the information you can derive from the file.
Format, in this case, does not mean format as in format a disk but format in the
sense of how the data is arranged. Only the program MATCH32.EXE knows how to
use this data.
TYPE can sometimes be useful with files like these because it may give you an
idea of what the file actually holds. Nearly all the files in the WUGXP directory are
ASCII files, which means that you can read them using the TYPE command.
4
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TYPE JUP.TMP e
C:\WUGXP>TYPE JUP.TMP
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
C:\WUGXP>_
In this case, the above is a text file (ASCII file), so you can read it.
Using the TYPE command, you “opened” your file, JUP.TMP, and saw the contents
displayed on the screen. Whenever a file is readable on the screen, as this one is, you
know it is an ASCII file. You did not need to include the drive or path since
JUP.TMP was on the hard disk in the WUGXP subdirectory and the TYPE command used the default values. You copied this file to the DATA disk in Activity 5.4.
Is the content of the file the same on the DATA disk as it is in the WUGXP
subdirectory? If it is, you will know that the COPY command makes no changes to
any information in a file when it copies it.
5
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TYPE A:JUP.TMP e
C:\WUGXP>TYPE A:JUP.TMP
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
C:\WUGXP>_
5.12
ACTIVITY: USING THE COPY AND TYPE COMMANDS
The contents of the two files are the same. Copying the file from
one disk to another had no impact on the contents. This is also true no matter what
type of file you copy. But you would still need to include the drive designator A: in
front of the file name JUP.TMP because that told the operating system which disk
drive to select. Had you not included the drive designator, the operating system
would have looked for the file JUP.TMP on the default hard disk and in the default
subdirectory \WUGXP. After the TYPE command has executed, you are returned to
the system prompt, ready for the next command.
6
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>CD \ e
C:\WUGXP>CD \
C:\>_
You have returned to the root directory of the hard disk.
5.11
Dummy Files
You are going to use some dummy files. “Dummy” refers to the fact that these files
have no particular meaning and are of no importance. You can use these files to
practice file-management commands without worrying about harming your “real”
program and data files. The concept of dummy files and/or dummy data is common in data processing. Often data-processing professionals wish to test different
portions of systems or programs. For instance, if you were writing a program about
employee benefits, rather than looking at every employee, you would create
dummy files and data in order to have a smaller representative sample that is
manageable and easily tested. Not only are the files smaller, they are samples. If the
data gets harmed in any way, it has no impact on the “real” data.
The following activities allow you to do the same. Following the instructions, you
will use the COPY command to make copies of different files either on the DATA
disk or from the WUGXP subdirectory to the DATA disk. You will then display the
contents of the file on the screen with the TYPE command.
5.12
Activity: Using the COPY
and TYPE Commands
Note 1:
Note 2:
1
C:\> is displayed and the DATA disk is in Drive A.
Remember that if your DATA disk is in a drive other than A, you will have
to substitute the proper drive letter. Check your Configuration Table in
Chapter 1.6 for the appropriate substitutions.
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
199
200
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INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
C:\>A:
A:\>_
You changed the default drive so that all activities will automatically occur or default to the DATA disk.
2
Key in the following: A:\>COPY JUP.TMP JUP.OLD e
A:\>COPY JUP.TMP JUP.OLD
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You keyed in the command and its required parameters to accomplish the work you wanted done. You did not need to specify the drive letter or the
path name preceding either the source file or the destination file name. Because you
did not, the COPY command automatically read JUP.TMP from and wrote JUP.OLD
to the default drive and directory, which is the root directory of the DATA disk.
3
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUP.TMP JUP.OLD e
A:\>TYPE JUP.TMP JUP.OLD
JUP.TMP
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
JUP.OLD
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>_
You can see that you made a copy of the JUP.TMP file to a new file
called JUP.OLD, but the contents of the files are identical. Also, rather than keying
in the TYPE command twice, TYPE allows you use more than one parameter.
5.12
4
ACTIVITY: USING THE COPY AND TYPE COMMANDS
Key in the following: A:\>COPY AST.TMP AST.TMP e
A:\>COPY AST.TMP AST.TMP
The file cannot be copied onto itself.
0 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You must give new files on the same disk and in the same
subdirectory unique names. Just as you should not label two file folders the same in
a file drawer, you would not label two disk files with the same names.
5
Key in the following: A:\>COPY AST.TMP ASTROLGY.TXT e
A:\>COPY AST.TMP ASTROLGY.TXT
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
Here you are making a copy of the contents of the file on the
DATA disk called AST.TMP, copying the contents to the DATA disk, and calling this
new file ASTROLGY.TXT. You could have used the absolute path and file name by
keying in COPY A:\AST.TMP A:\ASTROLGY.TXT. Either is correct, but it is not
necessary to specify the disk drive since the default drive is assumed. Nor is it
necessary to specify the path or directory because the root directory (\) is the
default directory.
6
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE ASTROLGY.TXT AST.TMP e
A:\>TYPE ASTROLGY.TXT AST.TMP
ASTROLGY.TXT
The study of Astronomy came from Astrology.
Most scientists no longer believe in
Astrology. The science of Astronomy is
changing every day.
AST.TMP
The study of Astronomy came from Astrology.
Most scientists no longer believe in
Astrology. The science of Astronomy is
changing every day.
A:\>_
201
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INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
The contents of each file are identical even though the file names
are different. The COPY command does nothing to the original; the contents of the
original file remain the same. As far as the system is concerned, what makes a file
different is its unique file name. To the operating system, AST.TMP and
ASTROLGY.TXT are unique, separate files.
7
Key in the following: A:\>COPY JUP.TMP JUPITER.TXT e
8
Key in the following: A:\>COPY MER.TMP MERCURY.TXT e
9
Key in the following: A:\>COPY VEN.TMP VENUS.TXT e
A:\>COPY JUP.TMP JUPITER.TXT
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>COPY MER.TMP MERCURY.TXT
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>COPY VEN.TMP VENUS.TXT
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
10 Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TMP *.TXT e
A:\>DIR *.TMP *.TXT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41
01:08
01:46
07:08
AM
PM
PM
PM
190
406
148
478
JUP.TMP
MER.TMP
AST.TMP
VEN.TMP
Directory of A:\
11/16/2000
10/30/2001
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12:00 PM
01:46 PM
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
07:08 PM
9 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
148 ASTROLGY.TXT
190 JUPITER.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
2,497 bytes
1,445,376 bytes free
A:\>_
You had four files with the extension .TMP. You still have those
files, but, in addition, you now have four more files you just “created” with the copy
command that have the extension .TXT.
5.14
5.13
ACTIVITY: USING THE COPY COMMAND
Making Additional Files
on the Same Disk
You often want to have extra copies of files on the same disk but in a different
subdirectory. You may want to keep your backup files in the same file cabinet (disk)
but in a different drawer (subdirectory). In this way you can group similar files
together. When you make a copy of a file on the same disk, in a different
subdirectory, it may have the same file name. Every file on a disk must have a
unique name. However, a copy of a file in a different subdirectory, even though the
file name is the same, has a different path name and is therefore unique.
You sometimes want to have extra copies of the same files on the same disk.
Often, you may wish to make copies of files created when you use other software
application packages. You choose to make copies because you want to leave your
original files intact. For instance, if you created an extensive client list with a database-management package and needed to update it, rather than working on the
original file, you could re-key in the entire client list. If you made a mistake, you
would still have your original list.
However, an easier method would be to copy the client list, stored as a file, to a
new file with a new name and make changes to the new file. When you make a copy
of a file on the same disk in the same subdirectory, you must give it a different
name. Every file name in a directory must be unique.
5.14
Activity: Using the COPY Command
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>MD \CLASS e
A:\>MD \CLASS
A:\>_
You created a subdirectory called CLASS on the DATA disk.
Remember, MD, which means “make directory,” is the command to create a place
for additional files. The first backslash (\) is the name of the root directory. CLASS
is the name of the subdirectory. The only reserved name for a directory is \. You
may use any name for the subdirectory you create, provided that you follow the filenaming rules.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR e
A:\>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
02/25/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
ASTRONOMY
203
204
CHAPTER 5
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
11/16/2000
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/30/2001
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
03/15/2002
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
07:41 AM
190 JUP.TMP
01:08 PM
406 MER.TMP
01:46 PM
148 AST.TMP
07:08 PM
478 VEN.TMP
01:46 PM
148 ASTROLGY.FIL
12:00 PM
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
07:41 AM
190 JUPITER.NEW
01:08 PM
406 MERCURY.NEW
07:41 AM
190 JUP.NEW
02:47 PM
86 BONJOUR.NEW
11:33 AM
152 GALAXY.NEW
01:08 PM
406 MER.NEW
01:46 PM
148 AST.NEW
01:46 PM
148 ASTRO.NEW
07:08 PM
478 VEN.NEW
07:41 AM
190 JUP.OLD
01:46 PM
148 ASTROLGY.TXT
07:41 AM
190 JUPITER.TXT
01:08 PM
406 MERCURY.TXT
07:08 PM
478 VENUS.TXT
01:38 PM
<DIR>
CLASS
20 File(s)
5,039 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,444,854 bytes free
A:\>
The directory display shows the subdirectory called CLASS. You
know it is a subdirectory because it has <DIR> by the file name. To see what is
inside that subdirectory, or “file cabinet,” you must use DIR with the path name. A
review of the syntax is:
DIR [drive:][path][filename]
You do not need to include the drive letter since the default drive is where the
DATA disk is. Nor do you need to include \ for the root directory, since the root
directory of the DATA disk is the default. You do need to include the path name. The
path name is the subdirectory name, CLASS.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR CLASS e
A:\>DIR CLASS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\CLASS
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
01:38 PM
<DIR>
.
01:38 PM
<DIR>
..
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,444,500 bytes free
A:\>_
This directory listing is not for the root directory. The display tells
you what you are looking at. The third line of the display reads Directory of
A:\CLASS, telling you that you are looking at the subdirectory called CLASS on
the DATA disk. There is nothing yet in this subdirectory. The . and the .. are created
5.14
ACTIVITY: USING THE COPY COMMAND
when you create a subdirectory. The . tells the operating system that this is a
subdirectory. The .. is a shorthand name for the directory above CLASS, in this case
the root directory (\). How do you copy a file into this subdirectory? You can always
use the absolute path. You do this by following the syntax of the COPY command:
COPY [drive:][path]filename [drive:][path]filename
4
Key in the following: A:\>COPY A:\JUP.TMP A:\CLASS\JUP.PAR e
A:\>COPY A:\JUP.TMP A:\CLASS\JUP.PAR
1 file(s) copied.
A:\> _
You copied the source file, JUP.TMP, from the root directory on the
DATA disk, to the destination, the subdirectory CLASS; you also gave the destination file a new name, JUP.PAR. By looking at the syntax diagram, you can follow
how you substituted the values you wanted:
COPY [drive:] [path] [filename] [drive:] [path]
COPY
A:
\
JUP.TMP
A:
\CLASS\
[file name]
JUP.PAR
In the destination syntax, what is the second backslash? The first backslash is the
name of the root directory. The second backslash is used as a delimiter between the
subdirectory name and the file name. This delimiter tells the operating system that
the subdirectory name is over and the file name is about to begin. Backslashes are
used as delimiters separating subdirectory and file names.
Keying in the absolute path is not as easy as using the relative path. With the
relative path, you don’t have to key in the default drive and directory. The system
will make these assumptions for you. You must include the command COPY. Since
the DATA disk is the default drive, you do not need to include the drive letter, and,
since the root directory is the default directory, you do not need to include the first
\. However, you do need to include the source file name.
The same is true with the destination file. You do not need to include the drive
letter or root directory, but you must include the path name and the new file name.
The shorthand way of copying is done in Step 5.
5
Key in the following: A:\>COPY MER.TMP CLASS\MER.PAR e
A:\>COPY MER.TMP CLASS\MER.PAR
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
In this case, you kept your typing to a minimum by using the
relative path, observing your default drive and directory and keying in only what
was necessary to execute the command.
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR CLASS e
205
206
CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
A:\>DIR CLASS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\CLASS
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
01:38 PM
<DIR>
.
01:38 PM
<DIR>
..
07:41 AM
190 JUP.PAR
01:08 PM
406 MER.PAR
2 File(s)
596 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,443,840 bytes free
A:\>_
You copied the files JUP.TMP and MER.TMP from the root
directory to the subdirectory CLASS on the DATA disk. You gave the copies new
names, JUP.PAR and MER.PAR. Are the files the same? You can use the TYPE
command to compare the contents visually, TYPE supports wildcards, but since the
files are in different directories, you must look at each file individually. Again, since
you want to look at the contents of two files in different subdirectories, you must
follow the TYPE syntax:
TYPE [drive:][path]filename[.ext]
7
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUP.TMP CLASS\JUP.PAR e
A:\>TYPE JUP.TMP CLASS\JUP.PAR
JUP.TMP
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
CLASS\JUP.PAR
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>_
The contents of the files are the same, even though they are in
different directories. The same is true for the MER files.
5.16
ACTIVITY: USING WILDCARDS WITH THE COPY COMMAND
8
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE MER.TMP e
9
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE CLASS\MER.PAR e
A:\>TYPE MER.TMP
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>TYPE CLASS\MER.PAR
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>_
The file contents are the same.
5.15
Using Wildcards with
the COPY Command
You can also use wildcards to copy files on the same drive to a different
subdirectory. Again, the important point to remember when using the command line
is that you can never violate syntax. It is always COPY source destination. Computers
and commands always do what you tell them to. Users sometimes think that the
“computer lost their files.” More often than not, files are misplaced because the user
gave an instruction that he or she thought meant one thing but, in reality, meant
something else. For instance, when the default drive and directory was A:\>, you
keyed in COPY THIS.FIL YOUR.FIL. You wanted YOUR.FIL to be copied to the root
of Drive C. Since you did not key that in (C:\YOUR.FIL), the default drive and
directory were used, and YOUR.FIL was copied to the default drive and directory
(A:\) instead of where you wanted it to go.
5.16
Note:
1
Activity: Using Wildcards
with the COPY Command
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.TMP CLASS\*.ABC e
207
208
CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
A:\>COPY *.TMP CLASS\*.ABC
JUP.TMP
MER.TMP
AST.TMP
VEN.TMP
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
As each file is copied, it is displayed on the screen. Your command
line says COPY any file on the DATA disk in the root directory (the default directory) that has the file extension .TMP, regardless of its file name, to a new set of files
that will have the same file name but a different extension, .ABC. These files were
copied to the subdirectory called CLASS on the DATA disk.
You could have keyed in COPY A:\*.TMP A:\CLASS\*.ABC. Once again, for
the source files (*.TMP), it is unnecessary to specify the designated drive and
directory. Since you did not tell it otherwise, the default drive and default directory
were assumed. However, for the destination you had to include the subdirectory
name, CLASS; otherwise, the files would have been copied to the default drive and
directory instead of to the subdirectory CLASS.
This is another area where using the command line is much quicker and easier
than using the GUI. In order to accomplish what you did with one command, you
would have had to take many more steps in Windows Explorer. You would have
had to select the files individually, drag them to their new location, and then rename
each file individually. You can see why users like the command line for certain tasks.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TMP e
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR CLASS\*.ABC e
A:\>DIR *.TMP
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.TMP
406 MER.TMP
148 AST.TMP
478 VEN.TMP
1,222 bytes
1,441,792 bytes free
A:\>DIR CLASS\*.ABC
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\CLASS
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41
01:08
01:46
07:08
AM
PM
PM
PM
190
406
148
478
JUP.ABC
MER.ABC
AST.ABC
VEN.ABC
5.17
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
USING COPY AND DIR WITH SUBDIRECTORIES
209
1,222 bytes
1,441,792 bytes free
A:\> _
You keyed in two commands, DIR *.TMP and DIR CLASS
\*.ABC, although you could have used one command. You used wildcards to
display the .ABC files in the subdirectory CLASS and the .TMP files in the root
directory. You also used the wildcard * to make copies of the .TMP files. The file
names are identical, but the extensions are different. The files were copied to the
subdirectory CLASS. However, the directory display merely shows that the files are
there. To see that the contents of the original files and copied files are the same, use
the TYPE command. Remember, you must specify the subdirectory where the .ABC
files are located.
4
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE MER.TMP e
5
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE CLASS\MER.ABC e
A:\>TYPE MER.TMP
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>TYPE CLASS\MER.ABC
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>_
The file contents are identical, even though the file names are
different and the files are in different directories.
5.17
Using COPY and DIR with Subdirectories
You are going to see how commands work with subdirectories by using the COPY
command to place files in the subdirectories and by using the DIR command to see
that the files were copied.
210
CHAPTER 5
5.18
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
Activity: Using COPY
with Subdirectories
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>CD ASTRONOMY\MERCURY e
2
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR e
A:\>CD ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
12:20 PM
<DIR>
.
12:20 PM
<DIR>
..
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,441,792 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You changed the default directory to the MERCURY directory,
which is under the ASTRONOMY directory under the root of the DATA disk. The
prompt should display A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY> as the default drive and
subdirectory. The prompt is quite lengthy because it shows you the default drive as
well as the default subdirectory. Remember: All activities will occur in the
subdirectory \ASTRONOMY\MERCURY, unless you specify another path. When
you keyed in DIR, it showed you the contents of only the current default directory.
The directory is empty of files but has the two subdirectory markers, dot and double
dot.
3
Key in the following:
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY \CLASS\JUP.PAR FINAL.RPT e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY \CLASS\JUP.PAR FINAL.RPT
1 file(s) copied.
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
The file called JUP.PAR in the subdirectory \CLASS was successfully copied to the subdirectory \ASTRONOMY\MERCURY, but is now called
FINAL.RPT. Spacing is very important when keying in commands.
Command
COPY
Space
Source (no spaces)
\CLASS\JUP.PAR
Space
Destination (no spaces)
FINAL.RPT
The syntax of the COPY command remained the same—COPY source destination.
First, you issued the COPY command, but it was not enough to list just the file name
5.18
ACTIVITY: USING COPY WITH SUBDIRECTORIES
JUP.PAR as the source. You had to include the path so that the operating system
would know in which subdirectory the file was located; hence, the source was
\CLASS\JUP.PAR. Users often get confused when using \. Here is a simple rule:
The first \ in any command line always means the root directory. Any other \ in the
command is simply a delimiter.
Thus, in the example, the first \ tells the operating system to go to the root and
then go down to CLASS. The second \ is the delimiter between the subdirectory
name and the file name, JUP.PAR. The destination is a file called FINAL.RPT. You
did not have to key in the path for the destination because the default
(\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY) was assumed. Remember, you can always key in the
command using the absolute path. In this instance, the command would have read
as follows:
COPY A:\CLASS\JUP.PAR A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY\FINAL.RPT
Next, you are going to make a copy of the file in the current directory, so you do
not need to include the absolute path name; here, you can use the relative path
name.
4
Key in the following:
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY FINAL.RPT NOTE2.TMP e
5
Key in the following:
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY FINAL.RPT NOTE3.TMP e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY FINAL.RPT NOTE2.TMP
1 file(s) copied.
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY FINAL.RPT NOTE3.TMP
1 file(s) copied.
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You copied two files. You did not have to include the absolute
path name because the default path was assumed. You used the relative path name.
The operating system always assumes the default drive and directory, unless you
tell it otherwise. Technically, the commands looked like this:
COPY A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY\FINAL.RPT A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY\NOTE2.TMP
COPY A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY\FINAL.RPT A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY\NOTE3.TMP
You can see that using the relative path eliminates a lot of keystrokes.
6
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
12:20 PM
12:20 PM
07:41 AM
<DIR>
<DIR>
.
..
190 FINAL.RPT
211
212
CHAPTER 5
05/07/2002
05/07/2002
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
07:41 AM
07:41 AM
3 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
190 NOTE2.TMP
190 NOTE3.TMP
570 bytes
1,440,256 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You see only the files that are in the default subdirectory. You can
create subdirectories from the current directory. Do not forget about the command
line editing keys. As you use them, you become familiar with how they work and
you save yourself unneeded keystrokes.
7
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>MD \WORK e
8
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>MD \WORK\CLIENTS e
9
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>MD \WORK\ADS e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>MD \WORK
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>MD \WORK\CLIENTS
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>MD \WORK\ADS
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You had to include the first backslash so that the WORK directory
would be under the root instead of under ASTRONOMY\MERCURY. WORK had
to be created before you could create its subdirectories, CLIENTS and ADS. However, you could have created WORK and CLIENTS with one command by keying
in MD\WORK\CLIENTS. You could have also created the directories with two
commands, keying in MD \WORK\CLIENTS and MD \WORK\ADS. Work is
considered the parent directory and clients and ads are the children to work. If you
use the MD command to create a child directory and there is no parent directory,
Windows will create the parent directory at the same time it creates the child
directory. Now that you have created the directories of interest, you can use
wildcards to copy files to them.
10 Key in the following:
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY *.* \WORK\CLIENTS e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY *.* \WORK\CLIENTS
FINAL.RPT
NOTE2.TMP
NOTE3.TMP
3 file(s) copied.
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
As the files were copied to the \WORK\CLIENTS subdirectory,
they were listed on the screen. Again, the syntax is the same: the command (COPY),
5.18
ACTIVITY: USING COPY WITH SUBDIRECTORIES
the source (*.* meaning all the files in the default subdirectory \ASTRONOMY
\MERCURY), the destination (\WORK\CLIENTS). You had to include the absolute path name in the destination. The first \ in the destination is very important
because it tells the OS to go to the top of the tree structure and then go down to the
\WORK\CLIENTS subdirectory. If you had not included that first backslash, the
operating system would have looked under the subdirectory
\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY. Since you wanted to have the files with the same
name in the destination subdirectory, \WORK\CLIENTS, you did not have to
specify new file names. The operating system used or defaulted to the current file
names.
11 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR \WORK\CLIENTS e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR \WORK\CLIENTS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\WORK\CLIENTS
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
05/07/2002
05/07/2002
05/07/2002
07:29 PM
<DIR>
.
07:29 PM
<DIR>
..
07:41 AM
190 FINAL.RPT
07:41 AM
190 NOTE2.TMP
07:41 AM
190 NOTE3.TMP
3 File(s)
570 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,437,184 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You can copy files from anywhere to anywhere, provided you give
the source and destination locations. If you use the relative path, be sure you are
aware of the current default drive and directory.
12 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>
COPY \WORK\CLIENTS\NOTE?.TMP \WORK\ADS\EXAM?.QZ e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY \WORK\CLIENTS\NOTE?.TMP \WORK\ADS\EXAM?.QZ
\WORK\CLIENTS\NOTE2.TMP
\WORK\CLIENTS\NOTE3.TMP
2 file(s) copied.
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
The operating system displayed the entire path name as it copied
all the .TMP files from the subdirectory \WORK\CLIENTS to the subdirectory
\WORK\ADS. So that you could retain the number in the source file name in the
destination file names, you used the ? wildcard as a place holder. Thus,
NOTE2.TMP copied as EXAM2.QZ, and NOTE3.TMP copied as EXAM3.QZ. To
see if the files were copied correctly, you will use the DIR command.
13 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR \WORK\ADS e
213
214
CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR \WORK\ADS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\WORK\ADS
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
05/07/2002
05/07/2002
07:29 PM
<DIR>
.
07:29 PM
<DIR>
..
07:41 AM
190 EXAM2.QZ
07:41 AM
190 EXAM3.QZ
2 File(s)
380 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,436,160 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You successfully copied the files because you used the proper path
name. You have been using the COPY and DIR commands to exemplify how to use
the path. Any command will work if you use the proper syntax and the proper path.
14 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>C: e
15 Key in the following: C:\>CD \WUGXP e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>C:
C:\>CD \WUGXP
C:\WUGXP>_
Note:
The prompt you saw as you began step 15 (C:\ >) may be different on your
system if you have been interrupted while following the steps in this
chapter. It does not matter; the command CD \WUGXP specifies to change
directories to the root (\) of the current drive, and then to the subdirectory
WUGXP. Regardless of what directory you went to when you keyed in
step 14, you will end up in C:\WUGXP after step 15.
You changed the default drive to C. In this example, you were in
the root directory of C. You then changed the default directory to WUGXP. Note that
it took two steps. You must first change drives, then change directories.
16 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY DRESS.UP A: e
C:\WUGXP>COPY DRESS.UP A:
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>_
You executed a simple COPY command. You asked the OS to copy
the file called DRESS.UP from the \WUGXP directory to the DATA disk in the A
drive, but where on the DATA disk did the file get copied? Since the last place you
5.18
ACTIVITY: USING COPY WITH SUBDIRECTORIES
were on the DATA disk was the MERCURY subdirectory (under ASTRONOMY,
under the root), that is where the file was copied. You did not specify a destination
directory and consequently, the current default directory was used. If you wanted
the file copied to the root directory of the DATA disk, you would have had to key in
COPY DRESS.UP A:\.
17 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:DRESS.UP e
18 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\DRESS.UP e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:DRESS.UP
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
10/30/2001
03:03 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
286 DRESS.UP
286 bytes
1,435,648 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\DRESS.UP
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
C:\WUGXP>_
The last place you were on the DATA disk was in the subdirectory
\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY. The operating system “remembered” where you last
were and copied the file to the MERCURY subdirectory (currently, the default
directory), not to the root directory. When you asked DIR to locate the file
DRESS.UP and preceded DRESS.UP only with A:, the operating system looked in
the default directory of A:, which was \ASTRONOMY\MERCURY. In order to
look at the root directory, you had to request A:\DRESS.UP. When you did, the file
was not found because that was not where it was copied.
19 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>A: e
C:\WUGXP>A:
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
Your default drive is now the A drive, where the DATA disk is
located. Look at the default directory. Note that you are not in the root directory of
the DATA disk but were returned to the MERCURY subdirectory (under
ASTRONOMY, under the root directory). As you can see, if you change drives
during various activities, Windows will remember the last default subdirectory of
the drive you were on. On the hard disk, the default directory is still \WUGXP.
215
216
CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
20 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>CD C:\ e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>CD C:\
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY> _
You issued the command to change the directory to the root on the
hard disk, in this case Drive C, but your prompt shows that you are still in the
MERCURY subdirectory on the DATA disk. Did you accomplish anything with the
command?
21 Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR C:ZZZ*.* e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR C:ZZZ*.*
Volume in drive C is XP_FULL
Volume Serial Number is C467-D4C1
Directory of C:\
File Not Found
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You used a made-up file name to see the current default directory
on the C drive. Notice the directory line Directory of C:\. You did, indeed, change
directories on C drive. When you issued the command CD C:\, you changed the
default directory from \WUGXP to the root of C on the hard disk without leaving
the DATA disk in the A drive.
5.19
Using Subdirectory Markers
with the COPY Command
Because the command line can get unmanageably long, using the subdirectory
markers dot and double dot is a convenient shorthand way of writing commands.
The . . (double dot) represents the parent of the current directory. The only directory
that does not have a parent is the root directory because it is the ultimate parent of
all the directories on a disk. You are going to use COPY as an example, but any
system command that uses directory names works with subdirectory markers.
Subdirectory markers are sometimes also called “dot notation.”
5.20
Note:
1
Activity: Using Shortcuts:
The Subdirectory Markers
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY> is displayed.
Key in the following:
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY FINAL.RPT . .\FIRST.TST e
5.20
ACTIVITY: USING SHORTCUTS: THE SUBDIRECTORY MARKERS
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY FINAL.RPT ..\FIRST.TST
1 file(s) copied.
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You copied the file called FINAL.RPT located in the current
directory, MERCURY, to the parent of MERCURY, which is ASTRONOMY. You
gave it a new name, FIRST.TST. Instead of having to key in
\ASTRONOMY\FIRST.TST, you used the shorthand name for \ASTRONOMY,
which is . .. This means the parent of MERCURY. You included \ between . . and
FIRST.TST as a delimiter.
2
Key in the following:
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY . .\FIRST.TST . .\VENUS\LAST.TST e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>COPY ..\FIRST.TST ..\VENUS\LAST.TST
1 file(s) copied.
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
You copied the file called FIRST.TST from the ASTRONOMY
subdirectory to the VENUS subdirectory, which is a child directory of ASTRONOMY. The long way to key in the command is to use the absolute path. If you
issued the command using the absolute path, it would look like the following:
COPY A:\ASTRONOMY\FIRST.TST A:\ASTRONOMY\VENUS\LAST.TST
In the source file, the first .. represented the parent of MERCURY. You did not
have to key in \ASTRONOMY. However, you did need to key in the delimiter \
preceding the file name. You also did not need to key in \ASTRONOMY in the
destination file. Instead you used the subdirectory marker .. (double dot). You did
need to key in \ preceding VENUS and \ preceding LAST.TST because they were
needed as delimiters to separate subdirectory names and file names. You can use
subdirectory markers to save keystrokes. You can now verify that the files are in the
VENUS subdirectory.
3
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR . .\VENUS e
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>DIR ..\VENUS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\ASTRONOMY\VENUS
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
12:32 PM
<DIR>
.
12:32 PM
<DIR>
..
07:41 AM
190 LAST.TST
1 File(s)
190 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,434,624 bytes free
A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>_
217
218
CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
You used the DIR command with the subdirectory markers to
verify that you successfully copied the file using subdirectory markers. The double
dot (..) represents the immediate parent directory.
4
Key in the following: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY>CD \ e
You returned to the root of the DATA disk.
5.21
Overwriting Files with
the COPY Command
When you made copies of files, you gave the files on the same disk and in the same
subdirectory unique names. One of the reasons for doing this is that, when you tried
to use the same file name on the same disk and directory, you got an error message:
File cannot be copied onto itself,
0 file(s) copied.
The operating system would not permit you to make that error. However, the
rule of unique file names is true only if the files are on the same disk and in the
same subdirectory. If you are using more than one disk or more than one
subdirectory, the system will let you use the same file name. There have been no
problems so far because, when you copied the source file from one disk to the
destination file on another disk, it was a new file on the destination disk.
Overwrite means just what it says; it writes over or replaces what used to be in a
file. If the contents of the source file are different from the contents of the destination
file, when you overwrite the destination file this will change. Both files will now
have not only the same file name but also the same file contents. The previous
contents of the destination file will be gone. Overwriting also happens on the same
disk when the destination file name already exists. The same rules apply to
subdirectories. See Figure 5.4 for a graphic representation of this.
A:THIS.FIL
A:THIS.FIL
This data will overwrite any
data in the destination file.
This data will overwrite any
data in the destination file.
C:\>COPY A:THIS.FIL B:
B:THIS.FIL
B:THIS.FIL
This data will be replaced by
the data in the source file.
This data will overwrite any
data in the destination file.
BEFORE
AFTER
Figure 5.4—Overwriting Files
The overwrite process seems dangerous because you will lose the data in the
destination file when you replace it with the source file. Why are you not protected
from this error? Because, when working with computers, this is typically not an
error. Usually, you do want to overwrite files. That is, you want to replace the old
contents of a file with the new, revised contents.
Data changes all the time. For example, if you have a customer list stored as a file
named CUSTOMER.LST on a disk, the information in the file (the data) changes as
5.22
ACTIVITY: OVERWRITING FILES USING THE COPY COMMAND
you add, delete, and update information about customers. When you have completed your work for the day, you want to back up your file or copy it to another
disk because you are working with it on a daily basis. Thus, you have a file called
CUSTOMER.LST on your source disk and a file called CUSTOMER.LST on your
destination disk. Since CUSTOMER.LST is clearly a descriptive file name, you really
do not want to create a new file name every time you copy the file to the destination
disk because creating new file names and then tracking current files can be timeconsuming and confusing. In addition, if you are working with a file on a daily
basis, you could end up with hundreds of files. In reality, you do not care about last
week’s or yesterday’s customer information or the old file; you care about the
current version and its backup file. When copying a file for backup purposes, you
do want the source file to overwrite the destination file. Windows warns you that
this is an overwrite—that you are about to overwrite the data in the older file. The
same is true at the command line. In earlier versions of the operating system, prior
to DOS 6.2, you were not made aware of the existence of a file on the destination
disk that has the same name—DOS simply overwrote the destination file contents
with the source file contents without a warning.
5.22
Activity: Overwriting Files
Using the COPY Command
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE GALAXY.NEW e
2
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUP.OLD e
A:\>TYPE GALAXY.NEW
Billions and billions of stars that are
bound together by gravity are what make
up a galaxy. Galaxies are the fundamental
units of the universe.
A:\>TYPE JUP.OLD
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>_
You have displayed the contents of two files and can see that each
file contains different data.
3
Key in the following: A:\>COPY GALAXY.NEW JUP.OLD e
219
220
CHAPTER 5
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
A:\>COPY GALAXY.NEW JUP.OLD
Overwrite JUP.OLD? (Yes/No/All):-
You get a message telling you that you already have a file by the
name of JUP.OLD.
4
Key in the following: Y e
A:\>COPY GALAXY.NEW JUP.OLD
Overwrite JUP.OLD? (Yes/No/All): Y
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
The file GALAXY.NEW was successfully copied to the file called
JUP.OLD, but what about the contents of the file? Did anything change?
5
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE GALAXY.NEW e
6
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUP.OLD e
A:\>TYPE GALAXY.NEW
Billions and billions of stars that are
bound together by gravity are what make
up a galaxy. Galaxies are the fundamental
units of the universe.
A:\>TYPE JUP.OLD
Billions and billions of stars that are
bound together by gravity are what make
up a galaxy. Galaxies are the fundamental
units of the universe.
A:\>_
The file contents are now identical. What used to be inside the file
called JUP.OLD located on the DATA disk was overwritten or replaced (i.e., is gone
forever) by the contents of the file called GALAXY.NEW. You need to be aware of
how this procedure works so that you do not accidentally overwrite a file.
The operating system does not allow you to overwrite or copy a file when the
source file and the destination file are on the same disk and in the same
subdirectory and have exactly the same file name.
7
Key in the following: A:\>COPY JUP.OLD JUP.OLD e
5.22
ACTIVITY: OVERWRITING FILES USING THE COPY COMMAND
A:\>COPY JUP.OLD JUP.OLD
The file cannot be copied onto itself.
0 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You tried to copy (overwrite) a file onto itself and got an error
message. This process works the same when you are dealing with subdirectories.
In Activity 5.14, you copied JUP.TMP and MER.TMP to the CLASS directory
with the same file names but different extensions, so that in the CLASS directory
the files were now called JUP.PAR and MER.PAR. You are going to use wildcards to
copy the rest of the .TMP files to the CLASS directory. In the process, you will
overwrite the existing files.
8
Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.TMP CLASS\*.PAR e
A:\>COPY *.TMP CLASS\*.PAR
JUP.TMP
Overwrite CLASS\JUP.PAR? (Yes/No/All):
The OS does not know the contents of the file; it only knows you
already have a file by that name. Rather than prompting you each time, one of the
choices is A for “all.” Thus, if you intend to overwrite all the .TMP files, you can
choose A.
9
Key in the following: A e
A:\>COPY *.TMP CLASS\*.PAR
JUP.TMP
Overwrite CLASS\JUP.PAR? (Yes/No/All):A
MER.TMP
AST.TMP
VEN.TMP
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
The OS has overwritten the JUP.PAR and MER.PAR files in the
CLASS directory with the JUP.TMP and MER.TMP files in the root directory. You
can prove this occurred by using the TYPE command.
10 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUP.TMP CLASS\JUP.PAR e
A:\>TYPE JUP.TMP CLASS\JUP.PAR
JUP.TMP
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Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
CLASS\JUP.PAR
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>_
As you can see, the contents of the two files are identical. You did
overwrite the destination file with the contents of the source file. You can verify that
all the files have been copied by using the DIR command.
11 Key in the following: A:\>DIR CLASS\*.PAR e
A:\>DIR CLASS\*.PAR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\CLASS
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.PAR
406 MER.PAR
148 AST.PAR
478 VEN.PAR
1,222 bytes
1,433,600 bytes free
A:\>_
Now all the .TMP files are in the CLASS directory. They have the
same file names but different file extensions.
5.23
Combining Text Files with
the COPY Command
Sometimes, but rarely, it is useful to combine the contents of two or more text
(ASCII) files. This process is known as file concatenation. To concatenate means to
“put together.” You might wish to concatenate when you have several short text
files that would be easier to work with if they were combined into one file. When
you combine files, nothing happens to the original files; they remain intact. You just
create a new file from the original files.
However, most often users concatenate files accidentally and are unaware of it
until they attempt to retrieve the file. Concatenation should never be done with
5.24
ACTIVITY: COMBINING FILES USING THE COPY COMMAND
either program files or the data files generated by programs. Programs are binary
code and combining any of these files makes the binary code useless and the
program incapable of being executed. The same is true for the data files that programs generate. When you create a data file with a program, that program “formats” the data in such a way that the program knows how to interpret that data.
That data file format is different for each program. A data file can be read only by
the program that created it. If another program can read a foreign data file, it is
because the program converts the foreign data into its own native format. The
classic example of that is converting data files created in WordPerfect so that these
files can be used in Word and the reverse.
Why learn concatenation if you should not use it? You need to learn concatenation because accidental concatenation of files can occur. The clue is to read the
messages displayed on the screen. In the following activity you will see the results
of concatenation. The COPY command never changes. The syntax never changes. It
is always COPY source destination. Look at the syntax diagram:
COPY [/D] [/V] [/N] [/Y ¦ /-Y] [/Z] [/A ¦ /B ] source [/A ¦ /B]
[+ source [/A ¦ /B] [+ ...]] [destination [/A ¦ /B]]
/A indicates an ASCII file, whereas /B indicates a binary file. In addition,
whenever you see the notation in a syntax diagram of two or more items separated
by the pipe symbol (¦) as in [/A ¦ /B ], it is an either/or choice. Either you may use
/A or you may use /B, but you may not use both.
5.24
Activity: Combining Files
Using the COPY Command
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\MUSIC /P e
Directory of C:\WUGXP\MUSIC
12/09/2001 11:04 AM
<DIR>
12/09/2001 11:04 AM
<DIR>
12/05/2001 09:53 AM
12/05/2001 09:54 AM
12/05/2001 08:41 AM
12/05/2001 08:41 AM
12/11/2001 09:41 AM
12/11/2001 09:41 AM
12/11/2001 09:41 AM
12/11/2001 09:41 AM
12/11/2001 09:41 AM
12/11/2001 09:41 AM
12/04/2001 09:33 AM
12/04/2001 09:34 AM
12/04/2001 09:28 AM
12/04/2001 09:28 AM
12/05/2001 08:44 AM
12/05/2001 08:45 AM
01/24/2002 09:42 AM
Press any key to continue . . .
282
451
247
368
852
451
271
760
357
444
222
725
258
876
227
311
427
.
..
Ballad1960.txt
Ballad1960Hits.txt
CalifSurf.txt
CalifSurfHits.txt
Doo-wopWest.txt
Doo-wopWestHits.txt
Doo-wop2.txt
Doo-wop2hits.txt
Doo-wopEast.txt
Doo-wopEastHits.txt
Idols1950.txt
Idols1950hits.txt
Idols1960.txt
Idols1960hits.txt
JazzEvans.txt
JazzEvansHits.txt
RB1958.txt
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You displayed the files in the MUSIC directory. The third and
fourth file on the list have “Calif” in their names.
2
Hold down the c key and press C to cancel the command.
3
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURF.TXT e
4
Key in the following:
A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURFHITS.TXT e
A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURF.TXT
The Surf Sound of the sixties did not begin with the Beach Boys.
The first beach rocker was a left-handed guy who played a righthanded guitar. That's right the bass string with his littlest
finger. Then came the rest of the surf rockers.
A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURFHITS.TXT
Here is a short chronology of California surfer music.
Dick Dale and the Del-tones, "Let's Go Trippin."
Jan and Dean, "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surf City."
The Beach Boys, "Surfin' Safari" and "Surfin' U.S.A."
The Surfaris, "Surfer Joe" and "Wipe Out."
The Marketts, "Out of Limits" and "Surfer's Stomp."
Chantays, "Pipeline."
The Trashmen, "Surfin' Bird."
A:\>_
You displayed the contents of one of the files. The first file has
information about surfing music, and the second file has a list of surfer music hits.
You want all of this information to be in one file, called CalSurf.MUS. The new file
will reside on the DATA disk.
Note:
In the following step, there are spaces between COPY and the source file
specification, before and after the + sign, and before the destination file
name. Though it appears here that the command is on two different lines,
the entire command must go on one line.
5
Key in the following (press the e key only when you see e):
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURF.TXT +
C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURFHITS.TXT CalifSurf.MUS e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURF.TXT + C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURFHITS.TXT
CalifSurf.MUS
C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CalifSurf.txt
C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CalifSurfHits.txt
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
Note:
As shown in the screen above, the command will probably have wrapped
to the next line on your screen. Just be sure you do not press the e key
until you see e, even if your command line wraps to the next line.
5.24
ACTIVITY: COMBINING FILES USING THE COPY COMMAND
The message is 1 file(s) copied. It seems as if you have too many
parameters because the syntax is COPY source destination. However, you are still
following the correct syntax for the COPY command. You are creating one destination file out of two source files. What you did here was say COPY (the command)
the contents of the file called C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURF.TXT and the
contents of the file called C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURFHITS.TXT (the source)
to a new file called CalifSurf.MUS that will reside on the root of the DATA disk (the
destination). The plus sign (+) told the operating system that the source had more to
it than just one file. It also told the OS that you were joining files. The destination
file is the last file name on the command line that does not have a plus sign in front.
Look at step 3 and note that CalifSurf.MUS has just a space in front of it, not a plus
sign, making CalifSurf.MUS the destination. Also note, the use of the combination
of upper and lower case letters in the destination file name is for the benefit of the
user—the reader. The operating system does not care if you use upper or lower case
letters, but it will remember and display the file in the case you choose.
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR CALIFSURF.MUS e
A:\>DIR CALIFSURF.MUS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
03/15/2002
08:29 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
616 CalifSurf.MUS
616 bytes
1,432,576 bytes free
A:\>_
The file CALIFSURF.MUS was requested with the DIR command
using uppercase letters, and displayed in mixed case. When it was created with the
COPY command, the name was specified with mixed case.
7
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE CALIFSURF.MUS e
A:\>TYPE CALIFSURF.MUS
The Surf Sound of the sixties did not begin with the Beach Boys.
The first beach rocker was a left-handed guy who played a righthanded guitar. That's right the bass string with his littlest
finger. Then came the rest of the surf rockers.
Here is a short chronology of California surfer music.
Dick Dale and the Del-tones, "Let's Go Trippin."
Jan and Dean, "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surf City."
The Beach Boys, "Surfin' Safari" and "Surfin' U.S.A."
The Surfaris, "Surfer Joe" and "Wipe Out."
The Marketts, "Out of Limits" and "Surfer's Stomp."
Chantays, "Pipeline."
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The Trashmen, "Surfin' Bird."
A:\>_
As you can see, the information that was contained in both the
files is now contained in this one file. But, did the contents of the original two files
change?
8
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURF.TXT e
9
Key in the following:
A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURFHITS.TXT e
A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURF.TXT
The Surf Sound of the sixties did not begin with the Beach Boys.
The first beach rocker was a left-handed guy who played a righthanded guitar. That's right the bass string with his littlest
finger. Then came the rest of the surf rockers.
A:\>TYPE C:\WUGXP\MUSIC\CALIFSURFHITS.TXT
Here is a short chronology of California surfer music.
Dick Dale and the Del-tones, "Let's Go Trippin."
Jan and Dean, "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surf City."
The Beach Boys, "Surfin' Safari" and "Surfin' U.S.A."
The Surfaris, "Surfer Joe" and "Wipe Out."
The Marketts, "Out of Limits" and "Surfer's Stomp."
Chantays, "Pipeline."
The Trashmen, "Surfin' Bird."
A:\>_
As you can see, the source files remain unchanged. You merely
created a third file from the contents of two files. Although you can join files with
the plus sign, remember that this is useful for text files only. If you try to join two
data files created by an application program using the COPY command, the application program will no longer be able to read the combined data file. You may also use
wildcards to concatenate text files.
10 Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.99 e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.99
Volume in drive C is XP_FULL
Volume Serial Number is C467-D4C1
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
01:46
07:08
03:42
01:08
PM
PM
PM
PM
148
478
190
406
AST.99
VEN.99
JUP.99
MER.99
5.24
ACTIVITY: COMBINING FILES USING THE COPY COMMAND
4 File(s)
1,222 bytes
0 Dir(s) 21,416,771,584 bytes free
A:\>_
Using the wildcards, you have shows that there are four files in
the C:\WUGXP directory with the .99 extension. You want all of the information in
one file. You could key in:
COPY AST.99 + VEN.99 + JUP.99 + MER.99 NINE.TXT
but there is a much easier way.
11 Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.99 NINE.TXT e
12 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE NINE.TXT e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.99 NINE.TXT
C:\WUGXP\AST.99
C:\WUGXP\VEN.99
C:\WUGXP\JUP.99
C:\WUGXP\MER.99
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
As you can see, you get the message “1 file(s) copied” which tells
you that the contents of the four files has been placed into 1 file.
13 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE NINE.TXT e
A:\>TYPE NINE.TXT
The study of Astronomy came from Astrology.
Most scientists no longer believe in
Astrology. The science of Astronomy is
changing every day.
The planet Venus comes physically closer to us
than any other planet in the solar system.
The mass of the Venus atmosphere is 96% carbon dioxide
not a human-friendly environment! Carbon dioxide makes
up less than 1% of our terrestial atmosphere.
Venus rotates very slowly and seems to have only
one tectonic plate. "Venusquakes" happen much less
frequently than Earthquakes.
No moon-lit nights on the planet named for
the goddess of love - Venus has no moon.
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
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Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>_
As you can see, the file now contains information about Astronomy, Venus, Jupiter, and Mercury. You have successfully concatenated the four
files with a simple, short command line using a wildcard character (*). Again, the
contents may differ if you are using the NTFS file system. The files will be copied
alphabetically rather than as they were found on Drive C. If you are using FAT32,
the files will be copied in the order they are found on the disk.
5.25
Printing Files
So far, you have not printed the contents of any files. You may have redirected the
output of the DIR command to the printer, but this printed only file names, not file
contents. You could redirect the output of the TYPE command to the printer by
keying in TYPE MY.FIL > PRN, if you were not on a network that prevented it. You
may also copy a file to a printer by keying in COPY MY.FIL PRN. Note here that
with the COPY command, there is no redirection, but merely copying a file to a
device. Again, if you are in a computer lab and printing to a network printer, this
may not work. However, using either redirection or the COPY command, you need
to manually eject the paper from the printer. The PRINT command makes it easier
to print the contents of text files. The PRINT command will print the contents of
files, not their names, and it will automatically eject the page. However, these
techniques work only for ASCII files. Again, data files generated by application
programs can be printed only from within the application program because the
application program must send special signals to the printer so that the data prints
correctly.
There are times you wish to print an ASCII file. You often will want a hard copy
of configuration information on your computer. There are also other reasons for
printing text files; for instance, if you have a printer problem from within an application program, the first thing you want to do is verify that it is a software problem,
not a hardware problem. To test this, you return to the command line interface level
and print an ASCII file. If the ASCII file prints, you now know you have a software
problem within the application program and not a connection problem with your
printer.
There are three ways to print a text file from the command line:
n Use the PRINT command. The syntax of the PRINT command is as follows:
PRINT [/D:device] [[drive:][path]filename[...]]
/D:device
Specifies a print device.
n Use redirection as you did in Chapter 2 with the DIR command.
5.27
ACTIVITY: SETTING UP PRINTING IN A LAB ENVIRONMENT
n Copy the contents of a file to a printer. The destination is a device, not a file. The
device is the printer. Since the printer is a device, it has a reserved name: PRN.
Sometimes this name causes problems when you are printing on a network, so
you will use LPT1 for Line Printer 1. When you use LPT1, be sure to key in the
letter L, the letter P, the letter T, and the number 1. You cannot use the letter l
(“ell”) as the number 1. These are the names for local printers. Network printers
also have specific names. The network administrator assigns the network
printer name. Unless you know your network printer name, you may not be
able to copy a file to the printer.
5.26
Printing in a Lab Environment
Without a local printer, printing can be complicated. In a lab environment, it takes
special preparation. If you have access to only a network printer, you will have to
determine if accommodation has been made for command line printing. It is probable that you will have special needs in your own lab environment for printing from
the Command line. The following activity will set up printing in many lab situations. Once again, BE SURE TO CHECK WITH YOUR LAB INSTRUCTOR BEFORE DOING THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITY!
5.27
1
Activity: Setting Up Printing
in a Lab Environment
Determine the name of the network server\printer (in this example,
BUSDIV\HP504-1).
Now you will create two short cuts on the desktop: one to enable
command line printing, and one to disable it when you are finished.
2
Return to the desktop by closing the command line window.
3
Right click the desktop, click New, and click Shortcut.
You have opened the Create Shortcut dialog box.
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4
Fill in the location box with the information shown below, substituting the name
of your server for BUSDIV and your printer for HP504-1 (all of the line may not be
visible): NET.EXE USE LPT1: \\BUSDIV\HP504-1 /YES
5
Click Next.
6
Key in the following in the Shortcut name box: Print From Command Line
7
Click Finish.
You have created a shortcut to enable printing on the desktop.
8
Repeat step 3.
9
Repeat step 4, changing the location box information to
NET.EXE USE LPT1 /D.
10 Repeat step 5.
11 Repeat step 6, changing the Shortcut name box information to Stop Printing
From Command Line.
12 Click Finish.
You have created a second shortcut on the desktop to disable
command line printing. In this example lab environment, before printing from the
command line, double click on the Print From.... icon. When the command line
printing is finished, double click on the Stop Print from... icon. In many circumstances, normal application printing will not resume until you have disabled
command line printing.
REMEMBER: The previous activity is an example of the type of preparation that
needs to be done to enable you to print from the command line in a networked
lab environment.
13 Open a Command Line window and make A:\> the default prompt.
5.28
ACTIVITY: PRINTING FILES
A:\>
You have started another Command Line session.
5.28
Activity: Printing Files
CAUTION: Do not do this activity if you are on a network unless instructed to do
so.
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Check with your lab instructor for any special instructions. (If necessary,
enable command line printing.)
Remember, many times in a lab environment, you can use LPT1, the
hardware name of the printer port. When LPT1 does not work, you may
try PRN. Other times, you need to use the printer object’s URL (Uniform
Resource Locator), such as \\SERVER\HP. Once again, check with your
lab instructor for what is needed in your lab.
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE MER.TMP e
A:\>TYPE MER.TMP
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>_
You see the contents of the file. To print it, you may use the PRINT
command.
2
Key in the following: A:\>PRINT MER.TMP e
A:\>PRINT MER.TMP
A:\MER.TMP is currently being printed
A:\>_
The PRINT command tells you the status of your print job. A print
job is something that you sent to the printer to be printed. If you check your printer,
you should have a hard copy of the contents of the file MER.TMP. Note that you see
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INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
only the contents of the file, not any of the file information such as its name or size.
Another advantage of the PRINT command is that you may use wildcards.
3
Key in the following: A:\>PRINT *.TMP e
A:\>PRINT *.TMP
A:\JUP.TMP is currently
A:\MER.TMP is currently
A:\AST.TMP is currently
A:\VEN.TMP is currently
being
being
being
being
printed
printed
printed
printed
A:\>_
Again, you see a status report. Each file’s contents will have
printed on a separate piece of paper and each page was automatically ejected. You
may also key in multiple files names as in PRINT VEN.TMP JUP.99, and so on. You
may also use redirection.
4
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT e
A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>_
The contents of the TYPE command are written to the standard
output device, the screen. You can redirect the output to another device—the printer.
5
Turn the printer on. Make sure the printer is online, or command line printing is
enabled.
6
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT > LPT1 e
A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT > LPT1
A:\>_
Nothing was written to the screen because you redirected the
output to the printer. Now you want to eject the page. Depending on how your
printer is set up, it may automatically eject the page without your having to take the
next step. Check your printer to see if your page printed and ejected; otherwise,
manually eject the page. See Activity 2.24 for the steps to take to manually eject a
page. It would seem that, if this works as it did, you could also use redirection with
the COPY command, but you cannot. The only output that is actually a product of
CHAPTER SUMMARY
the copy command itself is 1 file(s) copied. If you redirected that output, you would
have only the printed message 1 file(s) copied, not the contents of the file. Instead
of using redirection, you copy the file to a device, the printer.
7
Key in the following: A:\>COPY JUPITER.TXT LPT1 e
A:\>COPY JUPITER.TXT LPT1
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
Even though you are using a device, the syntax for the COPY
command remains the same. COPY is the command, the work you want done.
JUPITER.TXT is the source, the file you want copied. You do not need to enter a
drive designator in front of the file name because the operating system will assume
the default. LPT1 is the device name for the printer. The printer is the destination,
where you want the contents of the file to go. As soon as you press e, you may
hear and see the printer begin to print. If your page does not eject, manually eject it.
You then see your hard copy:
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
8
If you enabled Print From Command Line, disable it now by double-clicking the
Stop Print from Command Line icon.
9
Close the Command Line window.
Chapter Summary
1. One of the major reasons people buy computers is for using application programs that assist people in different tasks.
2. Application software usually generates data. Both application software and
data are stored as disk files.
3. Usually, only a program can use the data files it creates. A data file without the
application program cannot be used.
4. Another component of the operating system is the commands that allow the
user to manage and manipulate program and data files.
5. The internal commands DIR, COPY, and TYPE allow you to manage the files on
a disk.
6. The file extensions .COM (command file) and .EXE (executable code) tell the
operating system that the file is a program.
7. COPY allows you to copy files selectively.
8. The syntax of the copy command is:
COPY [drive:][path] filename [drive:][path] filename
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A simple way to remember the COPY syntax is
COPY source destination
Source is what you want to copy. Destination is where you want it copied.
9. The COPY command never changes the source file.
10. When naming files, it is best to stick to alphanumeric characters. Certain
characters are illegal, such as the colon (:) and the asterisk (*).
11. When copying a file to a subdirectory, you must include the path name. The
path name and the file name are separated by the backslash, which is used as a
delimiter. The one exception is that the root directory’s name is \ (backslash).
12. Wildcards may be used with the COPY command.
13. Files must have unique names when on the same drive and in the same
subdirectory, but files that are copied to different subdirectories may have
identical names because the path makes those file names unique.
14. TYPE allows you to display the contents of a file on the screen. The syntax is:
TYPE [drive:][path]filename
15. Wildcards may be used with the TYPE command.
16. You may use subdirectory markers with the DIR, COPY, and TYPE commands.
17. If you use *.* with a command, it chooses all the files. Thus, DIR *.* would
display all the files. COPY C:\WHAT\*.* A:\ would copy all the files in the
WHAT directory to the disk in Drive A.
18. When you move between drives, the operating system remembers the last
directory you were in.
19. Overwriting files with the COPY command is the process in which the contents
of the source file copy over the contents of the destination file.
20. Concatenation means combining the contents of files using the COPY command
with either + or a wildcard. There is only one destination file. You should not
concatenate program files or data files generated from program files.
21. You may print the contents of an ASCII file by using the PRINT command with
the name of the file or files. You may use multiple file names or use wildcards.
Usually the PRINT command automatically ejects the pages.
22. Printing in a networked lab environment requires special accommodations.
23. You may also print the contents of an ASCII file by keying in TYPE filename >
LPT1 or TYPE filename > PRN. If you are on a network, you may need to know
the name of your device. You will probably have to manually eject the page.
24. You may also print the contents of an ASCII file by keying in COPY filename
LPT1 or TYPE filename PRN. If you are on a network, you may need to know
the name of your device. You will probably have to manually eject the page.
Key Terms
ASCII
concatenation
destination file
LPT1
overwrite
PRN
source file
unformatted text file
Uniform Resource
Locator (URL)
TRUE/FALSE QUESTIONS
Discussion Questions
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Explain the function and purpose of internal commands.
Give two reasons for making a copy of a file on the same disk.
Give the syntax for the COPY command and explain each part of the syntax.
Is a file extension mandatory when naming a file?
What is the maximum number of characters that may be used when naming a
file?
List three characters that cannot be used when naming files.
List three examples of legal file names.
When would you use a wildcard with the COPY command?
What is the purpose and function of the TYPE command? Explain each part of
the syntax diagram.
How can you recognize an executable file?
What are ASCII files?
What is the purpose and function of dummy files?
Every file on a disk must have a unique name. Yet, when you make a copy of a
file on the same disk in a different subdirectory, it may have the same file name.
Explain.
Under what circumstances could a user think that the computer has “lost” its
files?
Can you use wildcards with the TYPE command? Why or why not?
What does the first \ in any command line mean?
What does it mean to “overwrite” a file? What are some of the dangers of
overwriting files?
Why would you make a copy of a file on the same disk? On another disk?
What would happen if you tried to copy a file from one disk to another and the
destination disk already had a file with the same name?
How would you combine the contents of two files? Why would you?
What happens to the original files when you combine two or more files?
What are some of the dangers of concatenating program files or data files?
What message on the screen informs you that you have concatenated several
files?
Name two ways that you may print the contents of an ASCII file.
Identify two advantages to using the PRINT command to print the contents of
ASCII files.
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true and the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. The contents of two files on the same disk can be identical even
though the file names are different.
T
F
2. It is a good idea to concatenate text files and program files.
T
F
3. The COPY command is an internal command.
T
F
4. The contents of files are not affected by displaying them with the
TYPE command.
T
F
5. To save time when copying multiple files to a different disk, you
can use wildcards.
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Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. There are two mandatory parameters for the COPY command. They are the
_______________ and the _______________.
7. When you replace the contents of a file with the contents of a different file, this
process is known as _______________.
8. You can differentiate between a program file and a data file by the file
_______________.
9. If you wish to display the contents of a text file on the screen, you would use the
_______________ command.
10. The delimiter that is used to separate a file name from a file extension is
_______________.
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. The COPY command can be used to
____
a. copy a file from one disk to another.
b. make a second copy of an existing file on the same disk with a new
name.
c. copy a file from one directory to another directory.
d. all of the above
12.
Files
may be copied to another disk in order to
____
a. make backup copies.
b. copy a program to another disk.
c. share data files with others.
d. all of the above
13. To display the contents of an ASCII file on the screen, you use the
____
a. DIR command.
b. TYPE command.
c. VIEW command.
d. SEE command.
14.
COPY
*.TXT THE.FIL will result in
____
a. joining together all files with the .TXT extension to a file called
THE.FIL.
b. joining THE.FIL to all files with the .TXT extension.
c. creating a new set of files with the same file name having .FIL as an
extension.
d. none of the above
15. COPY MY.TXT \DATA\OLD.TXT will
____
a. copy the file MY.TXT to a new file called DATA.
b. copy the file MY.TXT to a new file called OLD.TXT in the
subdirectory DATA.
c. copy the file OLD.TXT to a file called MY.TXT in the subdirectory
DATA.
d. copy the file called DATA to a file called MY.TXT in the
subdirectory called OLD.TXT.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
Writing Commands
Write the correct steps or commands to perform the required action as if you were
at the computer. The prompt will indicate the default drive and directory.
16. Copy the file called OLD.FIL from the root of Drive C to the root of Drive A,
keeping the same file name.
A:\>
17. Copy all files in the default directory with the .TXT file extension to files with
the same names but with the .DOC file extension.
A:\>
18. On the default drive, copy the file JOE from the root directory to the INFO
directory, and call the new file NAMES.
A:\>
19. Copy the contents of two files, one named DOG and one named CAT from the
default directory to a file called ANIMALS in the \MYFILES directory.
A:\>
20. Copy all files from the default directory with the extension .TXT to the
subdirectory TXTFILES.
A:\>
Homework Assignments
Note 1: Place the HOMEWORK disk in Drive A. Be sure to work on the HOMEWORK disk, not the DATA disk.
Note 2: The homework problems will assume Drive C is the hard disk and the
HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. If you are using another drive, such as
floppy Drive B or hard Drive D, be sure to substitute that drive letter
when reading the questions and answers.
Note 3: All subdirectories will be created under the root directory unless
otherwise specified.
Problem Set I
Problem A
Note:
If the DATA disk is in Drive A, remove it and place it in a safe place. Do
not use the DATA disk for these homework problems.
A-a
Insert the HOMEWORK disk into Drive A.
A-b
Copy the file called GRAMMY.REC from the WUGXP subdirectory to the
root directory of the HOMEWORK disk keeping the same file name.
A-c
Copy the file called GRAMMY.REC from the WUGXP subdirectory to the
root directory of the HOMEWORK disk but call the new file GRAMMY.TAP.
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A-d
INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
Execute the DIR command to display only the GRAMMY files on the HOMEWORK disk.
____
1. What date is listed for the files?
a. 10/31/2002
b. 10/31/2001
c. 10/01/2001
d. 10/01/2002
____
2. What are the sizes of the GRAMMY files in bytes?
a. GRAMMY.REC = 1,334 and GRAMMY.TAP = 1,434
b. GRAMMY.REC = 1,335and GRAMMY.TAP = 1,534
c. both files are 1,334 bytes
d. GRAMMY.REC = 1,434and GRAMMY.TAP = 1,434
A-e
____
While in the root of the HOMEWORK disk, copy the file GRAMMY.REC to
GRAM:.REC.
3. What message appears on the screen?
a. File(s) copied
b. Invalid file name
c. The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect.
d. no message was displayed
Problem B
B-a
____
B-b
____
Copy any files with the file extension .99 from the WUGXP subdirectory to
the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk keeping the same file names.
4. How many files were copied?
a. two
b. four
c. six
d. eight
Execute the DIR command to display only the files with the extension of .99
on the HOMEWORK disk.
5. What date is displayed for the files?
a. 10/30/2001 and 10/31/2001
b. 10/30/2000 and 10/31/2000
c. 10/30/1999 and 10/31/1999
d. 10/30/1998 and 10/31/1998
B-c
Create a subdirectory on the HOMEWORK disk called FILES.
B-d
Copy all the files with the extension of .99 from the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk into this subdirectory but give them the new extension of
.FIL.
B-e
Do a directory display of the FILES directory.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
6. There is a line in the resulting display that states
a. 2 File(s)
1,222 bytes
b. 4 File(s)
1,222 bytes
c. 6 File(s)
1,222 bytes
d. 8 File(s)
1,222 bytes
B-f
Create a subdirectory on the HOMEWORK disk called BOOKS.
B-g
Copy all the files in the WUGXP\MEDIA\BOOKS directory to the BOOKS
directory keeping the same file name(s).
____
7. How many files were copied?
a. seven
b. five
c. three
d. one
Problem C
C-a
____
C-b
____
Display the contents of the GRAMMY.REC file located in the root directory
of the HOMEWORK disk.
8. Who received the Pop Dance Recording award?
a. Sting
b. Rob Thomas
c. Santana
d. Cher
Display the contents of the GOLD_OLD.MOV file located in the
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\MOVIES directory.
9. What movie title is displayed?
a. Citizen Kane
b. Desk Set
c. Key Largo
d. Shane
C-c
Display the contents of the MYSTERY.BKS file located in the BOOKS
directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
____
10. What author ’s name is NOT displayed?
a. Josephine Tey
b. Sue Grafton
c. Peter Robinson
d. Janet Dawson
Problem D
D-a
Create a subdirectory called ROOM on the HOMEWORK disk under the
FILES directory created in Problem B.
D-b
On the HOMEWORK disk change the default directory to ROOM.
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INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
D-c
Using subdirectory markers, copy the file called VEN.FIL from the FILES
directory to the ROOM directory keeping the same name but giving it the
new extension of .RMS.
____
11. Which command did you use?
a. COPY \..\VEN.FIL \VEN.RMS
b. COPY ..\VEN.FIL VEN.RMS
c. COPY ..\VEN.FIL \VEN.RMS
d. COPY ..\VEN.FIL ..\VEN.RMS
Problem E
E-a
Change to the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
Note:
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
E-b
Copy any file with a .TMP extension from the WUGXP directory to the root
of the HOMEWORK disk, keeping the same file names but giving them the
extension of .TRP.
E-c
Copy the file called VEN.99 from the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk
to the subdirectory called HISTORY giving the file the new name of
VEN.ICE.
E-d
Copy any files with a .99 file extension from the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk to the HISTORY subdirectory, but give the files the new extension of .ICE.
____
12. Which command did you use?
a. COPY *.99 HISTORY
b. COPY *.99 HISTORY\*.ICE
c. COPY *.99 *.ICE
d. COPY .ICE \HISTORY\.99
____
13. What message was displayed?
a. 1 file(s) copied
b. Overwrite HISTORY\VEN.ICE? (Yes/No/All):
c. Overwrite VEN.ICE (Yes/No/All)?
d. no message was displayed
E-e
Take any steps necessary to copy the files.
Note:
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
E-f
Overwrite the file A:\BONJOUR.TRP with the contents of the file called
RIGHT.UP, which is located in the WUGXP directory.
____
14. Which command did you use?
a. COPY C:\BONJOUR.TRP RIGHT.UP
b. COPY C:\WUGXP\RIGHT.UP BONJOUR.TRP
c. COPY C:\WUGXP\BONJOUR.TRP C:\WUGXP\RIGHT.UP
d. COPY C:\WUGXP\RIGHT.UP RIGHT.UP
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
E-g
Display the contents of the file called BONJOUR.TRP on the HOMEWORK
disk.
____
15. What is the first line in the file?
a. HELLO, GUTEN TAG
b. BUONGIORNO,BONJOUR
c. Forces associated with the rotation of Earth cause the planet
d. Precession of Earth’s Axis
Problem F
Note:
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
F-a
Copy all the files that begin with EX and have FEB within the name and have
the extension .dta from the WUGXP directory to the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk.
____
16. Which command did you use?
a. COPY C:\WUGXP\EX*FEB*.DTA
b. COPY C:\WUGXP\EXFEB*.DTA
c. COPY C:\WUGXP\EX*F.DTA
d. COPY C:\WUGXP\?EX*FEB.DTA
____
17. How many files were copies?
a. one.
b. two.
c. three.
d. four.
F-b
Concatenate the files called EXP01FEB.DTA and EXP02FEB.DTA and
EXP03FEB.DTA (in that order) to the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk,
calling the new file FEBEXP.DTA
____
18. Which command did you use?
a. COPY EXP*FEB*.DTA FEBEXP.DTA
b. COPY EXP01FEB.DTA + EXP02FEB.DTA + EXP03FEB.DTA
FEBEXP.DTA
c. COPY *FEB*.DTA FEBEXP.DTA
d. COPY EX*.* EX*.*
F-c
Display the contents of the file FEBEXP.DTA on the HOMEWORK disk.
____
19. What is the last line in the file?
a. TOTAL
2340.00
b. TOTAL
2245.00
c. TOTAL
2270.00
d. MONTHLY EXPENSES FOR FEBRUARY, 2003
Note:
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
F-d
Concatenate all the files from the WUGXP directory that have the filename
EARTH with any extension to the subdirectory FILES on the HOMEWORK
disk. The new file should be named EARTH.ALL. Use a wildcard.
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____
20. Which command did you use?
a. COPY C:\EARTH* A:FILES\EARTH*
b. COPY C:\WUGXP\EARTH.* A:\FILES\EARTH.ALL
c. COPY EARTH.ALL FILES\EARTH.ALL
d. COPY C:\WUGXP\EARTH.ALL A:\FILES
Note:
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
F-e
Display the contents of the file EARTH.ALL created in F-d above.
____
21. The EARTH.ALL contains the contents of
a. the first Earth file.
b. the second Earth file.
c. the third Earth file.
d. the first, second, and third Earth files.
Problem G
Note 1: Check with your lab instructor prior to proceeding with this problem.
Note 2: Remember, use the method of printing (LPT1, PRN, or the URL of your
printer) that works in your particular lab environment.
Note 3: You may not be able to do this activity in your lab environment. Check
with your instructor to see if you should proceed.
Note 4: The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
Print the files whose names begin with called AST located on the root of the
HOMEWORK disk using the TYPE command and redirection (>) (Note: If you
used PRN or a URL instead of LPT1, substitute what you use for LPT1 in the
answers.)
____
22. Which command did you use? (Note: If you are in a lab environment that
uses a URL, assume that LPT1 is your URL.)
a. TYPE > AST*.* LPT1
b. TYPE > LPT1 AST*.*
c. TYPE AST*.* > LPT1
d. All of the above commands work.
Problem H
Note:
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
H-a
Copy all the files from the WUGXP directory that have the file extension of
.BAT to the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
____
23. How many files were copied?
a. two
b. four
c. six
d. eight
H-b
Copy the file called MARK.FIL and the file called GETYN.COM from the
WUGXP directory to the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
24. Is there a way use one command to copy both of these files simultaneously
from the command line?
a. yes
b. no
____
25. What is the size, in bytes, of GETYN.COM?
a. 326
b. 226
c. 126
d. 26
____
26. What kind of file is GETYN.COM?
a. data
b. text
c. program
d. none of the above
Problem Set II—At the Computer
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
Before proceeding with these assignments, check with your lab instructor
to see if there are any special procedures you should follow.
The HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive
and the default directory. All work will occur on the HOMEWORK disk.
Make sure that NAME.BAT, MARK.FIL, GETYN.COM, and GO.BAT are
all present in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk before proceeding with these problems.
All files with the .HW extension must be created in the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk.
1
Key in the following: A:\>NAME e
2
Here is an example to key in, but your instructor will have other information that
applies to your class. Key in the following:
Bette A. Peat e
(Your name goes here.)
CIS 55 e
(Your class goes here.)
T-Th 8-9:30 e
(Your day and time go here.)
Chapter 5 Homework e
3
Press 6 e
4
If the information is correct, press Y and you are back to A:\>.
You have returned to the system level. You now have a file called
NAME.FIL with your name and other pertinent information. Hint: Remember
redirection.
To Create 1.HW
1
Create a subdirectory called MOVIES under the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
2
Copy all the files in the WUGXP\MEDIA\MOVIES directory to the MOVIES
directory on the HOMEWORK disk and keep the same file names.
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INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
3
Locate all the files in the MOVIES directory on the HOMEWORK disk.
4
Place the names of the files in a file called 1.HW.
To Create 2.HW
1
On the HOMEWORK disk, make a copy of all the files in the MOVIES directory in
the MOVIES directory, keeping the same file names but having a new extension
of .FLM.
2
Locate only the files in the MOVIES directory that have the extension of .FLM
on the HOMEWORK disk.
3
Place the names of the files with only an extension of .FLM in a file called 2.HW.
To Create 3.HW
Redirect the contents (not the file name) of the file called BESTPIC.FLM in the
MOVIES directory on the HOMEWORK disk to a file called 3.HW.
To Create 4.HW
1
Overwrite the file called BESTPIC.FLM in the MOVIES directory on the HOMEWORK disk with the contents of the file called VEN.99 located in the root
directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
2
Redirect the contents (not the file name) of the file called BESTPIC.FLM in the
MOVIES directory on the HOMEWORK disk to a file called 4.HW.
To Create 5.HW
1
Concatenate all the files that have the extension .RED from the WUGXP directory to the MOVIES directory on the HOMEWORK disk.
2
Call the new file MYRED.FIL.
3
Redirect the contents (not the file name) of the file called MYRED.FIL to a file
called 5.HW.
To Print Your Homework
1
Be sure the printer is on and ready to accept print jobs from your computer.
2
Key in the following (be very careful to make no typing errors):
GO NAME.FIL 1.HW 2.HW 3.HW 4.HW 5.HW e
If the files you requested, 1.HW, 2.HW, etc., do not exist in the
default directory, you will see the following message on the screen:
File Not Found
The system cannot find the file specified.
Is there a message that says “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
The operating system is telling you that the file cannot be found. If you see this
screen, press Y to see what could be wrong, and repeat the print procedure after you
have corrected the problem.
If the default directory contains the specified files, the following message will
appear on the screen:
Is there a message that say “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
You will need to press N once for each file you are printing.
3
Follow the messages on the screen until the Notepad program opens with a
screen similar to the following:
All the requested files have been found and placed in a Notepad
document. Your homework is now ready to print.
4
On the Notepad menu bar, click File. Click Print.
The print dialog box opens. If you have more than one printer, all
your printer choices will be displayed. The default printer is the highlighted printer.
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INTERNAL COMMANDS: COPY AND TYPE
5
Click the Print button.
6
In the Notepad window, click File. Click Exit.
The following will appear on the Command Prompt screen:
You are about to delete any file with the .HW extension.
Before you delete your homework files, check your hard copy or
print out.
If your homework printout is correct, press Y to delete the
files.
If your homework printout is incorrect, press N.
Pressing N will prevent your homework files from being deleted.
You can then begin again.
At this point, look at your printout. If it is correct, you can press Y to delete the
homework files for this chapter. If your printout is incorrect, you can press N. That
will preserve your homework and you will need to redo only the problem that was
incorrect, not all the homework assignments.
7
Press Y e
You have returned to the default prompt.
8
Close the Command Prompt session.
9
Execute the shut-down procedure.
Problem Set III—Brief Essay
1. Copying and printing files can be done from My Computer or Windows Explorer. Why or why not might you use the command line to accomplish these
tasks?
2. Briefly explain the purpose and function of subdirectory markers. Give three
examples of how you would use subdirectory markers. Include commands that
can be used with subdirectory markers.
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter you will be able to:
1. Explain why it is necessary to eliminate files
from a disk.
2. Explain when and how to use wildcards with
the DEL command.
3. Explain the use of the /P parameter with the
DEL command.
4. Explain the purpose and function of the
RENAME/REN command.
5. Explain the purpose and function of the
MOVE command.
6. Explain the purpose and function of the
RD /S command.
7. Explain the importance of backing up data.
Student Outcomes
1. Use the DEL command to eliminate files on
disks and in directories.
2. Use wildcards appropriately with the DEL
command.
3. Use parameters with the DEL command.
4. Use the RENAME/REN command to change
the names of file and subdirectories.
5. Use the RENAME/REN command with
wildcards to change the names of files and
subdirectories.
6. Use the MOVE command to move files and
subdirectories.
7. Use the RD command without parameters to
delete empty directories.
8. Use the RD command with parameters to
delete directories with files and other directories.
9. Back up a data disk using the DISKCOPY
command.
10. Back up files using the COPY command.
Chapter Overview
The more work you do with computers, the more
files you create, and the harder it is to manage
them. It becomes increasingly difficult to keep
track of what disks have which files and which
files are needed. In addition, as new data is keyed
into existing files, the names given to the files
may no longer be appropriate. It is also important
to be able to make a copy of an entire disk or
specific files on a disk so that data is not lost due
to a power failure, a power surge, or a bad disk.
In this chapter, you will continue to work with
commands that help you manage and manipulate
your files. This chapter will focus on the DEL
command, which allows you to delete files you
no longer need or want; the RENAME command,
which is used to rename files; and the MOVE
command, which allows you to move files and
subdirectories from one location to another. In
addition, you will look at the RD /S command,
which allows you to quickly eliminate a
subdirectory and all its files. You will also learn
why and how to back up specific files or an entire
disk so that you do not lose important data.
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CHAPTER 6
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
Eliminating Files with the DEL Command
In the various activities completed previously, you copied many files. The DATA
disk began as a disk absent of files. As you have been working, the number of files
on the disk has increased dramatically. This is typical when working with computers. There is a kind of Murphy’s Law that says you create as many files as you have
disk space. However, you do not want to keep files forever. The more files and/or
disks you have, the harder it is to keep track of what disks have which files and
which files are the ones you need. If you have floppy disks, you end up with many
floppies, and if you have a hard disk, you end up with many subdirectories and
many files. Often, you are not quite sure what files are where. By keeping only the
files you need on your disk, you will decrease the number of files you have to
manage.
Logic tells you that, if you can copy and create files, you should be able to
eliminate files by deleting or erasing them. You can do these tasks with the DEL
command, which is identical to another command, ERASE (for the purposes of this
book, the DEL command will be discussed with the understanding that ERASE
works the same way). This command is internal, always resident in memory. You do
need to be careful with this command. Once you press e after the DEL command, the file is gone forever. The operating system does not ask you if this is really
the file you want to get rid of; it simply obeys your instructions.
When a file is deleted at the command line, it cannot be recovered except by
certain special utility programs. Even then, recovery is not necessarily complete or
even possible. Technically, when you delete a file, the file is not actually physically
removed from the disk. Instead, the first character of the file name is replaced with a
special byte—the symbol s—that marks the file as deleted in the directory entry
table. Then a 0 is placed in each cluster entry in the FAT (file allocation table). The
value of 0 in each cluster means to the operating system that the space is now
available for reuse by other files, even though, in fact, the data is still on the disk.
When you create the next file, the operating system sees that there is space available
in the directory entry table and the FAT and assigns the new file to that space. The
old file is overwritten by the new file. If you are using the NTFS file system, the
process is similar; instead of the FAT, the file’s MFT entry, directory entry, and data
clusters are marked as available. The file’s data remains, though, until the clusters
get recycled to store some other file.
Special utility programs, such as Norton Utilities, can occasionally help you
recover deleted files, particularly if you realize immediately that you inadvertently
erased a file. In versions of the operating system from MS-DOS version 5.0 through
MS-DOS version 6.22, the UNDELETE command was available. UNDELETE was an
operating system utility supplied to recover deleted files. However, once a file was
overwritten by new data, nothing could recover the previous data. It was gone
forever. When you use the DEL command in the Windows operating system, you
cannot recover deleted files. UNDELETE is not supported by Windows XP Professional, nor was is supported by Windows 2000 Professional. In Windows 9x versions, you could boot to the command line, and occasionally recover deleted files,
but that is no longer the case. Thus, you should consider that, for all practical
6.2
ACTIVITY: USING THE DEL COMMAND
purposes, when you use DEL, you have indeed permanently removed the file or
files.
When you delete a file from a hard drive using My Computer or Windows
Explorer (using the Windows GUI), the file goes to the Recycle Bin and is then
recoverable. You can open the Recycle Bin, select the file you deleted, and restore it.
However, if you never empty your Recycle Bin, eventually it becomes full and
Windows begins deleting the oldest files in the Recycle Bin. Files are not recoverable
if you delete them from a removable disk, such as a Zip drive or a floppy disk. Files
deleted from the command prompt bypass the Recycle Bin and cannot be recovered
by the operating system.
The syntax of the DEL command (identical to ERASE) is:
DEL [/P] [/F] [/S] [/Q] [/A[[:]attributes]] names
ERASE [/P] [/F] [/S] [/Q] [/A[[:]attributes]] names
The /P parameter prompts you before each file is deleted. /F forces the deletion
of read-only files. /S deletes specified files from the current directory and all
subdirectories. /Q puts the command in quiet mode; you are not prompted to
confirm the deletion. /A deletes files based on specified attributes. The attributes
are abbreviated as follows: R, read-only; A, archive; s, system; h, hidden; -, a prefix
meaning “not.”
6.2
Activity: Using the DEL Command
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
When keying in commands, you may use the editing keys to correct
typographical errors.
Be sure the DATA disk, not the HOMEWORK disk, is in Drive A.
C:\> is displayed as the default drive and directory.
1
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
2
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.DOS *.AAA e
C:\>A:
C:\WUGXP>A:
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.DOS *.AAA
C:\WUGXP\WILDTWO.DOS
C:\WUGXP\WILDTHR.DOS
C:\WUGXP\WILDONE.DOS
3 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You changed the default drive to A. You then copied the files with
a .DOS extension from the \WUGXP directory, keeping the same file names but
giving them a different extension (.AAA), to the root of the DATA disk.
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3
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.AAA e
A:\>DIR *.AAA
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
3 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
182 WILDTWO.AAA
181 WILDTHR.AAA
181 WILDONE.AAA
544 bytes
1,429,504 bytes free
A:\>_
You used the DIR command to confirm that the .AAA files are on
the DATA disk. The work you wish to do is delete files. The DEL command is an
internal command and was installed in memory (RAM) when you booted the
system. It will remain in memory until you turn off the power. It is a good practice
to use DIR before DEL with the same parameters. In this way, you can be extra sure
which files you will be deleting.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR WILDONE.AAA e
A:\>DIR WILDONE.AAA
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
12/31/2001
04:32 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
181 WILDONE.AAA
181 bytes
1,429,504 bytes free
A:\>_
The DIR command verified that the file called WILDONE.AAA is
located on the DATA disk.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DEL WILDONE.AAA e
A:\>DEL WILDONE.AAA
A:\>_
You asked the DEL command to eliminate the file called
WILDONE.AAA, located on the DATA disk. You did not need to include the drive
letter or \ because the operating system assumed the default drive and directory
and looked only for the file called WILDONE.AAA on the DATA disk in the root.
6.3
DELETING MULTIPLE FILES
However, it appears that nothing happened. All you got on the screen was the
system prompt.
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR WILDONE.AAA e
A:\>DIR WILDONE.AAA
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
The DIR command confirmed that the file is gone. You now know
that the DEL command was executed and that it removed the file called
WILDONE.AAA. It is no longer on the DATA disk. What if the file you wanted to
delete was not on the disk?
7
Key in the following: A:\>DEL NOFILE.XXX e
A:\>DEL NOFILE.XXX
Could Not Find A:\NOFILE.XXX
A:\>_
In order for the DEL command to execute, it must be able to find
the file to delete. Here, the file was not found.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DEL e
A:\>DEL
The syntax of the command is incorrect.
A:\>_
Not only must the operating system find the file but it also must
know what file to look for. Remember, the syntax is DEL names.
6.3
Deleting Multiple Files
You can delete more than one file at a time with the DEL command. List the files
you want to delete after the DEL command, separated by spaces. Remember, it is
always a good idea to use the DIR command first.
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6.4
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
Activity: Using DEL with
Multiple Parameters
1
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.DOS *.BBB e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.BBB e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.DOS *.BBB
C:\WUGXP\WILDTWO.DOS
C:\WUGXP\WILDTHR.DOS
C:\WUGXP\WILDONE.DOS
3 file(s) copied.
A:\>DIR *.BBB
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
3 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
182 WILDTWO.BBB
181 WILDTHR.BBB
181 WILDONE.BBB
544 bytes
1,428,480 bytes free
A:\>_
You copied the same files from the previous exercise and used the
DIR command to verify their presence on the DATA disk.
3
Key in the following:
A:\>DIR WILDONE.BBB WILDTWO.BBB WILDTHR.BBB e
A:\>DIR WILDONE.BBB WILDTWO.BBB WILDTHR.BBB
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
12/31/2001
04:32 PM
181 WILDONE.BBB
Directory of A:\
12/31/2001
04:32 PM
182 WILDTWO.BBB
Directory of A:\
12/31/2001
04:32 PM
3 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
181 WILDTHR.BBB
544 bytes
1,428,480 bytes free
A:\>_
You have identified the three files you want to delete.
6.6
4
ACTIVITY: USING THE DEL COMMAND WITH INDIVIDUAL FILES
Key in the following:
A:\>DEL WILDONE.BBB WILDTWO.BBB WILDTHR.BBB e
A:\>DEL WILDONE.BBB WILDTWO.BBB WILDTHR.BBB
A:\>_
No message appears on the screen. Were the files in fact deleted?
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.BBB e
A:\>DIR *.BBB
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
The DIR command has confirmed that the files were deleted.
6.5
Deleting Files on Other
Drives and Directories
Using the DEL command to eliminate files works exactly the same on other drives
and subdirectories as it did in the previous activities. The syntax of the command
remains DEL names. The only difference is that you must specify which disk drive
and which directory you want to look on. Once again, the operating system follows
your instructions exactly as keyed in; it does not check with you to see if you are
deleting the correct file. One of the most common mistakes computer users make is
placing the drive designator or subdirectory in the wrong place, which can completely change the meaning and results of an instruction. Again, the syntax of the
command is:
DEL names
DEL is the command; names represents the designated drives, subdirectories, and
names of the files you wish to delete. Notice that DEL and names are not in brackets, so they are required parts of the command.
6.6
Activity: Using the DEL Command
with Individual Files
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>MD TRIP e
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2
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.99 TRIP e
3
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.JAZ TRIP e
A:\>MD TRIP
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.99 TRIP
C:\WUGXP\APR.99
C:\WUGXP\FEB.99
C:\WUGXP\MAR.99
C:\WUGXP\JAN.99
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.JAZ TRIP
C:\WUGXP\GREEN.JAZ
C:\WUGXP\BLUE.JAZ
2 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You created another subdirectory on the DATA disk called TRIP.
You then copied files from the \WUGXP subdirectory on the hard disk to the
subdirectory called TRIP on the DATA disk. You used the COPY command. You had
to specify where the source files were located, C:\WUGXP. However, for the
destination of these files, since the default drive is A and the default directory is the
root, the OS assumed the default, and you did not have to specify either the destination drive or the root directory in the destination. If you had not included the name
of the subdirectory TRIP, where you wanted the files copied, the operating system
would have assumed the default and copied the files to the root directory of the
DATA disk. The longhand or absolute path version of the command is
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.99 A:\TRIP\*.99.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\JUP.99 e
A:\>DIR TRIP\JUP.99
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/30/2001
03:42 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.99
190 bytes
1,425,408 bytes free
A:\>_
The file is there. You successfully copied it.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DEL TRIP\JUP.99 e
6.6
ACTIVITY: USING THE DEL COMMAND WITH INDIVIDUAL FILES
A:\>DEL TRIP\JUP.99
A:\>_
You had to provide the proper syntax to tell the DEL command
where the JUP.99 file was located. It was located in the subdirectory TRIP under the
root directory on the DATA disk. Since the default drive is A, you did not need to
include the drive letter. Since the default subdirectory is the root (\), the \ is assumed and does not need to be keyed in. However, the \ between the subdirectory
TRIP and the file name JUP.99 does need to be keyed in. In this case \ is used as a
delimiter between the subdirectory name and the file name. Has the file been
deleted?
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\JUP.99 e
A:\>DIR TRIP\JUP.99
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
File Not Found
A:\>_
The file called JUP.99 is gone from the subdirectory called TRIP on
the DATA disk. Look at the display. The third line returned by the command,
Directory of A:\TRIP, tells you that DIR looked only in the subdirectory called
TRIP.
7
Key in the following: A:\>CD /D C:\WUGXP e
8
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY HELLO.TXT A:\ e
A:\>CD /D C:\WUGXP
C:\WUGXP>COPY HELLO.TXT A:\
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>_
You changed the default drive and the default subdirectory from
the root of the hard disk to the subdirectory called \WUGXP on Drive C. You then
copied the file called HELLO.TXT from the \WUGXP directory to the root directory
of the DATA disk. The purpose of this activity is to have two identically named files
on different drives.
9
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR HELLO.TXT e
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10 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\HELLO.TXT e
C:\WUGXP>DIR HELLO.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
05/30/2000
04:32 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 HELLO.TXT
53 bytes
7,346,790,400 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\HELLO.TXT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/30/2000
04:32 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 HELLO.TXT
53 bytes
1,425,408 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
You have two files called HELLO.TXT. One file is on the hard disk
in the subdirectory \WUGXP. The other file is on the DATA disk. You want to delete
the file on the DATA disk, not on the hard disk.
11 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DEL A:\HELLO.TXT e
C:\WUGXP>DEL A:\HELLO.TXT
C:\WUGXP>_
You asked DEL to erase the file on the DATA disk called
HELLO.TXT. The file should be gone from the DATA disk, but the file called
HELLO.TXT on the hard disk (Drive C, subdirectory \WUGXP) should still be there.
12 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR HELLO.TXT e
13 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\HELLO.TXT e
C:\WUGXP>DIR HELLO.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
05/30/2000
04:32 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 HELLO.TXT
53 bytes
7,346,790,400 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\HELLO.TXT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
6.6
ACTIVITY: USING THE DEL COMMAND WITH INDIVIDUAL FILES
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
C:\WUGXP>_
The file called HELLO.TXT is still in the subdirectory \WUGXP
on the hard disk, but the file called HELLO.TXT on the DATA disk is gone.
14 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\BLUE.JAZ e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\BLUE.JAZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/31/2001
06:51 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
125 BLUE.JAZ
125 bytes
1,426,944 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
There is a file called BLUE.JAZ in the subdirectory TRIP on the
DATA disk. To delete this file, you once again follow the same command you used
with the DIR command DEL command, substituting DEL for DIR. In this way, you
can be sure you of exactly what you will delete.
15 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DEL A:\TRIP\BLUE.JAZ e
C:\WUGXP>DEL A:\TRIP\BLUE.JAZ
C:\WUGXP>_
The syntax for the DEL command is DEL names. You used the
drive letter of the DATA disk, then TRIP and BLUE.JAZ for the name. The second
backslash was mandatory because you needed a delimiter between the file name
and the subdirectory name. This backslash is similar to the period that you used to
separate the file name from the file extension. Is the file gone?
16 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\BLUE.JAZ e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\BLUE.JAZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
File Not Found
C:\WUGXP>_
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USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
The file BLUE.JAZ from the directory TRIP on the DATA disk is
indeed gone.
17 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>CD \ e
18 Key in the following: C:\>A: e
C:\WUGXP>CD \
C:\>A:
A:\>_
You returned to the root directory of the hard disk. You then made
the root directory of the DATA disk the default drive and directory.
6.7
Using Wildcards with the DEL Command
You have been erasing or deleting files either one at a time, or by listing each file’s
complete name. Often you want to erase many files. It is tedious to erase many files
one at a time. You can use the wildcards with the DEL command to delete several
files at one time. Wildcards allow you to erase a group of files with a one-line
command. Although you can certainly delete files in My Computer, you must select
each file to be deleted, which takes time. It is simply quicker and easier deleting files
from the command line. However, at the command line, be exceedingly careful when
using wildcards with the DEL command. Once again, the strength of wildcards is
also their weakness. A global file specification means global. You can eliminate a
group of files very quickly. If you are not careful, you could erase files you want to
keep. In fact, you probably will some day say, “Oh no, those files are gone.” However, this does not mean you should never use wildcards. They are far too useful.
Just be very, very careful.
6.8
Activity: Using the DEL Command
Note 1: The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Note 2: If the .TMP files are not on the root of the DATA disk, they may be copied
from the \WUGXP subdirectory.
1
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TMP e
A:\>DIR *.TMP
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41
01:08
01:46
07:08
AM
PM
PM
PM
190
406
148
478
JUP.TMP
MER.TMP
AST.TMP
VEN.TMP
6.8
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
ACTIVITY: USING THE DEL COMMAND
1,222 bytes
1,427,456 bytes free
A:\>_
You should see four files with .TMP as the file extension displayed
on the screen. Remember, prior to doing a global erase, it is always wise to key in
DIR with the same global file specification you are going to use with the DEL
command. In this way, you can see ahead of time exactly which files will be deleted.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DEL *.TMP e
A:\>DEL *.TMP
A:\>_
You asked DEL to erase or delete every file with the .TMP file
extension on the DATA disk in the root directory. The wildcard * represented any file
name. Only the system prompt appears on the screen. The DEL command executed,
erasing those *.TMP files quickly and permanently. To verify this, use the DIR
command.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TMP e
A:\>DIR *.TMP
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
Those *.TMP files are, indeed, gone from the root directory on the
DATA disk. They are not recoverable by the operating system. It must be emphasized that before you use a wildcard to delete a group of files you should use the
DIR command to see the files you are going to delete. For instance, if you had a file
called TEST.TMP that you had forgotten about and that you did not want to delete,
the directory display would include it as follows:
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
05/01/1998
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
05:00p
5 File(s)
190 JUP.TMP
406 MER.TMP
148 AST.TMP
478 VEN.TMP
500 TEST.TMP
1,722 bytes
You would have been made aware of the presence of the TEST.TMP file using
the DIR command, and would thus have avoided losing a needed file. Using the
259
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DIR command with wildcards will let you display on the screen all the files that
have been selected by *.TMP, which includes the TEST.TMP file that you do not
want to erase. If you had keyed in DEL *.TMP, all those .TMP files would have been
deleted. Remember, the computer does not come back and tell you, “Oh, by the way,
TEST.TMP was included with the *.TMP files; did you want to erase that file?” The
DEL command simply eliminates all the .TMP files because that is what you told it
to do. You can also use wildcards when files are in a subdirectory.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\*.99 e
A:\>DIR TRIP\*.99
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
01:08 PM
3 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 AST.99
478 VEN.99
406 MER.99
1,032 bytes
1,429,504 bytes free
A:\>_
There are three files with the extension .99 on the DATA disk in the
subdirectory TRIP. The DEL command works the same way.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 e
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99
A:\>_
You asked DEL to erase or delete every file on the DATA disk in
the subdirectory TRIP that has any file name and has the file extension .99. The
wildcard * represented any file name. Only the system prompt appears on the
screen. The DEL command executed, erasing those *.99 files quickly and permanently. To verify this, you can use the DIR command.
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\*.99 e
A:\>DIR TRIP\*.99
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
File Not Found
A:\>_
6.10
ACTIVITY: USING /P AND /S WITH THE DEL COMMAND
The *.99 files are indeed gone from the TRIP directory.
6.9
The /P and /S Parameters
with the DEL Command
Prior to DOS 4.0, the DEL command provided no way for you to confirm deletions.
The file was simply erased. In DOS 4.0 an enhancement was introduced—the /P
parameter. This parameter allows you to tell the DEL command to prompt you with
the file name prior to deleting the file. The syntax is:
DEL [/P] [/S] names
/P is one of the optional fixed parameters that work with the DEL command. Its
purpose is to display each file name to verify that you really want to delete it. You
can think of the P as standing for “prompt you for an answer.” This parameter is
particularly useful when you are using wildcards. It minimizes the risk of accidental
file deletions. The /S parameter is also exceedingly useful, as it will traverse the
directory tree so you do not have to delete files individually throughout your disk
structure. Several new parameters were also added in Windows 2000 Professional,
and remain available in Windows XP. These include the ability to force the deletion
of read-only files (/F), to delete files based on certain attributes (/A), and to not ask
for confirmation of a deletion (/Q).
6.10
Activity: Using /P and /S
with the DEL Command
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.99 e
2
Key in the folloiwng: A:\>MD TRIP\CHINA e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.99
C:\WUGXP\AST.99
C:\WUGXP\VEN.99
C:\WUGXP\JUP.99
C:\WUGXP\MER.99
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>MD TRIP\CHINA
A:\>_
You have copied the files with the .99 extension from the WUGXP
directory to the root of the DATA disk and kept the file names the same.
3
Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.99 TRIP e
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4
Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.99 TRIP\CHINA e
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP TRIP\CHINA e
A:\>COPY *.99 TRIP\CHINA
AST.99
VEN.99
JUP.99
MER.99
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>DIR TRIP TRIP\CHINA
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
03/25/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
02:11 PM
<DIR>
02:11 PM
<DIR>
06:52 PM
02:29 PM
<DIR>
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
03:42 PM
01:08 PM
5 File(s)
.
..
105 GREEN.JAZ
CHINA
148 AST.99
478 VEN.99
190 JUP.99
406 MER.99
1,327 bytes
Directory of A:\TRIP\CHINA
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
02:29 PM
<DIR>
.
02:29 PM
<DIR>
..
01:46 PM
148 AST.99
07:08 PM
478 VEN.99
03:42 PM
190 JUP.99
01:08 PM
406 MER.99
4 File(s)
1,222 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,424,384 bytes free
A:\>_
You copied the files with the extension of .99 to the TRIP and the
TRIP\CHINA subdirectories on the DATA disk and confirmed that they are there.
The file called GREEN.JAZ is also in that subdirectory. Next, you are going to
choose some of the .99 files to delete.
6
Key in the following: A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P e
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P
A:\TRIP\AST.99, Delete (Y/N)?
The /P parameter, when included in the command line, prompts
you by asking if you want to delete the file called AST.99 in the subdirectory TRIP
on the DATA disk. When you have a Y/N choice, press either Y for “Yes” or N for
“No.” Pressing e takes no action.
7
Key in the following: N e
6.10
ACTIVITY: USING /P AND /S WITH THE DEL COMMAND
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P
TRIP\AST.99,
Delete (Y/N)?N
TRIP\VEN.99,
Delete (Y/N)?
DEL found the next file and asked if you wanted to delete the file
called VEN.99. If you are using NTFS, the next file that will be found will be JUP.99
because of the order the files were copied to the floppy disk.
8
If VEN.99 is displayed, key in Y. If JUP.99 is displayed, key in N.
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P
TRIP\AST.99,
TRIP\VEN.99,
TRIP\JUP.99,
Delete (Y/N)?N
Delete (Y/N)?Y
Delete (Y/N)?
DEL found the next file and asked if you wanted to delete the file
called JUP.99 or if you are using NTFS, the file will be MER.99.
9
If the displayed file is JUP.99, key in N. If the file displayed is MER.99, key in Y.
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P
A:\TRIP\AST.99, Delete
A:\TRIP\VEN.99, Delete
A:\TRIP\JUP.99, Delete
A:\TRIP\MER.99, Delete
(Y/N)? N
(Y/N)? Y
(Y/N)? N
(Y/N)
DEL found the next file and asked you if you wanted to delete the
file called MER.99. If you are using NTFS, the displayed file will be VEN.99.
10 If the displayed file is MER.99, key in Y. If the displayed file is VEN.99, key in Y.
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P
A:\TRIP\AST.99, Delete
A:\TRIP\VEN.99, Delete
A:\TRIP\JUP.99, Delete
A:\TRIP\MER.99, Delete
(Y/N)?
(Y/N)?
(Y/N)?
(Y/N)?
N
Y
N
Y
A:\>_
You were returned to the system prompt because there were no
more files with the extension .99 on the DATA disk in the subdirectory TRIP. You
were able to delete files selectively. You deleted the files VEN.99 and MER.99 but
kept the files AST.99 and JUP.99. You can verify this by using the DIR command.
11 Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP e
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A:\>DIR TRIP
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
03/25/2002
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
02:11 PM
<DIR>
.
02:11 PM
<DIR>
..
06:52 PM
105 GREEN.JAZ
02:29 PM
<DIR>
CHINA
01:46 PM
148 AST.99
03:42 PM
190 JUP.99
3 File(s)
443 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,425,408 bytes free
A:\>_
You retained the files AST.99 and JUP.99 but deleted VEN.99 and
MER.99. The file GREEN.JAZ was not deleted because it did not have the file
extension .99. You can use the /S parameter to traverse the directory tree. You can
also use more than one parameter at a time.
12 Key in the following: A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P /S e
13 Key in N e, then N e again.
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P /S
A:\TRIP\AST.99, Delete (Y/N)? N
A:\TRIP\JUP.99, Delete (Y/N)? N
A:\TRIP\CHINA\AST.99, Delete (Y/N)?
You answered “No, do not delete the files AST.99 and JUP.99 in
the TRIP directory,” but since you included the /S parameter, the DEL command
continued down the tree looking for all files that ended in .99.
14 Press Y and e until there are no more prompts.
A:\>DEL TRIP\*.99 /P /S
A:\TRIP\AST.99, Delete (Y/N)? N
A:\TRIP\JUP.99, Delete (Y/N)? N
A:\TRIP\CHINA\AST.99, Delete (Y/N)?
Deleted file - A:\TRIP\CHINA\AST.99
A:\TRIP\CHINA\VEN.99, Delete (Y/N)?
Deleted file - A:\TRIP\CHINA\VEN.99
A:\TRIP\CHINA\JUP.99, Delete (Y/N)?
Deleted file - A:\TRIP\CHINA\JUP.99
A:\TRIP\CHINA\MER.99, Delete (Y/N)?
Deleted file - A:\TRIP\CHINA\MER.99
A:\>_
Y
Y
Y
Y
Each time you pressed Y, you deleted the *.99 files in the
TRIP\CHINA directory. You also see a more complete message that tells you which
6.11
CHANGING FILE NAMES
files have been deleted. Again, your order of files will be different, if your hard disk
is using NTFS.
15 Key in the following: A:\>RD TRIP\CHINA e
A:\>RD TRIP\CHINA
A:\>_
You have removed the CHINA directory. If there had been any
files left in the CHINA directory, you would not have been able to use the RD
command to remove it.
6.11
Changing File Names
Often when working with files, you want to change a file name. For example, you
may wish to change the name of a file to indicate an older version. You might also
think of a more descriptive file name. As the contents of a file change, the old name
may no longer reflect the contents. When you make a typographical error, you want
to be able to correct it. One way to change the name of a file is to copy it to a different name. The COPY command can, in this way, help to change the name of a file.
You could, for example, copy the file A:\JUP.99 to A:\TRIP\JUP.00. You did not
change the name of an existing file—you created a new file with the same contents
under a different name.
The operating system supplies a way to change existing file names using the
internal command RENAME. RENAME does exactly what it says; it changes the
name of a file. The contents of the file do not change, only the name of the file. The
syntax for this command is:
RENAME [drive:][path][directoryname1 ¦ filename1]
[directoryname2 ¦ filename2]
or
REN [drive:][path][directoryname1 ¦ filename1]
[directoryname2 ¦ filename2]
RENAME does not let you specify a new drive or path for filename2 or
directoryname2. Remember, you are not making a copy of a file. It is like pasting a
new label on an existing file folder. That file folder does not get moved in the
process. You are dealing with only one file when using REN. In the syntax diagram,
filename1 and filename2 refer to the same file—filename1 will be changed to filename2.
You are changing the file name only, not creating another copy of it with a new
name.
The RENAME command has two forms, RENAME or REN, with exactly the
same syntax. Most computer users choose REN, simply because it has fewer keystrokes. The syntax is the command REN, the first parameter (the old file name),
and the second parameter (the new file name).
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Renaming files at the command line is especially useful. In My Computer or
Windows Explorer, renaming files is always a two-step process. First, you must
select the file; then, you must rename it. At the command line, you can accomplish
this task in one step.
6.12
Activity: Using the REN
Command to Rename Files
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\TV e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\TV
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\TV\COMEDY.TV
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\TV\DRAMA.TV
2 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You copied two files from the subdirectory
\WUGXP\MEDIA\TV from the hard disk to the root directory of the DATA disk.
Notice that after TV you did not have to specify a file name. When you key in a
command ending in the name of a directory rather than a file specification, *.* is
assumed. The destination is also assumed. It is the default drive and directory—in
this case the root directory of the DATA disk.
2
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE COMEDY.TV e
A:\>TYPE COMEDY.TV
COMEDY TELEVISION SERIES
Dharma & Greg
Bob Patterson
Spin City
Everybody Loves Raymond
Frasier
Friends
The Drew Carey Show
Will & Grace
Just Shoot Me
A:\>_
You are displaying the contents of the file called COMEDY.TV
located in the root directory on the DATA disk. You opened the file folder called
COMEDY.TV and looked inside.
3
Key in the following: A:\>REN COMEDY.TV FUNNY.TV e
6.12
ACTIVITY: USING THE REN COMMAND TO RENAME FILES
A:\>REN COMEDY.TV FUNNY.TV
A:\>_
Using the command REN changed the name of the file called
COMEDY.TV to FUNNY.TV. Since the default was the DATA disk and the default
directory was the root, the operating system looked only on the root directory of the
DATA disk for the file called COMEDY.TV. Once you pressed e, you got back
only the system prompt. Did anything happen?
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR COMEDY.TV e
A:\>DIR COMEDY.TV
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
Once you have renamed a file, it no longer exists under its old file
name.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR FUNNY.TV e
A:\>DIR FUNNY.TV
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
01:14 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
164 FUNNY.TV
164 bytes
1,426,944 bytes free
A:\>_
The above display demonstrates that the file called FUNNY.TV is
on the DATA disk in the root directory. You know that the file named COMEDY.TV
is no longer on the DATA disk. Are the contents of the file FUNNY.TV the same as
the contents of the file that was named COMEDY.TV?
6
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE FUNNY.TV e
A:\>TYPE FUNNY.TV
COMEDY TELEVISION SERIES
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Dharma & Greg
Bob Patterson
Spin City
Everybody Loves Raymond
Frasier
Friends
The Drew Carey Show
Will & Grace
Just Shoot Me
A:\>_
As you can see, you changed the file name from COMEDY.TV to
FUNNY.TV, but the contents of the file did not change. REN works the same way
with a file in a subdirectory. You just have to follow the syntax (only the partial
syntax, that which refers to renaming files, is shown here):
REN [drive:][path][filename1] [filename2]
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\GREEN.JAZ e
A:\>DIR TRIP\GREEN.JAZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/31/2001
06:52 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
105 GREEN.JAZ
105 bytes
1,426,944 bytes free
A:\>_
The file called GREEN.JAZ is in the subdirectory called TRIP on
the DATA disk. Using REN is different from using COPY. The COPY syntax requires
that you place the path name in front of the source file and the destination file. You
are dealing with two files; thus, each file could be in a separate location. This
situation is not true with REN. You are dealing with only one file and are changing
only one file name. You are not moving the file; thus, the path name is placed in
front of the source file only.
8
Key in the following: A:\>REN TRIP\GREEN.JAZ TRIP\RED.JAZ e
A:\>REN TRIP\GREEN.JAZ TRIP\RED.JAZ
The syntax of the command is incorrect.
A:\>_
The message is descriptive. The error message refers to second
part of the command, TRIP\RED.JAZ. That portion of the command syntax is
incorrect. It is incorrect because you placed a subdirectory before the new file name.
6.13
CHANGING THE NAMES OF SUBDIRECTORIES
The REN command already knew where the file to be renamed, GREEN.JAZ, was
located. It did not the location repeated.
9
Key in the following: A:\>REN TRIP\GREEN.JAZ RED.JAZ e
A:\>REN TRIP\GREEN.JAZ RED.JAZ
A:\>_
You received no error message, indicating that this command was
executed. All the REN command needed to correctly execute the command was the
location in the first part of the command, TRIP\GREEN.JAZ, and the new name,
RED.JAZ. You will confirm that the file name was changed from GREEN.JAZ to
RED.JAZ using the DIR command.
10 Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\*.JAZ e
A:\>DIR TRIP\*.JAZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/31/2001
06:52 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
105 RED.JAZ
105 bytes
1,426,944 bytes free
A:\>_
You can see that the file in the TRIP subdirectory with the extension .JAZ is now called RED.JAZ instead of GREEN.JAZ.
6.13
Changing the Names of Subdirectories
In previous versions of MS-DOS, the REN command worked only with files. With
the release of Windows 95, it became possible to use the REN command to rename
subdirectories. Previously, you used the MOVE command to rename subdirectories.
Remember the syntax.
REN [drive:][path][directoryname1 ¦ filename1]
[directoryname2 ¦ filename2]
When renaming subdirectories, the partial syntax is:
REN [drive:][path][directoryname1] [directoryname2]
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6.14
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
Activity: Using the REN Command
to Rename Subdirectories
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive and the
default directory.
1
Key in the following: A:\>MD PAGEONE e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR P*.* e
A:\>MD PAGEONE
A:\>DIR P*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
03/25/2002
02:59 PM
<DIR>
PAGEONE
0 File(s)
0 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,426,432 bytes free
A:\>_
You have created a new directory called PAGEONE on the root of
the DATA disk in the A drive. You have verified its existence by using the DIR
command. There is only one entry on the root of the DATA disk that begins with the
letter P.
3
Key in the following: A:\>REN PAGEONE PAGETWO e
A:\>REN PAGEONE PAGETWO
A:\>_
You received no error messages, so the command executed. Was
the subdirectory PAGEONE actually renamed to PAGETWO?
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR P*.* e
A:\>DIR P*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
03/25/2002
A:\>_
02:59 PM
<DIR>
PAGETWO
0 File(s)
0 bytes
1 Dir(s)
1,426,432 bytes free
6.14
ACTIVITY: USING THE REN COMMAND TO RENAME SUBDIRECTORIES
You have verified that the REN command successfully renamed
the directory PAGEONE to PAGETWO. PAGEONE no longer exists under its
original name. It is now PAGETWO. You can also rename subdirectories that are
within other subdirectories.
5
Key in the following: A:\>MD PAGETWO\DIRONE e
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR PAGETWO e
A:\>MD PAGETWO\DIRONE
A:\>DIR PAGETWO
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\PAGETWO
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
02:59 PM
<DIR>
.
02:59 PM
<DIR>
..
03:01 PM
<DIR>
DIRONE
0 File(s)
0 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,425,920 bytes free
A:\>_
You have created a subdirectory called DIRONE in the existing
subdirectory PAGETWO. You have also used the DIR command to display the
contents of the PAGETWO directory to verify the new subdirectory just created
called DIRONE. You will now rename the new directory.
7
Key in the following: A:\>REN PAGETWO\DIRONE DIRTWO e
A:\>REN PAGETWO\DIRONE DIRTWO
A:\>_
You have renamed the subdirectory DIRONE to DIRTWO. Again,
you see no error messages, so the command executed. You can verify the change
with the DIR command.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR PAGETWO e
A:\>DIR PAGETWO
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\PAGETWO
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
02:59 PM
02:59 PM
03:01 PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
.
..
DIRTWO
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0 File(s)
3 Dir(s)
0 bytes
1,425,920 bytes free
A:\>_
You have used the DIR command to confirm that you have,
indeed, renamed the subdirectory DIRONE to the new name of DIRTWO. This
subdirectory structure will no longer be used. You will use the RD /S command,
covered later in this chapter, to remove the entire structure.
9
Key in the following: A:\>RD PAGETWO /S e
A:\>RD PAGETWO /S
PAGETWO, Are you sure (Y/N)?
The RD /S command is asking you if you are sure you want to
delete the PAGETWO subdirectory and all of its contents.
10 Key in the following: Y e
11 Key in the following: A:\>DIR P*.* e
A:\>DIR P*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
As you can see with the DIR command, you have successfully
removed the NAMETWO directory structure.
6.15
Using REN with Wildcards
When you wish to change the name of a single file or directory, you can use My
Computer from the GUI. It is easy to do—just right-click the file or folder and
choose Rename. If, however, you have numerous files to rename and they have
something in common, such as they all have the .ABC file extension, using the
command line is more efficient. You can use the REN or RENAME command with
the wildcards ? and *, allowing you to change many file names with a one-line
command.
The wildcards or global file specifications are so “global” that, prior to renaming
files, it is wise to do a directory display with the wildcards you want to use so that
you can see what files are going to be renamed, just as you use a directory display
before you use the DEL command with wildcards. You do not want to rename a
subdirectory accidentally along with a group of files. This can happen all too easily.
6.16
ACTIVITY: USING REN WITH WILDCARDS
Once a file is renamed, you can never find the file under its old name. This rule has
caused havoc for users because it seems as if the file is lost. The file is still on the
disk, and you can find it, but only under its new name.
6.16
Activity: Using REN with Wildcards
Note 1:
Note 2:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
This activity assumes you have files on the DATA disk with the file extension .NEW. If you do not, you may copy them from \WUGXP to the DATA
disk.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR ???.NEW e
A:\>DIR ???.NEW
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.NEW
406 MER.NEW
148 AST.NEW
478 VEN.NEW
1,222 bytes
1,426,944 bytes free
A:\>_
You have four files with file names of three characters and with
the extension .NEW. You used ??? instead of *. When you used ???.NEW, the ???
selected only files that had a file name of three characters or less. Had you used *
instead of ???, you would have selected all file names that had an extension of
.NEW. That would have included such files as BONJOUR
.NEW. Your objective is to rename these four files, keeping their file names but
changing the file extension from .NEW to .BUD. You could rename these files one at
a time, REN JUP.NEW JUP.BUD, then REN MER.NEW MER.BUD, then REN
AST.NEW AST.BUD, and REN VEN.NEW VEN.BUD. However, this repetition
becomes very tiresome. Using wildcards allows you to rename these four files at one
time.
2
Key in the following: A:\>REN ???.NEW *.BUD e
A:\>REN ???.NEW *.BUD
A:\>_
All that is displayed is the system prompt. Was the work done?
Are the files renamed? To verify that you did rename these files, use the DIR command.
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3
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
Key in the following: A:\>DIR ???.NEW *.BUD e
A:\>DIR ???.NEW *.BUD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.BUD
406 MER.BUD
148 AST.BUD
478 VEN.BUD
1,222 bytes
1,426,944 bytes free
A:\>_
Files with file names of three characters and the extension .NEW
no longer exist on the DATA disk. With the REN command and the use of the
wildcards, you renamed four files with one command. When you use multiple
parameters on the command line, you do not see the message File Not Found. You
simply see the A: prompt with no file name following it. You can also use wildcards
with subdirectories.
4
Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.BUD TRIP e
A:\>COPY *.BUD TRIP
JUP.BUD
MER.BUD
AST.BUD
VEN.BUD
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You copied files with the .BUD extension from the root directory
of the DATA disk to a subdirectory called TRIP on the DATA disk.
5
Key in the following: A:\>REN TRIP\*.BUD *.PEN e
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\*.BUD e
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\*.PEN e
A:\>REN TRIP\*.BUD *.PEN
A:\>DIR TRIP\*.BUD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
6.17
USING RENAME ON DIFFERENT DRIVES AND DIRECTORIES
File Not Found
A:\>DIR TRIP\*.PEN
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
07:08 PM
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
478 VEN.PEN
190 JUP.PEN
406 MER.PEN
148 AST.PEN
1,222 bytes
1,424,896 bytes free
A:\>_
You successfully renamed all the files with the .BUD extension in
the subdirectory TRIP on the DATA disk to a new set of files with the same file
name but with the file extension of .PEN.
6.17
Using RENAME on Different
Drives and Directories
Since REN is an internal command, you can use it at any time, for any file, in any
drive, and in any directory. If you wish to rename a file on a different drive, you
must specify on which drive the old file is located. If you want the file renamed in a
different directory, you must specify in which directory the file is located. In the
syntax of REN OLDFILE.EXT NEWFILE.EXT, the operating system looks for
OLDFILE.EXT on the designated drive and directory. It renames the file and leaves
the file where it found it unless you preface OLDFILE.EXT with a drive letter. When
you key in the command REN B:OLDFILE.EXT NEWFILE.EXT, only the disk in
Drive B will be searched for the file called OLDFILE.EXT. If a directory is involved,
you must also include its name, so the command would read
REN C:\JUNK\OLDFILE.EXT NEWFILE.EXT
There is a substantial difference between the COPY command and the REN
command. With the COPY command, you can copy a file from one disk to another
disk or one directory to another directory, ending up with two identical files in
different locations. You cannot do this with the REN command because it changes
the names of files in only one directory or disk at a time. Remember, with REN you
are changing the name of an existing file in a specific location. REN finds a file by its
name, which is the first parameter in the REN command, on the designated disk or
directory. The second parameter must be the new name only, not including a repeat
of the location. REN cannot move a file from one location to another, nor can it copy
a file. It simply renames a file, leaving it where it found it.
275
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CHAPTER 6
6.18
Activity: Using RENAME
on Different Drives
Note:
1
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>CD /D C:\WUGXP e
A:\>CD /D C:\WUGXP
C:\WUGXP>_
You have changed the default drive to C: and have made
\WUGXP the default directory.
2
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR ASTRO.TXT e
3
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>COPY ASTRO.TXT A:\ e
4
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\ASTRO.TXT e
C:\WUGXP>DIR ASTRO.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
01:46 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 ASTRO.TXT
148 bytes
7,346,561,024 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>COPY ASTRO.TXT A:\
1 file(s) copied.
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\ASTRO.TXT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
01:46 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 ASTRO.TXT
148 bytes
1,424,384 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
The directory display tells you that the file called ASTRO.TXT
does now exist on both the root of the DATA disk in the A drive and in the
\WUGXP subdirectory on the C drive.
5
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TYPE A:\ASTRO.TXT e
C:\WUGXP>TYPE A:\ASTRO.TXT
The study of Astronomy came from Astrology.
6.18
ACTIVITY: USING RENAME ON DIFFERENT DRIVES
Most scientists no longer believe in
Astrology. The science of Astronomy is
changing every day.
C:\WUGXP>_
You used the TYPE command to see the contents of the file called
ASTRO.TXT located on the DATA disk.
6
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>REN A:\ASTRO.TXT A:\AST.TST e
C:\WUGXP>REN A:\ASTRO.TXT A:\AST.TST
The syntax of the command is incorrect.
C:\WUGXP>_
Remember, the syntax of this command is:
REN [drive:][path]oldfile.ext newfile.ext
Since the operating system knows you cannot change a file name on any other
disk except where the original file is located, it will not allow you to put a drive
designator before the new file name.
7
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>REN A:\ASTRO.TXT AST.TST e
C:\WUGXP>REN A:\ASTRO.TXT AST.TST
C:\WUGXP> _
You see no messages because the syntax of the command you
issued is correct. The file called ASTRO.TXT is in the root directory of the DATA
disk. You requested that REN change the name of this file from ASTRO.TXT to a
new file name AST.TST.
8
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR ASTRO.TXT e
9
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\ASTRO.TXT e
C:\WUGXP>DIR ASTRO.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
01:46 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 ASTRO.TXT
148 bytes
7,346,561,024 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\ASTRO.TXT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
277
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Directory of A:\
File Not Found
C:\WUGXP>_
You did not rename the file ASTRO.TXT on the hard disk in the
\WUGXP directory, only the one on the DATA disk. You got the message File Not
Found for the DATA disk because the file no longer exists under the file name
A:\ASTRO.TXT.
10 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\AST.TST e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\AST.TST
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
01:46 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 AST.TST
148 bytes
1,424,384 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
You successfully renamed the file in the root directory of the DATA
disk from ASTRO.TXT to AST.TST. Does the file AST.TST have the same contents
as ASTRO.TXT? It should because renaming changes only the file name, not the
contents. To verify this, you can use the TYPE command.
11 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TYPE A:\AST.TST e
C:\WUGXP>TYPE A:\AST.TST
The study of Astronomy came from Astrology.
Most scientists no longer believe in
Astrology. The science of Astronomy is
changing every day.
C:\WUGXP>_
If you check the screen display following Step 4, you will see that
the file contents are identical. REN works the same way with subdirectories on other
drives. In Activity 6.16, you copied the files with the .BUD extension to the
subdirectory TRIP on the DATA disk; you then renamed them with the same file
name but with the .PEN file extension.
12 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\*.PEN e
6.18
ACTIVITY: USING RENAME ON DIFFERENT DRIVES
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\*.PEN
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
07:08 PM
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
478 VEN.PEN
190 JUP.PEN
406 MER.PEN
148 AST.PEN
1,222 bytes
1,424,384 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
The files are there in the subdirectory TRIP on the DATA disk.
13 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>REN A:\TRIP\*.PEN *.INK e
C:\WUGXP>REN A:\TRIP\*.PEN *.INK
C:\WUGXP>_
Once again, all that appears is the system prompt. Notice how you
placed the drive and path in front of only the file names that you wanted to change
(the old file names). These files can be renamed only on the DATA disk in the
subdirectory TRIP. The REN command does not move files; it only changes file
names.
14 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\*.PEN e
15 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\*.INK e
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\*.PEN
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
File Not Found
C:\WUGXP>DIR A:\TRIP\*.INK
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
C:\WUGXP>_
07:08 PM
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
478 VEN.INK
190 JUP.INK
406 MER.INK
148 AST.INK
1,222 bytes
1,424,384 bytes free
279
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You successfully renamed all the .PEN files in the subdirectory
TRIP on the DATA disk. These files no longer exist with the .PEN file extension.
16 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>CD \ e
17 Key in the following: C:\>A: e
C:\WUGXP>CD \
C:\>A:
A:\>_
You returned to the root directory of the hard disk and also
changed the default drive to the DATA disk location.
6.19
Moving Files and Renaming Directories
You learned in Chapter 4 that you could use the MOVE command to rename a
directory. In this chapter, you learned to use the RENAME command for renaming
both files and subdirectories. The REN command renames files and subdirectories;
it does not move them from one location to another.
The MOVE command was introduced in DOS 6.0. MOVE allows you to move
files and subdirectories from one location to another. If you move a file or
subdirectory individually, you can change the name as you move it. If you move a
group of files and/or subdirectories, you cannot change their names. The MOVE
command includes a prompt that will warn you that you are about to overwrite a
file. However, if you desire, you can turn off the warning. The full syntax diagram
for the MOVE command is:
Moves files and renames files and directories.
To move one or more files:
MOVE [/Y ¦ /-Y] [drive:][path]filename1[,...] destination
To rename a directory:
MOVE [/Y ¦ /-Y] [drive:][path]dirname1 dirname2
[drive:][path]filename1 Specifies the location and name of the
file or files you want to move.
destination
Specifies the new location of the file.
Destination can consist of a drive letter
and colon, a directory name, or a
combination. If you are moving only one
file, you can also include a filename if
you want to rename the file when you move
it.
[drive:][path]dirname1 Specifies the directory you want to
rename.
dirname2
Specifies the new name of the directory.
/Y
/-Y
Suppresses prompting to confirm you want
to overwrite an existing destination file.
Causes prompting to confirm you want to
overwrite an existing destination file.
6.20
ACTIVITY: MOVING FILES AND RENAMING DIRECTORIES
The switch /Y may be present in the COPYCMD environment variable.
This may be overridden with /-Y on the command line. Default is
to prompt on overwrites unless MOVE command is being executed from
within a batch script.
The MOVE command will not only move files and directories from one directory
to another, but will also allow you to move them from one drive to another. This
feature is especially useful in maintaining your hard disk.
6.20
Activity: Moving Files and
Renaming Directories
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>MD FILES e
2
Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.99 FILES\*.FIL e
3
Key in the following: A:\>MD FILES\ROOM e
4
Key in the following: A:\>COPY GALAXY.NEW FILES e
A:\>MD FILES
A:\>COPY *.99 FILES\*.FIL
AST.99
VEN.99
JUP.99
MER.99
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>MD FILES\ROOM
A:\>COPY GALAXY.NEW FILES
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have created the FILES directory with a directory beneath it
called ROOM. You copied some files from the root directory of the DATA disk into
the FILES directory.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES e
A:\>DIR FILES
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
03:42
03:42
01:46
07:08
03:42
01:08
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
148
478
190
406
.
..
AST.FIL
VEN.FIL
JUP.FIL
MER.FIL
281
282
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03/25/2002
10/31/2001
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
03:42 PM
<DIR>
ROOM
11:33 AM
152 GALAXY.NEW
5 File(s)
1,374 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,420,800 bytes free
A:\>_
You have a subdirectory called ROOM under the FILES directory
on the DATA disk. You decide that you no longer care for the name ROOM and
wish to call the directory MYROOM.
6
Key in the following: A:\>MOVE FILES\ROOM FILES\MYROOM e
A:\>MOVE FILES\ROOM FILES\MYROOM
1 file(s) moved.
A:\>_
You have renamed a subdirectory from FILES\ROOM to
FILES\MYROOM. Notice the difference between the MOVE and REN syntax.
When using REN, you do not give the path with the new name. When using MOVE
to rename a directory, you do give the full path with the new name.
7
Key in the following: A:\>REN FILES\MYROOM PLACE e
A:\>REN FILES\MYROOM PLACE
A:\>_
You can verify that the subdirectory MYROOM was, indeed,
renamed to PLACE.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES e
A:\>DIR FILES
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
A:\>_
03:42 PM
<DIR>
.
03:42 PM
<DIR>
..
01:46 PM
148 AST.FIL
07:08 PM
478 VEN.FIL
03:42 PM
190 JUP.FIL
01:08 PM
406 MER.FIL
03:42 PM
<DIR>
PLACE
11:33 AM
152 GALAXY.NEW
5 File(s)
1,374 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,420,800 bytes free
6.20
ACTIVITY: MOVING FILES AND RENAMING DIRECTORIES
The directory name has again changed. Now you want to move a
file. You use MOVE to move files from one location to another. If you try to move a
file in the same drive and the same directory, it has the effect of eliminating the first
file and replacing the contents of the second file with the contents of the first file. In
the next steps you will see the results of such a task.
9
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE FILES\AST.FIL e
10 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE FILES\JUP.FIL e
A:\>TYPE FILES\AST.FIL
The study of Astronomy came from Astrology.
Most scientists no longer believe in
Astrology. The science of Astronomy is
changing every day.
A:\>TYPE FILES\JUP.FIL
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\> _
You can see that the contents are different as well as the file
names.
11 Key in the following: A:\>MOVE FILES\AST.FIL FILES\JUP.FIL e
A:\>MOVE FILES\AST.FIL FILES\JUP.FIL
Overwrite A:\FILES\JUP.FIL? (Yes/No/All):
This warning by the MOVE command tells you that you are about
to overwrite a file.
12 Press Y e
A:\>MOVE FILES\AST.FIL FILES\JUP.FIL
Overwrite A:\FILES\JUP.FIL? (Yes/No/All): Y
A:\>_
Because you entered Y for “yes,” the file was overwritten.
13 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE FILES\AST.FIL e
14 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE FILES\JUP.FIL e
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A:\>TYPE FILES\AST.FIL
The system cannot find the file specified.
A:\>TYPE FILES\JUP.FIL
The study of Astronomy came from Astrology.
Most scientists no longer believe in
Astrology. The science of Astronomy is
changing every day.
A:\>_
The file AST.FIL no longer exists. It “moved” to a new file,
JUP.FIL. Thus, JUP.FIL now holds the contents of the old AST.FIL. The old contents
of JUP.FIL are gone. If this sounds confusing, it is. The lesson here is do not use
MOVE when you mean REN. The following steps will show you how MOVE is
useful when it is used wisely.
15 Key in the following:
A:\>MOVE FILES\VEN.FIL FILES\PLACE\VEN.NEW e
A:\>MOVE FILES\VEN.FIL FILES\PLACE\VEN.NEW
A:\>_
You have, in essence, accomplished three separate functions with
one command. First, you copied the file called VEN.FIL located in the FILES
directory to the FILES\PLACE directory. Second, you gave it a new name,
VEN.NEW. Third, you deleted VEN.FIL from the FILES directory. All this occurred
using one command, MOVE, not three—COPY, REN, and DEL. If you used Windows Explorer, you would have to take two steps: first move the file, and then
rename it. The command line provided a one-step solution.
16 Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES e
17 Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES\PLACE e
A:\>DIR FILES
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
03:42 PM
<DIR>
.
03:42 PM
<DIR>
..
01:46 PM
148 JUP.FIL
01:08 PM
406 MER.FIL
03:42 PM
<DIR>
PLACE
11:33 AM
152 GALAXY.NEW
3 File(s)
706 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,421,312 bytes free
6.20
ACTIVITY: MOVING FILES AND RENAMING DIRECTORIES
A:\>DIR FILES\PLACE
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES\PLACE
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
03:42 PM
<DIR>
.
03:42 PM
<DIR>
..
07:08 PM
478 VEN.NEW
1 File(s)
478 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,421,312 bytes free
A:\>_
The file called VEN.FIL is no longer in the FILES directory. It is,
however, in the FILES\PLACE directory with the name of VEN.NEW. MOVE also
works well with wildcards. However, when you use wildcards with the MOVE
command, you cannot change file names.
18 Key in the following: A:\>MOVE FILES\*.FIL FILES\PLACE\*.TXT e
A:\>MOVE FILES\*.FIL FILES\PLACE\*.TXT
The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect.
A:\>
MOVE cannot combine the contents of files (concatenate files) and
therefore cannot place these files into one file called *.TXT.
19 Key in the following: A:\>MOVE FILES\*.FIL FILES\PLACE e
A:\>MOVE FILES\*.FIL FILES\PLACE
A:\FILES\JUP.FIL
A:\FILES\MER.FIL
A:\>_
Now that you have issued the command correctly, the files with
the .FIL extension are no longer in the FILES directory but in the PLACE directory.
20 Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES e
21 Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES\PLACE e
A:\>DIR FILES
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES
285
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03/25/2002
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
03:42 PM
<DIR>
.
03:42 PM
<DIR>
..
03:42 PM
<DIR>
PLACE
11:33 AM
152 GALAXY.NEW
1 File(s)
152 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,421,312 bytes free
A:\>DIR FILES\PLACE
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES\PLACE
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
03:42 PM
<DIR>
.
03:42 PM
<DIR>
..
07:08 PM
478 VEN.NEW
01:46 PM
148 JUP.FIL
01:08 PM
406 MER.FIL
3 File(s)
1,032 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,421,312 bytes freeee
A:\>_
The files with the .FIL extension were successfully moved from
one location to another. You can move files from one drive to another and from one
directory to another.
22 Key in the following: A:\>MOVE FILES\PLACE\*.FIL CLASS e
A:\>MOVE FILES\PLACE\*.FIL CLASS
A:\FILES\PLACE\JUP.FIL
A:\FILES\PLACE\MER.FIL
A:\>_
The files with the .FIL extension are no longer located in the
FILES\PLACE directory but were moved to the CLASS directory, keeping the same
file names.
23 Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES\PLACE\*.FIL e
24 Key in the following: A:\>DIR CLASS\*.FIL e
A:\>DIR FILES\PLACE\*.FIL
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES\PLACE
File Not Found
A:\>DIR CLASS\*.FIL
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\CLASS
6.20
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
ACTIVITY: MOVING FILES AND RENAMING DIRECTORIES
01:46 PM
01:08 PM
2 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 JUP.FIL
406 MER.FIL
554 bytes
1,421,312 bytes free
A:\>_
The files were successfully moved. You can see that the MOVE
command is very useful and very powerful. You can move entire subdirectory
structures, along with the files in them, with one command.
25 Key in the following: A:\>MD START\SUBDIR e
26 Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.FIL START\SUBDIR e
A:\>MD START\SUBDIR
A:\>COPY *.FIL START\SUBDIR
ASTROLGY.FIL
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have created a new directory, START, that contains a child
directory, SUBDIR, in which there is one file, ASTROLOGY.FIL. To see everything
in the START directory structure, you will use the DIR command with two of its
parameters: /S to view all the contents in the subdirectories and /B to see only the
file and subdirectory names with none of the other information.
27 Key in the following: A:\>DIR START /S /B e
A:\>DIR START /S /B
A:\START\SUBDIR
A:\START\SUBDIR\ASTROLGY.FIL
A:\>_
You can see that with this bare (/B) display, you do not see “Volume in drive A is DATA,” “Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D,” or “Directory of
A:\START.” Nor do you see the amounts of drive space used or free. The bare
display shows you directory names and file names only. You can see that the
START directory contains only one subdirectory, SUBDIR, and no files. The
subdirectory SUBDIR contains one file, ASTROLOGY.FIL. But you made a mistake. You actually wanted to place this entire directory structure beginning with
START under the subdirectory FILES. You can move the entire structure with the
MOVE command.
28 Key in the following: A:\>MOVE START FILES e
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A:\>MOVE START FILES
A:\>_
The command has properly executed. What actually happened?
You can use the DIR command to verify that the START directory is no longer
under the root, but that it and all of its contents are now under the FILES directory.
29 Key in the following: A:\>DIR START e
30 Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES e
A:\>DIR START
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>DIR FILES
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
03/25/2002
03:42 PM
<DIR>
.
03:42 PM
<DIR>
..
03:42 PM
<DIR>
PLACE
11:33 AM
152 GALAXY.NEW
03:58 PM
<DIR>
START
1 File(s)
152 bytes
4 Dir(s)
1,419,776 bytes free
A:\>_
As you can see, the START subdirectory is no longer on the root of
the DATA disk. It is now in the FILES directory. But has the entire subdirectory
structure been moved? You can verify this further with the DIR /S /B command.
31 Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES\START /S /B e
A:\>DIR FILES\START /S /B
A:\FILES\START\SUBDIR
A:\FILES\START\SUBDIR\ASTROLGY.FIL
A:\>_
You can see that the entire START directory structure was moved
successfully to the FILES directory.
6.22
6.21
ACTIVITY: USING RD AND RD /S
RD /S Revisited
In Chapter 4, you learned how to remove a directory. You could use the RD command with no parameters. This was the bottom-up approach. Since you create
directories from the top down, you had to delete directories from the bottom up. If
the subdirectory you wished to remove had more subdirectories beneath it, you had
to remove those subdirectories first. RD with the parameter /S allows you to delete
directories from the top down with one command. In addition, when you use RD on
its own, you must first remove any subdirectories and any files that are in each
subdirectory. Thus, removing directories with RD by itself is a two-step process—
first delete files (DEL), then eliminate the directory (RD). Removing directories from
the GUI is also a two-step process—delete and empty the Recycle Bin. RD /S has the
advantage that in one fell swoop, you eliminate files and directories—no second
step is required. It is a very powerful, but also an extremely dangerous, command.
6.22
Activity: Using RD and RD /S
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>RD FILES\PLACE e
A:\>RD FILES\PLACE
The directory is not empty.
A:\>_
The portion of the message that applies here is that the
FILES\PLACE directory is not empty of files. Thus, you have to take a step preceding the RD command.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DEL FILES\PLACE e
A:\>DEL FILES\PLACE
A:\FILES\PLACE\*, Are you sure (Y/N)? Y
You had to use the DEL command to eliminate the files. The
command DEL FILES\PLACE implied or defaulted to all the files in the PLACE
directory. You could have keyed in DEL FILES\PLACE\*.*, but *.* wasn’t necessary since, if you do not use a value with DEL, the default is all files.
3
Press Y e
4
Key in the following: A:\>RD FILES\PLACE e
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES e
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A:\>RD FILES\PLACE
A:\>DIR FILES
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\FILES
03/25/2002
03/25/2002
10/31/2001
03/25/2002
03:42 PM
<DIR>
.
03:42 PM
<DIR>
..
11:33 AM
152 GALAXY.NEW
03:58 PM
<DIR>
START
1 File(s)
152 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,420,800 bytes free
A:\>_
Once you eliminated the files from the PLACE directory using
DEL, you could remove the directory using the RD command without the /S
parameter. Using RD /S is much faster because it is a one-step process. In addition,
if you had any hidden or system files, they would be deleted as well.
6
Key in the following: A:\>RD FILES /S e
A:\>RD FILES /S
FILES, Are you sure (Y/N)?
As you can see, RD /S is offering to delete files and directories.
7
Press Y e
A:\>RD FILES /S
FILES, Are you sure (Y/N)? Y
A:\>_
You saw no message stating that the files or subdirectory were
deleted. Were they?
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR FILES e
A:\>DIR FILES
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
6.23
BACKING UP YOUR DATA DISK
The directory FILES was removed. RD /S is fast, but keep in mind
that “fast” can be “dangerous.”
6.23
Backing Up Your DATA Disk
You should get into the habit of backing up your data files so that if something
happens to the original data, you have a copy of the original material. In dataprocessing circles, this habit is called “Disaster and Recovery Planning.” It means
exactly what it says. If there is a disaster—fire, flood, power surge, theft, head crash,
coffee spilled on a disk—what is your plan to recover your programs and data?
Most application programs today come on a CD-ROM disc, but there are still
programs that come on diskette. Backing up application program disks can be
tricky, especially on copy-protected disks (which means you cannot back them up
with regular operating system commands). You should never back up your program
or software Application disks until you understand how the application programs
work. Application software that comes on diskettes provides documentation that
instructs you how to back up the specific application program disk you own.
Backing up a hard disk is a special circumstance, using special operating commands and procedures. You cannot and should not back up the hard disk using the
techniques that will be described here because the contents of a hard disk will not fit
on one floppy disk or on a zip disk.
However, you can and should back up all the data on any data disk with the
following techniques. There are three ways to back up data files. One way is to back
up the entire data disk—this backs up all the files and all the subdirectories. To do
this, you use the DISKCOPY command, which makes an identical copy of a disk,
track for track and sector for sector. You can use DISKCOPY on floppy disks.
You can also use the COPY command, which backs up files from floppy disk to
floppy disk or other storage media or specific files in specific directories on the hard
disk. The third method, using the XCOPY command, will be discussed later. Never
use the MOVE command for backup purposes. The MOVE command, although
useful in placing files onto a floppy disk from a hard disk, removes the files from
their original location. Thus, you end up with only one copy of your data files,
which defeats the purpose of backing up.
Typically, data files are backed up at the end of every work session so that you
can keep your data files current. It is very important to acquire a regular backup
routine so that it becomes an automatic process.
Usually with application software you are not so worried about backing up the
programs. If something happens to the hard disk, you can recover and reinstall the
programs from the original, purchased CDs or disks. However, the data that you
create is unrecoverable unless you have backed it up. A common technique to back
up data from a hard disk is to purchase a device called a “tape backup.” This device
allows the user the ease of backing up the hard disk without having to sit in front of
the computer and keep inserting blank floppy disks. In addition, if you have a
writable CD, you can also copy files to a CD. However, the important message is
that whatever technique you use, back up your data files!
In this text, you have been placing all your data files on a floppy disk. Backing up
this disk is the easiest kind of backup to perform. It is also extremely useful. With a
291
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USING DEL, REN, MOVE, AND RD /S
backup copy of the DATA disk, if you should have a problem, you would not have
to go back to Chapter 2 and redo all the activities and homework. In the next
activity, you will back up your DATA disk.
6.24
Activity: Backing Up with
the DISKCOPY Command
Note 1: The DATA disk is in Drive A. C:\> is displayed.
Note 2: DISKCOPY requires that media types be the same.
1
If you are not at the C prompt, change to the C drive now. Get either a blank disk,
a disk that has not been used, or a disk that has data on it that you no longer
want. Label it “BACKUP DATA disk.”
2
Key in the following: C:\>DISKCOPY A: A: e
C:\>DISKCOPY A: A:
Insert SOURCE disk in drive A:
and press ENTER when ready...
You are asked to put the SOURCE disk that you wish to copy in
Drive A. In this case, the DATA disk, which you want to copy, is already in Drive A.
You keyed in two disk drives, A and A, to ensure that you do not accidentally copy
the hard disk. You are telling DISKCOPY to make a copy from the disk in Drive A to
the disk in Drive A.
3
Press e
Copying 80 tracks,
18 sectors per track, 2 side(s)
The number of tracks and sectors will vary depending on the disk
media type. The DISKCOPY command tells the operating system to copy everything
on the disk in Drive A (the SOURCE) to RAM. While this program is doing the
copying, the cursor flashes on the screen. When the command is completed or the
program has finished executing (copying), you need to take another step. You
receive the following prompt:
Insert TARGET disk in drive A:
and press ENTER when ready . . .
This prompt tells you to remove the SOURCE disk from Drive A and insert the
blank or TARGET disk in Drive A so that the operating system has a place to copy
the information.
6.24
4
ACTIVITY: BACKING UP WITH THE DISKCOPY COMMAND
Remove your original DATA disk from Drive A. Insert the blank disk labeled
“BACKUP DATA disk” into Drive A. This is your target disk. Close or latch the
drive door. Press e
Volume Serial Number is 843B-9D87
Copy another disk (Y/N)?
You saw a only a flashing cursor while whatever was in RAM was
being copied or written to the blank disk in Drive A. Now you see a question: Do
you want to execute DISKCOPY again to copy another disk? In this case, you do not
wish to make another copy, so you key in N. The Volume Serial Number changes
each time you use the DISKCOPY command.
5
Press N
Copy another disk (Y/N)? N
C:\>_
Because of the DISKCOPY command, you now have two copies of
the DATA disk, the original and the backup. At the end of each work session, you
should follow these steps to back up your DATA disk. You do not need a new
backup disk each time. Keep using the same backup disk over and over. You are
merely keeping current; you do not need an archival or historical record of each
day’s work. You should also make a backup copy of your HOMEWORK disk.
However, if you wish to be prudent, it is wise to have more than one backup copy of
your disks. As you can imagine, the only time you need your copy of the data is
when something has gone wrong. This is not the time you want to find out that your
only copy of the data is bad. It is also a good idea to check your backed up data
periodically to ensure that it is good data and that you can recover it if you need to.
Remember, DISKCOPY makes an exact duplicate of the source diskette. Anything
that was previously on the target diskette is destroyed in this process.
Some organizations, such as banks and the IRS, may need to recreate records, so
they will have not only a Disaster and Recovery Plan but also archival data or an
archival backup. This is sometimes called a “transaction history.” Organizations like
this need far more than a simple backup copy. For instance, if you go into the bank
today and say you are missing the $100.00 deposit you made last week, the bank
cannot tell you that they do not know what happened last week. The bank needs to
be able to recreate all the transactions that occurred on the day in question. Just
having a backup copy of your account for today or even yesterday is not sufficient.
Most PC users, however, do not need archival data. Simply backing up their data is
sufficient.
6
Remove the disk labeled “BACKUP DATA disk” and keep it in a safe place until
you need it again to make another backup.
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You now have a backup copy of your DATA disk. You may wish to
repeat the steps with another disk to back up your HOMEWORK disk too, as well
as for any floppy disks you have important data stored on, such as your papers for
your English class. In this class, every time you complete a chapter, it is a good idea
to update your backups so that they are kept current. In this way, if something
happens to one of the original disks, you have lost only one chapter ’s work.
6.25
Backing Up Files with
the COPY Command
Note:
The following material is informational and meant to be read only. It is not
an activity.
Using the DISKCOPY command backs up an entire floppy disk. More often than
not, however, you need to back up only specific files, or you want to back up files
from the hard disk to a floppy disk or a removable drive such as a Zip drive.
Remember that you can also use the COPY command to back up specific files. The
basic syntax does not change. It is as follows:
COPY [drive:][path]SOURCE.FIL [drive:][path]DESTINATION.FIL
You can also back up files from one floppy disk to another with the COPY
command. Be sure that the destination disk is already formatted because COPY
does not format a new disk as DISKCOPY does. Furthermore, COPY can be used
only if you have two removable drives such as a floppy disk and a Zip drive. Since
you are using two disk drives, COPY does not require identical disk media types.
For example, you can copy from a 3½-inch, 1.44 MB disk to a Zip disk. You would
place the source disk in Drive A and the destination disk in Drive F or whatever
your removable drive letter is, and key in
A:\>COPY *.* F:\
A:\> is the default drive. COPY is the command. *.* means every file with every
file extension—the first * represents any file name, the second * represents any file
extension. COPY goes to the source disk to find each file in the root directory. As it
copies the source file, it lists the file name on the screen. F:\ represents the root
directory of the destination disk. Since you give no file names following F:\, COPY
assumes that you want the same file names on the destination disk. If there is a file
with the same name on the destination disk, COPY overwrites it.
If you want to back up files from a hard disk, you can also use the COPY command to copy the files in the individual subdirectories. However, you must be sure
that there are not too many files in a subdirectory to fit on a floppy disk. Look at the
following display:
C:\WUGXP>DIR *.TMP
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
05/07/2002
07:41 AM
190 JUPITER.TMP
6.25
10/31/2001
05/07/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
BACKING UP FILES WITH THE COPY COMMAND
01:08 PM
07:41 AM
02:47 PM
11:33 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
9 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
406 MERCURY.TMP
190 JUP.TMP
86 BONJOUR.TMP
152 GALAXY.TMP
406 MER.TMP
148 AST.TMP
148 ASTRO.TMP
478 VEN.TMP
2,204 bytes
7,209,746,432 bytes free
C:\WUGXP>_
After 9 File(s), the number is 2,024 bytes. This number tells you that these nine
files require only 2,204 bytes and will easily fit on a floppy disk. On the other hand,
you may get a display like the one that follows:
Volume in drive H is BETTES H
Volume Serial Number is 2F4B-16FD
Directory of H:\ENCARTA
04/23/2000 04:03p
07/03/2000 01:53p
10/22/1997 4:31p
10/22/1997 4:31p
08/12/1996 8:47p
08/12/1996 2:34p
08/12/1996 2:40p
08/12/1996 8:47p
08/12/1996 2:43p
08/12/1996 2:34p
08/12/1996 2:36p
08/12/1996 8:45p
08/12/1996 8:46p
08/12/1996 8:45p
08/12/1996 2:36p
08/12/1996 2:34p
11/16/1997 3:42p
08/12/1996 8:46p
08/12/1996 8:46p
08/12/1996 8:53p
08/12/1996 8:45p
10/05/1996 11:49a
10/22/1997 4:31p
18 File(s)
3 Dir(s)
72 APRIL.TMP
WORKING
.
..
2,681,344 ENCRES97.DLL
134,144 DECO_32.DLL
1,434 E97SPAM.INI
355,328 ENCTITLE.DLL
13,204 YBBST97A.DAT
526,336 EEUIL10.DLL
212,992 SUBSCRIB.EXE
17,258 DISCS.HLP
863,913 ENC97.HLP
6,429 ENC97.CNT
60,053 WEBTIPS.HLP
84,343 README.HLP
20,848 INST97A.LOG
1,520,354 ENC97F.STR
3,429,346 ENCART97.DAT
78,188 UNINSTAL.EXE
1,715,200 ENC97.EXE
4 ENCART97.ANN
<DIR>
UPDATES
11,720,718 bytes
921,403,392 bytes free
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
H:\ENCARTA>_
The number is now 18 File(s) that occupy 11,720,718 bytes, which will not fit on a
single floppy disk. However, the files would fit on a 100-MB Zip cartridge. Only if
the files will fit on a floppy disk can you use the COPY command. Thus, if you
wanted to back up the subdirectory \WUGXP, the command would be keyed in as
C:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.* A:
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This command, however, would not copy files in any subdirectories under the
\WUGXP subdirectory, only the files in the \WUGXP directory. You would have to
key in another command such as
C:\>COPY \WUGXP\DATA\*.* A:
You cannot and must not copy all the files from a hard disk to a floppy disk with
the COPY command. There are too many files on the hard disk, and they will not fit
on a single floppy disk. There are backup utilities to back up large volumes, but
they need a destination other than a floppy disk.
A question that arises is how often should you back up data? If you have backed
up files to floppies or a tape and have not changed your original files, you do not
need to back them up again. The files you are interested in backing up are those that
have changed or those that are new. A rule of thumb to follow is to think of how
long it would take you to recreate your data. If you think in those terms, you will
make regular backups.
Chapter Summary
1. DEL eliminates files.
2. Deleting files helps you manage your disks and directories.
3. The syntax for the DEL command is:
DEL names
4. Wildcards can be used with DEL.
5. DEL does not eliminate the data on the disk, only the entry in the directory
table.
6. Once a file has been deleted, it cannot be recovered except with special utility
programs.
7. Before you use wildcards with DEL, it is wise to use the DIR command to see
what is going to be erased.
8. The /P parameter prompts you to confirm whether or not you wish to delete a
file, and the /S parameter allows you to delete files in the directory hierarchy.
9. You can change the names of files or directories with the RENAME or REN
command.
10. The syntax for renaming is:
RENAME [drive:][path][directoryname1 ¦ filename1]
[directoryname2 ¦ filename2]
REN [drive:][path][directoryname1 ¦ filename1]
[directoryname2 ¦ filename2]
11. Renaming can be done only on one drive or directory. RENAME does not move
files.
12. Renaming changes only file names, not contents of files.
13. With the REN command, you use the path only with the original file name and
do not repeat it with the new file name.
14. Wildcards can be used with the REN command.
15. Before you use wildcards with the REN command, it is wise to use the DIR
command to see what files are going to be affected by renaming.
16. Once a file is renamed, it cannot be found under its old name.
17. The MOVE command can be used either to change the name of a subdirectory
or to move files from one location to another. When you use MOVE, two steps
are taken: the files are copied to the new location and deleted from the old
location.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
18. You may remove directories with either RD or RD /S. With RD alone, you must
remove files first and then any directories. RD /S does it all in one command.
19. It is wise to make backup copies of data files so that if something happens, you
have another source of data.
20. You can back up a floppy disk with the DISKCOPY command, or you can back
up files on your disk using the COPY command. The wildcard *.* allows you to
back up all the files in a directory.
Key Terms
archival backup
archival data
copy-protected
Disaster and Recovery Plan
Discussion Questions
1. Explain why you may want to eliminate files from a disk.
2. When you delete a file, the file is not actually removed from the disk. What
really happens?
3. Give the syntax of the DEL command and explain each part of the syntax.
4. Explain the following statement, with regards to the DEL command. The strength
of wildcards is also a weakness.
5. When deleting files, why should you key in DIR with global file specifications
first?
6. Explain the purpose and function of the /P parameter with the DEL command.
The /S?
7. Why would you want to change the name of a file?
8. Explain the purpose and function of the RENAME or REN command.
9. Give the syntax of the REN command and explain each part of the syntax.
10. What is the difference between the REN and RENAME commands?
11. What is the difference between the RENAME and COPY commands?
12. If you are using the REN command and get the message, “A duplicate file name
exists, or the file name cannot be found,” what could it mean?
13. What is the function and purpose of the MOVE command?
14. Give the syntax of the MOVE command and explain each part of the syntax.
15. Compare and contrast MOVE and COPY.
16. What is the difference between the MOVE and the REN commands?
17. Compare and contrast the RD /S command with the RD command without the
/S parameter.
18. What process could you use to back up specific files?
19. What process could you use to back up a subdirectory?
20. Why would you not copy all the files from the hard disk to a floppy disk with
the DISKCOPY command?
21. Why would you not copy all the files from a hard disk to a floppy disk with the
COPY command?
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True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true and the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. REN and RENAME perform identical functions.
T
F
2. It is not possible to find a file that has been renamed if you do not
know its new name.
T
F
3. When using wildcards with the MOVE command, you cannot
change the destination file name.
T
F
4. You cannot use REN on subdirectories.
T
F
5. If you use the command DEL TRIP and TRIP is a subdirectory
name, the default parameter is all files (*.*).
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. One way to verify that a file has been deleted is to use the _______________
command.
7. The REN command does not move files. Its only function is to _______________
a file name.
8. The command for making an exact duplicate of a floppy disk is
_______________.
9. After you complete a work session, an important procedure to follow to ensure
not losing your data is to _______________ your original disk.
10. The parameter that allows you to confirm whether or not you wish to delete a
file is _______________.
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. DEL is a command that
____
a. removes a subdirectory.
b. can delete only one file at a time.
c. can be used with wildcards.
d. none of the above
12. Prior to using wildcards with the DEL command,
____
a. it is a good idea to confirm visually the files to be erased using
DIR.
b. it is wise to remember that wildcards have opposite meanings
when used with DIR and COPY.
c. remember that only data files can be removed with the DEL
command.
d. remember that only program files can be removed with the DEL
command.
13.
When
A:\> is the default and DEL CLASS.DBF is keyed in,
____
a. the file CLASS.DBF will be deleted from the default drive.
b. the file CLASS.DBF will be deleted from Drive C.
c. nothing will happen.
d. none of the above
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
____
14. Using the command RD directory_name /S only
a. deletes the files from the specified directory.
b. deletes the files from the specified directory and files from its child
directories.
c. deletes the specified directory and all subdirectories and files
contained therein.
d. deletes the subdirectories contained in the specified directory.
15. The MOVE command
a. can be used to rename a directory.
b. can be used to make multiple copies of files.
c. can move an entire directory structure to a new location.
d. both a and c
Writing Commands
Write the correct steps or commands to perform the required action as if you were at
the computer. The prompt will indicate the default drive and directory.
16. Remove the file called CATS in the directory called ANIMALS located under
the root directory of Drive A.
A:\TEST>
17. Delete all the files with the .OLD file extension in the subdirectory WHAT
located under the current directory on the default drive.
C:\JUNK>
18. Change the extension of the COLOR file from .DOT to .DOC. The file is located
in the PAINT directory under the root directory on Drive A.
C:\>
19. Change the file extension from .FIL to .TXT for all the files in the FURN
subdirectory located under the root directory on Drive C.
A:\>
20. Eliminate the file called MYFILE.TXT, located in the subdirectory JUNK on
Drive C.
C:\JUNK>
Homework Assignments
Note 1: Place the HOMEWORK disk in Drive A. Be sure to work on the HOMEWORK disk, not the DATA disk.
Note 2: The homework problems will assume Drive C is the hard disk and the
HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. If you are using another drive, such as
floppy Drive B or hard Drive D, be sure and substitute that drive letter
when reading the questions and creating the answers.
Note 3: All subdirectories that are created will be under the root directory
unless otherwise specified.
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Problem Set I
Problem A
Note:
If the DATA disk is in Drive A, remove it and place it in a safe place.
CAUTION: Do not use the DATA disk for these HOMEWORK problems. Use
the HOMEWORK disk.
A-a
Insert the HOMEWORK disk into Drive A.
A-b
Copy all the files from the WUGXP\MEDIA\TV subdirectory to the root
directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
A-c
On the HOMEWORK disk, rename the file called DRAMA.TV to
SERIOUS.TV.
____
A-d
____
A-e
____
A-f
1. Which command did you use to rename the file?
a. REN DRAMA.TV SERIOUS.TV
b. REN SERIOUS.TV DRAMA.TV
c. COPY DRAMA.TV SERIOUS.TV
d. COPY SERIOUS.TV DRAMA.TV
Execute the DIR command looking only for the file called DRAMA.TV.
2. What message is displayed?
a. Invalid File Parameter
b. File Not Found
c. Required parameter missing
d. no message is displayed
Rename the file called SERIOUS.TV to DRAMA.TV.
3. Which command did you use?
a. REN DRAMA.TV SERIOUS.TV
b. REN SERIOUS.TV DRAMA.TV
c. COPY DRAMA.TV SERIOUS.TV
d. COPY SERIOUS.TV DRAMA.TV
Key in the following: TYPE SERIOUS.TV e
____
4. What message is displayed?
a. The system cannot find the file specified
b. File Not Found
c. Required parameter missing
d. no message is displayed
A-g
Key in the following: TYPE DRAMA.TV e
____
5. What television series is displayed?
a. The Rosie O’Donnell Show
b. Seinfeld
c. The Practice
d. Dallas
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
Problem B
Note:
B-a
____
B-b
____
B-c
____
B-d
____
The exercises in Problem B assume the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
Copy all files from the WUGXP subdirectory that have the file extension of
.DOS to the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk, keeping the file names
the same.
6. How many files were copied?
a. one
b. two
c. three
d. four
Rename all the files that have a file extension of .DOS to the same file name
but with .WG as the file extension (remember wildcards).
7. Which command did you use?
a. COPY *.DOS *.WG
b. REN *.DOS *.WG
c. COPY ?.DOS ?.WG
d. REN ?.DOS ?.WG
Make copies of all the .WG files on the root of the HOMEWORK disk keeping
the same file name but with a new extension of .RRR.
8. Which command did you use?
a. DIR *.RRR
b. REN *.WG *.RRR
c. DIR *.WG
d. COPY *.WG *.RRR
Make copies of all the .WG files on the HOMEWORK disk keeping the same
file names but with a new extension of .MMM.
9. What date is listed for the WILDTWO.MMM file?
a. 02/13/2000
b. 12/31/2001
c. 12/31/2000
d. 02/13/1999
B-e
Using the relative path, move all the files with the .RRR file extension to the
PHONE subdirectory.
____
10. What command did you use?
a. COPY *.RRR PHONE
b. REN *.RRR PHONE
c. MOVE *.RRR PHONE
d. MOVE PHONE *.RRR
B-f
Execute the DIR command looking only for files in the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk that have the .RRR file extension.
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____
11. How many files were located?
a. one
b. two
c. three
d. zero
B-g
Execute the DIR command looking only for files in the PHONE subdirectory
that have the .RRR file extension.
____
12. How many files were located?
a. one
b. two
c. three
d. zero
B-h
Rename all the files that have the extension of .WG to the same file name but
with .DOS as the file extension. Use a wildcard.
____
13. Which command did you use?
a. COPY *.DOS *.WG
b. REN *.DOS *.WG
c. COPY *.WG *.DOS
d. REN *.WG *.DOS
B-i
Key in the following:
MOVE WILDONE.MMM PHONE\OLD\WILD.MMM e
____
14. What message is displayed?
a. A:\WILDONE.MMM => a:\phone\old\wild.mmm [ok]
b. The system cannot find the path specified.
c. A:\WILDONE.MMM => a:\phone\old\wild.mmm [No such directory]
d. no message is displayed
B-j
Delete all the files on the HOMEWORK disk with the .MMM extension. Use a
wildcard.
____
15. Which command did you use?
a. DEL *.MMM /S or DEL /S *.MMM
b. DEL PHONE\*.MMM or DEL /S PHONE\*.MMM
c. RD PHONE\*.MMM or RD /S PHONE\*.MMM
d. MOVE *.MMM or MOVE /S *.MMM
____
16. What is displayed when you have finished executing the command?
a. 3 file(s) deleted
b. File not found
c. Deleted file - A:\WILDTWO.MMM
Deleted file - A:\WILDTHR.MMM
Deleted file - A:\WILDONE.MMM
d. none of the above
B-k
Ascertain how many files there are on the HOMEWORK disk with the extension .RRR. (Hint: Remember DIR /S.)
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
17. Which command did you use?
a. DIR /S *.RRR or DIR *.RRR /S
b. DIR PHONE\*.RRR
c. FIND PHONE\*.RRR
d. none of the above
B-l
Delete all the files with the .RRR extension on the HOMEWORK disk. Use a
wildcard.
____
18. Which commands could you have used?
a. DEL /S *.RRR or DIR *.RRR /S
b. DEL PHONE\*.RRR
c. MOVE PHONE\*.RRR
d. either a or b
Problem C
Note:
The exercises in Problem C assume the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
C-a
Copy the file from the WUGXP directory called PLANETS.TXT to the root of
the HOMEWORK disk.
C-b
Create a subdirectory called SERIES under the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
C-c
Copy all the files on the root of the HOMEWORK disk with the extension .99
to the SERIES directory.
C-d
Using the relative path, move the file called PLANETS.TXT from the root
directory of the HOMEWORK disk to the SERIES directory.
____
18. Which command did you use with PLANETS.TXT?
a. COPY PLANETS.TXT SERIES
b. DEL SERIES\PLANETS.TXT
c. REN PLANETS.TXT SERIES
d. MOVE PLANETS.TXT SERIES
____
19. The file PLANETS.TXT is now in
a. only the SERIES directory on the HOMEWORK disk.
b. only the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
c. the WUGXP directory on the hard drive and the
SERIES directory on the HOMEWORK disk.
d. none of the above
C-e
From the root of the HOMEWORK disk using the relative path, delete the file
PLANETS.TXT on the HOMEWORK disk.
____
20. Which command did you use?
a. DEL PLANETS.TXT
b. DEL SERIES\PLANETS.TXT
c. MOVE PLANETS.TXT
d. REN PLANETS.TXT
C-f
Eliminate the SERIES directory from the HOMEWORK disk without using the
/S parameter with the RD command.
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____
21. Which command did you use first?
a. RD SERIES
b. DEL SERIES or DEL \SERIES\*.*
c. DELETE SERIES or DELETE \SERIES\*.*
d. MOVE SERIES or MOVE \SERIES\*.*
____
22. Which command did you use second?
a. RD SERIES
b. DEL SERIES or DEL \SERIES\*.*
c. DELETE SERIES or DELETE \SERIES\*.*
d. MOVE SERIES or MOVE \SERIES\*.*
Problem D
Note:
The exercises in Problem D assume the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
D-a
You wish to use a wildcard, but you want to select only some files to eliminate in the FILES subdirectory that have the file extension .FIL.
____
22. What parameter would you use with the DEL command?
a. /K
b. /P
c. /S
d. /T
D-b
Use the correct parameter from the above question with the DEL command
to selectively eliminate the files with JUP or MER as a file name and .FIL as a
file extension from the FILES subdirectory.
____
23. Beside the file names, which message was displayed?
a. Delete [ok]?
b. Delete (Y/N)?
c. Invalid parameter
d. no message was displayed
D-c
Rename all the files in the FILES subdirectory that have a file extension of
.FIL to the same file name but with .AAA as the file extension.
____
24. Which command did you use?
a. REN FILES\*.FIL *.AAA
b. REN FILES\*.FIL FILES\*.AAA
c. REN FILES\*.AAA FILES\*.FIL
d. REN FILES\*.AAA *.FIL
Problem E
Note:
E-a
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and
directory.
Copy all the files from the \WUGXP directory that have the file extension of
.TMP to the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
25. How many files were copied?
a. 3
b. 6
c. 9
d. 12
E-b
Rename all the files on the root of the HOMEWORK disk with the .TMP file
extension to have the same names with the file extension of .AST. Use a
wildcard.
____
26. Which command did you use?
a. REN *.AST *.TMP
b. COPY *.AST *.TMP
c. REN *.TMP *.AST
d. COPY *.TMP *.AST
E-c
Eliminate all the .AST files except BONJOUR.AST.
____
27. Which command did you use?
a. DEL *.AST
b. DEL *.AST /P
c. DEL *.AST /Y
d. DEL *.AST /S
Problem Set II—At the Computer
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
Before proceeding with these assignments, check with your lab instructor
to see if there are any special procedures you should follow.
The HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. The A:\> prompt is displayed as the
default drive and the default directory. All work will occur on the HOMEWORK disk.
Make sure that NAME.BAT, MARK.FIL, GETYN.COM, and GO.BAT are
all present in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk before proceeding with these problems.
All files with the .HW extension must be created in the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk.
1
Key in the following: A:\>NAME e
2
Here is an example to key in, but your instructor will have other information that
applies to your class. Key in the following:
Bette A. Peat e
(Your name goes here.)
CIS 55 e
(Your class goes here.)
T-Th 8-9:30 e
(Your day and time go here.)
Chapter 6 Homework e
3
Press 6 e
4
If the information is correct, press Y and you are back to A:\>.
You have returned to the system level. You now have a file called
NAME.FIL with your name and other pertinent information. Hint: Remember
redirection.
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To Create 1.HW
1
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
2
Key in the following: DIR EXP*.* > 1.HWe
3
Eliminate all the files that begin with EXP and have any file extension.
4
Note the double >> and note that there is no space with between the two >>.
Key in the following: DIR EXP*.* >> 1.HW e
To Create 2.HW
1
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
2
Move all the files with a .TV extension to the PHONE directory.
3
Locate only the files in the PHONE directory on the HOMEWORK disk that have
the extension of .TV and place the names of the files in a file called 2.HW.
To Create 3.HW
1
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
2
Locate all the files in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk that have an
extension of .TV, if any, placing the output of the command in a file called
3.HW.
To Create 4.HW
1
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
2
Rename all the files in the FILES subdirectory that have the extension .AAA to
the same name but with the extension of .PLA.
3
Locate all the files in the FILES directory that have an extension of .PLA.
4
Place the output of the command in a file called 4.HW.
To Create 5.HW
1
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default drive and directory.
2
Eliminate all the files in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk that have the
.MAK extension, if any.
3
Locate any files in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk with the .MAK
extension, if any, and place the output of the command in a file called 5.HW.
To Print Your Homework
1
Be sure the printer is on and ready to accept print jobs from your computer.
2
Key in the following (be very careful to make no typing errors):
GO NAME.FIL 1.HW 2.HW 3.HW 4.HW 5.HWe
If the files you requested, 1.HW, 2.HW, etc., do not exist in the
default directory, you will see the following message on the screen:
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
File Not Found
The system cannot find the file specified.
Is there a message that says “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
The operating system is telling you that the file cannot be found. If you see this
screen, press Y to see what could be wrong, and repeat the print procedure after you
have corrected the problem.
If the default directory contains the specified files, the following message will
appear on the screen:
Is there a message that says “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
You will need to press N once for each file you are printing.
3
Follow the messages on the screen until the Notepad program opens with a
screen similar to the following:
All the requested files have been found and placed in a Notepad
document. Your homework is now ready to print.
4
On the Notepad menu bar, click File. Click Print.
5
Click the Print button.
6
In the Notepad window, click File. Click Exit.
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The following will appear on the Command Prompt screen:
You are about to delete any file with the .HW extension.
Before you delete your homework files, check your hard copy or
print out.
If your homework printout is correct, press Y to delete the
files.
If your homework printout is incorrect, press N.
Pressing N will prevent your homework files from being deleted.
You can then begin again.
At this point, look at your printout. If it is correct, you can press Y to delete the
homework files for this chapter. If your printout is incorrect, you can press N. That
will preserve your homework and you will need to redo only the problem that was
incorrect and not all the homework assignments.
7
Press Y e
You have returned to the default prompt.
8
Close the Command Prompt session.
Problem Set III—Brief Essay
1. What are the advantages of using the commands REN, DEL, COPY, and MOVE
from the command line instead of using Windows Explorer? What are the
disadvantages?
2. Deleting files and directories can have serious consequences and should never be done.
Agree or disagree with this statement and explain the rationale for your answer.
Learning Objectives
After finishing this chapter, you will be able to:
1. Explain the purpose and function of the
ATTRIB command.
2. Explain the purpose and function of the
SUBST command.
3. Explain the purpose and function of the
XCOPY command.
4. Explain the purpose and function of
DOSKEY.
5. Use the text editor to create and edit text files.
Student Outcomes
1. Use the ATTRIB command to protect files.
2. Use the SUBST command to simplify long
path names.
3. Use XCOPY to copy files and subdirectories.
4. Use the XCOPY parameters to copy hidden
files and retain file attributes.
5. Use DOSKEY to be more efficient at the
command line.
6. Create text files using the text editor.
Chapter Overview
By using different utility commands and programs, you can manipulate files and
subdirectories to help make tasks at the command line much easier. You can make the DEL *.*
command safer by using the ATTRIB command to
hide files that you don’t want to delete. You will
learn what file attributes are and how to manipulate them with the ATTRIB command. You can
copy files and subdirectories at the same time
with the XCOPY command. You can even copy
hidden files and empty subdirectories. By understanding how DOSKEY functions, you can
further use command line editing keys. By using
the text editor, you can quickly create simple text
files. In this chapter, you will take a look at these
commands and programs.
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7.1
CHAPTER 7
USING ATTRIB, SUBST, XCOPY, DOSKEY, AND THE TEXT EDITOR
File Attributes and the
ATTRIB Command
The root directory keeps track of information about every file on a disk. This information includes the file name, file extension, file size, date and time the file was last
modified, and a pointer to the file’s starting cluster in the file allocation table. In
addition, each file in the directory has attributes. Each attribute is a “bit” of information that is either on or off. A bit is 1/8 of a byte, and can store only a 1 or a 0, representing True or False, Yes or No, or On or Off. These attributes describe the status of
a file. The attributes are represented by a single letter. These attributes include
whether or not a file is a system file (S), a hidden file (H), a read-only file (R), or an
archived file (A). Attributes are sometimes referred to as flags. If you are using the
NTFS file system, there are also other attributes. These include an attribute indicating a compressed or encrypted file and whether the file contents should be indexed
for fast file searching. However, at the command line, the only attributes you can
change with the ATTRIB command are the S, H, R, and A.
The system attribute is a special signal to the operating system that the file is a
system file. Files with this attribute are usually operating system files, but some
application programs may set a bit to indicate that a particular program is a system
file. The hidden attribute means that, when you key in DIR, the file name is not
displayed. Hidden files cannot be deleted using the DEL command without parameters, copied with the COPY command, or renamed. For example, hidden files such
as the operating system files NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM are on a disk, but when
you execute DIR, they are not displayed. The same is true in Windows Explorer or
My Computer. Unless you change the folder options, hidden files are not displayed.
When a file is marked as read-only, it means exactly that. A user can only read the
file, not modify or delete it. Sometimes application programs will set the read-only
attribute bit to “on” for important files so that a user cannot easily or accidentally
delete them.
Finally, the archive attribute is used to indicate the backup history (archive
status) of a file. When you create or modify a file, an archive bit is turned on or set.
When a file has its archive bit turned on, that signifies that it has not been backed
up. Certain commands and programs, such as those that back up, can modify the
archive bit and reset it (turn it off or on).
The ATTRIB command allows you to manipulate file attributes. You can view,
set, and reset all the file attributes for one file or many files. ATTRIB is an external
command. The syntax for the ATTRIB command is the same as it was in
Windows 2000:
ATTRIB [+R ¦ -R] [+A ¦ -A] [+S ¦ -S] [+H ¦ -H]
[[drive:][path]filename] [/S [/D]]
When you see a parameter in brackets, as you know, it is an optional parameter.
When you see a parameter displayed as [+R ¦ -R], the bar (called a pipe) signifies
that there is a choice. The parameter can be one thing or the other, not both—the
choices are mutually exclusive. Thus, you can set a file with +R or -R, but not both at
the same time. When you see two sets of brackets such as [/S [/D]], it means that
7.2
ACTIVITY: USING ATTRIB TO MAKE FILES READ-ONLY
the /S can be used alone but the /D must be used with the /S and cannot be used
alone. The parameters are as follows:
+ Sets an attribute.
Clears an attribute.
R Read-only file attribute.
A Archive file attribute.
S System file attribute.
H Hidden file attribute.
/S Processes matching files in the current folder and all subfolders.
/D Processes folders as well.
The attributes that you will find most useful to set or unset are read-only (R) and
hidden (H). By making a file read-only, no one, including you, will be able to delete
or overwrite the file accidentally. If a data file is marked read-only, even when you
are in an application program, you cannot alter the data.
When you use the H attribute to make a file hidden, it will not be displayed
when using the DIR command. If you cannot see a file displayed in the directory
listing, you also cannot copy, delete, or rename it. This feature, as you will see, will
allow you great flexibility in manipulating and managing files.
The A attribute is called the archive bit. The A attribute is a signal that the file has
not been backed up. However, merely using the COPY command does not turn off
the A attribute. You must use certain programs, such as XCOPY, which can read and
manipulate the archive bit. Unlike COPY, XCOPY will determine whether or not a
file has changed since the last time it was backed up, based on whether or not the
archive bit is set. Then, XCOPY can make a decision on whether or not the file needs
to be backed up. Rarely, if ever, will you use the ATTRIB command to change the
attribute of a file marked as a system file (S).
You will find that, although you can change file attributes from Windows Explorer, it is much easier to do these kinds of tasks from the command prompt.
7.2
Activity: Using ATTRIB to
Make Files Read-only
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
1
Be sure you have opened the Command Prompt window.
Be sure the DATA disk is in Drive A and A:\> is displayed.
If specified files are not on your DATA disk, you can copy them from the
WUGXP subdirectory.
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB *.99 e
A:\>ATTRIB
A
A
A
A
A:\>_
*.99
A:\AST.99
A:\VEN.99
A:\JUP.99
A:\MER.99
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You asked the ATTRIB command to show you all the files with the
.99 extension in the root directory of the DATA disk. The only file attribute that is
visible or “on” for these files is A, the archive bit. The display tells you that the
archive bit is set for each file that has a .99 file extension.
2
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB C:\*.* e
A:\>ATTRIB
A
A SH
H
A SHR
A SHR
SH
H
A SHR
A SHR
C:\*.*
C:\startup.txt
C:\PAGEFILE.SYS
C:\CONFIG.SYS
C:\IO.SYS
C:\MSDOS.SYS
C:\boot.ini
C:\AUTOEXEC.BAT
C:\NTDETECT.COM
C:\ntldr
A:\>_
You are looking at the files in the root directory of C. Your display
will be different depending on what files are in your root directory. Also, if you are
using a network drive instead of a local hard disk, you may not be able to access the
root directory of the network drive. You can see that in this display, io.sys,
MSDOS.SYS, ntldr, and NTDETECT.COM are marked with an S for the system
attribute, an H for the hidden attribute, and an R for the read-only attribute. Since
you cannot boot the computer from the hard disk without these files, they are tripleprotected. Other critical files are marked with one or more of the S, H, and R attributes.
3
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.FIL e
Note:
Overwrite any files if you are prompted to do so.
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.FIL
C:\WUGXP\MARK.FIL
C:\WUGXP\CASES.FIL
C:\WUGXP\FRANK.FIL
C:\WUGXP\NEWPRSON.FIL
C:\WUGXP\PERSONAL.FIL
C:\WUGXP\Y.FIL
C:\WUGXP\CAROLYN.FIL
C:\WUGXP\person.fil
C:\WUGXP\STEVEN.FIL
C:\WUGXP\ZODIAC.FIL
10 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have copied all the files with the .FIL extension from the
\WUGXP subdirectory to the DATA disk.
4
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB *.FIL e
7.2
A:\>ATTRIB
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
ACTIVITY: USING ATTRIB TO MAKE FILES READ-ONLY
*.FIL
A:\ASTROLGY.FIL
A:\MARK.FIL
A:\CASES.FIL
A:\FRANK.FIL
A:\NEWPRSON.FIL
A:\PERSONAL.FIL
A:\Y.FIL
A:\CAROLYN.FIL
A:\person.fil
A:\STEVEN.FIL
A:\ZODIAC.FIL
A:\>_
The only attribute that is set (turned on) for these files is the
archive bit (A).
5
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB +R STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>ATTRIB +R STEVEN.FIL
A:\>_
You asked the ATTRIB command to make STEVEN.FIL a readonly file.
6
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL
A
R
A:\STEVEN.FIL
A:\>_
Now you have flagged or marked STEVEN.FIL as a read-only file.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DEL STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>DEL STEVEN.FIL
A:\STEVEN.FIL
Access is denied.
A:\>_
You cannot delete this file because it is marked read-only. You can
also protect against other kinds of file destruction. Once a file is marked read-only,
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even when you are in an application program, the operating system will stop you
from overwriting the file.
Note:
Steps 8 through 24 can be completed only if you have Microsoft Excel
installed on your computer. If Excel is not available, read through the
exercise and study the screen images.
8
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.XLS e
9
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.XLS e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.XLS
C:\WUGXP\NEW-SUVS.XLS
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>DIR *.XLS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
01:38 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
4,064 NEW-SUVS.XLS
4,064 bytes
1,409,536 bytes free
A:\>_
You have the file NEW-SUVS.XLS on the DATA disk.
10 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB +R *.XLS e
11 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB *.XLS e
A:\>ATTRIB +R *.XLS
A:\>ATTRIB *.XLS
A
R
A:\NEW-SUVS.XLS
A:\>_
You have made NEW-SUVS.XLS a read-only file.
12 Minimize the command line window:
13 Click Start. Click My Computer. Double-click the A drive icon. Click Tools on
the menu bar. Click Folder Options.
7.2
ACTIVITY: USING ATTRIB TO MAKE FILES READ-ONLY
14 Click the View Tab. Scroll down and remove the check from Hide extensions
for known file types. Click OK.
You have made it possible to see the .XLS file extension on the
New-SUVs file.
15 Scroll down until you can see the NEW-SUV.XLS file. Double-click on the
NEW-SUV.XLS file to open both Excel and the file.
You have opened the file in Excel. Notice the title bar says [ReadOnly].
16 Click in cell A-30 (the box right below Toyota).
17 Key in the following: Latest Thing e
You have added data to the file.
18 Click File on the menu bar. Click Save.
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You are told that the file is read-only.
19
Click OK.
Excel brought up the Save As dialog box. Notice that there is no
name in the File name box. In order to save the file, you would have to give it a
different name, as NEW-SUV.XLS is read only and can not be overwritten.
In less sophisticated software, when you try and save over a read-only file you may
get an error that is not at all descriptive, or worse, the program may simply “crash.”
Excel provides you with an easy solution.
20
Click Cancel to close the dialog box.
21
Click File. Click Exit.
Excel prompts you to save your changes. You do not want to save.
22
Click No to return to the desktop.
23
Close the My Computer window.
24
Click the minimized Command Line button on the taskbar.
25
Key in the following: A:\>CLS e
7.3
USING THE HIDDEN AND ARCHIVE ATTRIBUTES WITH ATTRIB
You have returned to the command line window and cleared the
screen.
26
Key in the following: A:\>COPY STEVEN.FIL BETTE.FIL e
27
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB +R BETTE.FIL e
28
Key in the following: A:\>DEL BETTE.FIL e
29
Key in the following: A:\>DEL /F BETTE.FIL e
30
Key in the following: A:\>DIR BETTE.FIL e
A:\>COPY STEVEN.FIL BETTE.FIL
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>ATTRIB +R BETTE.FIL
A:\>DEL BETTE.FIL
A:\BETTE.FIL
Access is denied.
A:\>DEL /F BETTE.FIL
A:\>DIR BETTE.FIL
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 2829-1507
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
You created a new file called BETTE.FIL. You made it read-only
and then attempted to delete it. Since it was read-only, you could not delete it with
the DEL command (“Access is denied”). However, when you added the /F parameter to the DEL command to force deletion of a read-only file, you could successfully
delete BETTE.FIL.
7.3
Using the Hidden and Archive
Attributes with ATTRIB
The purpose of the H attribute is to hide a file so that when you use the DIR command, you will not see it displayed. Why would you want to hide a file? The most
likely person you are going to hide the file from is yourself, and this seems to make
no sense. The real advantage to using the hidden attribute is that it allows you to
manipulate files. For instance, when you use the COPY or the MOVE command
with wildcards, you may not want to move or copy specific files. When you hide
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files, neither COPY nor MOVE can see them so they are protected from manipulation. These are tasks you cannot perform in Windows Explorer. Although you can
hide files and folders by right-clicking the file name, then clicking Properties, and
then choosing the Hide attribute, it is much more difficult to perform file operations
on groups of files simultaneously in Windows Explorer.
The A attribute uses certain commands to flag a file as changed since the last time
you backed it up. These commands can read the attribute bit (A) and can identify if
it has been set. If it is set (on), the commands that can read the archive bit know
whether the file has changed since the last time it was copied. With the ATTRIB
command, you can set and unset this flag to help identify what files you changed
since the last time you backed them up. The following activity will demonstrate
how you can use the H and A attributes.
7.4
Activity: Using the H
and the A Attributes
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\FI*.* e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\FI*.*
C:\WUGXP\FILE2.SWT
C:\WUGXP\FILE4.FP
C:\WUGXP\FILE2.FP
C:\WUGXP\FILE3.FP
C:\WUGXP\FILE2.CZG
C:\WUGXP\FILE3.CZG
C:\WUGXP\FILE3.SWT
7 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR F*.* e
A:\>DIR F*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
A:\>_
01:14 PM
12:53 PM
04:50 PM
04:51 PM
04:51 PM
04:51 PM
02:49 PM
02:49 PM
04:50 PM
9 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
164 FUNNY.TV
44 FRANK.FIL
138 FILE2.SWT
137 FILE4.FP
137 FILE2.FP
137 FILE3.FP
138 FILE2.CZG
138 FILE3.CZG
138 FILE3.SWT
1,171 bytes
1,405,952 bytes free
7.4
ACTIVITY: USING THE H AND THE A ATTRIBUTES
You copied all the files that begin with FI from the WUGXP
subdirectory to the root directory of the DATA disk. Now you want to move all the
files that begin with F to the TRIP subdirectory, but you do not want to move the
files you just copied. The problem is that, if you use MOVE F*.* TRIP, all the files
that begin with F will be moved, not just the ones you desire. You cannot say, “Move
all the files that begin with F except the files that begin with FI.” Here, the ability to
hide files is useful.
3
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB FI*.* +H e
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR F*.* e
A:\>ATTRIB FI*.* +H
A:\>DIR F*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
07/31/1999
01:14 PM
12:53 PM
2 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
164 FUNNY.TV
44 FRANK.FIL
208 bytes
1,405,952 bytes free
A:\>_
The files that begin with FI are hidden and will not be displayed
by the DIR command. Note that you could have keyed the command in with the
parameter +H before the file specification as well as after. (ATTRIB +H FI*.*) With
the ATTRIB command, the order does not matter. Now when you use the MOVE
command, none of the hidden files, the FI*.* files, will be moved.
5
Key in the following: A:\>MOVE F*.* TRIP e
A:\>MOVE F*.* TRIP
A:\FUNNY.TV
A:\FRANK.FIL
A:\>_
You see that you accomplished your mission. The files you hid
were not moved. What if you forget which files you hid? The /A parameter, which
can be used with the DIR command, allows you to specify the kind of file you want
to look for. The attribute choices are:
D
Directories
H
Hidden files
R
Read-only files
A
Files ready to archive
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /AH e
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A:\>DIR /AH
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
04:50 PM
04:51 PM
04:51 PM
04:51 PM
02:49 PM
02:49 PM
04:50 PM
7 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
138 FILE2.SWT
137 FILE4.FP
137 FILE2.FP
137 FILE3.FP
138 FILE2.CZG
138 FILE3.CZG
138 FILE3.SWT
963 bytes
1,405,952 bytes free
A:\>_
The attribute you wanted to use was the hidden attribute (H). As
you can see, the DIR /AH command displays only the hidden files. Now you can
“unhide” the files.
7
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB -H FI*.* e
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR F*.* e
A:\>ATTRIB -H FI*.*
A:\>DIR F*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
04:50 PM
04:51 PM
04:51 PM
04:51 PM
02:49 PM
02:49 PM
04:50 PM
7 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
138 FILE2.SWT
137 FILE4.FP
137 FILE2.FP
137 FILE3.FP
138 FILE2.CZG
138 FILE3.CZG
138 FILE3.SWT
963 bytes
1,404,928 bytes free
A:\> _
The FI*.* files are no longer hidden. Notice that this time, you
placed the parameter before the file specification.
You can manipulate other file attributes to assist you in managing your files. You
can indicate what files have changed since the last time you copied them by changing the A, or archive, bit. When you create a file, the operating system automatically
turns on the A attribute or “flags” it as new and not backed up. When you use
certain commands, such as XCOPY, that command will turn off the A flag to indicate
that the file has been backed up. Whenever you make a change to a file, the A
7.4
ACTIVITY: USING THE H AND THE A ATTRIBUTES
attribute bit is turned on again or “re-flagged” to indicate that there has been a
change since the last time you backed it up. You will learn later how this works
when using the XCOPY command. You can also manipulate the archive bit directly
with the ATTRIB command to let you know if you changed a file.
9
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE STEVEN.FIL e
10 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>TYPE STEVEN.FIL
Hi, my name is Steven.
What is your name?
A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL
A
R
A:\STEVEN.FIL
A:\> _
This file is protected with the R attribute. You can see the contents
of it using the TYPE command. Setting the R attribute does not prevent the file from
being viewed, neither with the TYPE command, nor with a program such as Excel.
You set the R attribute—the operating system automatically set the A attribute.
11 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB -A -R STEVEN.FIL e
12 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>ATTRIB -A -R STEVEN.FIL
A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL
A:\STEVEN.FIL
A:\>_
You have turned off all the attributes of this file.
13 Key in the following: A:\>COPY TRIP\FRANK.FIL STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>COPY TRIP\FRANK.FIL STEVEN.FIL
Overwrite STEVEN.FIL? (Yes/No/All):
Since the file is no longer read-only, you are asked if you want to
overwrite the contents of STEVEN.FIL with FRANK.FIL.
14 Press Y e
15 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE STEVEN.FIL e
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A:\>COPY TRIP\FRANK.FIL STEVEN.FIL
Overwrite STEVEN.FIL? (Yes/No/All): Y
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>TYPE STEVEN.FIL
Hi, my name is Frank
What is your name?
A:\>_
The file contents have clearly changed. This file is an ASCII or text
file and can be read on the screen with the TYPE command. If this were a data file
generated by a program, you could not use the TYPE command to see if the contents
had changed. By looking at the attributes of a data file, you could see that the file
had changed.
16 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL
A
A:\STEVEN.FIL
A:\>_
The A attribute or archive bit is once again turned on so that you
know the file has changed. Another way of saying it is that STEVEN.FIL is flagged
by the archive bit. If you had protected STEVEN.FIL with the read-only attribute,
you would be protected from accidentally overwriting the file. Other operations do
not work the same way. If you rename a file, it keeps the same file attributes, but if
you copy the file, it does not carry the read-only attribute to the copy. Since this is a
“new” file, the archive bit will be set automatically.
17 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB +R -A STEVEN.FIL e
18 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL e
A:\>ATTRIB +R -A STEVEN.FIL
A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL
R
A:\STEVEN.FIL
A:\>_
STEVEN.FIL is now read-only and has had the A flag turned off.
19 Key in the following: A:\>REN STEVEN.FIL BRIAN.FIL e
20 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB BRIAN.FIL e
7.5
THE SUBST COMMAND
A:\>REN STEVEN.FIL BRIAN.FIL
A:\>ATTRIB BRIAN.FIL
A
R
A:\BRIAN.FIL
A:\>_
You can rename a file marked Read-only. The read-only attributes
protects the contents of a file—not the filename. Even though you renamed
STEVEN.FIL to BRIAN.FIL, BRIAN.FIL retained the read-only attribute that
STEVEN.FIL had, plus the A attribute was added. It is the same file; you just
renamed it. However, things change when you copy a file because you are creating a
new, different file.
21 Key in the following: A:\>COPY BRIAN.FIL STEVEN.FIL e
22 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL e
23 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB BRIAN.FIL e
A:\>COPY BRIAN.FIL STEVEN.FIL
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>ATTRIB STEVEN.FIL
A
A:\STEVEN.FIL
A:\>ATTRIB BRIAN.FIL
A
R
A:\BRIAN.FIL
A:\>_
When you copied BRIAN.FIL, which had a read-only file attribute, to a new file called STEVEN.FIL, the operating system removed the readonly attribute of the new file. STEVEN.FIL is not a read-only file. Thus, setting the
read-only attribute is really most valuable for protecting you against accidental
erasure of a file, not for any particular security reason. Remember that you set file
attributes with the plus sign (+). You can unset file attributes with the minus sign (-).
You can eliminate or add several file attributes with a one-line command, but there
must be a space between each parameter, so follow the spacing of the command
syntax carefully.
7.5
The SUBST Command
SUBST is an external command that allows you to substitute a drive letter for a path
name. This command can be used to avoid having to key in a long path name. It can
also be used to install programs that do not recognize a subdirectory but do recognize a disk drive. You can also use SUBST if you need information from a drive that
a program does not recognize.
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CAUTION: Be cautious when you use SUBST when logged on to a network. You
may not be able to use SUBST on the network. As networks use letter drive
specifications, be SURE to check with your lab administrator to see if you can use
this command successfully, and if so, what drive letter you are free to use.
On a stand-alone system, when you use SUBST and while a substitution is in
effect, you should not use the commands LABEL, CHKDSK, FORMAT, DISKCOPY,
DISKCOM, RECOVER, or FDISK. These commands expect a drive letter to represent an actual disk drive. The syntax for the SUBST command is:
SUBST [drive1: [drive2:]path]
or to undo a substitution:
SUBST
drive1: /D
and to see what you have substituted:
SUBST
7.6
Activity: Using SUBST
Note 1: You have the DATA disk in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
Note 2: If you have a Drive E on your own computer system you should pick a
drive letter that is not being used, such as H: or K:. Remember that if you
are in a lab environment you must check with your instructor to see if you
can do this activity.
1
Key in the following:
A:\>TYPE ASTRONOMY\MERCURY\DRESS.UP e
A:\>TYPE ASTRONOMY\MERCURY\DRESS.UP
There are so many beautiful things that
dress up our universe. The nebuleas appear
to be “dressed” in lovely veils of translucent
clouds. Wonderful pictures of our universe
can be seen at http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html
Take a look at the archieve files to see!
A:\>_
You displayed the contents of the file called DRESS.UP in the
subdirectory called MERCURY under the subdirectory called ASTRONOMY in the
root directory. Even though you left the first backslash off, since the default directory is the root, you still have a lot of keying in to do. If you use the SUBST command, you need to key in only the logical or virtual drive letter. In this example, E:
is selected.
You are creating a virtual drive, one that exists temporarily. A virtual drive is also
known as a logical drive. You are letting a drive letter represent an actual physical
drive and path. Thus, you must be sure to use a drive letter that is not being used by
7.6
ACTIVITY: USING SUBST
an actual physical disk drive. If you have a floppy disk Drive A; a floppy disk
Drive B; a hard disk that is logically divided into Drives C, D, and E; a removable
drive such as a Zip drive that is Drive G; and a CD-ROM that is Drive H; your first
available letter would be I. If, on the other hand, you had all the above drives except
an actual physical Drive B, you could use B. Conceptually, this is how networks
operate—a network takes a path name and substitutes a drive letter for the path. It
appears to the user as a “real” drive and behaves like a real drive for COPY, MOVE,
and other file and directory commands. However, since it is not a “real” drive, you
cannot perform disk actions on it such as SCANDISK, format, or DISKCOPY. (Note:
If you have a Drive E on your own computer system, you should pick a drive letter
that is not being used, such as H: or K:. Remember, if you are in a lab environment,
you must check with your instructor to see if you can do this activity.) Often, Drive B
is not assigned to a drive letter and you may use B: instead of E:.
2
Key in the following: A:\>SUBST E: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY e
3
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE E:DRESS.UP e
A:\>SUBST E: A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
A:\>TYPE E:DRESS.UP
There are so many beautiful things that
dress up our universe. The nebuleas appear
to be “dressed” in lovely veils of translucent
clouds. Wonderful pictures of our universe
can be seen at http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html
Take a look at the archieve files to see!
A:\>_
You first set up the substitution. You said substitute the letter E for
the path name A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY. Now, every time you want to refer
to the subdirectory called A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY, you can just use the
letter E, which refers to logical Drive E. You can use this logical drive just like a
physical drive. You can use the DIR command, the COPY command, the DEL
command, and just about any other command you wish.
4
Key in the following: A:\>SUBST e
A:\>SUBST
E: => A:\ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
A:\>_
SUBST, when used alone, tells you what substitution you have
used.
5
Key in the following: A:\>SUBST E: /D e
6
Key in the following: A:\>SUBST e
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A:\>SUBST E: /D
A:\>SUBST
A:\>_
The /D parameter disabled or “undid” the SUBST command so
that logical Drive E no longer refers to the subdirectory A:\ASTRONOMY
\MERCURY. The SUBST that was keyed in with no parameters showed that no
substitution was in effect. Most software today is quite sophisticated. For instance, if
you have an older program that comes on a 5¼-inch disk and insists on running
from Drive A but Drive A is a 3½-inch disk drive, you can solve the problem with
SUBST. The biggest offenders are game programs and older installation programs.
The solution would be as follows:
SUBST A: B:\
This command would reroute every disk request intended for Drive A to Drive B.
The only tricky thing about this command is that you must include \ after B:.
SUBST does not recognize a drive letter alone as a destination, so you must include
the path.
7.7
The XCOPY Command
Although COPY is a useful internal command, it has some drawbacks, as you have
seen. COPY copies one file at a time, even with wildcards. If you issue the command
COPY *.FIL and there are four files ending in .FIL, the operating system finds the
first file and reads it, then rights it to the destination. Then it finds the second file,
reads it, and writes that one to the destination, and so on. This is the slowest way to
copy files. In addition, you cannot copy a subdirectory structure with the COPY
command. If you have disks with different formats such as a 3½ inch disk and Zip
disk, you cannot use DISKCOPY because the media types must be the same. You
can, however, use XCOPY. Unlike COPY, XCOPY is an external command that
allows you to copy files that exist in different subdirectories as well as the contents
of a subdirectory, including both files and subdirectories beneath a parent
subdirectory. It allows you to specify a drive as a source and assumes you want to
copy all files on the drive in the default directory. With XCOPY you can copy files
created on or after a certain date, or files with the archive bit set. XCOPY provides
overwrite protection so that, if there is a file with the same name, XCOPY will
request permission before overwriting the destination file with the source file.
Furthermore, XCOPY operates faster than the COPY command. In the previous
example copying the four files ending in .FIL, the XCOPY command finds all the
files meeting the criteria, reads them all into memory, and then writes them out to
the destination disk. This method saves time. The XCOPY command will not, by
default, copy system or hidden files.
7.7
THE XCOPY COMMAND
XCOPY is a very powerful and useful command. With it you can copy files and
subdirectories that have any attributes. You can also specify that the files and
subdirectories copied retain their attributes. As you remember, when you use COPY
to make a copy of a file, the copy does not have the same attributes as the source
file. The attributes are lost when the file is copied. There are further advantages to
using the command line over using Windows Explorer. When dragging and dropping to copy files and directory structures, it is easy to “miss” your destination. If
you want to be specific, it is easier to key in commands than to drag and drop. In
addition, you can perform file operations on a group of files rather than one file at a
time.
There are many parameters available when using the XCOPY command. The full
syntax is:
Copies files and directory trees.
XCOPY source [destination] [/A ¦ /M] [/D[:date]] [/P] [/S [/E]]
[/V] [/W] [/C] [/I] [/Q] [/F] [/L]
[/G] [/H] [/R] [/T] [/U] [/K] [/N]
[/O] [/X] [/Y] [/-Y] [/Z]
[/EXCLUDE:file1[+file2][+file3]...]
source
destination
/A
Specifies the file(s) to copy.
Specifies the location and/or name of new files.
Copies only files with the archive attribute set,
doesn’t change the attribute.
/M
Copies only files with the archive attribute set,
turns off the archive attribute.
/D:m-d-y
Copies files changed on or after the specified date.
If no date is given, copies only those files whose
source time is newer than the destination time.
/EXCLUDE:file1[+file2][+file3]...
Specifies a list of files containing strings. Each
string should be in a separate line in the files.
When any of the strings match any part of the
absolute path of the file to be copied, that file
will be excluded from being copied. For example,
specifying a string like \obj\ or .obj will exclude
all files underneath the directory obj or all files
with the .obj extension respectively.
/P
Prompts you before creating each destination file.
/S
Copies directories and subdirectories except empty
ones.
/E
Copies directories and subdirectories, including
empty ones.
Same as /S /E. May be used to modify /T.
/V
Verifies each new file.
/W
Prompts you to press a key before copying.
/C
Continues copying even if errors occur.
/I
If destination does not exist and copying more than
one file, assumes that destination must be a
directory.
/Q
Does not display file names while copying.
/F
Displays full source and destination file names while
copying.
/L
Displays files that would be copied.
/G
Allows the copying of encrypted files to destination
that does not support encryption.
/H
Copies hidden and system files also.
/R
Overwrites read-only files.
/T
Creates directory structure, but does not copy files.
Does not include empty directories or subdirectories.
/T /E includes empty directories and subdirectories.
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/U
/K
USING ATTRIB, SUBST, XCOPY, DOSKEY, AND THE TEXT EDITOR
Copies only files that already exist in destination.
Copies attributes. Normal Xcopy will reset read-only
attributes.
Copies using the generated short names.
Copies file ownership and ACL information.
Copies file audit settings (implies /O).
Suppresses prompting to confirm you want to overwrite
an existing destination file.
Causes prompting to confirm you want to overwrite an
existing destination file.
Copies networked files in restartable mode.
/N
/O
/X
/Y
/-Y
/Z
The switch /Y may be preset in the COPYCMD environment variable.
This may be overridden with /-Y on the command line.
These many parameters give XCOPY a great deal of versatility.
7.8
Activity: Using the XCOPY Command
Note:
You have the DATA disk in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\MEDIA e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\BOOKS e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\MEDIA
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP\MEDIA
02/04/2002
02/04/2002
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
09:21 AM
<DIR>
.
09:21 AM
<DIR>
..
09:24 AM
<DIR>
TV
09:24 AM
<DIR>
MOVIES
09:25 AM
<DIR>
BOOKS
0 File(s)
0 bytes
5 Dir(s)
7,033,864,192 bytes free
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\BOOKS
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\BOOKS
02/04/2002
02/04/2002
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
09:21 AM
<DIR>
.
09:21 AM
<DIR>
..
12:12 AM
1,260 PULITZER.BKS
12:04 AM
370 MYSTERY.BKS
12:09 AM
437 AME-LIT.BKS
3 File(s)
2,067 bytes
2 Dir(s)
7,033,864,192 bytes free
A:\>_
As you can see, the MEDIA subdirectory has three subdirectories:
TV, MOVIES, and BOOKS. Each subdirectory has files in it as well. If you were
going to use the COPY command to recreate this structure on your DATA disk, you
would have to create the directories with the MD command and then copy the files
7.8
ACTIVITY: USING THE XCOPY COMMAND
in the TV, MOVIES, and BOOKS subdirectories. XCOPY can do all this work for
you. You are still copying files, but you can consider XCOPY as a smart COPY
command. When working with computers, you want the computer to do all the
work, when possible.
3
Key in the following: A:\>XCOPY C:\WUGXP\MEDIA MEDIA /S e
A:\>XCOPY C:\WUGXP\MEDIA MEDIA /S
Does MEDIA specify a file name
or directory name on the target
(F = file, D = directory)?
You asked XCOPY to copy all the files from the WUGXP\MEDIA
subdirectory located on the hard disk to the \MEDIA subdirectory under the root
directory of the DATA disk. In this case, XCOPY is a smart command. It asks you if
you want to place all these files in one file or to create a subdirectory structure. In
this case, you want to create the subdirectory structure. The /S parameter means to
copy all the subdirectories and their files to the MEDIA subdirectory on the DATA
disk. XCOPY is a command that does not care where you place /S. The command
could have been written as XCOPY /S C:\WUGXP\MEDIA MEDIA, and it would
also have been correct.
4
Key in the following: D
(F = file, D = directory)? D
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\TV\COMEDY.TV
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\TV\DRAMA.TV
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\MOVIES\BESTPIC.MOV
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\MOVIES\BESTSONG.MOV
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\MOVIES\GOLD_OLD.MOV
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\BOOKS\PULITZER.BKS
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\BOOKS\MYSTERY.BKS
C:\WUGXP\MEDIA\BOOKS\AME-LIT.BKS
8 File(s) copied
A:\>_
Since you included the /S parameter, XCOPY copied all the files
from the subdirectory \WUGXP\MEDIA, including the subdirectories called
BOOKS, TV, and MOVIES and their contents.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR MEDIA e
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR MEDIA\BOOKS e
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A:\>DIR MEDIA
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\MEDIA
04/10/2002
04/10/2002
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
02:36 PM
<DIR>
.
02:36 PM
<DIR>
..
09:24 AM
<DIR>
TV
09:24 AM
<DIR>
MOVIES
09:25 AM
<DIR>
BOOKS
0 File(s)
0 bytes
5 Dir(s)
1,396,736 bytes free
A:\>DIR MEDIA\BOOKS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\MEDIA\BOOKS
04/10/2002
04/10/2002
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
02:36 PM
<DIR>
.
02:36 PM
<DIR>
..
12:12 AM
1,260 PULITZER.BKS
12:04 AM
370 MYSTERY.BKS
12:09 AM
437 AME-LIT.BKS
3 File(s)
2,067 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,397,760 bytes free
A:\>_
All the files and subdirectories were copied, and the subdirectory
structure was retained. As you can see, XCOPY is a smart command with many
useful parameters. One of the more useful ones is copying files modified or created
after a certain date.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
10/31/2001
11/16/2000
05/27/2001
10/30/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
01:46
02:10
04:03
04:32
12:00
02:43
12:00
10:08
03:42
12:15
11:37
12:16
01:08
11:24
07:08
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
AM
PM
AM
PM
148
121
72
53
59
529
53
81
190
97
253
99
406
194
478
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
DANCES.TXT
HELLO.TXT
Sandy and Patty.txt
TITAN.TXT
Sandy and Nicki.txt
LONGFILENAME.TXT
JUPITER.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
GALAXY.TXT
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
MERCURY.TXT
PLANETS.TXT
VENUS.TXT
7.8
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
ACTIVITY: USING THE XCOPY COMMAND
2,833 bytes
7,033,864,192 bytes free
A:\>_
You want to copy all the .TXT files that were created on or after
06-01-00 to the root directory of the DATA disk. You do not want to copy the files
DANCES.TXT and HELLO.TXT. The XCOPY command allows you to make choices
by date. In the following step, overwrite files if necessary.
8
Key in the following: A:\>XCOPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT /D:06-01-00 e
A:\>XCOPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT /D:06-01-00
C:\WUGXP\ASTRO.TXT
C:\WUGXP\BORN.TXT
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Patty.txt
C:\WUGXP\TITAN.TXT
Overwrite A:\Sandy and Nicki.txt (Yes/No/All)?
Remember the default for XCOPY is to confirm overwrites. The
command is telling you that Sandy and Nicki.txt already exists. Again, your choice
may be different if you are using the NTFS file system. In that case, the first file that
queries you as to overwriting is JUPITER.TXT. In this case, you want to overwrite all
the files.
9
Press A.
Overwrite A:\Sandy and Nicki.txt (Yes/No/All)? A
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Nicki.txt
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAME.TXT
C:\WUGXP\JUPITER.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMED.TXT
C:\WUGXP\GALAXY.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMING.TXT
C:\WUGXP\MERCURY.TXT
C:\WUGXP\PLANETS.TXT
C:\WUGXP\VENUS.TXT
13 File(s) copied
A:\>_
You copied only the 13 files of interest and not all 15 files that were
in the \WUGXP subdirectory. Furthermore, you can use the XCOPY command to
copy only files that have changed since the last time you copied them with XCOPY.
Remember, XCOPY can manipulate the A attribute (archive bit).
10 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD e
Note:
Do not be concerned if your files display in a different order than shown
here.
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A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD
A:\JUP.BUD
A:\MER.BUD
A
A:\AST.BUD
A:\VEN.BUD
A:\>_
The files with the extension of .BUD have the archive attribute
turned on.
11 Key in the following: A:\>XCOPY /M *.BUD CLASS e
12 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD e
A:\>XCOPY /M *.BUD CLASS
A:JUP.BUD
A:MER.BUD
A:AST.BUD
A:VEN.BUD
4 File(s) copied
A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD
A:\JUP.BUD
A:\MER.BUD
A:\AST.BUD
A:\VEN.BUD
A:\>_
When you used the /M parameter, it read the attribute bit for the
*.BUD files and, as it copied each file to the CLASS directory, it turned off the
archive bit on the source file.
To see how XCOPY can use the archive bit, you are going to make a change to the
AST.BUD file by using COPY to copy over the contents of AST.BUD with the
contents of FILE2.FP. You will then use the ATTRIB command to see that the A bit is
back on because the file contents changed. When you next use XCOPY with the /M
parameter, it will copy only the file that changed.
13 Key in the following: A:\>COPY FILE2.FP AST.BUD e
14 Press Y e
15 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD e
A:\>COPY FILE2.FP AST.BUD
Overwrite AST.BUD? (Yes/No/All): Y
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD
A:\JUP.BUD
A:\MER.BUD
A:\AST.BUD
7.8
ACTIVITY: USING THE XCOPY COMMAND
A:\VEN.BUD
A:\>_
Since AST.BUD already existed, COPY asked if you really wanted
to overwrite it. You keyed in Y for “Yes.” The AST.BUD file has changed since the
last time you used XCOPY. When you used the ATTRIB command, you saw that the
A bit for AST.BUD was turned back on.
16 Key in the following: A:\>XCOPY *.BUD CLASS /M e
17 Press Y
A:\>XCOPY *.BUD CLASS /M
Overwrite A:\class\AST.BUD (Yes/No/All)? y
A:AST.BUD
1 File(s) copied
A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD
A:\JUP.BUD
A:\MER.BUD
A:\AST.BUD
A:\VEN.BUD
A:\>_
Once again, XCOPY informed you that you were about to overwrite an existing file in the CLASS subdirectory. You told XCOPY you wanted to do
that. Notice that only one file was copied, AST.BUD, to the CLASS subdirectory.
XCOPY read the attribute bit, saw that only AST.BUD had changed, and copied
only one file, not all of the .BUD files. The XCOPY command then turned off the A
attribute so that, if you make any further changes to any of the .BUD files, XCOPY
will know to copy only the files that changed. XCOPY can also copy files that are
hidden.
18 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB *.BUD e
19 Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT e
20 Key in the following: A e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT
C:\WUGXP\ASTRO.TXT
Overwrite A:\ASTRO.TXT? (Yes/No/All): A
C:\WUGXP\BORN.TXT
C:\WUGXP\DANCES.TXT
C:\WUGXP\HELLO.TXT
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Patty.txt
C:\WUGXP\TITAN.TXT
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Nicki.txt
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAME.TXT
C:\WUGXP\JUPITER.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMED.TXT
C:\WUGXP\GALAXY.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMING.TXT
C:\WUGXP\MERCURY.TXT
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C:\WUGXP\PLANETS.TXT
C:\WUGXP\VENUS.TXT
15 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have copied all the files with the extension .TXT from the
WUGXP directory to the root of the DATA disk.
21 Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TXT e
22 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB +H SAN*.TXT e
A:\>DIR *.TXT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
11/16/2000
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
06/30/2002
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
11/16/2000
10/31/2001
05/27/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
11/24/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11:00 AM
01:46 PM
03:42 PM
01:08 PM
07:08 PM
02:30 PM
12:46 PM
01:10 PM
11:00 AM
01:43 PM
10:08 PM
12:15 AM
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
11:24 AM
03:03 PM
03:32 PM
17 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
148 ASTROLGY.TXT
190 JUPITER.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
1,223 NINE.TXT
148 ASTRO.TXT
121 BORN.TXT
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
529 TITAN.TXT
81 LONGFILENAME.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
72 DANCES.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
4,204 bytes
1,389,568 bytes free
A:\>ATTRIB +H SAN*.TXT
A:\>_
You have used the DIR command to display all 18 files ending in
.TXT. You have set the H attribute on for the two .TXT files that begin with SAN.
Those files will no longer be listed by the DIR command.
23 Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.TXT e
A:\>DIR *.TXT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 2829-1507
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
01:46
03:42
01:08
07:08
PM
PM
PM
PM
148
190
406
478
ASTROLGY.TXT
JUPITER.TXT
MERCURY.TXT
VENUS.TXT
7.8
06/30/2002
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
05/27/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
11/24/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
02:30 PM
12:46 PM
01:10 PM
01:43 PM
10:08 PM
12:15 AM
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
11:24 AM
03:03 PM
03:32 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
ACTIVITY: USING THE XCOPY COMMAND
1,223 NINE.TXT
148 ASTRO.TXT
121 BORN.TXT
529 TITAN.TXT
81 LONGFILENAME.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
72 DANCES.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
4,092 bytes
1,389,568 bytes free
A:\>_
You have displayed all the files ending with .TXT, but only 16 files
are displayed. The DIR command does not display hidden files.
24 Key in the following: A:\>MD HIDDEN e
25 Key in the following: A:\>COPY *.TXT HIDDEN e
A:\>MD HIDDEN
A:\>COPY *.TXT HIDDEN
ASTROLGY.TXT
JUPITER.TXT
MERCURY.TXT
VENUS.TXT
NINE.TXT
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
TITAN.TXT
LONGFILENAME.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
GALAXY.TXT
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
PLANETS.TXT
DANCES.TXT
HELLO.TXT
15 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
Only 16 files were copied. The two hidden files were not copied.
26 Key in the following: A:\>XCOPY *.TXT HIDDEN /H e
27 Key in the following: A
A:\>XCOPY *.TXT HIDDEN /H
A:Sandy and Nicki.txt
Overwrite A:\HIDDEN\ASTROLGY.TXT (Yes/No/All)? A
A:ASTROLGY.TXT
A:JUPITER.TXT
A:MERCURY.TXT
A:VENUS.TXT
A:NINE.TXT
A:ASTRO.TXT
335
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A:BORN.TXT
A:Sandy and Patty.txt
A:TITAN.TXT
A:LONGFILENAME.TXT
A:LONGFILENAMED.TXT
A:GALAXY.TXT
A:LONGFILENAMING.TXT
A:PLANETS.TXT
A:DANCES.TXT
A:HELLO.TXT
17 File(s) copied
A:\>_
All the files ending with .TXT were copied, including the two files
with the H attribute set.
28 Key in the following: A:\>CD HIDDEN e
29 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>DEL *.* e
30 Key in the following: Y e
31 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>DIR e
A:\>CD HIDDEN
A:\HIDDEN>DEL *.*
A:\HIDDEN\*.*, Are you sure (Y/N)? Y
A:\HIDDEN>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\HIDDEN
04/10/2002
04/10/2002
02:55 PM
<DIR>
.
02:55 PM
<DIR>
..
0 File(s)
0 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,387,520 bytes free
A:\HIDDEN>_
It would appear that all the files have been deleted.
32 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>DIR /AH e
A:\HIDDEN>DIR /AH
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\HIDDEN
11/16/2000
11/16/2000
A:\HIDDEN>_
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
2 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
112 bytes
1,387,520 bytes free
7.10
ACTIVITY: USING MULTIPLE XCOPY PARAMETERS
You have used the DIR command, asking it to display all files with
the hidden attribute (/AH). You can see that there are still two files in the HIDDEN
subdirectory. You did not delete them.
7.9
Multiple XCOPY Parameters
One of the advantages of using XCOPY is the ability to perform file operations on
hidden, system, and even read-only files. You can use XCOPY to manipulate files
that have one or more attributes set. As you become a more sophisticated computer
user, you will find that you need to troubleshoot different kinds of computer
problems to protect your Windows environment. Here you will find commands like
XCOPY invaluable because you can accomplish tasks at the command line that you
cannot accomplish in the graphical user interface.
In the last activity, in the A:\HIDDEN directory, there were two files that had the
hidden attribute set. Now you want to copy these files to a new directory without
removing the H attribute.
7.10
Activity: Using Multiple
XCOPY Parameters
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A and A:\HIDDEN> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>MD HOLD e
2
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>XCOPY *.TXT HOLD /H e
A:\HIDDEN>MD HOLD
A:\HIDDEN>XCOPY *.TXT HOLD /H
A:Sandy and Nicki.txt
A:Sandy and Patty.txt
2 File(s) copied
A:\HIDDEN>_
You can see from the display that the two hidden files were copied
to the new HOLD directory. Did the copies of the files retain the hidden attribute?
3
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>DIR HOLD e
A:\HIDDEN>DIR HOLD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\HIDDEN\HOLD
04/10/2002
04/10/2002
03:00 PM
03:00 PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
.
..
337
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0 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
0 bytes
1,385,984 bytes free
A:\HIDDEN>_
You know you copied files into the HOLD directory, yet there are
no files shown.
4
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>DIR HOLD /AH e
A:\HIDDEN>DIR HOLD /AH
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\HIDDEN\HOLD
11/16/2000
11/16/2000
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
2 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
112 bytes
1,385,984 bytes free
A:\HIDDEN>_
The hidden attribute on the two files copied was retained. You can
manipulate files with other attributes. You can also find out which files would be
copied by using the /L parameter. The /L parameter tells you what files would be
copied by the issued command. It does not copy them.
5
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>XCOPY \FILE*.* /L e
A:\HIDDEN>XCOPY \FILE*.* /L
\FILE2.SWT
\FILE4.FP
\FILE2.FP
\FILE3.FP
\FILE2.CZG
\FILE3.CZG
\FILE3.SWT
7 File(s)
A:\HIDDEN>_
Notice there was no sound. No actual copying took place. Using
/L with the XCOPY command allows you to “preview” the files that will be copied.
6
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>COPY \FILE*.* e
A:\HIDDEN>COPY \FILE*.*
\FILE2.SWT
\FILE4.FP
\FILE2.FP
\FILE3.FP
\FILE2.CZG
7.10
ACTIVITY: USING MULTIPLE XCOPY PARAMETERS
\FILE3.CZG
\FILE3.SWT
7 file(s) copied.
A:\HIDDEN>_
Indeed, the files that were listed in the preview were copied. You
have copied all the files that begin with FILE from the root directory to the HIDDEN subdirectory.
7
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB *.FP +R e
8
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB +S *.CZG e
9
Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB *.SWT +S +H +R e
A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB *.FP +R
A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB +S *.CZG
A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB *.SWT +S +H +R
A:\HIDDEN>_
You have applied different attributes to the files you copied from
the root directory. Notice that in Step 8, the file specification is listed last, while in
steps 7 and 9, it is listed first. Remember that, although this is not the case with most
commands, with ATTRIB, the order of the parameters does not matter.
10 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>DIR e
A:\HIDDEN>DIR
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\HIDDEN
04/10/2002
04/10/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
04/10/2002
02:55 PM
<DIR>
.
02:55 PM
<DIR>
..
04:51 PM
137 FILE4.FP
04:51 PM
137 FILE2.FP
04:51 PM
137 FILE3.FP
03:00 PM
<DIR>
HOLD
3 File(s)
411 bytes
3 Dir(s)
1,381,376 bytes free
A:\HIDDEN>_
Only the files ending with .FP are displayed. You can verify that
all the files are there, as well as look at all the file attributes.
11 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB e
339
340
CHAPTER 7
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
USING ATTRIB, SUBST, XCOPY, DOSKEY, AND THE TEXT EDITOR
A:\HIDDEN>ATTRIB
R
A:\HIDDEN\FILE4.FP
R
A:\HIDDEN\FILE2.FP
R
A:\HIDDEN\FILE3.FP
S
A:\HIDDEN\FILE2.CZG
S
A:\HIDDEN\FILE3.CZG
SHR
A:\HIDDEN\FILE3.SWT
H
A:\HIDDEN\Sandy and Nicki.txt
H
A:\HIDDEN\Sandy and Patty.txt
SHR
A:\HIDDEN\FILE2.SWT
A:\HIDDEN>_
Note:
Do not be concerned it the order of your directory listings differ from those
shown in the text. You have copied and deleted many files from your
DATA disk, and the order copied from the hard drive will differ, depending
on the file system (FAT32, NTFS) used on your computer.
You can see that all but five of the files have the hidden attribute
set. You have discovered that files with only the S attribute set (the system attribute)
are also hidden. Can you manipulate all of these files with different attributes at the
same time?
12 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN>CD \ e
13 Key in the following: A:\>MD HIDDEN2 e
A:\HIDDEN>CD \
A:\>MD HIDDEN2
A:\>_
You have returned to the root of the DATA disk and created a new
subdirectory named HIDDEN2.
You are going to copy the HIDDEN subdirectory with all its files and
subdirectories to the new subdirectory HIDDEN2. To do this, you will use multiple
parameters with the XCOPY command. The parameters you will use are as follows:
/S
Copies directories and subdirectories except empty ones.
/H
Copies hidden and system files.
/R
Overwrites read-only files.
/I
If the destination does not exist and you are copying more than one
file, assumes that the destination must be a directory. If you do not
include this parameter, you will be asked if you are copying to a
directory or a file.
/E
Copies directories and subdirectories, including empty ones.
/K
Copies attributes. XCOPY will automatically reset read-only attributes.
These six parameters used together will copy everything, retaining all attributes.
It may help you to remember them as SHRIEK. If the destination does exist, and you
do not need the /I parameter, remember “SHREK.” In this case, you know you have
7.10
ACTIVITY: USING MULTIPLE XCOPY PARAMETERS
already created the directory, HIDDEN2 so you do not need the /I. If you had not
created it, you would be queried whether the destination name was a file or a
directory. Including the /I means that XCOPY will assume the destination is a
directory.
14 Key in the following:
A:\>XCOPY HIDDEN HIDDEN2 /S /H /R /E /K e
A:\>XCOPY HIDDEN HIDDEN2 /S /H /R /E /K
HIDDEN\FILE4.FP
HIDDEN\FILE2.FP
HIDDEN\FILE3.FP
HIDDEN\FILE2.CZG
HIDDEN\FILE3.CZG
HIDDEN\FILE3.SWT
HIDDEN\Sandy and Nicki.txt
HIDDEN\Sandy and Patty.txt
HIDDEN\FILE2.SWT
HIDDEN\HOLD\Sandy and Nicki.txt
HIDDEN\HOLD\Sandy and Patty.txt
11 File(s) copied
A:\>_
You copied all the files and subdirectories with one command. Did
the copies of the files retain their attributes?
15 Key in the following: A:\>CD HIDDEN2 e
16 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN2>ATTRIB /S e
A:\>CD HIDDEN2
A:\HIDDEN2>ATTRIB
A
R
A:\HIDDEN2\FILE4.FP
A
R
A:\HIDDEN2\FILE2.FP
A
R
A:\HIDDEN2\FILE3.FP
A S
A:\HIDDEN2\FILE2.CZG
A S
A:\HIDDEN2\FILE3.CZG
A SHR
A:\HIDDEN2\FILE3.SWT
A
H
A:\HIDDEN2\Sandy and Nicki.txt
A
H
A:\HIDDEN2\Sandy and Patty.txt
A SHR
A:\HIDDEN2\FILE2.SWT
A:\HIDDEN2>_
You have verified that all the files you copied from the HIDDEN
subdirectory to the HIDDEN2 subdirectory have retained their attributes.
17 Key in the following: A:\HIDDEN2>CD \ e
18 Key in the following: A:\>RD HIDDEN /S e
19 Key in the following: Y e
20 Key in the following: A:\>RD HIDDEN2 /S e
21 Key in the following: Y e
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A:\HIDDEN2>CD \
A:\>RD HIDDEN2 /S
HIDDEN2, Are you sure (Y/N)? Y
A:\>RD HIDDEN /S
HIDDEN, Are you sure (Y/N)? Y
A:\>_
You returned to the root of the DATA disk and deleted the HIDDEN and HIDDEN2 subdirectories along with all the files and subdirectories they
contained.
22 Close the Command Prompt window.
7.11
DOSKEY
DOSKEY enhances command line editing. You may already have used it to correct
keystroke errors. DOSKEY is an external, memory-resident command that in
Windows XP Professional is loaded automatically (as it was in Windows 2000) when
you open a Command Prompt window. It keeps track of the last 50 commands that
you enter when you are in the Command Prompt window and stores them in area
of memory called the command history. You can, as you have been doing, recall
those command from the command history and edit them. (See Table 2.1 in
Chapter 2.) When you exceed 50 commands, the oldest commands are eliminated
and replaced by the new commands. When you exit the Command Prompt window,
all entries made during that work session are gone.
DOSKEY, though an external command, acts like an internal command, which
means that you need not reload it from disk each time you wish to use it. Memoryresident commands are also referred to as TSR commands (Terminate Stay Resident). The normal process with any external command (program) is to execute it by
keying in the command name. The operating system goes to the disk and looks for a
program with that name, loads it into memory, and executes that program. When
loaded, that program occupies and uses RAM. When you exit the program, the
operating system reclaims the memory.
When you load a TSR, the process works initially as it does with any external
command. You execute it by keying in the command name. The operating system
goes to the specified or default drive and path and looks for the program with that
name. The program is loaded into memory and executed. However, a TSR holds on
to the memory it occupies, even while it is not actually being used or accessed. It
does not release the memory for the duration of the Command Prompt work
session. You may still load other programs, but the other programs will not use the
memory that the TSR has claimed.
DOSKEY is loaded into memory when a Command Prompt window is opened. It
remains there until you close the Command Prompt window. DOSKEY lets you
recall command lines, edit them, keep a command history, and write macros. A
7.12
ACTIVITY: USING DOSKEY
macro is a command that you can define to automate a set of commands you often
use. You may also increase the size the command history or see what is in the
history file. The full syntax is as follows:
Edits command lines, recalls Windows XP commands, and creates
macros.
DOSKEY [/REINSTALL] [/LISTSIZE=size] [/MACROS[:ALL ¦ :exename]]
[/HISTORY] [/INSERT ¦ /OVERSTRIKE] [/EXENAME=exename]
[/MACROFILE=filename] [macroname=[text]]
/REINSTALL
/LISTSIZE=size
/MACROS
/MACROS:ALL
Installs a new copy of Doskey.
Sets size of command history buffer.
Displays all Doskey macros.
Displays all Doskey macros for all executables
which have Doskey macros.
/MACROS:exename
Displays all Doskey macros for the given
executable.
/HISTORY
Displays all commands stored in memory.
/INSERT
Specifies that new text you type is inserted
in old text.
/OVERSTRIKE
Specifies that new text overwrites old text.
/EXENAME=exename
Specifies the executable.
/MACROFILE=filename Specifies a file of macros to install.
macroname
Specifies a name for a macro you create.
text
Specifies commands you want to record.
UP and DOWN ARROWS recall commands; ESC clears command line; F7
displays command history; ALT+F7 clears command history; F8 searches
command history; F9 selects a command by number; ALT+F10 clears
macro definitions.
The following are some special codes in Doskey macro definitions:
$T
Command separator. Allows multiple commands in a macro.
$1-$9 Batch parameters. Equivalent to %1-%9 in batch programs.
$*
Symbol replaced by everything following macro name on command
line.
7.12
Activity: Using DOSKEY
1
Close current Command Prompt window.
2
Open a new Command Prompt window.
3
Key in the following:
C:\>A:
A:\>DIR *.TXT e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.99 e
A:\>VOL e
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
06/30/2002
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
05/27/2001
12/06/2001
01:08
07:08
02:30
12:46
01:10
01:43
10:08
12:15
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
406
478
1,223
148
121
529
81
97
MERCURY.TXT
VENUS.TXT
NINE.TXT
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
TITAN.TXT
LONGFILENAME.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
343
344
CHAPTER 7
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
11/24/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
USING ATTRIB, SUBST, XCOPY, DOSKEY, AND THE TEXT EDITOR
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
11:24 AM
03:03 PM
03:32 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
72 DANCES.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
4,092 bytes
1,389,568 bytes free
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.99
Volume in drive C is XP_FULL
Volume Serial Number is C467-D4C1
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
12:46 PM
148 AST.99
07:08 PM
478 VEN.99
03:42 PM
190 JUP.99
01:08 PM
406 MER.99
4 File(s)
1,222 bytes
0 Dir(s) 20,680,916,992 bytes free
A:\>VOL
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 2829-1507
A:\>_
(This graphic represents the tail end of what you see scroll by on
your screen.) You have executed several commands and can now use the DOSKEY
editing keys to recall and edit commands. If you want to see what is in the command history buffer, you can use the /HISTORY parameter.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DOSKEY /HISTORY e
A:\>DOSKEY /HISTORY
A:
DIR *.TXT
DIR C:\WUGXP\*.99
VOL
DOSKEY /HISTORY
A:\>_
You used the /HISTORY parameter to recall what commands you
keyed in. Although this seems no different than using the F7 key, there is one major
advantage. Since this command writes the output to the screen, you could redirect
the output to a file. If you do a certain series of repetitive tasks with a complicated
set of commands, you can save those commands in a file. Later, when you learn
about batch files, you could execute those series of commands with one command.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DOSKEY /HISTORY > TEST.BAT e
6
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE TEST.BAT e
7.12
ACTIVITY: USING DOSKEY
A:\>DOSKEY /HISTORY > TEST.BAT
A:\>TYPE TEST.BAT
A:
DIR *.TXT
DIR C:\WUGXP\*.99
VOL
DOSKEY /HISTORY > TEST.BAT
A:\>_
You have saved the series of keystrokes you made in a batch file.
Batch files (Chapter 10–11) are executable files. You may also create a macro that
will run a series of often-used commands. You, in essence, can create an alias for a
command. You may also, in your macro, have more than one command on a line.
(You may actually have more than one command on a line in a Command Prompt
window if you separate the commands with the ampersand (&). If you wish to do
this in a macro, you must use $T.
7
Key in the following: A:\>CD CLASS & DIR *.BUD & CD \ e
A:\>CD CLASS & DIR *.BUD & CD \
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\CLASS
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
04:51 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.BUD
406 MER.BUD
137 AST.BUD
478 VEN.BUD
1,211 bytes
1,389,056 bytes free
A:\>_
You issued more than one command on the command line using
the & as a separator between the commands. Nonetheless, you needed to key all of
the commands. If you used this command all the time, you could create a macro that
would execute it for you.
8
Key in the following:
A:\>DOSKEY bb=CD CLASS$TDIR *.BUD$TCD \ e
9
Key in the following: A:\>bb e
A:\>DOSKEY bb=CD CLASS$TDIR *.BUD$TCD\
A:\>bb
A:\CLASS> Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
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Directory of A:\CLASS
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
04:51 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.BUD
406 MER.BUD
137 AST.BUD
478 VEN.BUD
1,211 bytes
1,389,056 bytes free
A:\CLASS>
A:\>_
Since you saved those series of commands in a macro called bb,
every time you wanted to execute those series of commands, you would only need
to key in bb. However, once you close this particular Command Prompt window,
macros created in this window no longer exist. If you want to be able to reuse them,
you can redirect the macros into a batch file.
10 Key in the following: A:\>DOSKEY /MACROS > b.bat e
11 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE b.bat e
A:\>DOSKEY /MACROS > b.bat
A:\>TYPE b.bat
bb=CD CLASS$TDIR *.BUD$TCD\
A:\>_
When you close the Command Prompt window, your macros are
not saved. However, you have saved this macro in a batch file which you will edit in
the next activity so you may reuse it.
7.13
The Command Prompt Text Editor
There is no doubt that, for your writing needs, you will use a word-processing
program such as Word or WordPerfect. Word-processing programs are extremely
sophisticated and allow you full flexibility in creating and editing documents,
including inserting graphics or using different fonts such as Century Schoolbook or
Times New Roman. In order to retain all of your selections in your word-processing
documents, there are special codes that only the word-processing program can read.
These codes are entered as the document is formatted. Most word-processing
programs will, however, allow you to save your document files as ASCII text, also
referred to as text, MS-DOS text, or as unformatted text, by stripping the formatting
and saving only the keyed in text. This may puzzle you since, if you are creating a
letter or a report, you want the formatting included when you print it. However,
you will find that sometimes you need to “talk” to your computer. The only way
you can talk to it or give the operating system instructions is by using a text file.
Computers do not understand margins, italics, bold, or any other formatting
instructions. Those instructions are meant for the word processing program—not
7.13
THE COMMAND PROMPT TEXT EDITOR
the operating system. Now you know why every operating system includes a text
editor.
The Windows operating system includes the applet called Notepad, which
allows you to create text documents. If you are having troubles with Windows, you
may need to edit certain text documents that the Windows operating system requires to operate. In addition, you will want to write batch files. These can be
written only with a text editor. The command-line interface contains a text editor
called Edit. It is a full-screen text editor for use in the Command Prompt window. It
is not a word processor—it has no ability to format the data in documents.
Edit cannot manipulate the environment with margin-size or page-length adjustments. The Edit screen has a menu bar at the top and a status bar at the bottom. The
status bar shows you the column and line where the cursor is currently positioned.
Each menu contains further choices.
From the File menu, you can begin a New document, Open an existing document, Save a document, save a document under a new name (Save As), Print a
document, and Exit the editor.
From the Edit menu, you can Cut selected text, Copy selected text, Paste previously cut or copied text, or Clear (delete) selected text.
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From the Search menu, you can Find a specified string of text, Repeat the Last
Find, and search for a specified string of text and Replace it with another specified
string of text.
From the View menu, you can Split, Size, or Close the Edit window.
From the Options menu, you can change the Printer Port or the tab Stops and
choose the Colors for the Edit window.
From the Help menu, you can click Commands to get a list of all available Edit
commands and About to view the version information for Edit.
Aside from using the menus, there are many keystrokes you can use to edit a text
file in the Edit window. Table 7.1 lists most of the cursor movement keys and
shortcuts.
Cursor Action
Shortcut
Alternate Shortcut
Character left
L
c+S
Character right
R
c+D
Word left
c+L
c+A
Word right
c+R
c+F
Line up
U
c+e
Line down
D
Beginning of current line
h
c + Q, S
End of current line
n
c + Q, D
Top of file
c+h
End of file
c+n
Table 7.1—Desired Cursor Movement Key(s) to Use Keyboard Shortcuts
7.14
Activity: Using the Command
Prompt Text Editor
Note 1: The DATA disk is in the A drive. A:\> is displayed.
Note 2: VERY IMPORTANT—In this section you will be editing, creating, and
overwriting files with the text editor. File size, bytes, and bytes free
numbers shown in Directory listings will vary and will most likely not
match the examples shown in the text.
7.14
Note 3:
ACTIVITY: USING THE COMMAND PROMPT TEXT EDITOR
In order to make the mouse work in a window, you need to make some
alterations to the properties of the window.
1
Close any open Command Prompt windows.
2
Open a Command Prompt window. Right-click the title bar. Click Properties.
3
Click the Options tab.
If the QuickEdit Mode, under Edit Options has a check mark in it,
the mouse will not work in Edit. The mouse will work in full-screen mode. But by
clearing the QuickEdit Mode check box, you will always be able to use the mouse
no matter if you are in a window or in full-screen mode.
4
Clear the QuickEdit Mode check box by clicking it, if necessary. Click OK.
You see another dialog box. You must choose the option of Modify
shortcut that started this window. This will then allow the mouse to always work.
5
Click Modify shortcut that started in this window. Click OK.
6
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
7
Key in the following: EDIT e
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This is the opening screen to the editor. If this is the first time the
program has been executed, you will see a welcome message in the middle of the
screen, with instructions on how to remove the welcome message.
6
Close the welcome message if necessary, so your screen is blank. Then key in
the following:
This is a test. e
This is more test data.
You have keyed in some data. If you did not press e and kept
keying in data, you would move to character column 25. If you look at the bottom of
the screen, you see that the status line tells you what line and what character
position you are in. As you can see, you are on the second line, and the cursor is in
the 24th position.
You have two modes of operation: insert mode and overstrike mode. Insert mode
is the default. You can tell you are in insert mode because the cursor is a small
blinking line. Insert mode means that, as you key in data on an existing line, any
data following the cursor will not be replaced, just pushed along.
7
Press c + h
8
Key in the following: THIS IS MORE DATA.
7.14
ACTIVITY: USING THE COMMAND PROMPT TEXT EDITOR
The new data is there in front of the old data. Overstrike mode
permits you to replace the characters that are there. You can toggle between
overstrike mode and insert mode by pressing the i key.
9
Press the i key.
10 Key in My second.
Notice the shape of the cursor. It is a vertical rectangle. This cursor
shape indicates that you are in overstrike mode. You have replaced old text data
with new.
11 Press the i key to return to insert mode.
Full-screen editing can be done either with the cursor keys or with
the mouse. You can position the mouse and click to reposition the point of insertion.
You can select text by clicking the mouse at the beginning of the text you wish to
select, holding down the left mouse button, and dragging it to the end of the text
you wish to select.
12 Click under the first t in the phrase test data.
13 Hold down the left mouse button and drag to the end of the sentence, not
including the period.
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You have selected the phrase test data.
16 Key in the following: meaningless data
You have used the mouse to edit data. You can also use the
Command Prompt editor to edit existing files. Note: You can always use keystrokes
if you do not want to use the mouse. Pressing the a key and the first letter of a
menu will drop down the menu. Once you open the menu, you select the highlighted letter of the task you want to perform.
17 On the menu bar at the top of the editor, click File. Click Open.
18 Key in the following: A:\PERSONAL.FIL
You have chosen to open the PERSONAL.FIL file from the DATA
disk in the A drive.
19 Click OK.
7.14
ACTIVITY: USING THE COMMAND PROMPT TEXT EDITOR
You have opened the PERSONAL.FIL file in the editor. You can
search for text strings in the editor. You are going to look for Ervin Jones.
20 On the menu bar, click Search.
21 Click Find.
22 In the Find What area, key in Jones.
23 Click OK.
You found a Jones, but not the right one. You can repeat the search
with a function key.
24 Press the 3 key three times.
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You have cycled from Jones to Jones until you reached the one you
were looking for. You can also add text to the file.
25 Press the D key four times.
26 Key in the following (use the spacebar to align the data):
Peat
Brian
125 Second Vacaville CA
Farneth Nichole 237 Arbor
Vacaville CA
Athlete
Dancer
27 On the menu bar, click File.
28 Click Exit.
A dialog box appears asking you if you want to save the file
UNTITLED1. This file has the first data you keyed in. You do not want this file.
29 Click No.
You are now asked if you want to save A:\PERSONAL.FIL. You
do want to save the changes you made.
30 Click Yes.
A:\>EDIT
A:\>_
7.14
ACTIVITY: USING THE COMMAND PROMPT TEXT EDITOR
You have exited the editor and returned to the Command Prompt
window.
31 Open the Command Prompt editor.
32 Click File. Click Open.
33 Key in A:\STEVEN.FIL e
34 Click View. Click Split Window.
You can see the file data displayed in two windows.
35 Change the word Frank in the top screen to Steven.
You can see that the word was changed in both sections. When
you split the screen, you can look at the same file data in both windows.
36 Click File. Click Save.
37 Click File. Click Close.
38 Place your cursor in the top window. Click File. Click Open.
39 Key in A:\TEST.BAT. Click OK.
40 Place your cursor in the bottom window. Click File. Click Open.
41 Key in A:\B.BAT. Click OK.
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You have opened two separate files and can view them simultaneously on the split screen.
42 In the top window, delete the first line (A:) and the last two lines
(DOSKEY /HISTORY and DOSKEY /HISTORY > TEST.BAT).
43 In the bottom window, alter the line to read as follows:
DOSKEY bb=CD CLASS $TDIR *.BUD$TCD \
44 Save both files. Close both files. Exit the editor.
You now have two batch files. Batch files, which will be covered in
much more detail in Chapters 10 and 11, are programs that you can write. You
execute a batch file by keying in its name. You have one batch file (TEST.BAT) that
runs a series of commands. The other batch file (B.BAT) will set up a macro.
45 Close the Command Prompt window. Open a Command Prompt window. Make
A:\ the default drive.
46 Key in the following: A:\>bb e
A:\>bb
‘bb’ is not recognized as an internal or external command,
operable program or batch file.
A:\>_
Because you closed the Command Prompt window, your macros
are no longer in effect.
47 Key in the following: A:\>B e
A:\>B
A:\>DOSKEY bb=CD CLASS$TDIR *.BUD$TCD\
A:\>_
7.16
ACTIVITY: IMPORTING A TEXT FILE
Since you executed your batch file, you enabled your macro. Now
if you keyed in bb, you would see the screen that follows Step 9 in Activity 7.12.
48 Close the Command Prompt window.
7.15
Using Text Data Files
When there are so many application programs available that create their own
particular data files, why use a text editor to create data? The program you wish to
use may not be available to you at the time and place you want to create the data.
Many programs will allow you to import text files directly, and will in interpret
them into the format needed. Thus, where ever you are, and regardless of the
software available to you, if you have a computer, you have the ability to record the
data you need in a text file. As you have seen, text files take very little space on a
disk, so you can save your file to floppy, and take it with you to a workstation that
has the software you need.
In the next activity, you will use the Excel spreadsheet program and import text
data into a usable spreadsheet. Microsoft Excel 2002, from the Microsoft Office XP
suite, is used here. Other versions of Excel and other spreadsheet programs work in
a very similar fashion, though the dialog boxes and menus shown here will appear
different and may be used in a different order.
7.16
Activity: Importing a Text File
Note 1:
Note 2:
You are at the desktop, with no open command line windows.
This exercise assumes the class files are installed at C:\WUGXP. If this is
not the case, substitute the appropriate directory for your environment.
1
Open the Microsoft Excel Program.
2
On the menu bar, click Data.
3
Point to Import External Data (or Get External Data).
You have opened Excel, and began the process of importing the
data.
4
On the menu, click Import data (or Import Text File).
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The Select Data Source (or Import Text File) dialog box is opened.
5
Click the arrow by the Look in: drop down box and navigate to C:\WUGXP.
You have chosen your Data Source folder.
6
Double click PLANETS.TXT.
You have started to import the text data into Excel. The Text
Import Wizard dialog box is open. This screen is the first of three screens which will
enable you to you will tell Excel about your text data file. Notice you have a preview window in the bottom portion of the dialog box. You can see the text file in the
same way Excel “sees” it. You want to begin importing at row 1, and this file is a
“Delimited” file. Each element of the data is separated, or delimited by commas.
7
Click Next.
7.16
ACTIVITY: IMPORTING A TEXT FILE
This is the second screen of the Text Import Wizard. The default
delimiter is a Tab character, but your text file is using commas for delimiters.
8
Click the Tab check box to clear it.
9
Click the Comma check box to select it.
You have told Excel that you are using commas for data delimiters. Notice how the preview screen changes. You are shown how Excel is interpreting your text data file.
10
Click Next.
You have opened the last Text Import Wizard screen. Here you can
further refine your data. The first column is the Data preview window is selected. If
this column contained only text, no numbers, you could define it as a Text column. If
it were a column of dates, you could give Excel that information on this screen. You
will leave all the columns under General format.
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USING ATTRIB, SUBST, XCOPY, DOSKEY, AND THE TEXT EDITOR
Click Finish.
Now Excel is asking you where you want to place your data in the
worksheet. A is the first column, 1 is the first row. Your data will be placed beginning at the upper left corner of the worksheet.
12
Click OK.
You have successfully imported your data. The commas are gone,
and each element of data is in its own cell.
You also could have imported this delimited text data file into other types of
application software, such as a data base program like Access or Paradox, or a word
processing program such as WordPerfect or Word.
13 Click File. Click Exit.
Excel is asking if you want to save the newly created worksheet
file.
14 Click No.
You have closed the Excel program, and returned to the desktop.
Chapter Summary
1. File attributes are tracked by the operating system.
2. There are four file attributes: A (archive), H (hidden), S (system), and R (readonly).
3. The ATTRIB command allows you to manipulate file attributes.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
4. The SUBST command allows you to substitute an unused drive letter for a long,
unwieldy path name.
5. The XCOPY command allows you to copy files and subdirectories.
6. There are many parameters available to the XCOPY command. Among them are
parameters that enable you to:
a. copy by date (/D)
b. copy hidden files (/H)
c. copy subdirectories (/S)
d. overwrite read-only files (/R)
e. copy empty directories (/E)
f. keep file attributes (/K)
7. DOSKEY is an external, memory-resident program that loads automatically in
Windows XP Professional. It allows you to do command line editing.
8. A memory-resident program is commonly referred to as a TSR program. Once
loaded into memory, it remains in memory for the duration of the session.
9. The arrow and function keys in DOSKEY allow you to do command-line editing
by recalling and listing the previously keyed in commands.
10. You can create macros in a command line window.
11. On the desktop, you use Notepad to edit text files. In the Command Prompt
window, you use the Edit editor.
12. Edit can be used to edit or create ASCII text files.
13. In Edit, you can use menus, the mouse, and keystrokes to edit text.
14. Text files can be imported into application programs.
Key Terms
archive attribute
file attribute
hidden attribute
insert mode
overstrike mode
read-only attribute
system attribute
Terminate Stay Resident
(TSR)
text editor
Discussion Questions
1. What is the purpose and function of the ATTRIB command?
2. Give two parameters for the ATTRIB command and describe the function and
purpose of each.
3. What are file attributes?
4. What effect does a file marked “hidden” have for a user? How can you
“unhide” the file?
5. What does a file marked “read-only” mean to a user?
6. What is the function of the archive bit?
7. What is the purpose of the SUBST command?
8. Under what circumstances would the SUBST command be useful?
9. What is the purpose of the XCOPY command?
10. What advantages does the XCOPY command have over the COPY command?
11. List four XCOPY parameters, and explain their function and their syntax.
12. Explain the purpose and function of the DOSKEY command.
13. What is a memory-resident program, and how does it work?
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14.
15.
15.
16.
USING ATTRIB, SUBST, XCOPY, DOSKEY, AND THE TEXT EDITOR
Explain what a macro is and how you would create one.
Discuss how to execute commands from the history list.
How could you use the Editor program to create useful data information?
Compare and contrast a word-processing program, Notepad, and Edit.
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true and the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. The ATTRIB command allows you to add and remove file attributes.
T
F
2. You should not use the DIR command when the drive letter has
been assigned with the SUBST command.
T
F
3. You cannot copy empty subdirectories with the XCOPY command.
T
F
4. You should use caution when using SUBST while logged on to a
network.
T
F
5. The Edit editor can be used in place of Notepad.
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. If you key in the command ATTRIB +H THIS.ONE, you have marked the file
THIS.ONE as _______________.
7. The XCOPY parameter(s) that allow(s) you to copy hidden, system, and readonly files is/are _______________.
8. To see what commands you have keyed in, key in _______________.
9. If you have to key in a long path name repeatedly, you can use the
_______________ command to assign a drive letter to the path.
10. To go to the beginning of a file in Edit, press _______________.
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
____
11. Once installed, a TSR acts like an
a. external command.
b. internal command.
c. both a and b
d. neither a nor b
____
12. The /D parameter of the SUBST command
a. displays the true name of the logical drive.
b. will have no effect on the SUBST command.
c. will confirm that the substitution has occurred.
d. will disable the SUBST command.
____
13. XCOPY will copy ________ than COPY.
a. faster, with more options
b. slower, with more options
c. with fewer options
d. none of the above
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
____
14. If you wanted to protect the file MY.FIL from being accidentally
erased, you would key in the following:
a. ATTRIB -R MY.FIL
b. ATTRIB +R MY.FIL
c. ATTRIB +S MY.FIL
d. ATTRIB -S MY.FIL
15. To XCOPY a file marked read-only and to be sure that the destination
file retained the read-only attribute, you would use the parameters
a. /S /R
b. /R /K
c. /R /E
d. /T /E
Writing Commands
Write the correct step(s) or command(s) necessary to perform the action listed as if
you were at the keyboard.
16. Copy all the files and subdirectories, regardless of their attributes, from the
TEMP directory on the root of the default directory to the OLDTEMP directory
on the root directory of the disk in the A drive.
C:\>
17. Create a macro called X that will allow you to change your drive to C: and your
directory to the WUGXP.
A:\>
18. Allow the letter J to stand for C:\WUGXP\SPORTS.
C:\>
19. Prevent the DIR command from seeing all the files ending with .99 in the root
directory of the disk in the A drive.
C:\TEST>
20. In the Edit text editor, view and edit two text files simultaneously.
Homework Assignments
Note 1: Be sure to work on the HOMEWORK disk, not the DATA disk.
Note 2: The homework problems will assume Drive C is the hard disk and the
HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. If you are using another drive, such as
a floppy drive B or a hard drive D, be sure to substitute that drive letter
when reading the questions and answers.
Note 3: All subdirectories that are created will be under the root directory
unless otherwise specified.
Problem Set I
Note:
The prompt is A:\>.
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Problem A
A-a
If necessary, remove the DATA disk and insert the HOMEWORK disk in
Drive A.
A-b
Copy any files with the .TV extension from the PHONE directory to the root
directory of the HOMEWORK disk.
A-c
Copy the file in the root directory called DRAMA.TV to a new file called
GRAVE.TV, also in the root directory.
A-d
Using the relative path, display the attributes of the GRAVE.TV file.
____
1. Which command did you use?
a. DIR GRAVE.TV
b. ATTRIB GRAVE.TV
c. ATTRIB +R GRAVE.TV or ATTRIB GRAVE.TV +R
d. ATTRIB -R GRAVE.TV or ATTRIB GRAVE.TV -R
____
2. What file attribute is not displayed?
a. S
b. H
c. A
d. both a and b
A-e
____
A-f
Make the GRAVE.TV file read-only.
3. Which command did you use?
a. DIR GRAVE.TV
b. ATTRIB GRAVE.TV
c. ATTRIB -R GRAVE.TV or ATTRIB GRAVE.TV -R
d. ATTRIB +R GRAVE.TV or ATTRIB GRAVE.TV +R
Key in the following: DEL GRAVE.TV
____
4. What message is displayed?
a. Access is denied.
b. This is a read-only file.
c. This file is read-only, delete anyway?
d. no message is displayed
A-g
Display the attributes of the GRAVE.TV file.
____
5. Which attributes are set on the GRAVE.TV file?
a. A and S
b. A and R
c. A and H
d. A, H, and R
A-h
Copy GRAVE.TV to GRAVEST.TV.
A-i
Delete GRAVE.TV with the DEL command.
____
6. What parameter did you have to use with DEL?
a. /X
b. /P
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
c. /F
d. /Q
A-j
____
A-k
____
Make GRAVEST.TV a hidden, read-only file.
7. Which command did you use?
a. ATTRIB +A +R GRAVEST.TV
b. ATTRIB +H +A GRAVEST.TV
c. ATTRIB +H +R GRAVEST.TV
d. ATTRIB +S +H +R GRAVEST.TV
Use the DIR command (with no parameters) to display GRAVEST.TV.
8. Which of the following lines do you see on the screen?
a. GRAVEST.TV is a hidden file.
b. File Not Found.
c. Not found - GRAVEST.TV.
d. none of the above
Problem B
B-a
Make a subdirectory on the root of the HOMEWORK disk called FIRST.
B-b
From the root of the HOMEWORK disk, make a subdirectory under FIRST
called SECOND.
B-c
From the root of the HOMEWORK disk, make a subdirectory under SECOND
called THIRD.
____
9. Which command did you use to make the THIRD subdirectory?
a. MD THIRD
b. MD FIRST\THIRD
c. MD FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
d. MD SECOND\THIRD
B-d
Copy all the files ending in .99 from the WUGXP directory on the C drive to
FIRST.
B-e
Copy the files in the FIRST subdirectory to the SECOND subdirectory
keeping the same names but with the new file extension of .BRI.
B-f
Copy the files in the SECOND subdirectory to the THIRD subdirectory
keeping the same names but with the new file extension of .NIC.
B-g
From the root of the HOMEWORK disk, display all the files and subdirectories
in and under the FIRST subdirectory, but not the entire disk.
____
10. Which command did you use?
a. DIR /S
b. DIR FIRST SECOND THIRD
c. DIR FIRST /S
d. DIR FIRST/SECOND/THIRD
B-h
Make all the files in the FIRST directory read-only.
B-i
Make all the files in the THIRD directory hidden.
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____
11. Which command did you use to mark the files in the THIRD subdirectory as
hidden?
a. ATTRIB *.* +H THIRD
b. ATTRIB THIRD +H
c. ATTRIB FIRST\SECOND\THIRD\*.* +H
d. either a or b
B-j
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, make a directory called FIRST-2.
B-k
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, duplicate the
FIRST subdirectory, including all files and subdirectories beneath it, to the
subdirectory FIRST-2. (Be sure to duplicate all files and retain their attributes
in FIRST-2.)
____
12. Which command and parameters did you use?
a. XCOPY FIRST FIRST-2 /S /E
b. XCOPY FIRST FIRST-2 /S /H /R /E /K
c. XCOPY FIRST FIRST-2 /R /H /K
d. XCOPY FIRST FIRST-2 /S /E
____
13. How many files were copied?
a. 4
b. 8
c. 12
d. 16
Problem C
Note:
Check with your lab administrator before proceeding with the next
step.
C-a
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, assign the
letter E (if available) to represent the path to the THIRD subdirectory on the
HOMEWORK disk under FIRST.
Note:
If Drive E is not available, choose another drive letter and substitute it
in the answers.
____
14. Which command did you use?
a. SUBST E A:\FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
b. SUBST E: A:\FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
c. SUBST E THIRD
d. SUBST E: THIRD
C-b
Key in the following: SUBST e
____
15. What line is displayed on the screen?
a. E:\: => A:\FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
b. E = FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
c. E: = THIRD
d. none of the above
C-c
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, display the
directory of the E drive.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
16. How many files are displayed?
a. zero
b. two
c. four
d. eight
C-d
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default and without
using the ATTRIB command to determine which attributes are set, issue a
command that will remove the attributes from the files in the THIRD directory.
____
17. Which command did you use?
a. ATTRIB E:\*.* -A -H
b. ATTRIB -ALL E:
c. ATTRIB -*.* E:
d. none of the above
C-e
Remove the virtual Drive E.
____
18. Which command did you use?
a. SUBST /D
b. SUBST E: /D
c. SUBST E /D
d. SUBST /D e
Problem D
D-a
Create a macro called FIRST that will display the directory of the FIRST
directory and then will display the directory of the FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
directory.
____
19. Which command did you use?
a. DOSKEY /MACRO=FIRST=DIR FIRST & DIR FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
b. DOSKEY DIR FIRST & DIR FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
c. DOSKEY FIRST=DIR FIRST $TDIR FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
d. DOSKEY /MACRO FIRST=DIR FIRST $TDIR FIRST\SECOND\THIRD
D-b
Redirect the macro you created into a batch file called FIRST.BAT.
____
20. Which command did you use?
a. DOSKEY /MACROS > FIRST.BAT
b. DOSKEY /HISTORY > FIRST.BAT
c. DOSKEY > FIRST.BAT
d. DOSKEY *.* > FIRST.BAT
D-c
Edit the FIRST.BAT file so that it can be executed whenever you open a
command prompt window. Delete any unnecessary lines.
____
21. What did you add to the batch file macro line?
a. DOSKEY /MACROS
b. DOSKEY
c. DOSKEY /MACROS > FIRST.BAT
d. none of the above
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Problem E
Note:
The HOMEWORK disk is in the A drive and A:\> is the default drive. If
necessary, press a + e to operate in full-screen mode or clear the
QuickEdit option button.
E-a
Copy FRANK.FIL from the WUGXP directory to the root of the A drive.
E-b
Copy CAROLYN.FIL from the WUGXP directory to the root of the A drive.
E-c
Using Edit, edit FRANK.FIL to say “Hi, my name is Bob.” instead of “Hi, my
name is Frank.”
E-d
Save the file as BOB.FIL.
____
22. To save the file as BOB.FIL,
a. you clicked File and then Save As, keyed in BOB.FIL, and clicked OK.
b. you clicked File and then Save, keyed in BOB.FIL, and clicked OK.
c. you clicked Edit and then Save As, keyed in BOB.FIL, and clicked OK.
d. you clicked Edit and then Save, keyed in BOB.FIL, and clicked OK.
E-e
Close the file.
E-f
Open CAROLYN.FIL with the text editor.
E-g
Edit the file to read:
Hi, my name is Bette.
I like learning about operating systems.
I hope you like it too.
E-h
Save the file as BETTE.FIL.
E-i
Close the editor.
____
23. The current contents of CAROLYN.FIL are:
a. Hi, my name is Carolyn.
What is your name?
b. Hi, my name is Bette.
What is your name?
c. Hi, my name is Bette.
I like learning about operating systems.
I hope you like it too.
d. none of the above
E-j
Copy any files with the name BORN and any extension from the \WUGXP
directory to the root of the A drive.
E-k
Open the text editor and split the window into two sections.
____
24. After the editor was open, which procedure did you follow?
a. Click File, click Two Windows.
b. Click Edit, click Split Screen.
c. Click View, click Split Window.
d. Click Options, click Split View.
E-l
With the cursor in the top window, open the file AST.99 from the root of the
A drive.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
E-m
Move the cursor to the bottom window and open the file BORN.TYP from
the root of the A drive.
____
25. What is the last line in the bottom window?
a. changing every day.
b. BLASTS AWAY ITS WOMB OF DUST, AND SHINES!
c. A STAR IS BORN WHEN IT’S CORE REACHES
d. Most scientists no longer believe in
E-n
Close Edit.
Problem Set II
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
Before proceeding with these assignments, check with your lab instructor
to see if there are any special procedures you should follow.
The HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. The A:\> prompt is displayed as the
default drive and the default directory. All work will occur on the HOMEWORK disk.
Make sure that NAME.BAT, MARK.FIL, GETYN.COM, and GO.BAT are
all present in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk before proceeding with these problems.
All files with the .HW extension must be created in the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk.
1
Key in the following: A:\>NAME e
2
Here is an example to key in, but your instructor will have other information that
applies to your class. Key in the following:
Bette A. Peat e
(Your name goes here.)
CIS 55 e
(Your class goes here.)
T-Th 8-9:30 e
(Your day and time go here.)
Chapter 7 Homework e
3
Press 6 e
4
If the information is correct, press Y and you are back to A:\>.
You have returned to the system level. You now have a file called
NAME.FIL with your name and other pertinent information. (Hint: Remember
redirection.)
To Create 1.HW
Display the names of all files in only the root of the HOMEWORK disk that are
hidden and redirect the output of the command to a file called 1.HW.
To Create 2.HW
1
Remove the hidden attribute from all the files in only the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk.
2
Remove the FIRST-2 subdirectory from the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
3
Change the default directory to A:\FIRST>.
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4
Remove all the attributes from all files and subdirectories under the FIRST
subdirectory but not in the FIRST subdirectory.
5
Key in the following: A:\FIRST>ATTRIB /S > \2.HW e
To Create 3.HW
1
Change the default directory to A:\>.
2
Perform the step necessary to be able to refer to the directory
A:\FIRST\SECOND\THIRD as E: or a drive letter you can use.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR E: > 3.HW e
4
Remove the virtual Drive E.
To Create 4.HW
1
Concatenate the files BETTE.FIL and BOB.FIL to a new file named PEAT.FIL.
2
Open the file PEAT.FIL with the text editor and make sure there is a single blank
line between I hope you like it too. and Hi, my name is Bob.
3
Add a new blank line to the bottom of the file, then add another line that reads:
Are we having fun yet?
4
Save the file and exit the text editor.
5
Display the contents of PEAT.FIL and redirect it to a file called 4.HW.
To Create 5.HW
1
From the root of the A drive, set the read-only and hidden attributes for all the
files in the FILES subdirectory but not in any of the subdirectories of FILES.
2
Make an exact duplicate of the FILES subdirectory and any subdirectories to
another subdirectory off of the root called MORFILES. (Hint: You need to copy
all files, regardless of their attributes, and the new files should retain their attributes.)
3
Create a new file with the text editor on the root of the HOMEWORK disk called
5.HW. In the file, key in the command you used to copy FILES to MORFILES in
the previous step.
4
Remove any hidden or read-only attributes on any file on the entire
HOMEWORK disk.
To Print Your Homework
1
Be sure the printer is on and ready to accept print jobs from your computer.
2
Key in the following (be very careful to make no typing errors):
GO NAME.FIL 1.HW 2.HW 3.HW 4.HW 5.HW e
If the files you requested, 1.HW, 2.HW, etc., do not exist in the
default directory, you will see the following message on the screen:
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
File Not Found
The system cannot find the file specified.
Is there a message that says “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
The operating system is telling you that the file cannot be found. If you see this
screen, press Y to see what could be wrong, and repeat the print procedure after you
have corrected the problem.
If the default directory contains the specified files, the following message will
appear on the screen:
Is there a message that says “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
You will need to press N once for each file you are printing.
3
Follow the messages on the screen until the Notepad program opens with a
screen similar to the following:
All the requested files have been found and placed in a Notepad
document. Your homework is now ready to print.
4
On the Notepad menu bar, click File. Click Print.
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The print dialog box opens. If you have more than one printer, all
your printer choices will be displayed. The default printer is the highlighted printer.
5
Click the Print button.
6
In the Notepad window, click File. Click Exit.
The following will appear on the Command Prompt screen:
You are about to delete any file with the .HW extension.
Before you delete your homework files, check your hard copy or
print out.
If your homework printout is correct, press Y to delete the
files.
If your homework printout is incorrect, press N.
Pressing N will prevent your homework files from being deleted.
You can then begin again.
At this point, look at your printout. If it is correct, you can press Y to delete the
homework files for this chapter. If your printout is incorrect, you can press N. That
will preserve your homework and you will need to redo only the problem that was
incorrect, not all the homework assignments.
7
Press Y e
You have returned to the default prompt.
8
Close the Command Prompt session.
9
Execute the shut-down procedure.
Problem Set III—Brief Essay
1. The attributes most often set by the user are H and R. Describe two scenarios
where you might find it advantageous to set the hidden and/or read-only
attributes to a file or group of files.
2. The XCOPY command’s many parameters make it a versatile command. Choose
two of the parameters and describe, in detail, how, why, and when you would
use them.
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter, you will be able to:
1. Explain the purpose of organizing a hard
disk.
2. Explain the purpose and function of the
TREE command.
3. List criteria for organizing a hard disk
efficiently and logically.
4. Explain the role XCOPY can play in organizing a hard disk.
5. Explain the difference between contiguous
and noncontiguous files.
6. Explain the purpose and function of the
CHKDSK command.
7. Explain lost clusters and cross-linked files.
8. Explain the ways you can repair a disk.
9. Explain the purpose and function of using
the Disk Defragmenter program.
Student Outcomes
1. Reorganize the DATA disk.
2. Use the TREE command to view the organization of a disk.
3. Use the XCOPY command with its parameters to copy files.
4. Use the CHKDSK command to elicit statistical information about disks and memory.
5. Interpret the statistical information obtained
by using the CHKDSK command.
6. Use CHKDSK to see if files are contiguous.
7. Repair a disk, if possible.
8. Use the Disk Defragmenter utility program.
Chapter Overview
The more efficiently and logically a hard disk is
organized, the easier it becomes for you to know
where to store a new file or how to access an
existing one. Subdirectories (folders that group
files together under one heading) help you
organize a hard disk so that you can easily locate
a specific file.
An inefficient but typical hard disk organizational scheme is to divide the disk into major
application programs (e.g., word-processing
program, spreadsheet program, etc.) and place
the data files for those applications in the same
subdirectory. This organizational scheme can
create problems when you try to locate a specific
data file. To locate a specific data file, you have to
remember under which program the data file was
listed. It makes sense to never place program files
and data files in the same subdirectory. Program
files rarely change, and data files are always
changing. The majority of computer users are
working with application programs to help them
do their work projects more easily and efficiently.
It makes better sense to organize the disk the way
most people work—by project, not by software
application.
This chapter demonstrates ways to use the
hard disk efficiently. You will learn how to
organize a hard disk to serve your specific needs,
use directories to keep track of the files on your
disk, and determine the best command to use to
locate a specific file. You will learn what a logical
disk is and what commands can be used with a
logical disk. In addition, you will learn some
useful commands to manage the hard disk itself
and keep it healthy.
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Why Organize a Hard Disk?
You will accumulate many programs, and with each program you usually generate
many data files. What you have is an information explosion. Organization of
information is a constant process in the world; whether in a library or an office,
items need to be organized so that information can be found. People have been
managing paper files and folders with many office-related tools such as file cabinets, folders, and other organizational labels. However, managing files and folders
on a computer system is a much neglected topic of discussion. No one would think
of taking paper files and folders and throwing them into a room, yet that is exactly
what happens with a computer system. People “throw” their files and folders on the
computer system with no thought of organization or the ability to retrieve the
information they need. You need to manage these programs and data files so that
you can not only locate what you need but also be able to identify what is located.
Grouping files logically is the best way to organize. With Windows XP Professional,
you create subdirectories for storing related files. In addition, you want to name
your files and directories in some meaningful way so that you can identify what is
in each.
When Windows XP Professional is installed, certain folders are created. These
include at the very least My Documents, with at least two subfolders of My Music
and My Pictures. In addition, the subdirectories named Documents and Settings,
Program Files and Windows (or WINNT) are created. Each of these folders holds
other directories and files. Windows is used for the operating system files; Program
Files is used for different programs you may install, as well as programs included
with Windows such as Outlook Express. Documents and Settings is used to hold
your preferences for your system. My Documents is the default folder for data files
with specifically named directories for types of documents, i.e, My Pictures. As you
can see, if you have nothing on your computer but Windows XP Professional, there
is an organizational scheme using directories to hold significant files needed for the
operating system and the utility programs that come with Windows. There are also
critical files and folders placed in the root directory that Windows needs to boot the
system. These files and folders are normally hidden from view.
Obviously, you did not purchase a computer to have only an operating system to
use. You purchase programs that you will use in your work. People often purchase
or receive with their computer purchases some kind of integrated program that
provides tools for the most common types of work. Integrated programs, sometimes
called suites, usually include a program for word processing, a spreadsheet program, a database program, some kind of presentation software, and other related
tools.
The two most popular choices are Microsoft Office (which includes Word, Excel,
Access, PowerPoint, and other office-related programs) or WordPerfect Office
(which includes WordPerfect, QuattroPro, Paradox, Corel Presentations, and other
office-related programs). Sometimes, people choose individual programs rather
than a suite, particularly if they do not need all the programs in the suite. For
instance, you might choose to use Word as your word-processing program but Lotus
1-2-3 as your spreadsheet program. Other critical programs that users should
absolutely purchase or download include virus-checking programs such as Norton
8.1
WHY ORGANIZE A HARD DISK?
AntiVirus or McAfee VirusScan and a file compression utility such as WinZip. After
these programs, you will purchase programs that meet your needs - —graphics,
games, Web-related software, financial management software, etc. The list is endless
as to the kinds of tools (software) you will want to have on your computer.
When you purchase these additional programs for your computer system, you
must install them on your hard disk in order to use them. In general, most people
use the installation program that comes with their new program. In general, most
programs today come on a CD. The CD will have an installation program, usually
with a file with a name like SETUP or INSTALL. You may double-click that file
name to start the installation process. Often, when you insert the CD into the CDROM drive, the program will automatically ask you if you want to install it.
An installation program creates a directory or directories for the application
program you are installing and then copies the files from the CD-ROM (or floppy
disks, in rare cases) to the named directories. Many of these application programs
have such huge files that, when they are placed on the disk by the manufacturer, the
files are compressed. In the process of copying the files to the named subdirectory,
the setup or install programs must first decompress those program files. As part of
the installation, these programs may or may not create a directory for data. If not,
your data files may, by default, end up being saved to the directory that holds the
application program files or to the My Documents folder. In addition, the installation program will usually make entries in the Windows Registry that accomplish
such tasks as adding the program name to your menus, registering file extensions,
and so forth. However, if you do not tell the installation program where you want
the files and folders located, the program will decide what the folders are called and
where the files and folders are to be located. Many programs, including Microsoft
programs, will install their program folders under the Program Files folder. Other
programs will install the program folders and files to the root directory.
If, when you use the DIR command, the many files and subdirectory names in
the root directory scroll by endlessly, it becomes very difficult to know what files are
on the hard disk and where they are located. Furthermore, in many cases, you will
look at a directory name and have no idea if it contains a program you use. If you
look inside the directory, you also will have no idea if the files in it are your data
files or program files. You do not know what you can safely delete or what you
should back up. This problem does not change in the Windows GUI. Even in a
graphical environment, a disorganized disk is not a pretty sight. To further complicate the organization of your hard drive, the installation of programs is only the
beginning. You will be creating data files and the location of those data files will be
critical to you and your work. If you do not have some organizational scheme, you
will spend your time looking for data files instead of working with them.
The use of long file names on floppy disks, which are sometimes used for backing up files from the hard disk can be a problem. Remember, floppy disks always
use FAT. Thus, if you are using a 1.44-MB floppy disk, the root directory table is
limited to 224 entries. Disks were originally designed to hold files that complied to
the old 8.3 naming convention. Even if the files are very small (not much data in
them) and there is still ample room in the data sectors for new information, once the
directory table is filled you can no longer place more files on the disk. Once the root
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directory table is full, as far as the operating system is concerned, the disk is full,
regardless of how much actual space remains on the disk.
On the hard disk, you do not have this problem unless you are using FAT16 as
your file system. In that case, the root directory table on your hard disk has a limit of
512 entries. If every file was located in the root directory, you would ultimately get a
message that the disk was full. The root directory table would be what was actually
full, not the disk, but you would still not be able to place anything else on the disk.
However, today, most hard disks use either FAT32 or NTFS. If you are using FAT32
as your file system, your root directory table on the hard disk has a capacity of
65,535 entries. Although this number may seem sufficient, it is still not a good idea
to place all your directories and data and program files in the root directory. Just
think of scrolling through 65,535 entries to find a file of interest. Although the NTFS
file system does not have these limitations, organization of a disk is still a concern
for ease in locating files and directories.
Most programs written for the Windows environment install themselves to the
C:\Program Files folder. As you can imagine, this directory fills rapidly. Other setup
programs handle it differently. For example, when you install a program like
WordPerfect using the setup program, a subdirectory is created called C:\Corel, and
all products written by Corel are installed in that same directory. Most setup programs allow you to change the directory you wish to install in. If you have a second
drive or partition with extra space on it, you may want to install your software to a
subdirectory of your own choosing. Perhaps you have three drawing and graphics
programs, PCDraw, PCPaint, and Paint Shop Pro. You might want to create a
subdirectory called DRAW, and then install the programs in C:\DRAW\PCDraw,
C:\DRAW\PCPaint, and C:\DRAW\PSP, respectively. In this way, all your drawing
programs would be in one location.
There can be, however, one disadvantage to choosing your own installation
location. If you have technical problems with an installed program and need to call
that company’s tech support, the person you speak to will undoubtedly expect the
software to be installed to the setup program’s default directory. If you have installed it somewhere else, the support person may have difficulty helping you.
You typically have more than one program on your computer system. The
programs may have come with the computer when you purchased it, or you may
have purchased additional programs. For instance, a typical user might have a
word-processing program (Word), a spreadsheet program (Lotus 1-2-3), a database
program (FoxPro), the operating system (Windows XP Professional), and a checkbook management program (Quicken). If you were that user, your hard disk might
look like Figure 8.1.
8.1
WHY ORGANIZE A HARD DISK?
Root Directory
WINWORD <DIR>
LOTUS <DIR>
QUICKEN <DIR>
WINDOWS <DIR>
FOXPRO <DIR>
command.com
report.doc
clients.dbf
...
WINWORD
LOTUS
QUICKEN
WINDOWS
FOXPRO
winword.exe
123.exe
spell.chk
123.cfg
DATA <DIR>
win.ini
fp.exe
quick.exe
system.ini
...
...
fp.dat
quick.dat
...
...
...
DATA
1998.dat
...
Figure 8.1—A Typical Hard Disk Configuration
In Figure 8.1, an ellipsis (...) represents the rest of the files. You or the program
would create each subdirectory and place the program files that belong to the
application program in the proper subdirectory. Notice the Quicken program has
automatically created a subdirectory for data files.
The point is you want to use the programs to do work. As an example, let us say
you are a salesperson and you have two products to sell: widgets and bangles. You
use Word to write letters to clients and to make proposals. You use Lotus 1-2-3 to do
budget projections for clients. You use Quicken to manage your expenses. You use
the operating system to manage your files and disks. You use FoxPro to manage
your clients’ names and addresses (a database). You know enough that you know
you do not want the data files (such as REPORT.DOC or CLIENTS.DBF) in the root
directory. You could use the MOVE command to move the REPORT.DOC file to the
WINWORD subdirectory and to move CLIENTS.DBF to the FOXPRO subdirectory.
First an foremost, you do not want to save your data files to the program folders.
Placing data files in the program folders is not a good organizational technique for
several reasons. Program files do not change, while data files change as often as you
add or delete information. You also add and delete files. You will want to back up
your data files from the hard disk to a floppy disk, a tape, a CD, or a Zip drive to
ensure you do not lose your data. If you have placed your data files in the program
folders, you will have to sort through many program and support files to back up
your data and identify which is a program file and which is a data file. Furthermore,
part of the rationale for folders is to categorize information; data files are information.
Part of a good organizational scheme is creating meaningful names for your data
files so you can identify at a later date what they contain without having to open
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each file. Naming data files requires more thought than most beginning users
realize. Having a naming convention, a scheme for naming your files, helps you
determine what is in files. It also requires knowledge of how your application
programs work. For instance, if the programs you are using are Word and
PowerPoint you first need to know that Word automatically assigns the file extension of .doc to each file you create in Word, and PowerPoint assigns the file extension of .ppt to each file you create in PowerPoint. With that knowledge, you now
can name your files. Thus, if you were writing a book on Windows XP Professional,
your naming convention could be to preface every file name with a code to indicate
that it had to do with that book. Thus, your file names could be wxpch01.doc
(Windows XP Professional Chapter 1 document) and wxpch02.doc for the chapter
documents and wxpch01.ppt (Windows XP Professional Chapter 1 PowerPoint
presentation) and wxpch02.ppt for your presentations and wxppub1.doc (Windows
XP Professional publisher document 1) and wxppub2.doc for your correspondence
with your publisher. With this convention, it would be easy to locate all your files
that dealt with the book or only the files that dealt with your correspondence to
your publisher.
Because Windows XP Professional allows up to 255 characters for a file name, it
might seem easy to create meaningful names. In fact, you might ask why not call the
document Windows XP Professional Chapter 1.doc rather than wxpch01.doc? .
Certainly reading the file’s name will tell you what is in it and what program
created it (Word because of the .doc file extension). However, the availability of long
file names can actually be problematic, and not only because of the limitations of the
root directory table. Certainly, if you are using older programs, you must still use
the 8.3 file-naming rule. Windows XP Professional creates an MS-DOS alias for a
long file name which is a truncated version of the long file name. Thus, Windows XP
Professional Chapter 1.doc will have an MS-DOS name of window~01.doc and
Windows XP Professional Chapter 2.doc would have an MS-DOS name of
window~02.doc.Although, when using long file names, it is helpful to know the 8.3
file name, it is not too critical today as most people will have programs written for
the Windows world that do support long file names.
But there are also other reasons for using an 8.3 name. Some utility programs will
not work with long file names. Utility programs include such types of programs as
virus-scanning programs and disk-repair utilities. Many of these types of programs
cannot work with long file names. A strong recommendation is also to not use
spaces in file names, although Windows XP Professional allows you to so. There are
two primary reasons for this. Again, you will find that sometimes utility programs,
the Internet, and even Windows XP Professional itself do not like spaces in file
names, even though spaces are allowed characters. A program could “choke” (not
work) if it finds a file name with spaces. But more importantly, as a user, it is difficult to remember whether or not you placed spaces in a file name and where you
placed the spaces. My new file.doc and mynew file.doc and mynewfile.doc are all
considered unique file names by Windows XP Professional. If you never use spaces,
you never have to remember where and what spaces you used. For this reason,
another recommendation is always to use lower case letters.
Long file names can pose a problem in Windows XP Professional. Although a file
name can be up to 255 characters in length, the full file name also includes the path
8.1
WHY ORGANIZE A HARD DISK?
name. Remember that the folder name is part of the file name so that a file called
bud.wk1 full name is C:\LOTUS\WIDGETS\bud.wk1. Another consideration is
that file names that are too long make browsing a list of files in the Command
Prompt window or even Windows Explorer very difficult. Even if you only use
Windows XP Professional programs that allow long file names, there is still a
problem. You are the user who is going to key in the file name. The more characters
you have to key in, the more likely it is that you are going to make a typographical
error. It is also difficult to remember your naming strategy when you use very long
file names.
Again, the importance of creating meaningful file names cannot be overemphasized. Your naming convention should be easy to use so that when you create a new
file, you know what name you are going to give it so that it fits into your scheme.
You should be able to identify a file’s contents by its name. You do not want to have
to open each file to see what its contents are. For example, you are using your
database program and you want to keep track of your clients for the bangles
product line. You name the data file CLIENTS.DBF. However, you have two products to sell, bangles and widgets. Each product has different clients, so each product
requires a separate client file. You now have two files you want to call
CLIENTS.DBF. You do not want to overwrite one file with another, so you must
uniquely identify each file. An efficient way to do this is to create a subdirectory
called BANGLES and a subdirectory called WIDGETS and place each
CLIENTS.DBF file in the appropriate subdirectory. It is the subdirectory name that
clarifies which product client file you work with. An example of an inefficient but
typical hard disk organizational scheme with subdirectories for data might look like
Figure 8.2.
Root Directory
WINWORD <DIR>
LOTUS <DIR>
QUICKEN <DIR>
WINDOWS <DIR>
FOXPRO <DIR>
command.com
...
WINWORD
QUICKEN
WINDOWS
FOXPRO
WIDGETS <DIR>
WIDGETS <DIR>
DATA <DIR>
fc.exe
WIDGETS <DIR>
BANGLES <DIR>
BANGLES <DIR>
quick.exe
chksk.exe
BANGLES <DIR>
winword.exe
123.exe
quick.dat
...
fp.exe
spell.chk
123.cfg
...
...
...
WIDGETS
BANGLES
present.doc
report.doc
...
LOTUS
fp.dat
...
WIDGETS
BANGLES
DATA
WIDGETS
BANGLES
present.doc
bud.wk1
bud.wk1
1998.dat
clients.dbf
clients.dbf
...
98bud.wk1
...
...
...
...
...
Figure 8.23—Organizing a Disk by Software Application Package
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Although the organizational scheme in Figure 8.2 is better than placing the data
files in the root directory or in the program subdirectories, it is still very inefficient.
There are too many repeated subdirectory names. In addition, every time you want
a data file, you will have to remember not only what application you are working
on, but also where the appropriate data file is located. Furthermore, at this point
you must key in long path names. For example, when you want to retrieve
REPORT.DOC in Word, you need to key in C:\WINWORD\WIDGETS\
REPORT.DOC. In addition, when you need to find a file two or three levels down
the hierarchical tree, the operating system must look at every subdirectory on the
way down. The heads on the disk drive are constantly going back and forth reading
the entries and looking for the files.
As you become a more sophisticated user, you will find that you can use data
files in conjunction with different application programs. For instance, you can use
FoxPro to generate a mailing list from your CLIENTS.DBF file so that you can use it
with Word to send out a form letter. When you begin doing this, you end up with
data in two places: the word-processing subdirectory and the database subdirectory.
More importantly, when you find a new program you want to purchase, such as a
presentation package like Harvard Graphics, you need to add a new subdirectory
for that program, and you need to add further subdirectories for your products,
bangles and widgets. Or you could decide that you want a different word processor,
such as WordPerfect. How do you handle those data files in the WIDGETS and
BANGLES subdirectories? You do not want to delete them because WordPerfect will
be able to read them. An even worse nightmare is if you pick up a new product line
such as beads. Now you have to create a BEADS subdirectory under each application program. You have created a logistical nightmare for finding out where files are
located and deciding what data files should be kept.
The real problem with this all-too-typical organizational scheme is the logic
behind it. Remember, programs are tools. Before computers, you still used tools—a
pencil, a calculator, a typewriter. But did you file your output from these tools by
the tool name? When you wrote a letter using a typewriter, did you file it in a folder
labeled TYPEWRITER? When you calculated some numbers with your calculator,
did you place your totals in a file folder called CALCULATOR? Of course not. It
sounds silly to even suggest that. But in the above organizational scheme, that is
exactly what you are doing!
Programs are simply tools. People do not work by software package; they work
by projects. Software is a tool to help you do work easily and efficiently. Hence, it
makes much better sense to organize a hard disk by the way you work rather than
by the application package—the tool. In addition, with an efficient organizational
scheme, it is easier to add and delete projects and software. The following section
will recommend some guidelines to assist you in organizing your hard disk. However, you must always remember that any organizational scheme you devise is to
assist you in saving, retrieving, and backing up your data files easily. A good
organizational scheme for one user will not necessarily work for another.
8.2
8.2
METHODS OF ORGANIZING A HARD DISK
Methods of Organizing a Hard Disk
Certain criteria can give a hard disk an efficient and logical organization. These
include the following suggestions:
n The root directory should be a map to the rest of the disk. The only files that should be
in the root directory are the files placed there by the operating system. All other
files in the root directory should be subdirectory listings. Look at the root
directory as the index or table of contents to your entire hard disk. Ideally, when
you execute the DIR command, you should not see more than a screenful of
information. With today’s very large hard disks, it is difficult to keep to this
ideal. In reality, you may have 30 or more subdirectories off the root, which
cannot fit on one screen. Nonetheless, the principle remains valid. Keep the root
directory clear of unnecessary files.
n Plan the organization of your hard disk. Think about the work you do and how it
would be easiest for you to find your work files. This is especially true prior to
installing new software.
n Develop a naming convention for files and directories. It should be easy to
follow so that when you create new files or directories, you can logically name
them to fit your convention and when you look at a file name, you will know
approximately what data is in it.
n Create as many directories and subdirectories as you need before copying files
into them.
n There is no risk in creating or deleting folders for data files. Nor is there any risk
in moving, copying, or deleting data files. However, if your application software
has already been installed on your computer for you, you cannot and must not
rename or move program files or any program support files. If you do either, the
programs will not work!
n Create subdirectories that are shallow and wide instead of compact and deep. The
reason is that it is easier for the operating system to find files that are not buried
several levels down. Also, it is much easier for you to keep track of the
subdirectories when the organizational scheme is simple. Remember the old
programmer’s principle: “KISS—Keep It Simple, Stupid.” Short path names are
easier to key in than long path names.
n Do not place data files in the same subdirectory as program files. Although you are
constantly changing, creating, and deleting data files, you rarely, if ever, create
or delete program files.
n Many small subdirectories with few files are better than a large subdirectory with many
files. Remember, you are categorizing data. If you begin to get too many files in a
subdirectory, think about breaking the subdirectory into two or more
subdirectories. It is easier to manage and update a subdirectory with a limited
number of files because there is less likelihood of having to determine on a fileby-file basis which file belongs where. In addition, if you have too few files in
many subdirectories, think about combining them into one subdirectory.
n Keep subdirectory names short but descriptive. Try to stay away from generic and
meaningless subdirectory names such as DATA. The shorter the subdirectory
name, the less there is to key in. For instance, using the subdirectory name
WIDGETS for your widgets data files is easy. If you simply use W, that is too
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n
n
n
n
n
ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
short and cryptic for you to remember easily what the W subdirectory holds. On
the other hand, the name WIDGETS.FIL is a little long to key in. You rarely, if
ever, use extensions with subdirectory names. Again, remember you will be
keying in these path names.
Create a separate subdirectory for batch files. Batch files are files that you will learn
to write to help automate processes you do often. Place the subdirectory for
batch files under the root directory. A popular name for this subdirectory is
BATCH.
Create a subdirectory called UTILS (utilities) in which you will create further separate
subdirectories for each utility program you own or purchase. As you work with
computers, you start collecting utility software. Utility software programs
provide commonly needed services. An example of this is Norton Utilities.
Utility software would also include any shareware utilities that you might
acquire from a download site on the World Wide Web. In many instances, utility
software and shareware packages have similar file names, making it imperative
that each has its own separate and readily identifiable subdirectory. You can
place these subdirectories under the UTILS directory. You could place the UTILS
directory under the Program Files directory.
Learn how to install programs to your hard drive. Typically programs will have a
setup or install command. For instance, if you were going to install a filecompression program called WinZip, you would key in SETUP, and the setup
program would tell you that it is going to install the program to C:\WINZIP.
You can change that to C:\UTILS\WINZIP or D:\WINZIP. In other words, you
can create your own organizational scheme and do not have to let the installation programs put the programs anywhere they wish.
Learn how to use the application package, and also learn how the application package
works. For instance, find out if the application package assigns a file extension.
Lotus 1-2-3 assigns an extension of .WK1 for its files, whereas WordPerfect
assigns a file extension of .WPD. If an application does not assign file extensions
to data files, you can be extremely flexible and create file extensions that will
apply to the work that you do with that application program’s data files. For
instance, you could assign the file extension .LET to letter files that deal with all
your correspondence or .MYS to data files that deal with a mystery book you
are writing. However, nearly all programs written for Windows will assign file
extensions. With the addition of long file names introduced in Windows 95, you
can name a file CHAPTER8.MYS in Word, and the .DOC extension will be
added, leaving the full file name as CHAPTER8.MYS.DOC. But be aware of
your application programs file extension assignments. For instance, graphic
programs such as Paint Shop Pro will use common file extensions such as .TIF. If
you first install a program such as Paint Shop Pro, which uses the .TIF file
extension, then install a program such as SnagIt that also uses that file extension, now all .TIF files will be assigned to SnagIt instead of Paint Shop Pro.
Many software programs allow you to choose a custom installation where you
can choose what file extension will be used for that program.
Find out how the application package works with subdirectories. For instance, does it
recognize subdirectories for data files? Very few programs today do not recognize subdirectories. However, most programs will have a default subdirectory
8.2
METHODS OF ORGANIZING A HARD DISK
where that program saves its data files. You should know what that
subdirectory is and if you can change the default directory.
n Analyze the way you work. If you always use an application program’s default
data directory when you save and retrieve files, then organizing your hard disk
around projects will not work for you. In that case, perhaps you do want to
create data directories. Figure 8.3 is another way to organize your hard disk.
Root Directory
WINDOWS <DIR>
PROG <DIR>
DATA <DIR>
command.com
...
WINDOWS
PROG
DATA
SYSTEM32 <DIR>
WINWORD <DIR>
WORDDATA <DIR>
win.ini
LOTUS <DIR>
123DATA <DIR>
system.ini
QUICKEN <DIR>
FOXDATA <DIR>
...
FOXPRO <DIR>
UTILS <DIR>
WORDDATA
123DATA
FOXDATA
chap1.mys
widgets.wk1
widgets.dbf
publish.let
bangle.wk1
bangle.dbf
...
...
...
WINWORD
LOTUS
QUICKEN
FOXPRO
UTILS
winword.exe
123.exe
quick.exe
fp.exe
OTHER <DIR>
spell.chk
123.cfg
quick.dat
fp.dat
NORTON <DIR>
...
...
DATA <DIR>
...
DATA
NORTON
OTHER
1998.dat
nu.exe
other.exe
...
...
Figure 8.3—Another Organizational Scheme
n Analyze your environment. If, for instance, you are in an educational environment, organization by application package makes sense. You are teaching only
that one application package, and all data created by students will be saved to
floppy disks. Hence, your focus is the package, and organizing around the
application package in this instance is logical.
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Root Directory
WINDOWS<DIR>
WIDGETS <DIR>
BANGLES <DIR>
DATA <DIR>
...
WINDOWS
PROG
WIDGETS
BANGLES
SYSTEM32 <DIR>
WINWORD <DIR>
present.doc
present.doc
win.ini
LOTUS <DIR>
report.doc
report.doc
system.ini
QUICKEN <DIR>
bud.wk1
bud.wk1
...
FOXPRO <DIR>
98bud.wk1
clients.dbf
UTILS <DIR>
clients.dbf
...
WINWORD
LOTUS
QUICKEN
FOXPRO
UTILS
winword.exe
123.exe
quick.exe
fp.exe
OTHER <DIR>
spell.chk
123.cfg
quick.dat
fp.dat
NORTON <DIR>
...
...
DATA <DIR>
...
DATA
NORTON
OTHER
1998.dat
nu.exe
other.exe
...
...
Figure 8.4—Organization by Project
An organizational scheme for a project-oriented environment based on our
salesperson scenario could look something like Figure 8.4. In Figure 8.4, you know
where all your software application programs are located. In addition, it is much
easier to add a new software package or to update an existing one because all the
program files are located in one place. For instance, when you want to add a presentation software application program, such as Harvard Graphics, you can create a
subdirectory called C:\PROG\HG and install all the files in that location. If you
have a suite of software, such as Corel Perfect Office or Microsoft Office, its installation makes subdirectories that act like PROG in the example. Microsoft creates
MICROSOFT OFFICE under Program Files, and Corel creates COREL. Under these
directories are subdirectories holding the individual programs. Also, since this
scheme is organized by project, it is easy to add a new project or delete an old one.
If, for example, you are now selling beads, you can create a subdirectory called
C:\BEADS. If you no longer are selling widgets, you can use RD /S to eliminate the
WIDGETS subdirectory. It is also easy to know which data files belong to what
project. You also can tell which data files belong to which program by virtue of the
file extension. In this example, if you look at the subdirectory called WIDGETS, you
know that the data files PRESENT.DOC and REPORT.DOC were created with Word.
You know that the data files BUD.WK1 and 98BUD.WK1 were created with Lotus 12-3, whereas CLIENTS.DBF was created with FoxPro. The same would be true for
the BANGLES subdirectory. This example also shows that you leave the DATA
subdirectory as is for Quicken because that is where Quicken prefers the data files.
8.5
ACTIVITY: USING THE TREE COMMAND
This, of course, is not the only way to organize a hard disk. You can organize
your hard disk any way you wish, but there should be organization. Although it
may take some time in the beginning, ultimately organization will make more
effective use of the hard disk. Primarily you want to organize your data files into
meaningful directories. You do not want to save all your data files to a subdirectory
called My Documents. You want to be able to go directly to the subdirectory that
holds the files you wish to work on. Except when you create a new file, you will find
that if you properly organize your data files, you will rarely use the Start/All
Programs menu. Instead, you will go directly to the directory that holds the files you
wish to work on. For instance, if you were working with the bangles product line,
you could open the directory BANGLES, which would have all of your files that
deal with bangles, regardless of the application program that created them. The two
major considerations for any organizational scheme are first, how do you work, and
second, how do the application programs work?
8.3
Organizing a Disk
Most users do not begin with an organized hard disk. What may seem organized to
one user is chaos to another. In this instance, the user needs to reorganize the hard
disk, a process that can be done without reformatting the hard disk. To master this
process, you are going to take the DATA disk and reorganize it. This exercise will
give you some idea of how the process works without having to worry about
inadvertently deleting files from the hard disk. (You may like to back up your Data
disk before the reorganization process.)
8.4
Viewing the Disk Structure
with the TREE Command
You have looked at disk structures in the figures shown in this chapter. These have
been pictorial representations of how a disk was organized. The TREE command
allows you to see a graphic representation of the disk structure on the screen in the
command prompt window. The syntax of the TREE command is:
TREE [drive:][path] [/F] [/A]
/F
/A
8.5
Display the names of the files in each folder.
Use ASCII instead of extended characters.
Activity: Using the TREE Command
1
Open a Command Line window.
2
Make the C:\WUGXP directory the default.
3
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TREE e
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C:\WUGXP>TREE
Folder PATH listing for volume ADMIN504
Volume serial number is 71FAE346 0E38:11FF
C:.
GAMES
MATCH32
BOG2
MLINK
TEST
MUSIC
MEDIA
TV
MOVIES
BOOKS
DATA
SPORTS
LEVEL-1
LEVEL-2
LEVEL-3
C:\WUGXP>_
You can see a graphical representation of the folder structure
under the C:\WUGXP directory. Your order may be different. The subdirectories
GAMES, TEST, MUSIC, MEDIA, DATA, SPORTS, and LEVEL-1 are directly
under WUGXP. The subdirectories MATCH32, BOG2, and MLINK are under
GAMES; TV, MOVIES, and BOOKS are under MEDIA; and LEVEL-2 and
LEVEL-3 are under LEVEL-1. With this graphic, it is easy to see how the WUGXP
directory is organized.
4
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TREE /A e
C:\WUGXP>TREE /A
Folder PATH listing for volume ADMIN504
Volume serial number is 71FAE346 0E38:11FF
C:.
+---GAMES
¦
+---MATCH32
¦
+---BOG2
¦
\---MLINK
+---TEST
+---MUSIC
+---MEDIA
¦
+---TV
¦
+---MOVIES
¦
\---BOOKS
+---DATA
+---SPORTS
\---LEVEL-1
\---LEVEL-2
\---LEVEL-3
C:\WUGXP>_
8.6
ORGANIZING THE DATA DISK
You used the TREE command with the /A parameter. Instead of
the solid graphic lines, you got only those lines that you could create with the
keyboard using only ASCII characters, not the extended character set, which is able
to draw solid, unbroken lines on the screen. The information displayed, however, is
exactly the same.
5
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>TREE /F e
BOOKS
PULITZER.BKS
MYSTERY.BKS
AME-LIT.BKS
DATA
BONJOUR.TXT
GOOD.TXT
HIGHEST.TXT
MOTHER.LET
TEA.TAX
THANK.YOU
THIN.EST
SPORTS
BASKETBL.TMS
BSBALL-A.TMS
BSBALL-N.TMS
FOOT-COL.TMS
FOOT-PRO.TMS
LEVEL-1
HELLO.TXT
LEVEL-2
HELLO.TXT
LEVEL-3
HELLO.TXT
C:\WUGXP>_
The screen display above is the end of your display as it scrolled.
All the file names were listed within their respective directories. You can use redirection to place this information in a file, use the MORE filter.
6
8.6
Key in the following: C:\WUGXP>CD \ e
Organizing the DATA Disk
The DATA disk has minimal organization. The . . . in the figure below represents file
names. (Note: If you did not do all the chapter activities, your disk could look
different. It is not important that your disk is exactly as the one pictured. If you have
additional files or are missing some files, you can delete, copy, or create files as
needed. The contents of the text files do not matter.) Its structure is as follows:
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
Root Directory
ASTRONOMY <DIR>
CLASS <DIR>
WORK <DIR>
TRIP <DIR>
MEDIA <DIR>
Astrology.fil
...
ASTRONOMY
CLASS
WORK
TRIP
MEDIA
MERCURY <DIR>
VENUS <DIR>
JUPITER <DIR>
jup.par
...
CLIENTS <DIR>
ADS <DIR>
ven.ink
TV <DIR>
MOVIES <DIR>
BOOKS <DIR>
first.tst
MERCURY
VENUS
JUPITER
CLIENTS
ADS
TV
MOVIES
BOOKS
final.rpt
...
last.txt
...
final.rpt
...
exam2.qz
comedy.tv
bestpic.mov
pulitzer.bks
...
Figure 8.5—Current DATA Disk Structure
In addition to organizing this disk, you are also going to copy some programs
from the \WUGXP directory to the disk so that there will be programs as well as
data files on it. At this moment, you really cannot tell what is on this disk. There are
so many files in the root directory that when you key in DIR, you see many, many
files scrolling by on the screen. Therefore, you are going to reorganize the disk so
that it will be easier to manage. You are going to create the necessary subdirectories
and copy the appropriate files to the correct subdirectories. You will create a
GAMES subdirectory, which will be a map to the game programs on the DATA disk.
(Warning: If you have installed programs on your hard disk, you do not move or
copy them elsewhere. You may do so here as these are special examples.)
8.7
Activity: Setting Up the
GAMES Subdirectory
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. You have shelled out to the Command Line.
C:\> is displayed as the default drive and the default directory.
1
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
2
Key in the following: A:\>MD GAMES e
3
Key in the following: A:\>MD GAMES\ARGH e
4
Key in the following: A:\>MD GAMES\MLINK e
5
Key in the following: A:\>MD GAMES\OTHER e
C:\>A:
A:\>MD GAMES
A:\>MD GAMES\ARGH
A:\>MD GAMES\MLINK
8.7
ACTIVITY: SETTING UP THE GAMES SUBDIRECTORY
A:\>MD GAMES\OTHER
A:\>_
You created a generic program subdirectory and identified the
specific subdirectories that reflect the programs you will have on the DATA disk.
Now you need to copy the proper files to the proper subdirectory.
6
Key in the following:
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\*.* GAMES\MLINK e
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\*.* GAMES\MLINK
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLLOYD.DOC
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLLOYD.EXE
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLOTRA.DOC
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLPUSH.DOC
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLOTRA.EXE
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLPUSH.EXE
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLYAHT.EXE
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLYAHT.DOC
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLCRUX.DOC
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK\MLCRUX.EXE
10 file(s) copied.
A:\> _
You copied all the files necessary for the MLINK game into the
proper directory on the DATA disk.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK e
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR A:\GAMES\MLINK e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP\GAMES\MLINK
02/04/2002
02/04/2002
03/13/1990
03/13/1990
10/28/1989
07/07/1990
10/28/1989
07/06/1990
09/22/1989
09/22/1989
01/10/1992
01/10/1992
09:21 AM
<DIR>
.
09:21 AM
<DIR>
..
10:34 PM
13,093 MLLOYD.DOC
10:31 PM
46,128 MLLOYD.EXE
12:10 PM
12,988 MLOTRA.DOC
01:28 PM
12,534 MLPUSH.DOC
12:09 PM
47,136 MLOTRA.EXE
06:03 PM
45,632 MLPUSH.EXE
11:59 AM
37,088 MLYAHT.EXE
12:19 PM
10,962 MLYAHT.DOC
07:11 PM
19,191 MLCRUX.DOC
07:04 PM
26,368 MLCRUX.EXE
10 File(s)
271,120 bytes
2 Dir(s)
6,878,904,320 bytes free
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CHAPTER 8
ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
A:\>DIR GAMES\MLINK
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\GAMES\MLINK
04/17/2002
04/17/2002
03/13/1990
03/13/1990
10/28/1989
07/07/1990
10/28/1989
07/06/1990
09/22/1989
09/22/1989
01/10/1992
01/10/1992
01:07 PM
<DIR>
.
01:07 PM
<DIR>
..
10:34 PM
13,093 MLLOYD.DOC
10:31 PM
46,128 MLLOYD.EXE
12:10 PM
12,988 MLOTRA.DOC
01:28 PM
12,534 MLPUSH.DOC
12:09 PM
47,136 MLOTRA.EXE
06:03 PM
45,632 MLPUSH.EXE
11:59 AM
37,088 MLYAHT.EXE
12:19 PM
10,962 MLYAHT.DOC
07:11 PM
19,191 MLCRUX.DOC
07:04 PM
26,368 MLCRUX.EXE
10 File(s)
271,120 bytes
2 Dir(s)
1,112,064 bytes free
A:\>_
You used the COPY command in step 6 to request all the MLINK
files on the C drive be copied to the GAMES\MLINK directory on the DATA disk,
and they were indeed copied.
9
Key in the following: A:\>CD GAMES\OTHER e
10 Key in the following: A:\GAMES\OTHER>CD C:\WUGXP\GAMES e
A:\>CD GAMES\OTHER
A:\GAMES\OTHER>CD C:\WUGXP\GAMES
A:\GAMES\OTHER>_
You changed to the newly created OTHER directory under
GAMES on the root of the DATA disk. Then, you switched the default directory on
the C drive to WUGXP\GAMES. Did the default directory on C change?
11 Key in the following: A:\GAMES\OTHER>C: e
A:\GAMES\OTHER>C:
C:\WUGXP\GAMES>_
As you can see, the default directory on the C drive has changed
to WUGXP\GAMES.
12 Key in the following: C:\WUGXP\GAMES>A: e
13 Key in the following: A:\GAMES\OTHER>COPY C:LS*.* e
Note:
Do not key in the \ after C:
8.7
ACTIVITY: SETTING UP THE GAMES SUBDIRECTORY
C:\WUGXP\GAMES>A:
A:\GAMES\OTHER>COPY C:LS*.*
C:LS.DOC
C:LS.EXE
C:LS.PAS
3 file(s) copied.
A:\GAMES\OTHER>_
Notice the copy display. There is no \ after the C:. The copy is
taking place from the default directory on C, which you changed to
WUGXP\GAMES. By manipulating your default directory, you can shorten the path
name that you have to key in.
14 Key in the following: A:\GAMES\OTHER>DIR C: e
A:\GAMES\OTHER>DIR C:
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP\GAMES
02/04/2002
02/04/2002
06/23/1989
06/23/1989
08/19/1990
08/19/1990
08/14/1989
08/14/1989
05/09/1989
06/23/1989
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
09:20 AM
<DIR>
.
09:20 AM
<DIR>
..
11:34 PM
2,611 LS.DOC
11:40 PM
12,576 LS.EXE
04:00 AM
8,729 ARGH.DOC
04:00 AM
69,728 ARGH.EXE
10:31 PM
43,776 MLSHUT.EXE
10:48 PM
15,049 MLSHUT.DOC
03:51 PM
34,645 MAZE.EXE
11:41 PM
8,404 LS.PAS
09:14 AM
<DIR>
MATCH32
09:15 AM
<DIR>
BOG2
09:15 AM
<DIR>
MLINK
8 File(s)
195,518 bytes
5 Dir(s)
6,802,833,408 bytes free
A:\GAMES\OTHER>_
There are two other files to place in the OTHER directory, and
both begin with ML. But, there is also a directory that begins with ML that you do
not want to copy.
15 Key in the following: A:\GAMES\OTHER>COPY C:ML*.* e
A:\GAMES\OTHER>COPY C:ML*.*
C:MLSHUT.EXE
C:MLSHUT.DOC
2 file(s) copied.
A:\GAMES\OTHER>_
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As you can see, the COPY command ignored the subdirectory.
16 Key in the following: A:\GAMES\OTHER>CD\ e
17 Key in the following: A:\>TREE GAMES /F e
A:\>TREE GAMES /F
Folder PATH listing for volume DATA
Volume serial number is 71FAE346 30B8:DA1D
A:\GAMES
ARGH
MLINK
MLLOYD.DOC
MLLOYD.EXE
MLOTRA.DOC
MLPUSH.DOC
MLOTRA.EXE
MLPUSH.EXE
MLYAHT.EXE
MLYAHT.DOC
MLCRUX.DOC
MLCRUX.EXE
OTHER
LS.DOC
LS.EXE
LS.PAS
MLSHUT.EXE
MLSHUT.DOC
A:\>
You displayed the directory structure and files starting at the
GAMES directory and including all directories and files beneath. All that is remaining to copy is the ARGH game.
18 Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:ARG*.* GAMES\ARGH e
A:\>COPY C:ARG*.* GAMES\ARGH
C:ARGH.DOC
C:ARGH.EXE
2 file(s) copied.
A:\>
19 Key in the following: A:\>CD C:\ e
20 Key in the following: A:\>TREE GAMES /F e
A:\>TREE GAMES /F
Folder PATH listing for volume DATA
Volume serial number is 71FAE346 30B8:DA1D
A:\GAMES
ARGH
ARGH.DOC
ARGH.EXE
8.7
ACTIVITY: SETTING UP THE GAMES SUBDIRECTORY
MLINK
MLLOYD.DOC
MLLOYD.EXE
MLOTRA.DOC
MLPUSH.DOC
MLOTRA.EXE
MLPUSH.EXE
MLYAHT.EXE
MLYAHT.DOC
MLCRUX.DOC
MLCRUX.EXE
OTHER
LS.DOC
LS.EXE
LS.PAS
MLSHUT.EXE
MLSHUT.DOC
A:\> CD C:\
A:\>_
You have completed copying your game files and they are arranged in a logical manner. You then returned the default directory on the hard
drive to the root.
21 Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
10/31/2001
11/16/2000
05/27/2001
10/30/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
01:46 PM
02:10 PM
04:03 PM
04:32 PM
12:00 PM
02:43 PM
12:00 PM
10:08 PM
03:42 PM
12:15 AM
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
01:08 PM
11:24 AM
07:08 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 ASTRO.TXT
121 BORN.TXT
72 DANCES.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
529 TITAN.TXT
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
81 LONGFILENAME.TXT
190 JUPITER.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
2,833 bytes
6,878,904,320 bytes free
A:\>_
You displayed all the .TXT files in the WUGXP directory. You
want to copy all the .TXT files that were created on or after 05-30-00 to the root
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directory of the DATA disk. You do not want to copy the files HELLO.TXT or
DANCES.TXT. XCOPY allows you to make choices by date.
22 Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB -S -H -R *.* e
23 Key in the following: A:\>DEL *.TXT e
A:\>ATTRIB -S -H -R *.*
A:\>DEL *.TXT
A:\_
You removed any system, hidden, and read-only attributes that
were set for the files on the root of the A drive. You did not have to key in A:\*.* as
the root of A is the default directory. You then deleted all files ending in .TXT from
the DATA disk. This time, to be cautious, you did key in the drive specification.
When using DEL with a wild card, it is usually best to be absolutely sure what you
are deleting, and from where you are deleting it.
24 Key in the following: A:\>XCOPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT /D:05-31-00 e
A:\>XCOPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT /D:05-31-00
C:\WUGXP\ASTRO.TXT
C:\WUGXP\BORN.TXT
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Patty.txt
C:\WUGXP\TITAN.TXT
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Nicki.txt
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAME.TXT
C:\WUGXP\JUPITER.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMED.TXT
C:\WUGXP\GALAXY.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMING.TXT
C:\WUGXP\MERCURY.TXT
C:\WUGXP\PLANETS.TXT
C:\WUGXP\VENUS.TXT
13 File(s) copied
A:\>_
You copied only the 13 files of interest, not all 15 that were in the
\WUGXP subdirectory.
8.8
The MOVE Command Revisited
When reorganizing your hard disk, you sometimes do need to copy files and/or
subdirectory structures from one place to another and replace existing files. In terms
of reorganizing your hard disk, you do not necessarily want to actually copy files
and directories. Most often, what you really want to do is either move files from one
location to another or simply rename the subdirectory.
8.9
ACTIVITY: USING MOVE TO ORGANIZE YOUR DISK
You have used the MOVE command in previous chapters to move files from one
directory to another. Clearly, using the MOVE command is an easy way to manipulate your files. However, there is an important precaution to take before moving files
and directories wholesale. Moving data files and data directories is usually a safe
procedure that rarely impacts your programs. However, moving program files and
renaming program directories is not “safe.” Windows registers program files, their
names, and their locations in the Registry. If they are moved or renamed at the
Command Line or in the GUI, the Registry will not be able to find them. Program
files are not generally copied to a location—they are installed in a location with a
setup program. Files pertaining to the program are placed in many different locations. Moving or renaming these Windows program files and directories will almost
certainly cause the program to fail.
When dealing with small programs that are completely contained within one
directory and were created to run under DOS rather than Windows, problems can
still occur. Moving the entire directory or renaming it may be safe—the program
may still run. If you do decide to manipulate program files and directories, be sure
and take note of which directory the program files are in before you start. Does this
mean that you should not organize your hard disk? It does not, but you must do it
with extreme caution. You can and will be primarily concerned with organizing
your data files. These files can be easily and safely rearranged to meet your needs.
In the next activity you will move files and rename subdirectories so you can see
how easy it is with data files.
8.9
Activity: Using MOVE
to Organize Your Disk
Note:
1
You have the DATA disk in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *VEN*.* e
A:\>DIR *VEN*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
04/11/2002
10/31/2001
07:08 PM
07:08 PM
12:17 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
478 VEN.BUD
478 VEN.99
45 STEVEN.FIL
478 VENUS.TXT
1,479 bytes
951,808 bytes free
A:\>_
By using the wildcard character you were able to see all files that
contained VEN in filename. You want the files that are about VENUS, however you
do not want STEVEN.FIL.
2
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB +H STEVEN.FIL e
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3
Key in the following: A:\>MOVE *VEN*.* ASTRONOMY\VENUS e
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *VEN*.* e
5
Key in the following: A:\>ATTRIB –H STEVEN.FIL e
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *VEN*.* e
A:\>ATTRIB +H STEVEN.FIL
A:\>MOVE *VEN*.* ASTRONOMY\VENUS
A:\VEN.BUD
A:\VEN.99
A:\VENUS.TXT
A:\>DIR *VEN*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>ATTRIB -H STEVEN.FIL
A:\>DIR *VEN*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
04/11/2002
12:17 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
45 STEVEN.FIL
45 bytes
951,808 bytes free
A:\>_
You used the ATTRIB command to hide the file you did not want
to move. You then moved the files pertaining to VENUS to the VENUS subdirectory
under the ASTRONOMY subdirectory. When the files were moved, you removed
the hidden flag from STEVEN.FIL. You want to move the files pertaining to JUPITER and MERCURY to their own directories also.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *MER*.* e
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *JUP*.* e
A:\>DIR *MER*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
01:08 PM
01:08 PM
01:08 PM
01:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
406 MERCURY.NEW
406 MER.BUD
406 MER.99
406 MERCURY.TXT
1,624 bytes
951,808 bytes free
8.9
ACTIVITY: USING MOVE TO ORGANIZE YOUR DISK
A:\>DIR *JUP*.*
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
07:41 AM
07:41 AM
11:33 AM
03:42 PM
03:42 PM
5 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUPITER.NEW
190 JUP.BUD
152 JUP.OLD
190 JUP.99
190 JUPITER.TXT
912 bytes
951,808 bytes free
A:\>_
You see there are no files listed that you do not want to include in
your move, so it is not necessary to use the ATTRIB command to hide files.
9
Key in the following:
A:\>MOVE *MER*.* ASTRONOMY\MERCURY e
10 Key in the following: A:\>MOVE *JUP*.* ASTRONOMY\JUPITER e
11 Key in the following: A:\>TREE ASTRONOMY /F e
A:\>MOVE *MER*.* ASTRONOMY\MERCURY
A:\MERCURY.NEW
A:\MER.BUD
A:\MER.99
A:\MERCURY.TXT
A:\>MOVE *JUP*.* ASTRONOMY\JUPITER
A:\JUPITER.NEW
A:\JUP.BUD
A:\JUP.OLD
A:\JUP.99
A:\JUPITER.TXT
A:\>TREE ASTRONOMY /F
Folder PATH listing for volume DATA
Volume serial number is 71FAE346 30B8:DA1D
A:\ASTRONOMY
FIRST.TST
MERCURY
FINAL.RPT
NOTE2.TMP
NOTE3.TMP
DRESS.UP
MERCURY.NEW
MER.BUD
MER.99
MERCURY.TXT
VENUS
LAST.TST
VEN.BUD
VEN.99
VENUS.TXT
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JUPITER
JUPITER.NEW
JUP.BUD
JUP.OLD
JUP.99
JUPITER.TXT
A:\>_
You completed the moves successfully, as shown by the TREE
command. You decide that ASTRONOMY is not an accurate name for this directory.
12 Key in the following: A:\>REN ASTRONOMY 3PLANETS e
13 Key in the following: A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY e
14 Key in the following: A:\>DIR 3PLANETS e
A:\>REN ASTRONOMY 3PLANETS
A:\>DIR ASTRONOMY
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>DIR 3PLANETS
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\3PLANETS
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
11:04 AM
<DIR>
11:04 AM
<DIR>
12:20 PM
<DIR>
12:32 PM
<DIR>
12:34 PM
<DIR>
07:41 AM
1 File(s)
5 Dir(s)
.
..
MERCURY
VENUS
JUPITER
190 FIRST.TST
190 bytes
951,808 bytes free
A:\>_
You successfully renamed the ASTRONOMY directory to
3PLANETS. As previously stated, in versions of DOS previous to Windows 95, the
REN command would not rename subdirectories; you had to use the MOVE command. Using the MOVE command for this purpose was confusing given that, if you
keyed it in one way, you moved files, but, if you keyed it another way, you renamed
subdirectories. There are still files on the root which have to do with Astronomy.
15 Key in the following: A:\>DIR /W e
A:\>DIR /W
Volume in drive A is DATA
8.9
ACTIVITY: USING MOVE TO ORGANIZE YOUR DISK
Volume Serial Number is 2829-1507
Directory of A:\
ASTROLGY.FIL
BONJOUR.NEW
GALAXY.NEW
AST.BUD
ASTRO.NEW
[CLASS]
[WORK]
CalifSurf.MUS
WILDTWO.AAA
WILDTHR.AAA
[TRIP]
AST.99
DRAMA.TV
AST.TST
MARK.FIL
CASES.FIL
NEWPRSON.FIL
Y.FIL
CAROLYN.FIL
person.fil
BRIAN.FIL
ZODIAC.FIL
NEW-SUVS.XLS
FILE2.SWT
FILE4.FP
FILE2.FP
FILE3.FP
FILE2.CZG
FILE3.CZG
FILE3.SWT
[MEDIA]
PERSONAL.FIL
STEVEN.FIL
TEST.BAT
b.bat
[GAMES]
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
Sandy and Patty.txt
TITAN.TXT
Sandy and Nicki.txt
LONGFILENAME.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
GALAXY.TXT
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
PLANETS.TXT
[3PLANETS]
41 File(s)
15,115 bytes
6 Dir(s)
951,808 bytes free
A:\>_
There are some files that are related Astronomy and Astrology, but
they do not have enough in common to group them when copying. It would take a
lot of keying in to copy them one by one. This is a time that using the GUI is most
efficient. You will first create a directory to hold the remaining Astro... files, and then
move on to the Desktop.
16 Key in the following: A:\>MD ASTRO e
17 Close the Command Line window.
18 Open My Computer and double-click Drive A. Click View. Click Icons. Click
View. Click Status Bar to set it.
You are looking at the root of the A drive in the GUI.
19 Click the View button (the cursor is pointing to it in the above figure) and select
List.
20 Size the window so you can see all of the files.
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You are now looking at all the file names. If you can not see all the
file extensions, go to the Tools menu, select Folder Options, then View, and uncheck
Hide extensions for known file types.
21 Hold down the c key and, without releasing it, click each of the following
11 files:
AST.99
AST.BUD
ASTROLOGY.FIL ZODIAC.FIL
ASTRO.NEW
GALAXY.NEW
ASTRO.TXT
GALAXY.TXT
PLANETS.TXT TITAN.TXT
AST.TST
You have singled out the files you want to copy to the new ASTRO
directory.
22 Release the c key. Move the mouse pointer over any one of the selected files
and click the RIGHT mouse button.
8.9
ACTIVITY: USING MOVE TO ORGANIZE YOUR DISK
The shortcut menu appears.
23 Click Cut.
24 Double-click the ASTRO directory.
25 Right-click in the blank area of the folder.
You opened another shortcut menu.
26 Click Paste.
The Moving dialog box shows you the files are being moved from
the root of A, ‘A:\’ , to the ASTRO directory.
27 Click in the blank area of the window to de-select the files.
28 Click the View button. Select List.
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You have indeed moved all the files into the ASTRO directory.
29 Close all open windows
30 Open a Command Line window and make A:\ the default directory.
31 Key in the following: A:\>TREE /F e
VENUS
LAST.TST
VEN.BUD
VEN.99
VENUS.TXT
JUPITER
JUPITER.NEW
JUP.BUD
JUP.OLD
JUP.99
JUPITER.TXT
ASTRO
ASTRO.NEW
GALAXY.NEW
ASTRO.TXT
GALAXY.TXT
PLANETS.TXT
TITAN.TXT
AST.TST
AST.99
AST.BUD
ASTROLGY.FIL
ZODIAC.FIL
A:\>_
Most of the display will scroll off the screen, but the end of the
display shows you that you have successfully organized your Astronomy files.
8.10
8.10
CHECKING A DISK: FAT AND NTFS
Checking a Disk: FAT and NTFS
CHKDSK is an operating system utility that dates back to very early versions of
MS-DOS. CHKDSK is an external command stored in the C:\WINDOWS\
SYSTEM32 subdirectory. CHKDSK can be used on disks with any file system
supported by Windows XP Professional: FAT12 (floppy disks), FAT16, FAT32, and
NTFS. CHKDSK examines disk space and use for the NTFS and FAT file systems. A
status report is provided with information specific to the file system on the drive
you checked. CHKDSK also locates errors on a disk and can correct those errors
when you use the proper parameters.
The information provided by the reports is information you need to know about
your disks. You need to know how much room is left on the disk so that you can
add a new file. You want to know if there are any bad spots on a disk, which can
mean the loss of a file. Bad spots can come from a variety of sources, such as a
mishandled disk or a manufacturing defect. You may want to know if the files are
being stored efficiently on a disk or if you have problems with the logical structure
of the disk.
If your disk is using the FAT file system, the CHKDSK command analyzes both
FATs (file allocation tables) on the disk, the directory table for the root directory, the
directory structure, and the integrity of the files, including the validity of any long
file names. Part of the process of checking the FAT includes tracing out the chain of
data for each file. This ensures that the directory entries match the location and
lengths of files with the file allocation table on the specified drive. It ensures that all
the directories are readable. After checking the disk, CHKDSK reports how many
files are on a disk and how much space is taken. CHKDSK establishes the space left
on the disk for additional files.
As you learned in Chapter 3, NTFS uses an MFT (Master File Table) to track
every file on the disk rather than a FAT. The CHKDSK utility when used with an
NTFS file system works in three stages. Stage 1: CHKDSK looks at each file record
segment in the MFT for consistency. It also identifies which file segments and
clusters are currently being used. At the end of Stage 1, the CHKDSK command
then compares the information it collected against the information that NTFS keeps
on the disk. CHKDSK is looking for any discrepancies or problems. Stage 2: It
verifies what NTFS calls “indexes” (directories), again checking for internal consistency. It ensures that every directory and file belongs to at least one directory and
that the reference to that file in the MFT is valid. It also verifies file times and dates
as well as file size. This is the most time-consuming portion of CHKDSK. Stage 3:
CHKDSK checks and verifies the security for each directory and file. The security
information includes the file’s owner, permissions granted to users and groups, and
any auditing that is to occur for that file or directory.
You should regularly run the CHKDSK command for each disk to ensure that
your file structures have integrity. No files should be open when you run CHKDSK
on a disk. This means you need to close all programs, including programs such as
screen savers. If CHKDSK cannot lock the drive—prevent access—it will tell you
that it will run CHKDSK the next time you start your system.
The syntax for CHKDSK is:
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Checks a disk and displays a status report.
CHKDSK [volume[[path]filename]]] [/F] [/V] [/R] [/X] [/I] [/C]
[/L[:size]]
volume
filename
/F
/V
/R
/L:size
/X
/I
/C
Specifies the drive letter (followed by a colon),
mount point, or volume name.
FAT/FAT32 only: Specifies the files to check for
fragmentation.
Fixes errors on the disk.
On FAT/FAT32: Displays the full path and name of
every file on the disk.
On NTFS: Displays cleanup messages if any.
Locates bad sectors and recovers readable
information (implies /F).
NTFS only: Changes the log file size to the
specified number of kilobytes. If size is not
specified, displays current size.
Forces the volume to dismount first if necessary.
All opened handles to the volume would then be
invalid (implies /F).
NTFS only: Performs a less vigorous check of index
entries.
NTFS only: Skips checking of cycles within the
folder structure.
The /I or /C switch reduces the amount of time required to run
Chkdsk by skipping certain checks of the volume.
Note that there are parameters that are valid only with FAT file systems and
other parameters that are valid only with NTFS drives. In addition, on a hard disk,
you need to have administrator privileges to run CHKDSK.
8.11
Activity: Using CHKDSK on
Hard and Floppy Drives
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>C: e
2
Key in the following: C:\>CD WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 e
3
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>DIR CHKDSK.* e
A:\>C:
C:\>CD WINDOWS\SYSTEM32
C:\WINDOWS\system32>DIR CHKDSK.*
Volume in drive C is XP_FULL
Volume Serial Number is C467-D4C1
Directory of C:\WINDOWS\system32
08/23/2001
12:00 PM
11,776 chkdsk.exe
1 File(s)
11,776 bytes
0 Dir(s) 21,476,294,656 bytes free
C:\WINDOWS\system32>_
8.11
ACTIVITY: USING CHKDSK ON HARD AND FLOPPY DRIVES
The DIR command told you that the program CHKDSK.EXE is
indeed stored as a file in the \WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 subdirectory.
4
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CHKDSK e
C:\WINDOWS\system32>CHKDSK
The type of the file system is FAT32.
Volume XP_FULL created 11/17/2001 12:41 PM
Volume Serial Number is C467-D4C1
Windows is verifying files and folders...
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
25,201,648 KB total disk space.
688,448 KB in 540 hidden files.
20,800 KB in 1,257 folders.
3,518,960 KB in 38,544 files.
20,973,424 KB are available.
16,384 bytes in each allocation unit.
1,575,103 total allocation units on disk.
1,310,839 allocation units available on disk.
C:\WINDOWS\system32>_
The operating system tells you it has checked this file system
(FAT32) for errors and found none. Valuable information has been provided. You
know the total disk capacity (25,201,648 KB), the remaining space (20,973,424 KB),
the total number of allocation units (1,575,103), the number of allocation units
available for use (1,310,839), and the number of bytes in each allocation unit
(16,384). Do not worry if you do not see the same numbers displayed on your
screen. These numbers are related to how the disk was formatted, the size of the
hard disk, and how much internal memory is installed in a specific computer. What
is important is what the status report is telling you. Let us look at this example, line
by line:
25,204,648 KB total disk space
This number is the entire capacity of a specific
disk.
688,488 KB in 540 hidden files
What are hidden files? The Registry files are
hidden files. Many Help files are hidden files,
as well as system and information files from
both the operating system and software
applications. The number of hidden files will
vary from disk to disk.
20,800 KB in 1,257 folders
Nearly all hard disks have subdirectories.
This number is for subdirectory entries only.
3,518,960 KB in 38,544 files
These are the files that are stored on the disk.
They are not necessarily files that you created.
User files include all program or application
files you have on a disk.
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20,973,424 KB are available
This line establishes how much room remains
on the disk in Drive C for new data or program files in bytes. A KB is 1,024 bytes. A byte
is one character. It can be the letter “b,” the
letter “c,” the number “3,” or the punctuation
mark “?,” for example. To give you a rough
idea of what a byte means, a page of a printed
novel contains about 3,000 bytes. Thus, a disk
with a total capacity of 360,000 bytes could
hold or store a maximum of about 120 pages
of a novel. A 20-MB hard disk (1 megabyte
means 1,000,000 bytes) would hold approximately 20,000,000 bytes or 6,667 pages of text;
if the average novel has about 400 pages, you
could store about 16½ novels. A 2-GB hard
drive could hold about 1,800 books! This
approximation is not entirely accurate because it does not take into account that often
information is stored in such a way as to be
compressed. However, it does give you an
idea of the disk capacity in “human terms.”
As you work with computers, you become
accustomed to thinking in bytes.
16,384 bytes in each allocation unit As discussed earlier, the smallest unit that the
OS actually reads is a cluster. A cluster is
made up of sectors. A cluster is also referred
to as an allocation unit. The number of sectors
that make up a cluster (allocation unit) vary
depending on the type of disk.
1,575,103 total allocation
units on disk
This indicates the total number of clusters
available.
1,310,839 allocation units
available on disk
This line tells you how much room is
available on the disk by cluster.
Sometimes you will see a line reporting how many bad sectors a disk may have.
Having bad sectors is not uncommon on hard disks. If you had bad sectors, the line
might read “65,536 bytes in bad sectors.” The number would, of course, vary
depending on the disk that is checked. On a 20-GB hard disk, for instance,
65,536 bytes in bad sectors is not that significant. However, if you had a smaller
hard disk, the number would be significant and you might want to determine if
your hard disk needs to be replaced. The next step cannot be done unless you have
a disk that is formatted with NTFS. If you do not, simply read the steps.
5
Key in the following: C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32>CD \ e
6
Key in the following: C:\>CHKDSK E: e
8.11
ACTIVITY: USING CHKDSK ON HARD AND FLOPPY DRIVES
C:\>CHKDSK E:
The type of the file system is NTFS.
Volume label is NTFS.
WARNING! F parameter not specified.
Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.
CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...
File verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 3)...
Index verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 3)...
Security descriptor verification completed.
4795370
105440
256
0
27826
26032
4661848
KB
KB
KB
KB
KB
KB
KB
total disk space.
in 813 files.
in 64 indexes.
in bad sectors.
in use by the system.
occupied by the log file.
available on disk.
4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
1198842 total allocation units on disk.
1165462 allocation units available on disk.
C:\>_
In order to repair a disk, you need to include a parameter, and
CHKDSK informs you of that fact. Then each stage is executed. Then, again, you see
the statistical report.
4795370 KB total disk space
This number is the entire capacity of a specific
disk.
105440 KB in 813 files
These are the files that are stored on the disk.
They are not necessarily files that you created.
User files include all program or application
files you have on a disk.
256 KB in 64 indexes
This refers to indexes, which are like
subdirectories.
0 KB in bad sectors
The report tells you that you have no bad
sectors.
27826 KB in use by the system
This is information being used by the system.
26032 KB occupied by the log file
The log file is a transaction log of disk activities. Windows XP Professional uses this file so
it can recover files if you have disk problems. It
can even repair itself if necessary.
4661848 KB available on disk
This line establishes how much room remains
on the disk.
407
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CHAPTER 8
7
ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
4096 bytes in each allocation unit
As discussed earlier, the smallest unit that the
OS actually reads is a cluster. A cluster is made
up of sectors. A cluster is also referred to as an
“allocation unit.”
1198842 total allocation
units on disk available.
This indicates the total number of clusters
1165462 allocation units
available on disk
This line tells you how much room is available
on the disk by cluster.
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
C:\>A:
A:\>_
You have changed the default drive to the A drive. The DATA disk
is in the A drive.
8
Key in the following: A:\>CHKDSK e
C:\>A:
A:\>CHKDSK
The type of the file system is FAT.
Volume DATA created 2/25/2002 10:46 AM
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Windows is verifying files and folders...
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
1,457,664
9,216
497,152
951,296
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
total disk space.
in 18 folders.
in 112 files.
available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 total allocation units on disk.
1,858 allocation units available on disk.
A:\>_
This display looks similar to the screen displayed when you used
CHKDSK on the FAT hard drive. The numbers are, of course, very different. You
have 1,457,664 bytes total disk space because this is a 1.44-MB disk. The files and
bytes available will vary based on what is on the DATA disk. If you placed another
disk in Drive A, you would get different information about files and free bytes
remaining on that particular disk.
8.13
8.12
ACTIVITY: USING THE /V PARAMETER AND USING DIR PARAMETERS
The Verbose Parameter with
the CHKDSK Command
The CHKDSK command has a very useful parameter, /V. Using /V on a FAT drive is
known as running in verbose mode. This parameter, in conjunction with the CHKDSK
command, not only gives the usual status report, but also lists every file on the disk
including hidden files. On an NTFS drive, it displays clean-up messages, if any.
An important thing to remember about parameters is that they are associated
with specific commands and perform specific tasks for those commands. The same
parameter does not do the same thing with other commands. For instance, if you
use the parameter /V with the FORMAT command, it means put a volume label on
the disk. However, when you use /V with the CHKDSK command, it displays all
the files on the disk if it is FAT and displays clean-up messages if it is NTFS.
8.13
Activity: Using the /V Parameter
and Using DIR Parameters
Note 1:
Note 2:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
When you press e in step 1, the screen display will scroll by too fast to
see. Even hitting the Z key immediately will not stop the screen.
Your files may appear in a different order.
To facilitate mouse usage, click on the Command Line icon, go to Properties, and disable QuickEdit mode.
Note 3:
Note 4:
1
Key in the following: A:\>CHKDSK /V e
\CLASS\MER.PAR
\CLASS\JUP.ABC
\CLASS\MER.ABC
\CLASS\AST.ABC
99 percent completed.
\CLASS\VEN.ABC
\CLASS\AST.PAR
\CLASS\VEN.PAR
\CLASS\JUP.FIL
\CLASS\MER.FIL
\CLASS\JUP.BUD
\CLASS\MER.BUD
\CLASS\AST.BUD
\CLASS\VEN.BUD
100 percent completed.
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
1,457,664
9,216
497,152
951,296
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
total disk space.
in 18 folders.
in 112 files.
available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 total allocation units on disk.
1,858 allocation units available on disk.
A:\>_
409
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
The output from the command you entered scrolled by so quickly
that you were unable to see that all the files on the disk were listed. You can see only
the last few files and the statistical and memory information at the end of the
display. In order to view the information returned by this command, you are going
to use an operating system feature that will be covered in the next chapter—redirection. You have, however, used this feature in previous chapters to direct the Homework Assignments to the printer. You will redirect the output of the CHKDSK /V
command to a file instead of the screen, and then use the command line editor to see
it.
2
Key in the following: A:\>CHKDSK /V > CHKDSK.TXT e
A:\>CHKDSK /V > CHKDSK.TXT
A:\>_
Nothing is displayed on the screen. You have redirected the
display to the file CHKDSK.TXT on the default drive.
3
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT CHKDSK.TXT e
You can see the output of the CHKDSK /V command that you
have redirected to the CHKDSK.TXT file.
4
Move the scroll bar at the right edge of the screen approximately halfway down
the screen, as shown in the following screen.
8.13
ACTIVITY: USING THE /V PARAMETER AND USING DIR PARAMETERS
The subdirectory names are displayed, along with all the files each
subdirectory contains. You can use this command on any FAT drive to see the files
and directories. You could, for instance, key in CHKDSK C: /V. However, since the
display on a hard disk is typically large, it is not as useful as you would like. The
DIR command has the /S parameter, which allows you to look at all your
subdirectories on any disk. Furthermore, the DIR command has the /P parameter to
pause the display, and CHKDSK does not.
5
Scroll down to the bottom of the file.
Notice that Windows found errors on this disk. Your display may
or may not report errors.
6
On the Edit menu bar, click File. Click Exit.
A:\>CHKDSK /V > CHKDSK.TXT
A:\>EDIT CHKDSK.TXT
A:\>_
411
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
You have closed the command line editor.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /S e
Directory of A:\3PLANETS\JUPITER
02/25/2002
02/25/2002
05/07/2002
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12:34 PM
<DIR>
12:34 PM
<DIR>
07:41 AM
07:41 AM
11:33 AM
03:42 PM
03:42 PM
5 File(s)
.
..
190 JUPITER.NEW
190 JUP.BUD
152 JUP.OLD
190 JUP.99
190 JUPITER.TXT
912 bytes
Directory of A:\ASTRO
04/19/2002
04/19/2002
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
03:34 PM
<DIR>
03:34 PM
<DIR>
01:46 PM
11:33 AM
01:46 PM
11:37 AM
11:24 AM
02:43 PM
01:46 PM
01:46 PM
04:51 PM
01:46 PM
06:40 PM
11 File(s)
Total Files Listed:
113 File(s)
54 Dir(s)
.
..
148 ASTRO.NEW
152 GALAXY.NEW
148 ASTRO.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
529 TITAN.TXT
148 AST.TST
148 AST.99
137 AST.BUD
148 ASTROLGY.FIL
188 ZODIAC.FIL
2,193 bytes
467,283 bytes
946,688 bytes free
A:\>_
(This graphic represents the end portion of the scrolling display.)
This parameter allows you to view the files in all your directories. If you added the
/P parameter, you would pause the display. You can also view specific files in all
subdirectories.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR *.NEW /S e
A:\>DIR *.NEW /S
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
02:47 PM
1 File(s)
86 BONJOUR.NEW
86 bytes
Directory of A:\3PLANETS\MERCURY
10/31/2001
01:08 PM
1 File(s)
406 MERCURY.NEW
406 bytes
8.13
ACTIVITY: USING THE /V PARAMETER AND USING DIR PARAMETERS
Directory of A:\3PLANETS\JUPITER
05/07/2002
07:41 AM
1 File(s)
190 JUPITER.NEW
190 bytes
Directory of A:\ASTRO
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
01:46 PM
11:33 AM
2 File(s)
Total Files Listed:
5 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
148 ASTRO.NEW
152 GALAXY.NEW
300 bytes
982 bytes
946,688 bytes free
A:\>_
This command allows you to be even more specific and locate a
file anywhere on the disk by searching all the subdirectories. Thus, DIR /S supplants CHKDSK /V in its ability to show every file on the disk in every
subdirectory.
The CHKDSK /V command can also show any hidden files, but the parameters
in the DIR command are better for that purpose. Using the /A parameter (attribute)
with the attribute you wish, you can determine what you will see. You can use D
(directories), R (read-only files), H (hidden files), S (system files), and A (files ready
to archive). If you use the - sign before an attribute, you can select all the files except
those that have that attribute.
9
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /AD e
A:\>DIR /AD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
03/25/2002
12/06/2001
04/17/2002
02/25/2002
04/19/2002
01:38 PM
<DIR>
07:29 PM
<DIR>
02:11 PM
<DIR>
09:24 AM
<DIR>
01:07 PM
<DIR>
11:04 AM
<DIR>
03:34 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
7 Dir(s)
CLASS
WORK
TRIP
MEDIA
GAMES
3PLANETS
ASTRO
0 bytes
946,688 bytes free
A:\>_
You selected the /A parameter and used the D attribute for
directories to control the output of the DIR command. Remember, the order in
which your directories and files are displayed may vary.
413
414
CHAPTER 8
8.14
ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
Using CHKDSK to Repair Disk Problems
On a FAT disk, the file allocation table (FAT) and the directory work in conjunction.
Every file has an entry in the directory table. The file entry in the directory table
points to the starting cluster in the FAT. If the file is longer than one cluster, which it
usually is, the file allocation table has a pointer that leads it to the next cluster, then
the next cluster, and so on. These pointers chain all the data together in a file. If the
chain is broken (i.e., there is a lost pointer), the disk ends up with lost clusters,
which means that these clusters are marked as used in the FAT and not available for
new data. Look at Figure 8.6; clusters 3, 4, and 6 are a chain, but the FAT does not
know to which file this chain belongs. There is no entry in the root directory. Hence,
these are lost clusters.
Root Directory Table
File
File
Name
Extension
File Allocation Table
Date
Time
Other
Starting
Cluster
Info
Cluster
Number
Status
Number
MY
FIL
5-7-99
11:23a
1
1
in use
HIS
DOC
5-7-99
11:50a
5
2
in use
3
3
4
4
6
5
in use
6
end
Clusters 3, 4, and 6 have data, are linked together,
but have no file entry in the directory table.
Figure 8.6—Lost Clusters
Since these lost clusters belong to no specific file, they cannot be retrieved. The
data becomes useless, yet the operating system cannot write other data to these lost
clusters. Thus, you lose space on the disk. This phenomenon occurs for a variety of
reasons, the most common being a user who does not exit a program properly. If
you simply turn off the computer, you are interrupting the shut-down process of the
application program. Often, when you interrupt this process, the data will not be
properly written to the disk. Other times power failures or power surges are the
cause. Not exiting an application properly can be damaging to the operating system
and can leave lost clusters on the hard disk.
On an NTFS disk, CHKDSK, in Stage 2, looks for orphaned files. An orphaned
file is one that has an entry in the MFT but is not listed in any directory. It is similar
to a lost cluster in the FAT file system.
If one of these events happens, you may not be able to boot back into Windows.
You would then boot with your Windows boot disks and use your ASR (Automated
System Recovery Disk) to try to repair the damage or use System Restore. When
Windows XP Professional is running, you cannot run CHKDSK with the /F parameter and attempt to repair disk errors. When you execute the CHKDSK /F command, you will get a message at the beginning of the CHKDSK display similar to
this:
8.14
USING CHKDSK TO REPAIR DISK PROBLEMS
C:\>CHKDSK /F
The type of the file system is FAT32.
Cannot lock current drive.
Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another
process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be
checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)
The message “Cannot lock the current drive” means the current drive is the
default drive. However, even switching to another drive before running the command will not work.
E:\>CHKDSK C: /F
The type of the file system is FAT32.
Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another
process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be
checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N) N
“Cannot lock the current drive” does not appear, but the rest of the message is
the same. The message means that you can schedule CHKDSK with the /F parameter to run when your computer starts up the next time. The utility will run before
most of the system loads, eliminating the problem of other processes running. You
can, however, use the /F and /R parameters with CHKDSK on a floppy disk. If you
have multiple hard drives, you can run CHKDSK on a hard drive that is not the
default drive, and that is not currently in use. If you did use it on an active partition,
it may report erroneous error messages since it cannot lock the drive. The /F is used
to repair logical errors, and the /R is used to locate bad sectors and recover readable
information. Using /R implies /F.
Be careful when running this utility program. First, you should always regularly
back up your data files in case the “fix” behaves improperly. You could lose data.
Actually, you should be backing up your hard disk on a regular basis. Even after
backing up, it may be advisable to “schedule” CHKDSK /F to run when the system
next boots. It is faster this way, as the system is not loaded. Secondly, if you use /F
on a large disk or on a disk with a very large number of files (in the millions),
CHKDSK can take a very, very long time (even days) to complete. During this time,
you will not have access to the drive you are repairing since CHKDSK does not give
up control of the disk until it is finished executing. If the drive (system volume) is
being checked during the startup process, your computer will not be available to
you until the CHKDSK process is complete.
Another type of error that occurs infrequently is cross-linked files. Cross-linked
files usually occur on FAT disks. Cross-linked files are two files that claim the same
cluster in the FAT.
415
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
Root Directory Table
File
File
Name
Extension
File Allocation Table
Date
Time
Other
Starting
Cluster
Info
Cluster
Number
Status
Number
MY
FIL
4-15-94
11:23
1
1
MY.FIL
HIS
FIL
4-15-94
11:23
3
2
MY.FIL
3
HIS.FIL
4
MY.FIL
HIS.FIL
5
HIS FIL
6
MY.FIL
Figure 8.7—Cross-linked Files
In Figure 8.7, MY.FIL thinks it owns clusters 1, 2, 4, and 6. HIS.FIL thinks it owns
clusters 3, 4, and 5. Thus, both MY.FIL and HIS.FIL think that cluster 4 is part of
their chain. If you edit MY.FIL, the file will contain its own data as well as some part
of HIS.FIL. Even worse, if you delete MY.FIL, you will be deleting part of the
HIS.FIL data. Usually, to recover data from cross-linked files, you copy each file to a
new location so they are no longer cross-linked. One of the files is usually bad, but
at least you have one file that is good.
8.15
Activity: Using CHKDSK
to Repair Disk Problems
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:>CHKDSK /R e
A:\>CHKDSK /R
The type of the file system is FAT.
Cannot lock current drive.
A:\>_
The A drive is the default drive, so you received the message
“Cannot lock current drive.” Windows XP Professional needs total access to the
disk.
2
Key in the following: A:\>CD /D C:\ e
3
Key in the following: C:\>CHKDSK A: /R e
A:\>CD /D C:\:
C:\>CHKDSK A: /R
The type of the file system is FAT.
Volume DATA created 2/25/2002 10:46 AM
8.15
ACTIVITY: USING CHKDSK TO REPAIR DISK PROBLEMS
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Windows is verifying files and folders...
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows is verifying free space...
Free space verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
1,457,664
9,216
501,760
946,688
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
total disk space.
in 18 folders.
in 113 files.
available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 total allocation units on disk.
1,849 allocation units available on disk.
C:\>_
You needed to change drives so that CHKDSK could lock Drive A.
The status reports that there is “no problem” with this drive. Again, if you do not
have an NTFS drive (or one with errors), you cannot do the next steps. However,
read the steps.
4
Key in the following: C:\>CHKDSK E: e
C:\>CHKDSK E:
The type of the file system is NTFS.
Volume label is NTFS.
WARNING! F parameter not specified.
Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.
CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...
File verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 3)...
Index verification completed.
CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 3)...
Security descriptor verification completed.
4795370
105428
256
0
27826
26032
4661860
KB
KB
KB
KB
KB
KB
KB
total disk space.
in 813 files.
in 64 indexes.
in bad sectors.
in use by the system.
occupied by the log file.
available on disk.
4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
1198842 total allocation units on disk.
1165465 allocation units available on disk.
C:\>_
If Windows had found errors on this disk, it would have recommended running CHKDSK with the /F parameter. Windows would then make the
necessary corrections to the file system. If you had errors on a FAT disk, Windows
XP Professional, would ask if you wanted to convert the lost files to fragments. You
would see the following error message:
417
418
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
Convert lost chains to files (Y/N?)
If you answered yes, then Windows would place those file fragments in files
labeled FILE0000.CHK, FILE0001.CHK, FILE0002.CHK, and so on, depending on
how many chains were found. If you opened the file with a program like Notepad,
you would likely see that the file was a garbage file, as shown in Figure 8.8.
Figure 8.8—A Lost Cluster Opened in Notepad
Normally those files are useless and can be safely deleted, as well as any
FOUND directories.
8.16
Checking Disks with System Tools
Windows XP Professional provides another way to check a disk. You may use the
GUI and use System Tools. The three system tools that are provided in the GUI are
Error-checking (CHKDSK), Backup, and Defragmentation.
8.17
Note:
1
Activity: Checking Disks
with System Tools
The DATA disk is in the A drive.
Key in the following: C:\>EXIT e
8.17
ACTIVITY: CHECKING DISKS WITH SYSTEM TOOLS
You have terminated the command line session and returned to
the Windows XP Professional “GUI” screen. Your screen display may be different
depending on how Windows XP was installed.
2
Open My Computer (either from the Start menu, or the Desktop Icon, depending on your system configuration.)
3
Right-click on the A drive icon.
You have opened the shortcut menu for the A drive.
4
Click Properties. Click the Tools tab.
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
You have displayed the Tools dialog box, showing you three
options. You can check the disk for errors, back it up, or defragment it.
Defragmenting will eliminate noncontiguous files from a hard disk. In Windows
2000 and Windows XP, floppy disks can not be defragmented. Error-checking will
perform in a similar manner to CHKDSK.
5
Click the Check Now button.
You are give two options—to fix the errors if any are found and to
try and fix any bad sectors discovered during the check. This second option is very
time-consuming. In general, if there are bad sectors on a floppy disk, it is best to
copy the files to another disk and throw the disk with bad sectors away. Floppy
disks are very inexpensive, and data is very valuable.
6
Click Automatically fix file system errors.
7
Click Start.
The disk checking begins. Phase 1 is checking for errors. Scanning
for and attempting the recovery of bad sectors is Phase 2, which was not requested.
The completion dialog box appears when the check is complete.
No errors were found, and the check is complete. These options are available on
the property sheet for the hard drive as well, but if you attempt to check the hard
drive, you will receive the following message:
8.18
CONTIGUOUS AND NONCONTIGUOUS FILES
Just as at the command line, the checks cannot be performed while other processes are active. To check the hard drive, you would have to click Yes and shut
down and restart your computer.
8
Close all open windows.
8.18
Contiguous and Noncontiguous Files
“Contiguous” means being in contact with or touching. What does this have to do
with files? As far as the operating system is concerned, data is a string of bytes that
it keeps track of by grouping the data into a file. In order to manage storing and
retrieving files, a disk is divided into numbered blocks called “sectors.” Sectors are
then grouped into clusters. A cluster is the smallest unit that the operating system
deals with, and it is always a set of contiguous sectors. Clusters on a 1.44-MB floppy
disk consist of one 512-byte sector. The number of sectors that make up a cluster on
a hard disk varies depending on the size of the hard disk and the FAT being used.
On a 2-GB hard disk, a sector consists of 32,768 bytes. Most often, a data file will
take up more space on a disk than one cluster. Thus, the operating system has to
keep track of the location of all the parts of the file that are on the disk. It does so by
means of the directory and the FAT. If you are using NTFS, then it tracks the files by
means of the MFT.
The original release of Windows 95 used the standard FAT—a 16-bit version. A
32-bit FAT was introduced with release B of Windows 95. From that version through
Millennium, you have the choice of using the standard FAT or the 32-bit version,
referred to as FAT32. Beginning with Windows 2000, NTFS (New Technology File
System) is supported, which was previously supported only by Windows NT. This
file system allows local security. With NTFS, access to areas of the partition can be
blocked to some users, and allowed for others. This is useful in an environment
where more than one user has sensitive files stored on the same computer. It also
can block access to the operating system files. The decision on which file system to
use is made when the disk volume is originally partitioned. All floppy drives are
FAT12.
The FAT keeps a record of the cluster numbers each file occupies. As the operating system begins to write files on a new disk, it makes an entry in the disk’s
directory for that file and updates the FAT with the cluster numbers used to store
that file. Data is written to the disk based on the next empty cluster. Files being
written to a disk are written in adjacent clusters. The operating system wants all the
pieces of file information to be next to each other and tries to write to adjacent
clusters whenever possible. It is easier to retrieve or store information when it is
together. When this occurs, the file is considered contiguous. For example, if you
began writing a letter to your United States senator, it would be stored on your disk
in the manner shown in Figure 8.9.
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
11
10
9
8
sena
tor
se
na
to
r
CHAPTER 8
12 1
7 6
tor
2
na
3 se
4
5
Figure 8.9—One File in Clusters
12 1
na
t
se
11
10
or
sena
tor
The clusters with nothing in them are simply empty spaces on the disk. If you
now decide to write a letter to your mother, this new file is written to the next group
of adjacent clusters, which would begin with cluster 4 as shown in Figure 8.10.
2
3
9
4
8
5
moth
er
r
he
ot
m
er
moth
7 6
tor
sena
Figure 8.10—Contiguous Files in Clusters
11
10
sena
tor
se
na
to
r
These two files, SENATOR and MOTHER, are contiguous. Each part of each file
follows on the disk. Now you decide to add a comment to your senator letter,
making the SENATOR file bigger. When the operating system goes to write the file
to the disk, the FAT looks for the next empty clusters, which are clusters 7 and 8. The
FAT would appear as shown in Figure 8.11.
12 1
2
3
9
4
tor
sena
to
7 6
5
tor
sena
moth
er
r
he
ot
m
er
moth
r
8
se
na
422
Figure 8.11—Noncontiguous Files in Clusters
The parts of the file named SENATOR are separated, making this file noncontiguous, or fragmented. The process becomes more complicated as you add and delete
files. For example, if you delete the file SENATOR, the FAT marks clusters 1, 2, 3, 7,
and 8 as available even though the data actually remains on the disk. You then
decide to develop a PHONE file, as shown in Figure 8.12.
ACTIVITY: USING CHKDSK TO SEE IF FILES ARE CONTIGUOUS
11
10
2
3
9
4
8
tor
at
or
7 6
sena
5
tor
sena
moth
er
r
he
ot
m
er
moth
se
n
on
ph
12 1
e
phon
e
8.19
Figure 8.12—Adding a File
phon
e
12 1
3
9
4
joe
m
ar
y
8
7 6
e
on
joe
2
10
5
moth
er
r
he
ot
m
er
moth
mary
11
ph
r
he
ot
m
phon
e
Next, you decide to write a letter to your friend Joe, to write a letter to your
friend Mary, to add to the PHONE file, and to add to the letter to your mother. The
disk would look like Figure 8.13.
Figure 8.13—Adding More Files
The parts of these files are broken up and are no longer stored in adjacent clusters. They are now known as noncontiguous or fragmented files. If the disk is
comprised of noncontiguous files, it can be called a fragmented disk. It will take
longer to read noncontiguous files because the read/write heads must move around
the disk to find all the parts of a file. You can see if files are contiguous or noncontiguous by using a parameter with the CHKDSK command, but only on FAT volumes.
8.19
Activity: Using CHKDSK to
See If Files Are Contiguous
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. You are shelled out to the Command Line.
A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>CHKDSK BORN.TXT e
A:\>CHKDSK BORN.TXT
The type of the file system is FAT.
Volume DATA created 2/25/2002 10:46 AM
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Windows is verifying files and folders...
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
1,457,664 bytes total disk space.
9,216 bytes in 18 folders.
501,760 bytes in 113 files.
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946,688 bytes available on disk.
512
2,847
1,849
All specified
bytes in each allocation unit.
total allocation units on disk.
allocation units available on disk.
files are contiguous.
A:\>_
The screen display supplies all the statistical information about
the DATA disk and computer memory. In addition, the last line states, “All specified
file(s) are contiguous.” By adding the parameter of the file name BORN.TXT after
the CHKDSK command, you asked not only to check the disk but also to look at the
file BORN.TXT to see if all the parts of this file are next to one another on the DATA
disk. Are they contiguous? The message indicates that they are.
2
Key in the following: A:\>CHKDSK *.TXT e
A:\>CHKDSK *.TXT
The type of the file system is FAT.
Volume DATA created 2/25/2002 10:46 AM
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Windows is verifying files and folders...
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
1,457,664
9,216
501,760
946,688
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
total disk space.
in 18 folders.
in 113 files.
available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 total allocation units on disk.
1,849 allocation units available on disk.
\CHKDSK.TXT contains 2 non-contiguous blocks.
A:\>_
CHKDSK not only gave you the usual statistical information but
also checked to see if all the files in the root directory that have .TXT as an extension
are contiguous. By using wildcards, you can check a group of files with a common
denominator. In this case, the common denominator is the file extension .TXT. The
message on the screen verifies that one file, CHKDSK.TXT from all the files with
the extension .TXT, has two noncontiguous blocks.
3
Key in the following: A:\>CHKDSK *.* e
A:\>CHKDSK *.*
The type of the file system is FAT.
Volume DATA created 2/25/2002 10:46 AM
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Windows is verifying files and folders...
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
8.19
1,457,664
9,216
501,760
946,688
ACTIVITY: USING CHKDSK TO SEE IF FILES ARE CONTIGUOUS
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
total disk space.
in 18 folders.
in 113 files.
available on disk.
512 bytes in each allocation unit.
2,847 total allocation units on disk.
1,849 allocation units available on disk.
\CHKDSK.TXT contains 2 non-contiguous blocks.
A:\> _
The screen display shows only the same noncontiguous file. If you
had no fragmented files, you would have received the message, “All specified files
are contiguous.” The CHKDSK command, followed by star dot star (*.*), checked
every file in the root directory on the DATA disk to see if all the files were contiguous. The *.* represents all files in the root directory.
4
Key in the following: A:\>CHKDSK CLASS\*.* e
A:\>CHKDSK CLASS\*.*
The type of the file system is FAT.
Volume DATA created 2/25/2002 10:46 AM
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Windows is verifying files and folders...
File and folder verification is complete.
Windows has checked the file system and found no problems.
1,457,664
9,216
501,760
946,688
512
2,847
1,849
All specified
bytes
bytes
bytes
bytes
total disk space.
in 18 folders.
in 113 files.
available on disk.
bytes in each allocation unit.
total allocation units on disk.
allocation units available on disk.
files are contiguous.
A:\>_
You are checking to see if all the files in the subdirectory CLASS
are contiguous. In this case, they are.
What difference does it make if files are contiguous or not? Only to the extent
that noncontiguous files or a fragmented disk can slow performance. In other
words, if a file is contiguous, all of its parts can be found quickly, minimizing the
amount of time the heads need to read and write to the disk. If files are noncontiguous, the operating system has to look for all the parts of the file, causing the read/
write heads to fly about the disk. The longer the disk is used, the more fragmented it
becomes, slowing its performance. However, performance on a floppy disk is
usually not that important because most of the time you are working on the hard
disk.
You do notice a big decline in performance on a hard disk system. The solution
most hard disk users opt for is to use the disk defragmenter program. This program
is listed as Disk Defragmenter on the Start menu, under Programs, under Accesso-
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ries, under System Tools. This program, referred to generically as a disk optimization program, rearranges the storage on the hard disk so that each file is stored in
sequentially numbered clusters. Before using disk optimization, the disk must be
free of errors.
8.20
Defragmenting Your Hard Disk
To make your programs run faster and better, you need to perform disk maintenance. One way to maintain your disk is to run the Defragmenter program from the
Tools menu on the disks drive property sheet. The other is to run it from the Start
Menu, choose All Programs, choose Accessories, choose System Tools, and choose
Disk Defragmenter. Either way, it will rearrange files and unused space on your
hard disk. Although the Windows operating system allows you to run Disk
Defragmenter without closing all your programs, it is better, faster, and safer to
close any open programs you have running, including any screen savers or virusprotection programs. As stated previously, it is no longer possible to defragment
your floppy disk.
8.21
Note:
Activity: Using Disk Defragmenter
Be sure to check with your lab administrator before completing the following hard disk defragmenting exercise.
1
Click Start.
2
Point to All Programs.
3
Point to Accessories.
4
Point to System Tools.
You opened the System Tools menu. You will choose Disk
Defragmenter.
8.21
5
ACTIVITY: USING DISK DEFRAGMENTER
Click Disk Defragmenter.
Although this computer has an A drive, it is not listed in the Disk
Defragmenter options box. Attempting to defragment the A drive from its property
sheet menu would give the following results:
6
Highlight your hard drive C and click Analyze.
You will first see a graphical display of your disk, and then a
dialog box where you can choose to defragment or to view the analysis report.
7
Click View Report.
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You can see the information on your hard drive. You can scroll up
and down in the Volume information window and the Most fragmented files
window, or you can click the Save As button and save the report for printing or
examination at a later time. You will also get a recommendation to defragment or
not to defragment. It is good practice to defragment your hard drive regularly, as it
improves the performance of your system.
7
Click Close.
8
Close all open windows.
Chapter Summary
1. All disks should be organized. You should not place all your programs and data
in the root directory.
2. The root directory of a hard disk holds only 512 files if you are using FAT16.
3. Many users inefficiently organize their disk by application programs. This often
leads to a repetition of subdirectory names, forcing users to remember where
they placed their files and key in long path names. The operating system must
search every subdirectory when accessing a file. It is difficult to add and delete
application programs and data files in this scheme.
4. One way to organize a hard disk is by project.
5. Some guidelines to organizing a disk:
a. The root directory is a map to the rest of the disk.
b. Plan the organization before installing software.
c. Develop and use a naming convention for files and directories.
d. Create as many directories and subdirectores as you need before copying
files into them.
e. Remember that it is safe to work with data files but dangerous to move or
rename program files.
f. Subdirectories should be shallow and wide.
g. Do not place data files in program subdirectories.
h. It is better to have small subdirectories with only a few files.
i. Keep subdirectory names short and descriptive.
j. Create a separate subdirectory for batch files and utility programs.
k. Learn how the install programs work before you install software.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
l. Learn how each application program works.
m. Analyze the way you work.
If a disk is unorganized, you can organize it by planning it, creating the new
organizational scheme and any necessary subdirectories, copying files to the
new subdirectories, and deleting those files from the old subdirectories.
The XCOPY command allows you to copy files and the subdirectories beneath
them. Among the options available with XCOPY, you may choose:
a. to copy subdirectories and the files in them (/S).
b. to keep the read-only attribute (/R).
c. to copy hidden files (/H).
d. to create an empty subdirectory (/E).
e. to keep file attributes (/K)
The command line editor is a full-screen editor that allows you to modify text
files. It is a menu-driven program.
MOVE is used to move files. Although it can rename directories, it is better to
use the REN command to rename objects and the MOVE command to move
these objects. You must be cautious when you use MOVE to ensure you are
performing the task that you wish.
Utility programs include the ones that come with the operating system, such as
the external command MOVE.
CHKDSK will search your drives for errors and give you a statistical report on
the integrity of your drives.
You can use CHKDSK to check and repair FAT, FAT32, and NTFS drives but it
must not be the default drive.
You must not use CHKDSK /F while on a network drive or on any substituted
drives or the default drive.
Disk Defragmenter is a program used to optimize performance of a disk by
rewriting files so the clusters are contiguous. When files are contiguous, computer performance is enhanced.
You can not defragment a floppy disk in Windows XP Professional.
Key Terms
chain
cross-linked files
disk optimization
fragmented file
lost cluster
naming convention
utility program
Discussion Questions
1. Why would you want to organize a hard disk?
2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of organizing a hard disk by
application program rather than by project?
3. Why would you not want to place data files in a program subdirectory?
4. List five criteria that can be used for organizing a hard disk and explain the
rationale for each.
5. What are two major considerations for any disk organizational scheme?
6. What are some of the drawbacks of using the COPY command for organizing
your disk?
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7. Why is moving program files and renaming program directories not as safe as
moving data files and renaming data file directories?
8. What steps would you take to move a directory?
9. Why would you want to own utility programs that do not come with the operating system?
10. What is the function and purpose of the CHKDSK command?
11. CHKDSK informs you of two types of errors. Explain.
12. What is a lost cluster? A cross-linked file? What impact does either of these have
on available disk space?
13. Give the syntax for CHKDSK and explain two parameters when used with FAT
volumes. With NTFS volumes.
14. What is verbose mode? Explain the use of the /V parameter with the CHKDSK
command with a FAT file system and an NTFS file system.
15. Compare and contrast contiguous files with noncontiguous (fragmented) files.
16. Why would you use the parameter of the file name with the CHKDSK command?
17. What is the purpose and function of the /F parameter when it is used with the
CHKDSK command, and under what circumstances would you use it?
18. Explain the function and purpose of disk-optimization programs.
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true, and the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. The number of files that can be stored in the root of a hard drive
is unlimited if the file system is FAT16.
T
F
2. It is a good idea to have your data files and program files in the
same subdirectory so you can keep track of your files easily.
T
F
3. To repair FAT drives, you can use CHKDSK.
T
F
4. The operating system writes files to disk based on the next empty
cluster.
T
F
5. To optimize a disk, you should use CHKDSK.
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. To change the name of a subdirectory, you can use the _______________ command or the _______________ command.
7. Two commands that can help you organize your disk are _______________ and
_______________.
8. When you use the MOVE *.* command, subdirectories contained in the default
directory _______________ (are or are not) moved.
9. When you use the CHKDSK command, the parameter that will list every file on
the disk, including hidden files, is the _______________ parameter if the disk is
using the FAT16 or FAT32 file system.
10. To solve the problem of having noncontiguous files on a hard disk, use
_______________.
WRITING COMMANDS
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. A good rule of thumb when organizing a hard disk is
____
a. to create compact and deep subdirectories rather than shallow and
wide ones.
b. to place data files in the same subdirectories with their associated
program files.
c. to use the root directory as a map to the rest of the disk.
d. to have no files, only subdirectories, in the root directory.
12.
When
organizing a hard disk, XCOPY is ________ to use than COPY.
____
a. faster
b. slower
c. neither faster nor slower
d. less reliable
13. CHKDSK will not
____
a. tell how many files are on a floppy disk.
b. tell whether or not a floppy disk has hidden files.
c. remove damaged files from a floppy disk.
d. tell how much room is left on a floppy disk.
14.
A
noncontiguous file is one that
____
a. occupies more than one cluster.
b. occupies nonconsecutive clusters.
c. has a directory entry table that is missing certain numbers.
d. contains a document that hasn’t been finished.
15. To help your disk perform quickly and reliably, you should
____
a. rename the directories that hold program files after they have been
installed, so that they are all in the same directory.
b. use deep subdirectories.
c. run Disk Defragmenter.
d. use long file names.
Writing Commands
Write the correct steps or commands to perform the required action as if you were at
the computer. The prompt will indicate the default drive and directory. If there is no
prompt indicated, assume you are at the desktop and not in the Command Line
window.
16. You need statistical information about the disk in Drive A.
C:\WINDOWS>
17. You want to see if the file called GALAXY.NEW in the 3PLANETS directory on
the disk in Drive A is contiguous.
C:\WINDOWS>
18. You want to fix lost clusters and cross-linked files on the disk in Drive A.
C:\WINDOWS>
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19. You want to display all the files on the disk in Drive A. (Do not use the DIR
command.)
C:\>
20. You want to locate bad sectors and recover any readable information on
Drive E.
C:\>
Homework Assignments
Note 1: Place the HOMEWORK disk in Drive A. Be sure to work on the
HOMEWORK disk, not the DATA disk.
Note 2: The homework problems will assume that Drive C is the hard disk and
the HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. If you are using another drive,
such as floppy Drive B or hard Drive D, be sure and substitute that
drive letter when reading the questions and answers.
Note 3: All subdirectories that are created will be under the root directory
unless otherwise specified.
Problem Set 1
Problem A
A-a
On the HOMEWORK disk, under the subdirectory called HISTORY, create a
subdirectory called ROMAN.
A-b
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, use the XCOPY
command with the relative path to copy all the files in the root directory that
begin with W to the subdirectory called ROMAN that you just created.
____
1. Which command did you use?
a. XCOPY W*.* HISTORY
b. XCOPY W*.* HISTORY\ROMAN
c. XCOPY W*.* ROMAN\HISTORY
d. XCOPY W*.* ROMAN
____
2. What message(s) was/were displayed on the screen?
a. Reading source file(s).
b. Copying source file(s).
c. 3 File(s) copied
d. none of the above
____
3. Are there any files that begin with W in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk?
a. yes
b. no
A-c
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, move all the
files that begin with W to the subdirectory called ROMAN you created above.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
____
A-d
____
4. Which command did you use?
a. MOVE W*.* HISTORY\ROMAN
b. MOVE W*.* ROMAN\HISTORY
c. MOVE W*.* ROMAN
d. none of the above
Take the necessary steps to complete the move.
5. Are there any files that begin with W in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk?
a. yes
b. no
Problem B
B-a
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, under the
subdirectory called PHONE create a subdirectory called FILES.
B-b
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, move all the
files in the root directory that begin with F to the subdirectory called
PHONE\FILES that you just created.
____
B-c
____
6. What items beginning with F remain in the root directory?
a. the FILES and FIRST subdirectories
b. nothing is remaining that begins with F
c. the FEB.99 and FEB.TRP files
d. FILES, FIRST, FEB.99, and FEB.TRP
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, move all the
files in the root directory that have the file extension of .FIL to the
PHONE\FILES subdirectory.
7. How many files were moved?
a. one
b. four
c. six
d. eight
Problem C
Note:
C-a
____
The root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default.
Copy from the WUGXP directory the LEVEL-1, LEVEL-2, and LEVEL-3
subdirectories and all the files in those directories to the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk. There are no empty directories. Maintain the hierarchical
structure.
8. Which of the following commands did you use?
a. XCOPY C:\WUGXP\LEVEL-1\*.* LEVEL-1
b. XCOPY C:\WUGXP\LEVEL-1\*.* /O
c. XCOPY C:\WUGXP\LEVEL-1 LEVEL-1 /S
d. XCOPY C:\WUGXP\LEVEL-1\*.* LEVEL-1 /D
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____
C-b
ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
9. What is the first message displayed?
a. Reading source file(s) . . . .
b. Does LEVEL-1 specify a file name or directory name on the target (F =
file, D = directory)?
c. LEVEL-1 directory being created.
d. no message was displayed
Complete the command. Then, with the root directory of the HOMEWORK
disk as the default, use Edit to create a new file called PLANET.RED. The
contents of the file will be as follows:
This is a new red file.
Mars is called the red planet.
I wonder who painted it?
C-c
Make a directory called TRAVEL on the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
C-d
Copy all the files from the WUGXP directory ending with the extension .RED
to the TRAVEL subdirectory on the HOMEWORK disk.
C-e
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, move the
PLANET.RED file to the TRAVEL subdirectory on the HOMEWORK disk.
C-f
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, use Edit to
alter and save the PLANET.RED file with the following text added to the
current content:
Maybe the red comes from rust.
Maybe the red comes from Rubies!
If it comes from Rubies, I want to go there!
C-g
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, use Edit to
create a new file in the TRAVEL directory called ANSWERS.RED. The
contents should read:
How disappointing! The red of Mars is caused by rust,
called iron oxide. Rubies would have been more fun!
____
10. How many files are on the root of the HOMEWORK disk with the file
extension of .RED?
a. one
b. three
c. five
d. zero
____
11. How many files are in the TRAVEL subdirectory with the file extension of
.RED?
a. one
b. three
c. five
d. zero
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
C-h
With the root of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, rename the file called
ANSWERS.RED to WHY-MARS.RED in the TRAVEL subdirectory.
C-i
With the root of the HOMEWORK disk as the default, copy all the files from
the TRAVEL directory to the BOOKS subdirectory.
____
12. What is the total number of files with the extension .RED on the HOMEWORK disk?
a. 2
b. 4
c. 8
d. 10
____
13. What command did you use to answer question 12?
a. CHKDSK A:
b. DIR *.RED
c. DIR *.RED /S
d. DIR *.RED TRAVEL BOOKS
Problem Set II
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
Before proceeding with these assignments, check with your lab instructor
to see if there are any special procedures you should follow.
The HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive
and the default directory. All work will occur on the HOMEWORK disk.
NAME.BAT, MARK.FIL, GETYN.COM, GO.BAT, and NAME.FIL need to
be present in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk before proceeding
with these problems. In steps 1 and 2, you will move the files MARK.FIL
and NAME.FIL that were moved from the PHONE\FILES directory back
to the root directory. If these files are not there, you can copy them from the
WUGXP directory.
All files with the .HW extension must be created in the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk.
1
Key in the following: A:\>MOVE PHONE\FILES\MARK.FIL e
2
Key in the following: A:\>MOVE PHONE\FILES\NAME.FIL e
3
Use the editor to edit NAME.FIL.
4
Change Chapter 7 to Chapter 8.
5
Change the date to the current date.
You have updated NAME.FIL.
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To Create 1.HW
Locate all of the files ending with .RED on the HOMEWORK disk and place the
results of the command in a file called 1.HW.
To Create 2.HW
1
Copy only the files with the .TXT extension that were created on or after 5-31-00
in the WUGXP subdirectory to the root of the HOMEWORK disk (overwrite if
necessary).
2
Locate only the files in the root of the HOMEWORK disk that have the extension
.TXT. Place the names of the files in a file called 2.HW.
TO CREATE 3.HW
1
Copy all the files that have the extension .RED from the BOOKS subdirectory to
the root of the HOMEWORK disk.
2
Edit the file PLANET.RED in the TRAVEL directory. Remove the last three lines,
add two blank lines (press e twice) and save the file.
3
Display the contents (not the file name) of the PLANET.RED file you just edited
to a file called 3.HW.
4
From the root of the A drive, Key in the following:
TYPE A:\PLANET.RED >> 3.HW e
To Create 4.HW
Locate all the files that have the extension .TXT on the HOMEWORK disk and
place the results of the command in a file called 4.HW.
To CREATE 5.HW
In the root directory, see if the files that have the .TRP file extension are contiguous and place results of the command in a file called 5.HW.
To Print Your Homework
1
Be sure the printer is on and ready to accept print jobs from your computer.
2
Key in the following (be very careful to make no typing errors):
GO NAME.FIL 1.HW 2.HW 3.HW 4.HW 5.HW e
If the files you requested, 1.HW, 2.HW, etc., do not exist in the
default directory, you will see the following message on the screen:
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
File Not Found
The system cannot find the file specified.
Is there a message that says “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
The operating system is telling you that the file cannot be found. If you see this
screen, press Y to see what could be wrong, and repeat the print procedure after you
have corrected the problem.
If the default directory contains the specified files, the following message will
appear on the screen:
Is there a message that say “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
You will need to press N once for each file you are printing.
3
Follow the messages on the screen until the Notepad program opens with a
screen similar to the following:
All the requested files have been found and placed in a Notepad
document. Your homework is now ready to print.
4
On the Notepad menu bar, click File. Click Print.
5
Click the Print button.
6
In the Notepad window, click File. Click Exit.
The following will appear on the Command Prompt screen:
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ORGANIZING AND MANAGING YOUR HARD DISK
You are about to delete any file with the .HW extension.
Before you delete your homework files, check your hard copy or
print out.
If your homework printout is correct, press Y to delete the
files.
If your homework printout is incorrect, press N.
Pressing N will prevent your homework files from being deleted.
You can then begin again.
At this point, look at your printout. If it is correct, you can press Y to delete the
homework files for this chapter. If your printout is incorrect, you can press N. That
will preserve your homework and you will need to redo only the problem that was
incorrect, not all the homework assignments.
7
Press Y e
You have returned to the default prompt.
8
Close the Command Line session.
9
Execute the shut-down procedure.
Problem Set III—Brief Essay
1. Plan and organize the HOMEWORK disk on paper only. Write a brief explanation
to justify your organizational scheme.
2. One way to organize a hard disk is by project. Another way to organize it is by
program. Which way do you prefer? What advantages/disadvantages do you
see to each method? Explain your answer.
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter, you will be able to:
1. List the standard input and output devices.
2. Explain redirection.
3. Explain what filters are and when they are
used.
4. Formulate and explain the syntax of the three
filter commands SORT, FIND, and MORE.
5. Explain when and how to use the SORT,
FIND, and MORE commands.
6. Explain what shell extensions are and how
you may use them.
7. Explain what pipes are and how they are
used.
Student Outcomes
1. Use > and >> to redirect standard output.
2. Use < to redirect standard input.
3. Use filter commands to manipulate information.
4. Enable shell extensions and use extended
features.
5. Combine commands using pipes, filters, and
redirection.
Chapter Overview
The operating system usually expects to read
information from the keyboard. The keyboard is
the standard input device. The standard output
device, where the results of commands and the
output of programs is displayed, is the screen.
However, there are times when it is desirable to
redirect input and output. Changing the standard
input or standard output from one device to
another is a process known as redirection. There
are three external commands, called filters, which
allow the user to manipulate data input and
output. Pipes, used with filters, allow the user to
link commands. Pipes, filters, and redirection
give the user choices in determining where
information is read from (input) and written to
(output). You have been using redirection each
time you placed the result of a command into
your homework files (1.HW, 2.HW, etc.).
In this chapter you will learn how to use
redirection. You will learn to use pipes to connect
programs and filters to manipulate data.
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CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
Redirection of Standard
I/O (Input/Output)
You have already used input and output. When you keyed in something on the
keyboard, the operating system recognized it as input. After the input was processed, it was written to an output device—usually the screen. In other words, if
you key in TYPE MYFILE.TXT, the input is what you key in. The output is the
content of the file that is displayed on the screen. See Figure 9.1.
INPUT
OUTPUT from TYPE
command displays
on screen
A:\>TYPE MYFILE.TXT
This is a file.
A:\>_
Figure 9.1—Input and Output Devices
In the data processing world, this input/output process is commonly referred to as
I/O.
The operating system gets information from or sends information to three places:
standard input, standard output, and standard error. Standard input is the keyboard. Standard output is the display screen. Standard error is the place from which
the operating system writes error messages to the screen, e.g., “File Not Found.”
Not all commands deal with standard input and standard output. For instance,
the result or output of many of the commands you have used has been some action
that occurred, such as copying a file with the COPY command. There is no standard
input or output except the messages written to the screen. See Figure 9.2.
A:\>COPY MY.TXT ONE.FIL
1 file(s) copied
INPUT from user
OUTPUT from COPY command
A:\>
Figure 9.2—Results of COPY Command
On the other hand, the output of commands like DIR has been a screen display of
all the files on a disk. The information was received from the standard input device,
the keyboard, and the results of the DIR command were sent to the standard output
device, the screen. I/O redirection means that you tell the operating system you
want information read from or written to a device other than the standard ones. With
the DIR command, you can write the output to a file. This process is called redirecting the output of a command. See Figure 9.3.
9.2
ACTIVITY: USING > TO REDIRECT STANDARD OUTPUT
STANDARD INPUT
STANDARD OUTPUT
from DIR expects to
display on screen
A:\>DIR > PRN
A:\>_
STANDARD OUTPUT
from DIR is redirected
to a file
Figure 9.3—Redirecting Standard Output
Redirection works only when the command expects to send its results to the
standard output device or receive the information from the standard input device.
The following symbols are used for redirection:
>
The greater-than symbol redirects the output of a command to someplace
other than the screen, the standard output.
<
The less-than symbol tells the operating system to get its input from somewhere other than the keyboard.
>> The double greater-than symbol is used to redirect the output of a command
to an existing file, but it appends the information to the bottom of the file. It
does not overwrite the existing file. It appends the output to the bottom of the
existing file.
9.2
Activity: Using > to Redirect
Standard Output
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
01:46
02:10
04:03
04:32
12:00
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
148
121
72
53
59
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
DANCES.TXT
HELLO.TXT
Sandy and Patty.txt
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10/31/2001
11/16/2000
05/27/2001
10/30/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
02:43 PM
12:00 PM
10:08 PM
03:42 PM
12:15 AM
11:37 AM
12:16 AM
01:08 PM
11:24 AM
07:08 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
529 TITAN.TXT
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
81 LONGFILENAME.TXT
190 JUPITER.TXT
97 LONGFILENAMED.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
99 LONGFILENAMING.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
2,833 bytes
6,784,942,080 bytes free
A:\>_
This command behaved in the “normal” way. You asked for a
display of all the files in the WUGXP directory that had a .TXT file extension. The
selected files were displayed on the screen. Because the DIR command writes its
results to the screen, the standard output device, redirection can be used with this
command.
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT > TXTFILES.TXT e
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT > TXTFILES.TXT
A:\>_
The output of the command has been sent to the file
TXTFILES.TXT on the DATA disk. Nothing appears on the screen. When you key in
DIR C:\WUGXP\*.TXT, you normally see the directory listing of all the *.TXT files
on the screen, as you did in the display following step 1. The > sign tells the operating system that instead of sending the standard output to the screen, you want to
redirect that output elsewhere.
3
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE TXTFILES.TXT e
A:\>TYPE TXTFILES.TXT
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
10/31/2001
11/16/2000
05/27/2001
10/30/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
10/31/2001
01:46
02:10
04:03
04:32
12:00
02:43
12:00
10:08
03:42
12:15
11:37
12:16
01:08
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
AM
PM
148
121
72
53
59
529
53
81
190
97
253
99
406
ASTRO.TXT
BORN.TXT
DANCES.TXT
HELLO.TXT
Sandy and Patty.txt
TITAN.TXT
Sandy and Nicki.txt
LONGFILENAME.TXT
JUPITER.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
GALAXY.TXT
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
MERCURY.TXT
9.3
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
ACTIVITY: USING < TO REDIRECT STANDARD INPUT
11:24 AM
07:08 PM
15 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
194 PLANETS.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
2,833 bytes
6,784,942,080 bytes free
A:\>_
As you can see, the TXTFILES.TXT file contains the same information that would have appeared on the screen. Redirection is very useful. For example, if you wanted a file copy of the directory of a disk, you could not key in
COPY DIR filename because DIR is a command, not a file. You cannot copy a
command to a file. COPY is for use with files only. Redirection, used properly, gets
you that hard copy.
9.3
Activity: Using < to
Redirect Standard Input
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>MD TEST e
2
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.NEW TEST e
A:\>MD TEST
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.NEW TEST
C:\WUGXP\MER.NEW
C:\WUGXP\AST.NEW
C:\WUGXP\JUP.NEW
C:\WUGXP\VEN.NEW
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have a created a subdirectory called TEST on the DATA disk
and copied four files into it.
Standard input is from the keyboard. The DEL command uses standard input.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DEL TEST\*.* e
A:\>DEL TEST\*.*
A:\TEST\*.*, Are you sure (Y/N)?
You asked the DEL command to delete all the files in the TEST
subdirectory. DEL is asking you if you are really sure that you want to delete these
files. DEL is expecting input from the standard input device, the keyboard.
4
Key in the following: N e
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A:\>DEL TEST\*.*
A:\TEST\*.*, Are you sure (Y/N)? N
A:\>_
You were returned to the system prompt without deleting the files
in the TEST subdirectory because you answered N for “No, don’t delete.” As you
can see, the operating system took no action until it received input from you via the
keyboard, N. The input was N. You can prove that the files are still there by keying
in DIR TEST.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TEST e
A:\>DIR TEST
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TEST
04/23/2002
04/23/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
08:43 AM
<DIR>
08:43 AM
<DIR>
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
03:42 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
.
..
406 MER.NEW
148 AST.NEW
190 JUP.NEW
478 VEN.NEW
1,222 bytes
943,104 bytes free
A:\>_
From the display you can see that you did not delete the files in
the TEST directory.
6
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE Y.FIL e
A:\>TYPE Y.FIL
y
A:\>_
The Y.FIL file is a simple file that contains the letter y followed by
a carriage return ( e ). If you do not have this file on the DATA disk, you can
copy it from the WUGXP directory to the DATA disk.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DEL TEST\*.* < Y.FIL e
A:\>DEL TEST\*.* < Y.FIL
A:\TEST\*.*, Are you sure (Y/N)? y
A:\>_
9.4
ACTIVITY: USING >> TO ADD REDIRECTED OUTPUT TO A FILE
This time you told the operating system to get input from a file
called Y.FIL (< Y.FIL), instead of from the standard input device, the keyboard.
When DEL TEST\*.* was executed and displayed the message “Are you sure
(Y/N)?” it still needed input, a Y or N followed by e. The operating system
found the file you told it to look for, Y.FIL, which had the “y e” answer. This
file provided a response to the question, so the operating system proceeded to
delete the files in the subdirectory TEST.
You must be very careful with redirection of input. When you tell the operating
system to take input from a file, any input from the keyboard will be ignored. In this
example, if the Y.FIL contents were “X,” this would not be a valid answer to the
question posed, “Are you sure (Y/N)?” Only Y or N is an acceptable response. Any
other letter would be unacceptable, and the question would be asked again, and
then the system would assume the response was N and you would be returned to
the command prompt. You would see the following on the screen:
A:\TEST\*.*, Are you sure (Y/N)?X
A:\TEST\*.*, Are you sure (Y/N)?
and the files would not have been deleted.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR TEST e
A:\>DIR TEST
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TEST
04/23/2002
04/23/2002
08:43 AM
<DIR>
08:43 AM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
2 Dir(s)
.
..
0 bytes
945,152 bytes free
A:\>_
The files were deleted. You did it with one command line, and you
did not have to key in the Y. The Y came from the contents of the file called Y.FIL.
9.4
Activity: Using >> to Add
Redirected Output to a File
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT e
(Overwrite files as necessary.)
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\*.TXT
C:\WUGXP\ASTRO.TXT
C:\WUGXP\BORN.TXT
Overwrite A:\BORN.TXT? (Yes/No/All): A
C:\WUGXP\DANCES.TXT
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C:\WUGXP\HELLO.TXT
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Patty.txt
C:\WUGXP\TITAN.TXT
C:\WUGXP\Sandy and Nicki.txt
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAME.TXT
C:\WUGXP\JUPITER.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMED.TXT
C:\WUGXP\GALAXY.TXT
C:\WUGXP\LONGFILENAMING.TXT
C:\WUGXP\MERCURY.TXT
C:\WUGXP\PLANETS.TXT
C:\WUGXP\VENUS.TXT
15 file(s) copied.
A:\>
You have copied all the .TXT files to the root of the DATA disk.
2
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT e
3
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE MERCURY.TXT e
A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>TYPE MERCURY.TXT
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>_
You have two separate files. You want to add MERCURY.TXT to
the end of JUPITER.TXT. If you keyed in TYPE MERCURY.TXT > JUPITER.TXT,
you would overwrite the contents of JUPITER.TXT with the contents of
MERCURY.TXT. To append to the end of an existing file, you use the double redirection symbol, >>.
4
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE MERCURY.TXT >> JUPITER.TXT e
5
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT e
A:\>TYPE MERCURY.TXT >> JUPITER.TXT
A:\>TYPE JUPITER.TXT
9.6
THE SORT COMMAND
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun.
We learned most of what we know about Mercury
in 1974 when the tenth in the Mariner series
flew right by it. NASA hopes to send a spacecraft
back to Mercury, the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment
GEochemistry and Ranging (or MESSENGER) would launch
in 2004, fly by Mercury twice in 2008, and then go
into a year-long orbit of Mercury beginning in 2009.
A:\>_
Instead of overwriting the contents of JUPITER.TXT with the
contents of MERCURY.TXT, the contents of MERCURY.TXT were added to the end
of the JUPITER.TXT file.
9.5
Filters
Filter commands manipulate information. Filters read information from the keyboard (standard input), change the input in a specified way, and write the results to
the screen (standard output). Filter commands function like filters in a water
purification system. They remove the unwanted elements from the water (data) and
send the purified water (data) on its way. There are three filters, all of which are
external commands:
SORT
Arranges lines in ascending or descending order.
FIND
Searches for a particular group of characters, also called a character
string.
MORE Temporarily halts the screen display after each screenful.
The operating system creates temporary files while it “filters” data with the
SORT command, so during this process it is important that there be access to the
disk and the filters. You must be sure that the floppy disk is not write-protected or, if
you are using a Network drive, that you have write access to that drive. If a disk is
write-protected, or if you do not have the write “permission,” the operating system
will not be able to execute the SORT filter command.
9.6
The SORT Command
The SORT filter command arranges or sorts lines of input (text) and sends them to
standard output (the screen), unless you redirect it. The default SORT is in ascending order (A to Z or lowest to highest numbers), starting in the first column. The
SORT command has many parameters. The syntax for the command is:
SORT [/R] [/+n] [/M kilobytes] [/L locale] [/REC recordbytes]
[[drive1:][path1]filename1] [/T [drive2:][path2]]
[/O [drive3:][path3]filename3]
The full syntax is listed in the command summary in Appendix H.
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9.7
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
Activity: Using SORT
Note 1: The DATA disk is in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
Note 2: Remember when you see 6, it means to press the 6 key.
1
Key in the following: A:\>SORT e
MERCURY e
VENUS e
EARTH e
3e
MARS e
JUPITER e
6e
A:\>SORT
MERCURY
VENUS
EARTH
3
MARS
JUPITER
^Z
3
EARTH
JUPITER
MARS
MERCURY
VENUS
A:\>_
As you can see, the SORT command took input from the keyboard.
When you pressed the 6 key (identical to pressing c + Z), you told the SORT
command that you were finished entering data. Then the SORT command “filtered”
the data and wrote the keyboard input alphabetically to the standard output device
(the screen). See Figure 9.4 for a graphical representation of this filter.
INPUT
MERCURY
VENUS
EARTH
3
MARS
JUPITER
OUTPUT
through filter
SORT
(raw data from keyboard)
Figure 9.4—Filtering Data
2
Key in the following: A:\>SORT e
333 e
3e
3
EARTH
JUPITER
MARS
MERCURY
VENUS
(filtered data to screen)
9.7
ACTIVITY: USING SORT
23 e
124 e
6e
A:\>SORT
333
3
23
124
^Z
124
23
3
333
A:\>_
The SORT command does not seem very smart because these
numbers are certainly not in numeric order. This data is not actually numeric data.
Numbers, in this case, are really character data and not numeric values that are
manipulated mathematically. Numbers are often used as character data. For instance, a zip code or a phone number, although they use numbers, really are character data and are not treated mathematically. You would not think of adding your
address to your phone number and dividing by your zip code, for example.
Character data is sorted from left to right. Numeric data is sorted by units. Thus,
if you look at “Smith” and “Smythe,” you read character data from left to right and
would place “Smith” before “Smythe.” If you had the numbers 124, 222, 22, 23, 31,
9, and 6, the numeric order would be, of course, 6, 9, 22, 23, 31, 124, and 222. You
first sort all the single-digit numbers. You then sort the two-digit numbers by
looking at the first digit—thus you know that 22 and 23 come before 32. Since 22
and 23 have the same first digit, you then go to the second digit to determine that
the 2 in 22 comes before the 3 in 23.
A human knows that 12 comes before 13 because that person has learned how
numbers work. The operating system is different. It relies on something called the
ASCII sort sequence. ASCII is a standard code that assigns values to letters, numbers, and punctuation marks—from the left, in the same way we read characters.
The ASCII sort sequence is determined by the number assigned to the ASCII character. The sort order is punctuation marks (including spaces), then numbers, then
letters (lowercase preceding uppercase). If you had a series of characters such as BB,
aa, #, 123, bb, 13, and AA, the ASCII sort order would be:
#
123 13
aa AA bb BB
Notice that with the new sort sequence the relative position of aa and AA did not
change, but the relative position of BB and bb did change.
There is another point about using the SORT command. Not only does it follow
the ASCII sort sequence, but it also sorts entire lines from left to right. Thus, the sort
sequence of “Carolyn Smith” and “Robert Nesler” is:
Carolyn Smith
Robert Nesler
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Because the SORT command looks at the entire line, “Carolyn” comes before
“Robert.”
In our numeric example, SORT looked at the entire line, and, since the “1” in
“124” preceded the “2” in “23,” it placed the “124” before the “23.” You can force
the operating system to sort numbers correctly using the spacebar to add the space
character (indicated here by a #).
3
Key in the following: A:\>SORT e
333 e
##3 e
#23 e
124 e
6e
A:\>SORT
333
3
23
124
^Z
3
23
124
333
A:\>_
By entering spaces, you forced the lines to be the same length,
placing the number digits in their proper position. Since spaces precede numbers in
the ASCII sort sequence, the SORT command could sort the entire line and place it
in proper numeric order. Indeed, you made numeric data character data. Essentially,
you left-justify character data and right-justify numeric data.
9.8
Filters and Redirection
The standard output of filters is a screen display. Hence, you can redirect both the
output and input of these filter commands. The filter commands are not usually
used with actual keyboard input, but with input redirected from a file, a device, or
another command.
9.9
Activity: Using the SORT
Command with Redirection
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A with A:\> displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\STATE.CAP e
2
Key in the following: A:\>SORT < STATE.CAP e
9.9
ACTIVITY: USING THE SORT COMMAND WITH REDIRECTION
A:\>COPY C:\WUGXP\STATE.CAP
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>SORT < STATE.CAP
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Louisiana
Michigan
Nebraska
New York
Ohio
Oregon
Phoenix
Sacramento
Denver
Tallahassee
Baton Rouge
Lansing
Lincoln
Albany
Columbus
Salem
A:\>_
You copied the STATE.CAP file from the WUGXP directory to the
DATA disk. You then keyed in the SORT command. You used the symbol < for
taking data from a source other than the keyboard, the file called STATE.CAP, and
fed it into the SORT command. Displayed on your screen (the standard output) is
the STATE.CAP file arranged in alphabetical order, with Arizona and Phoenix at
the top. Another SORT command feature is the /R parameter, which allows you to
sort in reverse or descending order (Z to A). In Windows XP Professional, the SORT
command no longer requires the < prior to the file being sorted.
3
Key in the following: A:\>SORT STATE.CAP e
A:\>SORT STATE.CAP
Arizona
California
Colorado
Florida
Louisiana
Michigan
Nebraska
New York
Ohio
Oregon
Phoenix
Sacramento
Denver
Tallahassee
Baton Rouge
Lansing
Lincoln
Albany
Columbus
Salem
A:\>_
As you can see, the command worked the same even without the
< symbol. SORT expects either keyboard input or a file.
4
Key in the following: A:\>SORT /R < STATE.CAP e
A:\>SORT /R < STATE.CAP
Oregon
Salem
Ohio
Columbus
New York
Albany
451
452
CHAPTER 9
Nebraska
Michigan
Louisiana
Florida
Colorado
California
Arizona
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
Lincoln
Lansing
Baton Rouge
Tallahassee
Denver
Sacramento
Phoenix
A:\>_
The file STATE.CAP that the SORT command used as input is
displayed on the screen in reverse alphabetical order. The standard output, the
results of the SORT command, is written to the screen. The SORT parameter that
sorts by a column number is /+n. (A column, on the screen, is the place occupied by
one character.)
5
Key in the following: A:\>SORT /+17 STATE.CAP e
A:\>SORT /+17 STATE.CAP
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Oregon
Florida
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
Salem
Tallahassee
A:\>_
This time you sorted by the character in the column number you
specified, the seventeenth position in the line in this example. The first letter of the
city is in the seventeenth column. The file is now ordered by city rather than by
state. It is important to note that the SORT command does not understand columns
in the usual sense. A person would say that the “city” column is the second column,
going from left to right. The SORT command counts each character (letters and
spaces) from left to right and counts each character as a column. Thus, “city” is
located by counting the number of characters, including the spaces between the
characters. The total number was 17.
In these examples, you have been “massaging the data.” The actual data in
STATE.CAP has not changed at all. It remains exactly as it was written. The only
thing that has changed is the way it is displayed—the way you are looking at the
data. This alphabetic arrangement is temporary. If you want to change the data in
the file, you need to save the altered data to a new file.
6
Key in the following: A:\>SORT /+17 STATE.CAP > SORTED.CAP e
7
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE SORTED.CAP e
9.9
ACTIVITY: USING THE SORT COMMAND WITH REDIRECTION
A:\>SORT /+17 STATE.CAP > SORTED.CAP
A:\>TYPE SORTED.CAP
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Oregon
Florida
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
Salem
Tallahassee
A:\>_
You used redirection and saved the sorted output to a new file
called SORTED.CAP. The standard output of the command SORT STATE.CAP
would be written to the screen (the standard output device). Since standard output
writes to the screen, you can redirect it to a file called SORTED.CAP with the
command line SORT STATE.CAP > SORTED.CAP. In this case, you do need the >
symbol. Otherwise SORT will not know what to do with the output. The SORT
command includes a parameter to store the sorted data in a file that works faster
than using redirection. The parameter is /O.
8
Key in the following. A:\>SORT /+17 STATE.CAP /O BYCITY.CAP e
9
Key in the following. A:\>TYPE SORTED.CAP e
10 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE BYCITY.CAP e
A:\>SORT /+17
STATE.CAP /O BYCITY.CAP
A:\>TYPE SORTED.CAP
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Oregon
Florida
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
Salem
Tallahassee
A:\>TYPE BYCITY.CAP
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
453
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CHAPTER 9
Oregon
Florida
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
Salem
Tallahassee
A:\>_
As you can see, both files are the same. With this small file, the
time difference is not discernable, but with a large data file, using /O is considerably faster than using redirection.
9.10
The FIND Filter
The FIND command allows you to search a file for a specific character string by
enclosing it in quotation marks. Although intended for use with ASCII text files, this
command can be useful with some data files produced by application software. For
example, let’s say you used a program to create five documents. One of the documents was a paper on law enforcement in which you know you used the word
“indictment” but you can’t remember the name of the file. You could, of course,
open each one of the five documents, or you could use the FIND command to search
for the word “indictment.” Although much of the document would appear as funny
characters if you used the TYPE command, the FIND command might be able to tell
you whether or not the word “indictment” is in the file.
On the desktop, there is a Search option in the Start menu, which can search files
for textbook as well. In this text you are using the command line, but it is not as
reliable in Windows XP Professional as it was in Windows 2000. Using the FIND
command at the command line can help you find a file based on content.
The FIND command is case sensitive unless you use the parameter /I,
which means ignore case. The syntax is:
FIND [/V] [/C] [/N] [/I] [/OFF[LINE]] "string"
[drive:][path]filename[ ...]]
/V
/C
/N
/I
Displays all lines NOT containing the specified string.
Displays only the count of lines containing the string.
Displays line numbers with the displayed lines.
Ignores the case of characters when searching for the
string.
/OFF[LINE] Do not skip files with offline attribute set.
"string"
Specifies the text string to find.
[drive:][path]filename
Specifies a file or files to search.
If a path is not specified, FIND searches the text typed at the
prompt or piped from another command.
If a file name is not specified, FIND searches the text typed at the prompt or
piped from another command.
9.11
Activity: Using the FIND Filter
Note 1: The DATA disk is in Drive A with the A:\> displayed.
Note 2: Only if PERSONAL.FIL is not on the root of the DATA disk, copy it from
WUGXP to the root of the DATA disk. Use the text editor to open
A:\PERSONAL.FIL. Go to Chapter 7, Activity 7.14, step 26. Add the data
listed there to the bottom of the file. Save the edited file.
9.11
Note 3:
1
ACTIVITY: USING THE FIND FILTER
You must use double quotes. Single quotes are invalid.
Key in the following: A:\>FIND "Smith" PERSONAL.FIL e
A:\>FIND "Smith" PERSONAL.FIL
---------- PERSONAL.FIL
Smith
Gregory 311 Orchard
Smith
Carolyn 311 Orchard
Smith
David
120 Collins
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Orange
MI
MI
CA
Engineer
Housewife
Chef
A:\>_
The FIND command found every occurrence of the character
string “Smith” in PERSONAL.FIL on the DATA disk. A character string must be
enclosed in quotation marks. Since FIND is case sensitive, you must key in the word
exactly as it appears in the file. The character string SMITH would not be found
because FIND would be looking for uppercase letters. If you use the parameter /I,
the command would find SMITH, smith, or Smith. The FIND command “filtered”
the file PERSONAL.FIL to extract the character string that matched the specification. With the use of the /V parameter, you can search a file for anything except what
is in quotation marks.
2
Key in the following: A:\>FIND /V "Smith" PERSONAL.FIL e
Suzuki
Markiw
Markiw
Nyles
Nyles
Markiw
Washingon
Jones
Babchuk
Babchuk
Jones
Gonzales
JONES
Lo
Jones
Perez
Yuan
Markiw
Peat
Farneth
Charlene
Nicholas
Emily
John
Sophie
Nick
Tyrone
Steven
Walter
Deana
Cleo
Antonio
JERRY
Ophelia
Ervin
Sergio
Suelin
Nicholas
Brian
Nichole
567 Abbey
354 Bell
10 Zion
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
10 Zion
345 Newport
32 North
12 View
12 View
355 Second
40 Northern
244 East
1213 Wick
15 Fourth
134 Seventh
56 Twin Leaf
12 Fifth
123 Second
456 Stage
Rochester
Phoenix
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Orange
Phoenix
Thousand Oaks
Thousand Oaks
Ann Arbor
Ontario
Mission Viejo
Phoenix
Santa Cruz
Ann Arbor
Orange
Glendale
Vacaville
Davis
MI
AZ
AZ
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
CA
MI
CA
CA
AZ
CA
MI
CA
AZ
CA
CA
Day Care Teacher
Engineer
Retired
Retired
Retired
Retired
Manager
Buyer
President
Housewife
Clerk
Engineer
Systems Analyst
Writer
Banker
Editor
Artist
Engineer
Athlete
Biologist
A:\>_
(This graphic represents the last part of what you will see on your
screen.) Though the output is so long it scrolled off the screen, you can see that
FIND located everyone except Smith. Furthermore, you can find the specific line
number of each occurrence by using the /N parameter.
3
Key in the following: A:\>FIND /N "Smith" PERSONAL.FIL e
455
456
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
A:\>FIND /N "Smith" PERSONAL.FIL
---------- PERSONAL.FIL
[7]Smith
Gregory 311 Orchard
[8]Smith
Carolyn 311 Orchard
[28]Smith
David
120 Collins
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Orange
MI Engineer
MI Housewife
CA Chef
A:\>_
Displayed on the screen are not only all the people named Smith,
but also the line numbers where their names appear in the file. You can also have a
numeric count of the number of times a specific character string appears in a file.
The FIND command will not display the actual lines, but it will tell you how many
occurrences there are of that specific string.
4
Key in the following: A:\>FIND /C "Smith" PERSONAL.FIL e
A:\>FIND /C "Smith" PERSONAL.FIL
---------- PERSONAL.FIL: 3
A:\>_
The number 3 follows the file name. The name Smith, (capital “S,”
small “mith”) appears three times in the file PERSONAL.FIL. You can also tell the
FIND command to ignore case.
5
Key in the following: A:\>FIND /I "Jones" PERSONAL.FIL e
A:\>FIND /I "Jones" PERSONAL.FIL
---------- PERSONAL.FIL
Jones
Steven
32 North
Jones
Cleo
355 Second
JONES
JERRY
244 East
Analyst
Jones
Ervin
15 Fourth
Phoenix
Ann Arbor
Mission Viejo
AZ
MI
CA
Buyer
Clerk
Systems
Santa Cruz
CA
Banker
A:\>_
By using the /I parameter, which told the FIND command to
ignore the case, you found both Jones and JONES. The parameters can come at the
end of the command.
6
Key in the following: A:\>FIND "Jones" PERSONAL.FIL /I e
A:\>FIND "Jones" PERSONAL.FIL /I
---------- PERSONAL.FIL
9.12
Jones
Jones
JONES
Analyst
Jones
PIPES
Steven
Cleo
JERRY
32 North
355 Second
244 East
Phoenix
Ann Arbor
Mission Viejo
AZ
MI
CA
Buyer
Clerk
Systems
Ervin
15 Fourth
Santa Cruz
CA
Banker
A:\>_
As you can see, the results of step 5 and step 6 are exactly the
same.
9.12
Pipes
Pipes allow the standard output of one program to be used as standard input to the
next program. When you use pipes, you are not limited to two programs. You may
pipe together many programs. The term “pipe” reflects the flow of information from
one command to the next. Pipes are used with filter commands. You may take any
command that has standard output and pipe it to a filter. The filter will “do”
something to the standard output of the previous command, such as sort it. Since
filters always write to standard output, you may use pipes and filters to further
refine your data. Essentially, you may use filters to transform data to meet your
needs.
The pipe symbol is the vertical broken bar (¦) used between two commands. The
standard output from a command is written to a temporary file. Then the next
command in the pipeline, typically a filter, reads the temporary file as standard
input. See Figure 9.5.
DIR | SORT
temp
file
DIR
standard output from DIR
written to a temporary file
SORT
temporary file used as
standard input for SORT
Figure 9.5—Piping Commands
On the original IBM keyboard, the pipe symbol is located between the s key
and the letter Z. On some computers, the pipe symbol is located along with the
backslash. Some other keyboards have the ¦ symbol next to the c and a keys
on the right side of the keyboard. The location of the pipe is not standard and could
appear in other locations, particularly on notebook computers. The pipe is the
connection between two commands, like a pipe in a water system. Since filters are
external commands, the operating system must be able to access the commands. If a
disk is write-protected, filter commands will not work because these commands
read and write temporary files to the disk.
After using pipes with filters, you may see some strange files on the directory
listing labeled:
%PIPE1.$$$
%PIPE2.$$$
%PIPE3.$$$
457
458
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
or
11002649
1100274E
All files must be named—even temporary files. These are the names the operating
system gives for the files that it creates when you use piping. These temporary files
“hold” the data until the next command can process it. These temporary files are
automatically deleted by the operating system when you have finished your chain
of commands. You will not see these names displayed on the screen, and probably
will not see them at all. Remember, you must be able to write to the disk to use the
pipe. The floppy can not be write-protected, and you must have write permission on
a network drive.
9.13
The MORE Filter
The MORE command displays one screenful of data at a time with a prompt that
reads -- More --. The MORE command pauses after the screen is full. How the
display continues depends on what key is touched. When there is no more data in
the file, the MORE command finishes by returning you to the system prompt. The
purpose of the MORE command is to allow you to be able to read a long text file,
one that would not fit onto the screen, one screenful at a time. Many new features
have been were added to the MORE command with Windows 2000 Professional and
are retained in Windows XP Professional. The syntax is:
MORE [/E [/C] [/P] [/S] [/Tn] [+n]] < [drive:][path]filename
command-name ¦ MORE [/E [/C] [/P] [/S] [/Tn] [+n]]
MORE /E [/C] [/P] [/S] [/Tn] [+n] [files]
[drive:][path]filename
Specifies a file to display one
screen at a time.
command-name
Specifies a command whose output
will be displayed.
/E
/C
/P
/S
/Tn
Enable extended features
Clear screen before displaying page
Expand FormFeed characters
Squeeze multiple blank lines into a single line
Expand tabs to n spaces (default 8)
Switches can be present in the MORE environment
variable.
+n
Start displaying the first file at line n
files
List of files to be displayed. Files in the list
are separated by blanks.
If extended features are enabled, the following commands
are accepted at the -- More -- prompt:
P n
S n
F
Q
=
?
Display next n lines
Skip next n lines
Display next file
Quit
Show line number
Show help line
9.14
ACTIVITY: USING THE MORE FILTER
<space> Display next page
<ret>
Display next line
By default, in Windows XP Professional, extended features are enabled. The
following exercises assume extended features are enabled. As the syntax diagram
indicates, MORE can be both redirected and used with a pipe.
9.14
Activity: Using the MORE Filter
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A with the A:\> displayed.
You will use the pipe symbol ¦, so be sure you locate it on the keyboard. Key in
the following: A:\>DIR ¦ MORE e
A:\>DIR ¦ MORE
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001 02:47
03/15/2002 01:38
03/15/2002 07:29
03/15/2002 08:29
12/31/2001 04:32
12/31/2001 04:32
03/25/2002 02:11
10/30/2001 01:41
08/12/2000 04:12
08/12/2000 04:12
07/31/1999 12:53
08/12/2000 04:12
07/31/1999 12:53
12/06/2001 12:25
07/31/1999 12:53
10/31/2001 01:38
10/31/2001 04:50
10/31/2001 04:51
10/31/2001 04:51
10/31/2001 04:51
10/31/2001 02:49
10/31/2001 02:49
10/31/2001 04:50
12/06/2001 09:24
04/11/2002 11:40
04/11/2002 12:17
04/11/2002 12:20
04/11/2002 12:20
04/17/2002 01:07
10/30/2001 02:10
11/16/2000 12:00
11/16/2000 12:00
-- More --
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
86 BONJOUR.NEW
CLASS
WORK
616 CalifSurf.MUS
182 WILDTWO.AAA
181 WILDTHR.AAA
TRIP
155 DRAMA.TV
73 MARK.FIL
314 CASES.FIL
2,672 NEWPRSON.FIL
3 Y.FIL
47 CAROLYN.FIL
465 person.fil
44 BRIAN.FIL
4,064 NEW-SUVS.XLS
138 FILE2.SWT
137 FILE4.FP
137 FILE2.FP
137 FILE3.FP
138 FILE2.CZG
138 FILE3.CZG
138 FILE3.SWT
MEDIA
2,431 PERSONAL.FIL
45 STEVEN.FIL
36 b.bat
30 TEST.BAT
GAMES
121 BORN.TXT
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
Your file listing may vary. The Command Line window height
shown in these displays has been adjusted to provide a varied range of displays. By
using the pipe symbol, you asked that the output of the DIR command be used as
input to the MORE command. The -- More -- on the bottom of the screen tells you
459
460
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
that there are more screens of data. Press the spacebar and the next page of data
appears. Pressing the e key displays the next line in the file.
2
Press the e key until you are back at the system prompt. You may have to
press several times until you are returned to the system prompt, as with extended features, the e key continues the display one line at a time.
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR ¦ MORE e
4
Press the z
10/30/2001
11/16/2000
11/16/2000
05/27/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
02/25/2002
04/19/2002
04/20/2002
04/23/2002
04/23/2002
10/30/2001
12/11/1999
05/30/2000
10/31/2001
04/23/2002
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
11/24/2001
10/31/2001
07/31/2000
04/23/2002
04/23/2002
02:10 PM
12:00 PM
12:00 PM
10:08 PM
12:15 AM
12:16 AM
11:04 AM
<DIR>
03:34 PM
<DIR>
12:27 PM
08:13 AM
08:43 AM
<DIR>
01:46 PM
04:03 PM
04:32 PM
02:43 PM
11:13 AM
11:37 AM
01:08 PM
11:24 AM
07:08 PM
04:32 PM
01:01 PM
01:04 PM
44 File(s)
8 Dir(s)
121
59
53
81
97
99
BORN.TXT
Sandy and Patty.txt
Sandy and Nicki.txt
LONGFILENAME.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
3PLANETS
ASTRO
4,482 CHKDSK.TXT
996 TXTFILES.TXT
TEST
148 ASTRO.TXT
72 DANCES.TXT
53 HELLO.TXT
529 TITAN.TXT
596 JUPITER.TXT
253 GALAXY.TXT
406 MERCURY.TXT
194 PLANETS.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
260 STATE.CAP
260 SORTED.CAP
260 BYCITY.CAP
21,904 bytes
937,984 bytes free
A:\>_
You displayed the next page of information. (If necessary, press the
spacebar again until you are returned to the A:\> prompt.) With extended features,
you can also use Q to break the command and return to the system prompt.
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR ¦ MORE e
6
Press the Q key.
A:\>DIR ¦ MORE
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
02:47
01:38
07:29
08:29
PM
PM
PM
PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
86 BONJOUR.NEW
CLASS
WORK
616 CalifSurf.MUS
9.14
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
03/25/2002
10/30/2001
08/12/2000
08/12/2000
07/31/1999
08/12/2000
07/31/1999
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
12/06/2001
04/11/2002
04/11/2002
04/11/2002
04/11/2002
04/17/2002
10/30/2001
11/16/2000
11/16/2000
04:32
04:32
02:11
01:41
04:12
04:12
12:53
04:12
12:53
12:25
12:53
01:38
04:50
04:51
04:51
04:51
02:49
02:49
04:50
09:24
11:40
12:17
12:20
12:20
01:07
02:10
12:00
12:00
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
AM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
<DIR>
ACTIVITY: USING THE MORE FILTER
182 WILDTWO.AAA
181 WILDTHR.AAA
TRIP
155 DRAMA.TV
73 MARK.FIL
314 CASES.FIL
2,672 NEWPRSON.FIL
3 Y.FIL
47 CAROLYN.FIL
465 person.fil
44 BRIAN.FIL
4,064 NEW-SUVS.XLS
138 FILE2.SWT
137 FILE4.FP
137 FILE2.FP
137 FILE3.FP
138 FILE2.CZG
138 FILE3.CZG
138 FILE3.SWT
MEDIA
2,431 PERSONAL.FIL
45 STEVEN.FIL
36 b.bat
30 TEST.BAT
GAMES
121 BORN.TXT
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
A:\>_
Note:
The size (number of bytes) listed may be different from the display due to
the difference in files you created.
The display halted and returned you to the system level. You may
ask yourself, why do this when the same effect is achieved by using DIR /P? There
are two reasons. The first is that you can connect several commands with pipes and
filters. The second is that /P works only with the DIR command.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR ¦ SORT /+39 ¦ MORE e
A:\>DIR ¦ SORT +39 ¦ MORE
8 Dir(s)
44 File(s)
Directory of A:\
937,984 bytes free
21,904 bytes
Volume Serial Number is 2829-1507
Volume in drive A is DATA
06/27/2002 02:17 PM
<DIR>
07/04/2002 11:05 PM
<DIR>
10/30/2001 12:46 PM
07/04/2002 02:24 PM
10/30/2001 02:47 PM
10/30/2001 01:10 PM
07/31/1999 12:53 PM
07/05/2002 01:42 PM
06/27/2002 07:22 PM
148
37
86
121
44
260
616
3PLANETS
ASTRO
ASTRO.TXT
b.bat
BONJOUR.NEW
BORN.TXT
BRIAN.FIL
BYCITY.CAP
CalifSurf.MUS
461
462
CHAPTER 9
07/31/1999
08/12/2000
07/04/2002
06/27/2002
12/11/1999
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
07/04/2002
05/30/2000
07/05/2002
— More —
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
12:53
03:12
11:18
07:00
03:03
01:41
02:49
03:51
03:50
02:49
04:51
04:50
03:51
11:37
10:43
03:32
01:26
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
PM
AM
PM
PM
PM
<DIR>
<DIR>
47 CAROLYN.FIL
314 CASES.FIL
4,481 CHKDSK.TXT
CLASS
72 DANCES.TXT
155 DRAMA.TV
138 FILE2.CZG
137 FILE2.FP
138 FILE2.SWT
138 FILE3.CZG
137 FILE3.FP
138 FILE3.SWT
137 FILE4.FP
253 GALAXY.TXT
GAMES
53 HELLO.TXT
596 JUPITER.TXT
You now have a sorted directory listing. The filename begins in
column 40. You used column 39 to begin the SORT on the space before the file name,
thus preventing the lines with bytes and bytes free sizes, which contain numbers in
column 40, from being listed at the top of the display.
8
Continue pressing the z until you have returned to the system prompt
or press Q.
07/05/2002
05/27/2001
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
08/12/2000
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
10/31/2001
07/31/1999
12/06/2001
07/04/2002
11/24/2001
11/16/2000
11/16/2000
07/05/2002
07/31/2000
07/04/2002
07/05/2002
07/04/2002
10/31/2001
06/30/2002
07/05/2002
10/31/2001
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
06/27/2002
08/12/2000
A:\>_
01:26 PM
10:08 PM
12:15 AM
12:16 AM
03:12 PM
03:33 PM
<DIR>
01:08 PM
01:38 PM
12:53 PM
12:25 AM
02:22 PM
11:24 AM
11:00 AM
11:00 AM
01:36 PM
04:32 PM
02:22 PM
01:24 PM
<DIR>
02:24 PM
01:43 PM
02:45 PM
<DIR>
01:23 PM
07:08 PM
04:32 PM
03:32 PM
07:07 PM
<DIR>
04:12 PM
8 Dir(s)
44 File(s)
596
81
97
99
73
JUPITER.TXT
LONGFILENAME.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
MARK.FIL
MEDIA
406 MERCURY.TXT
4,064 NEW-SUVS.XLS
2,672 NEWPRSON.FIL
465 person.fil
2,428 PERSONAL.FIL
194 PLANETS.TXT
53 Sandy and Nicki.txt
59 Sandy and Patty.txt
260 SORTED.CAP
260 STATE.CAP
45 STEVEN.FIL
TEST
37 TEST.BAT
529 TITAN.TXT
TRIP
995 TXTFILES.TXT
478 VENUS.TXT
181 WILDTHR.AAA
182 WILDTWO.AAA
WORK
3 Y.FIL
937,984 bytes free
21,907 bytes
9.14
ACTIVITY: USING THE MORE FILTER
You returned to the system prompt. Pipes are extremely useful
with long ASCII text files. Often a program will come with a Read.me or
Readme.txt file and this command can be used to read the file. A Readme file holds
late-breaking information about the program. If you have a text file that is more
than one screenful (or page) of data, you cannot use TYPE /P filename.ext because
/P is not a valid TYPE parameter. You can use the MORE command with a file as
input. You can enter the name of the text file to be used with the MORE command,
or you can pipe it. In the next step, the command used with the file name will be
used first.
9
Key in the following: A:\>MORE PERSONAL.FIL e
Gillay
Carolyn
Panezich Frank
Tuttle
Steven
Maurdeff Kathryn
Maurdeff Sonia
Smith
Gregory
Smith
Carolyn
Winter
Jim
Winter
Linda
Tran
Tai Chan
Golden
Jane
Chang
Wendy
Brogan
Lloyd
Brogan
Sally
Babchuk
Nicholas
Babchuk
Bianca
Rodriguez Bob
Helm
Milton
Suzuki
Charlene
Markiw
Nicholas
Markiw
Emily
Nyles
John
Nyles
Sophie
Markiw
Nick
Washingon Tyrone
Jones
Steven
Smith
David
Babchuk
Walter
Babchuk
Deana
Jones
Cleo
Gonzales Antonio
JONES
JERRY
Lo
Ophelia
Jones
Ervin
Perez
Sergio
Yuan
Suelin
— More (92%) —
699 Lemon
689 Lake
356 Embassy
550 Traver
550 Traver
311 Orchard
311 Orchard
333 Pick
333 Pick
345 Lakeview
345 Lakeview
356 Edgewood
111 Miller
111 Miller
13 Stratford
13 Stratford
20 Elm
333 Meadow
567 Abbey
354 Bell
10 Zion
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
10 Zion
345 Newport
32 North
120 Collins
12 View
12 View
355 Second
40 Northern
244 East
1213 Wick
15 Fourth
134 Seventh
56 Twin Leaf
Orange
Orange
Mission Viejo
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Garden Grove
Garden Grove
Orange
Orange
Ann Arbor
Santa Cruz
Santa Cruz
Sun City West
Sun City West
Ontario
Sherman Oaks
Rochester
Phoenix
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Orange
Phoenix
Orange
Thousand Oaks
Thousand Oaks
Ann Arbor
Ontario
Mission Viejo
Phoenix
Santa Cruz
Ann Arbor
Orange
CA
CA
CA
MI
MI
MI
MI
CA
CA
CA
CA
MI
CA
CA
AZ
AZ
CA
CA
MI
AZ
AZ
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
CA
CA
MI
CA
CA
AZ
CA
MI
CA
Professor
Teacher
Juggler
Teacher
Student
Engineer
Housewife
Key Grip
Teacher
Doctor
Nurse
Librarian
Vice-President
Account Manager
Professor
Professor
Systems Analyst
Consultant
Day Care Teacher
Engineer
Retired
Retired
Retired
Retired
Manager
Buyer
Chef
President
Housewife
Clerk
Engineer
Systems Analyst
Writer
Banker
Editor
Artist
You asked that the file from the DATA disk called PERSONAL.FIL
be used as the file to be sent to the MORE command. The MORE command then
displayed a screenful of this file. You will see more or less of the file depending on
the size of your Command Line window. There is an alternative way to produce the
same results. You can pipe the output of the file to the MORE command.
10 Continue to press the z until you have returned to the system prompt
or press Q.
463
464
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
11 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE PERSONAL.FIL ¦ MORE e
Gillay
Carolyn
Panezich
Frank
Tuttle
Steven
Maurdeff
Kathryn
Maurdeff
Sonia
Smith
Gregory
Smith
Carolyn
Winter
Jim
Winter
Linda
Tran
Tai Chan
Golden
Jane
Chang
Wendy
Brogan
Lloyd
Brogan
Sally
Babchuk
Nicholas
Babchuk
Bianca
Rodriguez Bob
Helm
Milton
Suzuki
Charlene
Markiw
Nicholas
Markiw
Emily
Nyles
John
Nyles
Sophie
-- More --
699 Lemon
689 Lake
356 Embassy
550 Traver
550 Traver
311 Orchard
311 Orchard
333 Pick
333 Pick
345 Lakeview
345 Lakeview
356 Edgewood
111 Miller
111 Miller
13 Stratford
13 Stratford
20 Elm
333 Meadow
567 Abbey
354 Bell
10 Zion
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
Orange
Orange
Mission Viejo
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Garden Grove
Garden Grove
Orange
Orange
Ann Arbor
Santa Cruz
Santa Cruz
Sun City West
Sun City West
Ontario
Sherman Oaks
Rochester
Phoenix
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
CA
CA
CA
MI
MI
MI
MI
CA
CA
CA
CA
MI
CA
CA
AZ
AZ
CA
CA
MI
AZ
AZ
AZ
CA
Professor
Teacher
Juggler
Teacher
Student
Engineer
Housewife
Key Grip
Teacher
Doctor
Nurse
Librarian
Vice-President
Account Manager
Professor
Professor
Systems Analyst
Consultant
Day Care Teacher
Engineer
Retired
Retired
Retired
You took the output from the TYPE command, which is normally a
screen display, and piped it as input to the MORE command. The MORE command
then displayed a screenful of this file. Remember that there must be a command on
either side of the pipe. You could not key in PERSONAL.FIL ¦ MORE because
PERSONAL.FIL is a file and not a command.
12 Continue to press the z or press Q to return you to the system prompt.
You returned to the system prompt. PERSONAL.FIL is more than
one screenful of information. Lines of information in a data file are called records.
Each person listed in the file, and all the information on that same line, is one
record. MORE will allow you to start viewing the file at a specified line, or record
number. Also, to help avoid confusion, you can clear the screen before the display
begins.
13 Key in the following: A:\>MORE PERSONAL.FIL /C +20 e
Markiw
Markiw
Nyles
Nyles
Markiw
Washingon
Jones
Smith
Babchuk
Babchuk
Jones
Gonzales
Nicholas
Emily
John
Sophie
Nick
Tyrone
Steven
David
Walter
Deana
Cleo
Antonio
354 Bell
10 Zion
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
10 Zion
345 Newport
32 North
120 Collins
12 View
12 View
355 Second
40 Northern
Phoenix
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Orange
Phoenix
Orange
Thousand Oaks
Thousand Oaks
Ann Arbor
Ontario
AZ
AZ
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
CA
CA
MI
CA
Engineer
Retired
Retired
Retired
Retired
Manager
Buyer
Chef
President
Housewife
Clerk
Engineer
9.14
JONES
Lo
Jones
Perez
Yuan
Markiw
Peat
Farneth
JERRY
Ophelia
Ervin
Sergio
Suelin
Nicholas
Brian
Nichole
244 East
1213 Wick
15 Fourth
134 Seventh
56 Twin Leaf
12 Fifth
123 Second
456 Stage
ACTIVITY: USING THE MORE FILTER
Mission Viejo
Phoenix
Santa Cruz
Ann Arbor
Orange
Glendale
Vacaville
Davis
CA
AZ
CA
MI
CA
AZ
CA
CA
Systems Analyst
Writer
Banker
Editor
Artist
Engineer
Athlete
Biologist
A:\>_
Markiw’s record is the twentieth record in PERSONAL.FIL (+20).
The display began at that point in the file. Also, the screen was cleared (/C) before
the display began. Notice, not even the command you keyed in is visible. You can
use the MORE filter with more than one file.
14 Key in the following: A:\>MORE SORTED.CAP BYCITY.CAP /C e
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Oregon
Florida
— More (100%) —
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
Salem
Tallahassee
The command does not appear on the screen, as the /C parameter
cleared the screen before the display began. The entire file, SORTED.CAP is on the
screen, signified by the 100%.
15 Press the z
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Oregon
Florida
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
Salem
Tallahassee
A:\>_
Because SORTED.CAP and BYCITY.CAP contained the same
information and the /C parameter cleared the screen before each display, the
information does not seem to have changed. There are times when clearing the
screen can become confusing.
465
466
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
16 Key in the following: A:\>MORE SORTED.CAP BYCITY.CAP e
17 Press the z
A:\>MORE SORTED.CAP BYCITY.CAP
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Oregon
Florida
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
Salem
Tallahassee
New York
Louisiana
Ohio
Colorado
Michigan
Nebraska
Arizona
California
Oregon
Florida
Albany
Baton Rouge
Columbus
Denver
Lansing
Lincoln
Phoenix
Sacramento
Salem
Tallahassee
A:\>_
The first file displayed, and then the message -- More (100%) -was displayed. When you pressed the spacebar, the message disappeared, and the
second file was displayed. In this case, not using the /C parameter made it possible
to compare the two files.
18 Close all open windows and return to the desktop environment, the GUI.
9.15
Other Features of MORE
If you look at the bottom of the syntax diagram of the MORE command,
If extended features are enabled, the following commands
are accepted at the -- More -- prompt:
P n Display next n lines
S n Skip next n lines
F
Display next file
Q
Quit
=
Show line number
?
Show help line
<space>
Display next page
<ret>
Display next line
it states that if extended features are enabled, you have more choices available to
you with the MORE command. Extensions in this case means that Windows XP
Professional provides more features to CMD.EXE, which provides a richer, more
powerful shell programming environment. When you open a Command Prompt
9.16
ACTIVITY: USING THE EXTENDED FEATURES OF MORE
window, you are running a shell. A shell is the command interpreter used to pass
commands to the operating system. The Command Prompt, by default, enables the
shell extensions. If your system did not, by default, enable shell extensions, part of
the previous exercise would not have worked correctly. You can enable extended
features by keying in CMD /X. If you wanted the shell extensions disabled, you
could key in CMD /Y. The commands that use the shell extensions are DEL,
COLOR, CD, MD, PROMPT, PUSHD, POPD, SET, SETLOCAL, ENDLOCAL, IF,
FOR, CALL, SHIFT, GOTO, STARTS, ASSOC, and FTYPE. If you wanted full details
on what you may do with each command, you would key in the command name
with /? . In this case, you are going to continue to use some of the extended features
of the MORE command.
9.16
Activity: Using the
Extended Features of MORE
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. You are on the desktop.
Click Start. Click Run.
You may run a program from the Run dialog box. You may have
data already in the Open text box. Run remembers the last command that was
keyed in. In this case, the command you want to execute is the shell, CMD.EXE.
2
If there is any text in the Open text box, clear it. Then key in CMD.EXE /X.
You are now going to execute the program CMD /X. The /X
ensures that you are going to be able to use the extensions to commands.
3
Click OK.
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
C:\>_
467
468
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
You have opened a Command Prompt window. The prompt in
your new window will vary. If you are not in the root directory of C, key in CD \.
4
Key in the following: C:\>A: e
5
Key in the following: A:\>MORE PERSONAL.FIL e
Gillay
Carolyn
Panezich
Frank
Tuttle
Steven
Maurdeff
Kathryn
Maurdeff
Sonia
Smith
Gregory
Smith
Carolyn
Winter
Jim
Winter
Linda
Tran
Tai Chan
Golden
Jane
Chang
Wendy
Brogan
Lloyd
Brogan
Sally
Babchuk
Nicholas
Babchuk
Bianca
Rodriguez Bob
Helm
Milton
Suzuki
Charlene
Markiw
Nicholas
Markiw
Emily
Nyles
John
Nyles
Sophie
— More (59%) —
699 Lemon
689 Lake
356 Embassy
550 Traver
550 Traver
311 Orchard
311 Orchard
333 Pick
333 Pick
345 Lakeview
345 Lakeview
356 Edgewood
111 Miller
111 Miller
13 Stratford
13 Stratford
20 Elm
333 Meadow
567 Abbey
354 Bell
10 Zion
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
Orange
Orange
Mission Viejo
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Garden Grove
Garden Grove
Orange
Orange
Ann Arbor
Santa Cruz
Santa Cruz
Sun City West
Sun City West
Ontario
Sherman Oaks
Rochester
Phoenix
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
CA
CA
CA
MI
MI
MI
MI
CA
CA
CA
CA
MI
CA
CA
AZ
AZ
CA
CA
MI
AZ
AZ
AZ
CA
Professor
Teacher
Juggler
Teacher
Student
Engineer
Housewife
Key Grip
Teacher
Doctor
Nurse
Librarian
Vice-President
Account Manager
Professor
Professor
Systems Analyst
Consultant
Day Care Teacher
Engineer
Retired
Retired
Retired
So far the MORE command is working in the usual way. With
extensions enabled, if you press the z, referred to as <space> in the syntax
diagram, you will display the next page. If you press the e key, referred to as
<ret> in the syntax diagram, you will display the next line in the file.
6
Press e twice.
Panezich
Tuttle
Maurdeff
Maurdeff
Smith
Smith
Winter
Winter
Tran
Golden
Chang
Brogan
Brogan
Babchuk
Babchuk
Rodriguez
Helm
Suzuki
Markiw
Markiw
Frank
Steven
Kathryn
Sonia
Gregory
Carolyn
Jim
Linda
Tai Chan
Jane
Wendy
Lloyd
Sally
Nicholas
Bianca
Bob
Milton
Charlene
Nicholas
Emily
689 Lake
356 Embassy
550 Traver
550 Traver
311 Orchard
311 Orchard
333 Pick
333 Pick
345 Lakeview
345 Lakeview
356 Edgewood
111 Miller
111 Miller
13 Stratford
13 Stratford
20 Elm
333 Meadow
567 Abbey
354 Bell
10 Zion
Orange
Mission Viejo
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Garden Grove
Garden Grove
Orange
Orange
Ann Arbor
Santa Cruz
Santa Cruz
Sun City West
Sun City West
Ontario
Sherman Oaks
Rochester
Phoenix
Sun City West
CA
CA
MI
MI
MI
MI
CA
CA
CA
CA
MI
CA
CA
AZ
AZ
CA
CA
MI
AZ
AZ
Teacher
Juggler
Teacher
Student
Engineer
Housewife
Key Grip
Teacher
Doctor
Nurse
Librarian
Vice-President
Account Manager
Professor
Professor
Systems Analyst
Consultant
Day Care Teacher
Engineer
Retired
9.16
Nyles
John
Nyles
Sophie
Markiw
Nick
Washingon Tyrone
— More (64%) —
ACTIVITY: USING THE EXTENDED FEATURES OF MORE
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
10 Zion
345 Newport
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Orange
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
Retired
Retired
Retired
Manager
By pressing e twice, you moved two lines down in the file.
You may exit the MORE command by keying in Q.
7
Press Q.
Tuttle
Maurdeff
Maurdeff
Smith
Smith
Winter
Winter
Tran
Golden
Chang
Brogan
Brogan
Babchuk
Babchuk
Rodriguez
Helm
Suzuki
Markiw
Markiw
Nyles
Nyles
Markiw
Washingon
Steven
Kathryn
Sonia
Gregory
Carolyn
Jim
Linda
Tai Chan
Jane
Wendy
Lloyd
Sally
Nicholas
Bianca
Bob
Milton
Charlene
Nicholas
Emily
John
Sophie
Nick
Tyrone
356 Embassy
550 Traver
550 Traver
311 Orchard
311 Orchard
333 Pick
333 Pick
345 Lakeview
345 Lakeview
356 Edgewood
111 Miller
111 Miller
13 Stratford
13 Stratford
20 Elm
333 Meadow
567 Abbey
354 Bell
10 Zion
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
10 Zion
345 Newport
Mission Viejo
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Ann Arbor
Garden Grove
Garden Grove
Orange
Orange
Ann Arbor
Santa Cruz
Santa Cruz
Sun City West
Sun City West
Ontario
Sherman Oaks
Rochester
Phoenix
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Orange
CA
MI
MI
MI
MI
CA
CA
CA
CA
MI
CA
CA
AZ
AZ
CA
CA
MI
AZ
AZ
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
Juggler
Teacher
Student
Engineer
Housewife
Key Grip
Teacher
Doctor
Nurse
Librarian
Vice-President
Account Manager
Professor
Professor
Systems Analyst
Consultant
Day Care Teacher
Engineer
Retired
Retired
Retired
Retired
Manager
A:\>_
By pressing Q, you exited the MORE command and returned to
the system prompt.
8
Key in the following: A:>MORE PERSONAL.FIL e
9
Key in the following: P
Nyles
Sophie
12 Brooks
-- More (59%) -- Lines:
Sun City West
CA
Retired
By pressing P where MORE stopped, you can now request how
many lines you want displayed.
10 Key in the following: 5 e
469
470
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
Nyles
Sophie
Markiw
Nick
Washingon Tyrone
Jones
Steven
Smith
David
Babchuk
Walter
-- More (72%) --
12 Brooks
10 Zion
345 Newport
32 North
120 Collins
12 View
Sun City West
Sun City West
Orange
Phoenix
Orange
Thousand Oaks
CA
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
CA
Retired
Retired
Manager
Buyer
Chef
President
You have displayed the next five lines.
11 Press the = sign.
Babchuk
Walter
12 View
-- More (72%)[Line: 29] --
Thousand Oaks
CA
President
Pressing the = sign displays which line number you are on.
12 Press S.
Babchuk
Walter
12 View
-- More (72%) -- Lines:
Thousand Oaks
CA
President
You are asked how many lines you want to skip in your display.
13 Key in the following: 3 e
Brogan
Babchuk
Babchuk
Rodriguez
Helm
Suzuki
Markiw
Markiw
Nyles
Nyles
Markiw
Washingon
Jones
Smith
Babchuk
JONES
Lo
Jones
Perez
Yuan
Markiw
Peat
Farneth
A:\>_
Sally
Nicholas
Bianca
Bob
Milton
Charlene
Nicholas
Emily
John
Sophie
Nick
Tyrone
Steven
David
Walter
JERRY
Ophelia
Ervin
Sergio
Suelin
Nicholas
Brian
Nichole
111 Miller
13 Stratford
13 Stratford
20 Elm
333 Meadow
567 Abbey
354 Bell
10 Zion
12 Brooks
12 Brooks
10 Zion
345 Newport
32 North
120 Collins
12 View
244 East
1213 Wick
15 Fourth
134 Seventh
56 Twin Leaf
12 Fifth
125 Second
237 Arbor
Santa Cruz
Sun City West
Sun City West
Ontario
Sherman Oaks
Rochester
Phoenix
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Sun City West
Orange
Phoenix
Orange
Thousand Oaks
Mission Viejo
Phoenix
Santa Cruz
Ann Arbor
Orange
Glendale
Vacaville
Vacaville
CA
AZ
AZ
CA
CA
MI
AZ
AZ
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
AZ
CA
CA
CA
AZ
CA
MI
CA
AZ
CA
CA
Account Manager
Professor
Professor
Systems Analyst
Consultant
Day Care Teacher
Engineer
Retired
Retired
Retired
Retired
Manager
Buyer
Chef
President
Systems Analyst
Writer
Banker
Editor
Artist
Engineer
Athlete
Dancer
9.18
ACTIVITY: COMBINING COMMANDS
You skipped three lines, which in this case took you to the end of
the file.
14 Close all open windows.
You have returned to the desktop.
9.17
Combining Commands
with Pipes and Filters
You can use the pipe symbol to join commands where the standard output of one
command is the standard input of the next command. The pipe symbol allows you
to connect two or more programs and create a flow of data. When you use the pipe
symbol, there must be a command on both sides of the actual symbol. If you use
redirection with the “pipeline,” a command does not have to be on either side of the
> or >>. Remember, when you are redirecting output from a command, it is an
“instead of” process. For instance, instead of writing the output of a command to
the screen, you are redirecting the output to a file. When you combine the use of
pipes and the >, the redirection becomes the end of the pipeline, the last step in the
process.
9.18
Activity: Combining Commands
Note 1:
Note 2:
1
Open a Command Prompt window.
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following:
A:\>FIND "Teacher" PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "CA" e
A:\>FIND "Teacher" PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "CA"
Panezich Frank
689 Lake
Orange
Winter
Linda
333 Pick
Garden Grove
CA
CA
Teacher
Teacher
A:\>_
You asked the FIND command to locate the lines that contained
“Teacher” in the PERSONAL.FIL, and to take the output from that command and
pipe it back through the FIND command again, locating the lines from that output
that contained “CA.” The results were that only the teachers who live in California
were displayed. Remember, the data in PERSONAL.FIL has not changed. You have
merely searched that data so you could display only those lines, or records, that met
your requirements. If you want to save the data you displayed, you must save it to a
file.
2
Key in the following: A:\>
FIND "Teacher" PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "CA" > TEACHER.FIL e
3
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE TEACHER.FIL e
471
472
CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
A:\>FIND "Teacher" PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "CA" > TEACHER.FIL
A:\>TYPE TEACHER.FIL
Panezich Frank
689 Lake
Winter
Linda
333 Pick
Orange
Garden Grove
CA
CA
Teacher
Teacher
A:\>_
You used FIND to locate all the teachers in California in the same
way you did in step 1. Since the FIND command sends its output to the screen, you
were able to redirect it. The results of the command did not appear on the screen
because you redirected the output to a file called TEACHER.FIL. You then used the
TYPE command to display that file on the screen. You can use the same filter more
than once in the same command line. You can also use filters in combination in the
same command line.
4
Key in the following:
A:\>FIND "PrOfeSSor" PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "AZ" ¦ SORT e
A:\>FIND "PrOfeSSor" PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "AZ" ¦ SORT
A:\>
The command found nothing, as it is case sensitive.
5
Press the up arrow key once.
6
Use the left arrow key until the cursor is under the P in PERSONAL.FIL.
7
Key in the following: /I z
8
Press the n key.
9
Press e
A:\>FIND "PrOfeSSor" /I PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "AZ" ¦ SORT
Babchuk
Bianca
13 Stratford Sun City West AZ Professor
Babchuk
Nicholas 13 Stratford Sun City West AZ Professor
A:\>_
This time the FIND command ignored the case and located
professor, regardless of how it was keyed in. You then piped (had the standard
output of the FIND command sent as standard input to the next FIND command) to
select only those who lived in Arizona (“AZ”). You then piped the standard output
of FIND to the SORT command because you wanted all the professors who live in
Arizona sorted in alphabetical order.
If you wanted a permanent copy of this list, you could have redirected the
standard output (normally displayed on the screen) to a file. For instance, if you had
9.18
ACTIVITY: COMBINING COMMANDS
keyed in the command as FIND "PrOfeSSor" /I PERSONAL.FIL ¦ FIND "AZ" ¦
SORT > AZ.FIL, the output of the command would have been placed in a file called
AZ.FIL.
Perhaps the easiest way to remember the rules of pipes, filters, and redirection is
that, when you use a pipe, there must be a command on either side of the pipe.
Remember, you are taking the standard output of a command and using it as
standard input to the next command. Remember also that not every command has
standard output. For instance, when you key in DEL filename at the system level,
there is no output that appears or is written to the screen. The file is simply deleted.
When you key in COPY MYFILE YOURFILE, the only item written to the screen is
the message “1 file(s) copied.” The standard output from the COPY command is
that message. Nothing else is written to the screen.
Conversely, when you use redirection, it is an “instead of” action. Instead of the
standard output being written to the screen, you are redirecting (sending) it somewhere else, such as a file or a device. You only get one output place. Since it is an
“instead of” action, you cannot say instead of displaying the output of the DIR
command on the screen, redirect the output to a file and redirect the output to the
screen. Your choice is either the screen or a file, not both. The device name for the
screen is CON. If you keyed in DIR > CON > TESTFILE, the output would not
appear on the screen, but would go to the file TESTFILE. If you keyed in DIR >
TESTFILE > CON the output would go to the screen. The output will go to the last
place it is directed to go. The primary use of pipes and filters is manipulating the
standard output and standard input of commands. You rarely use pipes and filters
to sort or find data in text or data files.
10 Key in the following: A:\>DIR ¦ SORT /+39 ¦ MORE e
A:\>DIR ¦ SORT /+39 ¦ MORE
Directory of A:\
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Volume in drive A is DATA
02/25/2002 11:04 AM
<DIR>
04/19/2002 03:34 PM
<DIR>
10/30/2001 01:46 PM
148
04/11/2002 12:20 PM
36
10/30/2001 02:47 PM
86
10/30/2001 02:10 PM
121
07/31/1999 12:53 PM
44
04/23/2002 01:04 PM
260
03/15/2002 08:29 PM
616
07/31/1999 12:53 PM
47
08/12/2000 04:12 PM
314
04/20/2002 12:27 PM
4,482
03/15/2002 01:38 PM
<DIR>
12/11/1999 04:03 PM
72
10/30/2001 01:41 PM
155
10/31/2001 02:49 PM
138
10/31/2001 04:51 PM
137
10/31/2001 04:50 PM
138
10/31/2001 02:49 PM
138
10/31/2001 04:51 PM
137
10/31/2001 04:50 PM
138
10/31/2001 04:51 PM
137
3PLANETS
ASTRO
ASTRO.TXT
b.bat
BONJOUR.NEW
BORN.TXT
BRIAN.FIL
BYCITY.CAP
CalifSurf.MUS
CAROLYN.FIL
CASES.FIL
CHKDSK.TXT
CLASS
DANCES.TXT
DRAMA.TV
FILE2.CZG
FILE2.FP
FILE2.SWT
FILE3.CZG
FILE3.FP
FILE3.SWT
FILE4.FP
473
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CHAPTER 9
10/31/2001
04/17/2002
— More —
Note:
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
11:37 AM
01:07 PM
<DIR>
253 GALAXY.TXT
GAMES
Your screen display will vary based on the work you did as well as the date
and time you created the files.
You took the directory display and piped the output to the SORT
command. You then sorted by the file name, which begins in the 39th column. You
then piped the output to the MORE command so that you could see the output one
screenful at a time. You can perform the same task with the parameters of the DIR
command. The command line DIR /ON /P would provide the same results.
11 Continue pressing the z until you have returned to the system prompt
or press Q to quit.
12 Key in the following: A:\>DIR ¦ FIND "<DIR>" ¦ SORT /+39 e
A:\>DIR ¦ FIND "<DIR>" ¦ SORT /+39
02/25/2002 11:04 AM
<DIR>
04/19/2002 03:34 PM
<DIR>
03/15/2002 01:38 PM
<DIR>
04/17/2002 01:07 PM
<DIR>
12/06/2001 09:24 AM
<DIR>
04/23/2002 08:43 AM
<DIR>
03/25/2002 02:11 PM
<DIR>
03/15/2002 07:29 PM
<DIR>
3PLANETS
ASTRO
CLASS
GAMES
MEDIA
TEST
TRIP
WORK
A:\>_
You sent the output of DIR to FIND. You were looking for any file
that had <DIR> in it. You used uppercase letters since that is how <DIR> is displayed. You had to use quotation marks to enclose <DIR>. Had you not done that,
the command line would have read the < and the > as redirection symbols. By
enclosing them, you ensured those symbols were read as character data. You then
sent that output to the SORT command with the /+39 parameter. Now you have an
alphabetical list of the subdirectories on your DATA disk. Again, you can do the
same task with the parameters of the DIR command. The command line DIR /AD
/ON would provide the same results, except you would see information about bytes
and volume label.
Chapter Summary
1. The redirection symbols are >, <, and >>.
2. The >> appends output redirected from standard output to the end of a file.
3. Redirection, pipes, and filters have to do with standard input and standard
output.
4. Any command that expects its input from the keyboard has standard input.
5. Any command that normally displays its output on the screen has standard
output.
6. Standard error means that the operating system writes error messages to the
screen.
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
7. You can redirect standard input and output to and from devices or files.
8. The pipe symbol is ¦.
9. The pipe takes standard output from one command and uses it as standard
input for the next command.
10. You can pipe many programs together.
11. Filters take data, change it in some fashion, and send the output to the screen.
12. The three filters are SORT, FIND, and MORE.
13. Two of the SORT command parameters are /R for reverse order and /+n for
column number.
14. FIND has four parameters: /V for everything except the specified item, /C for
the number of occurrences of the item, /N for the line number where the item
appears in the file, and /I for results regardless of case.
15. MORE lets you look at text files one screenful at a time. The parameter /C clears
the screen before the display begins.
16. You may enable shell extensions (extended features) in a command prompt
window. However they are enabled by default. Extensions give you more
options with commands.
17. You must have a command on both ends of the pipe.
18. Redirection is the last action you can take. You write either to the screen or to a
file, not to both. You either accept input from the keyboard or from a file.
19. You can string together pipes and filters to create your own commands.
20. Each part of a command must be able to stand alone on the command line.
21. Redirection performs an “instead of” action.
Key Terms
ASCII sort sequence
case sensitive
character string
extension
filter
input/output (I/O)
pipe
redirection
standard error
standard input
standard output
Discussion Questions
1. Explain redirection.
2. Explain the terms standard input, standard output, and standard error.
3. Does every operating system command use standard input and standard
output? If not, why not?
4. What is the difference between > and >> when redirecting output?
5. Explain how the symbol < is used.
6. Keying in COPY DIR filename will not give you a file containing the directory
display. Why?
7. What are filters?
8. What do the three SORT parameters covered in this chapter—/n, /O, and /R—
represent?
9. Explain how the SORT command works. Describe any limitations of the SORT
command.
10. Identify one place to which standard output can be written.
11. What is the purpose of the FIND command?
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12. What are four parameters that can be used with the FIND command, and what
do they represent?
13. Why must a character string be enclosed in quotation marks when using the
FIND command?
14. What are pipes?
15. Are there any restrictions on the use of pipes? If so, what are they?
16. How is the MORE command used?
17. What are two useful features that extended features provides for the MORE
command?
18. How can combining filters be useful?
True/False Questions
For each question, circle the letter T if the statement is true or the letter F if the
statement is false.
T
F
1. All system commands use standard input and standard output.
T
F
2. Standard output can be directed to a file.
T
F
3. There are only two filter commands: FIND and SORT.
T
F
4. You can use the FIND command to find data either with or
without a specified string enclosed in double-quotes.
T
F
5. The SORT command allows you to sort data from the keyboard.
Completion Questions
Write the correct answer in each blank space.
6. The standard input device is the _______________.
7. The standard output device is the _______________.
8. In the syntax SORT [/R] [/+n], the letter n represents a(n) _______________.
9. The filter command used to display information one screenful at a time is the
_______________ command.
10. The redirection symbols are _______________, _______________, and
_______________.
Multiple Choice Questions
For each question, write the letter for the correct answer in the blank space.
11. The command that redirects the output of the DIR command to the file
____
DIRTXT.TXT is
a. DIR ¦ DIRTXT.TXT
b. DIR < DIRTXT.TXT
c. DIR >DIRTXT.TXT
d. COPY DIR DIRTXT.TXT
12. The parameter used with the command SORT to sort a list by the fifth
____
column of data in a file (where the fifth column begins at character
number 25) would be:
a. /+5
b. /+25
c. /+5-25
d. /+R=25
WRITING COMMANDS
____
____
____
13. To display MYFILE.FIL one screenful at a time, you would use:
a. MORE MYFILE.FIL
b. TYPE MYFILE.FIL ¦ MORE
c. COPY MYFILE.FIL > MORE
d. either a or b
14. The command to display the files FIRST.FIL and SECOND.FIL on the
screen, each one screenful at a time, is:
a. MORE FIRST.FIL SECOND.FIL
b. MORE > FIRST.FIL > SECOND.FIL
c. FIRST.FIL >> SECOND.FIL >> MORE
d. none of the above
15. When using the SORT command, if you key in 1234, 96, 4, and 789, the
order returned would be:
a. 4
96
789
1234
b. 1234 789
96
4
c. 1234 4
789
96
d. 96
789
4
1234
Writing Commands
Note:
If you find it necessary to perform some of the steps in order to write your
answers, do the work on a new disk, not on your DATA or HOMEWORK
disk. To be able to perform the steps, you will need to copy the files
\WUGXP\STATES.USA, \WUGXP\PERSONAL.FIL,
\WUGXP\STEVEN.FIL, and \WUGXP\CASES.FIL to the root of the
new disk.
Write the step(s) or command(s) to perform the required action as if you were at the
computer. The prompt will indicate the default drive and directory.
16. Without changing the default directory, make a directory on the A drive named
WORK. Without changing the default directory, locate every occurrence of
“Teacher” in the file PERSONAL.FIL located in the root directory of the disk in
the A drive, and send the output to a file called TEACHER.FIL, which is in the
WORK directory of the disk in the A drive.
C:\>
17. Display the contents of PERSONAL.FIL, located on the root of the disk in the A
drive, one screenful at a time.
C:\TEMP>
18. Display the contents of PERSONAL.FIL, located on the root of the disk in the A
drive, one screenful at a time beginning with the 25th record (line), on a clear
screen.
A:\>
19. Append the contents of STEVEN.FIL to the file called CASES.FIL. Both files are
on the root of the disk in Drive A.
C:\>
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CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
20. Find out how many occurrences of “Teacher” appear in the file
PERSONAL.FIL, which is located on the root of the disk in Drive A.
C:\>
Homework Assignments
Note 1: Place the HOMEWORK disk in Drive A. Be sure to work on the
HOMEWORK disk, not the DATA disk.
Note 2: The homework problems assume that Drive C is the hard disk and that
the HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. If you are using another drive,
such as floppy Drive B or hard Drive D, be sure to substitute that drive
letter when reading the questions and answers.
Note 3: All subdirectories that are created will be under the root directory
unless otherwise specified.
Note 4: The homework problems will use C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 as the
directory where the system utility files are located.
Note 5: It is assumed that the path includes C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32.
Note 6: Do not save the output from the commands to a file unless specifically
asked to do so.
Problem Set I
Problem A
A-a
Place the HOMEWORK disk in Drive A.
A-b
Copy all the files from the WUGXP\SPORTS directory to the HOMEWORK
disk, maintaining the same directory structure on the HOMEWORK disk. (Hint:
Remember XCOPY.)
A-c
With the root directory of the A drive as the default directory and using the
relative path, sort the file called BASKETBL.TMS in the SPORTS
subdirectory.
____
1. Which command(s) could you have used?
a. SORT SPORTS\BASKETBL.TMS
b. TYPE BASKETBL.TMS ¦ SORT
c. both a and b
d. neither a nor b
____
2. What team is listed first?
a. Atlanta Hawks
b. Boston Celtics
c. Charlotte Hornets
d. Los Angeles Lakers
A-d
Key in the following:
A:\>COPY \SPORTS\*.TMS \SPORTS\ALL.SPT e
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
A-e
____
With the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk as the default and using the
relative path, display the contents of the SPORTS\ALL.SPT file one
screenful at a time.
3. Which command did you use?
a. TYPE SPORTS\ALL.SPT < MORE
b. TYPE SPORTS\ALL.SPT /P
c. MORE SPORTS\ALL.SPT
d. MORE < TYPE SPORTS\ALL.SPT
A-f
Press Q to exit.
A-g
Sort the ALL.SPT file in reverse order and display the output one screenful at
a time.
____
4. What team appeared first on the first screen display?
a. Utah Jazz
b. Washington Bullets
c. USC Trojans
d. Washington Redskins
A-h
Press Q to exit.
A-i
In the ALL.SPT file, find all the teams that have “Los” in their names. Do not
ignore case.
____
5. What results are displayed?
a. Los Angeles Lakers
b. Los Angeles Dodgers
c. neither a nor b appears
d. both a and b appear
Problem B
B-a
____
B-b
____
B-c
Be sure you have the ALL.SPT file from Problem A above. In the ALL.SPT
file, find all the teams that have “go” in their names. Do not ignore case.
6. What team appears that is not from Chicago?
a. Michigan Gophers
b. San Diego Padres
c. San Diego Chargers
d. all teams are from Chicago
Copy PERSONAL.FIL from C:\WUGXP to A:\TRAVEL. Sort the
TRAVEL\PERSONAL.FIL file in alphabetical order.
7. What name appears last?
a. Winter
b. Wyse
c. Yuan
d. Zola
From TRAVEL\PERSONAL.FIL, create a file sorted by city (city starts in
column 34) called CALIF.FIL that will be saved to the TRAVEL subdirectory.
This file will contain only people who live in California (CA). Begin your
command with the FIND command.
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CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
8. What street name is listed last in CALIF.FIL?
a. Brooks
b. Lake
c. Pick
d. View
____
B-d
Copy the STATES.USA file from the WUGXP directory to the subdirectory
called TRAVEL on the HOMEWORK disk keeping the same file name.
B-e
In the STATES.USA file, find all the states that are located in the South and
sort the output in reverse alphabetical order.
____
10. What state is displayed first?
a. South Carolina
b. North Carolina
c. Louisiana
d. Florida
Problem Set II
Note 1: Before proceeding with these assignments, check with your lab instructor
to see if there are any special procedures you should follow.
Note 2: The HOMEWORK disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed as the default drive
and the default directory. All work will occur on the HOMEWORK disk.
Note 3: Make sure that NAME.BAT, MARK.FIL, GETYN.COM, GO.BAT, and
NAME.FIL are all present in the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk
before proceeding with these problems.
Note 4: All files with the .HW extension must be created in the root directory of the
HOMEWORK disk.
1
Use the text editor (Edit) to edit NAME.FIL with current information. Here is an
example, but your instructor will have other information that applies to your
class.
Bette A. Peat
CIS 55
T-Th 8-9:30
Chapter 9 Homework
2
Save the file and close the editor.
You have returned to the system level. The file called NAME.FIL
has been updated with the current pertinent information.
To Create 1.HW
While the root directory of the HOMEWORK disk is the default, locate all the
people who live in Orange in the TRAVEL\PERSONAL.FIL file and sort them in
descending order (Hint: Z to A) sending the output to a file called 1.HW.
HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS
To Create 2.HW
1
Sort the files in the TRAVEL directory of the HOMEWORK disk. Sort in file name
order. Use the SORT command. File name begins in column 40. Save the output
to a file called 2.HW.
2
Sort the files in the SPORTS directory of the HOMEWORK disk. Sort in file name
order. Use the SORT command. Base your sort on column 40. Append the
output to the file called 2.HW.
To Create 3.HW
In the SPORTS\ALL.SPT file, find all the teams that have “in” within their
names, regardless of case, and direct the output to a file called 3.HW.
To Create 4.HW
In the TRAVEL\PERSONAL.FIL file, find all occurrences, regardless of case, of
the name Jones, sort them by occupation (column 53) and direct the output to a
file called 4.HW.
To Create 5.HW
In the SPORTS\ALL.SPT file, locate all the lines that do not have an “r” in them,
regardless of case, and direct the output to a file called 5.HW.
To Print Your Homework
1
Be sure the printer is on and ready to accept print jobs from your computer.
2
Key in the following (be very careful to make no typing errors):
GO NAME.FIL 1.HW 2.HW 3.HW 4.HW 5.HW e
If the files you requested, 1.HW, 2.HW, etc. do not exist in the
default directory, you will see the following message on the screen:
File Not Found
The system cannot find the file specified.
Is there a message that says “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
The operating system is telling you that the file cannot be found. If you see this
screen, press Y to see what could be wrong, and repeat the print procedure after you
have corrected the problem.
If the default directory contains the specified files, the following message will
appear on the screen:
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CHAPTER 9
PIPES, FILTERS, AND REDIRECTION
Is there a message that say “File Not Found. The system cannot
find the file specified.”
If so, press Y to find out what could be wrong.
Otherwise, press N to continue.
You will need to press N once for each file you are printing.
3
Follow the messages on the screen until the Notepad program opens. Your
homework is now ready to print.
4
On the Notepad menu bar, click File. Click Print. The print dialog box opens. If
you have more than one printer, your printer choices will be displayed. The
default printer is the highlighted printer.
5
Click the Print button.
6
In the Notepad window, click File. Click Exit.
The following will appear on the Command Prompt screen:
You are about to delete any file with the .HW extension.
Before you delete your homework files, check your hard copy or
print out.
If your homework printout is correct, press Y to delete the
files.
If your homework printout is incorrect, press N.
Pressing N will prevent your homework files from being deleted.
You can then begin again.
At this point, look at your printout. If it is correct, you can press Y to delete the
homework files for this chapter. If your printout is incorrect, you can press N. That
will preserve your homework and you will need to redo only the problem that was
incorrect, not all the homework assignments.
7
Press Y e
You have returned to the default prompt.
8
Close the Command Prompt session.
9
Execute the shut-down procedure.
Problem Set III—Brief Essay
1. List and explain the syntax and at least two parameters for the three filter
commands (FIND, SORT, and MORE). Also explain how redirection and piping
can work with each of them.
2. Discuss two real-world scenarios where you would use pipes, a filters, and
redirection. Include one example of a pipe, a filter, and a use of redirection.
Learning Objectives
After completing this chapter you will be able to:
1. Compare and contrast batch and interactive
processing.
2. Explain how batch files work.
3. Explain the purpose and function of the
REM, ECHO, and PAUSE commands.
4. Explain how to stop or interrupt the batch file
process.
5. Explain the function and use of replaceable
parameters in batch files.
6. Explain the function of pipes, filters, and
redirection in batch files.
Student Outcomes
1. Use Edit to write batch files.
2. Use COPY CON to write batch files.
3. Write and execute a simple batch file.
4. Write a batch file to load an application
program.
5. Use the REM, PAUSE, and ECHO commands
in batch files.
6. Terminate a batch file while it is executing.
7. Write batch files using replaceable parameters.
8. Write a batch file using pipes, filters, and
redirection.
Chapter Overview
You have used many command line commands
throughout this textbook. Many of these commands are repeated in the same sequence. If more
than one command is needed to execute a program, you have to key in each command at the
system prompt. This repetitive, time-consuming
process increases the possibility of human error.
A batch file is a text file that contains a series of
commands stored in the order the user wants
them carried out. It executes a series of commands with a minimum number of keystrokes.
Batch files allow you to automate a process and,
at the same time, create more powerful commands, which increases productivity.
In this chapter, you will learn to create batch
files to automate a sequence of commands, to
write and use batch files for complex tasks, to use
batch file subcommands, to halt the execution of
a batch file, and to write batch files using replaceable parameters. You will also learn how batch
files can be used from the desktop.
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INTRODUCTION TO BATCH FILES
10.1
Concepts of Batch and
Interactive Processing
Operating system commands used at the command line are programs that are
executed or run when you key in the command name. If you wish to run more than
one command, you need to key in each command at the system prompt. You can,
however, customize and automate the sequence of commands by writing a command sequence, called a batch file or a command file, to be executed with a minimum number of keystrokes. Any command you can enter at the system prompt can
be included in a batch file. You can even execute an application program from a
batch file. When you string together a sequence of steps in an application program,
it is called a “macro,” which is conceptually similar to a batch file.
A batch file contains one or more commands. To create this file of commands, you
write a text file using Edit, COPY CON, or a text editor such as Notepad. You can
also use a word processor providing it has a “Save as text file” option. The file that
you write and name will run any command that the operating system can execute.
This file must have the file extension .BAT if you are using a version of Windows
earlier than Windows 2000 Professional. Beginning with Windows 2000 Professional, you may also use the extension .CMD. The file must be an ASCII file. Once
you have written this command file, you execute or run it by simply keying in the
name of the batch file, just as you key in the name of a command. The operating
system reads and executes each line of the batch file, as if you were sitting at the
terminal and separately keying in each command line. Once you start running a
batch file, your attention or input is not needed until the batch file has finished
executing.
Batch files are used for several reasons. They allow you to minimize keystrokes,
and they minimize the possibility of errors, as you do not have to key in the commands over and over. Batch files are used to put together a complex sequence of
commands and store them under an easily remembered name. They automate any
frequent and/or consistent procedures that you always want to do in the same
manner, such as backing up critical data to an alternate location. In addition, you
can execute application programs by calling them with a batch file.
“Batch” is an old data-processing term. In the early days of computing, work was
done by submitting a job (or all the instructions needed to run the job successfully)
to a data-processing department, which would run these jobs in batches. There was
no chance for anyone to interact with the program. The job was run, and the output
was delivered. Thus, when you run a batch job, you are running a computer routine
without interruption.
Batch jobs are still run today. An example of a batch job would be running a
payroll—issuing paychecks. The computer program that calculates and prints
paychecks is run without interruption. The output or results are the paychecks. This
job can be run at any time. If a company decides that payday will be Friday, the
data-processing department can run the payroll Thursday night. If the company
decides payday will be Monday, the data-processing department can run the payroll
Sunday night. This is batch processing.
Batch processing is in contrast to an interactive mode of data processing. Sometimes called online or real time mode, interactive mode means you are interacting
10.2
HOW BATCH FILES WORK
directly with the computer. An automated teller machine (ATM) that a bank uses so
that you can withdraw or deposit money without human intervention is an example
of interactive processing. The bank needs instant updating of its records. It cannot
wait until next week to run a batch job to find out how much money you have
deposited or withdrawn. If you withdraw $100, the bank first wants to be sure that
you have $100 in your account, and then it wants the $100 subtracted immediately
from your balance. You are dealing with the computer in an interactive, real time
mode—the data is processed without delay.
In the PC world, you can work in interactive mode, but this usually requires a
connection to another computer, over phone lines, DSL, or a cable modem. The
Internet allows you to communicate directly with other computers and perform
such functions as reviewing airline flight schedules and booking an airline ticket.
Although interactive mode can be exciting, most of the time you are working oneon-one with your computer and are not in interactive mode. Hence, the batch mode
is the area of emphasis.
10.2
How Batch Files Work
You will be creating and executing batch files in this chapter. By now you should
know that data and programs are stored as files, but how does the operating system
know the difference between a data file and a program file? As mentioned in
previous chapters, it knows the difference based on the file extension. When you
key in something at the prompt, the operating system first checks in RAM to
compare what you keyed in to the internal table of commands. If it finds a match,
the program is executed. If what you keyed in does not match an internal command,
the operating system looks on the default drive and directory for the extension
.COM, meaning command file, first. Then the operating system looks for the file
extension .EXE, meaning executable file (this extension is used for system utility
programs and most application software).
If what you keyed in does not match either .COM or .EXE, the operating system
looks on the default drive and directory for the file extension .BAT, meaning batch
file. If it finds a match, it loads and executes the batch file, one line at a time. It then
looks for .CMD, meaning command file. If it finds a match, it loads and executes the
command file, one line at a time. If what you keyed in does not match any of the
above criteria, it continues to search in your default directory for files with the
following extensions: .VBS, .VBE, JS, JSE, WSF and WSH. Table 10.1 lists the search
order for extensions.
Extension
Meaning
.COM
Command file
.EXE
Executable file
.BAT
Batch file
.CMD
Command script file
.VB
VBScript file (Visual Basic)
.VBE
VBScript Encoded Script file (Visual Basic)
.JS
JScript file (JavaScript)
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.JSE
JScript Encoded Script file (JavaScript)
.WSF
Windows Script file
.WSH
Windows Script Host Settings file
Table 10.1—Search Order for Extensions
If the command interpreter does not find any of these in your default drive and
directory, it then searches your search path as set in the PATH statement, in the file
extension order listed above. If your file name does not meet any of these criteria,
then you see the error message, “filename is not recognized as an internal or external
command, operable program or batch file.”
What if you had files on a disk that had the same file name but three different file
extensions, such as CHKDSK.COM, CHKDSK.EXE, and CHKDSK.BAT? How
would the operating system know which program to load and execute? Priority
rules are followed. The operating system looks for the program with the .COM file
extension first and, if found, would never get to the other files. However, if you
were more specific and keyed in both the file name and the file extension, such as
CHKDSK.BAT, the operating system would then execute the file name you specified.
Remember that, since the batch file is a program, either the .BAT file must be on
the default drive and directory or the path must be set to the location of the batch
file so you may invoke it. Most importantly, each line in a batch file must contain
only one command.
10.3
Using Edit to Write Batch Files
To write batch files, you need a mechanism to create an ASCII text file, since that is
what a batch file is. You should remember that ASCII is a code used by the operating system to interpret the letters, numbers, and punctuation marks that you key in.
In simple terms, if a file is readable with the TYPE command, it is an ASCII text file.
You can use a word-processing program to write a batch file if it has a nondocument
or text mode. However, most word-processing programs are quite large and take
time to load into memory. Most batch files are not very long, nor do they need the
features of a word processor. Using a word processor to write a batch file is like
using a sledgehammer to kill a fly.
Having a small, simple text editor is so important that the operating system
includes one as part of the system utility programs. This is the Command Line
editor, called Edit. Edit is simple to use and universal. You will write some batch
files using Edit. Remember, Edit is only a tool to create the file; it does not run or
execute it. You execute the file when you key in the file name at the system prompt
in the Command Line window. Each line in a batch file must contain only one
command. A batch file can have any legal file name but the file extension must
always be .BAT or .CMD.
If you are in the Windows interface, the text editor is Notepad. Like Edit,
Notepad creates text-only files and may be used to write batch files. However, if you
are having problems with Windows, you will not have Notepad available to you
because you need a graphical user interface to use Notepad. Edit, on the other hand,
10.4
ACTIVITY: WRITING AND EXECUTING A BATCH FILE
can work at the command line. In fact, you will later see that when you create your
startup disk, Edit is on the disk, but not Notepad. Thus, in the following activities,
you will be using Edit.
10.4
Activity: Writing and
Executing a Batch File
Note 1:
Note 2:
Note 3:
Note 4:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Although you may use a mouse with the MS-DOS editor, the instructions
will show the keystroke steps, not the mouse steps.
In some systems, the mouse will not work in Edit unless you change the
properties of Edit to open Edit in full-screen mode or clear the Quick Edit
Mode check box in the Command Line property sheet (Options tab).
The amount of space shown as remaining on the disk will vary, depending
on the size and placement of the batch files on your disk.
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT EXAMPLE.BAT e
You are now using the Command Line editor. You are going to
create a batch file named EXAMPLE. The file extension must be .BAT or .CMD.
2
Key in the following: DIR *.NEW e
3
Key in the following: DIR C:\WUGXP\*.FIL e
Look at each line. Each one is a legitimate operating system
command that could be keyed in at the prompt. Each command is on a separate
line. The first line asks for a listing of all the files on the disk in the default drive that
have the file extension .TXT. The second line asks for all the files in the WUGXP
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directory in the C drive that have the file extension FIL. At this point, you have
written the batch file. Next, you need to exit Edit and save the file to disk.
4
Press a + F.
5
Press X.
Since you have not saved the file, Edit reminds you with a dialog
box that, if you want this file on the disk, you must save it.
6
Press Y.
A:\>EDIT EXAMPLE.BAT
A:\>_
You have saved your file, exited Edit, and returned to the system
prompt.
7
Key in the following: A:\>DIR EXAMPLE.BAT e
A:\>DIR EXAMPLE.BAT
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
04/29/2002
12:57 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
33 EXAMPLE.BAT
33 bytes
936,960 bytes free
A:\>_
The DIR EXAMPLE.BAT command shows that there is a file on
the DATA disk called EXAMPLE.BAT. It looks like any other text file.
How do you make the operating system treat it like a program so that you can
execute it? You simply key in the name of the file at the prompt. You do not need to
key in the extension, just the name. The operating system first looks for a file in its
internal table called EXAMPLE. It does not find it. It then looks for a file called
EXAMPLE.COM on the default disk, the DATA disk. No file exists called
EXAMPLE.COM. Next, it looks for a file on the default disk called EXAMPLE.EXE.
No file exists called EXAMPLE.EXE. It then looks for a file called EXAMPLE.BAT
on the default disk. It does find a file by this name. It loads it into memory and
executes each line, one at a time. Thus, to execute the batch file called EXAMPLE,
key in the name of the file at the prompt. Watch what happens on the screen after
you key in the file name.
10.5
8
WRITING AND EXECUTING A BATCH FILE TO SAVE KEYSTROKES
Key in the following: A:\>EXAMPLE e
A:\>EXAMPLE
A:\>DIR *.NEW
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10/30/2001
02:47 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
86 BONJOUR.NEW
86 bytes
936,960 bytes free
A:\>DIR C:\WUGXP\*.FIL
Volume in drive C is ADMIN504
Volume Serial Number is 0E38-11FF
Directory of C:\WUGXP
08/12/2000
08/12/2000
07/31/1999
07/31/1999
07/31/2000
08/12/2000
07/31/1999
12/06/2001
07/31/1999
10/31/2001
04:12 PM
04:12 PM
12:53 PM
12:53 PM
04:32 PM
04:12 PM
12:53 PM
12:25 AM
12:53 PM
06:40 PM
10 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
73 MARK.FIL
314 CASES.FIL
44 FRANK.FIL
2,672 NEWPRSON.FIL
2,307 PERSONAL.FIL
3 Y.FIL
47 CAROLYN.FIL
465 person.fil
46 STEVEN.FIL
188 ZODIAC.FIL
6,159 bytes
6,785,228,800 bytes free
A:\>_
(Note: Part of the display may have scrolled off of your screen.)
The operating system read and executed each line of the batch file you wrote, one
line at a time. The screen displayed each command line and the results of the
command line as it executed. Each line executed as if you had sat in front of the
keyboard and keyed in each command individually. You did key in the commands
when you wrote the batch file, but you had to key them in only once. The first line
was DIR *.NEW. When the operating system read that line, it executed it and
showed on the screen the file on the DATA disk with the file extension .NEW. It then
read the next line of the batch file and looked in the root directory of Drive C for any
file that had the file extension .FIL. It found 10 files with that extension, and displayed their names on the screen. Now that you have written the file
EXAMPLE.BAT, you can execute this batch file’s commands over and over again by
keying in EXAMPLE at the prompt.
10.5
Writing and Executing a Batch
File to Save Keystrokes
The previous example showed you how to write and execute a batch file, but that
file is not especially useful. The next batch file to be written will allow you to key in
only one keystroke instead of seven. As you know, the command DIR /AD will
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quickly show you any subdirectories on the DATA disk. The /A switch means
attribute, and the attribute you want displayed is D for directories. This command is
composed of seven keystrokes, and you must have the proper parameters. With a
batch file, you can do the same task by pressing only one key.
The DIR command has other parameters that are very useful. One of these is O
for order. There are many kinds of order you can achieve. One kind that is useful is
the arrangement of files by size. The command line would be DIR /OS. The O is for
order, and the S is to arrange by size from the smallest to the largest file. If you
wanted to reverse the order so that the files would be displayed from the largest to
smallest, the command would be DIR /O-S. The O is still for order, but the - is for
reverse order, placing smallest files at the end of the listing. The S is for file size.
This command would take eight keystrokes. You can reduce it to one.
These batch files you are going to write are very small—one line. It seems like a
lot of trouble to load Edit just to accomplish this task. If you would rather not load
Edit, you can use the COPY command to write a simple ASCII file. The syntax is:
COPY CON filename
What you are doing here is copying what you key in (CON) to a file name. CON
is the operating system’s name for the keyboard/console devices of your computer.
You are still following the syntax of the COPY command; it is just that now you are
copying from a device—the console (CON)—to a file. Remember that in an early
chapter, you copied to a device, the printer (COPY filename PRN). Just as PRN,
LPT1, and LPT2 are reserved device names, so is CON.
When you are done keying in text, you must tell the COPY command you are
finished. You do this by pressing the 6 key and then the e key. This writes the
data you keyed in to the file name you specified. This is what you have been doing
in your Homework assignments when you have entered data in NAME.FIL. The
only problem with COPY CON, as it is informally referred to, is that you cannot
correct errors once you press e at the end of a command line. Nor can you use
COPY CON to correct errors in an existing file. To do that, you need an editor, such
as Edit. But nothing is faster than using COPY CON.
10.6
Activity: Writing and Executing
a One-letter Batch File
Note 1: The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Note 2: For these examples, the use of COPY CON will be shown. If you make
errors, you can either use COPY CON and key in all the data again or use
the MS-DOS editor to correct the errors.
Note 3: In earlier chapters you may have used DOSKEY and the function keys to
correct errors. Either of these methods will work with COPY CON.
1
Key in the following: A:\>COPY CON D.BAT e
A:\>COPY CON D.BAT
_
10.6
ACTIVITY: WRITING AND EXECUTING A ONE-LETTER BATCH FILE
When you keyed in COPY CON D.BAT, you were informing the
COPY command that you wanted to make the keyboard the source. The cursor is
blinking right below the prompt, and the screen is blank.
2
Key in the following: DIR /AD e
A:\>COPY CON D.BAT
DIR /AD
_
You have one line. You are finished keying in data and you wish
this line to be saved to a file called D.BAT. First, however, you must tell COPY you
are finished.
3
Press 6 e
A:\>COPY CON D.BAT
DIR /AD
^Z
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
By pressing 6 and then e, you sent a signal to COPY that
you were done. The 6 appeared on the screen as ^Z. Pressing c + Z will
produce the same results as 6. You then got the message “1 file(s) copied” and
were returned to the system level.
4
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE D.BAT e
A:\>TYPE D.BAT
DIR /AD
A:\>_
You wrote a one-line batch file named D.BAT with COPY CON
and saved the file D.BAT to the disk. Once you returned to the system prompt, you
displayed the contents of D.BAT with the TYPE command. The fact that you could
display this file with the TYPE command is another indication that it is indeed an
ASCII file. All COPY CON did was allow you to create the file, and TYPE merely
displayed what is inside the file. To execute the file, you must key in the file name.
Now, whenever you want to see the subdirectories on the DATA disk in Drive A,
you only have to key in one letter to execute this command.
5
Key in the following: A:\>D e
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A:\>D
A:\>DIR /AD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
03/25/2002
12/06/2001
04/17/2002
02/25/2002
04/19/2002
04/23/2002
01:38 PM
<DIR>
07:29 PM
<DIR>
02:11 PM
<DIR>
09:24 AM
<DIR>
01:07 PM
<DIR>
11:04 AM
<DIR>
03:34 PM
<DIR>
08:43 AM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
8 Dir(s)
CLASS
WORK
TRIP
MEDIA
GAMES
3PLANETS
ASTRO
TEST
0 bytes
936,448 bytes free
A:\>_
Your display may vary based on what subdirectories are on the
DATA disk and in what order they were created. As you can see, you set up a
command sequence in a batch file called D.BAT. You can run this batch file whenever the need arises, simply by keying in the name of the batch file at the system
prompt. You can also display the files by size, with the smallest file at the end of the
list.
6
Key in the following: A:\>COPY CON S.BAT e
DIR /O-S e
6e
A:\>COPY CON S.BAT
DIR /O-S
^Z
1 File(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have written another simple one-line batch file and saved it to
the default directory.
7
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE S.BAT e
A:\>TYPE S.BAT
DIR /O-S
A:\>_
10.7
USING BATCH FILES TO ALTER YOUR COMMAND LINE ENVIRONMENT
After saving the file to disk, you looked at its contents with the
TYPE command. To execute the batch file, you must key in the batch file name (S) at
the system prompt.
8
Key in the following: A:\>S e
A:\>S
A:\>DIR /O-S
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 3330-1807
Directory of A:\
12/06/2001
12/06/2001
10/30/2001
05/27/2001
08/12/2000
12/11/1999
11/16/2000
05/30/2000
11/16/2000
07/31/1999
07/04/2002
07/31/1999
07/04/2002
07/04/2002
07/06/2002
04/29/2002
04/29/2002
08/12/2000
10/30/2001
07/04/2002
06/30/2002
06/27/2002
06/27/2002
07/05/2002
06/27/2002
07/04/2002
12:16 AM
12:15 AM
02:47 PM
10:08 PM
03:12 PM
03:03 PM
11:00 AM
03:32 PM
11:00 AM
12:53 PM
02:22 PM
12:53 PM
02:24 PM
02:24 PM
10:26 AM
01:34 PM
01:32 PM
04:12 PM
03:33 PM
<DIR>
11:05 PM
<DIR>
02:45 PM
<DIR>
07:07 PM
<DIR>
07:00 PM
<DIR>
01:24 PM
<DIR>
02:17 PM
<DIR>
10:43 PM
<DIR>
48 File(s)
8 Dir(s)
99
97
86
81
73
72
59
53
53
47
45
44
37
37
31
10
9
3
LONGFILENAMING.TXT
LONGFILENAMED.TXT
BONJOUR.NEW
LONGFILENAME.TXT
MARK.FIL
DANCES.TXT
Sandy and Patty.txt
HELLO.TXT
Sandy and Nicki.txt
CAROLYN.FIL
STEVEN.FIL
BRIAN.FIL
b.bat
TEST.BAT
EXAMPLE.BAT
S.BAT
D.BAT
Y.FIL
MEDIA
ASTRO
TRIP
WORK
CLASS
TEST
3PLANETS
GAMES
22,079 bytes
935,936 bytes free
A:\>_
(The graphic represents the top and bottom of what you will see
scroll by on your screen.) The files are listed by size, and all the subdirectories are
grouped at the bottom of the display. Because directories have no size, they are
listed last as the smallest files.
10.7
Using Batch Files to Alter Your
Command Line Environment
Today, in the Windows environment, you typically open a command line session by
clicking on the icon on the Start Menu. The window can be opened from a short cut
as well. The short cut can then be altered to run in a customized way.
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In Chapter 8, disk organization was discussed. It was suggested that, on your
own system, you might create a subdirectory called Batch to hold your batch files,
and Utils to hold utility files. These two user-created directories will not be part of
the normal path in a command line window. If you have batch files that you like to
use when in a command line session, it would be helpful if the default path included these two directories.
You will first create two subdirectories on the DATA disk, and then add them to
the path for use in your command line sessions. Note: To be truly useful, the directories would be on your own system on the hard drive. Using the DATA disk to do
this could, in the real world, present a serious problem, in that the DATA disk that
contained the two subdirectories would have to be in the A drive each and every
time you used your short cut to begin a command line session.
10.8
Activity: Creating a Batch File to Alter
the Command Line Session Environment
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>MD Batch e
2
Key in the following: A:\>MD Utils e
3
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /AD e
A:\>MD Batch
A:\>MD Utils
A:\>DIR /AD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
03/25/2002
12/06/2001
04/17/2002
02/25/2002
04/19/2002
04/23/2002
04/29/2002
04/29/2002
01:38 PM
<DIR>
07:29 PM
<DIR>
02:11 PM
<DIR>
09:24 AM
<DIR>
01:07 PM
<DIR>
11:04 AM
<DIR>
03:34 PM
<DIR>
08:43 AM
<DIR>
01:58 PM
<DIR>
01:58 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
10 Dir(s)
CLASS
WORK
TRIP
MEDIA
GAMES
3PLANETS
ASTRO
TEST
Batch
Utils
0 bytes
934,912 bytes free
A:\>_
You have created two subdirectories on the DATA disk and used
the DIR command to verify their existence. Notice that the operating system remembers the case you used when you created the directories.
10.8
ACTIVITY: CREATING BATCH FILE TO ALTER COMMAND LINE SESSION ENVIRONMENT
You would like the directory names to be in upper case. You can use the REN
command to change the case.
4
Key in the following: A:\>REN Batch BATCH e
5
Key in the following: A:\>REN Utils UTILS e
6
Key in the following: A:\>DIR /AD e
A:\>REN Batch BATCH
A:\>REN Utils UTILS
A:\>DIR /AD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
03/15/2002
03/15/2002
03/25/2002
12/06/2001
04/17/2002
02/25/2002
04/19/2002
04/23/2002
04/29/2002
04/29/2002
01:38 PM
<DIR>
07:29 PM
<DIR>
02:11 PM
<DIR>
09:24 AM
<DIR>
01:07 PM
<DIR>
11:04 AM
<DIR>
03:34 PM
<DIR>
08:43 AM
<DIR>
01:58 PM
<DIR>
01:58 PM
<DIR>
0 File(s)
10 Dir(s)
CLASS
WORK
TRIP
MEDIA
GAMES
3PLANETS
ASTRO
TEST
BATCH
UTILS
0 bytes
934,912 bytes free
A:\>_
You have used the REN command to change the case of the
directory names.
7
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT A:\BATCH\SETPATH.BAT e
8
In the Edit screen, Key in the following:
PATH = %PATH%;A:\BATCH;A:\UTILS
9
Press a + F.
10 Press X.
11 Press the Y key to save the file.
A:\>EDIT A:\BATCH\SETPATH.BAT
A:\>_
You have completed creating the SETPATH.BAT file, and returned
to the command line window.
12 Close the Command line window.
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If you still have the shortcut to the command line window on your desktop, do not do Steps 13 through 17; go directly to Step 18.
13 Point to Programs. Point to Accessories.
14 Point to the Command Prompt icon.
You have displayed the Icon to start a command line session.
15 Hold down the right mouse button and drag the command icon onto the desktop.
16 Release the right mouse button.
You see a shortcut menu appear.
17 Click Copy Here.
You now have a short cut to open a command line session on the
desk top.
18 Right-click the shortcut icon, and click Properties.
19 Click the Shortcut tab.
10.8
ACTIVITY: CREATING BATCH FILE TO ALTER COMMAND LINE SESSION ENVIRONMENT
You have opened the property sheet for the shortcut to the
CMD.EXE program. Notice entry in the Target text box. When you click this Icon,
the operating system goes to the root of this system (%SystemRoot%), to the system32 subdirectory, and runs the program file cmd.exe. Also, notice the Start In text
box. In this example, the computer is part of a Domain network, which assigns a
particular home directory to the user. The line %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%
causes the initial default directory to be the directory assigned by the network
administrator to the user. On this particular computer, that will be a directory on the
server addressed as G.
In your own home environment, you could change this to say C:\ or C:\DATA or
whatever directory you wished to be the default directory when you open a command session.
20 Click in the Target text box. Press the n key.
21 Press the spacebar once.
22 Key in the following: /k A:\BATCH\SETPATH.BAT
You have given additional instructions to the Target command
line. You have told the operating system to go to the specified drive, run cmd.exe to
open a command line session, and then to run the file SETPATH.BAT residing in the
specified A:\BATCH directory.
23 Click Apply.
24 Click OK.
25 Double-click the shortcut to the Command line icon on the desktop.
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As you can see, the batch file executed. But, did it work?
26 Key in the following from the default prompt: A: e
27 Key in the following: A:\>PATH e
G:\>A:
A:\>PATH
PATH=C:\WINNT\system32;C:\WINNT;C:\WINNT\system32\WBEM;A:\BATCH;A:\UTILS
A:\>_
As you can see by the path returned, the batch file did indeed
work. Each time you use this shortcut icon to open a command line session, the path
will include the specified directories on the A drive. Once again, this will only be
helpful if this particular disk is in the A drive.
28 Close the command line window.
29 Remove the DATA disk from the A drive.
30 Double-click the shortcut icon.
The message box tells you that it is running the program cmd.exe
and that program is reporting there is No Disk in the drive.
31 Insert the DATA disk into the A drive.
32 Click Try Again.
G:\>PATH =
C:\WINNT\system32;C:\WINNT;C:\WINNT\system32\WBEM;A:\BATCH;A:\UTILS
G:\>_
10.10
ACTIVITY: WRITING A BATCH FILE TO EXECUTE THE BOG GAME
The operating system found the specified disk and directories, and
executed the batch file requested.
With the /k parameter, you can include a batch file with any number of commands that you would like to execute each time you open a command line session.
Once again, the use of this technique on a floppy has limited value, but on your own
system, referencing directories on the hard drive, it can be very valuable.
33 Close all open windows.
34 Drag the shortcut to the Recycle bin to delete it.
10.9
Writing a Batch File to Load
an Application Program
Previously, in order to execute the BOG game, you had to take three separate steps.
First you had to change to the directory where the program file was located. Second,
you had to load the program, BOG.EXE. Third, after you exited the game, you
returned to the root directory. A batch file is an ideal place to put all of these commands. In the following activity, you will run the BOG game from its location on the
hard drive. Remember, if your WUGXP directory is somewhere other than C:\,
substitute that location in your batch file.
10.10 Activity: Writing a Batch File
to Execute the BOG Game
Note:
You may use any text editor you wish for creating the batch files. You may
use COPY CON, but when you have more than one line, using an editor is
easier. Remember, you cannot edit lines when you use COPY CON. The
operating system’s Edit program will be used in this text. Instructions for
keyboard use will be shown, but if you prefer using a mouse, do so.
1
Open a command line window.
2
Change directories to the root of the A drive.
3
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT BOG.BAT e
4
Key in the following: CD /D C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2 e
BOG e
A: e
You have just written a batch file to load the BOG application
program. You can give the file the name BOG.BAT, because it is in the root directory
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of the DATA disk and BOG.EXE is in a subdirectory on the hard drive. The two file
names will not conflict, and you will not have to be specific and key in BOG.BAT.
Furthermore, the first line tells the operating system to change drives and directories. The full path name is necessary in to change to the desired directory, but even if
it had not been, you want the batch file to run no matter where you are when you
execute it, so commands the require a particular location should always be referenced by their full file specification.
5
Press a + F.
6
Press X.
7
Press Y.
8
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE BOG.BAT e
A:\>TYPE BOG.BAT
CD /D C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
BOG
A:
A:\>_
You created the batch file BOG.BAT in Edit and then returned to
the system prompt. Now you can execute this file.
9
Key in the following: A:\>BOG e
When you keyed in BOG at the root directory, the operating
system looked for changed directories, looked for and found the BOG program, and
executed it. It read the lines in the order they appeared. It read the first line, which
said to change the drive and directory to the C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
subdirectory. It then read the second line, which told it to look for a program called
BOG.EXE, and then it loaded BOG. The BOG game then appeared on the screen.
10 Click the Exit Program button.
10.12
ACTIVITY: CREATING A SHORTCUT ON THE DESKTOP
A:\>BOG
A:\>CD /D C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>BOG
C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2>A:
A:\>_
You can see on the command line screen how the lines were
executed, one at a time. It does not matter if played the game for one minute, one
hour, or one entire day. Whenever you exit the program, the command line continues with the execution of the batch file where it last was and simply reads and
executes the next line. The operating system finished executing your batch file by
changing the drive back to the A drive.
10.11 Creating Shortcuts for Batch
Files on the Desktop
Any batch file can be run from the Windows environment. One way to do it is to
locate the batch file name in Windows Explorer or My Computer, then double-click
the file name. You can also create a shortcut for it and place it on the desktop or in a
folder. Again, once it is a shortcut, the shortcut can be clicked to execute the batch
file. However, there are things that you can do with the shortcut that you cannot do
in the command line interface. You can also change the icon for the shortcut.
10.12 Activity: Creating a
Shortcut on the Desktop
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>EXIT e
2
Right-click in any blank area of the desktop.
3
Point to New.
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You opened the shortcut menu for the desktop, and the pop out
menu for New.
4
Click Shortcut.
You started the Create a shortcut wizard.
5
In the location box, key in C:\WUGXP\GAMES\BOG2\BOG.EXE.
Notice that, as you type, the operating system anticipates what
you mean. Once you key in the B of BOG, the BOG2 directory was shown below. As
you continued to key in the full name, the B of BOG.EXE brought up 4 possibilities.
You could have, at this point, double clicked on BOG.EXE and populated the
location box in this way. However, in this example, you keyed in the entire file
specification.
6
Click Next.
10.12
ACTIVITY: CREATING A SHORTCUT ON THE DESKTOP
You are asked to supply a name for the shortcut. Once again,
Windows XP anticipates what you want. This time, however, the assumption is
incorrect.
7
In the name box, key in My BOG Game as shown in the figure above.
8
Click Finish.
You now have a shortcut to the batch file you created. Notice the
Icon. Many executable files written for the Windows environment contain an icon
that represents the program. If this program had not contained an icon, you would
see the default windows icon. You can change the icon for short cuts..
9
Right-click the shortcut.
10 Click Properties.
You have opened the property sheet for the shortcut to the BOG
program.
11 Click the Shortcut tab, if it is not already selected.
12 Click the Change Icon button.
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As you can see, the program file BOG.EXE has its own icons. You
want to change this.
13 Click Browse.
14 Click the down arrow of the Look for icons in this file: text box.
15 Click the C drive icon.
16 Click the Windows directory.
17 Click the system32 directory. Click shell32.dll. (If you cannot see these directory names, you may have to go to the Tools menu of My Computer, Folder
Options, View, and select Show all files.)
Windows provides a set of icons in a file named SHELL32.DLL.
You are going to choose this file by either double clicking it, or selecting it and
clicking the open button.
18 Click Open. Scroll until you an icon you like. (In this example, a Star was chosen.) Double-click the icon.
10.13
BATCH FILES TO RUN WINDOWS PROGRAMS
Now your shortcut to BOG is represented by the icon you selected.
19 Click Apply. Click OK.
Your shortcut appears on the desktop with the new icon.
20 Double-click the icon.
You have used the icon to run the BOG program.
21 Click Exit Program.
22 Drag the shortcut to BOG to the Recycle Bin.
10.13 Batch Files to Run Windows Programs
The Windows system files will reside in a different directory, depending on how the
Windows XP operating system was installed. If the installation was an upgrade to
Windows 2000, you will have a WINNT directory. It you upgraded Windows 98 or
have a new installation, it will have a Windows directory. The drive may be C:\ or
D:\, or another drive. Windows “keeps notes” about itself in the system environ-
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ment. Remember that the path was stored in the environmental variable %Path%.
The drive is referred to, in the environment, as “%SystemDrive%” and the directory
where the system files are located is referred to as “%SystemRoot%.” You can use
this information to create a batch file to run the small programs that come with
Windows, such as Notepad or Calculator.
Perhaps you prefer to use Notepad when writing batch files, but find it bothersome to have to return to the GUI to start the Notepad program. You can create a
batch file that will allow you to run the program without having to return to the
desktop. You can also use special features of Notepad to create a log file that will
add the current date and time to a file created with Notepad. In order to use this
feature, you must create a file with Notepad whose first line is .LOG.
10.14 Activity: Creating a Batch
File to Run Notepad
Note:
You have shelled out to the Command Line. The DATA disk is in Drive A.
A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT N.BAT e
%SYSTEMROOT%\NOTEPAD.EXE e
A: e
2
Key in the following: a + F. Press X.
3
Key in the following: Y e
A:\>EDIT N.BAT
A:\>_
You have written a batch file to start a Windows applet, Notepad.
You used an environmental variable, %SYSTEMROOT%. Case does not matter.
You could key in an absolute path such as C:\WINDOWS\NOTEPAD.EXE or
C:\WINNT\NOTEPAD.EXE if you knew the name of your Windows directory.
However, if you use the environmental variable, Windows knows where the Windows files are located and will substitute the correct name. You did not need to use
%SYSTEMDRIVE% as that variable knows which drive the %SYTEMROOT% is on.
4
Key in the following: A:\>N e
10.14
ACTIVITY: CREATING A BATCH FILE TO RUN NOTEPAD
You have opened Notepad without returning to the desktop.
5
Key in the following in the Notepad window: .LOG e
You are creating a log file using Notepad. Here case does matter
and you must use uppercase letters preceded by a period.
6
Click File. Click Save As.
7
In the File name text box, key in the following: A:\log.txt e
8
Click Save. Click File. Click Exit.
A:\>N
A:\>C:\WINNT\NOTEPAD.EXE
A:\>A:
A:\>_
You have closed Notepad and returned to the Command Line
window.
9
Key in the following: Edit log.bat e
%systemroot%\notepad log.txt e
DIR *.AAA e
10 Press a + F. Press X. Press Y.
11 Key in the following: A:\>LOG e
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When you supplied a file name with Notepad, it opened the file
you specified. As you can see, Notepad has placed the current date and time in the
log.txt file. However, your second command has not executed. Your batch file
requires that you finish using Notepad before it will read the next line and execute it
(DIR *.AAA).
12 In Notepad, key in the following: The first entry in my log file. e
13 Press a + F. Press X. Key in the following: Y
A:\>LOG
A:\>C:\WINNT\NOTEPAD LOG.TXT
A:\>DIR *.AAA
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
12/31/2001
12/31/2001
04:32 PM
04:32 PM
2 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
182 WILDTWO.AAA
181 WILDTHR.AAA
363 bytes
932,352 bytes free
A:\>_
Now that you exited Notepad, your other command could execute. There is a command called START that allows you to start a program in a new
window and at the same time, continue executing your batch file in the previous
window. You may also change the title of the Command Line window.
14 Edit and save the LOG.BAT file so it reads as follows and only has these two
lines:
START notepad log.txt
START "THE .AAA FILES WINDOW" DIR *.AAA
The START command will start a new command window so that
LOG.TXT will open in one window. The second command accomplishes two tasks.
It will open another window, and it will give the window the title enclosed in
quotation marks.
10.15
SPECIAL BATCH FILE COMMANDS
15 Key in the following: LOG e
You have three windows open, your original Command Line, your
Notepad window, and “THE .AAA FILES WINDOW.” The Notepad window is
waiting for you to make an entry.
16 Make the Notepad window active. In the Notepad window, key in the following:
The second entry in my log file.
17 Click File. Click Save. Click File. Click Exit.
You still have THE AAA FILES WINDOW open. The DIR command executed.
18 Key in the following in each of the command line windows: Exit e
You have closed the Command Line windows.
10.15 Special Batch File Commands
There are commands specifically designed to be used in batch files. They are the
same for Windows XP as they were for Windows 2000. These commands can make
batch files extremely versatile. They are listed in Table 10.2 below:
Command
Purpose
CALL
Calls one batch program from another without causing the first
batch program to stop. The CALL command now accepts labels as
the target of the call.
ECHO
Displays or hides the text in batch programs while the program is
running. Also used to determine whether or not commands will be
echoed to the screen while the program file is running.
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ENDLOCAL
Ends localization of environment changes in a batch file, restoring
environment variables to their values before the matching
SETLOCAL command.
FOR
Runs a specified command for each file in a set of files. This
command can also be used at the command line.
GOTO
Directs the operating system to a new line in the program that you
specify with a label.
IF
Performs conditional processing in a batch program, based on
whether or not a specified condition is true or false.
PAUSE
Suspends processing of a batch file and displays a message
prompting the user to press a key to continue.
REM
Used to document your batch files. The operating system ignores
any line that begins with REM, allowing you to place lines of
information in your batch program or to prevent a line from
running.
SETLOCAL
Begins localization of environmental variables in a batch file.
Localization lasts until a matching ENDLOCAL command is
encountered or the end of the batch file is reached.
SHIFT
Changes the position of the replaceable parameter in a batch
program.
Table 10.2—Batch File Commands
You will examine and use some of these commands in the following activities.
10.16 The REM Command
The REM command, which stands for “remarks,” is a special command that allows
the user to key in explanatory text that will be displayed on the screen. Nothing else
happens. REM does not cause the operating system to take any action, but it is very
useful. When a line begins with REM, the operating system knows that anything
following the REM is not a command and, thus, is not supposed to be executed, just
displayed on the screen. REM allows a batch file to be documented. In a dataprocessing environment, “to document” means to give an explanation about the
purpose of a program. This process can be very important when there are many
batch files on a disk, especially when someone who did not write the batch file
would like to use it. The REM statements should tell anyone what the purpose of
the batch file is. The remarks can also include the name of the batch file, the time
and date it was last updated, and the author of the batch file.
10.17 Activity: Using REM
Note:
1
You have shelled out to a Command Line window. The DATA disk is in
Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>COPY CLASS\JUP.* e
10.17
ACTIVITY: USING REM
A:\>COPY CLASS\JUP.*
CLASS\JUP.PAR
CLASS\JUP.ABC
CLASS\JUP.FIL
CLASS\JUP.BUD
4 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have copied some files that were previously moved to the
CLASS directory to the root of the DATA disk.
2
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT TEST2.BAT e
REM This is a test file e
REM to see how the REM e
REM command works. e
TYPE JUP.BUD e
COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
You are using Edit to write another batch file called TEST2.BAT.
You have inserted some text with REM preceding each line. You keyed in two
command line commands, TYPE and COPY. Now you want to save this file to the
disk and return to the system level.
3
Press a + F. Press X. Press Y.
4
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE TEST2.BAT e
A:\>EDIT TEST2.BAT
A:\>TYPE TEST2.BAT
REM This is a test file
REM to see how the REM
REM command works.
TYPE JUP.BUD
COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
A:\>_
This batch file was created as a test case. The remarks just keyed in
explain the purpose of this batch file. You created TEST2.BAT in Edit and returned
to the system prompt. You then displayed TEST2.BAT with the TYPE command. To
execute the TEST2.BAT batch file, you must run it.
5
Key in the following: A:\>TEST2 e
A:\>TEST2
A:\>REM This is a test file
A:\>REM to see how the REM
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A:\>REM command works.
A:\>TYPE JUP.BUD
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
When you keyed in TEST2, the batch file was executed. The
operating system read the first line of the batch file, REM This is a test file. It knew
that it was supposed to do nothing but display the text following REM on the
screen. Then the next line in the batch file was read, REM to see how the REM, and
the same procedure was followed. The operating system kept reading and displaying the REM lines until it got to the line that had the command TYPE. To the operating system, TYPE is a command, so it executed or ran the TYPE command with the
parameter JUP.BUD. Then the next line was read, which was another command,
COPY, so it was executed. The file JUP.BUD was copied to a new file called
JUP.XYZ. Then the operating system looked for another line in the batch file but
could find no more lines, so it returned to the system level. The purpose of REM is
to provide explanatory remarks about the batch file.
10.18 The ECHO Command
Notice in the above activity, when you ran TEST2.BAT you saw the command on the
screen, and then the command executed. You saw the words “TYPE JUP.BUD”
which was the command, and then saw the typed-out file, the results of the command. Both the command and the output of the command were “echoed” to the
screen. ECHO is a command that means display to the screen. The default value for
ECHO is on. Unless specifically told otherwise, both commands and their results
will show on the screen. In a batch file, you can turn off the display of the command
and see only the output of a command—not the command itself. For instance, COPY
THIS.FIL THAT.FIL is a command. The output of the command is 1 File(s) copied.
The work of the command is the actual copying of the file. See Table 10.3.
Echo On Display
Command:
COPY THIS.FIL THAT.FIL
Output:
1 File(s) copied
Echo Off Display
1 File(s) copied
Table 10.3—ECHO On or Off
If the purpose of the REM command is to document a batch file, what is the
purpose of the ECHO command? One purpose of the ECHO command is, by
turning it off, you can minimize screen clutter. For instance, although you want to
10.19
ACTIVITY: USING ECHO
use the REM command to document your batch file, you really only want to see this
documentation when you type out the contents of the file, or edit it to make
changes. You do not need to see your documentation on the screen every time you
run the batch file. ECHO OFF allows you to suppress the display of the commands.
10.19 Activity: Using ECHO
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>COPY TEST2.BAT TESTING.BAT e
A:\>COPY TEST2.BAT TESTING.BAT
1 File(s) copied.
A:\>_
You made a copy of the file TEST2.BAT.
2
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT TESTING.BAT e
3
At the top of the file, key in the following: ECHO OFF e
You are using a copy of the batch file from the previous activity.
The only difference is that you added one line at the top of the batch file to turn
ECHO off. You are going to run the batch file so that only the output of each command is displayed, not the actual commands. First you must exit Edit and save the
file to the disk.
4
Press a + F. Press X. Press Y.
5
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE TESTING.BAT e
A:\>TYPE TESTING.BAT
ECHO OFF
REM This is a test file
REM to see how the REM
REM command works.
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TYPE JUP.BUD
COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
A:\>_
You saved the file as TESTING.BAT and displayed the contents
on the screen. Now you wish to execute the file.
6
Key in the following: A:\>TESTING e
A:\>TESTING
A:\>ECHO OFF
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
The batch file TESTING.BAT has the same commands as
TEST2.BAT, but this time you saw only the output of the commands, not the actual
commands themselves. You saw the ECHO OFF command on the screen, but you
did not see the REM commands displayed on the screen. You saw the results of the
TYPE JUP.BUD command, the contents of the file on the screen, but you never saw
the TYPE JUP.BUD command on the screen. You also did not see the COPY JUP.BUD
JUP.XYZ command, only the results of the command—the message “1 file(s) copied.
You can eliminate the display of the ECHO OFF command.
7
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT TESTING.BAT e
@ (do not press e)
You have inserted the @ symbol in front of ECHO OFF to prevent
the command from echoing to the screen.
10.19
8
Press a + F. Press X. Press Y.
9
Key in the following: A:\>TESTING e
ACTIVITY: USING ECHO
A:\>TESTING
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
The ECHO OFF display was suppressed. All you see at the end of
the display is 1 file(s) copied. This may be misleading. You want to see the names of
the source and destination files used in the copy process.
10 Key in the following: EDIT TESTING.BAT e
11 Place the cursor under the C in COPY and press the e key.
There is now a blank line in the file.
12 Place the cursor in the blank line and Key in the following: ECHO ON
13 Press a + F. Press X. Press Y.
14 Key in the following: TESTING e
A:\>TESTING
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
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A:\>COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You have manipulated the screen display to better suit your needs
using ECHO OFF and ECHO ON.
You already have a file by the name of JUP.XYZ, but, even though you are using
the COPY command, it did not tell you that the file already exists (overwrite protection). The purpose of using a batch program would be defeated if there were
interaction required by the user, so the warning is not there. The differences between
ECHO ON and ECHO OFF are exemplified in Table 10.4.
TEST2.BAT—
ECHO ON Display
TESTING.BAT—
ECHO OFF Display
Command:
ECHO ON
ECHO OFF
Command:
REM This is a test file
Command:
REM to see how the REM
Command:
REM command works.
Command:
TYPE JUP.BUD
Output:
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
Command:
COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
Output:
1 File(s) copied
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
1 File(s) copied
(Note: Although commands and file names are shown as uppercase letters, the case
does not matter.)
Table 10.4—ECHO ON and ECHO OFF: A Comparison of Screen Displays
10.20 The CLS Command
In the previous exercise, running the batch file TESTING caused the output of that
file to be placed on the screen directly below the request (TESTING) for the file to
execute. In many instances, the screen already contained previously executed
commands and outputs. The purpose of this batch file is to 1) display the contents of
a file and 2) to copy that file to another file. Having the display appear on a screen
that already contains information can be difficult to read. Using the CLS (CLear
Screen) command after turning the ECHO off eliminates this problem.
10.23
ACTIVITY: USING PAUSE
10.21 Activity: Using CLS
1
Key in the following: EDIT TESTING.BAT e
2
Place the cursor under the R in the first REM command and press the e key.
3
In the blank line created, key in the following: CLS
4
Press a + F. Press X. Press Y.
5
Key in the following: TESTING e
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
The first “action” taken by the batch file after the ECHO was
turned off was to clear the screen. When and if to turn the ECHO off and on, and
when and if to clear the screen depends on the purpose and function of each batch
file.
10.22 The PAUSE Command
Another batch file command is PAUSE, which does exactly what its name implies: It
tells the batch file to stop executing until the user takes some action. Batch file
processing is suspended, and no other batch command will be executed until the
user presses a key. The PAUSE command will wait forever until the user takes some
action.
10.23 Activity: Using PAUSE
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT TEST2.BAT e
2
Press c + n
3
Key in the following: PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ e
DEL JUP.XYZ
4
Press a + F. Press X. Press Y.
5
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE TEST2.BAT e
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A:\>EDIT TEST2.BAT
A:\>TYPE TEST2.BAT
REM This is a test file
REM to see how the REM
REM command works.
TYPE JUP.BUD
COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ
DEL JUP.XYZ
A:\>_
You saved the file to disk with the changes you made. You then
looked at the contents of the file with the TYPE command. You edited the batch file
TEST2.BAT. When the file is executed, the first three lines of the file, the REM
statements, explain the purpose of TEST2.BAT. Then the batch file displays the
contents of JUP.BUD on the screen and copies the file JUP.BUD to a new file,
JUP.XYZ. The PAUSE statement tells you that the file is going to be deleted and
gives you a chance to change your mind. After you take action by pressing a key, the
file JUP.XYZ is erased.
To execute TEST2.BAT, you must key in TEST2 at the prompt.
6
Key in the following: A:\>TEST2 e
A:\>TEST2
A:\>REM This is a test file
A:\>REM to see how the REM
A:\>REM command works.
A:\>TYPE JUP.BUD
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ
Press any key to continue . . .
The batch file TEST2 has stopped running or “paused.” It has
halted execution until some action is taken. When you press a key, the operating
system will read and execute the next line of the batch file. PAUSE just stops; it is
10.25
ACTIVITY: QUITTING A BATCH FILE
not an order. If ECHO were off, all you would see is the message, “Press any key to
continue ...”. You would not see the message, “You are going to delete JUP.XYZ.”
7
Press e
A:\>PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ
Press any key to continue . . .
A:\>DEL JUP.XYZ
A:\>_
The batch file continued executing all the steps and deleted the file
called JUP.XYZ.
8
Key in the following: A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ e
A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
File Not Found
A:\>_
The file JUP.XYZ was deleted.
10.24 Stopping a Batch File from Executing
In the above activity, you pressed a key after the PAUSE command was displayed so
that the batch file continued to execute. What if you wanted to stop running the
batch file? You can do this by interrupting or exiting from a running batch file. You
do this by pressing the c key, and while pressing the c key, pressing the letter
C (c + C or c + k). At whatever point c + C is pressed, you leave the
batch file and return to the system prompt. The rest of the lines in the batch file do
not execute.
10.25 Activity: Quitting a Batch File
Note:
1
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
Key in the following: A:\>TEST2 e
A:\>REM This is a test file
A:\>REM to see how the REM
A:\>REM command works.
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A:\>TYPE JUP.BUD
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>COPY JUP.BUD JUP.XYZ
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ
Press any key to continue . . .
You are at the same point as you were in the last activity. The
batch file reached the PAUSE command. It has momentarily stopped running. You
do not want to erase JUP.XYZ. You want the batch file to cease operation. Previous
experience with the PAUSE command showed that pressing any key would continue running the program. If any key were pressed here, the next line in the file,
DEL JUP.XYZ, would execute and the file JUP.XYZ would be erased. To stop this
from happening, another action must be taken to interrupt the batch file process.
2
Hold down the c key, and while it is down, press the letter C. Then release
both keys.
A:\>PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ
Press any key to continue . . .
Terminate batch job (Y/N)?_
The message is giving you a choice: either stop the batch file from
running (Y for “yes”) or continue with the batch file (N for “no”). If you press Y, the
last line in the batch file, DEL JUP.XYZ, will not execute.
3
Press Y e
A:\>PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ
Press any key to continue . . .
Terminate batch job (Y/N)? Y
A:\>_
The system prompt is displayed. If the batch file was interrupted
properly, JUP.XYZ should not have been deleted because the line, DEL JUP.XYZ
should not have executed.
4
Key in the following: A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ e
10.26
REPLACEABLE PARAMETERS IN BATCH FILES
A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
07:41 AM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.XYZ
190 bytes
928,768 bytes free
A:\>_
The file JUP.XYZ is still on the DATA disk. Pressing c + C at the
line PAUSE You are going to delete JUP.XYZ broke into the batch file TEST2.BAT and
stopped it from running. Because TEST2.BAT stopped executing and returned you
to the system prompt, it never got to the command line DEL JUP.XYZ. Therefore, the
file JUP.XYZ is still on the DATA disk. Although in this activity you broke into the
batch file at the PAUSE statement, you can press c + C any time during the
execution of a batch file. The batch file will stop when it has completed the current
command before executing the next one. The problem is, with the speed of today’s
computers, it is difficult to ascertain how many lines of the batch file have been read
by the operating system when you press c + C.
10.26 Replaceable Parameters in Batch Files
In the same way that you use parameters with system commands, you can use
parameters effectively in batch files. For instance, look at the command DIR A: /W.
Command
DIR
Command Line Parameter
A: /W
In the above example, the space and the / are delimiters. DIR is the command. A:
and W are parameters that tell the operating system that you want a directory of A:
and that you want it displayed in a wide mode. Parameters give the command
additional instructions on what to do. When you use the DIR command as used
above, the /W parameter is fixed; you cannot choose another letter to accomplish a
wide mode display.
Many commands use variable or replaceable parameters. An example of a
command that uses a replaceable parameter is TYPE. TYPE requires one parameter,
a file name, but the file name you use will vary; hence, it is a variable parameter.
The TYPE command uses the parameter that you keyed in to choose the file to
display on the screen. You can key in TYPE THIS.FIL or TYPE TEST.TXT or whatever file name you want. You replace the file name for the parameter, hence the term
replaceable parameter.
Command
TYPE
or
Replaceable Command Line Parameter
THIS. FIL
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Command
TYPE
Replaceable Command Line Parameter
TEST.TXT
Batch files can also use replaceable parameters, also called dummy parameters,
substitute parameters, or positional parameters. When you write the batch file, you
insert place holders that will hold information that is keyed in at the time the batch
file is executed. When you execute the batch file by keying in the batch file name,
you also key in additional information on the command line that will be inserted
where the placeholders are in the batch file. The batch file looks to the command
line and selects which information you desire by its position (positional parameters)
on the command line. What you are doing is parsing a command. To parse is to
analyze something in an orderly way. In linguistics, to parse is to divide words and
phrases into different parts in order to understand relationships and meanings. In
computers, to parse is to divide the computer language statement into parts that can
be made useful for the computer. In the above example, the TYPE command had the
argument TEST.TXT passed to it so that it can display the contents of that variable.
When you write the batch file, you supply the place holder or marker to let the
batch file know that something, a variable, will be keyed in with the batch file name
at execution time. The place holder, marker, or blank parameter used in a batch file
is the percent sign (%) followed by a number from 0 through 9. The % sign is the
signal to the operating system that a parameter is coming. The numbers indicate
what position the parameter is on the command line. Whatever is first is %0, usually
the command itself. Thus, the command occupies the position of %0. The next item
on the command line is in the first position (%1) and the next item on the command
line is in the second position (%2) and so on.
The batch files that you have written so far deal with specific commands and
specific file names, but the real power of batch files is their ability to use replaceable
parameters. You are going to write a batch file in the usual way with specific file
names, and then use the batch file to see how replaceable parameters work.
10.27 Activity: Using Replaceable Parameters
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUP.XYZ e
2
Key in the following: A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ e
A:\>TYPE JUP.XYZ
Jupiter is the largest planet
in our Solar System. It has a
giant red spot on it. Huge storms
larger than our earth that last
more than a century take place
on the planet Jupiter.
A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
10.27
05/07/2002
07:41 AM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
ACTIVITY: USING REPLACEABLE PARAMETERS
190 JUP.XYZ
190 bytes
928,768 bytes free
A:\>_
This file was created in the last activity. It has data in it and
occupies 190 bytes of space on the disk. (Your file size may differ slightly.) If you
remember, when you delete a file, the data is still on the disk. What if you wanted a
way to delete the data completely so that it cannot ever be recovered? You can
overwrite the file with new data. If you key in ECHO at the command line, you get
a status report of whether ECHO is on or off. You can redirect the output of the
ECHO command to your file, making it 13 bytes long and replacing the data in the
file with the output of the ECHO command. You are going to first try this at the
command line.
3
Key in the following: A:\>ECHO > JUP.XYZ e
4
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE JUP.XYZ e
5
Key in the following: A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ e
A:\>ECHO > JUP.XYZ
A:\>TYPE JUP.XYZ
ECHO is on.
A:\>DIR JUP.XYZ
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/03/2002
02:26 PM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
13 JUP.XYZ
13 bytes
928,768 bytes free
A:\>_
As you can see, it worked. You have really overwritten this file.
Your data is no longer in the file to recover. This command would be useful when
deleting files of a confidential nature. It would prevent most data recovery programs from being able to recover the data from your file. It can also be used in a
batch file.
6
Key in the following: A:\>EDIT KILLIT.BAT e
ECHO > JUP.XYZ e
TYPE JUP.XYZ e
DEL JUP.XYZ
7
Press a + F. Press X.
8
Press Y.
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A:\>EDIT KILLIT.BAT
A:\>_
Edit is the tool you used to write the batch file. You created a
simple batch file that sends data to JUP.XYZ, displays the file contents, and then
deletes the file called JUP.XYZ. You then used the Edit menu to exit and save
KILLIT.BAT to your disk.
9
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE KILLIT.BAT e
A:\>TYPE KILLIT.BAT
ECHO > JUP.XYZ
TYPE JUP.XYZ
DEL JUP.XYZ
A:\>_
You displayed the contents of the KILLIT.BAT file. To execute this
batch file, you must call it, which is another way of saying key in the command
name—the name of the batch file.
10 Key in the following: A:\>KILLIT e
A:\>KILLIT
A:\>ECHO
1>JUP.XYZ
A:\>TYPE JUP.XYZ
ECHO is on.
A:\>DEL JUP.XYZ
A:\>_
The batch file called KILLIT ran successfully. (The 1 before the
directional sign (>) indicates the numerical value of Standard Output, indicating
that the Standard Ouput of the Echo command is redirected to the object of the
directional sign.) However, this batch file is not useful, as it can be used only for the
file called JUP.XYZ. You have deleted JUP.XYZ so now KILLIT.BAT is no longer
useful.
10.27
ACTIVITY: USING REPLACEABLE PARAMETERS
What if you wanted to do the same sequence of commands for a file called
JUP.TMP or PERSONAL.FIL or any other file on the disk? Until now, you would
have to create another batch file using JUP.TMP instead of JUP.XYZ. You would
write another batch file for PERSONAL.FIL. You can quickly clutter up your disks
with many batch files, all doing the same thing but using different file names and
having no value after they have executed. An easier way is to have a batch file that
does the same steps—a generic batch file. When you execute it, you supply the
specific parameter or file name that interests you. When you write this batch file,
you need to supply a place for the name of the file. These places are called “replaceable parameters.” They are percent signs followed by numbers.
You are going to edit KILLIT.BAT so that it uses replaceable parameters. In
addition, you will document it and add some protection for yourself. When you key
in the replaceable parameters, be sure to use the percent sign (%), then the number
1, and not the lowercase of the letter L (l). Also note that there is no space between
% and the number 1.
11 Key in the following:
A:\>EDIT KILLIT.BAT e
REM This batch file will make e
REM the data in a file difficult to recover. e
DIR %1 e
PAUSE You are going to kill the file, %1. Are you sure? e
12 Replace ECHO > JUP.XYZ with ECHO > %1.
13 Delete the line TYPE JUP.XYZ.
14 Replace DEL JUP.XYZ with DEL %1.
15 Press a + F. Press X.
16 Press Y.
17 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE KILLIT.BAT e
A:\>TYPE KILLIT.BAT
REM This batch file will make
REM the data in a file difficult to recover.
DIR %1
PAUSE You are going to kill the file, %1. Are you sure?
ECHO > %1
DEL %1
A:\>_
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You used Edit to edit the file KILLIT.BAT. You then saved it to the
disk. You displayed the contents of the file on the screen. The contents of the batch
file KILLIT.BAT are different from the previous version of KILLIT.BAT. By using
the place holder %1, instead of a specific file name, you are saying that you do not
yet know what file name (%1) you want these commands to apply to. When you run
the batch file KILLIT, you will provide a value or parameter on the command line
that the batch file will substitute for %1. For instance, if you key in on the command
line, KILLIT MY.FIL, KILLIT is in the zero position on the command line (%0) and
MY.FIL is in the first position on the command line (%1). Remember, you used %1
as a place holder in the KILLIT.BAT file. You will fill that place holder at the time of
execution.
For you to understand the purpose of replaceable parameters, it is helpful to
view them as positional parameters. The operating system gets the information or
knows what to substitute by the position on the command line. The first piece of
data on the command line is always in position 0; the second piece of data on the
command line is always in position 1; the third piece of data on the command line is
always in position 2, and so on.
18 Key in the following: A:\>KILLIT JUP.BUD e
A:\>KILLIT JUP.BUD
A:\>REM This batch file will make
A:\>REM the data in a file difficult to recover.
A:\>DIR JUP.BUD
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\
05/07/2002
07:41 AM
1 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.BUD
190 bytes
928,768 bytes free
A:\>PAUSE You are going to kill the file, JUP.BUD. Are you sure?
Press any key to continue . . .
In the command line KILLIT JUP.BUD, KILLIT is position 0 and
JUP.BUD is position 1. The batch file KILLIT executed each command line. However, when it found %1 in the batch file, it looked for the first position after KILLIT
on the command line, which was JUP.BUD. It substituted JUP.BUD every time it
found %1. You placed the DIR %1 in the batch file to confirm that it is on the disk.
The PAUSE statement allows you to change your mind. The %1 in the PAUSE line
identifies which file is to be killed.
19 Press e
10.28
MULTIPLE REPLACEABLE PARAMETERS IN BATCH FILES
A:\>PAUSE You are going to kill the file, JUP.BUD. Are you sure?
Press any key to continue . . .
A:\>ECHO
1>JUP.BUD
A:\>DEL JUP.BUD
A:\>_
You have deleted the file. Even if you, or anyone else, try to
recover it, the data is truly gone. You have written a generic or “plain wrap” batch
file that allows you to use the same batch file over and over. All you have to supply
is a value or parameter after the batch file name on the command line. Thus, you
could key in KILLIT BUSINESS.APP, KILLIT SALES.LET, KILLIT FEB.99, KILLIT
TELE.SET, or any other file name. The batch file will execute the same commands
over and over, using the position 1 (%1) value (the file name) you key in after the
batch file name. You can see that because this file is versatile, it is infinitely more
useful than it was without positional parameters.
10.28 Multiple Replaceable
Parameters in Batch Files
In the above example, you used one replaceable parameter. What happens if you
need more than one parameter? For instance, if you want to include the COPY
command in a batch file, COPY needs two parameters: source and destination. Many
commands require more than one parameter. You may also use multiple parameters
in batch files. You can have up to 10 dummy parameters (%0 through %9). Remember, replaceable parameters are sometimes called positional parameters because the
operating system uses the position number in the command line to determine which
parameter to use. The parameters are placed in order from left to right. For example,
examine the command line:
COPY MYFILE.TXT YOUR.FIL
COPY is in the first position, %0 (computers always count beginning with 0, not 1).
MYFILE.TXT is in the second position, %1, and YOUR.FIL is in the third position,
%2.
The next activity will allow you to create a simple batch file with multiple
replaceable parameters so you will see how the positional process works. Then you
will write another batch file, and in it you will create a command that the operating
system does not have. Your new command will copy all files except the ones you
specify.
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10.29 Activity: Using Multiple
Replaceable Parameters
Note:
The DATA disk is in Drive A. A:\> is displayed.
1
Key in the following:
A:\>EDIT MULTI.BAT e
REM This is a sample batch file e
REM using more than one replaceable parameter. e
TYPE %3 e
COPY %1 %2 e
TYPE %1
2
Press a + F. Press X.
3
Press Y.
4
Key in the following: A:\>TYPE MULTI.BAT e
A:\>TYPE MULTI.BAT
REM This is a sample batch file
REM using more than one replaceable parameter.
TYPE %3
COPY %1 %2
TYPE %1
A:\>_
You keyed in and saved a batch file called MULTI.BAT on the root
of the DATA disk. You then displayed the contents of MULTI.BAT on the screen. To
execute it you must not only key in the command name MULTI but must also
provide the command with the positional parameters that are referred to in the file.
First you will copy some files to the root of the DATA disk.
5
Key in the following: A:\>COPY CLASS\VEN.* e
A:\>COPY CLASS\VEN.*
CLASS\VEN.ABC
CLASS\VEN.PAR
CLASS\VEN.BUD
3 file(s) copied.
A:\>_
You copied some files from the CLASS directory that had been
moved from the root directory during disk organization (Chapter 8). In the next
step, you will key in MULTI VEN.ABC JUP.ABC FILE2.SWT. The batch file knows
what to put in each percent sign because it looks at the position on the command
line. It does not matter which order you use the %1 or %2 or %3 in the batch file,
only the order you use on the command line. See Table 10.5.
10.29
ACTIVITY: USING MULTIPLE REPLACEABLE PARAMETERS
Position 0 on the
Command Line
Position 1 on the
Command Line
Position 2 on the
Command Line
Position 3 on the
Command Line
MULTI
VEN.ABC
JUP.ABC
FILE2.SWT
When the batch
file needs a value
for %0, it uses
MULTI
When the batch
file needs a value
for %1, it uses
VEN.ABC
When the batch
file needs a value
for %2, it uses
JUP.ABC
When the batch
file needs a value
for %3, it uses
FILE2.SWT
Command
Parameter
Parameter
Parameter
Table 10.5—Positional Parameters
6
Key in the following: A:\>MULTI VEN.ABC JUP.ABC FILE2.SWT e
A:\>MULTI VEN.ABC JUP.ABC FILE2.SWT
A:\>REM This is a sample batch file
A:\>REM using more than one replaceable parameter.
A:\>TYPE FILE2.SWT
This is file 2.
Doing a DIR on the .SWT files
they all appear to be the
same—same date, same size.
BUT the content is different.
A:\>COPY VEN.ABC JUP.ABC
1 file(s) copied.
A:\>TYPE VEN.ABC
The planet Venus comes physically closer to us
than any other planet in the solar system.
The mass of the Venus atmosphere is 96% carbon dioxide,
not a human-friendly environment! Carbon dioxide makes
up less than 1% of our terrestial atmosphere.
Venus rotates very slowly and seems to have only
one tetonic plate. "Venusquakes" happen mush less
frequently than Earthquakes.
No moon-lit nights on the planet named for
the goddess of love - Venus has no moon.
A:\>_
Each time the batch file came to a command line and needed a
value for a replaceable parameter (%1, %2, or %3), it looked to the command line as
it was keyed in by you, and it counted over (by position or location on the command
line) until it found the value to replace for the percent sign. MULTI.BAT is actually
in the first position, which is counted as %0. The command itself is always first, or
%0. Thus, to indicate the position of the replaceable parameters, %1 refers to the
first position after the command, not the first item on the command line. %2 refers
to the second position after the command, not the second item on the command line,
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and so on. Hence, when you refer to %1, you are referring to the first position after
the command. When it needed a value for %1, it used VEN.ABC because that was
in the first position on the command line. When it needed a value for %2, it used
JUP.ABC because that was in the second position on the command line, and, when
it needed a value for %3, it used FILE2.SWT because that was in the third position
on the command line. Instead of calling them replaceable parameters, it is easier to
remember them as positional parameters because it is the position on the command
line that matters, not where it occurs in the batch file. Although this batch file may
show you how the positional parameters work, it is not very useful. It does not
accomplish any logical task. You are going to use the same principle to create a
command that the operating system does not have.
7
Key in the following:
A:\>EDIT NOCOPY.BAT e
REM This batch file, NOCOPY.BAT, will hide specified files, e
REM then copy all other files from one location to another, e
REM then unhide the original files. e
ATTRIB +H %1 e
COPY %3\*.* %2 e
ATTRIB -H %1
You created a batch file called NOCOPY.BAT using multiple
positional parameters. You have created a command that the operating system does
not have. It copies files selectively, allowing you to copy all files except those you
hid. You must save the file to disk.
8
Press a + F. Press X.
9
Press Y.
10 Key in the following: A:\>TYPE NOCOPY.BAT e
A:\>TYPE NOCOPY.BAT
REM This batch file, NOCOPY.BAT, will hide specified files,
REM then copy all other files from one location to another,
REM then unhide the original files.
ATTRIB +H %1
COPY %3\*.* %2
ATTRIB -H %1
A:\>_
You are displaying the contents of NOCOPY.BAT. To execute it,
you must not only key in the command name—NOCOPY—but also provide the
command with values for all the positional parameters. You want to copy all the
files from the CLASS directory to the TRIP subdirectory except the files that have
the .ABC file extension. Remember, parameters are separated by a space. On the
command line you will key in NOCOPY CLASS\*.ABC TRIP CLASS. The value
CLASS\*.ABC replaces parameter %1, TRIP replaces %2, and CLASS replaces %3.
Notice that %1 will be used to represent a subdirectory and files ending with .ABC,
while %2 and %3 will represent subdirectory names only.
10.29
ACTIVITY: USING MULTIPLE REPLACEABLE PARAMETERS
11 Key in the following: A:\>NOCOPY CLASS\*.ABC TRIP CLASS e
A:\>NOCOPY CLASS\*.ABC TRIP CLASS
A:\>REM This batch file, NOCOPY.BAT, will hide specified files,
A:\>REM then copy all other files from one location to another,
A:\>REM and then unhide the original files.
A:\>ATTRIB +H CLASS\*.ABC
A:\>COPY CLASS\*.* TRIP
CLASS\JUP.PAR
CLASS\MER.PAR
CLASS\AST.PAR
CLASS\VEN.PAR
CLASS\JUP.FIL
CLASS\MER.FIL
CLASS\JUP.BUD
CLASS\MER.BUD
CLASS\AST.BUD
CLASS\VEN.BUD
10 file(s) copied.
A:\>ATTRIB -H CLASS\*.ABC
A:\> _
(Note: You may not see the command line you keyed in, as it may
scroll off the screen.) You ran the batch file called NOCOPY. You substituted or
provided the values: CLASS\*.ABC (%1), TRIP (%2), and CLASS (%3). To check that
the *.ABC files are not hidden in the CLASS directory and that they have not been
copied to the TRIP directory, do the following:
12 Key in the following: A:\>DIR CLASS\*.ABC e
13 Key in the following: A:\>DIR TRIP\*.ABC e
A:\>DIR CLASS\*.ABC
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\CLASS
05/07/2002
10/31/2001
10/30/2001
10/31/2001
07:41 AM
01:08 PM
01:46 PM
07:08 PM
4 File(s)
0 Dir(s)
190 JUP.ABC
406 MER.ABC
148 AST.ABC
478 VEN.ABC
1,222 bytes
921,088 bytes free
A:\>DIR TRIP\*.ABC
Volume in drive A is DATA
Volume Serial Number is 30B8-DA1D
Directory of A:\TRIP
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File Not Found
A:\>_
Your goal was achieved. To the operating system, the command
sequence or string of commands looked like this:
ATTRIB +H CLASS\*.ABC
COPY CLASS\*.* TRIP
ATTRIB -H CLASS\*.ABC
When you keyed in NOCOPY CLASS\*.ABC TRIP CLASS, you asked the
operating system to load the batch file called NOCOPY.BAT. The first position after
NOCOPY has the value of CLASS\*.ABC. The second position has the value of
TRIP, and the third position has the value of CLASS. Then the lines were executed
in order:
1. REM This batch file, NOCOPY.BAT, will hide specified files,
This line is documentation for you to know why you wrote this batch file.
2. REM then copy all other files from one location to another,
This line is a continuation of the documentation for you to know why you wrote
this batch file.
3. REM then unhide the original files.
This line is a continuation of the documentation for you to know why you wrote
this batch file.
4. ATTRIB +H CLASS\*.ABC
This line tells ATTRIB to hide all the files in the CLASS directory with the file
extension of .ABC. The operating system knew which file and which directory
were %1 and could substitute CLASS\*.ABC for %1 because CLASS\*.ABC
held the first position (%1) after the command NOCOPY.
5. COPY CLASS\*.* TRIP
This line tells the operating system to copy files in a directory. It knew in which
directory to get the files because CLASS was %3, so it substituted CLASS for
%3. The operating system knew it could substitute CLASS for %3 because
CLASS was in the third position after NOCOPY. It knew to copy all the files
because you included *.*. It knew which directory to copy the files to because it
substituted TRIP for %2. It could substitute TRIP for %2 because TRIP was in
the second position after NOCOPY.
6. ATTRIB -H CLASS\*.ABC
This line tells the operating system to unhide