D9485 DAVIC QPSK Bridge Installation and Operation Guide

OL-30211-01
D9485 DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Installation and Operation Guide
Please Read
Important
Read this entire guide. If this guide provides installation or operation instructions,
give particular attention to all safety statements included in this guide.
Notices
Trademark Acknowledgments
Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its
affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this
URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks.
Third party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners.
The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between
Cisco and any other company. (1110R)
Publication Disclaimer
Cisco Systems, Inc. assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions that may
appear in this publication. We reserve the right to change this publication at any
time without notice. This document is not to be construed as conferring by
implication, estoppel, or otherwise any license or right under any copyright or
patent, whether or not the use of any information in this document employs an
invention claimed in any existing or later issued patent.
Copyright
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Information in this publication is subject to change without notice. No part of this
publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by photocopy,
microfilm, xerography, or any other means, or incorporated into any information
retrieval system, electronic or mechanical, for any purpose, without the express
permission of Cisco Systems, Inc.
Contents
Safety Precautions
v
FCC Compliance
ix
About This Guide
xi
Chapter 1 Introducing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
1
System Overview ..................................................................................................................... 2
The QPSK Bridge Communication ........................................................................................ 6
Front Panel Overview ............................................................................................................. 7
Back Panel Overview............................................................................................................... 9
Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
11
Installation Prerequisites ...................................................................................................... 12
Measure RF Output on Existing QPSK ............................................................................... 14
Unpack and Inspect the QPSK Bridge ................................................................................ 15
Install the DAVIC QPSK Bridge into a Rack ...................................................................... 16
Connect Power Sources ......................................................................................................... 17
Connect the Test Port (Optional) ......................................................................................... 19
Connect the Craft Port (Optional) ....................................................................................... 20
Connect the Ethernet Port ..................................................................................................... 21
Connect the RF Input Ports .................................................................................................. 22
Connect the RF Output Ports ............................................................................................... 23
Provision the QPSK Bridge on the DNCS .......................................................................... 24
Power On the QPSK Bridge .................................................................................................. 25
Install the QPSK Bridge Software ........................................................................................ 27
Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
31
QPSK Bridge User Interfaces................................................................................................ 32
QPSK Bridge Shell Menu ...................................................................................................... 34
QPSK Bridge Web Interface.................................................................................................. 60
LCD Interface.......................................................................................................................... 67
Upgrading the QPSK Bridge ................................................................................................ 75
Chapter 4 Using the Delay Mode in the QPSK Data Link
79
Feature Implementation ........................................................................................................ 80
Delay Mode Setup and Operation ....................................................................................... 81
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iii
Contents
Design Examples .................................................................................................................... 83
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
85
Routine Maintenance............................................................................................................. 86
General Troubleshooting Guidelines .................................................................................. 88
Troubleshoot Alarms ............................................................................................................. 89
Chapter 6 Customer Information
103
Appendix A QPSK Bridge Configuration File
105
The QPSK Configuration File ............................................................................................. 106
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Safety Precautions
Safety Precautions
Read, Retain, and Follow These Instructions
Carefully read all safety and operating instructions before operating this product. Follow all
operating instructions that accompany this product. Retain the instructions for future use.
Give particular attention to all safety precautions.
Warning and Caution Icons
WARNING:
Avoid personal injury and product damage! Do not proceed beyond any icon
until you fully understand the indicated conditions.
The following icons alert you to important information about the safe operation of this
product:
You will find this icon in the literature that accompanies this product. This icon
indicates important operating or maintenance instructions.
You may find this icon affixed to this product and in this document to alert you of
electrical safety hazards. On this product, this icon indicates a live terminal; the
arrowhead points to the terminal device.
You may find this icon affixed to this product. This icon indicates a protective earth
terminal.
You may find this icon affixed to this product. This icon indicates excessive or
dangerous heat.
You may find this symbol affixed to this product and in this document. This symbol
indicates an infrared laser that transmits intensity-modulated light and emits
invisible laser radiation and an LED that transmits intensity-modulated light.
Heed All Warnings
Adhere to all warnings on the product and in the operating instructions.
Avoid Electric Shock
Follow the instructions in this warning.
WARNING:
To reduce risk of electric shock, perform only the instructions that are
included in the operating instructions. Refer all servicing to qualified service
personnel.
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Safety Precautions
Servicing
WARNING:
Avoid electric shock! Opening or removing the cover may expose you to
dangerous voltages.
Do not open the cover of this product and attempt service unless instructed to do so in the
operating instructions. Refer all servicing to qualified personnel only.
Cleaning, Water, Moisture, Open Flame
To protect this product against damage from moisture and open flames, do the following:

Before cleaning, unplug this product from the AC outlet. Do not use liquid or aerosol
cleaners. Use a dry cloth for cleaning.



Do not expose this product to moisture.
Do not place this product on a wet surface or spill liquids on or near this product.
Do not place or use candles or other open flames near or on this product.
Ventilation
To protect this product against damage from overheating, do the following:

This product has openings for ventilation to protect it from overheating. To ensure
product reliability, do not block or cover these openings.


Do not open this product unless otherwise instructed to do so.
Do not push objects through openings in the product or enclosure.
Placement
To protect this product against damage from breakage, do the following:

Place this product close enough to a mains AC outlet to accommodate the length of the
product power cord.

Route all power supply cords so that people cannot walk on, or place objects on, or lean
objects against them. This can pinch or damage the cords. Pay particular attention to
cords at plugs, outlets, and the points where the cords exit the product.

Make sure the mounting surface or rack is stable and can support the size and weight of
this product.
WARNING:
Avoid personal injury and damage to this product! An unstable surface may
cause this product to fall.
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Safety Precautions
When moving a cart that contains this product, check for any of the following possible
hazards:

Move the cart slowly and carefully. If the cart does not move easily, this condition may
indicate obstructions or cables that you may need to disconnect before moving this cart
to another location.


Avoid quick stops and starts when moving the cart.
Check for uneven floor surfaces such as cracks or cables and cords.
WARNING:
Avoid personal injury and damage to this product! Move any appliance and
cart combination with care. Quick stops, excessive force, and uneven
surfaces may cause the appliance and cart to overturn.
Fuse
When replacing a fuse, heed the following warnings.
WARNING:
Avoid electric shock! Always disconnect all power cables before you change a
fuse.
WARNING:
Avoid product damage! Always use a fuse that has the correct type and rating.
The correct type and rating are indicated on this product.
Grounding This Product (U.S.A. and Canada Only)
Safety Plugs
If this product is equipped with either a three-prong (grounding pin) safety plug or a twoprong (polarized) safety plug, do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or
grounding-type plug. Follow these safety guidelines to properly ground this product:

For a 3-prong plug (consists of two blades and a third grounding prong), insert the plug
into a grounded mains, 3-prong outlet.
Note: This plug fits only one way. The grounding prong is provided for your safety. If
you are unable to insert this plug fully into the outlet, contact your electrician to replace
your obsolete outlet.

For a 2-prong plug (consists of one wide blade and one narrow blade), insert the plug
into a polarized mains, 2-prong outlet in which one socket is wider than the other.
Note: If you are unable to insert this plug fully into the outlet, try reversing the plug. The
wide blade is provided for your safety. If the plug still fails to fit, contact an electrician to
replace your obsolete outlet.
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Safety Precautions
Grounding Terminal
If this product is equipped with an external grounding terminal, attach one end of an 18gauge wire (or larger) to the grounding terminal; then, attach the other end of the wire to an
earth ground, such as an equipment rack that is grounded.
20050727 Headend/Rack
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FCC Compliance
FCC Compliance
Where this equipment is subject to U.S.A. FCC and/or Industry Canada rules, the following
statements apply.
United States FCC Compliance
This device has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable
protection against such interference when this equipment is operated in a commercial
environment.
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy, and if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case users will be required to correct the interference at their own
expense.
Canada EMI Regulation
This Class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
Cet appareil numérique de la class A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.
20061110 FCC HE
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ix
About This Guide
About This Guide
Introduction
This guide describes the Cisco Model D9485 (DAVIC) Quadrature Phase-Shift
Keying (QPSK) Bridge. The unit may be purchased with redundant AC power
supplies or redundant DC power supplies. This guide provides installation,
operation, and troubleshooting procedures (including routine maintenance), as well
as technical specifications.
Note: In this guide the DAVIC QPSK Modulator/Demodulator Bridge will be
referred to as the QPSK Bridge.
Purpose
This guide provides a detailed specifications and component description for the
QPSK Bridge. After reading this guide, you will be able to successfully install,
operate, and troubleshoot the QPSK Bridge. In addition, you will be able to perform
routine maintenance which will aid in trouble-free operation. This guide also
includes a detailed specifications appendix and component descriptions.
Audience
This guide is written for Digital Broadband Delivery System (DBDS) system
administrators, Digital Network Control System (DNCS) operators, call center
personnel, and system operators who are responsible for installing and operating the
QPSK Bridge. These individuals should have extensive working experience with
cable communications equipment.
Document Version
This is the first formal release of this document.
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1 Chapter 1
Introducing the DAVIC QPSK
Bridge
Introduction
This chapter describes how the QPSK Bridge functions, and how it
functions within the DBDS. This chapter also includes illustrations and
descriptions of the QPSK Bridge front and back panel components.
In This Chapter
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
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System Overview .................................................................................... 2
The QPSK Bridge Communication ....................................................... 6
Front Panel Overview ............................................................................ 7
Back Panel Overview.............................................................................. 9
1
Chapter 1 Introducing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
System Overview
Introduction
The D9485 QPSK Bridge replaces the functions of the D9482 Modulator and up to
eight D9494/D9492 demodulators. It is an integral component of the DBDS. The
QPSK Bridge works with Digital Home Communication Terminals (DHCTs) to
provide a forward-signaling and reverse-communications path for interactive twoway video and data services.
The Modulating/Demodulating Process
The QPSK Bridge’s internal QPSK modulator initiates and controls configuration
and setup through the QPSK forward path. The QPSK modulator splits messages
into Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) cells, formats the messages in DAVICcompliant frames, adds QPSK modulation, and then transmits the messages to the
DHCT at a rate of 1.544 Mbps. After the DHCTs are configured, all control and
status information travels through the QPSK forward path, while all video and
audio sources are carried by high-bandwidth Quadrature Amplitude Modulation
(QAM) channels to the DHCT via a separate QAM modulator.
The QPSK Bridge’s internal QPSK demodulators receive the messages that originate
from a DHCT, such as a request for a service, on a 1.544 Mbps reverse-path channel.
The QPSK demodulators demodulate the incoming QPSK signals, perform error
correction on the detected data, and transmit the messages to the main internal
processor in the QPSK Bridge. The QPSK Bridge uses the slot number information
inserted by the internal QPSK demodulator, along with the demodulator port
number (for example, reverse channel number) to create a “success feedback” word
to acknowledge or confirm receipt to the DHCT. These words generate the
“acknowledge bits.” The DHCT needs these bits to determine whether its cell was
received successfully. Received cells from the demodulators are routed to the main
memory of the QPSK Bridge, where complete messages are reassembled. The QPSK
Bridge processes these reassembled messages as a part of its Media Access Control
(MAC) functions. The QPSK Bridge serves as a DAVIC Router by implementing the
DAVIC MAC functions and by communicating signaling and status information
back to the DNCS through an Ethernet/IP connection.
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System Overview
Diagram of Major DBDS Components
The following diagram shows the major components of the DBDS:
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Chapter 1 Introducing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Major Stages and Descriptions
Note: The following table describes the operational stages of the QPSK Bridge:
Stage
Description
RF Inputs
The QPSK demodulator(s) receive a QPSK reverse burst carrier
signal from the DHCT by way of the hybrid fiber coax (HFC)
CATV plant through its Radio Frequency (RF) input ports in
the range of 5 to 42 MHz.
Tuner/Demodulator
Each tuner/demodulator can be configured to a specific input
frequency in the 5.00-42.00 MHz range in 250 KHz steps. There
are four input level ranges supported by the demodulator, as
follows:
Range 1
Modulator
-13 to +3 dBmV
Range 2
-5 to +11 dBmV
Range 3
+3 to +19 dBmV
Range 4
+11 to +27 dBmV
The low frequency modulator port is used for typical
installation where the downstream DAVIC channel is
configured in the 70-130 MHz range.
The high frequency modulator port can be used to support
CATV plants where the downstream split is greater than
130Mhz.
Note: The HF port is reserved for future use.
The low frequency and high frequency ports contain the same
data. If both ports are active, the downstream DAVIC signal is
cloned and output by both ports.
Main Processor
4

Controls all user interfaces (LCD, buttons, LEDs, Craft
Port, Web interface, and so on).


Controls the modulators/demodulators.



Monitors power supplies.
Monitors the environmental conditions of the QPSK Bridge
and adjusts fan speeds to ensure adequate cooling.
Performs DAVIC MAC functions.
Interfaces with the DNCS via remote procedure calls
(RPC).
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System Overview
Internal Components
The following illustration identifies the internal components and processes of the
QPSK Bridge:
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Chapter 1 Introducing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
The QPSK Bridge Communication
This section describes how the QPSK Bridge communicates with devices on the
Ethernet network and devices on the DAVIC network.
Communication Path
The QPSK Bridge is a DAVIC-compliant headend QPSK signaling hub. This single
device acts as a bridge between the Ethernet Network and the DAVIC network. The
QPSK Bridge uses BOOTP to get its IP settings for the Ethernet interface. On the
DAVIC network, the QPSK Bridge performs all of the MAC functionality required to
allow a DAVIC device to send/receive data to/from the Ethernet network.
Replacement of Existing DAVIC Modulator / Demodulators
A single D9485 QPSK Bridge replaces the functionality of one D9482 Modulator and
up to eight D9494 / D9492 demodulators.
6
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Front Panel Overview
Front Panel Overview
Front Panel Components
The following illustration shows the front panel components of the QPSK Bridge:
Description of Components
The following table contains the front panel alarm and component descriptions that
correspond to each number in the preceding labeled diagram of the QPSK Bridge
front panel:
Item
Component
Description
1
Front Panel Retaining
Thumb Screws
Two thumb screws that secure the
protective front panel encasing the
replaceable fan modules.
2
Fan Modules
Three field-replaceable fan modules for
cooling internal circuitry.
3
RF Output Monitor Port
Single BNC connector, which provides
a monitor for the low frequency RF
output port located on the rear of the
chassis.
4
LED Indicators:
5
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
ALARM indicator (red/yellow) illuminates for any alarm. Refer
to Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge (on page 85) for
more information.

CW Mode (yellow) illuminates when the output modulator(s) are
in Continuous Wave mode.

BURST DATA indicator (green) illuminates when the
demodulator(s) are receiving data.
LCD Alphanumeric
Display
Displays information and menus for
front panel keys.
7
Chapter 1 Introducing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
8
Item
Component
Description
6
Directional buttons and
Enter button.
Allows you to navigate through the
LCD menus, make selections, and save
changes to non-volatile memory.
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Back Panel Overview
Back Panel Overview
Back Panel Components
The following illustration shows the back panel components of the 110-240 VAC
QPSK Bridge:
Description of Components
The following table describes the back panel components. Each item in the table
corresponds to the appropriate number in the preceding labeled diagram of the
D9485 back panel.
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Item
Component
Description
1
Power Inlet
3-prong male socket.
2
Ethernet Connector
Connects (indirectly) to the DNCS. This
is a 10/100/1000 RJ-45 Ethernet port
used for remote communication and
configuration.
3
Maintenance LED
indicator
Illuminates when configured by the
operator to do so. Allows for easier
identification of the QPSK Bridge from
the rear.
4
Craft Port
Standard female DB-9 RS-232 serial
connector for direct or remote
connection to the system's text-based
diagnostic and configuration menus.
5
RF Inputs
Eight QPSK demodulators, each with its
own 75 Ω female F-connector. These
connect to the external HFC plant.
6
RF Outputs
Two 75 Ω QPSK modulator ports. One
female F-connector is for the high
frequency range (70-1002 MHz); the
other is for the low frequency range (70130 MHz). These connect to the external
HFC plant.
7
GND
Ground screw for grounding the unit.
9
Chapter 1 Introducing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Back Panel Components for 48 VDC QPSK Bridge
The following illustration shows the back panel components of the 48 VDC QPSK
Bridge:
Description of Components
The following table describes the back panel components:
10
Item
Component
Description
1
Power Inlet
Three position, screw-cage, clamp plug (Phoenix
Contact 1804917 supplied with unit), with a mating
jack on the unit. Recommended wire AWG is 12
maximum, 18 minimum.
2
Ethernet Connector Connects (indirectly) to the DNCS. This is a
10/100/1000 RJ-45 Ethernet port used for remote
communication and configuration.
3
Maintenance LED
indicator
Illuminates when configured by the operator to do
so. Allows for easier identification of the QPSK
Bridge from the rear.
4
Craft Port
Standard female DB-9 RS-232 serial connector for
direct or remote connection to the system's textbased, diagnostic and configuration menus.
5
RF Inputs
Eight QPSK demodulators, each with its own 75 Ω
female F-connector. These connect to the external
HFC plant.
6
RF Outputs
Two 75 Ω QPSK modulator ports. One female Fconnector is for the High frequency range (70-1002
MHz); the other is for the Low frequency range (70130 MHz). These connect to the external HFC plant.
7
GND
Ground screw for grounding the unit.
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2 Chapter 2
Installing the DAVIC QPSK
Bridge
Introduction
This chapter provides procedures for installing the QPSK Bridge into a
rack and for connecting the QPSK Bridge to other DBDS components.
For detailed instructions on how to provision the QPSK Bridge on the
DNCS, refer to the DNCS online help.
Important: The QPSK Bridge must be installed in the system headend
before you can perform any calibration or provisioning.
In This Chapter








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Installation Prerequisites ..................................................................... 12
Measure RF Output on Existing QPSK .............................................. 14
Unpack and Inspect the QPSK Bridge ............................................... 15
Install the DAVIC QPSK Bridge into a Rack ..................................... 16
Connect Power Sources........................................................................ 17
Connect the Test Port (Optional) ........................................................ 19
Connect the Craft Port (Optional) ...................................................... 20
Connect the Ethernet Port.................................................................... 21
Connect the RF Input Ports ................................................................. 22
Connect the RF Output Ports .............................................................. 23
Provision the QPSK Bridge on the DNCS ......................................... 24
Power On the QPSK Bridge................................................................. 25
Install the QPSK Bridge Software ....................................................... 27
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Installation Prerequisites
This section describes the rack, power, and operating temperature requirements for
the QPSK Bridge.
Rack Requirements
The QPSK Bridge fits into a standard rack mount: type EIA RS-310.
CAUTION:
When installing the QPSK Bridge into a rack, be careful not to tangle or strain
interconnecting cables.
Power Requirements
The QPSK Bridge requires a power source with the following specifications:
Item
Specification
Voltage


48 VDC +20/-15%
100-240 VAC model: 90 to 264 VAC (100 to 240 VAC power
systems)
WARNING:
Avoid damaging the QPSK Bridge and creating a possible
fire hazard! Do not connect the QPSK Bridge to an incorrect
power source.
Power
< 175W
Connector
Specifications

48 VDC model: Three-position screw-cage clamp plug (Phoenix
Contact 1804917 supplied with unit), with mating jack on unit.
Recommended wire AWG is 12 maximum, 18 minimum.

100-240 VAC model: Three-prong male socket
Line frequency (AC) 47 to 63 Hz (50 to 60 Hz power systems)
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Installation Prerequisites
WARNINGS:


This product is for indoor use only.

The main disconnect for the AC powered unit is the line cord. The AC
plug needs to be readily accessible or an alternate disconnect installed
near the unit.

The DC supply branch circuit should be fused for 20A or less. A power
disconnect is required.
This product must be installed in accordance with all national and local
building/electrical codes.
Operating Temperature
The operating temperature of this equipment is 0 to 50°C (32 to 122°F).
CAUTION:

Avoid damage to this product! Your warranty is void if you operate this
product above or below the maximums specified operating temperature.

Avoid damage to this product! Your warranty is void if you install this
product without proper ventilation.
To help maintain the operating temperature in the acceptable range, follow these
guidelines:
 Place the equipment in an air-conditioned environment
 Keep cooling vents obstruction-free
Note: The intake vents are on the front panel. The exhaust vent is on the back
panel.
 Maintain a cool temperature in your headends and hubs where the QPSK
Bridges are in use.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Measure RF Output on Existing QPSK
Prior to installing the new D9485 QPSK Bridge, measure the RF output power levels
on the QPSK modulator you are replacing. Then, after installing the new D9485
QPSK Bridge, use the front panel of the D9485 QPSK Bridge to match those output
levels.
14
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Unpack and Inspect the QPSK Bridge
Unpack and Inspect the QPSK Bridge
This section provides the procedures for unpacking and inspecting the QPSK Bridge.
Carrier’s Responsibility
We inspect and carefully pack all products before shipment. The carrier is
responsible for safe shipping and delivery. Do not return products damaged in
transit to us. If there are any missing parts or damage to the product, contact Cisco
Services.
Note: Retain all boxes for future equipment shipping needs. They have been
designed for use with this equipment.
Unpacking and Inspecting Procedure
Follow these steps to unpack and inspect the QPSK Bridge:
1 Review the safety precautions.
2 Inspect the shipping carton for visible damage.
3 Open the shipping carton.
4 Remove all packing material.
5 Inspect the product for visible damage.
6 Inspect the box or product for loose items that may indicate concealed damage.
7 Inspect for missing parts, using the packing slip as a guide.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Install the DAVIC QPSK Bridge into a Rack
This section describes the rack requirements and the procedure for installing the
QPSK Bridge into a rack.
Rack Requirements
The QPSK Bridge dimensions are 1.75 inches high x 19.00 inches wide x 16.5 inches
in diameter. The QPSK Bridge fits into a type EIA RS-310 rack mount.
CAUTION:


Do not to tangle or strain interconnecting cables.
Be sure to install additional support.
Installing the QPSK Bridge into a Rack
Follow these steps to install the QPSK Bridge into a rack:
1 Place the QPSK demodulator in the rack.
2 Insert a mounting screw through each of the four mounting holes on the attached
angle support brackets of the QPSK Bridge and then into the rack.
3
Firmly tighten each mounting screw.
Important: When you use the attached angle support brackets, you can install the
QPSK Bridges above or below each other in the rack. These support brackets provide
additional support and allow correct air circulation through the unit and
compensate for the additional weight of wire connectors and cabling.
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Connect Power Sources
Connect Power Sources
This section contains instructions for connecting the DC and AC power sources to
the QPSK Bridge.
Connecting an Earth Ground
Complete the following steps to connect an earth ground to either the DC or AC
versions of the QPSK Bridge.
CAUTION:
When using the 48 VDC power supply, the product’s ground terminal must
be connected to an earth ground.
1
2
3
4
Cut the appropriate length of ground wire (18 AWG minimum) to make the
connection from the ground lug (marked with a ground symbol) to the electrical
system protective ground.
Strip the wire and crimp on a #8 ring terminal, sized appropriately for the gauge
of ground wire used. Attach in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions,
using the correct tools.
Place the ring terminal and #8 lock washer on the ground lug and tighten with
the provided nut.
Connect the other end of the ground wire to the electrical system protective
ground using connectors and methods that are in accordance with national and
local building/electrical codes.
Power Source Combinations
The QPSK Bridge may be operated with either of the following combinations of
power supply:
 Dual AC
 Dual DC
 AC/DC
Important: Always operate the QPSK Bridge with the correct Cisco power supplies.
Connecting a DC Power Source
Complete the following steps to connect a DC power source to the 48 VDC QPSK
Bridge:
1 Verify that the DC power source is set to the Off position.
2 Insert the wires from the DC power source into the screw-cage clamp plug. Use a
small flat-blade screwdriver to tighten the screws at the top of the screw-cage
clamp plug to secure the wires.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
3
Insert the plug into the mating jack on the back panel of the 48 VDC power
supply.
CAUTION:
Keep the DC power source set to the Off position until you are ready to power
on the QPSK Bridge.
Connecting an AC Power Source
Complete the following steps to connect an AC power source to the 100-240
VAC.power supply:
1 Connect the power cord to the AC power inlet on the back panel of the 100-240
VAC power supply.
2 Connect the other end of the power cord to an AC electrical outlet.
CAUTION:
The QPSK Bridge will power up immediately after the power cord is inserted
into a live AC electrical outlet. Do not insert the plug until you are ready for
unit operation.
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Connect the Test Port (Optional)
Connect the Test Port (Optional)
The QPSK Bridge includes an RF Output Monitor port for monitoring the RF
spectrum of the ‘Low’ RF Output port located on the back of the QPSK Bridge
chassis. The Output Monitor port is a female BNC connector that outputs a -20 dB
signal of the ‘Low’ RF Output port for diagnostic and troubleshooting purposes.
This section describes the procedure for connecting to the RF Output Monitoring
Port (optional).
1 Connect one end of the BNC coaxial cable to the RF Output Monitor port on the
QPSK Bridge.
2 Connect the other end of the BNC coaxial cable to the desired monitoring
equipment.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Connect the Craft Port (Optional)
The craft port on the QPSK Bridge is a standard female DB-9 RS-232 connector. Use
the craft port to connect the QPSK Bridge to a diagnostic PC. This section describes
the procedure for connecting the craft port.
Important: This port is for diagnostic use and is not designed to be connected for
normal operation.
1
2
3
Connect the male end of a DB-9 data cable to the Craft (Diagnostics) port on the
back of the QPSK Bridge.
Note: The cable connection is straight-through.
Connect the other end of a DB-9 data cable to an available serial port on the
diagnostic PC.
Note: To maintain signal clarity and strength, do not use a cable longer than 50
ft.
Power on the PC and activate a ProComm or HyperTerminal window using the
following modem connection settings:





20
19200 baud
1 stop bit
No parity
8 data bits
No flow control
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Connect the Ethernet Port
Connect the Ethernet Port
The Ethernet port on the QPSK Bridge is a standard female RJ-45 connector. Use the
Ethernet port to connect the QPSK Bridge to the DNCS to obtain an IP address via
BootP and configuration information via a downloadable file. The Ethernet port can
also be used to view and change system information from a remote PC. This section
describes the procedure for connecting to the Ethernet port.
1
2
Connect the male end of the Ethernet cable to the Ethernet port on the QPSK
Bridge.
Connect the other end of the Ethernet cable to the DNCS or to another piece of
network equipment (switch, router) that is connected to the DNCS via a network
connection.
Important: While using external routing equipment in association with the D9485
QPSK Bridge, ensure that the external routing equipment is set to autonegotiate
mode. Using half or full duplex mode may cause problems while communicating
with the device.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Connect the RF Input Ports
The RF input ports connect the QPSK Bridge to the HFC network and to the DHCT
upstream signal path using a 75 Ω RG-59 coaxial cable. There are 8 RF input ports on
the QPSK Bridge. This section describes the procedure for connecting the RF input
port.
1
2
3
Locate the RF input port on the back panel of the QPSK Bridge to which you
want to connect.
Connect the male end of a 75 Ω RG-59 coaxial cable to the RF input port.
Connect the male end of the 75 Ω RG-59 coaxial cable to a RF signal splitter in the
distribution plant (headend).
Note: If you are upgrading from the legacy D9494 Demodulator and D9482
Modulator, connect the RG-59 coaxial cable to the RF input port on the QPSK Bridge
that corresponds to the ‘Demodulator Interface port’ on the modulator. Repeat for
all demodulators being replaced.
Example: If the legacy demodulator (D9494) has its Network Data port connected to
the Demodulator Interface #1 on the modulator, you will connect the RF coaxial
cable connected to the RF input of the legacy demodulator (D9494), (from the
demodulator) to the QPSK Bridge RF input #1.
22
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Connect the RF Output Ports
Connect the RF Output Ports
The RF output ports connect the QPSK Bridge to the HFC network and to the DHCT
downstream signal path, using a 75 Ω RG-59 coaxial cable. There are two RF output
ports on the QPSK Bridge; one is for low frequency operation in the 70 – 130 MHz
range to replace the functionality of the current D9482 modulator. The other is for
high frequency operation in the 70 – 1002 MHz range for future use. This section
describes the procedure for connecting the RF output ports.
1
2
3
Locate the RF Output port on the back of the QPSK Bridge labelled as “Low”.
Note: The Output Port labeled as “High” is for future use and may require a
firmware update for operation.
Connect one end of the 75 Ω RG-59 coaxial cable to the ‘Low’ RF output port.
Connect the other end of the 75 Ω RG-59 coaxial cable to an RF signal splitter in
the distribution plant (headend).
Note: If you are replacing the legacy D9482 modulator, remove the RG-59 coaxial
cable from the RF OUT port on the modulator and connect it to the ‘Low’ RF output
port on the QPSK Bridge.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Provision the QPSK Bridge on the DNCS
After you have installed and connected the QPSK Bridge, you must provision the
QPSK Bridge on the DNCS. For detailed instructions on how to provision the QPSK
Bridge on the DNCS, refer to the DNCS online help for your system release.
24
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Power On the QPSK Bridge
Power On the QPSK Bridge
After you have installed and connected the QPSK Bridge to your network, power on
the device. The DNCS manages the QPSK Bridge and should provision it upon boot.
QPSK Bridge Boot Process
The following figure shows the boot process for the different boot modes available
on the QPSK Bridge. Unless previously configured, the system will only be able to
sign on DHCTs when configured in Boot Mode 2.
Important: Boot Mode 1 will attempt to obtain an IP address for 20 seconds before
skipping that process and obtaining configuration from NVRAM.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Configuration File
The QPSK Bridge configuration file is an .xml file that is downloaded upon each
boot from the TFTP server identified during the BootP process. The configuration
file is used by the QPSK Bridge to configure settings that are required for normal
operation. For any settings present in both the configuration file and through the
DNCS provisioning process, the values in the provisioning process will take priority
over the configuration file values. For more information regarding the QPSK Bridge
configuration file, refer to QPSK Bridge Configuration File (on page 105).
26
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Install the QPSK Bridge Software
Install the QPSK Bridge Software
1
Acquire the new QPSK code. Contact the representative who handles your
account for assistance.
2 Open an xterm window on the DNCS as the dncs user.
3 Become the root user.
su root
Important: Do not use a dash in this command.
4 Get the current D9485 QPSK Bridge information.
pkginfo -l SAIqpsk2
5 Remove any existing package instance of the new QPSK code.
pkgrm SAIqpsk2
6 Insert the CD containing the QPSK code into the CD drive of the DNCS.
7 Enter cd /cdrom0/cdrom to change the working directory.
8 Begin the installation of the software.
pkgadd -d .
Note: Do not overlook the space and the period at the end of the command.
9 When prompted, select SAIqpsk2.
10 Upon completion, verify that the code was correctly installed on the DNCS.
pkginfo -l SAIqpsk2
Expected output:
PKGINST: SAIqpsk2
NAME: D9485 QPSK Modulator and Demodulator 10-21-13
CATEGORY: application
ARCH: SunOS_sparc
VERSION:
1.2.13
BASEDIR:
VENDOR:
DESC:
PSTAMP:
INSTDATE:
STATUS:
FILES:
/tftpboot
Cisco Systems, Inc.
D9485 QPSK Modulator and Demodulator 10-21-13
thor20131021103221
Oct 21 2013 14:53
completely installed
2 installed pathnames
31345 blocks used (approx)
Note: The version information highlighted in blue reflects the installed version
on the DNCS for the next generation of QPSK.
11 Change the working directory.
cd /tftpboot
12 Open the qpsk2.xml file with a text editor.
13 Change the SSH, HTTP, and SNMP entries from Disabled to Enabled.
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Chapter 2 Installing the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
14 Save and close the file.
15 Complete these steps at the QPSK UI on the DNCS:
a Select the appropriate QPSK, and then choose File > Open to open the
QPSK's configuration information.
b Verify that the configuration file name is qpsk2.xml.
c Verify that Database Persistence is set to On.
d Save your changes.
16 Choose File > Reset to reboot the QPSK.
17 Monitor the QPSK to be sure that it received the reboot request.
18 At the DNCS, open the /dvs/dncs/tmp/bootpd* file to verify that the QPSK has
made a provision request.
Note: The QPSK will reboot twice, once from the initial reboot request, and once
more after the QPSK code has completed downloading to the QPSK.
Important: Before using the new D9485 QPSK Bridge, use the front panel to match
the RF output power levels of the QPSK modulator that was replaced.
Install the QPSK Bridge ISO Image
1
Transfer the QPSK ISO image file to the /tmp directory of the DNCS.
Notes:
 If transferring via FTP, be sure that the transfer is done in binary mode.

2
3
4
Confirm file ownership and permissions.
Log in to the DNCS using Telnet or SSH.
Switch to the root user.
Are you replacing existing QPSK Bridge software on the DNCS?

If yes, then back up the existing qpsk2.xml file:
a Change to the /tftpboot directory:
cd /tftpboot
b Back up the existing qpsk2.xml file:
cp qpsk2.xml qpsk2.xml.old

5
6
7
8
28
If no, continue with step 5.
Return to the /tmp directory:
cd /tmp
Type the following command and press Enter to create a loopback device for the
ISO image:
lofiadm –a <full path to iso file> /dev/lofi/1
Note: The last character is the number 1.
Example: lofiadm –a /tmp/QPSK2-1.2.16.iso /dev/lofi/1
Mount the device as /mnt:
mount –o ro –F hsfs /dev/lofi/1 /mnt
Change to the /mnt directory:
cd /mnt
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Install the QPSK Bridge Software
9
10
11
12
13
OL-30211-01
Type the following command and press Enter to install the QPSK Bridge
software:
install_pkg SAIqpsk2
Type y and press Enter at the confirmation message.
After verifying the successful installation, type the following command and
press Enter to exit from the /mnt directory.
cd /tmp
Type the following command and press Enter to unmount the image:
umount /mnt
Type the following command and press Enter to remove the device:
lofiadm –d /dev/lofi/1
29
3 Chapter 3
Operating the DAVIC QPSK
Bridge
Introduction
This chapter provides operational information for user interfaces
which include the web interface, the console port interface, and the
LCD interface. This chapter shows how to access your QPSK Bridge,
navigate the front panel LCD, view system information, and make
changes to your systems configuration. Changes made to the
configuration using these interfaces can be so that they persist across
reboots.
In This Chapter





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QPSK Bridge User Interfaces............................................................... 32
QPSK Bridge Shell Menu ..................................................................... 34
QPSK Bridge Web Interface ................................................................ 60
LCD Interface ........................................................................................ 67
Upgrading the QPSK Bridge ............................................................... 75
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
QPSK Bridge User Interfaces
Interfacing with the QPSK Bridge can be accomplished both remotely and while
directly connected with a PC. Remote connectivity is achieved through the RJ-45
Ethernet port located on the back panel of the chassis, while direct connectivity is
achieved over the RS-232 console port located on the back panel of the chassis or
through the front panel LCD.
Remote Connectivity
Accessing the QPSK Bridge over a network is a convenient way of accessing your
QPSK Bridge remotely. In order to do this, the unit must have gained network access
and obtained an IP address via a BootP server. Once a network IP address has been
obtained, remote connectivity to your QPSK Bridge can be done in two different
ways.
 SSH — Provides access to the text-based shell menu. An SSH client is required in
order to access this menu and will allow you to view device information,
statistics, and also perform configuration and maintenance functions.
 Web GUI (WebUI) — Provides access to a web-based point-and-click system of
menus. A web browser client is required to access this interface and allows you
to view device information and statistics, as well as perform basic maintenance
functions.
Important: Mozilla Firefox Versions 14 and 15, Microsoft Internet Explorer
Version 9, and Google Chrome Versions 21 and 22 have been tested in
conjunction with the QPSK Bridge. Newer versions of these Web browsers can
also be used.
32
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QPSK Bridge User Interfaces
Direct Connectivity
When in the proximity of the QPSK Bridge, you can connect directly to the chassis
RS-232 console port. This port provides a serial connection to the text-based shell
menu. Very similar to SSH connectivity, a terminal emulation client is required in
order to access this menu. It will allow you to view device information and statistics,
and also perform configuration and maintenance functions.
1 Connect a computer running terminal emulation software (such as Hyper
Terminal) to the RS-232 port on the back of the D9485 QPSK Bridge.
2 Using your terminal emulation software, create a new connection and select the
COM port to which your RS-232 cable is connected.
3 Specify the following connection settings:





Baud Rate — 19200
Data — 8
Parity — N
Stop — 1
Flow Control — No
All configuration functions that can be accomplished over the serial connection can
also be accomplished through the SSH connection.
Front LCD
The front panel LCD allows you to change the configuration of the QPSK Bridge and
reset the admin password, if forgotten. No special tools are required to use this
interface. Navigation buttons are present on the front panel to navigate the menus,
make changes, and commit changes. For more information on the front panel LCD,
see LCD Interface (on page 67).
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
The shell menu on the QPSK Bridge has a simple text-based menu system navigated
using numerical entries. Regardless of how you connect to the text-based shell menu
(RS-232 or SSH), the same basic functions can be performed. This section outlines the
different menus that can be accessed, and the functions you can perform while
connected to this interface.
Sort and Filter
Some menus within the shell menu allow you to sort and/or filter data. Filtering is
useful when searching for a specific string or piece of information, while sorting is
useful to help re-organize a table in a fashion which best suits you.
To sort data, type s in the Enter Option field in the shell menu and follow the
onscreen commands to sort a table. You can sort multiple columns in ascending or
descending order.
To filter data, type f in the Enter Option field in the shell menu and follow the
onscreen commands. You can sort data in a table by column and then filter by
specific text or numbers. When filtering text, note that the text is case sensitive.
Additionally, some menus now have a jump function that allows the user to jump to
any page of the list or log. There is also a “bottom” function that allows the user to
go to the last page of the list or log.
Making Changes
Some menus will allow you to make configuration changes to the QPSK Bridge. If
you are able to make a change or to perform a function, an option number will be
located on the left of the table or widget that you can reference.
Enter the option number to modify, then follow the on-screen instructions to commit
a change. If a change is no longer desired, simply leave the entry blank and the value
will remain at the current value.
Note: Any changes that you make in this interface are automatically saved.
34
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
Initial Login
The first time you connect to the text-based shell menu, you will be prompted for a
login and a password. The default login credentials are:
Login: D9485_admin
Password: MAC address of the D9485 unit, with colons
You will be asked immediately to confirm the password, and then to change the
password to something other than the MAC address of the unit.
Important: When changing the password for the first time, there are a few security
guidelines that must be followed while picking the new password.
 Cannot be the MAC address of the unit
 Must contain at least 8 characters
 Must contain at least three of the following:
-
Upper-case letter
-
Lower-case letter
-
Number
-
Symbol
Make note of your new admin password for future reference. If you forget the
password, it can be set to a new temporary value using the LCD interface.
Important: If the LCD interface is locked, you cannot recover a lost password. Once
the password is changed, you will be presented with the Main menu screen, as
shown in the following figure:
From this Main menu, you can access all other shell menus. For quick reference, the
current time is located at the top right of every menu.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Alarms
The Alarms menu provides you with a list of the alarms that are currently active on
the QPSK Bridge, and also a record of all past and present alarms.
Alarms are categorized according to severity. The severity levels from highest to
lowest are Critical, Major, Minor, and Status. Each alarm menu has a total count of
alarms and lists each severity level, as shown in the following figure:
History
This menu provides a list of all alarms that have been raised (and cleared) since the
last reboot. Even if an alarm is cleared, it will show up in this list.
Current
This menu provides a list of all alarms that are currently active on the QPSK Bridge.
Once an alarm is cleared, it will no longer show in this menu. The following table
describes each column in this menu.
36
Column
Description
Priority
Displays the severity level of each alarm.
Event
Message
Displays an alarm code and a short description of what caused the
alarm.
Instance
Displays the instance of hardware in which the alarm has
occurred. (1-8 if related to a demodulator, 1-2 if related to power
supply, and so on.)
Type
Displays the type of event. In this menu, they are all alarms.
Assert Time
Displays the time and date when the alarm was asserted.
De-Assert
Time
Displays the time and date when an alarm was cleared.
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
Status
The Status menu provides detailed insight into the current state of the OPSK Bridge.
1. Logs
This menu shows all log messages for the QPSK Bridge. Any event or alarm that
occurs will be logged in this list, along with the time and date at which it occurred.
Processes are also logged.
Note: During the boot process, log messages will show a timestamp of "Jan 1" until
the actual date and time are received from the DNCS as part of the provisioning
process.
2. RPC Logs
This menu shows all log messages as they relate to the RPC transactions. This refers
to any communication between the QPSK Bridge and an RPC server. Each log
message is time-stamped.
3. DHCT Logs
This menu shows all log messages between the QPSK Bridge and any DHCTs that it
has provisioned. Each log message is labeled with the MAC address of the DHCT to
which it pertains, along with a timestamp of when the event occurred.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
4. System Information
This menu shows basic system information about the QPSK Bridge and how long
your system has been running since the last reboot.
5. Ports
This menu shows all of the TCP and UDP ports that are open on the QPSK Bridge
and their related processes.
38
Column
Description
Proto
Lists the protocol IP of the port
Local Address
Lists the IP address of the port on the QPSK
Bridge
Remote Address
Lists the IP address to which the port is
connected
State
Lists the active state of each open port
Process
Describes what type of a process is occurring
on each port
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
Configuration
The Configuration menu provides you with the ability to change the configured
parameters of the QPSK Bridge. When making changes, you must be aware that
some configuration parameters are managed by the DNCS. Any changes made
locally will be overwritten by the DNCS when the device is provisioned.
1. Media Access Controller
This menu allows you to configure various elements related to the MAC. This menu
allows you to modify the following parameters:
 Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) - The VPI is used to identify the virtual circuit used
by the DNCS to identify a unique QPSK Bridge. This can be modified to be any
number between 0 and 255.
 Service Frequencies - The Service Frequency is the upstream frequency (or RDC)
at which the QPSK Bridge tells the DHCTs to transmit data. This is a frequency
between 5 MHz and 42 MHz and should correspond to the frequency of the
associated demodulator. The backup frequency is used as an alternate service
frequency should a change in network variables require a frequency change.
Typically, these values are the same.
 DAVIC Ranging – This is the process of adjusting the transmitted power and
timing delay for DAVIC messages from a DHCT for optimal performance. This
functionality can be enabled or disabled for all DHCTs.
 DAVIC Broadcast Messages – Allows you to set the rate at which DAVIC
broadcast messages are sent downstream to connected DHCTs. This can be used
to reduce the amount of DHCT sign-on traffic.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
 Power Levels – Allows you to set the upstream power levels (RDC) for the
DHCTs.
-
The Acceptable minimum and maximum values are the worst case power
levels of a DHCT as measured by a QPSK Bridge demodulator.
-
Target maximum and minimum values are the values of the ideal power
levels of a DHCT as measured at a QPSK Bridge demodulator.
-
The DHCT maximum and minimum values are the transmission power
levels as measured at the upstream port of a DHCT. The range of these
values may depend on the model of DHCT.
 Modulator Fiber Distance Setting – Allows you to select the maximum node
distance. This setting is configured per QPSK Bridge and affects all DHCTs
connected to all demodulators. This value changes the timing delay between the
DHCT and the QPSK Bridge. The range is from 0 km to 248 km, in 31 km
increments.
2. Network
This menu provides information about the IP networks to which the QPSK Bridge
and DHCTs are connected, including its own MAC address and IP address, and the
IP information of the DHCT network.
 Data Routing - Describes the different data types flowing through the QPSK
Bridge and their destination locations as defined by the DNCS. The QPSK Bridge
will treat each data type uniquely and pass the data along to the DHCTs it
serves. These data flows can be edited through this menu; however, it is
recommended that changes to these data flows take place through the DNCS.
 DHCT Network – Displays the base IP address and subnet mask for the network
to which all DHCTs are connected.
3. Modulator
This menu shows the characteristics of the QPSK modulator output port(s), as
shown in the following figure:
40
OL-30211-01
QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
 RF Output Port – This field will always display “low” indicating the Low
frequency RF port. Currently, only the Low Frequency RF output port is
configurable on the QPSK Bridge. The High Frequency Output port is reserved
for future use.
 Frequency – The output frequency of the RF Output port. Range is from 70 MHz
to 130 MHz in 0.25 MHz steps.

Power Level – The power level of the RF Output port. Range is from 50 dBmV to 60
dBmV. The default power level is 60 dBmV.
 CW Mode – This shows the status of the CW (continuous wave) mode for the RF
Output Port. When enabled, the output will be a carrier only, at the pre-set
frequency. To enable CW Mode, see the section on CW Mode under the
Maintenance (on page 47) heading.
Note: There is no downstream traffic (FDC) when this is enabled.
 DNCS Provisioned – Used to display/configure DNCS provisioning for this
modulator.
 RF Output – Used to display the status of the RF Output port. When set to
muted, there is no RF output.
4. Security
This menu is used to display/configure RADIUS authentication, as shown in the
following figure:
 Server – This displays the IP address of the configured RADIUS server.
 Secret – This displays the password that the QPSK Bridge uses to authenticate
with the RADIUS server.
 Timeout – This displays the timeout period before the QPSK Bridge will no
longer attempt to get a password from the RADIUS server.
 Enabled – This displays the status of the RADIUS server. When set to ‘no’, the
QPSK Bridge will not attempt to authenticate with the RADIUS server.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
5. DNCS
This menu displays the RPC server IP information for the QPSK Bridge. There are
four RPC servers with which the QPSK Bridge communicates under normal
operation. The RPC Connection Parameters table is shown in the following figure.
Each RPC server can be configured through this menu to an IPv4 address.
6. BOOTP Parameters
This menu displays the BOOTP parameters for the QPSK Bridge. This menu displays
BOOTP information from the last boot. This information is not configurable on the
QPSK Bridge; it must be configured on the BOOTP server (typically the DNCS). The
BOOTP Parameters table is shown in the following figure:
42
OL-30211-01
QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
7. Demodulators
This menu displays the configuration settings for the eight QPSK demodulators in
the QPSK Bridge. From this menu, you can enable/disable any demodulator and
also modify the tuning frequency and attenuation of each demodulator. The
Demodulator menu is shown in the following figure:
OL-30211-01
Column
Description
Number
Identifies the demodulator.
DNCS Name
Name given to a DHCT node by the DNCS. Each
demodulator is connected to a single DHCT node.
Frequency
Frequency to which the demodulator is tuning. This is the
upstream frequency (or RDC) on which the DHCTs are
transmitting. Tuning range is 5 MHz to 42 MHz.
Attenuation
Internal attenuation of each demodulator. Ideal power
level at the input to the demodulator is 0 dB. The
attenuation can be increased if the average receive level is
higher than 0 dB. Each demodulator can be adjusted to
have the following attenuation: 0 dB, 8 dB, 16 dB, or 24 dB.
DNCS Provisioned
Describes whether or not the demodulators are
provisioned by the DNCS.
DNCS Enabled
The functioning state of each demodulator. When enabled,
the demodulator is on and ready to receive upstream data
(RDC). When disabled, the demodulator is off and will
not receive data.
43
Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
8. Chassis
This menu displays information about the chassis, its craft (serial) port settings, and
its configured boot mode. The Chassis menu is shown in the following image:
From this menu, you can:
 Change the name of the chassis. The name of the chassis must be humanreadable, and can contain numbers (0-9), letters (a-z, A-Z), an underscore “_”,
and a dash “-“.
 Change the boot mode for next reboot. The different boot modes are:
-
NVRAM (mode 0) – Will use configuration information saved to NVRAM.
The QPSK Bridge will not obtain an IP address, download a configuration
file, or obtain provisioning from the DNCS. Any previous changes made to
the system will be saved in NVRAM.
-
Single BOOTP/TFTP (mode 1) – Will attempt to obtain an IP address and
configuration file for 20 seconds, and then default to using the configuration
information saved in NVRAM. The QPSK Bridge will not attempt to obtain
provisioning from the DNCS.
-
Multiple BOOTP/TFTP (mode 2) – Will continually attempt to obtain an IP
address and configuration file until it is successful.
You can also change the CRAFT Port baud rate from this menu. Baud rates can be
set to 9600, 19200 (default), 38400, 57600, or 115200.
Important: Changes to the baud rate are instantaneous if made through SSH or
LCD. If logged into the CRAFT Port interface and the baud rate is changed (either
through a SSH connection or the LCD) the CRAFT Port session will automatically be
terminated to apply the new settings.
44
OL-30211-01
QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
9. Admin Password Change
This menu allows you to change the D9485_admin user account password. The rules
for creating a new password are the same as for changing the password on initial
login:
 Cannot be the MAC address of the unit
 Must contain at least 8 characters
 Must contain at least one of each of the following
-
Capital letter
-
Lower case letter
-
Number
-
Symbol
10. Remote Syslog Targets
This menu displays the Syslog servers that have been configured for the QPSK
Bridge. You can add and delete Syslog servers from this menu.
11. LCD
This menu allows the front panel LCD Interface to be locked or unlocked. When
locked, pressing the buttons on the front panel of the QPSK Bridge will not allow
you to navigate or alter any configuration settings on the unit. Additionally, a
MINOR alarm is raised when the front panel LCD is locked.
12. Database
This menu allows the user to clear the DHCT database on the QPSK Bridge upon a
reboot. When set to mode zero (0), the STB database will be cleared on the next
reboot and all DHCTs connected to the QPSK Bridge will need to sign on again.
When set to mode one (1), the STB database will persist across reboots and DHCTs
will not be required to sign on again. The default mode for this menu is mode zero
(0).
13. Services
This menu displays the status of all QPSK Bridge network services (except RPC) and
allows you to enable/disable services.
Note: All user interface network services (SSH, HTTP, SNMP) are disabled by
default.
 SSH – Provides remote access to the text-based shell menu.
 HTTP – Provides remote access to the WebUI.
 SNMP – Provides SNMP access.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
14. SNMP
This menu displays the SNMP configuration of the QPSK Bridge and also allows you
to change the SNMP communities and/or add/remove SNMP trap receivers. The
QPSK Bridge can have up to five trap receivers. See QPSK Bridge Configuration File
(on page 105) for more information on configuring SNMP communities and trap
receivers through the configuration file. The following figure shows the SNMP
menu:
The following data describe each of the tables in the SNMP menu:
SNMP Widget 1 Descriptions
Column
Description
Community Name The name of the SNMP Community the QPSK
Bridge is to join. This can only be edited through
the configuration file.
Access Mode
Can be set ‘read only’ or ‘read / write’.
SNMP Widget 2 Descriptions
46
Column
Description
IP Address
IPv4 address of the SNMP trap server. This can
only be edited through the configuration file.
Port Number
Port of the IP address of the SNMP trap server.
Notification
Version
SNMP version: v2 or v3.
Notification Type


Trap – Sets receiver as a trap receiver.

Disabled – Disables the SNMP trap
receiver.
Inform – Sets receiver as a information
receiver.
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
Maintenance
The maintenance menu provides you with the ability to directly perform
maintenance functions on the QPSK Bridge. Some maintenance functions under this
menu can only be performed while accessing the shell menu, while others can also
be accessed through the WebUI.
1. Reboot
This menu displays the System Uptime and also allows you to perform system
reboot functions. While in this menu, there are four options.
Option
Description
No
Does nothing and takes you out of the Reboot menu.
Reboot
Instantly reboots the QPSK Bridge.
Count Down and Reboots the system after a 10-second timer.
Reboot
Wipe Database
and Reboot
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Instantly reboots the QPSK Bridge and clears the
DHCT database.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
The Reboot menu is shown in the following illustration:
2. Upgrade
This menu allows you to perform a remote system upgrade, either through TFTP or
HTTP file transfer, or through a local serial connection and a Z-modem file transfer.
Upgrade file names must begin with “D9485”. The upgrade menu is shown in the
following figure:
For more information on upgrading the QPSK Bridge, see Upgrading the QPSK
Bridge (on page 75).
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
3. Maint LED
This menu allows you to toggle the maintenance LED on the back of the QPSK
Bridge on and off. This is typically used to physically identify a specific QPSK Bridge
that requires maintenance.
Note: The maintenance LED will turn on during the boot process.
4. Saved Configuration
This menu shows the last time that the system configuration was automatically
saved to the NVRAM. Once a configuration has been saved, it will load upon
successive reboots and will remain static until another change is made on the
system. All changes made on the QPSK Bridge are automatically saved.
5. CW Mode
This menu allows you to enable or disable Continuous Wave (CW) mode on the
output port of the QPSK Bridge. CW mode is disabled by default. While enabled, the
output will be a continuous wave at a constant frequency and amplitude. RF Output
port is always ‘Low’.
6. Test Mode
Test Mode is used for advanced trouble-shooting with Tier 3 support personnel.
Activating Test Mode will provide Tier 3 support personnel with more in-depth
resources for troubleshooting your QPSK Bridge. Test Mode is disabled by default.
To enable test mode, complete these steps:
1 Contact Cisco Services to ensure that Test Mode is required to be activated.
2 Display an Activation Request key in the shell menu.
3 Copy and paste the entire Activation Request key, including the header and
footer information, into an email to Cisco Services. Cisco Services will use this
key to generate an Activation Key.
4 Cisco Services will provide the Activation Key to you to enable Test Mode. You
will have five attempts to enter the Activation Key correctly, before a new
Activation Request key is required.
Important: This "password" is only valid for 48 hours from the time the
Activation Key is generated. After 48 hours, a new Activation Request key will
need to be generated and provided to Cisco Services.
Test mode will remain enabled until it is disabled.
7. DNCS Provision
This menu contains information on the last time the QPSK Bridge was provisioned,
as well as the IP address of the system.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
8. Technical Support
This menu provides basic information for contacting Cisco Services. An example of
this information is shown in the following figure:
9. DHCT
The DHCT menu allows you to query any DHCT that is connected to the QPSK
Bridge by requesting a DAVIC Status Message or pinging the DHCT IP address.
 To request a DAVIC Status Message, enter the MAC address of the DHCT you
wish to query. The response from the DAVIC status request can be found in the
DHCT logs (Status > DHCT Logs).
 To ping a DHCT, enter the IPv4 address of the DHCT you wish to ping. The
QPSK Bridge will ping the DHCT four times and display the results of the query
in the Shell window. A list of DHCT IPv4 addresses can be found in the
Statistics > DHCT menu.
10. Spectral Inversion and Randomization
This menu allows you to invert the upstream (RDC) and downstream (FDC) data
channels and also pick an upstream and downstream randomizer sequence. The
randomizer can be either Cisco proprietary, or SCTE-55. The default settings are
upstream and downstream spectral inversion disabled and Cisco proprietary
randomizer.
Important: If you modify these settings to something other than the default, it will
result in a failure to communicate with most Cisco DHCTs.
11. Debug Dump
The debug dump is a snap-shot of the state of the QPSK Bridge and contains very
detailed information about its processes. It is extremely useful and often required for
any troubleshooting with Cisco Services. The debug dump menu allows you to
generate and save a debug dump on a network TFTP server. To generate a debug
dump:
1 Enter the entire path and filename of the location on the TFTP server to save the
debug dump file. If only a filename is given, the debug dump is to be saved in
the root directory of the TFTP server.
Note: The system provides a default filename, but not a default path.
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
2
Enter the IP address of the TFTP server for which the debug dump is to be saved.
While the debug dump is being generated, its status will be presented in this menu.
The QPSK Bridge will remain fully operational while the debug dump is being
generated.
Note: A debug dump can also be generated via the WebUI. For more information
on how to generate a debug dump through the WebUI, see QPSK Bridge Web
Interface (on page 60).
One debug dump can be generated at any given time. A new debug dump that is
generated will overwrite any previously generated debug dump that is stored on the
system. Debug dumps do not persist across a system reboot.
12. Clear Statistics
This menu allows you to individually clear the statistics for the modulator,
demodulator, and DHCTs. Statistics that are cleared will be instantaneously reset
and a log message will be created.
13. Delete Logs
This menu allows you to delete and clear all of the system logs messages from the
Shell menu. This includes the logs, DHCT logs, and RPC logs. Once deleted, these
logs messages cannot be recovered by the user.
14. Factory Reset
A system wipe will erase all configuration data, system logs, the DHCT database,
and will also clear the D9485_admin password. When complete, the system will
automatically reboot and you will be required to connect to the Shell menu to
change the D9485_admin password. See Initial Login (on page 35) for more details
on setting a password.
15. DAVIC Trace
This menu allows for the trace of specific DAVIC messages. By enabling a message
type, those messages will appear in the DHCT logs for all DHCTs signed onto the
QPSK Bridge. Each message type can be enabled/disabled individually.
Note: The settings of this menu are not stored in system memory and will be
disabled after a reboot.
Important: DAVIC Trace can be CPU-intensive and is intended for informational
and troubleshooting purposes. We recommend that DAVIC Traces not be enabled
indefinitely.
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Statistics
The Statistics menus display information about the QPSK Bridge and its operational
statistics. These menus provide an overall picture of the health of the QPSK Bridge
and can be used to help diagnose any issues that may arise from normal operation.
Each sub-menu provides in-depth statistics about a different element of the QPSK
Bridge.
1. Scheduling
The Scheduling menu displays information and statistics about demodulator slot
timing and scheduling. This menu also describes the rate at which ranging slots are
received at the QPSK Bridge.
 Demodulator Slot Allocations describes the rates at which contention and
reservation slots are occurring on a per demodulator basis. This table also shows
how many contention and reservation slots occur, on average, per frame.
 Demodulator Reservation Requests provides statistics on how many
reservation slots are requested and granted per demodulator.
 Demodulator Reservation Latency describes the delay between a DHCT
requesting a reservation slot and being granted a reservation slot.
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
2. Operating System
The Operating System menu displays tables containing system resource statistics,
such as Disk, Memory, and CPU usage. There is also a Load table that displays the
average system load and a count of the number of processes currently running on
the QPSK Bridge.
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Table
Description
Disk
Displays the amount of NVRAM system storage
being used by the system, and how much is free.
Memory
Displays the system RAM memory usage.
Load
Displays the system load statistics and an active
process count.
CPU Usage
Displays CPU usage statistics by user, system,
and idle.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Table
Description
LCD Button Presses Displays the number of times each of the LCD
navigation buttons have been pressed.
3. Temperature
The Temperature statistics menu displays information about the system's
temperature and related elements. This includes the fan speed of the three front fan
modules and temperature statistics from the internal temperature sensors. The
temperature statistics menu is shown in the following figure.
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
4. Power
The Power statistics menu displays the input and output power statistics of the
QPSK Bridge, including currents and voltages. The voltage rails are the internal
voltages of the QPSK Bridge that are used to power the various components within
the unit.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
5. Ethernet Network
The Ethernet Network statistics menu displays the total number of packets that are
sent and received over the Ethernet Management interface, located on the rear panel
of the QPSK Bridge. The receive (Rx) and transmit (Tx) errors can be useful in
troubleshooting connectivity issues with the unit. The Ethernet Network Statistics
menu is shown in the following figure:
6. Modulator
The Modulator statistics menu displays the health of the Low RF output port. It
displays various statistics related to the functions of the QPSK Bridge. The following
table describes the three tables located in this menu.
56
Table
Description
Overview

Total number of DHCTs connected to the QPSK
Bridge.

The state of the Low QPSK modulator.
Notes:
– Good means that there are no known problems
with the modulator.
– Not Present means that the system does not
detect a modulator.
– Failover Event means that the modulator has
internally detected a major problem.
– Muted means that the output of the modulator is
muted and is no longer transmitting.
– Software Error means something went wrong
contacting the modulator.
– General Error means that there is an unknown
issue with the modulator.

Total number of Extended Super Frames sent to the
DHCTs.
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
Table
Description
Transmitted Cells


Total number of cells transmitted in the FDC.

The peak number of cells transmitted in a 50 ms
period over a one minute window.

The total number of cells dropped due to
oversubscription of the FDC.
Transfer Rates
The average number of cells transmitted in a 50 ms
period calculated over a one minute window.
Displays the total amount of data traffic as well as a
breakdown of different data types transmitted from the
DNCS to the DHCTs over the FDC.
7. Demodulator
The Demodulator Statistics menu displays information about the eight QPSK
demodulators located on the rear panel of the QPSK Bridge. This menu provides
information on each demodulator itself, as well as the DHCTs that are connected to
the QPSK Bridge. Descriptions of each table located in this menu can be found
below.
 Total Received Cells – Provides in-depth statistics about the total number of
cells received across all eight demodulators and includes a breakdown of all
AAL5 errors, packet drops, and buffer overflows. In a healthy network, all
values in this table should be close to zero, except the number of received cells.
Notes:
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
Unknown VPI – Packet received with unexpected VPI value, such as an STB
not in the database. Cells discarded.


Number Received — Total number of cells received on all demodulators.

HEC Uncorrectable Errors – Number of cells received with uncorrectable
HEC errors.

LLDMA Packet Drops – Number of MAC packets received but discarded
due to LLDMA buffer overflow.

Received Buffer Overflow Errors – Number of input ATM cells discarded
due to input buffer overflow.

(AAL5) CRC Errors – Packet reassembly failed due to CRC error. Packet
discarded.

(AAL5) Time-out Errors – Packet reassembly failed due to too long a spacing
between received cells. Packet discarded.

(AAL5) Abort Errors – Packet reassembly failed due to receiving the AAL5
abort indicator. Packet discarded.
HEC Correctable Errors – Number of cells received with corrected HEC
errors. Uncorrectable HEC cells are dropped.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge

(AAL5) Length Failure - Numbers of times a packets fails reassembly due to
an incorrect length in the AAL5 trailer when reassembly is attempted. The
packet is discarded.

Total AAL5 Errors — The sum of all AAL5 errors.
 DHCTs – Provides a breakdown of the total number of DHCTs that are
connected to each demodulator, with a further breakdown of how many DHCTs
have their status pending. A DHCT with its status pending has not sent a status
response to the QPSK Bridge.
 Cell Counts – Shows the total number of cells, by demodulator, that have been
received. A further breakdown of the number of peak, average, good, bad, and
erroneous cells is also given.
Notes:

Peak - The highest number of cells received in a 50 ms window over the last 1
minute window.






Average - Total number of cells received in the last 1 minute window.
Bad - Number of cells received with an uncorrectable number of errors.
One Error - Number of cells received with one error corrected by FEC.
Two Errors - Number of cells received with two errors corrected by FEC.
Three Errors - Number of cells received with three errors corrected by FEC.
Total Good - Number of cells received with no errors.
 Counts by Slot Type – Shows a breakdown of the total number of each type of
cell that is received by each demodulator. This table also shows the total number
of errors of each type of cell on a per demodulator basis.
 Power and Timing – Shows the power and timing measurements for each
demodulator.
58
Column
Description
Demodulator ID
Identifies each demodulator on the QPSK Bridge.
Last Power
The power of the last cell received at the demodulator.
Current Average
Power
The average power of all cells received.
Maximum Power in
Last 24 H
The highest power level of any cell received within
the last 24 hours.
Minimum Power in
Last 24 H
The lowest power level of any cell received within the
last 24 hours.
Last Arrival Time
The amount of time after the start of the framing
window at which the start of the last packet was
received on the demodulator.
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QPSK Bridge Shell Menu
8. DHCTs
The DHCT statistics menu shows a summary of the state of all DHCTs connected to
the QPSK Bridge along with detailed statistics for each individual DHCT. The
following table describes the detailed statistics.
Column
Description
MAC Address
Unique physical address of the DHCT.
VCI
Virtual Circuit Identifier of the DHCT.
IPv4 Address
The IP address assigned to the STB by the DNCS.
Demodulator
Identifies the physical demodulator (1-8) to which the
DHCT is connected on the QPSK Bridge.
State
Describes the operational state of the DHCT.
Last Arrival Time The amount of time after the start of the framing window at
which the start of the last packet from the DHCT was
received on the demodulator.
Slot
The slot of the frame (1-9) through which the DHCT is
communicating.
Maximum Power The maximum RF power of a cell arriving from the DHCT,
as measured at the demodulator. Range is between +31.75
and -32 dBmV.
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Last Power
The RF power of the last cell arriving from the DHCT, as
measured at the DHCT. Range is between +31.75 and -32
dBmV.
Good Cells
Total number of cells that had either no errors or correctable
errors.
Bad Cells
Total number of cells that had uncorrectable (>3) errors.
0 Error Cells
Total number of cells that had 0 errors.
1 Error Cells
Total number of corrected cells that had 1 error.
2 Error Cells
Total number of corrected cells that had 2 errors.
3 Error Cells
Total number of corrected cells that had 3 errors.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
QPSK Bridge Web Interface
The Web Interface on the QPSK Bridge is a system of point-and-click menus used to
view system information and statistics. The information in these menus is the same
as the information that is available through the Shell menu; however, it is presented
in a more user-friendly manner.
While using the Web interface, you cannot configure the QPSK Bridge as can be
done with the Shell menu. Basic maintenance functions can be performed, but that is
the extent of user interaction with the device. This section will describe the Web
Interface, its layout, and its functionality.
Important: Prior to using the Web Interface, ensure that HTTP is enabled. Choose
Configuration > Services.
Connecting to the Web Interface
To connect to the QPSK Bridge’s Web interface, point your web browser to the IP
address of the QPSK Bridge.
Note: Supported Web browsers are Mozilla Firefox Versions 14 and 15, Microsoft
Internet Explorer Versions 9, and Google Chrome versions 21 and 22. Newer
versions of these Web browsers can also be used.
The QPSK Bridge uses a security certificate to authenticate itself. Depending upon
the web browser used to connect to the QPSK Bridge, different security warnings
may appear. You will be asked to accept the QPSK Bridge’s security certificate in
order to continue and access the Web Interface.
An example of the FireFox security warning follows:
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QPSK Bridge Web Interface
After clicking Add Exception…, another window appears. Click Confirm Security
Exception to proceed to the login window, as shown in the following figure:
The login window will authenticate that you have permission to access the QPSK
Bridge's data and statistics. The credentials (username and password) are the same
credentials that are used to access the QPSK Bridge via the Shell menu. The default
login is D9485_admin and the password is a user-configured password.
Important: Prior to accessing the Web Interface, initial login must occur through the
Shell menu so that the default password can be changed and the web service
enabled. See Initial Login (on page 35).
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Using the Web Interface
Once successfully logged in to the QPSK Web interface, you are presented with the
System Information menu as shown in the following figure:
The Web interface is broken into two main areas:
1 Navigation Pane – Provides a tool for navigating the Web interface to obtain
information about the QPSK Bridge.
2 Information Pane – Displays information relevant to the menu you have selected
in the QPSK Bridge Navigation Pane.
Navigation Pane
The Navigation Pane can also be broken into different areas, as shown in the
following figure:
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QPSK Bridge Web Interface
Area Name
Description
1
Cisco device
information
Shows the Cisco device model number and logo. Clicking
on the Cisco logo will take you to the Cisco.com homepage.
2
Data and
Statistics
Menus
These menus display various types of information about
the QPSK Bridge. Clicking on a menu will produce a dropdown list with more options.
3
Chassis Name
Displays the chassis name you set up.
4
Quick Buttons
Provides a quick access to specific information and also the
current time and date.


Provides quick access to the Current Alarms menu

Provides quick access to the Debug Dump generation
menu.

Provides quick access to the Maintenance LED menu.
Provides a pop-up list showing technical support
information.
Information Pane
The Information Pane displays the data within each of the Data and Statistics menus.
Following are descriptions of the four areas of the information pane:
1 Menu Path – This path helps you locate where within the menus the information
in area 2 is being displayed.
2 Information and Statistics – This is the main area of the Information Pane. It
displays all of the data/statistics for the currently selected menu. This area may
contain tools for sorting and filtering the data displayed.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
3
4
Sort – Clicking the top of some columns will sort that column. You can sort in
either ascending or descending order. Not all menus have columns that can be
sorted.
Search Filter – In this field, you can search for a specific string of text. The results
from any search will automatically be displayed as you type in the entry. Not all
menus contain the search option.
Data and Statistics Menus
The menu system in the Web interface follows the same structure as the menu
system for the Shell menu. All of the information displayed in the Web interface is
pulled from the same locations within the QPSK Bridge as the Shell menu. For
additional information on the Data and Statistics menu, see Statistics (on page 52).
Note: The SNMP MIB file for the QPSK Bridge can be downloaded at any time by
choosing Configuration > SNMP.
Maintenance
The Maintenance menu in the Web interface is very limited in the actions that can be
performed. There are two sub-menus under the Maintenance menu:
 MAINT LED
 Debug Dump
Both sub-menus perform the same function as their Shell menu counterparts.
MAINT LED
The maintenance LED is an LED located on the rear of the QPSK Bridge and is used
to help locate a specific QPSK Bridge when many are racked together. This is
typically turned on to identify a unit that requires maintenance to be performed (for
example, power supply or fan replacement). The maintenance LED can be turned on
and off through the WebUI by following these steps:
1 Select the MAINT LED State to which you wish to set the LED from the dropdown list.
2 Click Submit.
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QPSK Bridge Web Interface
After you click Submit, a green banner indicator, as seen in the following figure,
should appear to indicate that the command was successful. A log message will also
appear to show that the MAINT LED state was set to ‘ON’.
Debug Dump
A debug dump that is generated through the Web interface provides the exact same
information as a debug dump generated through the Shell menu. It is a snapshot of
the state of the QPSK Bridge and includes all alarms, log messages, and other
detailed information about the operational state of the device. For quick access to a
debug dump, the Web interface is often the best option.
To obtain a debug dump through the Web Interface:
1 Generate a new debug dump by clicking New.
Note: The Debug Dump State will change multiple times until the debug dump
has been generated. This takes a few minutes.
2 Download the debug dump from the QPSK Bridge by clicking on the web link
provided next to the Download heading. The file is a tarball (.tgz) and will
require an archiving tool to decompress.
Note: Not all files within the debug dump will be able to be opened and read. Some
files are encrypted for Cisco Services' use only.
After a debug dump has been successfully generated, there will be a timestamp of
when the debug dump was Last Completed, and a green banner at the top of the
page indicating that the changes have been successfully submitted.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
The following figure shows the outcome of a successful web interface debug dump:
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LCD Interface
LCD Interface
The LCD interface, located on the front of the QPSK Bridge, is a digital LCD display
with accompanying navigation buttons. It provides access to a series of menus used
to gather information and change configuration settings on the QPSK Bridge.
Changes made through the LCD interface are instantaneous and require physical
access to the device. To prevent access, you can lock the LCD interface through the
Shell menu.
Using the LCD Interface
The LCD interface is shown in the following figure. It consists of a 192 x 32 pixel
screen and a directional button pad with an Enter button located in the center.
The LCD interface is navigated with the directional button pad and the Enter button.
Status items are broken down into related categories and some can be modified
using the directional buttons. The directional buttons allow you to scroll through a
list of selectable items or trigger an event within the system. Any changes that you
make using the front panel are automatically saved.
There are three types of nodes in the LCD menu system:
 Menu Node – Top level menu that provides access to other menus, display
nodes, and configuration nodes.
 Display Node – Displays system configuration information, but cannot be
modified through the LCD interface.
 Configure Node – Allows you to make configuration changes.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Navigational Chart
Following is a high-level navigational chart for the LCD Interface menu system. The
legend in the following figure shows which blocks (or groups of blocks) are which
types of nodes in the navigational chart:
The following table describes the actions of the directional pad for each node type:
Node
Left/Right Arrows
Up/Down Arrows
Menu
Move to
previous/next
heading in same
menu level.
Traverse up/down in
Same as Down key.
menu hierarchy. Moving
up from the top-most level
of the menu hierarchy will
enter the default display.
Moving down from a
“leaf” node will enter the
display nodes for the
current view.
Display
Return to Menu
navigation
Move to previous/next
item in display node list.
Configure Return to DISPLAY Select previous/next
mode without
allowable value for the
committing
configurable field.
changes
Enter/OK
Enters CONFIG mode
for the selected display
node, if applicable.
Start configuration
action or indicate
acceptance of change of
configuration.
When on a configure node, the configuration list, once selected by the Enter key,
allows you to scroll through a list, using the ▲and ▼ keys, of configuration values
for the node. If a new value is desired, the Enter key is pressed while the new value
is displayed and the focus returns to the display item name. To back out of selecting
a new value the ◄ or ► key can be used to return focus to the display item name.
Each Modulator and Demodulator has its own menu heading, and its numeric
identifier will appear in each associated Display node.
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Status Display Node
The Status Display node is the QPSK Bridge’s default LCD screen and displays basic
information about the QPSK Bridge. The Status Display is shown in the following
figure:
RF Node
The RF node allows you to change the RF characteristics of the modulators and
demodulators on the QPSK Bridge. To access this node, press the ◄ and ► arrow
keys until RF shows on the LCD. Then, press Enter.
From this top Menu node, you can scroll through the different RF characteristics to
configure the following nodes:
 Modulator [1…2] Node – Allows you to configure the Low RF output port.
Node
Node Type
Description
Value
RF
Output
Port
Display
Displays the selected RF
Output port.
Low only
RF Freq
Configure
Allows you to set the RF
Output Frequency.
70 – 130 MHz
Allows you to set the RF
Output Power.
50 – 60 dBmV
RF
Power
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Configure
0.25 MHz steps
1 dBmV steps
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Node
Node Type
Description
Value
RF
Enabled
Configure
Allows you to enable /
disable the Low RF
Output port.
Enable – Disable
CW
Mode
Configure
Allows you to enable /
disable CW Mode.
Enable – Disable
 Demodulator [1…8] Node – Allows you to configure demodulators 1 – 8.
Node
Node Type Description
Value
Demodulator
Display
Displays the selected
demodulator.
1–8
Input
Frequency
Configure
Allows you to configure the
selected demodulator input
frequency.
5 – 42 MHz
Attenuation
Configure
Allows you to set the attenuation
at the selected demodulator.
0, 8, 16, 24 dB
Input RSSI
Display
Displays the signal strength of the dB
last received cell on the selected
demodulator.
Last Arrival
Time
Display
Displays the number of
0 – 999999 ns
nanoseconds since the start of the
frame that the last cell on the
selected demodulator arrived.
Slot Allocation Display
Displays the total number of
receive time slots used on the
demodulator, relative to the total
number of receive time slots
available.
1 MHz steps
percentage
 Max Node Distance Node – Allows you to configure the maximum node
distance, that is, the furthest distance from the QPSK Bridge to a group of
DHCTs assigned to a demodulator. The Max Node Distance is configurable
between 0 – 248 km, with a 31 km step size.
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LCD Interface
System Node
The System node displays information about the QPSK Bridge itself, its IP network,
Craft port, and supply voltages. The baud rate for the Craft port is the only element
that can be configured from within this node. To access this node, press the ◄ and
► arrow keys until System shows on the LCD. Then, press Enter. The following
figure provides a closer look at this node:
 Info Node – Displays system information about the QPSK Bridge.
Node
Node Type
Description
Value
System
Release
Display
Displays the system
software version currently
running on the QPSK
Bridge.
1_X_Y
Model
Number
Display
Displays the model number
of the QPSK Bridge.
D9485
Product ID
Display
Displays the product ID of
the QPSK Bridge.
D9485
 Network Node – Displays basic network information about the QPSK Bridge.
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Node
Node Type Description
Value
IP
Display
Displays the QPSK
Bridge’s IP address.
www.xxx.yyy.zzz
MAC
Display
Displays the QPSK
Bridge’s MAC address.
aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
 CRAFT Port Node – Displays the settings required to connect to the QPSK
Bridge’s RS-232 CRAFT port.
Node
Node Type Description
Value
Baud
Rate
Configure
Displays a user-configurable 9600, 19200, 38400,
baud rate.
57600, 115200
Data
Bits
Display
Displays the number of data 8
bits.
Stop
Bits
Display
Displays the number of stop
bits.
1
Parity
Display
Displays if there is not a
parity bit.
None
 Supply Voltages Node – Displays all of the QPSK Bridge’s internal voltage rails
and power supply voltages.
72
Node
Node
Type
Description
Value
1.0 V Rail
Display
Displays the current 1.0 V
rail voltage.
~ 1000 mV
1.2 V Rail
Display
Displays the current 1.2 V
rail voltage.
~ 1200 mV
1.8 V Rail
Display
Displays the current 1.8 V
rail voltage.
~ 1800 mV
2.5 V Rail
Display
Displays the current 2.5 V
rail voltage.
~ 2500 mV
3.3 V Rail
Display
Displays the current 3.3 V
rail voltage.
~ 3300 mV
5.0 V Rail
Display
Displays the current 5.0 V
rail voltage.
~ 5000 mV
6.0 V Rail
Display
Displays the current 6.0 V
rail voltage.
~ 6000 mV
PSU 1 Out Display
Displays the DC output
voltage of power supply #1
~ 120000 mV
PSU 1 In
Display
Displays the AC input
voltage of power supply #1
~ 120 V
PSU 2 Out Display
Displays the DC output
voltage of power supply #2
~ 120000 mV
PSU 2 In
Displays the AC input
voltage of power supply #2
~ 120 V
Display
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LCD Interface
Alarms Node
The Alarms node lists all current active alarms present on the QPSK Bridge. This
node will display when the alarm was raised, the severity of the alarm, the alarm ID,
and a short description of the alarm. Use the ▲and ▼buttons to scroll through the
active alarms. An example of the Alarms node LCD screen follows:
Admin Node
The Admin node allows you to perform a few major administration functions on the
QPSK Bridge. To access this node, press the ◄ and ► arrow keys until Admin
shows on the LCD, and then press Enter. The following figure provides a closer look
at this node.
Within this node, you can access two configure nodes:
Set a One-Time Password (OTP)
This resets the D9485_admin password to a provided random character password.
To reset the password, follow these steps.
1 Navigate to the OTP node.
2
Press Enter and then ▲ or ▼ to select Set OTP.
3
Press Enter and the OTP is displayed.
This password can only be entered once, at which time you will be asked to change
the password. To use this password, you must log into the Shell menu. See Initial
Login (on page 35) for more details on setting a password.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Perform a Factory Reset
A factory reset will reset the QPSK Bridge back to factory defaults. All configuration
information, logs, and historical information will be removed.
1 Navigate to the Factory Reset node.
2
Press Enter, select Do Factory Reset, then press Enter again.
A factory reset will take a few minutes to complete. When the system wipe
completes, the QPSK Bridge will reboot and the Status Display screen will appear on
the LCD. Once the device reboots, the password will be reset to the factory default
and you will need to perform initial login using the console port. See Initial Login
(on page 35) on for more details on setting a password.
D9485 Reboot
The QPSK Bridge can be soft-reset from the LCD menu. A reboot takes affect
immediately.
1 Navigate to the D9485 Reboot node.
2
Press Enter, select Reboot, then press Enter again.
Boot Log Node
The Boot Log node displays information about the QPSK Bridge’s last boot cycle.
This node will display the time and date at which each boot element on the QPSK
Bridge successfully completed. Use the ▲ and ▼ buttons to scroll through the
twelve different boot log entries. Following is an example of a Boot Log screen:
The display shows when the QPSK Bridge has finished its boot process and has
become fully operational.
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Upgrading the QPSK Bridge
Upgrading the QPSK Bridge
Upgrading the QPSK Bridge can be accomplished both remotely and while directly
connected with a PC. Remote upgrades are achieved via a TFTP/HTTP download of
the upgrade file over the Ethernet port. Direct upgrades are achieved through a
Zmodem transfer over the RS-232 console port. Using either method, the system will
automatically install the upgrade once the file has completed downloading on the
QPSK Bridge and then reboot. Normal operation will persist while the upgrade file
is being downloaded and installed.
The QPSK Bridge contains two complete software images: the active image and a
backup image. If the device is running the active image, it will upgrade the backup
image. Once the backup image has been upgraded, the system will reboot into the
backup image, thus becoming the new active image. The old active image will
become the new backup image.
The QPSK Bridge allows you to upgrade/ downgrade to versions of software that
are older/newer than the currently running version. Caution should be taken while
applying a new upgrade file to ensure that the software changes will not impact
desired operation.
A system upgrade can be aborted at any time while the file is being downloaded or
installed. If there is a problem with an upgrade, the Result in the System Upgrade
table will show as Failed, an alarm will be raised, and log messages will be created.
When troubleshooting an upgrade failure, the logs can provide insight as to the
reason.
Important: An upgrade filename must start with the text “D9485”. An upgrade file
that fails to follow this naming convention will be rejected by the QPSK Bridge.
Note: While using external routing equipment in association with the D9485 QPSK
Bridge, ensure that the external routing equipment is set to autonegotiate mode.
Using half or full duplex mode may cause problems while communicating with the
device.
TFTP/HTTP Transfer
The QPSK Bridge can also be upgraded by initiating a TFTP/HTTP file transfer to
download an upgrade file from a TFTP server. The upgrade can be initiated by
either adding upgrade information to the configuration file, or by manually
initiating an upgrade through the Shell menu. In this way, the QPSK Bridge will
download the upgrade file, and then apply it before automatically rebooting.
Shell Menu
1 Choose Maintenance > Upgrade and select 1 - System Upgrade.
2 Enter the TFTP server or HTTP address where the upgrade file is located.
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75
Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
3
Enter the entire path / filename of the upgrade file and press Enter to begin
upgrade.
Important: When identifying which upgrade file to use, the entire path,
filename, and extension are required.
Example: /tftpboot/Cisco/D9485/Upgrades/D9485_1_2_16.bin.signed
Result: The upgrade will begin and the Result will indicate the status of the
upgrade.

In Progress indicates that the QPSK Bridge was able to use the information
provided to begin downloading the upgrade file

Failure indicates that there was an error in downloading the upgrade file.
Check the alarms and logs to determine the cause of the failure.
Note: When the upgrade is finished, the QPSK will automatically reboot and the
current SSH connection is closed.
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Upgrading the QPSK Bridge
4
After an upgrade has completed (5 - 10 minutes), verify that the unit has
successfully upgraded to the new software version by verifying the System
Release in the System Information menu (Status > System Information).
Configuration File Upgrade
On every boot, the QPSK Bridge downloads and loads a configuration file (if
configured on the DNCS). This configuration file can tell the QPSK Bridge to
perform a system upgrade by indicating a TFTP/HTTP server address to go to and a
file to download. The upgrade will be performed in the background and the system
will reboot automatically when complete. For more information on the configuration
file, see the online help for the QPSK, as well as QPSK Bridge Configuration File (on
page 105).
Important: When performing an upgrade through the Shell menu, ensure that the
configuration file does not indicate an upgrade that conflicts with the newly
upgraded file. If so, the QPSK Bridge will upgrade to the file indicated in the
configuration file, upon boot.
Zmodem Transfer
Note: Due to the nature of the Zmodem file transfer method, this is the least
desirable method of upgrading.
Perform the Zmodem upgrade file transfer through the shell menu by using the RS232 serial port. To access this upgrade option you must use a terminal program
capable of sending a file using z-mode, such as TeraTerm or HyperTerminal.
Notes:
 A Linux PC with minicom is recommended for performing Zmodem upgrades.
If you are using a Windows PC, TeraTerm is recommended.
 A Zmodem transfer can take anywhere from 20 minutes to 2 hours. The QPSK
Bridge cannot be used during this time. If a transfer error occurs, an error
message will be displayed in the terminal window.
1 Connect to the QPSK Bridge’s serial port (see Direct Connectivity (on page 33)).
2 Enter the upgrade menu, in Maintenance (on page 47), in the Shell menu.
3 Choose option 2, Start Zmodem Upgrade, and then enter y to start the transfer.
Note: Once the transfer has started, the shell menu will not be accessible.
4 Select the upgrade file you wish to transfer and begin the transfer.
Notes:
OL-30211-01

In TeraTerm, choose File > Transfer > ZMODEM > Send. Select the upgrade
file and click Open.

Once the transfer has been started (Step 3), you will have about one minute
to select the upgrade file and begin the transfer. Otherwise the transfer will
time out. The sooner the Zmodem transfer can be started, the greater chance
you have of a successful upgrade.
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Chapter 3 Operating the DAVIC QPSK Bridge

5
78
To decrease the time required to make a Zmodem transfer, try increasing the
baud rate. The baud rate can be increased on both the QPSK Bridge and the
terminal program. See Chassis under Configuration (on page 39) for more
information on how to change the baud rate.
Once the transfer is complete, the QPSK Bridge will automatically install the
upgrade and reboot.
Note: Repeat Steps 3 and 4 if the Zmodem transfer fails.
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4 Chapter 4
Using the Delay Mode in the
QPSK Data Link
Introduction
The standard mode of operation for the QPSK data link requires the
QPSK modulator and demodulator hardware to be physically located
near the geographic center of the desired coverage zone. The operation
of the system then allows a radius of operation of about 70 KM from
the site of the hardware in the hub.
There are a number of applications that need or desire to physically
locate the QPSK hardware in the headend (or some location other than
the center of the coverage zone) and yet provide QPSK coverage to set
tops that are more than 70 KM from the headend site. In response to
this need, Cisco has developed a software design modification for the
D9485 QPSK Bridge to allow the QPSK modulator/demodulator
hardware to be located in the headend and provide QPSK data
services to a remote hub at a distance of up to 252 KM. This chapter
provides application information to assure successful implementation
of this feature.
In This Chapter



OL-30211-01
Feature Implementation....................................................................... 80
Delay Mode Setup and Operation ...................................................... 81
Design Examples ................................................................................... 83
79
Chapter 4 Using the Delay Mode in the QPSK Data Link
Feature Implementation
This feature has been implemented by introducing a delay in the DAVIC frame
reference timing the QPSK modulator provides to the QPSK demodulator. This
timing delay provides additional time in the DAVIC signal framing to compensate
for the time required for the QPSK signal to propagate through the optical
distribution cable and return back to the QPSK demodulator. This modification
allows for nine different values of propagation delay to be programmed into the
QPSK modulator via the front panel. The delay value options are specified as optical
propagation distance equivalents of the delay time programmed in the QPSK
modulator. The distance increment equivalents to the delay time are calculated by
multiplying the delay time by the distance a signal can travel through an optical
fiber, having an assumed propagation velocity factor of 70 percent of the speed of
light. The propagation distance choices are offered in 31.5 KM increments (one way),
starting with 31.5 KM and up to 252 KM. The actual timing delay increments occur
in integer multiples of 300 microseconds.
When the delay feature is activated, the QPSK expects an optical transmission delay
equal to or greater than the distance value programmed into the QPSK modulator.
The QPSK system continues to have a zero to 70 KM ranging distance for set tops in
the delay mode. Therefore, the maximum distance a set top can be located from the
headend in the delay mode is the sum of the programmed delay distance plus the 70
KM ranging distance. The action of the timing delay causes the apparent “zero
ranging distance” to occur at the optical cable distance physically equal to the delay
(one-way) distance programmed in the modulator. If the optical cable is longer than
the programmed distance value, the ranging radius will be reduced by the excess
optical cable length. If the optical cable is shorter than the programmed distance
value, the set tops within a radius equal to the distance the optical cable is shorter
than the programmed distance value will not be able to complete a ranging
sequence.
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OL-30211-01
Delay Mode Setup and Operation
Delay Mode Setup and Operation
1
2
3
4
5
6
Configure the network per Application Rules (on page 81).
Download Version 1.2.16+ D9485 QPSK modulator software on to the QPSK
modulator
Choose Delay Mode from the front panel options menu. After choosing this
option, the QPSK will force another download of the QPSK application code.
Wait for the new application download (now configured for delay mode) to
complete.
Choose a value of optical cable length from the front panel options menu equal
to or less than the sum of actual optical cable length used for the distribution to
the remote hub, plus the minimum optical cable length used in the HFC network
from the hub. Adjust the setting if the cable propagation velocity factor is not
equal to 70 percent.
Place a set top at the closest possible location to where the HFC network
transitions from optics to cable. Check the delay time on the set top diagnostic
screen. The delay value should not be less than 200 microseconds. Place a set top
in the location with the maximum possible cable distance from the cable
breakout point in the HFC network. Check the delay time at the set top
diagnostic screen. The delay value should not exceed 760 microseconds.
If the delay values do not fall within the 200 microseconds and 760 microseconds
delay time bounds, the set tops in the affected region will not provide reliable
ranging performance. Either the programmed delay value or the network must
be adjusted to keep the delay times at the test boundaries within the specified
limits.
Application Rules
 Transport distances are in integer multiples of 31.5 KM, up to maximum of 252
KM.
 The programmed delay distance should be chosen to be equal to or less than the
sum of the transport cable to the hub, plus the shortest optical cable distance on
any of the attached nodes.
 The ranging radius is 0 to 70 KM, with 0 KM set at the programmed cable length.
 All demodulators are delayed by the same value programmed in the QPSK
modulator.
 If the optical cable length exceeds the programmed distance value, the ranging
radius shrinks.
 If the optical cable length is less than the programmed distance value, close-in set
tops will not range.
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Chapter 4 Using the Delay Mode in the QPSK Data Link
 Variations in the optical cable length branching from the hub will cause a
reduction in the ranging radius.
 If an errant distance value is programmed in the QPSK modulator, a new,
corrected value can be entered, and the set tops will re-range after a ten-minute
timeout. Or, the operator can force a set top reboot.
 In a pinch, coverage radii can be extended by matching the optical cable distance
to the programmed distance value.
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Design Examples
Design Examples
Matched Cable Length and Delay
The design example, shown in the following figure, is an application example of the
QPSK modem in a matched configuration. The optical cable distance is equal to the
programmed delay distance and all of the node distances from the hub have equal
lengths.
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83
Chapter 4 Using the Delay Mode in the QPSK Data Link
Mismatched Cable Length and Delay
The following figure provides a design illustration of what happens when the delay
parameters are mismatched. The primary item worth noting is that a significant
reduction in ranging radius may occur if there is both a mismatch of cable distance
relative to the programmed distance and a wide variation in the node optics
distances from the hub. This combination could produce gaps in the coverage zone
where set tops would not range on to the system if not properly managed.
84
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5 Chapter 5
Troubleshooting the DAVIC
QPSK Bridge
Introduction
This chapter provides routine maintenance information, general
troubleshooting guidelines, and explanations of major, minor, and
status alarm conditions. This chapter also includes instructions for
assessing alarm conditions. An alarm troubleshooting table, arranged
alphabetically according to an alarm’s front panel LCD message, is
included along with additional information for resolving alarm
conditions.
In This Chapter



OL-30211-01
Routine Maintenance............................................................................ 86
General Troubleshooting Guidelines ................................................. 88
Troubleshoot Alarms............................................................................ 89
85
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Routine Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance ensures proper functionality of the QPSK Bridge
and helps in trouble-free operation. This section describes important maintenance
procedures.
WARNING:
Only qualified personnel should attempt maintenance and service of the
QPSK Bridge.
Quarterly Visual Inspection
The QPSK Bridge can operate unattended for extended periods of time. If the QPSK
Bridge is operating normally, do not make any adjustments. However, do conduct a
visual inspection at least once every four months.
Check the following items during a visual inspection:
 Cables and connectors — Make sure that all cables are connected properly and
that all retaining screws are tight. Inspect cables for stress and chafing.
 Cover and back panel — If necessary, clean the cover and back panel with a soft
cloth dampened with a mild detergent solution.
 Cooling fan and intakes — Check the cooling fans on the front panel and the
outtake vents on the rear panel for excessive lint or dust buildup. Remove the
lint and dust from the fans and the outtake vents using a damp cloth or a small
hand vacuum.
 LEDs — Make sure that all LEDs are indicating normal status.
Replacing the Fan
This section provides instructions for replacing the cooling fan unit on the QPSK
Bridge. The QPSK modulator has three cooling fans located behind the cover on the
front of the unit.
Follow these steps to replace the cooling fan on the front panel of the QPSK Bridge.
1 Power off the QPSK Bridge. While this step is not necessary due to the fans being
hot-swappable, it is nonetheless recommended. If replacing more than one fan
module, only replace one cooling fan at a time to ensure that the unit does not
overheat.
2 Remove the front panel cover by removing the two thumb screws located at the
sides of the cover.
Note: The cover is attached to the chassis by a connecting wire. It is OK to let the
cover hang while changing the chassis, but do not hang anything from it.
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OL-30211-01
Routine Maintenance
3
4
5
6
7
8
On the front panel of the QPSK Bridge, unplug the fan from the connector.
Note: Needle-nose pliers may be required to reach the connector.
Remove the retaining screws using a Phillips screwdriver and set the nonfunctioning fan and screws aside.
Note: Be sure not to drop or misplace the screws. You will need them to replace
the fan.
Attach the replacement fan to the back panel using the same screws you
removed, making sure that you orient the fan so that the airflow blows inward.
Note: Be sure to use a torque of approximately 4-6 in./lb.
Plug the replacement fan into the power connector provided on the front panel.
Power on the QPSK Bridge (if powered off).
Verify that the replacement fan is operating correctly. If the replacement fan does
not operate correctly, contact Cisco Services for assistance.
Replacing a Power Supply
This section describes how to replace a power supply on the QPSK Bridge. The
QPSK Bridge contains two field-replaceable and hot-swappable power supplies.
Each power supply is independent and only one supply is required for the QPSK
Bridge to function properly.
CAUTION:
Avoid damage to this product! Your warranty is void if you attempt to operate
this product with non-genuine replacement parts.
1
2
3
4
5
6
OL-30211-01
Remove the power cable from the power supply you wish to replace.
Note: If only one power supply is present, removing power will turn off the
QPSK Bridge.
Using a Phillips-head screwdriver, remove the two captive retaining screws
securing the power supply to the QPSK Bridge chassis.
Remove the old power supply from the chassis by pulling on the handle.
Insert the new power supply into the empty power supply slot and use the
handle to guide the power supply fully into its slot.
Note: Extra force may be needed to properly seat the power supply with the
chassis power connector.
Secure the new power supply to the chassis by tightening the two captive
retaining screws.
Apply power to the new power supply by inserting the power cord connector
into the power supply.
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Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
General Troubleshooting Guidelines
Introduction
This section describes major, minor, and status alarms. In addition, this section
explains how to access and read the alarms that display on the front panel LCD of
the QPSK Bridge. If the QPSK Bridge indicates an alarm, check for false alarms,
check the power supply, and/or follow the guidelines for troubleshooting major and
minor alarms.
Checking AC Power
If the QPSK Bridge does not power up and the LEDs are either not lit or display red,
this indicates a faulty power supply or power supply connection.
Follow these steps to determine whether a power problem is causing a power alarm.
1 Verify that the power wires and/or power cords are firmly connected in the
QPSK Bridge and at the power outlet. Replace/reconnect the power wires or
cords if necessary.
2 Verify that the outlet is supplying the proper voltage.
3 If the QPSK Bridge still indicates a power alarm, one or more power supplies
may be defective.
a Attempt to power the QPSK Bridge with each single power supply
individually to determine if the problem exists with only one supply.
b Each power supply contains an internal fan. If the fan is running and the
power supply otherwise appears to be operating correctly, it may indicate an
internal problem in the QPSK Bridge.
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Troubleshoot Alarms
Troubleshoot Alarms
List of Alarms
When there is an alarm condition on the QPSK Bridge, the front panel display
indicates which alarm condition is active and the ALARM indicator LED will be
illuminated. An alarm Alarm Text message displays on the second line of the
display, briefly describing which alarm condition is active. See Alarms Node under
LCD Interface (on page 67) for additional information. Also, a list of all active
alarms can be found in both the QPSK Bridge Shell Menu (on page 34) and the
QPSK Bridge Web Interface (on page 60).
Each alarm’s Alarm Text will begin with the alarm ID – a unique identifier (e.g.,
0x50010812). Use the alarm ID and the table below to quickly gain additional insight
into what may be causing the alarm to rise. Many of the alarms on the QPSK Bridge
can be raised for multiple reasons, and often additional investigation will be
required to find the cause, and thus the resolution, of any particular alarm.
Important: The Alarms table in this section should only be used as a guideline to
help troubleshoot and resolve alarm conditions. If an alarm cannot be resolved,
contact Cisco Services.
All alarms on the QPSK Bridge are assigned a priority level. Each priority level has
an associated Alarm LED color. Below are the different priority levels in order of
severity (most severe to least severe) and their associated Alarm LED colors.
Priority
Level
Associated
LED Color
CRITICAL
RED
MAJOR
RED
MINOR
YELLOW
STATUS
OFF
The highest alarm priority level will always be indicated by the Alarm LED. For
more information on configuring SNMP Trap receivers, see the sample configuration
file in QPSK Bridge Configuration File (on page 105).
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Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Note: All alarms in the Alarms and Events List, which follows, are also sent as
SNMP traps.
Alarms and Events List
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
STATUS
MAINT_LE Maintenance
D
LED has been
turned on
0x5001080D - Test
mode enabled.
MINOR
Yellow
Test Mode has
been enabled.
0x50010400 System software
out of memory.
MAJOR
Red
QPSK Bridge has
run out of system
memory.
0x5001082B Customer-specific
data deleted.
MINOR
Yellow
All user data has
been removed.
QPSK Bridge is
reset to factory
default
configuration.
0x5001082D Customer logs
deleted.
MINOR
Yellow
All system, RPC,
and DHCT log
messages have
been deleted.
STATUS
None
User has set a
OTP for the
QPSK Bridge
through front
panel LCD.
Red
User has not set a Set the D9485_admin
D9485_admin
password.
password.
None
Upgrade is in
progress.
Group sys_maint
0x50010812 Maintenance mode
activated.
Group sys_sw
Group sys_passwd
0x50010825 Password changed
via Front Panel.
0x5001082C - Failed MAJOR
to set Admin
Default Password.
Group sys_upgrade
0x50010814 Upgrade in
progress
(arguments: %s).
90
STATUS
OL-30211-01
Troubleshoot Alarms
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
0x50010815 Upgrade success.
Reboot required.
STATUS
None
Upgrade was
successful.
Requires reboot.
0x5001010A Upgrade file
download has
started.
STATUS
None
QPSK Bridge has
started an
upgrade by
downloading the
new firmware.
Yellow
Could not open
downloaded
software
upgrade.
Corrupted data.
0x50010104 - Failed MINOR
to open upgrade
file (%s).
Resolution
Check the file name to
ensure it begins with
D9485. Ensure that the
upgrade file exists on
the TFTP server.
%s:
0x50010105 - Failed MINOR
to read upgrade file
(%s).
Yellow

Name not
prefixed with
'D9485'

Invalid
parameters of
failed
transfer

aborted
After being
downloaded and
opened, the file
was not able to
be read.
%s:
0x5001010B Upgrade
programming
started.
OL-30211-01
STATUS
None

package
verification

package
extraction

upgrader
verification

aborted
Confirm that the
upgrade file is not
corrupt on the TFTP
server. Compare the
MD5 sum to the
expected value.
Upgrade has
downloaded and
started
programming.
91
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x50010106 - Failed MAJOR
to program the
upgrade.
Red
An error
Re-apply upgrade.
occurred that
prevented the
QPSK Bridge
from completing
the programming
of the newly
downloaded
firmware.
0x50010808 - Failed MAJOR
to boot the upgrade
(%s).
Red
New software
Check/replace your
was downloaded upgrade file and try to
and
re-apply the upgrade.
programmed, but
failed to reboot
and load upgrade
image.
%s:

run-time:
<running
release
version>
doesn't
match:
<Supposes
active
release>
Group sys_temp
92
0x50010826 MAJOR
Processor board
temperature
threshold exceeded
(%s).
Red
Safe processor
board
temperature
exceeded.
Check the ambient
room temperature and
adjust if necessary.
Check fans for proper
operation.
0x50010827 MAJOR
Ambient
temperature
threshold exceeded
(%s).
Red
Safe internal
ambient air
temperature
exceeded.
Check the ambient
room temperature and
adjust if necessary.
Check fans for proper
operation.
0x50010828 - Fan
MAJOR
temperature
threshold exceeded
(%s).
Red
Safe internal
ambient air
temperature for
fan controller
board exceeded.
Check the ambient
room temperature and
adjust if necessary.
Check fans for proper
operation.
OL-30211-01
Troubleshoot Alarms
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x50010829 MAJOR
Output module
temperature
threshold exceeded
(%s).
Red
Safe internal
modulator
temperature
exceeded
Check the ambient
room temperature and
adjust if necessary.
Check fans for proper
operation.
0x5001082A MAJOR
PSU%s
temperature
threshold exceeded
(%s).
Red
Inlet or Outlet
temperature of
power supply
exceeded.
Check the ambient
room temperature and
adjust if necessary.
Check power supply
fans for proper
operation.
Replace power supply.
GROUP sys_pwr
0x50010804 Processor board
voltage out of
range (%s).
MAJOR
Red
Voltage
supplying
processor board
out of acceptable
range.
Check/replace power
supply. If power
supply OK, Contact
Cisco Services.
0x50010806 PSU%s voltage out
of range (%s).
MAJOR
Red
Input or output
voltages of power
supply are out of
acceptable range.
Check input supply
voltage to QPSK
Bridge. Replace power
supply.
0x50010807 PSU%s current out
of range (%s).
MAJOR
Red
Input or output
currents of power
supply are out of
acceptable range.
Check input supply
current to QPSK
Bridge. Replace power
supply.
MAJOR
Red
QPSK Bridge
does not detect a
fan connected in
the particular
slot.
Check to ensure a fan
is present. Replace fan
assembly.
0x50010817 MAJOR
FAN%s RPM out of
range (%s).
Red
Fan RPM is too
high (>18000
RPM) or too low
(<3500 RPM).
Check/replace fan.
Yellow
Power supply is
not present in
Slot 1 or 2.
GROUP sys_fan
0x50010816 FAN%s not
present.
GROUP sys_psu
0x50010818 MINOR
PSU%s not present.
OL-30211-01
93
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
%s - PSU%s has
failed.
MAJOR
Red
Power supply
has failed and is
not providing
power.
Replace power supply.
Ensure it is plugged
into a power source.
0x50010809 - Failed MAJOR
FPGA DDR
memory test.
Red
FPGA has a bad Try to reboot the
memory module. system. Contact Cisco
Services.
0x5001080E - Failed MAJOR
component (%s).
Red
An important
system
component has
failed.
0x5001080F - Failed MAJOR
ethernet port (%s).
Red
Ethernet port is
not working. Not
receiving or
sending data.
0x50010601 Receive errors on
ethernet port (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
Packets were not
received
correctly.
Check source and
cables.
0x50010602 Transmit errors on
ethernet port (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
Packets were not
transmitted
correctly.
Check your cable.
Reseat/replace cable.
0x50010810 - Front
Panel failure (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
Front panel is no
longer working,
or
communication
with the front
panel has been
lost.
Reboot system.
Contact Cisco
Services.
0x5001010C Pending BOOTP
lease request.
STATUS
None
QPSK Bridge is
waiting for a
BOOTP lease
from BOOTP
server.
0x50010805 BOOTP lease
successfully
acquired.
STATUS
None
QPSK Bridge has
successfully
acquired a
BOOTP lease.
GROUP sys_hw
Check/replace
component if possible.
Reboot system.
Contact Cisco
Services.
GROUP dhcp
94
OL-30211-01
Troubleshoot Alarms
Alarm Text
Priority
0x50010107 - Failed MAJOR
to acquire a BOOTP
lease.
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
Red
QPSK Bridge did
not acquire a
BOOTP lease and
does not have an
IP address.
Ensure that the QPSK
Bridge is properly
configured on the
BootP server.
Check the Ethernet
cable to ensure a
physical connection
exists.
0x50010108 - Failed MAJOR
to open
configuration file
(%s).
Red
QPSK Bridge
could not open
the configuration
file downloaded
from the DNCS.
Ensure that the
configuration file is in
the correct format .xml.
0x50010109 - Failed MAJOR
to read
configuration file
(%s).
Red
QPSK Bridge
could not read
the downloaded
configuration file
from the DNCS.
Verify that the
configuration file on
the DNCS is in the
correct format and
contains all required
information.
GROUP stb_ctl
0x50010208 - VCI
usage exceeds
threshold (%s).
STATUS
None
VCI usage has
exceeded the
threshold you set.
0x50010207 Invalid DAVIC
message type.
STATUS
None
The QPSK Bridge
received an
invalid DAVIC
message.
0x50010200 - MAC
configuration
failed.
MAJOR
Red
MAC
configuration
failed to load
properly.
None
DHCT with MAC
address %s did
not send a
response to the
QPSK Bridge's
STATUS
message.
0x50010202 - DHCT STATUS
not responding
(%s).
OL-30211-01
Reboot
95
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x5001081B - Total
DHCTs exceeds
limit (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
The total number Reduce the number of
of DHCTs trying DHCTs provisioned
to sign onto the
on the QPSK Bridge.
QPSK Bridge has
exceeded the
maximum set on
DNCS.
0x5001020B DHCT sign-on
ranging failure
(%s).
STATUS
None
DHCT with MAC
address %s did
not sign on
because it has
failed.
0x5001020C DHCT connected
ranging failure
(%s).
STATUS
None
DHCT with MAC
address %s was
in the idle state,
but failed to stay
in PETE and
failed it's
connection.
YELLOW
Too many
DHCTs are
trying to sign on
to demod 1-8.
Limit is user
configurable.
GROUP stb_ctl_demod
0x5001081C MINOR
DHCTs exceeds
limit on demod %s.
Reduce the number of
DHCTs signing on to
demod (1-8).
GROUP scheduler
96
0x50010204 Temporarily lost
slot boundary
generation
synchronization.
STATUS
None
The system has
lost frame
generation
synchronization.
0x5001020A Dynamic Ranging
reached max
(ranging every
frame).
STATUS
None
The system has
enough
contention on the
sign-on ranging
slot that it has
reached the point
that every frame
has a sign-on
opportunity.
OL-30211-01
Troubleshoot Alarms
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
0x5001082F Scheduler
discarded one or
more schedules
(%s).
STATUS
None
The system has
discarded a
DHCT schedule
due to processing
mismatch (high
CPU load).
0x50010831 STATUS
Scheduler
encountered one or
more full queues
(%s).
None
The system
scheduler buffer
is full and has
overflown.
Resolution
GROUP inmapd
0x5001081D Issuing Multicast
Join on %s.
STATUS
None
The system has
issued an IGMP
join request.
0x5001081E Issuing Multicast
Leave on %s.
STATUS
None
The system has
issued an IGMP
leave request.
GROUP mod_mgr_task
OL-30211-01
0x50010000 Reboot complete.
STATUS
None
System reboot
has completed.
0x50010001 Modulator
frequency changed
%s.
STATUS
None
Modulator RF
Output frequency
has changed from
x Hz to y Hz.
0x50010002 STATUS
Modulator RF level
changed %s.
None
Modulator RF
Output level has
changed from x
dB to y dB.
0x50010003 - Front
panel display
locked.
STATUS
None
Front panel LCD
and buttons are
locked and
cannot be used.
0x50010004 Modulator CW
mode on.
MINOR
Yellow
CW Mode is
enabled. Not
used in normal
operation.
0x50010005 Modulator FP RF
muted.
MINOR
Yellow
The RF Output
Enable Modulator RF
on the modulator Output.
is disabled.
97
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x50010007 Modulator RF not
locked.
MAJOR
Red
The RF Output
Reboot. Contact Cisco
on the modulator Services.
frequency is not
constant.
GROUP demod_mgr_task
0x6001000A Demodulator %s
not provisioned by
DNCS.
MINOR
Yellow
Demodulator (18) is not
configured by the
DNCS.
Check to see if RPC is
enabled. Check to see
the if the QPSK Bridge
was Provisioned by
the DNCS
(Maintenance-->DNCS
Provision in shell
menu).
0x6001000B Demodulator %s
frame sync error.
MINOR
Yellow
Demodulator (18) has lost frame
synchronization
with internal
clock.
"Check input quality.
Check distance offset
setting.
If causing service
problems, reboot. If
the problem persists,
contact Cisco Services.
NOTE: This alarm is
expected to raise after
just changing this
setting."
0x60010014 Demodulator %s
queue full.
MINOR
Yellow
Demodulator (18) FEC buffer
queue is full and
additional
packets are
arriving.
0x60010018 Demodulator %s
FEC error(s). Refer
to demodulator
stats for the
aggregate number
of failed cells.
MINOR
Yellow
This indicates
Check network
that a packet was congestion.
received on a
demodulator (18) which
contained
uncorrectable
errors.
0x5001080A - %s
queue depth at 20
percent.
MINOR
Yellow
RPC queue is
20% full and
beginning to back
up.
Check RPC servers.
Disable then re-enable
RPC (Configuration->Services). Reboot.
0x5001080B - %s
queue depth at 80
percent.
MAJOR
Red
RPC queue is
80% full and
almost backed
up.
Check RPC servers.
Disable then re-enable
RPC (Configuration->Services). Reboot.
GROUP rpc
98
OL-30211-01
Troubleshoot Alarms
OL-30211-01
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x5001080C - %s
queue depth at 99
percent.
MAJOR
Red
RPC queue is
full.
Check RPC servers.
Disable then re-enable
RPC (Configuration->Services). Reboot.
0x50010101 QPSK_MGR not
connected (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
QPSK Bridge
Check the IP address
cannot connect to of the QPSK_MGR
the QPSK_MGR. (Configuration->DNCS in the Shell
menu). Check network
path to RPC server.
Check to ensure the
RPC service has not
gone down.
0x50010102 HCT_MGR not
connected (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
QPSK Bridge
Check the IP address
cannot connect to of the HCT_MGR
the HCT_MGR.
(Configuration->DNCS in the Shell
menu).Check network
path to RPC server.
Check to ensure the
RPC service has not
gone down.
0x50010103 ALM_MGR not
connected (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
QPSK Bridge
Check the IP address
cannot connect to of the ALM_MGR
the ALM_MGR. (Configuration->DNCS in the Shell
menu). Check network
path to RPC server.
Check to ensure the
RPC service has not
gone down.
0x50010811 SMG_MGR not
connected (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
QPSK Bridge
Check the IP address
cannot connect to of the SMG_MGR
the SMG_MGR.
(Configuration->DNCS in the Shell
menu). Check network
path to RPC server.
Check to ensure the
RPC service has not
gone down.
99
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x50010100 - Did
not receive
provisioning from
DNCS.
MINOR
Yellow
QPSK Bridge did
not download a
configuration file
from the DNCS
as expected.
Check to ensure that
the DNCS is
configured to provide
a configuration file to
the QPSK Bridge.
Ensure that system is
in Boot Mode 2.
0x50010504 Upstream Buffer
Overflow (%s).
MINOR
Yellow
Internal receive
buffer has filled
on Demod 1-8.
May resolve itself with
time. Check DHCTs.
0x50010820 Upstream Buffer
Overflow rate
exceeded
threshold.
STATUS
None
Upstream buffer
has exceeded
1.544
Mbps/demod.
0x50010821 STATUS
Downstream Buffer
Overflow rate
exceeded
threshold.
None
Internal transmit
buffer has
exceeded 1.544
Mbps/demod.
0x50010822 - OOB STATUS
bandwidth
Overflow exceeded
threshold level.
None
OOB bandwidth
threshold has
been exceeded
and will raise a
SNMP trap. OOB
modulator is
sending too
much traffic to
the DHCT
population.
Bandwidth
threshold is
configurable via
SNMP.
0x5001050B - AAL5 MINOR
CRC Error (%s).
Yellow
Reconstructed
packets did not
pass the CRC
check.
Group data_path
100
Check RF network
setup (upstream RF
settings and levels).
This can occur with a
lot of sign on activity.
Wait until sign on
activity decreases and
check if alarm is still
raised.
OL-30211-01
Troubleshoot Alarms
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x50010507 - AAL5 STATUS
Abort.
None
QPSK Bridge has This can occur with a
discarded a
lot of sign on activity.
DHCT message. Wait until sign on
activity decreases and
check if alarm is still
raised.
0x50010506 - AAL5 MINOR
Timeout.
Yellow
QPSK Bridge did
not receive entire
DHCT message
within DAVIC
timeout window.
0x5001082E STATUS
Downstream Buffer
Overflow (%s).
None
There is a high
amount of traffic
on the system.
Normal behavior
at times.
0x50010830 Reassembly Error
(%s).
None
Problem occurred
while attempting
to reassemble a
packet from a
DHCT.
0x50010201 - Set
MAJOR
Frequency failed
for modulator (%s).
Red
Could not set the Ensure that the
modulator
Modulator output
frequency.
frequency is between
70 & 130 MHz. Reboot.
Contact Cisco
Services.
0x60010201 - Set
Frequency failed
for demodulator
(%s).
Red
Could not set the
demodulator
frequency
(demod 1-8).
STATUS
This can occur with a
lot of sign on activity.
Wait until sign on
activity decreases and
check if alarm is still
raised. If problem
persists, check the max
node distance.
GROUP generic
OL-30211-01
MAJOR
Ensure that the
demodulator output
frequency is between 5
& 42 MHz. Reboot.
Contact Cisco
Services.
101
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting the DAVIC QPSK Bridge
102
Alarm Text
Priority
Associated Description
LED
Resolution
0x50010823 Primary Service
Frequency is set to
a value that is not
serviced by any
demodulators on
this chassis.
MINOR
Yellow
The Primary
Service
Frequency from
the DNCS for the
DHCTs is set to a
frequency for
which no
demodulators are
configured.
Ensure that the
Primary Service
Frequency set in the
DNCS and the
frequency of the
demodulators on the
QPSK Bridge, match.
0x50010824 Backup Service
Frequency is set to
a value that is not
serviced by any
demodulators on
this chassis.
MINOR
Yellow
The Backup
Service
Frequency from
the DNCS for the
DHCTs is set to a
frequency for
which no
demodulators are
configured.
Ensure that the
Backup Service
Frequency set in the
DNCS and the
frequency of the
demodulators on the
QPSK Bridge, match.
OL-30211-01
6 Chapter 6
Customer Information
If You Have Questions
If you have technical questions, call Cisco Services for assistance.
Follow the menu options to speak with a service engineer.
Access your company's extranet site to view or order additional
technical publications. For accessing instructions, contact the
representative who handles your account. Check your extranet site
often as the information is updated frequently.
OL-30211-01
103
A
Appx auto letter
Appendix A
QPSK Bridge Configuration
File
Introduction
The QPSK Bridge configuration file, with explanation, found in this
appendix, can be copied and pasted for use.
Note: The configuration file must be delivered to the QPSK Bridge as
an XML file.
In This Appendix

OL-30211-01
The QPSK Configuration File............................................................ 106
105
Appendix A
QPSK Bridge Configuration File
The QPSK Configuration File
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<ifacade_config>
<!--Do not modify these settings. -->
<head>
<Version>1</Version>
<Product>D9485</Product>
<Checksum>0x12345</Checksum>
</head>
<config set="boot">
<!--Radius server information. Mandatory: No. -->
<RADIUS view="earlyboot">
<Server></Server> <!--The IP address of RADIUS server-->
<Secret></Secret> <!--The password that the D9485 uses to authenticate with the
RADIUS server-->
<Timeout__s_></Timeout__s_> <!--The timeout period before the D9485 will no
longer attempt to obtain a password from the RADIUS server. -->
<Enabled>No</Enabled> <!--Set the status of the RADIUS server. When set to
“No”, the D9485 will not attempt to authenticate with the RADIUS server. -->
</RADIUS>
<!--Leaving these fields blank or entering ‘Disabled’ will turn these connections off.
Mandatory: Yes. -->
<DNCS_Connection_Parameters view="earlyboot">
<HCT_RPC_Server>10.253.0.1</HCT_RPC_Server> <!--This is the IPv4 address
for the RPC HCT Server. -->
<MGR_RPC_Server>10.253.0.1</MGR_RPC_Server> <!--This is the IPv4 address
for the RPC MGR Server. -->
<ALARM_RPC_Server>10.253.0.1</ALARM_RPC_Server> <!--This is the IPv4
address for the RPC ALARM Server. -->
106
OL-30211-01
The QPSK Configuration File
<STATS_RPC_Server>10.253.0.1</STATS_RPC_Server> <!--This is the IPv4
address for the RPC STATS Server. -->
</DNCS_Connection_Parameters>
<!--Chassis identifiers used to set custom parameters for identifying the chassis.
Mandatory: No. -->
<Chassis view="earlyboot">
<Name>GALIANO_05R2</Name> <!--User configurable chassis name. This can
be set to any string. -->
<System_Model>D9485</System_Model> <!--User configurable system model
number. -->
<Boot_Mode>Multiple BOOTP/TFTP (mode 2)</Boot_Mode> <!--Boot Mode for
the system. Can be set to: NVRAM (mode 0); Singe BOOTP/TFTP (mode 1);
Multiple BOOTP/TFTP (mode 2). Default is ‘Multiple BOOTP/TFTP (mode 2)’. For
more information on Boot modes, see Chassis -->
</Chassis>
<!--Locks the front panel button functionality. When locked, the front panel buttons
will not perform any function. Mandatory: No-->
<Front_Panel_Lock view="earlyboot">
<Locked>No</Locked> <!--Can be Yes or No-->
</Front_Panel_Lock>
<!--Craft Port Settings – for more information see ‘Direct Connectivity’.
Manditory: No. -->
<CRAFT_Port_Settings view="earlyboot">
<Baud_Rate>19200</Baud_Rate>
<Data_Bits>8</Data_Bits>
<Stop_Bits>1</Stop_Bits>
<Parity>None</Parity>
</CRAFT_Port_Settings>
<!--User Configurable Technical Support Information. This information is displayed
on the UI. Mandatory: No.-->
<Technical_Support view="earlyboot">
OL-30211-01
107
Appendix A
QPSK Bridge Configuration File
<Email>support@cisco.com</Email>
<Telephone>(555)555-5555</Telephone>
<Web>www.cisco.com</Web>
</Technical_Support>
<!--Identifies the Remote Syslog servers for system logs. Syslog server addresses can
be IPv4 or server names. Mandatory: No.-->
<Remote_Targets view="earlyboot">
<Target_Host_Name>localhost</Target_Host_Name>
</Remote_Targets>
<Remote_Targets view="earlyboot">
<Target_Host_Name>127.0.0.1</Target_Host_Name>
</Remote_Targets>
<!--Fiber Distance Setting. User settable maximum node distance setting for the
DHCTs connected to the D9485. Mandatory: No-->
<Modulator_Fiber_Distance_Setting view="earlyboot">
<Max_Node_Distance>0 km</Max_Node_Distance> <!-- Range: 0km–248km, in
31 km increments. For more information on correctly setting the modulator fiber
distance setting, see “QPSK Delay Mode Technical Bulletin” application notes.-->
</Modulator_Fiber_Distance_Setting>
<!--Modulator settings of the Low RF Output port. See section ‘3. Modulator’ for
more information. Mandatory: Yes. -->
<Modulator view="running">
<RF_Output_Port>Low</RF_Output_Port> <!--Always ‘Low’-->
<Frequency>83000000 Hz</Frequency> <!--Frequency (70 – 130 MHz) -->
<Power_Level>60 dBmV</Power_Level> <!--Power Level (50 – 60 dBmV) -->
<CW_Mode>Disabled</CW_Mode> <!--Continuous Wave Mode. When
enabled, the output will only be a carrier. -->
<DNCS_Provisioned>Enabled</DNCS_Provisioned> <!--DNCS will configure
the modulator port when enabled. When disabled, the modulator must be a
configured manually or via this configuration file. -->
108
OL-30211-01
The QPSK Configuration File
<RF_Output>Unmuted</RF_Output> <!--Activates\Deactivates the RF Output
port. When ‘Muted’, there is no output present on the port. Set to ‘Unmuted’ for
normal operation. -->
</Modulator>
<!-- The entries below are for configuring each of the 8 QPSK demodulators. See
section ‘7. Demodulators’ for more information on these settings. Each demodulator
must be configured individually. Mandatory: Yes. -->
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>1</Number> <!--Demodulator identifier (1-8) -->
<DNCS_Name>NODE15A</DNCS_Name> <!--DHCT node name-->
<Frequency__Hz_>11000000</Frequency__Hz_> <!--Frequency (5 – 42 MHz) -->
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation> <!--Attenuation (0, 8, 16, or 24 dB) -->
<DNCS_Provisioned>Enabled</DNCS_Provisioned> <!--Describes if the
demodulator is provisioned by the DNCS. Enabled = Yes; Disabled = No. -->
<DNCS_Enabled>Enabled</DNCS_Enabled> <!--Functioning state of the
demodulator. Enabled = On; Disabled = Off. -->
</Demodulator>
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>2</Number>
<DNCS_Name>UNKNOWN</DNCS_Name>
<Frequency__Hz_>5000000</Frequency__Hz_>
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation>
<DNCS_Provisioned>Disabled</DNCS_Provisioned>
<DNCS_Enabled>Disabled</DNCS_Enabled>
</Demodulator>
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>3</Number>
<DNCS_Name>UNKNOWN</DNCS_Name>
<Frequency__Hz_>5000000</Frequency__Hz_>
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation>
<DNCS_Provisioned>Disabled</DNCS_Provisioned>
OL-30211-01
109
Appendix A
QPSK Bridge Configuration File
<DNCS_Enabled>Disabled</DNCS_Enabled>
</Demodulator>
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>4</Number>
<DNCS_Name>UNKNOWN</DNCS_Name>
<Frequency__Hz_>5000000</Frequency__Hz_>
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation>
<DNCS_Provisioned>Disabled</DNCS_Provisioned>
<DNCS_Enabled>Disabled</DNCS_Enabled>
</Demodulator>
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>5</Number>
<DNCS_Name>UNKNOWN</DNCS_Name>
<Frequency__Hz_>5000000</Frequency__Hz_>
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation>
<DNCS_Provisioned>Disabled</DNCS_Provisioned>
<DNCS_Enabled>Disabled</DNCS_Enabled>
</Demodulator>
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>6</Number>
<DNCS_Name>UNKNOWN</DNCS_Name>
<Frequency__Hz_>5000000</Frequency__Hz_>
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation>
<DNCS_Provisioned>Disabled</DNCS_Provisioned>
<DNCS_Enabled>Disabled</DNCS_Enabled>
</Demodulator>
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>7</Number>
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<DNCS_Name>UNKNOWN</DNCS_Name>
<Frequency__Hz_>5000000</Frequency__Hz_>
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation>
<DNCS_Provisioned>Disabled</DNCS_Provisioned>
<DNCS_Enabled>Disabled</DNCS_Enabled>
</Demodulator>
<Demodulator view="running">
<Number>8</Number>
<DNCS_Name>UNKNOWN</DNCS_Name>
<Frequency__Hz_>5000000</Frequency__Hz_>
<Attenuation>0 dB</Attenuation>
<DNCS_Provisioned>Disabled</DNCS_Provisioned>
<DNCS_Enabled>Disabled</DNCS_Enabled>
</Demodulator>
<!-- The VPI is used to identify the virtual circuit used by the DNCS to identify a
unique QPSK Bridge. Mandatory: No. -->
<VPI view="running">
<VPI>29</VPI> <!-- Can be any number between 0 and 255. -->
</VPI>
<Service_Frequencies view="running">
<Service_Channel_Frequency>11000000 Hz</Service_Channel_Frequency> <!-The Service Frequency is the upstream frequency (or RDC) at which the QPSK
Bridge tells the DHCTs to transmit data. This is a frequency between 5 MHz and 42
MHz and should correspond to the frequency of the associated demodulator.
Mandatory: Yes-->
<Backup_Service_Channel_Frequency>11000000
Hz</Backup_Service_Channel_Frequency> <!-- The backup frequency is used as an
alternate service frequency should a change in network variables require a frequency
change. Typically, this value is the same as the Service Channel Frequency.
Mandatory: Yes. -->
</Service_Frequencies>
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<!--Allows the user to set the upstream (RDC) power levels for the DHCTs. These
are typically configured through the DNCS. Mandatory: No. -->
<Power_Levels view="running">
<Acceptable_minimum>-9 dBmV</Acceptable_minimum> <!--The minimum
acceptable power level of a DHCT as measured by the QPSK Bridge demodulator. ->
<Acceptable_maximum>-1 dBmV</Acceptable_maximum> <!--The maximum
acceptable power level of a DHCT as measured by the QPSK Bridge demodulator. ->
<Target_minimum>-8 dBmV</Target_minimum> <!--The ideal minimum
acceptable power level of a DHCT as measured by the QPSK Bridge demodulator. ->
<Target_maximum>-2 dBmV</Target_maximum> <!--The ideal maximum
acceptable power level of a DHCT as measured by the QPSK Bridge demodulator. ->
<DHCT_minimum>0 dBmV</DHCT_minimum> <!--The minimum
transmission power levels as measured at the upstream port of a DHCT. Levels
depend on model of DHCT. -->
<DHCT_maximum>50 dBmV</DHCT_maximum> <!--The maximum
transmission power levels as measured at the upstream port of a DHCT. Levels
depend on model of DHCT. -->
</Power_Levels>
<!--Data Routing describes the different data types flowing through the QPSK
Bridge. It is recommended that changes to these data flows be made through the
DNCS. Each rule must be set individually. See ‘2. Networking’ for more
information. Mandatory: Yes. -->
<Data_Routing view="running">
<Rule>1</Rule> <!--Designator (1-8) -->
<Active>Enabled</Active> <!--Enabled/Disabled-->
<Name>CA</Name> <!--Data name-->
<Type>CA</Type> <!--Data type-->
<Dest_IP>10.15.64.1</Dest_IP> <!--Destination IP address for data type-->
<VPI>0</VPI> <!--Virtual Path Identifier (0-255) -->
<VCI>4000</VCI> <!--Virtual Channel Identifier-->
</Data_Routing>
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<Data_Routing view="running">
<Rule>2</Rule>
<Active>Enabled</Active>
<Name>SAR</Name>
<Type>SAR</Type>
<Dest_IP>10.15.64.2</Dest_IP>
<VPI>0</VPI>
<VCI>0</VCI>
</Data_Routing>
<Data_Routing view="running">
<Rule>3</Rule>
<Active>Enabled</Active>
<Name>PASSTHRU</Name>
<Type>PASSTHRU</Type>
<Dest_IP>10.15.64.3</Dest_IP>
<VPI>0</VPI>
<VCI>4001</VCI>
</Data_Routing>
<Data_Routing view="running">
<Rule>4</Rule>
<Active>Enabled</Active>
<Name>SI</Name>
<Type>SIBASE</Type>
<Dest_IP>10.15.64.4</Dest_IP>
<VPI>0</VPI>
<VCI>4002</VCI>
</Data_Routing>
<Data_Routing view="running">
<Rule>5</Rule>
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<Active>Enabled</Active>
<Name>BROADCAST</Name>
<Type>BROADCAST</Type>
<Dest_IP>10.15.127.255</Dest_IP>
<VPI>255</VPI>
<VCI>65535</VCI>
</Data_Routing>
<Data_Routing view="running">
<Rule>6</Rule>
<Active>Disabled</Active>
<Name></Name>
<Type>EMMG</Type>
<Dest_IP></Dest_IP>
<VPI>0</VPI>
<VCI>0</VCI>
</Data_Routing>
<Data_Routing view="running">
<Rule>7</Rule>
<Active>Disabled</Active>
<Name></Name>
<Type>EMMU</Type>
<Dest_IP></Dest_IP>
<VPI>0</VPI>
<VCI>0</VCI>
</Data_Routing>
<!--Clear the DHCT database on next reboot. Mandatory: No. -->
<Options view="running">
<Database_Restore_Mode>0</Database_Restore_Mode> <!--(1) DHCT database
will persist across reboots;(0) DHCT database will clear on reboot. -->
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</Options>
<!--This is the process of adjusting the transmitted power and timing delay for
DAVIC messages from a DHCT for optimal performance. Mandatory: Yes. -->
<DAVIC_Ranging view="lateboot">
<State>Enabled</State> <!--Cab be Enabled or Disabled
</DAVIC_Ranging>
<!--Set the rate at which DAVIC broadcast messages are sent to DHCTs. Mandatory:
Yes. -->
<DAVIC_Broadcast_Messages view="lateboot">
<Broadcast_Rate>1 second(s)</Broadcast_Rate> <!--Between 1-15 seconds per
broadcast message. -->
</DAVIC_Broadcast_Messages>
<!--Enable/Disable Network Services. Used to enable non-essential networking
services. All non-essential services default to disabled if not explicitly set to enabled.
Mandatory: Yes-->
<Network_Services view="lateboot">
<SSH>Enabled</SSH> <!-- Enabled/Disabled
<HTTP>Enabled</HTTP> <!-- Enabled/Disabled
<SNMP>Enabled</SNMP> <!-- Enabled/Disabled
</Network_Services>
<!--SNMP Communities – see SNMP on page 45 for more information. You may
define up to 5 SNMP Communities. Mandatory: No-->
<SNMP_Communities view="lateboot">
<Community_Name>test</Community_Name> <!--User settable name of the
SNMP Community. Each Community Name must be a unique string. -->
<Access_Mode>ReadOnly</Access_Mode> <!--Configurable permissions for
this community. Can be set to ‘ReadOnly’ or ‘ReadWrite’. -->
</SNMP_Communities>
<SNMP_Communities view="lateboot">
<Community_Name>test2</Community_Name>
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<Access_Mode>ReadOnly</Access_Mode>
</SNMP_Communities>
<!--SNMP Trap Recievers - see SNMP on page 45 for more information. You may
define up to 5 SNMP Trap receivers. Mandatory: No. -->
<Trap_Receivers view="lateboot">
<IP_Address>127.0.0.1</IP_Address> <!--IPv4 address of the SNMP Trap
receiver. -->
<Port_Number>1234</Port_Number> <!--Port to use for sending the SNMP
traps to. [1 .. 65535]. Typically 162. -->
<Notification_Version>v2</Notification_Version> <!--SNMP trap receiver
version: "v2".-->
<Notification_Type>Trap</Notification_Type> <!--Sets the receiver type: 'Trap'
one way, no acknowledgement 'Inform' acknowledgment from receiver 'Disabled'
receiver is disabled. Traps will not be sent. -->
</Trap_Receivers>
<Trap_Receivers view="lateboot">
<IP_Address>127.0.0.2</IP_Address>
<Port_Number>1235</Port_Number>
<Notification_Version>v2</Notification_Version>
<Notification_Type>Trap</Notification_Type>
</Trap_Receivers>
<!--SNMP Trap Identifiers used to identify a D9485 from other trap devices in a
network. These fields populate saltUserName and saltDeviceInstance in the SNMP
trap. These cannot be set through the system Shell menu. Mandatory: No. -->
<SNMP_Trap_Values view="lateboot">
<SALTUSERNAME>System</SALTUSERNAME> <!--String of length 0 – 255
bytes.
<SALTDEVICENAME>QPSK</SALTDEVICENAME> <!--String of length 0 –
255 bytes.
</SNMP_Trap_Values>
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<!--System Upgrade. Automatically start and upgrade on boot. For more
information, see the section on Upgrading the QPSK Bridge. Mandatory: No. -->
<System_Upgrade view="lateboot">
<TFTP_Server_or_HTTP_Address>http://192.168.2.3</TFTP_Server_or_HTTP_Ad
dress> <!--TFTP or HTTP address of Upgrade Server. -->
<Upgrade_File>1.2.16.bin.signed</Upgrade_File> <!--TFTP: The full path and
filename of the upgrade file as located on the TFTP Server identified above. For
example, if the file is located on server 192.168.2.3 in
/tftpboot/QPSK_files/D9485_REL_4P_1_2_16-G.bin.signed use
TFTP_Server_or_HTTP_Address: 192.168.2.3. Upgrade_File:
QPSK_files/D9485_REL_4P_1_2_16-G.bin.signed, assuming /tftpboot is the root
directly for the server. The filename to use is located at the HTTP_Address above. If
the file is accessible at http:<!--192.168.2.3/QPSK_files/D9485_REL_4P_1_2_16G.bin.signed use TFTP_Server_or_HTTP_Address: http:<!--192.168.2.3/QPSK_files
Upgrade_File: D9485_REL_4P_1_2_16-G.bin.signed-->
</System_Upgrade>
</config>
</ifacade_config>
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Product and service availability are subject to change without notice.
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
April 2014
Part Number OL-30211-01