Guide to the Heating and Cooling Systems at McLean Gardens

MCLEAN GARDENS
Guide to the Heating and
Cooling Systems at McLean
Gardens
How They Function and Their Maintenance
Version 1.0
5/21/2013
This document explains the McLean Gardens heating and cooling system and recommended
maintenance for proper functioning of the equipment involved. Potential problems related to
the operation of these systems are discussed.
Version 1.0 May 21, 2013
Table of Contents
Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 3
How Your Residence is Cooled and Heated.................................................................................... 4
Condensation .................................................................................................................................. 6
Recommended Maintenance (to Avoid Costly Repairs)................................................................. 7
Providing Heated and Cooled Water – The Plants ......................................................................... 8
The Pipes......................................................................................................................................... 9
Potential Problems and Failures ..................................................................................................... 9
Heat Pump Failures..................................................................................................................... 9
Heat Pump Operation and Maintenance.................................................................................. 12
Condensate ............................................................................................................................... 12
The Fan...................................................................................................................................... 12
The Filter ................................................................................................................................... 13
Electrical controls...................................................................................................................... 13
Pipes and Pipe Connections...................................................................................................... 13
Plant Operations Failures.......................................................................................................... 13
Attachment A: Plants and the Buildings they Service.................................................................. 15
Attachment B: What Contractors Should Know .......................................................................... 16
Attachment C: Pictures of the Plants and their Equipment ........................................................ 17
Attachment D. Cross Reference of Addresses to Plants and Buildings ....................................... 22
List of Figures
Figure 1.
Figure 2:
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 5:
Figure 6.
Typical Unit Heating and Cooling System ....................................................................... 4
The Heating and Cooling Cycles ...................................................................................... 5
Condensate Pump and Heat Pump Loop Pipes (Phase II Unit)....................................... 6
Plastic Valve(s) ................................................................................................................ 7
Typical Unit Valves and Pipes........................................................................................ 10
Unit Heating and Cooling System with Updated Valves and Hoses ............................. 10
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Figure 7. Melted HVAC PVC Pipe ................................................................................................. 11
Figure 8. Inside a Plant. Lightest blue pipes are for cold water, darker blue pipes for hot water.
....................................................................................................................................................... 17
Figure 9. Cold water heat exchanger. .......................................................................................... 17
Figure 10. Boiler provides heated water. .................................................................................... 18
Figure 11. Electric motors power the pumps that circulate the water in the loops. .................. 18
Figure 12. Electronic controls and Internet connections provide for remote monitoring of plant
operations. .................................................................................................................................... 19
Figure 13. Cooling tower fans. ..................................................................................................... 19
Figure 14. Pipes bring heated water after use to cool units to cooling tower. ........................... 20
Figure 15. Electric motors power cooling fans. ........................................................................... 20
Figure 16. Inside the cooling tower – grille removed for visibility. ............................................. 21
Figure 17. More cooling tower pipes and grille. .......................................................................... 21
Figure 18. Map with Buildings Identified ..................................................................................... 24
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Summary
McLean Gardens residents should be familiar with the Association’s heating and cooling
system and how to operate and maintain their individual systems. This document provides
information on how these systems work. A summary of salient facts follows, with additional
details provided in the attachments.
Heat pumps in individual units cool or heat the units. They require professional service
and maintenance every six months and are subject to stringent operating conditions. Experts
recommend that heat pumps be replaced when they reach the end of their useful life,
estimated at from 12 to 15 years, but it may be shorter or longer. Individual parts may require
periodic replacement. Maintenance, repair, and replacement of heat pumps are at the owner’s
expense.
Heat pumps require heated or cooled water, which is provided through PVC pipes from
the McLean Gardens six central plants. The connections to the central plants involve pipes and
valves located within the individual unit; these should be examined as part of routine
maintenance for soundness and replaced by the owners, as required.
Heating and cooling depend on the operation of the central plants. When the plants are
not in the appropriate operational mode the heat pumps, if used, can be damaged and/or the
pipes that support heating and cooling can be damaged as well. If heat pumps are set to
cooling while the plants are set to heating, the PVC pipes can melt.
Central plants may not function due to season (e.g., cooling towers are shut down for
the winter), maintenance, mechanical failures, or lack of electricity or water. McLean Gardens
management issues written notices (paper notices delivered to each unit and via e-mail) as to
the status of the plants and actions that should be taken to control the heat pumps when the
plants are not operational.
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How Your Residence is Cooled and Heated
Each apartment has a water source heat pump, which provides heating or cooling
depending on the season. This heat pump is owned by the unit owner, who is responsible for
its operation, maintenance, and replacement. Figure 1 shows a typical unit heat pump system.
Figure 2 is a diagram of the heating and cooling cycles related to heat pump systems. Heat
pumps have an estimated useful life of 12 to 15 years; some estimates are as high as 20 years.
Figure 1. Typical Unit Heating and Cooling System
Heated or cooled air
leaves the heat pump
via metal ducts.
Filter fits into slot in front of
air intake – air is drawn in
from the unit at this point.
Metal cabinet encloses
heat pump, coils, fan,
and electrical parts.
A water source heat pump generally is more efficient than an air source heat pump, but
requires water that meets the conditions required by the heat pump – cooled or heated to the
extent required by the heat pump to do its job. The heat pump is the machine that transfers
heat to or from the unit to the water in the pipes connected to the plants via a loop. In the
heating mode, the heat pump absorbs heat from the hot water in the loop (which action cools
the water in the loop) and transfers the heat to the unit. In the cooling mode, the heat pump
extracts heat from the apartment and heats the cooled loop water. The loop water, in turn, is
heated by the boilers and cooled by the cooling towers. Figure 2 illustrates this cycle, which is
basically the same as that of a refrigerator. Note that serious and costly damage will result if
the heat pump is set to cool when heated water is provided or is set to heat when cooled
water is provided.
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Figure 2: The Heating and Cooling Cycles
/heat exchanger
Cold
Hot
Loop to cooling tower
Loop to boiler in plant
Cold
Hot
/heat exchanger
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Condensation
The heat pump, during cooling season, condenses moisture that is in the air. This
reduces the humidity in the apartment, but results in liquid water that must be disposed of.
The heat pump enclosure includes a drain pan under the heat pump's coil to collect the
condensed water. The water is carried by piping from the pan to a suitable termination point of
disposal. Figure 3 shows elements of a condensate disposal system.
Without a regular program for servicing heat pumps, including cleaning the coil and
changing filters, stoppage and water overflow can result. Overflow of the condensate will
cause considerable damage to condominium units. In addition, where possible, periodic
cleaning of condensate drainage pipes is conducted by Association maintenance staff.
The condensate drainage piping is routed as follows: For units A and B for buildings 1, 9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31 (Phase I and II
buildings), the condensate is pumped outside by a condensate pump located in the units. (See
Figure 2.) For buildings 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 23, 24, and 25 (Phase III buildings) the condensate
drains into the washing machine's drain in the basement. A common vertical (riser) condensate
drain line discharges the condensate from units A, C & E and B, D & F from each entryway.
Figure 3. Condensate Pump and Heat Pump Loop Pipes (Phase II Unit)
Plastic tubing used to
expel condensate water.
PVC pipes connect to the
loop, bringing and
returning water to the
plant.
Pump expels condensate
water.
Pipe brings condensate
from heat pump.
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Recommended Maintenance (to Avoid Costly Repairs)
Proper maintenance will prevent most problems related to the heating and cooling
system:

Have your heat pump checked every six months by a certified and licensed contractor,
and have the recommended maintenance performed. Many residents have
maintenance contracts with their heat pump installers or other contractors for seasonal
service. A properly-maintained heat pump works more efficiently, saving you money on
energy bills, and prevents costly failures that could damage your and your neighbors'
units.

Replace aging or obsolete pipes and valves. The pictures in Figure 4 illustrate the types
of valves that may fail due to age. (Contrast these with the valves in Figure 6, page 11.)
Figure 4. Plastic Valve(s)

Replace heat pumps that are beyond their useful life.

Replace the filter every three months (or sooner if dirty).

If you have any questions about heat pump and related equipment problems and
maintenance, call the management office at 202-966-9780.
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Providing Heated and Cooled Water – The Plants
The Association provides cooled or heated water according to the season. Six plants
located on the grounds heat or cool water that circulates through underground PVC pipes to
each building, forming a loop. The plants and the buildings they serve are listed in Attachment
A. Information on the equipment in the plants is in Attachment C.
In the heating season water in the loops is heated by boilers that burn natural gas. In
the cooling season, cooling towers use electricity and water to dissipate heat – large fans move
air over a large radiator and evaporate water. Electricity is also used to power pumps that
circulate the water to the buildings.
The plants are designed to provide water at temperatures between 70° F and 75° F for
heating and for cooling. The plants cannot handle returning loop water with temperature
above 100° F. If the loop water temperature (resulting from unit heat pumps heating the loop
water while cooling the units) exceeds 100° F, the plant must be shut down to avoid damage to
the equipment. (When there are exceptionally hot days in the summer, air conditioning may
result in water loop temperatures that exceed this limit and air conditioning may not be
available. However, this has not happened.)
The heated or cooled water flows constantly from the plants to the buildings and back
to the plants. This water flow is continuous and the water is not lost. (The water in the loops is
used up only if there is a leak.) However, water used in the cooling towers is used up as it
evaporates to provide cooling and must be replenished.
Providing cooled water to the unit heat pumps requires that the cooling towers be
operational. The cooling towers require winterization at the end of the cooling season in order
to avoid damage caused by freezing weather. The towers cannot be operated while winterized.
Readying the cooling towers for the cooling season is normally accomplished by April 15, the
average date after which freezing is not likely in the Washington area. By law, heated water
must be provided until May 15. These constraints make it difficult to provide cooling on short
notice before April 15. Only under unusual circumstances would cooling be available prior to
April 15.
A control system that allows either heating or cooling in the periods of transition from
one to the other was installed in 2012. For a month or so either cooling or heating can be
operational during the spring and fall transition periods. Announcements of these periods will
be made by management.
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The Pipes
The underground PVC pipe system branches out to distribute the heated or cooled
water into each building. The distribution system within each building consists of PVC pipes of
progressively diminishing size, ending in the pipes that are visible at the heat pumps in each
unit.
The flow of heating/cooling water into buildings can be individually controlled by cut-off
valves at each entryway, with some exceptions. Building isolation valves for Buildings 1 through
8 and 23 through 25 are as follows:
Valve at 3863 Rodman isolates building # 1.
Valve at 3871 Rodman isolates building # 2.
Valve at 3821 39th isolates buildings # 5 through #8.
Valve at 3760 39th Street isolates building # 8.
Valve rear of 3821 39th Street isolates buildings # 4 through #8.
Valve between Plant F and 3871 Rodman isolates buildings # 1 through #3.
Valve across from Plant F (next to Fannie Mae’s fence) isolates buildings # 6 through #8.
There are three isolation valves for buildings #23 through #25.
The valves for Buildings 1 through 8 and 23 through 25 are strategically located in the
loops to provide flexibility in isolating a building or buildings from one another in case parts of
the loops must be shut down. These isolation valves were installed during the 2012
underground pipe replacement projects.
The PVC pipes are rated for temperatures of up to 180° F. If exceeded, the pipe will
soften and become deformed (for example, narrower, which impedes water flow) or burst or
otherwise break, leading to major flooding. These breakages can take place long after the
initial damage was inflicted. Figure 7 (page 11) shows the damage that can result.
Potential Problems and Failures
Failures in the heating and cooling system can be related to individual heat pumps,
pipes, plant operations, and human errors.
Heat Pump Failures
Each apartment has a heating and cooling system, enclosed in a metal box with various
openings. The system consists of the heat pump itself, a fan, a filter, electrical controls, pipes
and pipe connections. Each of these can affect how a unit is cooled or heated. Figures 1 (on
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page 4) and 5 illustrate the main elements (those that are visible without disassembly) of the
unit heating and cooling systems. Figure 6 shows updated replacement hoses and valves.
Figure 5: Typical Unit Valves and Pipes
Valves that shut off water from/to
the loop. If these valves do not
work or are not present there is no
quick way to stop flooding if the
hoses break or are disconnected.
Hoses that connect the loop to the
heat pump. These hoses
deteriorate over time.
Condensate line.
Figure 6. Unit Heating and Cooling System with Updated Valves and Hoses
Lever action shut off valves
facilitate isolating heat pump
from loop pipes. They are quick
acting.
Flexible metal hoses connect
heat pump to loop pipes. Metal
hoses are sturdier than rubber
hoses.
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The whole cooling and heating system is designed and operated to provide heating or
cooling only, not both simultaneously (but see page 8 for an explanation of the capability to
switch from one mode to the other and back in the spring and fall):

When heated water is provided by the plants, all heat pumps in all apartments must be
set to heating or be shut off.

If a heat pump is set to cooling when heated water is provided, the heat pump will
further heat the water in the loop, which can lead to damaging the heat pump and to
melting the PVC pipes. In addition, the plant may have to be shut down to avoid major
damage. What can happen to pipes is shown in Figure 7. As a result of melting, the pipe
constricted and cracked, and later burst, resulting in serious water damage to multiple
units.
Figure 7. Melted HVAC PVC Pipe

Melting PVC pipes will lead to floods, potentially affecting multiple units.

When cooled water is provided by the plants, all heat pumps in all apartments must be
set to cooling or be shut off.

Management will inform residents of the status of the plants and when heated or
cooled water will be provided. (See page 8 for an explanation of the capability to switch
between heating and cooling modes during the spring and fall.)
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Heat Pump Operation and Maintenance
Regular monitoring of heat pump operation is critical. Although modern water source
heat pumps may be equipped with safety devices that control and monitor the compressor and
protect the heat pump, these devices may not be absolutely reliable.
High-and low-pressure safety switches are designed to monitor high and low pressure in
the heat pump system. Abnormal pressures may be caused by abnormal water temperatures in
the loops, or by an unexpected plant shutdown. The safety switches can be expected to
automatically shut off the heat pump when they sense abnormal pressures. This should protect
the heat pump from potential damage, which could result in flooding the unit and those below.
In addition to built-in safety switches, another safety measure could be the installation
of sensors that recognize the water temperature being supplied to the heat pump. If the water
temperature exceeds your heat pump's pre-set high and low temperature, the sensor system
should safely shut down the heat pump. When the water temperature is back to normal, the
heat pump automatically restarts. These temperature sensors are available from heat pump
contractors.
To ensure continued proper operation of the safety control mechanism, it is very
important that your heat pump be checked and serviced (at least annually but preferably at
each change from heating to cooling and vice versa) by a reputable heating and cooling
company that specializes in water source heat pumps. If the pressure/high temperature safety
control in your heat pump is not functioning properly, it will not recognize increased condenser
pressure, or that the central plant has shut down, and will continue running. When this
happens the PVC pipes in your system begin to swell and may rupture, resulting in a flood.
Condensate
The condensate drain can get clogged, resulting in a backup of condensate water, which
will spill into the apartment and units below. See the section on Condensation (page 6) for
further information.
The Fan
The fan moves the air from the apartment through the heat exchanger of the heat
pump and forces it through the ducts to the various rooms. It is driven by an electric motor.
The fan must operate to cool or heat the apartment.
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The Filter
A filter is installed where the return air from the apartment enters the heating/cooling
radiator of the heat pump, before the fan. The filter keeps dirt from obstructing the air flow
across the radiator and helps to keep the heat exchange surfaces clean. The filter should be
changed every three months or sooner if it has been accumulating dirt. Failure to change the
filter will result in inefficient operation (using more electricity than necessary) and can lead to
premature fan and/or heat pump failure and resulting need for replacement.
Electrical controls
Various electrical circuits provide high voltage current to operate the heat pump and
low voltage current for controls such as the thermostat. These systems are generally quite
sturdy and durable. Should there be an electrical or control problem they should be addressed
by qualified and licensed repair people.
Pipes and Pipe Connections
Individual pipes that are attached to the unit can break. Equipment originally installed
had rubber hoses connecting the heat pump to the PVC pipes that connect to the loop. Those
hoses are beyond their useful life. If these hoses have not been replaced they can break and
cause flooding (with concomitant repair liabilities) as well as stop the ability to cool or heat the
unit.
Plant Operations Failures
An entire plant may be shut down, in which case the buildings serviced by the plant will
not have cooling or heating, and must shut down their heat pumps. Plants may be shut down
for many reasons, including:

To repair an individual unit's heat pump. An entryway may be isolated from the loop by
closing the isolation shut off valve, so repairs can be done on an individual unit without
interrupting service to all units in other entryways and buildings in the loop. However,
the isolation shut off valves may sometimes be found to be inoperable, requiring a plant
shut down. The isolation valves may be inoperable due to damage caused by
earthquakes, other soil movement, corrosion, age, and accidents. In these cases, repair
of the isolation valves may also require an additional plant shutdown.

To repair a plant component. Depending on the type of repair, the system could be
down for hours or days. For example, the adhesive used to replace a broken PVC pipe
requires 16 to 24 hours to cure.
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
To perform regular preventive maintenance. Every effort is made to schedule this work
during the spring and fall months when it is not necessary to use apartment heat
pumps. However, the weather does not always cooperate.

Plant shutdowns are sometimes caused by unforeseeable break downs such as a blown
fuse (which could be caused by electrical surges), clogged filters (which could result
from debris that enters the water loops), pump failures (which could be caused by wear
and tear or power surges), and other mishaps.

Power failures will shut plants down and cause damage, which may result in delays in
restarting a plant.
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Attachment A: Plants and the Buildings they Service
Plant A services Buildings 17-21; Plant B Buildings 14-16 & 22; Plant C Buildings 9-13;
Plant D Buildings 23-29; Plant E Buildings 30-31; and Plant F Buildings 1-8. The related
addresses are as follows (a cross reference organized by addresses is provided in Attachment D.
Cross Reference of Addresses to Plants and Buildings):
Plant A services:
Porter Street numbers 3848, 3840, 3832, 3824, and 3816.
38th Street 3450, 3440, 3420, and 3410.
Newark Street 3801, 3811, 3821, 3831, 3841, 3851, 3861, 3871, and 3881.
Plant B services:
39th Street numbers 3511, 3521, 3531, 3541, 3551, 3641, 3631, 3621, 3611, and 3601.
Porter Street 3896, 3888, 3880, 3872, 3864, and 3856.
3891 Newark St
Plant C services:
39th Street numbers 3701, 3711, 3721, 3731, and 3741.
Rodman Street 3880, 3870, 3860, and 3850.
38th Street 3690, 3680, 3670, 3660, 3620, 3610, and 3600,
Porter Street 3851, 3861, 3871, 3881, and 3891.
Plant D services:
39th Street numbers 3540, 3530, 3520, 3510, 3500, 3650, 3640, 3630, 3620, 3610, and
3600.
Langley Court all addresses.
Plant E services:
39th Street numbers 3470, 3460, 3450, 3440, 3430, 3420, 3410, and 3400.
Plant F services: Buildings 1-8
Rodman Street numbers 3801, 3807, 3815, 3823, 3831, 3839, 3847, 3855, 3863, 3871,
3879, 3887, and 3895.
39th Street numbers 3801, 3811, 3821, 3850, 3840, 3830, 3820, 3810, 3800, 3770, 3760,
3750, 3740, 3730, 3720, 3710, and 3700.
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Attachment B: What Contractors Should Know
If work needs to be performed on the heat pump in a unit, the contractor performing
the work should be given the following information:

The heating and air conditioning unit is a water source heat pump. Note that not all
heating and air conditioning contractors work on water source heat pumps. If you need
assistance in finding a qualified contractor, call the management office (202-966-9780).

There is no specific drainage system for the water that is in the heat pump and
associated pipes. During replacement of heat pumps or shut off valves, water in the
system should be drained into the water heater's drain or poured with buckets into the
bathtub or toilet.

If the shut off valves for the loop water have to be replaced, or are not trusted (due to
condition) to fully isolate the unit’s pipes from the loop, the loop must be isolated for
the whole entry way (and sometimes the building) in which the apartment unit is
located and the water in the pipes must be drained. Draining the pipes may take a day
or longer, depending on the location of the unit. Call the management office (202-9669780) to arrange for shutting off the loop water. Failure to do so most likely will result
in severe damage to the unit and those below it.
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Attachment C: Pictures of the Plants and their Equipment
Figure 8. Inside a Plant. Lightest blue pipes are for cold water, darker blue pipes for hot
water.
Figure 9. Cold water heat exchanger.
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Figure 10. Boiler provides heated water.
Figure 11. Electric motors power the pumps that circulate the water in the loops.
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Figure 12. Electronic controls and Internet connections provide for remote monitoring of
plant operations.
Figure 13. Cooling tower fans.
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Figure 14. Pipes bring heated water after use to cool units to cooling tower.
During cooling season,
PVC pipes return heated
water to the top of the
cooling tower.
Cooled water is returned
to plant to use to cool
units.
Figure 15. Electric motors power cooling fans.
Electric motor.
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Figure 16. Inside the cooling tower – grille removed for visibility.
Water cascades (drops)
from the top. Water is
cooled by contact with air
and evaporation of water.
Cooled water
accumulates at bottom
and is pumped into the
plant.
Figure 17. More cooling tower pipes and grille.
Grille lets air to be
drawn in by the
fans. Keeps water
in, objects out.
Meter, used to measure
water consumption.
Make-up water line.
Pipes for overflows and
emptying cooling tower.
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Attachment D. Cross Reference of Addresses to Plants and Buildings
A map of the buildings’ location and address is at the end of this attachment.
Address
Address
No.
Street
Bldg.
Units
Plant
No.
3410
38th St
3420
3440
Street
19
A421-F426
Plant A
3901
Langley Ct
38th St
19
A415 -F420
Plant A
3911
38th St
18
A409-F414
Plant A
3921
3450
38th St
18
A403 -F408
Plant A
3600
38th St
12
A271-F276
3610
38th St
12
A265 -F270
3620
38th St
12
3660
38th St
3670
3680
Bldg.
Units
Plant
25
A553 -F558
Plant D
Langley Ct
25
A559 -F564
Plant D
Langley Ct
25
A565 -F570
Plant D
3930
Langley Ct
28
A637 -F642
Plant D
Plant C
3931
Langley Ct
25
A571-F576
Plant D
Plant C
3940
Langley Ct
28
A631-F636
Plant D
A259-F264
Plant C
3941
Langley Ct
25
A577 -F582
Plant D
11
A253 -F258
Plant C
3950
Langley Ct
28
A625 -F630
Plant D
38th St
11
A247 -F252
Plant C
3951
Langley Ct
26
A583 -F588
Plant D
38th St
11
A241-F246
Plant C
3960
Langley Ct
27
A619 -F624
Plant D
3690
38th St
11
A235 -F240
Plant C
3961
Langley Ct
26
A589 -F594
Plant D
3400
39th St
31
A715 -F720
Plant E
3970
Langley Ct
27
A613 - F618
Plant D
3410
39th St
31
A709 -F714
Plant E
3971
Langley Ct
26
A595 -F600
Plant D
3420
39th St
31
A703 -F708
Plant E
3980
Langley Ct
27
A607 -F612
Plant D
3430
39th St
30
A697 -F702
Plant E
3990
Langley Ct
27
A601-F606
Plant D
3440
39th St
30
A691-F696
Plant E
3801
Newark St
19
A427 -F432
Plant A
3450
39th St
30
A685 -F690
Plant E
3811
Newark St
19
A433 -F438
Plant A
3460
39th St
30
A679 -F684
Plant E
3821
Newark St
20
A439-F444
Plant A
3470
39th St
30
A673 -F678
Plant E
3831
Newark St
20
A445 -F450
Plant A
3500
39th St
29
A667 -F672
Plant D
3841
Newark St
20
A451-F456
Plant A
3510
39th St
29
A661-F666
Plant D
3851
Newark St
20
A457 -F462
Plant A
3511
39th St
22
A487 -F492
Plant B
3861
Newark St
21
A463 -F468·
Plant A
3520
39th St
29
A655 -F660
Plant D
3871
Newark St
21
A469-F474
Plant A
3521
39th St
22
A493 -F498
Plant B
3881
Newark St
21
A475 -F480
Plant A
3530
39th St
29
A649-F654
Plant D
3891
Newark St
22
A481-F486
Plant B
3531
39th St
22
A499-F504
Plant B
3816
Porter St
18
A397 -F402
Plant A
3540
39th St
29
A643 -F648
Plant D
3824
Porter St
18
A391-F396
Plant A
3541
39th St
22
A505 -F510
Plant B
3832
Porter St
17
A385-F390
Plant A
3551
39th St
22
A511 - F516
Plant B
3840
Porter St
17
A379-F384
Plant A
3600
39th St
24
A547 -F552
Plant D
3848
Porter St
17
A373 -F378
Plant A
3601
39th St
14
A331-F336
Plant B
3851
Porter St
13
A277 -F282
Plant C
3610
39th St
24
A541-F546
Plant D
3856
Porter St
16
A367 -F372
Plant B
3611
39th St
14
A325 -F330
Plant B
3861
Porter St
13
A283 -F288
Plant C
3620
39th St
24
A535 -F540
Plant D
3864
Porter St
16
A361-F366
Plant B
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Version 1.0 May 21, 2013
Address
Address
No.
Street
Bldg.
Units
Plant
No.
Street
Bldg.
Units
Plant
3621
39th St
3630
39th St
14
A319-F324
Plant B
23
A529 -F534
Plant D
3871
Porter St
3872
Porter St
13
A289 -F294
Plant C
16
A355 -F360
Plant B
3631
39th St
14
A313 -F318
Plant B
3880
Porter St
15
A349 -F354
Plant B
3640
39th St
23
A523 -F528
Plant D
3881
Porter St
13
A295 -F300
Plant C
3641
39th St
3650
39th st
14
A307-F312
23
A517 -F522
Plant B
3888
Porter St
15
A343 -F348
Plant B
Plant D
3891
Porter St
13
A301-F306
Plant C
3700
39th St
8
A175-F180
Plant F
3896
Porter St
15
A337 -F342
Plant B
3701
39th St
3710
39th St
9
A181 - F186
Plant C
3801
Rodman St
1
AI-F6
Plant F
8
A169 - F174
Plant F
3807
Rodman St
1
A7 -F12
Plant F
3711
39th St
9
A187 - F192
Plant C
3815
Rodman St
1
A13 - FI8
Plant F
3720
39th St
8
A163 - F168
Plant F
3823
Rodman St
1
AI9 -F24
Plant F
3721
39th St
9
A193 - F198
Plant C
3831
Rodman St
1
A25-F30
Plant F
3730
39th St
8
A157 - F162
Plant F
3839
Rodman St
2
A31-F36
Plant F
3731
39th St
9
A199 -F204
Plant C
3847
Rodman St
2
A37 -F42
Plant F
3740
39th St
7
A151 - F156
Plant F
3850
Rodman St
10
A229 -F234
Plant C
3741
39th St
9
A205 -F210
Plant C
3855
Rodman St
2
A43 -F48
Plant F
3750
39th St
7
AI45 - FI50
Plant F
3860
Rodman St
10
A223 -F228
Plant C
3760
39th St
7
A139 - FI44
Plant F
3863
Rodman St
2
A49-F54
Plant F
3770
39th St
7
AI33 -F138
Plant F
3870
Rodman St
10
A217 -F222
Plant C
3800
39th St
6
A127 -F132
Plant F
3871
Rodman St
3
A55 -F60
Plant F
3801
39th St
4
A79-F84
Plant F
3879
Rodman St
3
A61-F66
Plant F
3810
39th St
6
A121-F126
Plant F
3880
Rodman St
10
A211 - F216
Plant C
3811
39th St
4
A85 -F90
Plant F
3887
Rodman St
3
A67 -F72
Plant F
3820
39th St
6
AI15 -F120
Plant F
3895
Rodman St
3
A73 -F78
Plant F
3821
39th St
4
A91-F96
Plant F
3830
39th St
5
AI09 -F114
Plant F
3840
39th St
5
AI03 -FI08
Plant F
3850
39th St
5
A97 -FI02
Plant F
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Version 1.0 May 21, 2013
Figure 18. Map with Buildings Identified
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