Respect The Game Handbook

MPSSAA
Respect The Game
Handbook
For S tu d e n t -A t h l e te s, C r e a te d B y S tu d e n t - At h l e t e s
Leadership
Community Service
Responsi bi lity
Te a m w o r k
Honor
Pride
Respect
Sportsmanship
MPSSAA .ORG
The website home of the MPSSAA features a
Respect The Game page with downloadable logos,
public service announcements, public address
announcements and upcoming events with
information on ways you can contribute to
sportsmanship in Maryland High School
Athletics. Get involved and
Never Forget To Respect the Game.
Table of
Contents
Respect the Game
MPSSAA.ORG......................................................IFC
Letter From The MPSSAA Executive Director................1
Table of Contents ..................................................2
Respect The Game Section
Student-Athlete Code of Conduct ........................3
What I Wish My Parents Knew ............................4
What I Wish My Coaches Knew ............................5
What is a Student-Athlete ..................................6
Student-Athletes In Their Own Words ..................7
What We Learn From Participating ....................8-9
Being a Role Model..........................................10
Being a Leader ..............................................11
Making The Call ..............................................12
Respect The Game - Student-Athlete ..................13
Resources
Quotes..........................................................14
Knowing the Facts ..........................................15
What Can I Do ..............................................16
MPSSAA 2008-09 Sportsmanship Winners ..........IBC
Credits: All material produced by the office of the MPSSAA with the majority of content composed by the MPSSAA Student Leadership Delegation of Martha Jacobs (Baltimore Polytechnic HS), Paige Puller (Kenwood HS), Lyndse Hokanson (South River HS),
Courtney Jarvis (Westlake HS), Joshua Yates (North East HS) and Alex Eckard (Linganore HS). The student leadership delegation is pictured on the front cover in green shirts from their community service project at the NFHS National Student Leadership
Conference. Cover and page layouts by Andy Warner, Assistant Director of the MPSSAA. Photo credits to George Smith. All
quotes on page 7 and the back cover are from written responses in the 2007 MPSSAA Sportsmanship Survey.
Never Forget To Respect the Game
Student-Athletes
Code of Conduct
Created By Student-Athletes, For Student-Athletes
R e s p e c t our diversity
Embracing diversity is everyone’s responsibility and obligation. Respect all individuals regardless
of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual nature or religious beliefs. Comments, slurs, innuendos, gestures or actions that degrade anyone are not to be tolerated.
When you don’t respect others you don’t respect yourself
R e s p e c t being a student-athlete
Being a student-athlete carries responsibilities because you represent yourself, family, school and
community. As a highly visible program in your school, your academic success is also reflected in
your athletic success. Taking pride in academics is as important as taking pride in athletics.
A complete student-athlete excels in the classroom and on the playing field
R e s p e c t those who make the games possible
Without those who make the games possible there would be no games. Treat officials, coaches,
administrators and parents with the respect they deserve for offering their time to make the sports
we play possible.
Participation in athletics is not a right; it’s a privilege bestowed by those who make it possible
R e s p e c t yourself and your visibility
The most important eyes on you may not be the ones you see. Respect your responsibility as a
role model because you may have a crucial role in someone’s life and not even know it.
Remember your actions speak louder than words and be cognizant that others are watching
R e s p e c t the game’s integrity
If your opponent plays dirty it is not an excuse to retaliate. Respect your commitment to playing
the game and not dirty play. Stay focused on doing your best instead of bringing down others.
You can’t get ahead trying to get even
R e s p e c t the essence of winning
Respect your opponents in victory because one day you will be in their shoes. Be humble in victory and mindful of your opponent’s efforts and dedication. Without opponents there are no games.
Being humble speaks for itself
R e s p e c t the opportunities provided
The opportunities to participate in athletics are not rights but rather a privilege unmatched in any
other country in the world. Be mindful that the game is bigger than anyone and that representing
ones community and school is a privilege that should not be taken lightly.
The name on the front is more impor tant than the name on the back of the jersey
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
What I Wish My Parents Knew About
Me Participating in High School Athletics
I W i s h M y Pa r e n t s
thought twice before they make the comments they do because they don’t know that the person who knocked me over may have just sincerely apologized.
They don’t know they may be just trying to keep up after coming back from an injury. They don’t
know that the only reason they may be playing is just to make friends and have fun.
I W i s h M y Pa r e n t s remembered that everyone playing is someone’s child,
someone’s sibling and someone’s friend and when they make the comments they do; it is the
mother, father, brother, sister or friend that are the ones that hear them. What if another parent
was criticizing me, how would you feel and what would you say?
I W i s h M y Pa r e n t s would leave their egos at the gate when they pay to come
watch me play. I don’t play to relive their memories but to make my own and in return all I ask for
is their support.
I W i s h M y Pa r e n t s knew that when they yell at the coach or the official they
are not helping me, but rather hurting me. It is embarrassing, a distraction, and encourages everyone else to act with the same poor sportsmanship behavior they are projecting.
I W i s h M y P a r e n t s remember that they are a direct representation of our
school and community. What they do sets a standard for expectations of our fans and players. Any
and every action has a reaction and the negative ones by them create a poor standard for all of
us. Welcoming and treating opponent’s parents and fans the same as they want to be treated
when we play at their site sets far more of an example than any comment during the game.
I W i s h M y Pa r e n t s remember that I am a reflection of them and they are one
of me. We both create an image that the other has to live with. Respect the fact that I want to be
respected.
I W i s h M y Pa r e n t s knew that the stress that they put on us after practice may
affect future performances. When we are fatigued, it takes understanding by our parents that we
are putting our best effort forward all the time, and that we just need their encouragement not their
criticism.
I W i s h M y Pa r e n t s understood that school is still a big priority even though ath-
Respect the Game
letics are important. Athletics are not what is going to get me into college, but rather my achievements inside the classroom matched with what I learn outside the classroom.
Student Athletes
What I Wish My Coaches Knew About
Me Participating in High School Athletics
I W i s h M y C o a c h e s knew we cling to their actions and listen to their every word.
How they treat others becomes a direct reflection on how we treat others. When they don’t act with
sportsmanship, respect, or make ethical decisions they are not the positive role model we need.
I W i s h M y C o a c h e s knew that we have more responsibility than just sports
and we need their understanding and guidance to help balance our lives instead of adding stress.
I W i s h M y C o a c h e s knew fear is an unacceptable way to coach and that their
players will trust and appreciate them more if they treated them with respect instead of yelling
and degrading them.
I W i s h M y C o a c h e s understood that they are more than just a coach of X’s and
O’s but rather a coach in everything we do. We look up to them as our leader, our inspiration, our
mentor, and our teacher. They show us the skills and tools we need to be successful on and off
the field, and we implement what they show us whenever and wherever we can.
I W i s h M y C o a c h e s realized the field is also the classroom for teaching us
more important things that will take us far in life. Characteristics that they demonstrate are ones
that we look to recreate in everyday life. What they show us creates for better human beings not
just better athletes. They are not just our coach; They are our role models.
I W i s h M y C o a c h e s realized the messages they are sending when their actions
are marred by the notion of only winning. Do they really want us to see them yelling at the referee?
Do they want us to hear them degrading the other coach? Do they want us to learn that fouling is
the way to get ahead? They want us to listen to them but are they even sending the right message? We look up to them and respect them, but when they look back at us and see their poorer
qualities do they realize that is a reflection on them? Remember coach, we are always watching
you.
I W ish My Coaches
remember that this is our school, our community’s team
and that is who we represent. Lead the way in a manner that would make us and our family proud.
Foster a give and take relationship so that you can learn from us and we can learn from you. Being
our coach means being the father or mother figure that has to make the tough decisions, but always the right ones because that is what is best for us in the big picture.
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
What is a Student-Athlete
Which statement is true?
High school sports are a privilege provided to the student because of the
accomplishments in the classroom?
OR
Student-athletes higher achievement levels in the classroom are directly
related to the life skills learned from their athletic participation?
The answer is both statements are true because anyway you look at it;
Student-Athlete is the ultimate balanced equation!!!
Being
a
student-athlete
involves realizing that you must maintain a strong work
ethic and devotion to both sides of the equation. After all, one does not exist without the other.
Being
a student-athlete means understanding that priorities come before privileges.
Being
a
student-athlete
means acting with integrity, following all rules and codes
of conduct and exhibiting good sportsmanship, even when others do not.
Being
a
student-athlete
means practicing good time management and realizing that
a commitment to excellence in both athletics and academics is important to achieve in either.
Being
a
student-athlete
means understanding the balance of the student-athlete
equation.
•
•
•
A student-athlete is able to uphold the same high expectations to perform in
their respective sports as is required in maintaining grade point averages.
A student-athlete understands their performance in the classroom leads to
their ability to perform on the field or court.
A student-athlete
realizes what they learn from participating can be applied to
how they approach learning in the classroom.
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
In Yo u r O w n W o r d s
The following are quotes directly from student-athletes in the state. These responses
were given during the MPSSAA spor tsmanship sur vey administered in the spring of
2007.
“To respect the game means to play the game by the rules, how the game was intended to be played. Respecting the game also means to respect the opposing team
and your own team. Along with respecting the teams, it also means to play with your
head and heart and skill, not by foul play and taunting.” - MPSSAA Student- Athlete
“Respect the game means to me that you should play the game in as mature and responsible way as possible and have fun doing so. You shouldn’t berate anyone playing, coaching or officiating.” - MPSSAA Student- Athlete
“Respect the game to me means that you must respect your surroundings and the
opposing team as well as fans. Be very kind and make sure that you are representing your team, school and/or association well.” - MPSSAA Student- Athlete
“Respect the game means much more than respecting just the game. It means respecting your coach, teammates, opponents, and especially yourself. You need to
have good sportsmanship while participating in any sport, whether it’s not speaking
while they shoot, or wishing them good luck. Respect is a huge part of the game. Nobody can enjoy themselves without it and that’s the real purpose why we’re all playing in the first place, right?” - MPSSAA Student- Athlete
“Respect the game means to play it how our primitive ancestors meant the game to
be played – with dignity and for the love of it.” - MPSSAA Student-Athlete
“The referees, the facilities, the entire game is a privilege to play. The competition we
all love is based upon certain things and those things should be respected.” - MPSSAA
Student- Athlete
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
What We Learn From Participating
Attitude
Everything that we approach in life requires a strong mind and the right sense of mind. Sports are the
true test of who has an attitude that leads to success.
Belief
Achieving in high school sports gives student athletes the ability to believe in themselves, and with
belief comes further success.
The chain is infectious.
Character
Balance
Student-Athletes learn that the key to being an effective member of this group is to keep in mind that
you can’t have a great deal of success on one side
without the other. Sports reinforces the skills that
allow us to become strong in the classroom, but we
can’t gain those skills without first dedicating ourselves wholly to succeeding in the classroom.
Courage
Chemistr y
All high school sports are team
Sports not only build character,
Student-athletes recognize that
they reveal what is within us. We
they must develop the ability to sports. They involve the hard work
and determination of every athlearn that finding the right charac- sense fear, and then pursue onlete on the team. At the end of
ter leads to making the right deciward. Recognizing fear yet still
the day, it takes a sense of knowsions even when no one is
daring to risk failure is what
watching.
makes a student-athlete mentally ing that the team is bigger than
you. Through high school athletready to compete, at anything in
ics, all players must learn to coinlife.
cide with others of different skill
levels.
Determination
High school athletes
learn to be driven, and
goal minded. In any
sport, every athlete must
share a common goal in
order for their team to
achieve. It is the determination of each athlete
to meet challenges and
conquer them that creates successful human
beings.
Dedication
The most successful student-athletes are those
that commit their entire
being to what they do.
Whether it is three
sports, four clubs and
three honors classes; the
only person that will be
able to successfully manage the stresses of high
school athletics is the
one who dedicates their
self to giving 100% in
everything they do. When
we cheat one thing, we
cheat everything. We
must give our all in everything we do.
Desire
With determination, student athletes internalize
a subconscious characteristic of desire. This
competitive fire to
achieve is another facet
of a successful studentathlete’s continual strife
for excellence. If any high
school athlete thinks that
they have reached the ultimate point of success,
and find no need to keep
going, they have lost one
of the most important
pieces to the puzzle.
Going for what they want
makes any person more
successful than those
that just wait.
Discipline
Disciplined athletes display discipline even when
people aren’t looking. It
is this discipline that we
learn from being with
other teammates and
witnessing the success
of other teams. We learn
that through the discipline of others we can
become disciplined ourselves and do what is
necessary to achieve.
Most of the time, this
sense of looking after
ourself is not evident
until we are tested. Then
we find out who has the
proper character
Student Athletes
What We Learn From Participating
Ability to handle Adversity
Accountability
Attitude
Balance
Belief
Character
Chemistry
Collaboration
Communication
Confidence
Control
Cooperation
Courage
Dedication
Desire
Determination
Discipline
Goals
Good Decisions
Hard work
Heart
Honesty
Humility
In c l u s i o n
In d e p e n d e n c e
In t e g r i t y
Kindness
Leadership
Pride
Priorities
Respect
Responsibility
Sacrifice
Selflessness
Sportsmanship
Success
Te a m w o r k
Te a m s p i r i t
Ti m e m a n a g e m e n t
Tr u s t
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
Being a Role Model
As a student-athlete you are already a role model whether you know it or not. In representing your school and community, you become a role model for underclassman
who will be standing in your position in the not to distant future and for the little kids
who one day dream of wearing the same jersey’s you don. Taking pride in this privilege means setting the stage for leaving the programs you are so passionate about
playing in a better position then when you found them.
Being
a
Role
Model
is leading by example and being cognizant of your actions because the most important eyes on you may not be the ones you see. It is being able to not only
tell others what is right but to show them.
Being
a
Role
Model
means understanding your place in society and honoring your
opportunities to do what’s right even if nobody is watching.
Being a Role Model is taking pride in your position on the team, giving your all even
in times of despair and doing so with honor, respect and integrity.
Being
a
Role
Model
is doing what you’re supposed to without complaints or selfishness and demonstrating positive values.
Being
a
Role
Model
means you are showing someone good things that can maybe
change someone’s life.
Being
a
Role
Model
is setting standards and living by those standards in everything
you do.
Being a Role Model means making tough decisions regardless how popular they may
be. It is doing the right thing because that is the right thing to do.
Being
a
Role
Model
is understanding you can’t get ahead trying to get even and taking your actions to a level above dirty and unfair play.
Being
a
Role
Model
is realizing true victory is accomplished through doing what’s
ethically right.
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
Being a Leader
Student-Athletes embracing the leadership role they hold in their school is a crucial
par t of interscholastic athletics. A leader is not an honor solely bestowed on selected
team captains but a responsibility of all student-athletes. Accepting this responsibility encourages others to follow in your footsteps toward projecting an environment
that honors respect for all those that play and make the games possible.
Being a Leader is a privilege that comes with numerous responsibilities and a full com-
mitment to those responsibilities. It is being able to follow your heart and to stand up for what is
right.
Being a Leader is understanding your actions and words have consequences and using
that knowledge to set good examples for others to follow.
Being a Leader is keeping your team and their chemistry together even amidst defeat
or adversity.
Being a Leader means you understand the true meaning and effects of sportsman-
ship, responsibility, positive attitudes, integrity and honesty.
Being a Leader a means being a motivator and always having a positive view.
Being a Leader is also being a servant. Make sure you look out and respect your fellow teammates and opponents. This will earn you their trust and respect.
Being a Leader means empowering those around you to make good decisions through
examples of graciousness in defeat and humility in victory.
Being a Leader takes having pride in yourself, understanding the responsibility of hav-
ing others follow in your path. This includes having pride in your actions, your words, your decisions
on and off the field, and the manner with which you carry yourself.
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
W h e n t h e Ti m e C o m e s ,
Are you Ready to make the call...
As a student-athlete, there will be many times when you will be faced to make tough
decisions, sometimes at the spur of the moment. When the time comes are you ready
to make the right call.
It is the preseason and you know that a friend trying out for your team no longer lives
in your school district making them ineligible. If your coach finds out after the season
starts, you know he/she is going to have to report the ineligible player and you will
end up forfeiting any games the player participates in, possibly jeopardizing your
team’s season. - - - Your Call
You are being stretched out like a rubber band with trying to prioritize school, athletics and work. You feel there is so much expected out of you from your parents, coach,
friends, boss and teachers. You have a big test next week and your coach schedules
an extra practice and you are also schedule to work at the same time. - - - Your Call
You are in the middle of a big game when a player on the opposing team takes a cheap
shot at you. Everyone sees it except for the officials who were following the play down
the field. - - - Your Call
Last season, after a game with a rival high school someone broke into your school’s
stadium and vandalized the new turf field. Although nothing was proven, everyone believes it was players from the rival team who committed the deed. Heading into this
year’s contest, you overhear some of your teammates planning retaliation. - - - Your
Call
You realize as the season goes on that some of your fellow upperclassmen have been
treating the rookies harshly, making them carry their bags, clean up after them and
constantly making fun of them. It has gotten to the point where you overhear the rookies talking about quitting. - - - Your Call
Respect the Game
Student Athletes
Respect the Game
• R e s p e c t your opponents as fellow athletes and
worthy competitors; like you, they have worked hard to
represent their school.
• R e s p e c t your teammates. Everyone makes a contribution to the team in his or her own way. Respect
everyone’s effort.
• R e s p e c t your coaches for their efforts in molding
the team that represents your school.
• R e s p e c t officials for their efforts in keeping the
game within a set of boundaries. Recognize that a
neutral observer of an event will not always agree with
your perceptions.
• R e s p e c t yourself. What you do is a reflection on
you, your school and your family.
Never Forget To Respect the Game
Quotes
If it is a cliché to say athletics build character as well as muscle, then I subscribe to the cliché.
– Gerald Ford, 38th President
I’ve never known anybody to achieve anything without overcoming adversity.
– Lou Holtz, Football Coach
The values learned on the playing field – how to set goals, endure, take criticism and risks,
become team players, use our beliefs, stay healthy, and deal with stress – prepare us for life.
– Donna de Varona, Olympic Champion Swimmer
The glory of sport comes from dedication, determination, and desire. Achieving success and
personal glory has less to do with wins and losses than it does with learning how to prepare
yourself so that at the end of the day you know there was nothing more you could have done to
reach your ultimate goal.
– Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Olympic Track and Field Gold Medalist
“One man practicing good sportsmanship is far better than 50 others preaching it.”
– Knute Rockne, Football Coach
Sports create a bond between contemporaries that lasts a lifetime. It also gives your life
structure, discipline, and a genuine, sincere, pure fulfillment that few other areas of endeavor
provide.
– Bob Cousy, Hall of Fame Basketball Player
Sports gives us the ability to test ourselves mentally, physically, and emotionally in a way no
other aspect of life can. For many who struggle with fitting in or our identity, sports gives us our
first face of confidence. That first bit of confidence can be a gateway to many other great things.
– Dan O’Brien, Olympic Track and Field Athlete
Individual commitment to a group effort - that is what makes a team work, a company work, a
society work, a civilization work. -- Vince Lombardi, Football Coach
Respect the Game
Know the Facts
Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond
the High School Interscholastic Level
Student-Athletes
Men's
Basketball
Women's
Basketball
Football
Baseball
Men's
Ice Hockey
Men's
Soccer
High School Student Athletes
546,335
452,929
1,071,775
470,671
36,263
358,935
High School
Senior Student
Athletes
156,096
129,408
306,221
134,477
10,361
102,553
NCAA Student
Athletes
16,571
15,096
61,252
28,767
3,973
19,793
NCAA Freshman
Roster Positions
4,735
4,313
17,501
8,219
1,135
5,655
NCAA Senior
Student Athletes
3,682
3,355
13,612
6,393
883
4,398
NCAA Student
Athletes Draf ted
44
32
250
600
33
76
Percent High
School to NCAA
3.0%
3.3%
5.7%
6.1%
11.0%
5.5%
Percent NCAA to
Professional
1.2%
1.0%
1.8%
9.4%
3.7%
1.7%
Percent High
School to
Professional
0.03%
0.02%
0.08%
0.45%
0.32%
0.07%
Note: These percentages are based on estimated data and should be considered approximations of
the actual percentages. Information was last updated in February, 2007 and can be found at
NCAA.org in the websites athletics and academics section.
Student-Athletes
What Can I Do
There are many different actions we can take to both prevent problems and promote good citizenship. Some of the most powerful actions we can take are individual and involve only ourselves or those closest to us. Other actions can be taken within our existing teams or groups
and involve creating or becoming involved in new groups or organizations in our school and
community. Either individually or with other student and adult leaders you can make a difference by doing your part to promote a “Culture of Class”.
Individual
-
Role model good sportsmanship
Helping opponents to their feet after a fall during a game.
Shaking hands and congratulating opponents
Encourage your parents to display good sportsmanship
Welcome officials with a handshake prior to the game and thank them afterwards.
Speak to younger students about the expectations of good sportsmanship at your school.
Organize group and team activities to build team chemistry.
-
Write and design your own team’s public service announcement to be read prior to the start of your home
games addressing your expectations as participants for the conduct of fans and spectators.
Develop a captain’s program where each team’s captains meet regularly to discuss leadership, sportsmanship and how to instill those values in their teams.
Develop student-athlete clubs that focus on welcoming opponents, creating sportsmanship initiatives, developing leadership and team building programs and focusing on working with the community including
doing community service projects.
Contribute to school paper or booster club newsletter with feature articles about sportsmanship, citizenship and expectations from student-athletes of spectators at events.
-
Team/School
County/Regional
Develop a student-athlete advisory committee with school administration or local school system to organize leadership workshops and develop and revise policies/codes that affect student-athletes.
Work as an ambassador or partake in the award ceremonies at county and regional championships.
My Action Plan
Action Plan For (describe the action or activity)__________________________________________________
When will this take place?_____________________________ Where?______________________________
Tasks: What needs to be done to carry out this activity?
Responsibilities: Who will make sure that it happens?
2008-09 MPSSAA
S t a t e To u r n a m e n t
Sportsmanship A ward W inners
Volleyball ........................River Hill
Boy’s Soccer ....................Boonsboro
Girl’s Soccer..................Bethesda-CC
Football ..........................Linganore
Boy’s Basketball ....Frederick Douglass
Girl’s Basketball ................River Hill
Baseball ............................Fallston
Softball ......................North Carroll
Boy’s Lacrosse ................South River
Girl’s Lacrosse ....................Fallston
Never Forget To Respect the Game.
What Does Respect the Game Mean To You?
“Respect The Game” means that the rules of
hte game are applied and adhered to by all
concerned. The referees, players and
coaches all follow the rules of the game. If
the coaches and players set this standard
and adhere to it, I believe the fans will follow suit.
--- MPSSAA Parent
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“Respect The Game” is understanding that
any game presents unique “teachable moments” that are difficult to find anywhere
else for our kids. It means allowing coaches
to teach sportsmanship, how to deal with
failure and what it means to be a team member when you might have to sacrifice the “I”
for the “We”. --- MPSSAA Administrator
“Respect The Game” means that everyone involved in
a contest whether a player, coach or fan must adhere
to conduct that does not take away from the spirit of
fair play. Respect must be demonstrated by each participant or spectator--- MPSSAA Principal