efficient powr factor correction for multipulse bridgeless

International Research Journal of Engineering and Technology (IRJET)
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Volume: 04 Issue: 07 | July -2017
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EFFICIENT POWR FACTOR CORRECTION FOR MULTIPULSE BRIDGELESS
ACTIVE BOOST CONVERTER 3 PHASE AC-DC CONVERTER
Bishnu Kumari Prajapati1, Dr. Jyoti Shrivastava2
Bishnu Kumari Prajapati Student, Electrical Engineering power system, Sam Higginbottom University Of
Agriculture ,Technology And Sciences, Uttar Pradesh, India.
2Dr.Jyoti Shrivastava senior Assistant Professor, Name of the Electrical Engineering, Sam Higginbottom University
Of Agriculture ,Technology And Sciences, Uttar Pradesh, India.
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Abstract - In our daily life, we find various application of
the power supplies, regulators etc. All the electrical and
electronic appliances require high QoS power supplies. The
Power factor is an important measure of the power quality
being provided to the user end. Thus, this parameter needs
to be controlled and losses are to be minimized. In this work,
we have presented a modified PFC Boost converter with
bridgeless AC to DC converter for Multi-Pulse systems. We
have designed, implemented and simulated the results for
the 24-Pulse converter topology for Three phase AC to DC
rectifier systems. We have shown using our proposed
technique and topology, the power factor has been increased
from 0.715 to 0.982 as compared to the conventional 24Pulse rectifier model. We have implemented the design and
all the simulation through MATLAB-SIMULINK model and
design verified by SIMPOWERSYSTEM toolbox of SIMULINK.
Key Words: Rectifier, 24-pulse converter, Power Factor,
Boost Converter, Multi-pulse systems
1. INTRODUCTION
In AC Transmission lines, the power factor is very important
parameter of Quality of Service. The major power losses are
due to low power factor. Thus, it needs to be controlled in a
very efficient manner. Thus, the need for a very efficient
power factor correction models needs to be developed.
Thus, maintaining the power factor for the (90-400V) is very
difficult. The utilities will always demand for high power
factor and low THD. Several topologies have been introduced
conventionally in this area.
The rectifier circuits find a lot of applications in the
electronics and electrical loads. We need to use it as power
supply for various critical DC loads like DC Motor,
Electronics appliances etc.
Thus, we need to develop the circuitry that can improve the
power factor of the supply. Power factor of the supply lower
in presence of the various non-linear loads, reactive loads
and losses in the systems due to this. Thus, Power factor
correction is a very important technique used for controlling
the power factor of the input AC Supply and thus
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maintaining the good Quality of service in the transmission
systems.
The main reasons for the power losses in AC-DC converter is
due to high switching losses, their non-linearity and
simultaneous switching losses and noises arising due to it.
To reduce the harmonic distortions, the various multi-pulse
topologies have been utilized. The various pulse converters
like 6-pulse, 12-pulse, 24-pulse converters are been applied
to the various power supplies. These techniques are found to
very efficient for the converter design.
In our proposed design, we introduce a bridgeless AC-DC
boost converter for boosting the PFC of the 24-pulse rectifier
systems. We have implemented the design on the MATLABSIMULINK.
Here, the bridgeless topology has been presented. It based
on the three phase 220V /50 Hz supply. The diode based 24pulse bridgeless active boost converter has been presented
here. Thus, EMI inductor has also been added. Our design is
compared with the conventional 24-pulse AC to DC
converter (bridge-based). It is proved by the results , that the
method proposed by us for the proposed load has improved
the power factor of the power supply systems.
2. Bridgeless PFC Boost Converter
In the previous boost topology, current flows through two of
the bridge diodes in series, whereas, in the bridgeless power
factor correction configuration, current flows through only
one diode and the return path is provided by Power
MOSFET. When S2 switches off, energy stored in inductor is
released and the current flows through D2, through the load
and back to the mains through the body diode of switch
S1.Thus, in each half line cycle, one of the MOSFET operates
as an active switch and the other one operates as a diode.
The difference between the bridgeless PFC and conventional
PFC is that in bridgeless PFC converter the inductor current
flows through only two semiconductor devices, but in
conventional PFC circuit the inductor current flows through
three semiconductor devices.
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International Research Journal of Engineering and Technology (IRJET)
e-ISSN: 2395-0056
Volume: 04 Issue: 07 | July -2017
p-ISSN: 2395-0072
www.irjet.net
The three-phase output voltages provided by four secondary
winding have the same amplitude and 15º phase shift
between them. The required phase shifts are obtained by
connecting the primary windings in zigzag configuration. Fig.
3 shows the 24-pulse transformer windings connection and
a phasor diagram representing the twelve-phase voltage
system at the transformer output.
Fig.1. Bridgeless boost converter topology for single phase
Fig.3 24-Pulse AC to DC converter systems
Fig.2. Switching cycle of Bridgeless boost converter topology for
single phase.
The bridgeless PFC circuit is shown in Figure 1. The boost
inductor is split and located at the AC side to construct the
boost structure. The equivalent circuit of positive half line
cycle is show in Figure 2. In this half line cycle, MOSFET S1
and boost diode D1, together with the boost inductor
construct a boost DC/DC converter. Meanwhile, MOSFET S2
is operating as a simple diode. The input current is
controlled by the boost converter and following the input
voltage.
Four six-pulse diode bridges are used to convert three phase
output voltages to four dc voltages with 2400 Hz ripple. The
four dc outputs are connected in parallel to the load, through
inter phase inductors, to provide a dc voltage having 9600
Hz ripple. The inter phase inductors are used to limit the
circulating current between secondary and to reduce the
output ripple.
4. Proposed Design
4.1 Conventional 24-pulse rectifier system (3-Phase)
During the other half line cycle, circuit operation as the same
way. Thus, in each half line cycle, one of the MOSFET
operates as active switch and the other one operates as a
diode: both the MOSFETs can be driven by the same signal
3. Multi-Pulse Converter
Multi-pulse rectifiers use various pulse multiplication
schemes to produce the desired pulse number in the input
currents and the output voltages [3], [4]. The
electromagnetic device needed to create the different phase
shifts can be multi-winding transformer or auto-transformer
or a combination of three-phase and single phase
transformers. The windings are then connected together
following particular configuration to obtain the desired
configuration.
Fig.4 Conventional 24-pulse rectifier systems
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Volume: 04 Issue: 07 | July -2017
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Fig.4 shows the conventional model of the 24-pulse rectifier
systems. The system has been designed for 220V/50 Hz
system. Three phase source has been used for the
conversion.Four six-pulse diode bridges are used to convert
three phase output voltages to four dc voltages .The inter
phase inductors are used to limit the circulating current
between secondary and to reduce the output ripple.
5. RESULTS & DISCUSSION
Figure 6 shows the input voltage waveform of the
power supply. It shows 220V /50V RMS three phase
supply. The Table 1 shows all the simulation parameters
of the input supply. The input resistance is found to be 0.01
Ohm and inductance is 1mH.
4.2 Bridgeless 24-pulse Boost converter systems
Fig.6 Input Source Waves
Similarly, Figure 7 shows the current waveform of the input
power supply. The output is connected to the non-linear load
and transformer is being used at the supply.
Fig. 5 Proposed design of bridgeless 24-pulse converter
systems.
Figure 5 shows the propose model for the above bridgeless
converter. The difference between the bridgeless PFC and
conventional PFC is that in bridgeless PFC converter the
inductor current flows through only two semiconductor
devices, but in conventional PFC circuit the inductor current
flows through three semiconductor devices. Thus, three
phase bridgeless converter has been presented.
Fig.7. Current Input Waveform
4.3 Simulation Parameters
Figure 8 represents the 24-pulse converter pulse output
from the 24-pulse converter circuit. It represents four sixpulse diode bridges output combined used to convert three
phase output voltages.
Table 1. Simulation Parameters
Parameters
Values
Input Voltage
Frequency
Source Resistance
Source Inductance
Three phase Transformer Winding 1
Three phase Transformer Winding 2
Three phase Transformer Winding 3
DC Capacitor
220V RMS
50 Hz
0.01 Ohm
1 mH
Delta (D1)
Y
Delta (D11)
1000uF
100
Ohm,
5mH
Output Impedance
Fig.8. 24-pulse conversion output
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International Research Journal of Engineering and Technology (IRJET)
e-ISSN: 2395-0056
Volume: 04 Issue: 07 | July -2017
p-ISSN: 2395-0072
www.irjet.net
Fig.9 DC Output from the 24-Pulse converter output
Simulation Results:
Comparison
Conventional
24-Pulse
Converter
Proposed
Bridgeless
Boost 24-Pulse Converter
Power Factor
0.717
0.982
CONCLUSION
In this work, we have presented a modified PFC Boost
converter with bridgeless AC to DC converter for Multi-Pulse
systems. We have designed, implemented and simulated the
results for the 24-Pulse converter topology for Three phase
AC to DC rectifier systems. We have shown using our
proposed technique and topology, the power factor has been
increased from 0.715 to 0.982 as compared to the
conventional 24-Pulse rectifier model. We have implemented
the design and all the simulation through MATLABSIMULINK model and design verified by SIMPOWERSYSTEM
toolbox of SIMULINK.
[6]. S.M.AshrafulAlam Mohon1,GolamSarowar2, Dr. Md.
Ashraful Hoque3,
M. Bazlur Rashid4, TaniaAnnur” A Novel High Performance
Bridgeless Ac-Dc Boost Converter” e-ISSN: 2320-0847 pISSN : 2320-0936
Volume-5, Issue-8, pp-70-75(2016)
[7]. ChongmingQiao and Keyue M. Smedley, “A Topology
Survey of Single-Stage Power Factor Corrector with a Boost
type InputCurrent-shaper”, 0-7803-5864-3/00/$10.00 02 000 IEEE,
Pg: 460-467.
[8]. SumanDwari, and Leila Parsa, “An Efficient AC–DC StepUp Converter for Low-Voltage Energy Harvesting,” IEEE
transactions
on power electronics, vol. 25, no. 8, august 2010
[9]. S. Dwari, R. Dayal, and L. Parsa, “A novel direct AC/DC
converter for efficient low voltage energy harvesting,”
inProc. IEEE Ind.
Electron. Soc. Annu. Conf., Nov. 2008, pp. 484–488.
[10]. B. Su and Z. Lu, “An interleaved totem-pole boost
bridgeless rectifier with reduced reverse-recovery problems
for power factor
correction,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 25, no. 6,
pp.769-780, June 2010.
BIOGRAPHIES
Bishnu Kumari Prajapati Belong to
Bihar and Received her Bachelor of
Technology degree from Aryabhatta
Knowledge University patna, Bihar in
2015. Now she is pursuing M..Tech in
Electrical Engineering (Power System)
from SHUATS, Allahabad, UP India.
REFERENCES
[1]. D. M. Mitchell, “AC - DC converter having an Improved
Power Factor,” U.S. Patent 4 412 277, Oct. 25, 1983.
[2]. D. Tollik and B. Pietkiewicz, “Comparative Analysis of 1ɸ active Power Factor correction Topologies,” in Proc. Int.
Telecommunication Energy Conf., Oct.
1992, pp. 517–523.
[3]. W.-Y. Choi, J.-M. Kwon, E.-H. Kim, J.-J. Lee, and B.-H.
Kwon, “Bridgeless boost rectifier with low conduction losses
and reduced diode reverse-recovery
problems,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 769–
780, Apr. 2007.
[4]. H. Ye, Z. Yang, J. Dai, C. Yan, X. Xin, and J. Ying, ―Common
mode noise modelling and analysis of dual PFC circuit,‖
International Telecommunication
Energy Conf. (INTELEC) Proc., pp. 575-582, Sep.2004.
[5]. Suja C Rajappan , K. Sarabose , Neetha John”
An Efficient AC/DC Converter with Power Factor
Correction” ISSN 2250-2459, ISO 9001:2008 Certified
Journal, Volume 3, Issue 3, March 2013.
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Dr. Jyoti Shrivastava has done her
graduation in Electrical Engineering
and her post graduation in Design of
Heavy Electrical Equipments. At
present she is serving as an Senior
Assistant Professor in Electrical
Engineering department at college of
Engineering and Technology, SHIATS,
Allahabad, India. She has several
international and National papers to
her credit. Her field of interest and
research are Power system control and
operation, power quality improvement
and condition monitoring of heavy
electrical equipments. Her research
aims to increase Transmission &
Distribution system capacity and
enhancing system reliability.
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