Technical Data
Agfa Professional Films
-1
400
500
In professional photography and creative imaging the main
considerations are quality, continuity and individuality. For
these reasons the films for this area are measured by special
standards. A film only satisfies these high standards if its
performance is above-average. And it will only be accepted if
it achieves this performance with extreme accuracy, consistency and with the maximum reliability. The wide range of
professional applications calls for a correspondingly wide range
of different emulsions, whose characteristics must be designed
exactly for specific areas of use.
Agfa Professional films are specified to satisfy these exceptional standards. They combine the maximum quality with
maximum reliability: optimum colour saturation and tonal
definition, exact contrast ranges, exemplary grey balance, the
finest detail rendition in the critical highlight and shadow
areas, extreme sharpness and fine granularity, and uniform
exposure requirements at short and long exposure times.
Two examples of extremely tight production tolerances:
speed:
± 0.5 DIN = ± 1/6 stop
colour balance:
± 5 CC filter units
is used under license of Agfa-Gevaert AG
Agfacolor Optima 100
Agfacolor Optima 200
Agfacolor Optima 400
Agfacolor Portrait 160
Agfachrome RSX II 50
Agfachrome RSX II 100
Agfachrome RSX II 200
Agfapan APX 100
Agfapan APX 400 *
Agfa Scala 200x
* new generation (as of 2003)
Agfacolor Optima with
EYE VISION technology
A film's colour rendition is governed by a number of factors. The
emulsions' spectral sensitivity or sensitisation is particularly
important, when it comes to reproducing true-to-nature colours
with the maximum accuracy. By means of the EYE VISION
technology incorporated in all the Agfacolor Optima films, it is
now possible to match, to a large extent, the films' sensitisation
to the colour perception of the human eye. The effect is shown
schematically in the following diagrams. The EYE VISION
technology achieves more accurate colour fidelity, and largely
eliminates the colour falsifications present in films with
conventional sensitisation such as:
• an unpleasant green cast with fluorescent light (e.g. neon tubes),
• a shift towards red in certain blue-coloured flowers (hortensia,
clematis, delphinium etc.),
• the brown rendition of particular green fabric colours,
• the absence of texture in certain red colours (e.g. roses).
Spectral sensitivity of the eye
blue
400
450
500
green
red
550
600
650
nm
Spectral sensitivity of the film emulsions
OPTIMA
blue
previously
Sensitivity (speed)
Sensitivity is a measure of the response of a film to light exposure.
The speed of films is based on the minimum exposure required for
producing optimum tone reproduction. It is determined according
to international standards for b&w, colour negative, and colour
reversal films that specify the exposure, chemical processing and
densitometer.
The figure given on the pack applies however to the exposure
time range of 1 s to 1/10 000 s. Absolutely no sensitivity deviations occur with any Agfa films within this range.
Reciprocity effect
The effect of an exposure of silver halide based films to light is
the product of light intensity × time of exposure, i.e. E = l × T.
This reciprocity law (first defined by Bunsen and Roscoe and also
known as the Schwarzschild effect) holds that a 1/100 second
exposure time at a light intensity of 1 lux will yield the same
results as an exposure time of 1 second at 100 lux. However, at
intensities significantly below or above the range in which reciprocity is maintained with a given film, more exposure will be
required to achieve the same result. This is known as reciprocity
failure. With colour films the failure of reciprocity tends to be
different for the blue, green and/or red recording layers resulting
in a shift in colour and colour contrast balance.
Appropriate information about reciprocity failure and the means
for compensation through exposure adjustments and/or use of
colour filters is given in the technical data section.
Colour sensitivity
The spectral sensitivity of Agfa colour negative, colour reversal
and black and white Professional films covers the entire range
of visible radiation.
red
green
Information on the performance characteristics of
Agfa Professional films
Colour balance
400
450
500
550
600
Agfa Professional film range
Agfacolor negative films:
• Optima 100
• Optima 200
• Optima 400
• Portrait 160
Agfachrome reversal films:
• RSX II 50
• RSX II 100
• RSX II 200
Agfapan black and white negative films:
• APX 100
• APX 400
Agfa black and white reversal films:
• Scala 200x
2
650
nm
Daylight has a completely different colour temperature to the
artificial light produced by the halogen and incandescent lamps
common in practice. (An exception is formed by the halogen
metal vapour lamps with daylight characteristics, e.g. Osram
HMI and Philips MSR lights for professional use.)
Colour films detect variations in the colour temperature much
more accurately than the human eye, which receives an overall
colour impression and largely balances the differences. For this
reason colour films have to be sensitised to a certain kind of
subject light, i.e. depending on the film type a particular colour
temperature is fixed as reference white-point during manufacture.
All the Agfacolor and Agfachrome Professional films are matched
to daylight , and are designed for the spectral radiation of mixed
sunlight (colour temperature approx. 5500 Kelvin). Photography
in this type of light does not require filtration, i.e. the results
with all the films have an even, neutral colour balance.
If however the colour temperature of the subject light varies
distinctly, this has to be counteracted for colour reversal films
by camera correction filters, which prevent colour casts.
F-PF-E3
Colour temperature
too high
(> 5 500 K)
too low
(< 5 500 K)
Filter colour
yellow-red
blue
The exposure must also be adjusted depending on the filter
strength.
Light sources and filters
Daylight
Practical correction examples
High colour temperature, e. g. 5700 K
Landscapes, portraits with cloudy sky,
cloudless mountainscapes
Low colour temperature, e. g. 5 300 K
Landscapes, portraits at dawn or dusk
Filter
Correction
81 A
+ 1/3 stop
82 A
+ 1/3 stop
Filter
Photo lamps 3 400 K
Photo lamps 3 200 K
80 B
80 A
Exposure correction
(f-stops)
+ 11/3
+2
Electronic flash
Electronic flash frequently works with a colour temperature of
5500 K (average daylight). There are however equipment and
applications for which the flash tube colour temperature varies
from this average figure. In these cases a test is advisable. Bear
in mind that with longer exposure times the electronic flash
light can be influenced by any other light sources present, so
that a mixed-light situation is created.
Fluorescent tubes
The spectral distribution of radiation of fluorescent light tubes
varies quite considerably according to manufacturer, lamp type
and lamp age. Exact filter information is therefore not possible.
To ensure optimum colour rendition in spite of this, test shots
are advisable.
The following correction figures can only serve as guides for the
right filtration in practice, and apply to colour reversal films.
They are based on results gained by experience. However the
exposure times can be lengthened so much by the filtration that
a further correction is necessary, due to the reciprocity effect.
Fluorescent lamp type
Daylight (D)
White (W)
Cold-white (KW)
Warm-white
Filter
50 R
40 M
20 C + 40 M
40 M + 10 Y
Exposure correction
(f-stops)
+1
+ 2/3
+1
+1
Mixed light
When you take pictures with different light sources, special
attention must be paid to the colour temperature of the main
light source for the correction filtration. The precise colour rendition and – if required – specific colour temperature effects
should definitely be found with test shots.
F-PF-E3
UV-blocking filter
Films are also sensitive to the UV content of daylight. UVblocking filters are therefore often used to prevent colour shifts
and unsharpness. This is unnecessary for all the Agfa Professional colour films, because a UV-blocking layer is already
incorporated in the emulsion. An extra filter is nevertheless
useful to protect the lens against physical damage.
Polarisation filter
Artificial light
Agfa Professional films can also be used in artificial light with
suitable filtration.
Light source
Other filters
This filter is used firstly to cut down reflections, e.g. from glass
or water (not metal), and secondly to create special effects (e.g.
more vivid sky blue). A certain lengthening factor must be applied
to the exposure, depending on the filter type (see the instructions
for use of the camera or filter).
Filters for black and white photography
All the correction and contrast filters standard in black and
white photography can be used with Agfapan films.
Examples:
Yellow filter
To heighten cloud contrast
Orange filter
For clear long-distance views
Red filter
To “dramatise” an atmosphere
To compensate for the loss in speed caused by these filters, the
manufacturer’s lengthening factors must be applied. Filters for
black and white films are not suitable for colour photography.
They cause strong colour shifts.
Storage of unprocessed films
High temperatures and high atmospheric humidity can impair
the photographic characteristics of a film material, in particular
its speed and colour balance. Harmful fumes such as formalin or
other fumes given off mainly by glues or cosmetics should
definitely be avoided. Films are best stored in the original pack,
because this protects them against humidity and fumes. Storage
in a refrigerator (below +10 °C / 50 °F) or in a deep freezer
(below 0 °C / 32 °F) is an effective way of stabilising films’
photographic properties for a very long time. However wait long
enough for the film to come up to room temperature after it has
been taken out of refrigeration, since otherwise condensation
can form on the cold material. (Recommended acclimatisation
time: with refrigerator approx. 2 hours, with deep freezer approx.
8 hours).
Cameras do not provide sufficient protection against these
harmful effects. It is therefore advisable to keep a camera cool,
dry and airtight when a film is loaded (if necessary in a
polyethylene bag).
Once a film has been exposed, the above precautions for
unexposed films are even more important. Exposed films should
be kept cool and dry, or even better processed as soon as possible
after exposure. This ensures that these effects have no time to
take place.
3
Directions for X-ray inspections
The basic rule is that films are sensitive to X-rays, and this sensitivity
increases with the film’s sensitivity. The X-ray inspection equipment
used on many airports marked “Film Safe” does not affect films
under normal circumstances. Nevertheless, for safety’s sake films
should not be handed in as luggage but kept in hand luggage. In
cases of doubt a visual inspection is preferable.
Processing
Film type
Process
Agfacolor
negative films
Agfachrome
slide films
Agfapan
B/W films
Agfa Scala 200x
B/W slide film
AP 70
Compatible
with process
C-41
AP 44
E-6
Process
data sheet
C-70,
C-7172
C-44
For developing methods, types
C-SW16
etc. see data sheet
Special Scala process in authorised
Scala labs only (see internet: www.agfa.com)
The Technical Data sheets listed contain detailed information
on the processing of the relevant films.
Pushed/pulled processing of slide films
If the first development time is changed, the photographic speed
also changes. Lengthening the time leads to an increase in speed
(so-called pushing), shortening the time reduces it (pulling).
This is a correction method often used in professional photography, with the aim of a fine adjustment of the colour density
or a deliberate change in speed.
The Agfachrome RSX II Professional films feature exceptio-nally
good push/pull stability. Up to a speed adjustment of ± 1 stop
(1), the neutrality of colour rendition is preserved in full. Even
an increase in speed of up to two stops only has a very slight
effect on the colour balance.
With the standard Scala process: ISO 200/24°.
The speed of the Agfa Scala 200x can be varied in steps by pushing or
pulling the process. The contrast, maximum density and granularity
simultaneously vary in comparison to the standard process.
Push 1
Push 2
Push 3
400/27° 800/30° 1600/33°
increasingly steeper
decreasing
increasingly coarse-grained
b) To flatten the contrast:
– for reproductions of X-rays
– for duplicates of BW negatives and original Scala
transparencies
Storage of processed films
The same precautions apply to processed films:
• under 25° C
• 30 to 60 % relative humidity
• protected from fumes
• darkness
Further processing
Evaluating negatives
Negatives of colour and black and white films can be appraised
in basically the same way. The most important criterion is the
shadow area. Thin coverage in comparison to the mask coloration
should be apparent on colour negatives.
Retouching
In portrait photography and in some other areas as well, the
retouching of processed film material is common. The film types
suitable for this treatment incorporate a retouchable back (only
roll film and sheet film), i.e. they are suitable for pencil and liquid
retouching (retouching paints). Only the Agfacolor XPS 160 roll
film has a retouchable emulsion.
Evaluating slides
Agfa Scala 200x Professional
Step
Speed (ISO)
Contrast
Maximum density
Granularity
Pulled processing
a) To decrease the speed:
– for higher maximum density
– for finer granularity (–10 % at ISO 100/21°)
Pull 1
100/21°
flatter
increasing
finer
Applications
Varying the speed and the contrast is useful in many fields.
Pushed processing
a) To increase the speed:
– with poor lighting / available light
– with lenses with long focal lengths and / or low power
– with fast-moving subjects
The colour balance of Agfachrome Professional films is designed
for the viewing light specified in ISO 3664. The main features of
this standard:
• colour temperature 5000 K
• mean luminance 1400 cd/m2
• uniformity of luminance at least 75 %
Comparisons should be made in principle on one and the same
light box, because there may be considerable variations in light
colour and intensity between different boxes.
Use of slide films in scanners
All Agfachrome Professional films are reprographically compatible. The high-grade photographic characteristics of this material
are therefore transferred completely, even if only the standard
scanner setting is used.
b) To steepen the contrast:
– for dramatic effects
4
F-PF-E3
Specific information on the product
Layer design
The charts and figures shown on page 6 to 9 are briefly explained
below, and the conditions of measurement are also described.
All the figures are averages of various production runs. For some
emulsion batches they may vary slightly from each other, in
spite of the very tightly maintained tolerances.
The continuous further development of coating technology
permits thinner, and simultaneously more layers. The thinner
layers enhance the sharpness, and the extra layers have
separating, blocking, protecting and filtering functions. They
optimise not only the colour rendition, but also the sharpness
and storage life as well. A schematic representation is shown on
right, taking the Optima 100 as an example.
Supercoat
UV filter layer
Spectral sensitivities
The chart indicates the colour sensitivity of an unprocessed film.
Reference:
– equal-energy spectrum
Reading density: – 1.0 above minimum density
Blue-sensitive yellow layers
Absorption of the emulsion dyes
Yellow filter layer
The chart indicates the relative effect of a processed film on
transmitted light. For colour negative films this is a measure for
the spectral sensitisation of the following printing material, for
colour slide films it is a measure for the viewer’s eye under
defined standard light conditions.
Reference: – neutral subject with medium brightness
– minimum density
Green-sensitive magenta layers
Red filter layer
Red-sensitive cyan layers
Colour density curves
Anti-halo layer
The chart indicates the dye densities of a processed film in
relation to the exposure.
Reference: – exposure:
daylight 1/100 second
– process:
AP 70/C-41 and AP 44/E-6
– densitometry: Status A and Status M
Total layer thickness (without base):
(Other films: see pages 6 to 9)
Sharpness
Emulsion base
This is an MTF (Modulation Transfer Function) chart, which indicates
the image sharpness. The higher the transfer factor in %, the lower
the transfer losses are.
Reference: – exposure:
daylight
– densitometry: visual filter (Vλ)
Base
16 µm
The film base is made of acetyl cellulose or polyester. The type
and thickness of the base are given on pages 6 to 9.
Granularity
Granularity is the irrregular density structure of an exposed and
processed area of film. The figure is based on the RMS (rootmean-square) measuring method. The smaller the figure is, the
finer grain the film has. The RMS measuring method is intended
to match an instrumentally found figure with the visual perception
of the film granularity.
Reference: – exposure:
daylight
– densitometry: visual filter (Vλ)
– measurement: diffuse density 1.0;
48 µm reading aperture
Resolving power
This is given as a figure in the appendix. It indicates the resolution
limit in the rendition of adjacent finest details (e.g. lines in a
matrix).
The resolving power is a purely visual criterion, which is greatly
influenced by the contrast range.
Reference: – lines per mm at contrast range 1.6 : 1 or 1000 : 1
F-PF-E3
5
Agfacolor Portrait 160
Process colour coding on 35 mm films
Margin bars on the cartridge
• red
Process AP 70/C-41
• blue
Process AP 44/E-6
• grey
B/W negative processing
Process colour coding on roll films
Overprint at end of backing paper
• yellow Process AP 70/C-41
• blue
Process AP 44/E-6
• black
B/W negative processing
3. Symbol marks on colour negative films
Symbols are exposed on to 35 mm and
roll films to identify the film generation.
Oprima 100
4 red squares
Oprima 200
4 red triangles
Oprima 400
2 red squares
Portrait 160
4 green squares
Spectral sensitivity
→ lg Sensitivity
Film identification
Blue
Green
Agfapan APX 100
-01.-
400
500
2.0
Medium density
1.0
Minimum density
0
400
500
Sharpness
150
100
50
30
20
Agfacolor Optima 200
/10 000-1 10
100
0
+1
+2
1
Agfacolor Optima 400
1
/10 000-1 10
100
0
+1
+2
Agfacolor Portrait 160
1
/10 000-1 10
100
0
+1
+2
10
2
3
5
10
20
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Colour density curves
→ Density
Agfacolor Optima 100
/10 000-1 10
100
0
+½
+ 1½
1
4.0
3.0
Blue
Colour slide films
Agfachrome RSX II 50
/10 000-1 10
100
0
+½
+1
0
05B
10B
Exposure reading (seconds)
Exposure adjustment (f-stops)
Filtration (CC filter)
1
Exposure reading (seconds)
Exposure adjustment (f-stops)
Filtration (CC filter)
1
Agfachrome RSX II 100
/10 000-1 10
100
0
+½
+1
0
05B
10B
Agfachrome RSX II 200
/10 000-1 10
100
0
+1
+2
0
075Y 15Y 05C
/
Agfapan APX 100
-½ 1
10 100
0
+1 +2 +3
0 – 10 – 25 – 35
1 10 000
B/W slide film
/
Agfa Scala 200x
-½ 1
10 100
0
+½ +1 +2
1 10 000
Green
2.0
1
Red
1.0
0
B/W negative films
6
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
Agfa Scala 200x
Colour negative films
Exposure reading (seconds)
Exposure adjustment (f-stops)
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
Spectral density
→ Spectral density
The film type can be identified from the
type of notching. The emulsion side is facing
the viewer when the notching in upright
format is at top right.
Agfachrome RSX II 100
Reciprocity effect
Exposure reading (seconds)
Exposure adjustment (f-stops)
Developing adjustment (%)
Red
0
→ Transfer factor (%)
1. Film type + emulsion number
2. Frame numbering
•On 35 mm films after 2 blank exposures
continuous frame numbering starting
with "1" and "1A" up to 12A, 24A or
36A
•On roll films continuous double-sided
frame numbering from 1-12 or 41-61
(120 roll film), or 1-25 or 41-83 (220
roll film).
Exposure reading (seconds)
Exposure adjustment (f-stops)
1.0
Notch coding on sheet films
Exposed margin marks
Exposure reading (seconds)
Exposure adjustment (f-stops)
2.0
Agfapan APX 400
/10 000-1 1
10 100
0
+1 +2 +3
0 – 10 – 25 – 35
1
–3.0
–2.0
–1.0
0
+1.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
Speed:
ISO 160/23°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 3.5
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
150 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
60 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
18 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120/220 =
95 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
135-24 =
00786 3
135-36 =
00786 4
Negative code:
49 – 02
F-PF-E3
Agfacolor Optima 200
Agfacolor Optima 400
Spectral sensitivity
Spectral sensitivity
Spectral sensitivity
1.0
Blue
Red
Green
2.0
→ lg Sensitivity
2.0
→ lg Sensitivity
→ lg Sensitivity
Agfacolor Optima 100
1.0
Blue
Red
Green
2.0
Blue
Red
Green
1.0
0
0
0
500
Spectral density
→ Spectral density
-1.0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
400
500
Spectral density
2.0
Medium density
1.0
Minimum density
400
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
500
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
Spectral density
2.0
Medium density
1.0
Minimum density
→ Spectral density
400
→ Spectral density
-1.0
2.0
Medium density
1.0
Minimum density
0
400
500
0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
400
500
0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
400
150
100
50
30
2
3
5
10
20
30
Blue
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
100
50
30
20
2
3
5
10
20
2
3
5
10
20
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Colour density curves
4.0
3.0
10
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Colour density curves
4.0
3.0
10
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Colour density curves
→ Density
50
20
→ Density
10
100
Blue
→ Density
20
→ Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness
150
→ Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness
150
→ Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness
500
4.0
Blue
3.0
Green
Green
2.0
Red
1.0
0
- 4.0
- 3.0
- 2.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
Red
2.0
Red
1.0
Speed:
ISO 100/21°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 4.0
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
140 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
50 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
16 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
135-24 =
00798 3
135-36 =
00798 4
Negative code:
49 – 14
F-PF-E3
Green
2.0
0
- 4.0
1.0
- 3.0
- 2.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
Speed:
ISO 200/24°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 4.3
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
130 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
50 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
18 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
135-24 =
00799 3
135-36 =
00799 4
Negative code:
49 – 15
0
- 4.0
- 3.0
- 2.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
Speed:
ISO 400/27°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 4.5
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
130 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
50 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
19 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120/220 =
95 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
135-24 =
00794 3
135-36 =
00794 4
Negative code:
49 – 10
7
Agfachrome RSX II 100
Agfachrome RSX II 200
Spectral sensitivity
Spectral sensitivity
Spectral sensitivity
Blue
0
- 0.1
400
Green
Red
500
→ Spectral density
1.0
400
400
Green
Red
500
Magenta
500
Cyan
Visual grey
1.0
Yellow
0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
400
1.0
Blue
-1.0
400
Magenta
500
Cyan
Visual grey
Yellow
0.5
0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
400
20
50
30
20
2
3
5
10
20
Green
Red
Blue
3.0
Magenta
500
Cyan
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
100
50
30
20
2
3
5
10
20
4.0
2
3
5
10
20
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Colour density curves
Green
Red
3.0
10
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Colour density curves
→ Density
4.0
10
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Colour density curves
→ Density
100
→ Density
10
→ Transfer factor (%)
150
→ Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness
150
→ Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness
30
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
1.0
150
50
500
Red
1.5
Sharpness
100
Green
Spectral density
1.5
0.5
2.0
0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
Spectral density
Visual grey
0
Blue
-1.0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
1.5
Yellow
1.0
0
Spectral density
0.5
→ lg Sensitivity
1.0
2.0
→ Spectral density
→ lg Sensitivity
2.0
→ Spectral density
→ lg Sensitivity
Agfachrome RSX II 50
Blue
4.0
Blue
Red
3.0
Green
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0
-3.0
-2.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
+2.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
Speed:
ISO 50/18°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 10.0
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
135 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
55 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
25 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
8
135-36 =
00089 4
0
-3.0
-2.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
+2.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
Speed:
ISO 100/21°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 10.0
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
130 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
50 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
25 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
sheet film = Acetate 190 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
135-36 =
00057 4
0
-3.0
-2.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
+2.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
Speed:
ISO 200/24°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 12.0
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
120 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
50 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
27 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
135-36 =
00118 4
F-PF-E3
Agfapan APX 400
Agfa Scala 200x
Spectral sensitivity
Spectral sensitivity
Spectral sensitivity
1.0
0
1.0
0
400
500
-1.0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
400
500
→ Density
3.0
2.0
1.0
-3.0
-2.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
3.0
2.0
Pull 1
1.0
-3.0
-2.0
0
-3.0
-1.0
0
+1.0
+2.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
-2.0
30
20
50
30
5
10
20
2
3
5
10
20
REFINAL
RODINAL 1+25
0.70
0.65
0.55
0.75
REFINAL
0.70
RODINAL SPECIAL
STUDIONAL LIQUID
0.65
RODINAL 1+25
0.60
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
→ Developing time (min.)
Speed:
ISO 100/21°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 9.0
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
150 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
7 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
sheet film = PET 175 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
135-24 =
00023 3
135-36 =
00023 4
F-PF-E3
50
30
0.55
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
→ Developing time (min.)
Speed:
ISO 400/27°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 14.0
Resolving power
Contrast 1000 : 1
110 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
10 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code:
2
3
5
10
20
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Contrast/maximum density with
pushed/pulled processing
RODINAL 1+50
0.60
0
+1.0 +2.0
+3.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
100
10
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
Gamma-time curves
0.75
RODINAL SPECIAL
STUDIONAL LIQUID
10
30
50
100
→ Lines per mm
→ Density
3
-1.0
20
→ C
2
Gamma-time curves
→ Negative contrast (C )
100
20
→ Negative contrast (γ)
10
→ Transfer factor (%)
150
→ Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness
150
→ Transfer factor (%)
Sharpness
150
50
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
Push 1
Push 2
Push 3
Sharpness
100
500
3.0 Standard
2.0
0
-4.0
+2.0
→ lg exposure (Lx · s)
400
Characteristic curves
1.0
0
-4.0
1.0
–1.0
600
700
→ Wavelength (nm)
Characteristic curve
Characteristic curve
2.0
0
→ Density
-1.0
→ Density
2.0
→ lg Sensitivity
2.0
→ lg Sensitivity
→ lg Sensitivity
Agfapan APX 100
135-36 =
00019 4
3.4
3.2
3.0
2.8
2.6
2.4
2.2
2.0
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.2
1.0
0.8
0.6
ISO: 100/21°
Pull 1
Maximum density
Contrast
200/24°
400/27°
Push 1
800/30°
Push 2
1600/33°
Push 3
Speed:
ISO 200/24°
Granularity (x 1000):
RMS 11.0
Resolving power (Reference: ISO 200°)
Contrast 1000 : 1
120 lines/mm
Contrast 1.6 : 1
50 lines/mm
Layer thickness:
7 µm
Film base:
135 =
120 µm
120 =
95 µm
sheet film = PET 175 µm
DX coding
Cartridge code: 135-36 =
00024 4
9
General instructions of B/W film processing
It is a well-known fact that the results of development depend not only on the time, temperature and type of solution, but also on the
process method used (tray, small tank, drum, large tank). To obtain reproducible results, the following instructions should be
followed:
• For processing in small tanks, agitate (tilt) the tank continuously for the first minute, and then tilt every thirty seconds. Avoid
developing times under three minutes.
• For processing in drums (rotary process), choose a speed greater than 30 rpm (changing the direction of rotation). Avoid developing
times under three minutes.
The development times given below are guides only, and are based on an average contrast of γ = 0.65. Variations are possible,
depending on the individual processing conditions.
Processing Agfapan APX 100
Processing Agfapan APX 400
Developer
Developing time in min.
18 °C
20 °C
22 °C
24 °C
Processing in small tanks/trays
Refinal
8
6
4½
4
Rodinal 1 + 25
10
8
6
5
Rodinal 1 + 50
20
17
14
12
Rodinal Special
5
4
3
–
Studional Liquid
5
4
3
–
Processing in tanks
Atomal FF
10
8
6
5
Refinal
9
7
5
4
Developer
Exposure index Agfapan APX 100
Exposure index Agfapan APX 400
Developer
Refinal
Rodinal 1 + 25
Rodinal 1 + 50
Rodinal Special
Studional Liquid
Time*
6 min.
8 min.
17 min.
4 min.
4 min.
*) Processing in small tank at 20 °C
Speed
ISO 125/22°
ISO 125/22°
ISO 160/23°
ISO 125/22°
ISO 125/22°
Developing time in min.
18 °C
20 °C
22 °C
24 °C
Processing in small tanks/trays
Refinal
7
5
4
3
Rodinal 1 + 25
11 ½
10
9
8
Rodinal 1 + 50
–
30
27 ½
25
Rodinal Special
7
6
4½
4
Studional Liquid
7
6
4½
4
Tetenal Ultrafin Plus
16
Kodak T-MAX
12
Kodak D76/Ilford ID11
12
Processing in tanks
Atomal FF
12 ½
10
6
6
Refinal
6½
5
4
3
Developer
Refinal
Rodinal 1 + 25
Rodinal 1 + 50
Rodinal Special
Studional Liquid
Time*
5 min.
10 min.
30 min.
6 min.
6 min.
Speed
ISO 400/27°
ISO 320/26°
ISO 320/26°
ISO 400/27°
ISO 400/27°
*) Processing in small tank at 20 °C
Further processing details are given in the Technical Data Sheet P-SW16.
ISO 9001 quality certificate
Since 1994 the photo-chemical production department of Agfa-Gevaert AG has possessed the ISO 9001 certificate for its quality
management system, as awarded by Lloyd’s Register for Quality Assurance Ltd. (LRQA), London.
The ISO 9001 standard defines the principles of quality assurance, including concepts and criteria for customer-based quality
planning, specifications for each stage of production, and also systems for error prevention and for the continuous enhancement of
production techniques.
Comprehensive documentation of all the tests and their regular monitoring by internal and external auditors ensures that the product
quality is consistently based on objectively defined criteria, and conforms at all times to a reproducible standard.
10
F-PF-E3
Summary of the Agfa Professional film range
Agfacolor
Optima
100
ISO
35 mm films
135-24
135-36
135-36 MP 5
135-36 MP 50
17 m DP ***
30.5 m DP ***
Roll films
120
120 MP 5
120 MP 50
220 MP 5
Optima
200
Optima
400
Agfachrome
Portrait
160
RSX II
50
RSX II
100
Agfapan
RSX II
200
APX
100
APX
400
Agfa
Scala
200x
100/21° 200/24° 400/27° 160/23° 50/18° 100/21° 200/24° 100/21° 400/27° 200/24°
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sheet films *
6.5 × 9 cm, 21/2 × 31/2 ”
9 × 12 cm, 31/2 × 33/4 ”
10.2 × 12.7 cm,
4 × 5“
1
13 × 18 cm, 5 /8 × 71/8 “
20.3 × 25.4 cm,
8 × 10 “
Ranges vary from country to country.
•
•
•
•
•**
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
*
Agfachrome, Scala:
10-sheet packs
Agfapan:
25-sheet packs
** Also available in 50-sheet packs
*** DP = bilateral perforation
Note
The information given here is based on the evaluation of typical products at the time of printing. Slight deviations are possible due
to production tolerances. Agfa-Gevaert constantly endeavours to improve product quality, and therefore reserves the right to alter
the product specifications without notice.
Agfa, the Agfa Rhombus, Agfachrome, Agfacolor, Agfapan, Refinal, Rodinal, Scala and Studional are registered trademarks of AgfaGevaert AG, Leverkusen, Germany.
F-PF-E3
11
Technical Data
Date: 07/2003
F-PF-E4
4th edition