KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film
February 2009 • E-7023
TECHNICAL DATA / COLOR NEGATIVE FILM
KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film is a worry-free, easy-to-use
high speed film designed for snapshooters. ULTRA MAX
400 Film gives you the flexibility you need to take
consistently better pictures in more picture taking
situations—better low-light picture quality with fewer
underexposures, better results with zoom lenses, greater
flash range, better "stop-action" photos, and reduced
impact of camera shake.
Even when enlarged, ULTRA MAX 400 Film delivers
excellent sharpness and fine grain for crisp, clear pictures.
Optimized color precision technology provides
consistently bright, vibrant colors with accurate skin-tone
reproduction for natural-looking people pictures.
ULTRA MAX 400 Film is designed for processing in
KODAK FLEXICOLOR Chemicals for Process C-41. It is
printing compatible with KODAK GOLD Films.
FEATURES
• Advanced
T-GRAIN Emulsion
technology
• Antenna dye
sensitization
• Advanced
development
accelerators
• Optimized color
precision
technology
ADVANTAGES
• True 400 speed
• Outstanding
underexposure
latitude
• Long flash range
• Fine grain and
high sharpness
• Great skin tones
and superb color
BENEFIT
• Better pictures
under more
conditions (inside,
outside, bad light,
fast action)
STORAGE AND HANDLING
Load and unload your camera in subdued light.
Store unexposed film at 21° C (70° F) or lower in the
original sealed package. Always store film (exposed or
unexposed) in a cool, dry place. Process film as soon as
possible after exposure.
Protect negatives from strong light, and store them in a
cool, dry place. For more information on storing negatives,
see KODAK Publication No. E-30, Storage and Care of
KODAK Photographic Materials—Before and After
Processing.
DARKROOM RECOMMENDATIONS
Do not use a safelight. Handle unprocessed film in total
darkness.
EXPOSURE
Film Speed: ISO/DIN 400/27°
Use these speed numbers in the table below with cameras
or meters marked for ISO, ASA, or DIN speeds or exposure
©Eastman Kodak Company, 2007
indexes. Do not change the film-speed setting when you
use a filter if your camera has through-the-lens metering.
For critical work, make a series of test exposures.
Daylight
Use the exposures in the table below for average frontlit
subjects from 2 hours after sunrise to 2 hours before
sunset.
Shutter
Speed
(seconds)
Lens
Opening
Bright/Hazy Sun on Light Sand or
Snow
1/500
f/16
Bright or Hazy Sun (Distinct
Shadows)*
1/500
f/11
Weak, Hazy Sun (Soft Shadows)
1/500
f/8
Cloudy Bright (No Shadows)
1/500
f/5.6
Heavy Overcast, Open Shade†
1/500
f/4
Lighting Conditions
*Use
f/5.6 for backlit close-up subjects.
shaded from the sun but lighted by a large area of sky.
†Subject
Electronic Flash:
Fluorescent and High-Intensity Discharge Lights
Use the appropriate guide number in the table below as a
starting point for your equipment. Select the unit output
closest to the number given by your flash manufacturer.
Then find the guide number for feet or metres.
To determine the lens opening, divide the guide number
by the flash-to-subject distance. If negatives are too dark
(overexposed), use a higher guide number; if they are too
light (underexposed), use a lower number.
For best results without special printing, use the
color-correction filters in the table below as starting points
when you expose these films under fluorescent and
high-intensity discharge lamps. Use exposure times of
1/60 second or longer to avoid the brightness and color
variations that occur during a single alternating-current
cycle.
Though this film is tolerant of mixed-lighting situations,
for best color results under uniform fluorescent or
high-intensity discharge sources, use the exposure and
filter recommendations given below. These
recommendations are starting points.
Actual filtration may vary between lamps and lamp
manufacturers. Depending on the specific source,
additional filtration or special printing may be required to
achieve best results.
Unit Output
(BCPS)*
*BCPS
Guide Number
Distance in Feet
Distance in Meters
350
85
26
500
100
30
700
120
36
1000
140
42
1400
170
50
2000
200
60
2800
240
70
4000
280
85
5600
340
105
8000
400
120
= beam candlepower seconds
Automatic Flash Units: Set ISO / ASA selector to 400.
Type of
Fluorescent
Lamp
KODAK Color
Compensating Filters
Exposure Adjustment
40R
+ 2 ⁄3 stop
20C + 30M
+ 1 stop
Warm White
40B
+ 1 stop
Warm White
Deluxe
30B + 30C
+ 1 1 ⁄3 stops
Cool White
30M
+ 2 ⁄3 stop
Cool White
Deluxe
10C + 10M
+ 2 ⁄3 stop
Daylight
White
Note: When you do not know the type of fluorescent
lamps, try a 10C + 20M filter combination and increase
exposure by 2⁄3 stop; color rendition may be less than
optimum.
Type of High-Intensity
Discharge Lamp
KODAK Color
Compensating
Filters
Exposure
Adjustment
High Pressure Sodium Vapor
70B + 50C
+ 3 stops
Metal Halide
10R + 20M
+ 2 ⁄3 stop
Mercury Vapor with Phosphor
20R + 20M
+ 2 ⁄3 stop
80R
+ 1 2 ⁄3 stops
Mercury Vapor without
Phosphor
Note: Some primary color filters were used in the tables
above to reduce the number of filters and/or to keep the
exposure adjustment to a minimum. Red filters were
substituted for equivalent filtration in magenta and yellow.
Blue filters were substituted for equivalent filtration in cyan
and magenta.
Adjustments for Long and Short Exposures
You do not need to make any exposure or filter adjustments
for exposure times of 1/10,000 second to 1 second.
Exposures longer than 1 second may require compensation
and filtration.
2
KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film • E-7023
PROCESSING
RETOUCHING
Process in KODAK FLEXICOLOR Chemicals for Process
C-41.
Information on replenishment rates is available online at
www.kodak.com/go/photofinishing.
Negatives on this film can be retouched on the emulsion
side with retouching pencils, after applying a retouching
fluid, such as KODAK Retouching Fluid.
IMAGE STRUCTURE
JUDGING NEGATIVE EXPOSURES
Print Grain Index Magnification Table:
You can check the exposure level of the color negative with
a suitable electronic densitometer equipped with a filter
such as the red filter for Status M Densitometry or a
KODAK WRATTEN Gelatin Filter No. 92. Depending on the
subject and the light source used for exposure, a normally
exposed color negative measured through the red filter
should have the approximate densities listed below. These
densities apply for the recommended light sources and
correct processing of the negative.
The Print Grain Index number refers to a method of
defining graininess in a print made with diffuse-printing
illumination. It replaces rms granularity and has a different
scale which cannot be compared to rms granularity.
This method uses a uniform perceptual scale, with a
change for four units equaling a just noticeable difference
in graininess for 90 percent of observers.
Densities of Properly Exposed and Processed Negatives
Area Measured on the Negative
Density
Reading
The KODAK Gray Card* (gray side) receiving the
same illumination as the subject
0.80 to 1.00
The lightest step (darkest in the negative) of a
KODAK Paper Gray Scale receiving the same
illumination as the subject
1.20 to 1.40
Normally lighted forehead of person with light
complexion†
1.10 to 1.40
Normally lighted forehead of person with dark
complexion†
0.85 to 1.25
*KODAK
Publication No. R-27
of the extreme range in skin color, use these values only as a guide.
For best results, use a KODAK Gray Card (gray side).
†Because
A Print Grain Index rating of 25 on the scale represents
the approximate visual threshold for graininess. A
higher number indicates an increase in the amount of
graininess observed.
The standardized inspection (print-to-viewer) distance
for all print sizes is 14 inches, the typical viewing
distance for a 4 x 6-inch print.
In practice, larger prints will likely be viewed from
distances greater than 14 inches, which reduces
apparent graininess.
Print Grain Index numbers may not represent graininess
observed from more specular printing illuminants, such
as condenser enlargers.
The Print Grain Index numbers listed in this publication
apply to the following standards:
Negative Size:
PRINTING NEGATIVES
This film is optimized for printing on KODAK EKTACOLOR
EDGE Paper, KODAK ROYAL Digital Color Paper, and
KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Metallic Paper.
Make color slides and transparencies by printing the
negatives on KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA
Transparency Display Material or KODAK
PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Clear Display Material.
You can scan an image to a file and print digitally to
KODAK EKTACOLOR EDGE Paper, KODAK ROYAL Digital
Color Paper, KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Papers,
KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Metallic Paper,
KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Transparency Display
Material, or KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Clear
Display Material.
Make black-and-white prints on any of the materials
mentioned above using the recommendations in KODAK
Publication CIS-274, Printing Black-and-White Images
Without KODAK Black-and-White Papers.
KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film • E-7023
Print Size:
Magnification:
Print Grain Index:
24 x 36 mm
(135-size standard format)
4 x 6 inches
(10.2 x 15.2 cm)
4.4X
46
3
CURVES
Spectral-Sensitivity Curves
Characteristic Curves
4.0
Exposure: Daylight
Process: C-41
Densitometry: Status M
Log H Ref: -1.44
DENSITY
G
2.0
Exposure: Daylight
Effective Exposure: 1/100 sec
Densitometry: Status M
Density: 0.2>D-min
3.0
B
3.0
LOG SENSITIVITY *
4.0
R
YellowForming
Layer
2.0
CyanForming
Layer
MagentaForming
Layer
1.0
1.0
0.0
250
300
350
400
450
500
550
600
650
700
750
WAVELENGTH (nm)
2
0.0
-4.0
E7023A
-3.0
-2.0
-1.0
0.0
E7023B
1.0
*Sensitivity = reciprocal of exposure (erg/cm ) required
to produce specified density
LOG EXPOSURE (lux-seconds)
Spectral-Dye-Density Curves
2.5
Typical densities for a midscale neutral subject
and D-min.
Process: C-41
DIFFUSE SPECTRAL DENSITY
2.0
Midscale Neutral
1.5
Minimum Density
1.0
0.5
0.0
400
E7023C
500
600
700
WAVELENGTH (nm)
NOTICE: The sensitometric curves and data in this publication represent product tested
under the conditions of exposure and processing specified. They are representative of
production coatings, and therefore do not apply directly to a particular box or roll of
photographic material. They do not represent standards or specifications that must be
met by Eastman Kodak Company. The company reserves the right to change and
improve product characteristics at any time.
KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film • E-7023
4
MORE INFORMATION
Kodak has many publications to assist you with
information on Kodak products, equipment, and materials.
Additional information is available on the Kodak
website.
The following publications are available from Kodak
Customer Service and from dealers who sell Kodak
products, or you can contact Kodak in your country for
more information.
E-30
Storage and Care of KODAK Photographic Materials—
Before and After Processing
E-7022
KODAK GOLD 100 and 200 Films
E-7024
KODAK ULTRA MAX 800 Film
E-4035
KODAK PROFESSIONAL ULTRA COLOR Films
E-4040
KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA Films
E-7020
KODAK EKTACOLOR EDGE Paper
E-7021
KODAK ROYAL Digital Color Paper
E-4020
KODAK PROFESSIONAL ULTRA ENDURA Paper
E-4021
KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA and SUPRA ENDURA
Papers
E-4038
KODAK PROFESSIONAL ENDURA Transparency and Clear
Display Materials
For the latest version of technical support publications for KODAK
Products, visit Kodak on-line at:
http://www.kodak.com
If you have questions about KODAK Products, call Kodak.
In the U.S.A.:
1-800-242-2424, Monday–Friday
9 a.m.–7 p.m. (Eastern time)
In Canada:
1-800-465-6325, Monday–Friday
8 a.m.–5 p.m. (Eastern time)
Note: The Kodak materials described in this publication
are available from dealers who supply Kodak products.
You can use other materials, but you may not obtain
similar results.
KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film • E-7023
5
KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film
Kodak, Kodak Professional, Edge, Ektacolor, Endura, Flexicolor, Gold, Max, Portra, Royal,
Supra, T-Grain, Ultra, and Wratten are trademarks.
Revised 2/09
Printed in U.S.A.
KODAK ULTRA MAX 400 Film
KODAK Publication No. E-7023
Film & Photofinishing Systems Group
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY • ROCHESTER, NY 14650