MARC D-STAR Presentation - Montgomery Amateur Radio Club

MARC D-STAR Presentation
January 7
Bruce Semple
WA3SWJ
Credits
• John Davis – WB4QDX
• Maryland D-Star
• TAPR – Digital Communications Conference – John Hays (K7VE)
• Mark Holmes – KJ4VO
• Jim Moen – K6JM
• Fred Van Kempen – PA4YBR
• Jim McClellan – N5MIJ
• Guy, Larry, & Ray
• Ron Milione Ph.D. W2TAP
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
D-Star – What is it ?
D-STAR (Digital Smart Technologies for Amateur Radio) is a digital voice and
data protocol specification (published in 2001) developed as the result of
research by the Japan Amateur Radio League to investigate digital technologies
for amateur radio. ICOM provided the equipment used for development and
testing.
• D-STAR is an open protocol – although it is published by JARL, it is available to be implemented by anyone. While
ICOM is the only company to date that manufactures D-STAR- compatible radios, any equipment or software that
supports the D-STAR protocol will work with a D-STAR system. D-STAR systems can be built using both commercial
and homebrew equipment and software.
• In a D-STAR system, the air link portion of the protocol applies to signals travelling between radios or between a
radio and a repeater. D-STAR radios can talk directly to each other without any intermediate equipment or
through a repeater using D-STAR voice or data transceivers. The Gateway portion of the protocol applies to the
digitial interface between D-STAR repeaters.
• D-STAR also specifies how a voice signal is converted to and from streams of digital data, a function called a codec.
• The D-STAR codec is known as AMBE (Advanced Multi-Band Excitation) from Digital Voice Systems, Inc (DVSI)
(www.dvsinc.com)
• The voice signal is transmitted in the D-STAR system at 3,600 bps (3.6kbps)
Analogue FM Transmitter Block Diagram
Look inside the D-STAR radio
Analog
Speech
2.4kbps
digitized voice
+FEC
AMBE
4.8kbps
(3.6 voice +
1.2 data)
Controller
Modem
GMSK
Signal
Digital Voice Encoder
Some Protocol Specification Terminology
• Digital Voice (DV)
• 3600 bps data stream real time encoded with
• 2400 bps voice (AMBE encoded)
• 1200 bps Forward Error Correction (FEC) for voice
• 1200 bps data (text messages, GPS, telemetry, etc.)
• About 900 bps available for transmission of “user data”
• 6.25 kHz. Bandwidth using GMSK
• Digital Data (DD) (23cm only - ID-1 Radios)
• 128 kbps data stream
• 150 kHz. Bandwidth
• Possible extensions to other rates and bandwidths
D-STAR Radio Frame Structure in DV mode
-- The work of the “Controller”
D-STAR Radio Frame Structure Notes
1)
2)
3)
The preamble of radio frame according [shogen] consists of 64 bits (alternating 1 and 0). Based on
the fact, that conventional amateur transmitter needs more time to lock its PLL after the PTT was
activated, the preamble is transmitted up to 550bits (and longer), before the “frame sync” will be
started. The “frame sync“ is following bit pattern: {1,1,1,0,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,0,0}.
The “sync flag” consists of following bit pattern: {1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0} + {1,1,0,1,0,0,0} +
{1,1,0,1,0,0,0}. The “sync flag“ is transmitted in the 1st and than in each 21th data time slot. The
“sync flag“ is used in the receiver for correction of time synchronization to the transmitter as well it
is used as preamble in case if the receiver was switched on during an ongoing transmission and
missed the regular header.
The “terminating flag” is send at the end of the ongoing transmission in order to indicate a regular
end of it. The “terminating flag” consists of {1,0,1,0,...,1,0,1,0}32 Bit+
{0,0,0,1,0,0,1,1,0,1,0,1,1,1,1,0} 16Bit. After that approximately 20 Zeros or Ones are send. The
Transmitter is switched off (PTT deactivation) after 10th such Zero or One.
Look inside the D-STAR radio
Analog
Speech
2.4kbps
digitized
voice +FEC
AMBE
4.8kbps
(3.6 voice +
1.2 data)
Controller
GMSK
Signal
Modem
GMSK
In digital communication, Gaussian minimum shift keying or GMSK is a continuousphase frequency-shift keying modulation scheme. It is similar to standard minimumshift keying (MSK); however the digital data stream is first shaped with a Gaussian
filter before being applied to a frequency modulator. This has the advantage of
reducing sideband power, which in turn reduces out-of-band interference between
signal carriers in adjacent frequency channels.[2] However, the Gaussian filter
increases the modulation memory in the system and causes intersymbol
interference, making it more difficult to differentiate between different transmitted
data values and requiring more complex channel equalization algorithms such as an
adaptive equalizer at the receiver. GMSK has high spectral efficiency, but it needs a
higher power level than QPSK, for instance, in order to reliably transmit the same
amount of data.
From – www.radio-electronics.com
D-STAR Channel Spacing
T-MARC – getting a 2M or 440 repeater
frequency pair – is a huge challenge
The D-STAR voice and low speed data signal
offers a significant improvement in spectrum
efficiency, requiring only a 6 Khz channel
instead of the 20,25, or even 30Khz of analog
wide-band FM.
D-Star repeaters could be “interleaved”
between existing analogue 2M / 440
channels.
D-STAR
Spectral Efficiency
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
What Can I do with it …
Germantown, MD
D-Star Network – Interconnects the
“gateways” - Infrastructure to enable
moving voice packets encoded by the
AMBE vocoder, locally, regionally, or
globally.
Internet
(D-Star
Network)
London
San Francisco, CA
Simplex
Operation
Local Repeater
Add an Internet
“gateway function”
to the Repeater
http://aprs.fi/info/DSTAR
Position reported via APRS
(144.390 Mhz)
Position reported via D-STAR
(any D-StAR repeater)
Gateway Status Page
http://dsync.dstarusers.org/
Reflector Operation
Internet (D-Star Network)
REF025B
REF068A
REF001C
Rome, Italy
London
Naples, Italy
Germantown, MD
Frederick, MD
Alexandria, VA
D-STAR - Reflectors
D-STAR Growth Continues
• As of May 1, 2014 – 1,111 DPLUS Gateways,
over 2,575 Voice Repeaters, 218 Data Modules and 34,298 registered users
on US Trust Server and 62+ DPLUS reflectors in operation
• Other users, repeaters and reflectors on DCS and XREF systems
Gateways
Repeaters
2500
2000
Users
1200
35000
1000
30000
25000
800
1500
20000
600
15000
1000
400
500
10000
200
0
5000
0
0
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
• D-STAR has largest base of users and repeaters of all digital modes
28 of 19
From D-STARUSERS.ORG – Watch D-Star Grow
(snap shot taken on 01/02/2015)
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
D-STAR OV-1
(From ICOM – New Concept Sheet)
Features of the D-STAR System
• Digitally-modulated voice and data communication
• High-speed 64–128 kbps data access
• Complies with IP connection
• Repeaters can handle both digital and analog voice
• System operates on multi-site and backbone connection
D-STAR Repeater Architecture
Many D-Star repeater
installations have more than one
repeater. Each repeater is on a
different amateur radio band. By
convention:
 The “C” module is on the
“2m” band (144-148
MHz).
 The “B” module is on the
“70cm” band (440-450
MHz).
 The “A” module is on the
“23cm” band (1.2 GHz).
Linux Gateway PC
Running G2 Gateway
software
32 of 19
Provision for an “Alternate Backbone”
ICOM -- D-STAR Controller – and 70cm RF deck
ICOM Repeater Controller
ICOM Repeater Controller – Block Diagram
We are one node in the D-Star Network
Germantown, MD
Internet
(D-Star
Network)
London
San Francisco, CA
Gateway Status Page
http://dsync.dstarusers.org/
KV3B Gateway –
Detailed Status
KV3B Gateway – DPLUS Dashboard
https://kv3b.dstargateway.org/
--- or ---
https://dstar-mc.marcclub.org/
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
ID-1 for 1.2 GHz Voice and Data
• Operates FM, Digital Voice (DV), low speed data and high speed data
(DV)
• High speed data connection is Ethernet compatible
• Acts as Ethernet bridge
• Used by MED team during MCM to provide TCP/IP connectivity
44 of 19
Icom Mobiles
• IC-2200 and ID-800 were initial mobiles
• D-STAR board can be added to IC-2200
• ID-880 updated ID-800 with improved user functions
• Dual-band, single receive mobile
• IC-2820 is full featured mobile
• Dual-band, dual receive
• Built-in GPS with external antenna
• New ID-5100 mobile offers new features
•
•
•
•
•
Dual-Band, dual receive
GPS built into head unit
Touchscreen display
Optional Bluetooth interface
DR Mode with 1200 included memories
45 of 19
Icom Handhelds
• IC-91AD was initial D-STAR handheld
• Dual-band, dual receive
• IC-92AD dual-band, dual receive
• Slightly larger frame with more heat sink
• Waterproof
• GPS spkr/mic optional accessory
• IC-80 introduced as lower cost handheld
• Dual-band, single receive
• GPS spkr/mic accessory available
• ID-31A is 70cm handheld
•
•
•
•
Waterproof
SD card for memory storage, update memory from downloads
Built-in GPS
User friendly DR Mode, locate closest repeater
• ID-51A is latest dual band handheld
• All features of ID-31A, but dual band, dual receive
46 of 19
DV Dongle -- $199.95
• Produced by Internet Labs, available at major ham dealers
• Provides access to D-STAR repeaters via PC without radio
• Small module connects to PC via USB
• Uses PC sound card for mic/speaker audio
• Windows software runs efficiently on PCs, Netbooks, Windows
tablet
• Coming to Android tablets, smartphones
• Java-based software for Mac, Linux
• Connect to repeaters, reflectors, send data, view history.
47 of 19
DV Dongle – Connectivity
Analog
Speech
Computer
IP Encapsulation
D-STAR
Network
AMBE
NOTE: No Radio Present !
DV Access Point (DVAP) -- $250
• Produced by Internet Labs, available at
major ham dealers
• Creates instant local access point for
limited area without D-STAR repeater
• Connects to PC via USB
• Includes 10mw 2m transceiver and
stubby antenna
• Use HT, other D-STAR radio nearby for full
network access without local repeater
• Windows software module for
configuration and operation
49 of 19
DVAP Connectivity
Must be a D-STAR
enabled HT
Typical range:
Several hundred feet
D-STAR
Network
DV Node Adapters/GMSK Modems
• Provides D-STAR interface to FM radio
• Can be used to create hotspot or repeater
• Can create D-STAR compatible radio
with Dongle
Must be a D-STAR
enabled HT
OR
51 of 19
New MARC D-STAR RaspberryPi based HotSpot
Plugs into
LAN Switch
RaspberryPi
DVRPTR
Motorola GM300 Radio
446.050Mhz, 25 Watts
(Analogue)
RaspberryPi
Running Maryland D-Star Image
(loaded on Memory card – visible)
(powered 5v - via USB cable/PS)
DVRPTR_V1 9600 GMSK Modem
(connects to radio – audio in, audio out, PTT)
(USB serial connection to Pi)
(powered 12v - by wall wart )
For Dongle, DVAP, Hotspot – Need to “punch holes” in your home Firewall for Digital Voice Audio Streams
D-Star Hardware Review
• No D-Star Radio Required
• DV Dongle
• D-Star Radio Required
• DVAP (DV Access Point)
• D-Star Hot Spot
• D-Star Repeater
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
Why Registration Required?
NOT
REQUIRED
NOT
REQUIRED
REQUIRED
D-STAR
Network
Registration Document Available
• We have a nice 7 page document (with screen shots) listing the 12 simple
steps
• Overview
• Submit a “registration request” to the KV3B Gateway
• Send an email to WA3SWJ@arrl.net to poke him about a registration that needs to be
approved!
• D-STAR Sys Admin verifies (1) active FCC license and that (2) you are not already
registered at another gateway.
• You only need to be registered at one of the Gateway’s in the D-STAR system
• Sys Administrator notifies you that your registration has been completed
• You log into your account on the Gateway and configure your personnel information
• Register your D-STAR Device(s) (HT, Hotspot, mobile,etc)
KV3B Registration Page
https://dstar-mc.marcclub.org/LogoutAction.do
Registration Request
After notification by Sys Admin – Complete Personnal Information
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
The Four call signs -- terminology
 The terminology is from the viewpoint of the
communication link!
 “MyCall” is really YOUR call sign; that is, you, the guy or gal
holding the radio or microphone.
 “YourCall” (also called “UrCall”) is really the call sign of the
OTHER person, that is, the person you want to talk to (you
only set this when you use the D-Star gateway system).
 “Rpt1Call” (also called “R1Call”) is the call sign of the local
repeater.
 “Rpt2Call” (also called “R2Call”) is the call sign of the local
gateway computer.
D-Star Network
62
D-STAR CALLSIGN Fields
---- For Local simplex Operation
• FOUR CALLSIGNS
•
•
•
•
THE ORIGINATION
THE DESTINATION
THE FIRST ROUTING
THE NEXT ROUTING
MYCALL W2TAP
URCALL CQCQCQ
RPTC1
not used
RPTC2
not used
D-STAR CALLSIGN Fields – the Magical 8th Character
• CALLSIGNS
•
The station’s call is up to 7 Characters long
• By definition the MYCALL must be the legal callsign of the originating
station. Additional ID on the MYCALL of 4 characters
• The MYCALL will look like “W2TAP _ _ _ / Ron_”
• The “/Ron_” portion is not used for routing
• The 8th Character of a callsign is the PORT of a D-Star Repeater
• The Ports are by convention
•
•
•
•
A
B
C
G
is 1200 Mhz or BLANK is routed as an “A”
is 440 Mhz
is 144 Mhz
is the GATEWAY COMPUTER use only in RPTC2
ID 880 Programming – using RT Systems
7 spaces an the letter “I”
in the 8th position
Reflector Operation
Internet (D-Star Network)
REF025B
REF068A
REF001C
Rome, Italy
London
Naples, Italy
Germantown, MD
Frederick, MD
Alexandria, VA
Topics
• D-STAR – What is it?
• What Can I do with it?
• The Repeater / Gateway System
• D-STAR User Equipment
• D-STAR User Registration
• Your First D-STAR Call - The Four Call Signs
• D-STAR Routing
How is Traffic routed over the Internet
• Gateway system
• Associates the user’s callsign with a discrete IP number within the gateway
system
• Accomplished by user registration
• Associates distant repeater callsigns with discrete IP number within the
system
• Assigned when the gateway system is commissioned
• The IP numbers used in routing are NEVER needed beyond the inner workings of the
gateway system
• All that is needed are the CALLSIGNS which are available to the user’s “front panel”
• Tracks each user’s callsign last location
• Routes traffic for that user to the last known repeater and port
What is Routing?
• Two Routing Methods
• Site Routing
• Where you want to talk
• Specific System/Gateway and Port
• User Routing
• Who you want to talk
• Specific User
Site Routing (you specify the target Gateway/Repeater System
User Routing (the D-Star Network “finds” the user for you)
Internet (D-Star Network)
Rome, Italy
London
Naples, Italy
Germantown, MD
Frederick, MD
Alexandria, VA
Site Routing
 Given this information





W2TAP: Huntington, NY
W2KPQ: Selden, NY
W4DOC: Atlanta, GA
K6MDD: Mt. Diablo, CA
N7IH: Bellevue, WA (ICOM
America HQ)
 G7ICM: ICOM UK
 VK8RAD: Darwin, Australia
 And I programmed my Radio




MYCALL = W2TAP
RPT 1 = W2KPQ--B
RPT 2 = W2KPQ--G
URCALL = /VK8RADB
Note the “/” as the first
character to indicate
repeater or site routing
• Results
– My call would be routed from the W2KPQ repeater, over the
gateway, and come out on the UHF module in Darwin Australia
User Routing
 Given this same information





W2TAP: Batavia, IL
K5TIT: Dallas, TX
W4DOC: Atlanta, GA
K6MDD: Mt. Diablo, CA
N7IH: Bellevue, WA (ICOM
America HQ)
 G7ICM: ICOM UK
 VK8RAD: Darwin, Australia
 And I programmed my radio




MYCALL = W2TAP
RPT 1 = W9CEQ---B
RPT 2 = W9CEQ---G
URCALL = N5MIJ
• Results
– W2TAP’s voice and data communications would be routed from the
W9CEQ repeater, over the gateway, and come out on the last RF
module N5MIJ used any where in the world!
– Pretty Cool!
Basic Callsign Routing – Another Example
www.jfindu.net/DStarActivity.aspx
Cross Band Operations
• Goal
– To talk to friends on
another band, same
system.
• System Configuration
–
–
–
–
23cm DV
23cm DD
70cm DV
2m DV
Port A
Port A
Port B
Port C
• Callsign Programming
•
•
•
•
MYCALL = W2TAP
RPT 1 = NS9RC---B
RPT 2 = NS9RC---A
URCALL = CQCQCQ
• Result
– Both Voice and Data Communications routed to NS9RC
Port A, which is 1200 Mhz!
D-Star Routing
 There are four ways to communicate with other users on other D-Star
repeaters, using the D-Star network:
1. “Repeater routing” – this is part of the original D-Star design.
2. “Call sign routing” – this is part of the original D-Star design.
3. Using “repeater linking” – this capability was added by “D-Plus”, a gateway
software add-on. (tying two repeaters together)
4. Using “reflector linking” – this capability was added by “D-Plus”, a gateway
software add-on.
 #s 1 & 2 are slightly complex, and if both you & the other user don’t
“get it right”, you will not be able to talk.
 #s 3 & 4 are much simpler to setup & use, and often the repeater is
already set in that mode.
D-Star Network
77
D-Star “network routing” overview
 Advantages of call sign routing:
1. You can call another user without knowing which repeater that user
is currently on.
2. Only “ties up” the two repeaters involved
 Limitations of repeater or call sign routing :
1. You can’t hear what is happening on the remote repeater.
2. You usually need to initially announce that you are remote, so that
the remote user(s) know to set up their radios for repeater or call
sign routing.
3. If the remote user doesn’t setup his/her radio correctly, you will be
unable to have a successful two-way conversation.
D-Star Network
78
D-Star “network linking” overview
 Advantages of repeater or reflector linking:
1. You can hear what is happening on the remote repeater(s).
2. The remote user does not need to configure his/her radio in order to
respond.
3. A repeater can be left in this configuration for new users.
 Limitations of repeater or reflector linking :
1. You can’t call another user without knowing which repeater that user
is currently on.
D-Star Network
79
D-Star repeater routing: call
• For the user wanting to contact another user using repeater routing,
it’s easy:
•
•
•
•
•
You set the “YourCall” field to the other repeater’s call sign:
The first character is a slash (“/”),
followed by the other repeater’s call sign,
followed by spaces to pad the field to seven (7) characters,
followed by the other repeater’s module (“A”, “B”, or “C”) in the 8th character
position.
• The gateway computer routes the call to the indicated remote
repeater.
D-Star Network
80
D-Star call sign routing: reply
• If other users at the remote repeater hear your call and wish
to reply, they must program their radios to send their
transmissions back to the caller.
• To do this, they must set “YourCall” to either:
1. the caller’s callsign; or
2. the call sign of the repeater that the caller is on.
• This can be done by either:
1. Manually setting the “YourCall” field; or
2. immediately (before anyone else transmits) pressing the “RX->CS”
button (the label varies among radio models).
D-Star Network
81
Call sign vs. repeater routing
• So, what’s the difference?
• Note that the radio setup to reply, appears to be the same for
both call sign routing and for repeater routing!
• Both call sign routing and repeater routing accomplish the exact
same thing!
• What is different, depends upon your intent:
• If the person you are talking to, moves (eg, mobile) to another
repeater, call sign routing will automatically route your transmissions to
the new repeater.
• Repeater routing is fixed until you change “YourCall”.
D-Star Network
82
D-Star Call Sign Routing - Challenges
• Features: common to both call sign and repeater routing:
• All radios listening to either repeater can hear both sides of the conversation.
HOWEVER:
• If any other listener transmits on either repeater, only other listeners on that
repeater will hear the transmission, UNLESS they ALSO program their radios
for call sign or repeater routing.
• This means if someone attempts to join the conversation, the local user
should mention that call sign routing is in use.
D-Star Network
83
D-Star call routing summary
• Normally, call sign routing is easier for the replying
station to set (via the “Rx->CS” button), so it is
normally used for remote calling.
• Repeater routing might be best if you want to talk to
just anyone on the remote repeater.
• Of course, in any routing communications, some users
can be using call sign routing and some can be using
repeater routing.
D-Star Network
84
D-Star linking - Using Reflectors
• Linking to D-Star repeaters and reflectors is made
possible by the D-Star gateway software add-on by
Robin Cutshaw / AA4RC.
• Linking to D-Star repeaters and reflectors was not
envisioned in Icom’s design of the D-Star network:
• You can only link two D-Star repeaters together
• A reflector is very similar to a D-Star gateway, but without
any repeater modules. You can link many D-Star repeaters
to one reflector.
D-Star Network
85
D-Star network commands
 These commands only work if:
1. You have set the “Rpt2Call” field to specify your local gateway (otherwise
the gateway will never see them).
2. Your local gateway must be running:


“D-Plus”, the gateway software add-on (written by Robin Cutshaw / AA4RC) to Icom’s
gateway software; or
“D-Extra” software on systems running non-Icom gateway software.
 These commands are set into the “YourCall” field of the radio. You
key your radio to send the command to the gateway.
D-Star Network
86
ID 880 Programming – using RT Systems
7 spaces an the letter “I”
in the 8th position
“Can you hear me now?”
 (with apologies to Verizon’s advertizing slogan).
 Ever want a truly objective signal report? Use the “echo” command:
 Program a “YourCall” value of seven (7) spaces, followed by an “E” in the 8th
(module) position.
 Key your radio & speak a short test message of your choice (I recommend
using the words “echo test” in it).
 When you unkey your radio, the gateway will play back (“echo”) your
transmission.
 Remember to change your “YourCall” value back!
D-Star Network
88
D-Star repeater linking
• To link to another repeater (running “D-Plus” or “D-Extra”), you set
the “YourCall” field to the other repeater’s call sign:
• Enter the other repeater’s call sign,
• followed by spaces to pad the field to six (6) characters,
• followed by the other repeater’s module (“A”, “B”, or “C”) in
the 7th character position,
• followed by the “link” command (“L”) in the 8th character
position.
• Key the radio briefly ONCE to set the link; you will hear a voice
message announcing the result.
• Remember to change your “YourCall” value back!
D-Star Network
89
After the link …
• Once the link to a D-Star repeater or reflector has been
established:
• All repeaters linked together act as one repeater, with one
caveat:
• All users must insure that the “Rpt2Call” field is set to their local
repeater’s gateway, or their transmissions will not be heard on
the other repeater(s).
• Users should set the “YourCall” field to “CQCQCQ” or “/” (the
latter is required on D-star radios using the “DR” (“D-Star
Repeater”) mode.
D-Star Network
90
D-Star unlinking
 Program a “YourCall” value of seven (7) spaces, followed by an “U” in the 8th
(module) position.
 Key your radio
 When you unkey your radio, the gateway will play “say” UNLINKED
 Remember to change your “YourCall” value back!
D-Star Network
91
D-Star tip: The new “DR” mode
 Icom’s new “D-Star Repeater” mode separates the “YourCall”
memories from the “Rpt1Call”/Rpt2Call” memories.
 In “DR” mode, you can select the “YourCall” value, and then
scroll through the “Rpt1Call”/Rpt2Call” memories without
changing the “YourCall” value.
 Tip: Enter the “DR” mode first, before selecting a “YourCall”
value.
 Tip: Save & use “/” as a “YourCall” value in place of “CQCQCQ”.
When “YourCall” contains “CQCQCQ”, the “DR” mode will blank
out the “Rpt2Call” field, and your transmissions will not be
routed to the gateway (or a linked repeater or reflector).
D-Star Network
92
D-Star network information
 This could be a whole session, so I will just list a few:
 www.DstarDB.com (my site: tracks D-Star usage)
 www.dstarinfo.com (D-Star programming calculator)
 www.dstarusers.org (D-Star repeater list)
 www.jfindu.net (and other APRS stuff)
 www.aprs-is.net/DPRSCalc.aspx (D-PRS calculator)
D-Star Network
95
Resources
• http://dstarinfo.com
• http://dstarusers.org
• http://www.moencomm.com
• http://www.k6jm.com/hs-setup.htm
• http://groups.yahoo.com
• dstar_digital
• gmsk_dv_node
• DStar-Gateway
• http://dutch-star.eu
• http://www.k5tit.org
• http://ok-dstar.blogspot.com
Questions