IMPORTANT: The furnace must be installed with the Modulating TouchScreen Thermostat R02P030 (#1F95M). If the furnace is to be installed with the modulating cooling option, use
the Communicating Thermostat R02P029 (#1F991292).
ATTENTION: Do not tamper with the unit or its controls. Call a qualified service technician.
INSTALLER / SERVICE TECHNICIAN: Use the information in this manual for the installation / servicing of the furnace and
keep the document near the unit for future reference.
Gas furnaces manufactured on or after May 1, 2017 are not permitted to be used in Canada for heating of buildings or
structures under construction.
These instructions must be read and understood completely before attempting installation.
HOMEOWNER: PLEASE Keep this manual near the furnace for future reference.
Manufactured by:
Industries Dettson Inc.
Sherbrooke (Québec) Canada
www.dettson.ca
2016-09-19
X40225 Rev.O
TABLE OF CONTENTS
5.3-
1- Safety regulation .............................................. 7
Return air connections ............................... 22
1.1-
Safety labeling and warning signs................ 7
5.3.1-
Bottom return air inlet .................................. 22
1.2-
Important information ................................... 7
5.3.2-
Side return air inlet ...................................... 22
1.3-
Detection systems ........................................ 7
5.4-
Filter arrangement ...................................... 22
2- Introduction ....................................................... 9
5.5-
Supply air ducts ......................................... 22
2.1-
Codes and standards ................................... 9
5.5.1-
2.1.1-
Safety ............................................................ 9
2.1.2-
General installation ........................................ 9
6.1-
General ...................................................... 22
2.1.3-
Combustion and air ventilation..................... 10
6.2-
Gas valve and propane conversion kit ....... 23
2.1.4-
Duct systems ............................................... 10
6.3-
Gas pipe grommet ..................................... 23
2.1.5-
Acoustical lining and fibrous glass duct ....... 10
2.1.6-
Gas piping and pipe pressure testing........... 10
7.1-
120 V wiring ............................................... 23
2.1.7-
Electrical connections .................................. 10
7.2-
24 V wiring ................................................. 24
7.3-
Thermostats ............................................... 24
7.4-
Alternate power supply............................... 24
2.2-
Electrostatic discharge ............................... 10
2.3-
Location ..................................................... 10
2.3.1-
General ....................................................... 10
2.3.2-
Location relative to cooling equipment ......... 11
6- Gas piping ....................................................... 22
7- Electrical connections .................................... 23
8- Venting and combustion air piping ............... 26
8.1-
3- Alizé cooling unit ............................................ 13
3.1-
Thermostat using Alizé system .................. 13
3.2-
Position of the interface board ................... 13
3.3-
Wires connections with interface board ..... 13
4.2-
Upflow orientation ...................................... 14
Direct vent (2 pipe applications) .................. 26
8.1.2-
Non direct vent (1 pipe) applications ............ 26
8.3-
General ...................................................... 26
8.4-
Connecting to furnace ................................ 26
Right side condensate drain trap connection 14
8.4.1-
Combustion air piping .................................. 27
4.1.2-
Left side condensate drain trap connection.. 15
8.4.2-
Exhaust vent piping ..................................... 27
Down flow orientation ................................. 15
8.5-
Materials .................................................... 27
4.2.1- Down flow condensate drain trap
connection ................................................................. 15
8.6-
Size of the vent and combustion air pipes.. 27
4.2.2-
8.7Combustion air and vent piping insulation
guidelines ................................................................ 31
Downflow venting drainage .......................... 17
8.8-
Horizontal right orientation ......................... 17
4.3.1- Horizontal right condensate drain
connection ................................................................. 17
4.3.2-
Horizontal right vent drainage ...................... 17
9.1-
8.8.1-
Concentric vent ........................................... 32
8.8.2-
Two pipe termination ................................... 32
8.8.3-
Sidewall termination .................................... 32
To start the furnace .................................... 33
9.1.1-
Horizontal left orientation ........................... 17
4.4.1-
Installing the vent termination .................... 32
9- Start up, adjustment and safety check ......... 33
4.3.3- Multiposition pressure switch connection
horizontal................................................................... 17
4.4-
8.1.1-
4.1.1-
4.2.3- Multiposition pressure switch connection
downflow ................................................................... 17
4.3-
Introduction ................................................ 26
8.2Special venting requirements for installations
in Canada ................................................................ 26
4- Installation ....................................................... 14
4.1-
Duct work acoustical treatment .................... 22
Lighting instructions..................................... 33
9.2-
Unit operation hazard ................................. 33
9.3-
Setup switches ........................................... 33
9.4-
Fault code reset ......................................... 36
Horizontal left condensate drain connection 17
4.4.2- Multiposition pressure switch connection
horizontal................................................................... 18
5- Duct installation .............................................. 22
9.5-
Diagnostic features .................................... 36
5.1-
General requirements ................................ 22
9.6-
Normal operation codes ............................. 36
5.2-
Smart Duct System .................................... 22
9.7-
Sequence of operation ............................... 36
2
10-
9.7.1-
Heating cycle initiation ................................. 36
10.13.4-
S4 – Heat rise adjust .............................. 40
9.7.2-
Heating cycle response ............................... 36
10.13.5-
S5 – Cooling........................................... 41
9.7.3-
Setting input rate ......................................... 37
11-
User’s information manual ..................... 41
Thermostat ............................................... 37
11.1-
Operating your furnace .............................. 41
10.1- Non-communicating modulating
thermostats.............................................................. 37
11.2-
Lighting instructions ................................... 41
11.3-
Shutting down the furnace ......................... 42
10.2J6)
24 VAC thermostat (TSTAT) INPUT (J4 &
37
11.4-
To turn off gas to the furnace ..................... 42
10.3-
Fuse (F1) ................................................... 38
11.5-
Maintenance of your furnace...................... 42
10.4-
120 VAC terminals ..................................... 38
11.6-
Combustion and ventilation air ................... 42
10.5- INDUCED DRAFT MOTOR (INDUCER)
CONTROL OUTPUT (E8) ....................................... 38
11.7-
Return air ................................................... 43
11.8-
Filter location.............................................. 43
10.6103)
Electronic air cleaner (E.A.C.) output (E38
10.7-
Stepper gas valve control........................... 38
10.8-
Pin Mate-V-Lok connector (J1) .................. 38
11.8.1-
10.9- Communicating ECM motor communications
(control) connection (E114) ..................................... 38
10.10- Communications L.E.D.’s (Light emitting
diodes) 38
Cleaning/replacing the filter .................... 43
11.9-
Lubrication ................................................. 43
11.10-
Burner flame ............................................. 43
11.11system
Condensate collection and disposal
43
11.12-
Rollout switch ........................................... 43
11.13-
Safety interlock switch .............................. 43
10.11-
Memory card ............................................ 39
11.14-
Repair parts .............................................. 43
10.12-
Replacing the furnace control ................... 40
11.15-
Dual seven segment display..................... 43
10.13-
Dipswitch .................................................. 40
11.16-
Fault code buffer ...................................... 43
10.13.1-
S1 – Heat air flow adjustment ................. 40
10.13.2-
S3-1 and S3-2 – Cooling airflow select ... 40
11.16.1buffer
11.17-
10.13.3S3-3 and S3-4 – Cooling and heat pump air
flow adjustment ......................................................... 40
Clearing diagnostic fault codes from the
44
Active fault codes ..................................... 44
LIST OF FIGURE
Figure 1 Freeze protection and return air temp. .............. 9
Figure 16 Pressure switch assembly .............................. 20
Figure 2: Installation in a garage .................................... 11
Figure 17 Horizontal left condensate drain connection (1)
....................................................................................... 21
Figure 3 Dimensional drawing ........................................ 12
Figure 4 Interface card position ...................................... 13
Figure 18 Horizontal left condensate drain connection (2)
....................................................................................... 21
Figure 5 Interface board wires connection ..................... 13
Figure 19 Typical gas pipe arrangement ........................ 23
Figure 6 Drain trap ......................................................... 14
Figure 20 Wiring diagram ............................................... 25
Figure 7 Left side condensate drain connection ............. 14
Figure 21 Vent coupling and adapter with gasket .......... 27
Figure 8 Right side condensate drain connection .......... 14
Figure 22 Direct venting ................................................. 29
Figure 9 Unused stub on drain trap ................................ 16
Figure 23 Other than direct vent clearance .................... 30
Figure 10 Condensate box ............................................. 16
Figure 11 Down flow orientation ..................................... 17
Figure 24 Wiring diagram for modulating heat (no dual
fuel) (non-communicating).............................................. 37
Figure 12 Condensate pressure switch .......................... 18
Figure 25 15-Pin connector; J1 with pin designations .... 38
Figure 13 Unused stub in the horizontal right position ... 19
Figure 26 Control switch modulating valve ..................... 42
Figure 14 Horizonal Right Drain connection of the
condensation box ........................................................... 19
Figure 27 Typical flame appearance .............................. 43
Figure 28 Exploded View – Modulating .......................... 64
Figure 15 Horizontal right drain trap position.................. 20
3
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1 Minimum clearance to combustible material for all
units* .............................................................................. 10
Table 33 33 - MRLC (Manually Reset Limit Control)
OPEN ............................................................................. 55
Table 2 Furnished parts list ............................................ 10
Table 34 44 - LPC (low pressure control (switch)) Closed
....................................................................................... 56
Table 3 Maximum capacity of pipe in Ft³ of gas/hr ......... 23
Table 35 46 - LPC (low pressure control (switch)) Open 57
Table 4 Inlet Gas pressure ............................................. 23
Table 36 55 - HPC (High Pressure Control (switch))
CLOSED ........................................................................ 58
Table 5 Electrical data .................................................... 24
Table 6 Thermostat choice vs system ............................ 24
Table 7 Maximum equivalent vent length (ft.)................. 31
Table 37 57 - HPC (High Pressure Control (switch))
OPEN ............................................................................. 59
Table 8 Deduction for fitting ........................................... 31
Table 38 60 - Blower fault - running ............................... 60
Table 9 Approved combustion air and vent pipe, fitting
and cement materials (U.S.A. Installation) - (In Canada all
vent material s shall comply to ULC S636)..................... 31
Table 39 61 - Blower fault – not running......................... 60
Table 40 66 - Blower overspeed .................................... 61
Table 41 68 - No blower communication ........................ 61
Table 10 Dipswitch S1 - Air flow adjustment - Dip switch
setting............................................................................. 34
Table 42 71 - No inducer communications ..................... 62
Table 11 Dipswitch S3 - Cooling airflow select for noncommunicating condenser ............................................. 35
Table 43 77 - No gas valve feedback ............................. 62
Table 12 Dipswitch S3 - Cooling/heat pump airflow
adjustment for non-communicating system .................... 35
Table 45 Part list – Modulating – ECM 3.0 ..................... 66
Table 13 Dipswitch S4 - Heat rise – test mode –
continuous fan selection ................................................. 35
Table 46 Heating CFM C15-M-V .................................... 68
Table 44 93 - Control fault .............................................. 63
Table 47 Cooling CFM demand C15-M-V and C15-M-S
....................................................................................... 68
Table 14 Dipswitch S5 – Dehumidification and 1st stage
cooling ............................................................................ 35
Table 48 Heating CFM C15-M-S .................................... 69
Table 15 Dipswitch S3 and S5 – Setting cooling airflow
demand .......................................................................... 36
Table 49 Heating CFM C30-M-V .................................... 69
Table 16 Normal operation codes/messages ................. 44
Table 50 Cooling CFM demand for C30-M-V and
C30-M-S ......................................................................... 69
Table 17 Fault code ....................................................... 44
Table 51 Heating CFM for C30-M-S ............................... 70
Table 18 D1 - No shared data ........................................ 45
Table 52 Heating CFM for C45-M-V ............................... 70
Table 19 D4 - Memory card............................................ 46
Table 20 D5 - Card hardware conflict ............................. 46
Table 53 Cooling CFM demand for C45-M-V and
C45-M-S ......................................................................... 70
Table 21 D6 - Blower horsepower conflict ...................... 47
Table 54 Heating CFM for C45-M-S ............................... 71
Table 22 D7 - Blower manufacturer conflict ................... 47
Table 55 CFM in heating for C60-M-V............................ 71
Table 23 D8 - old shared data ........................................ 48
Table 56 Cooling CFM demand for C60-M-V ................. 71
Table 24 h – NO V ......................................................... 49
Table 57 Heating CFM for C75-M-V ............................... 72
Table 25 10 - Ignition 1 hour retry .................................. 49
Table 58 Cooling CFM demand for C75-M-V ................. 72
Table 26 11 - Failed ignition ........................................... 50
Table 59 Heating CFM for C105-M-V ............................. 72
Table 27 12 - Low flame sense ...................................... 51
Table 60 Cooling CFM demand for C105-M-V ............... 73
Table 28 13 - Flame lost................................................. 52
Table 61 Heating CFM for C120-M-V ............................. 73
Table 29 16 - Igniter fail.................................................. 53
Table 62 Cooling CFM demand for C120-M-V ............... 73
Table 30 14 - Unexpected flame .................................... 53
Table 31 22 - Main limit open ......................................... 54
Table 32 26 - Line neutral reverse ................................. 54
4
INDEX OF ANNEXES
Annex 1 CFM TABLES FOR COOLING AND HEATING ......................................................................................................... 68
Annex 2 SPECIFICATION SHEET ........................................................................................................................................... 74
5
Required notice for Massachusetts installations
Important
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts requires compliance with regulation 248 CMR as follows:
5.08: Modifications to NFPA-54, Chapter 10. Revise 10.8.3 by adding the following additional requirements:
For all side wall horizontally vented gas fueled equipment installed in every dwelling, building or structure used in whole or in part for
residential purposes, including those owned or operated by the commonwealth and where the side wall exhaust vent termination is less
than seven (7) feet above finished grade in the area of the venting, including but not limited to decks and porches, the following requirements
shall be satisfied:
Installation of Carbon Monoxide Detectors
At the time of installation of the side wall horizontal vented gas fueled equipment, the installing plumber or gas fitter shall observe that a
hard wired carbon monoxide detector with an alarm and battery backup is installed on the floor level where the gas equipment is to be
installed. In addition, the installing plumber or gas fitter shall observe that a battery operated or hard wired carbon monoxide detector with
an alarm is installed on each additional level of the dwelling, building or structure served by the side wall horizontal vented gas fueled
equipment. It shall be the responsibility of the property owner to secure the services of qualified license professionals for the installation of
hard wired carbon monoxide detectors.
In the event that the side wall horizontally vented gas fueled equipment is installed in a crawl space or an attic, the hard wired carbon
monoxide detector with alarm and battery backup may be installed on the next adjacent floor level.
In the event that the requirements of this subdivision cannot be met at the time of completion of installation, the owner shall have a period
of thirty (30) days to comply with the above requirement; provided, however, that during said thirty (30) day period, a battery operated
carbon monoxide detector with an alarm shall be installed.
APPROVED CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS: Each carbon monoxide detector as required in accordance with the above provision
shall comply with NFPA 720 and be ANSI/UL 2034 listed and IAS certified.
SIGNAGE: A metal or plastic identification plate shall be permanently mounted to the exterior of the building at a minimum height of eight
(8) feet above grade directly in line with the exhaust vent terminal for the horizontally vented gas fueled heating appliance or equipment.
The sign shall read, in print size no less than in-half (1/2) inch in size, “gas vent directly below. Keep clear of all obstruction”.
INSPECTION: the state of local gas inspector of the side wall horizontally vented gas fueled equipment shall not approve the installation
unless, upon inspection, the inspector observes carbon monoxide detectors and signage installed in accordance with the provisions of 248
CMR 5.08 (2) (a) 1 through 4:
EXEMPTION: the following equipment is exempt from 248 CMR 5.08(2) (a) 1 through 4:
The equipment listed in Chapter 10 entitled “equipment not required to be vented “in the most current edition of NFPA 54 as adopted by
the board; and
Product approved side wall horizontally vented gas fueled equipment installed in a room or structure separate from the dwelling, building
or structure in whole or in part for residential purposes.
MANUFACTURER REQUIREMENTS – GAS EQUIPMENT VENTING SYSTEM PROVIDED
When the manufacturer of product approved side wall horizontally vented gas equipment provides a venting system design or venting
system component with the equipment, the instructions provided by the manufacturer for installation of the equipment and the venting
system shall include:
Detailed instructions for the installation of the venting system design or the venting system components; and a complete parts list for the
venting system design or venting system.
MANUFACTURER REQUIREMENTS – GAS EQUIPMENT VENTING SYSTEM PROVIDED
When the manufacturer of product approved side wall horizontally vented gas fueled equipment does not provide the parts or venting the
flue gases, but identifies “special venting system”, the following requirements shall be satisfied by the manufacturer:
The referenced “special venting system” shall be product approved by the board, and the instruction for that system shall include a parts
list and detailed installation instructions.
A copy of all installation instructions for all product, approved side wall horizontally vented gas fueled equipment, all venting instructions,
all part s lists for venting instructions, and/or all venting design instructions shall remain with the appliance or equipment at the completion
of the installation.
For questions regarding these requirements, please contact the Commonwealth of Massachusetts board of State
Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters, 239 Causeway Street, Boston, MA, 02114, tel.: 617 727-9952.
6
WARNING
1- SAFETY REGULATION
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING/COMPONENT DAMAGE
HAZARD
1.1- Safety labeling and warning signs
The words DANGER and WARNING are used to identify the levels of
seriousness of certain hazards. It is important that you understand their
meaning. You will notice these words in the manual as follows:
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal injury or death and
unit component damage.
Corrosive or contaminated air may cause failure of parts containing flue
gas, which could leak into the living space. Air for combustion must not
be contaminated by halogen compounds, which include fluoride,
chloride, bromide, and iodide. These elements can corrode heat
exchangers and shorten furnace life. Air contaminants are found in
aerosol sprays, detergents, bleaches, cleaning solvents, salts, air
fresheners, and other household products. Do not install furnace in a
corrosive or contaminated atmosphere. Make sure all combustion and
circulating air requirements are met, in addition to all local codes and
ordinances.
DANGER
Immediate hazards that WILL result in death, serious bodily injury
and/or property damage
WARNING
Hazards or unsafe practices that CAN result in death, bodily injury
and/or property damage.
WARNING
NOTE: is used to highlight suggestions which will result in enhanced
FIRE, EXPLOSION, ELECTRICAL SHOCK, AND CARBON
MONOXIDE POISONING HAZARD
installation, reliability or operation.
Failure to follow this warning could result in dangerous operation,
personal injury, death, or property damage. Improper installation,
adjustment, alteration, service, maintenance, or use can cause carbon
monoxide poisoning, explosion, fire, electrical shock, or other conditions
which may cause personal injury or property damage. Consult a
qualified service agency, local gas supplier, or your distributor or branch
for information or assistance. The qualified service agency must use
only factory authorized and listed kits or accessories when modifying
this product.
1.2- Important information
DANGER
Non-observance of the safety regulations outlined in this manual will
potentially lead to consequences resulting in death, serious bodily injury
and/or property damage.


It is the homeowner’s responsibility to engage a qualified
technician for the installation and subsequent servicing of this
furnace;
WARNING
Before calling for service, be sure to have the information page of
your manual (last page of your manual) close by in order to be able
to provide the contractor with the required information, such as the
model and serial numbers of the furnace.
FIRE, EXPLOSION, AND CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING
HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal injury, death, or
property damage.
Never operate a furnace without a filter or filtration device installed.
Never operate a furnace with filter or filtration device access doors
removed.
WARNING
Installations and repairs performed by unqualified persons can result in
hazards to them and to others. Installations must conform to local codes
or, in the absence of same, to codes of the country having jurisdiction.
Untrained personnel can perform basic maintenance functions such as
cleaning and replacing air filters. All other operations must be performed
by trained service personnel. When working on heating equipment,
observe precautions in literature, on tags, and on labels attached to or
shipped with furnace and other safety precautions that may apply.
The information contained in this manual is intended for use by a
qualified technician, familiar with safety procedures and who is
equipped with the proper tools and test instruments
These instructions cover minimum requirements and conform to existing
national standards and safety codes. In some instances, these instructions
exceed certain local codes and ordinances, especially those that may not
have kept up with changing residential construction practices. We require
these instructions as a minimum for a safe installation.
1.3- Detection systems
It is recommended that carbon monoxide detectors be installed wherever
oil or gas fired heaters are used. Carbon monoxide can cause bodily harm
or death. For this reason, approved carbon monoxide detectors shall be
installed in your residence and properly maintained to warn of dangerously
high carbon monoxide levels.
Follow all safety codes. Wear safety glasses, protective clothing, and work
gloves. Have a fire extinguisher available. Read these instructions
thoroughly and follow all warnings or cautions included in literature and
attached to the unit.
Fire can cause bodily harm or death. For this reason, approved smoke
detectors should be installed in your residence and be properly maintained,
to warn early on, of a potentially dangerous fire. Also, the house should be
equipped with approved and properly maintained fire extinguishers.
Your unit is equipped with safety devices that can prevent it from
functioning when anomalies are detected such as a blocked venting
system.
7
CAUTION
CAUTION
INJURY HAZARD
FROZEN AND BURST WATER PIPE HAZARD
Ignoring this warning could result in personal injury.
Failure to protect against the risk of freezing may result in property
damage. Special precautions MUST be made if installing furnace in an
area which may drop below freezing. This can cause improper operation
or damage to equipment. If furnace environment has the potential of
freezing, the drain trap and drain line must be protected
Sheet metal parts may have sharp edges or burrs. Use care and wear
appropriate protective clothing, safety glasses and gloves when
handling parts, and servicing furnaces
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Use only with type of gas approved for this furnace. Refer to the
furnace rating plate.
Install this furnace only in a location and position as specified in
section 2.3-Location.
Provide adequate combustion and ventilation air to the furnace
as specified in section 8-Venting and combustion air piping
Combustion products must be discharged outdoors. Connect
this furnace to an approved vent system only as specified in
section 8.4.2-Exhaust vent piping.
Never test for gas leaks with an open flame. Use a
commercially available soap solution made specifically for the
detection of leaks to check all connections, as specified in
section 6-Gas piping.
Always install furnace to operate within the furnace’s intended
temperature rise range with a duct system which has an
external static pressure within the allowable range, as specified
in section 5-Duct installation. See furnace rating label.
When a furnace is installed so that supply ducts carry air
circulated by the furnace to areas outside the space containing
the furnace, the return air shall also be handled by duct(s)
sealed to the furnace casing and terminating outside the space
containing the furnace. See section 5.3-Return air connections.
A gas fired furnace for installation in a residential garage must
be installed as specified in the WARNING box below:
CAUTION
PROPERTY DAMAGE HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in burst water pipes and/or
property damage. If a condensate pump is installed, a clogged
condensate drain or a failed pump may cause the furnace to shut down.
Do not leave the home unattended during freezing weather without
turning off water supply and draining water pipes or otherwise
protecting against the risk of frozen pipes.
Ensure all condensate drain connections are secured and liquid tight.
Use the furnished tube clamps and verify tightness
CAUTION
FURNACE CORROSION HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in furnace damage. Air for
combustion must not be contaminated by halogen compounds, which
include fluoride, chloride, bromide, and iodine. These elements can
corrode heat exchangers and shorten furnace life. Air contaminants are
found in aerosol spray, detergents, bleaches, cleaning solvents, salts,
air fresheners, and other household products.
WARNING
FIRE, INJURY OR DEATH HAZARD
WARNING
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal injury, death
and/or property damage.
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING HAZARD
When the furnace is installed in a residential garage, the burners and
ignitions sources must be located at least 18 in. (457 mm) above the
floor. The furnace must be located or protected to avoid damage by
vehicles. When the furnace is installed in a public garage, airplane
hangar, or other building having a hazardous atmosphere, the furnace
must be installed in accordance with the NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1-2009
or CAN/CSA B149.2-2010.
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal injury or death.
The operation of exhaust fans, kitchen ventilation fans, clothes dryers,
attic exhaust fans or fireplaces could create a NEGATIVE PRESSURE
CONDITION at the furnace. Make-up air MUST be provided for the
ventilation devices, in addition to that required by the furnace.
Do not install the furnace on its back or hang furnace with control
compartment facing downward. Safety control operation will be
adversely affected. Never connect return air duct to the back of the
furnace.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
The furnace is factory shipped for use with natural gas. A CSA
(A.G.A. and C.G.A.) listed accessory gas conversion kit is
required to convert furnace for use with propane gas.
See Table 1 Minimum clearance to combustible material for all
units for required clearances to combustible construction.
Maintain a 1” (25 mm) clearance from combustible materials to
supply air ductwork for a distance of 36” (914 mm) horizontally
from the furnace. See NFPA 90B or local code for further
requirements.
These furnaces SHALL NOT be installed directly on carpeting,
tile, or any other combustible material other than wood flooring.
Gas furnace manufactured on or after May 1, 2017 are not
permitted to be used in Canada for heating of buildings or
structures under construction.
8
with the instruction provided in this manual. A manufactured home
installation must conform with the Manufactured Home Construction and
Safety Standard, Title 24 CFR, Part 3280, or when this Standard is not
applicable, The Standard for Manufactured Home Installations
(Manufactured Home Sites, Communities and Set-Ups), ANSI/NCS
A225.1, and/or MH Series Mobile Homes, CAN/CSA-Z240. Follow all
national and local codes and standards in addition to these
instructions. The installation must comply with regulations of the serving
gas supplier, local building, heating, plumbing, and other codes.
WARNING
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING HAZARD
Failure to follow the steps outlined below for each appliance connected
to the venting system being placed into operation could result in carbon
monoxide poisoning or death. The following steps shall be followed for
each appliance connected to the venting system being placed into
operation, while all other appliances connected to the venting system
are not in operation:
This furnace is designed for minimum continuous return air temperature of
60 °F (16 °C) or intermittent operation down to 55 °F (13 °C) such as when
used with a night setback thermostat. Return air temperature must not
exceed 80 °F (27 °C). Failure to follow these return air temperature limits
may affect reliability of heat exchangers, motors, and controls (Figure 1
Freeze protection and return air temp.).
1. Seal any unused openings in venting system;
2. Inspect the venting system for proper size and horizontal
pitch, as required in the National Fuel Gas Code, NFPA
54/ANSI Z223.1-2009 and these instructions. In Canada, refer
to CAN/CSA-B149.1-2010. Determine that there is no
blockage or restriction, leakage, corrosion and other
deficiencies, which could cause an unsafe condition
The furnace should be sized to provide 100 % of the design heating load
requirement plus any margin that occurs because of furnace model size
capacity increments. Heating load estimates can be made using approved
methods available from Air Conditioning Contractors of America (Manual
J); American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning
Engineers; or other approved engineering methods. Excessive over sizing
of the furnace could cause the furnace and/or vent to fail prematurely.
3. As far as practical, close all building doors and windows and
all doors between the space in which the appliance(s)
connected to the venting system are located and other spaces
of the building.
4. Close fireplace dampers.
2.1- Codes and standards
5. Turn on clothes dryers and any appliance not connected to
the venting system. Turn on any exhaust fans, such as range
hoods and bathroom exhausts, so they are operating at
maximum speed. Do not operate a summer exhaust fan.
Figure 1 Freeze protection and return air temp.
6. Follow the lighting instructions. Place the appliance being
inspected into operation. Adjust the thermostat so appliance
is operating continuously.
7. Test for spillage from draft hood equipped appliances at the
draft hood relief opening after 5 minutes of main burner
operation. Use the flame of a match or candle.
8. If improper venting is observed during any of the above tests,
the venting system must be corrected in accordance with the
National Fuel Gas Code, NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1-2009. In
Canada, refer to CAN/ CSA-B149.1-2010.
9. After it has been determined that each appliance connected
to the venting system properly vents when tested as outlined
above, return doors, windows, exhaust fans, fireplace
dampers and any other gas-fired burning appliance to their
previous conditions of use.
Follow all national and local codes and standards in addition to these
instructions. The installation must comply with regulations of the serving
gas supplier, local building, heating, plumbing, and other codes. In absence
of local codes, the installation must comply with the national codes listed
below and all authorities having jurisdiction. In the United States and
Canada, follow all codes and standards for the following:
Failure to follow the instructions outlined in Locating the Vent
Termination for each appliance being placed into operation could result
in carbon monoxide poisoning or death. For all venting configurations
for this appliance and other gas appliances placed into operation for the
structure, provisions for adequate combustion, ventilation, and dilution
air must be provided in accordance with:
2.1.1-
U.S.A. Installations: Section 9.3 NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1 1−2009, Air for
Combustion and Ventilation and applicable provisions of the local
building codes.
USA:
Canadian Installations: Part 8 of CAN/CSA−B149.1−10. Venting
Systems and Air Supply for Appliances and all authorities having
jurisdiction.
Safety
National Fuel Gas Code (NFGC) NFPA 54-2009/ANSI Z223.12009 and the Installation Standards, Warm Air Heating and Air
Conditioning Systems ANSI/NFPA 90B
CANADA: National Standard of Canada, Natural Gas and Propane
Installation Code (NSCNGPIC) CAN/CSA B149.1-2010
2.1.2-
General installation
2- INTRODUCTION
USA:
This 4-way multi-positioning and modulating Category IV condensing
furnace is CSA design certified as a direct vent (2 pipes) or non-direct vent
(1 pipe). The furnace is factory shipped for use with natural gas. The
furnace can be converted in the field for use with propane gas when a
factory supplied conversion kit is used. Refer to the furnace rating plate for
conversion kit information.
CANADA: NSCNGPIC. For a copy, contact Standard Sales, CSA
International, 178 Rexdale Boulevard, Etobicoke (Toronto),
Ontario, M9W 1R3, Canada
This Category IV furnace is approved for installation in
Manufactured/Mobile housing. The furnace must be installed in accordance
9
NFGC and the NFPA 90B. For copies, contact the National Fire
Protection Association Inc., Battery march Park, Quincy, MA
02269; or for only the NFGC contact the American Gas
Association, 400 N. Capitol, N.W.,Washington DC 20001
2.1.3USA:
Combustion and air ventilation
5)
Use this procedure for installed and uninstalled (ungrounded)
furnaces.
6)
Before removing a new control from its container, discharge your
body’s electrostatic charge to ground to protect the control from
damage. If the control is to be installed in a furnace, follow items
1 through 4 before bringing the control or yourself in contact with
the furnace. Put all used and new controls into containers before
touching ungrounded objects.
7)
An ESD service kit (available from commercial sources) may
also be used to prevent ESD damage.
Duct systems
USA and CANADA: Air Conditioning Contractors Association (ACCA)
(Manual D), Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning
Contractors National Association (SMACNA), or
American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air
Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).
2.1.5-
If you touch ungrounded objects (and recharge your body with
static electricity), firmly touch a clean, unpainted metal surface of
the furnace again before touching control or wires.
Section 9.3 of the NFPA54/ANSI Z223.1-2009 Air for
Combustion and Ventilation
CANADA: Part 8 of the CAN/CSA B149.1-2010, Venting Systems and Air
Supply for Appliances
2.1.4-
4)
Acoustical lining and fibrous glass duct
2.3- Location
USA and CANADA: current edition of SMACNA, NFPA 90B as tested by
UL Standard 181 for Class I Rigid Air Ducts.
2.3.1-
2.1.6-
These furnaces are shipped with materials to assist in proper furnace
installation. These materials are shipped in the main blower compartment.
See Table 2 Furnished parts list. This furnace must:
USA:
Gas piping and pipe pressure testing
NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1-2009 NFGC; Chapters 5, 6, 7, and 8
and national plumbing codes.
CANADA: CAN/CSA-B149.1-2010, Part 6

Be installed so the electrical components are protected from water;

Not be installed directly on any combustible material other than
wood flooring;

Be located close to the chimney or vent and attached to an air
distribution system. Refer to section 5-Duct installation;

Be provided ample space for servicing and cleaning. Always
comply with minimum fire protection clearances shown in Table 1
Minimum clearance to combustible material for all units or on the
furnace rating label.

Install de furnace with a correct slope if installed in other position
than upflow. If installed upflow, make sure the furnace is leveled to
ensure proper drainage of condensate.
IN THE STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS:

This product must be installed by a licensed plumber or gas fitter.

When flexible connectors are used, the maximum length shall not
exceed 36 in. (914 mm).

When lever type gas shutoffs are used they shall be "T" handle
type.

The use of copper tubing for gas piping is not approved by the state
of Massachusetts.
2.1.7USA:
General
Table 1 Minimum clearance to combustible material for all units*
Electrical connections
Position
Rear
Front
Required for service
All sides of supply plenum
Sides
Vent
Top of furnace
National Electrical Code (NEC) ANSI/NFPA 70-2011
CANADA: Canadian Electrical Code
2.2- Electrostatic discharge
CAUTION
Clearance in (mm)
0
0
*24'' (610)
*1''(25)
0
0
1''
*See local building codes.
FURNACE RELIABILITY HAZARD
Table 2 Furnished parts list
Failure to follow this caution may result in unit component damage.
Electrostatic discharge can affect electronic components. Take
precautions during furnace installation and servicing to protect the
furnace electronic control. Precautions will prevent electrostatic
discharges from personnel and hand tools which are held during the
procedure. These precautions will help to avoid exposing the control to
electrostatic discharge by putting the furnace, the control, and the
person at the same electrostatic potential.
1)
Quantity
Disconnect all power to the furnace. Multiple disconnects may be
required. DO NOT TOUCH THE CONTROL OR ANY WIRE
CONNECTED TO THE CONTROL PRIOR TO DISCHARGING
YOUR BODY’S ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE TO GROUND.
2)
Firmly touch the clean, unpainted, metal surface of the furnace
chassis which is close to the control. Tools held in a person’s
hand during grounding will be satisfactorily discharged.
3)
After touching the chassis, you may proceed to service the
control or connecting wires as long as you do nothing to recharge
your body with static electricity (for example; DO NOT move or
shuffle your feet, do not touch ungrounded objects, etc.).
Description
1
6
Plastic cap 5/8"
Plastic cap 1/2"
10
1
Screw TEKS HEX WSH #8-18 x ½
2" PVC pipe (Length = 1.5" OR 6.75”)
1
1
Drain trap
Drain trap gasket
2
2
Gasket wall pipe flange
Wall pipe flange
1
1
Clear PVC tube 5/8" ID x 24"
Clear PVC tube 1/2" ID x 24"
1
Square PVC tube 3/16’’ ID x 8”
Brown wire (Only used in Downflow and
horizontal configuration)
1
The following types of furnace installations may require OUTDOOR AIR for
combustion due to chemical exposures:
10

Commercial buildings

Buildings with indoor pools

Laundry rooms

Hobby or craft rooms, and

Chemical storage areas
When installing the furnace, provisions must be made to ensure the supply
of adequate combustion and ventilation air in accordance with the “air for
combustion and ventilation” section of the National Fuel Gas Code, NFPA
5/ANSI Z223.1-2002, or latest edition, or applicable provisions of the local
building code.
Figure 2: Installation in a garage
If air is exposed to the following substances, it should not be used for
combustion air. Outdoor air may be required for combustion:

Permanent wave solutions

Chlorinated waxes and cleaners

Chlorine based swimming pool chemicals

Water softening chemicals

De-icing salts or chemicals

Carbon tetrachloride Halogen type refrigerants

Cleaning solvents (such as perchloroethylene)

Printing inks, paint removers, varnishes, etc.

Hydrochloric acid

Cements and glues

Antistatic fabric softeners for clothes dryers

Masonry acid washing materials
2.3.2-
All fuel burning equipment must be supplied with air for fuel combustion.
Sufficient air must be provided to avoid negative pressure in the equipment
room or space. A positive seal must be made between the furnace cabinet
and the return air duct to prevent pulling air from the burner area.
Location relative to cooling equipment
The cooling coil can either be installed in the supply air duct or in the return
air duct. If the cooling coil is installed in the supply air duct, it must be at a
minimum of 6” over the furnace heat exchanger.
Place the unit so that proper venting can be achieved, with a minimum
number of elbows, in accordance with the instructions in this manual. The
furnace should be located as close to the chimney (vertical venting) or to
the outside vent wall (horizontal venting) as possible.
11
Figure 3 Dimensional drawing
12
(temperature at which the unit will switch from heat pump heating to
auxiliary heat, in this case gas) will be adjustable through the thermostat.
If this unit is destined to be used as a cooling system only, the heat
pump can also be disable from the communicating thermostat, by using
emergency heat. For more details refer to the manual provided with the
thermostat.
3- ALIZÉ COOLING UNIT
To optimize your HVAC experience, Dettson offers a cooling system
called the Alizé.
3.1- Thermostat using Alizé system
3.2- Position of the interface board
When using the Alizé cooling unit, the communicating thermostat must
be used (R02P029). The interface card (K03069) will be able to gather
information from the outdoor unit, the furnace and the thermostat,
making this integrated system easy to install. The indoor blower speed
will be determined by various factors including outdoor temperature,
compressor speed and demand from the thermostat. The balance point
Provision has been made on the main control board support in the
furnace to locate the interface board (K03069). Refer to Figure 4
Interface card position.
Figure 4 Interface card position
3.3- Wires connections with interface board
Figure 5 Interface board wires connection, explains how to properly wire
the interface board to the ERV/HRV and main furnace control. For the
complete wire connection, please refer to the Alizé manual. The interface
board allows the ERV/HRV to be interlocked with the furnace, giving a
smooth and quiet operation of the whole system.
Figure 5 Interface board wires connection
13
Figure 7 Left side condensate drain connection
4- INSTALLATION
The furnace is factory built for upflow position. In this position, the drain
trap can be installed on right or left side depending on air return duct.
When installing the furnace in the upflow position, make sure it is
leveled.
To ensure proper drainage of the condensate when installed in
position other than upflow, tilt the furnace from level position to a
minimum slope of ½” higher at back to front.
When installing the furnace in other orientation than the upflow position,
simply configure the condensate tubing accordingly with the instructions
provided in this section of the manual.
CAUTION
PROPERTY DAMAGE HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in water spillage and/or
property damage.
For any position other than upflow, the multiposition pressure
switch must be connected pneumatically to the condensate box
and electrically to the control to allow the furnace to stop in the
event of drain blockage.
Figure 6 Drain trap
Figure 8 Right side condensate drain connection
4.1- Upflow orientation
In the upflow orientation, the drain trap (Figure 6 Drain trap) can
be installed to the right or to the left of the furnace. The
condensate drain hoses must be routed from the trap through the
furnace casing. Remove the knock out parts of metal and install
the hoses to the drain trap. The condensate hoses can be routed
through the left or right.
4.1.11.
14
Right side condensate drain trap connection
Remove the oblong knock-out from the right side of the
casing.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Place the drain trap gasket on drain trap, in a way that
the holes are aligned.
Install the drain trap on the right side, the three outlet
stub of the drain trap toward the interior of the furnace.
The three outward stubs ends are now inside the
furnace.
Screw in place the drain trap with two head tapping
screws on the right side of the furnace.
Connect the outlet drain from the drain trap to an
additional condensate piping using a ½’’ tee for an
adequate drainage of the condensate. DO NOT vent
using the remaining 3 outlet stubs. Such a drain shall
be in compliance with local building codes or to a
condensate pump approved for the use with acidic
furnace condensate.
Prime the drain trap with water. This will ensure proper
furnace drainage at startup and will avoid any
recirculation of flue gas.
On the remaining 3 outlet stub, connect black vinyl cap
(1x5/8’’ and 2x1/2”). Those cap are furnished in the loose
part bag.
9.
On the remaining 3 outlet stub, connect black vinyl cap
(1x5/8’’ and 2x1/2”). Those cap are furnished in the part
bag.
4.2- Down flow orientation
To install the furnace in down flow position, the following steps are
required for proper operation.
NOTE: It is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED to use the optional
downflow base to ensure the 1’’ clearance around the
supply duct going through the floor and the proper slope
of the furnace for condensate drainage. Also, the base
allows sufficient spacing for the venting and the drain
trap.
4.2.1-
Down flow condensate drain trap connection
1. Remove all PVC tubes from the ID blower, condensate
box and vent collector and block the stub openings with
furnished 5/8’’ & 1/2’’ black caps.
2. Remove the knock-out from the bottom left side of the
casing.
3. Place the drain trap gasket on drain trap.
4.1.21.
Remove the oblong knock-out from the left side of the
casing.
2.
Place the drain trap gasket on drain trap.
3.
Install the drain trap on the side, the three outlet stubs of
the drain trap toward the interior of the furnace. The three
outward stubs are now inside the furnace.
4.
Connect each of condensate tubes to a stubs. Use de
furnished ½’’ and 5/8’’ hoses to cut the appropriate length
to get to the drain trap. The condensate hose from the
condensate box is 5/8’’ and it must be connected to the
5/8’’ stub of the drain trap. The condensate hoses from
the ID blower and the vent flange are ½” and are
connected to the ½” stubs of the drain trap.
5.
Ensure the hoses are adequately connected to the stubs.
6.
Screw in place the drain trap with two head tapping
screws on the side of the furnace.
7.
Connect the outlet drain from the drain trap to an
additional condensate piping using a ½’’ tee for an
adequate drainage of the condensate. DO NOT vent
using the remaining three outlet stubs. Such a drain
shall be in compliance with local building codes or to a
condensate pump approved for the use with acidic
furnace condensate.
8.
4. Install the drain trap on the bottom left side, the three
outlet stubs ends of the drain trap directed toward the
interior of the furnace. The three outward stubs ends now
penetrate inside the furnace.
Left side condensate drain trap connection
5. Screw in place the drain trap with 2 Tek tapping screws to
the side of the furnace.
6. Install two 1/2’’ black plastic caps on the 1/2” stub of the
drain trap. See Figure 9 Unused stub on drain trap.
7. Cut the required length of furnished 5/8’’ clear PVC tube
and connect one end on the port on the lower right side of
the condensate box.(Figure 10 Condensate box)
8. Connect the other end to 5/8’’ stub of the drain trap and
secure the hose on the gas manifold with a tie wrap.
9. Connect the outlet from the drain trap to the condensate
drain piping with a tee. DO NOT vent using the
remaining 3 outlet stubs. Such a drain shall be in
compliance with local building codes or to a condensate
pump approved for the use with acidic furnace
condensate.
10. The venting should be drained using a PVC 636 tee.
Connect this tee to a P-trap and connect it to your
condensate drain. Commercially available condensate
trap exist for use with IPEX system 636.
11. Make sure the unused stub ends of the drain trap are
plugged with furnished plastic caps.
Prime the drain trap with water. This will ensure proper
furnace drainage at startup and will avoid any
recirculation of flue gas.
15
Figure 9 Unused stub on drain trap
Figure 10 Condensate box
16
Figure 11 Down flow orientation
4.2.2-
All furnaces with horizontal exhaust vent piping must have a PVC
636 drain tee assembly and trap installed in the exhaust pipe as
close to the furnace as possible. See Figure 11 Down flow
orientation. Commercially available condensate trap exist for use
with IPEX system 636.
4.2.3-
Connect a piece of 5/8’’ PVC tube to the bottom left of
the condensate box and route with an elbow to the drain
trap. See Figure 14 Horizontal Right Drain connection of
the condensation box.
7.
Connect the outlet from the drain trap to the condensate
drain piping using a ½’’ PVC tee. DO NOT vent using
the remaining 3 outlet stubs. Such a drain shall be in
compliance with local building codes or to a condensate
pump approved for use with acidic furnace condensate.
8.
Make sure the unused stubs ends of the drain trap are
plugged with furnished plastic caps.
Multiposition pressure switch connection downflow
The 3/16 stub just beside the drain of the condensate box must
be drilled or cut open. The black squared PVC tubing of the
pressure switch (-0.2 in w.c.) must be connected to this stub. This
tubing is furnished with the furnace. See Figure 12 Condensate
pressure switch.
NOTE : The drain trap must be vertical.
4.3.2-
The pressure switch must now be electrically connected in series
with the low fire pressure switch (top) with the brown jumper. See
Figure 16 Pressure switch assembly and wiring diagrams.
4.3.3-
Horizontal right condensate drain connection
1.
Remove all PVC tubes from the ID blower, condensate
box and vent collector and block the stub openings with
furnished 5/8’’ & 1/2’’ black caps.
2.
Remove the knock-outs from the bottom middle side of
the casing.
3.
Place the drain trap gasket on the drain trap.
4.
Screw in place the drain trap with 2 Tek tapping screws
to the side of the furnace.
5.
Install two 1/2” black plastic caps on the unused stub
openings on the drain trap inside the furnace. See Figure
13 Unused stub in the horizontal right position
Horizontal right vent drainage
All furnaces with horizontal exhaust vent piping must have a PVC
636 drain tee assembly and trap installed in the exhaust pipe as
close to the furnace as possible. See Figure 15 Horizontal right
drain trap position
4.3- Horizontal right orientation
4.3.1-
6.
Downflow venting drainage
Multiposition pressure switch connection horizontal
The 3/16 stub just beside the drain of the condensate box must
be drilled or cut open. The tubing of the pressure switch (-0.2
nearest to the ID blower) must be connected to this stub.
The pressure switch must now be electrically connected in series
with the low fire pressure switch (top) with the brown jumper. See
Figure 16 Pressure switch assembly and wiring diagrams.
4.4- Horizontal left orientation
4.4.11.
17
Horizontal left condensate drain connection
Remove the knock-outs from the bottom middle side of
the casing.
Plug the 5/8’’ and 1/2” tubes to the drain trap. The drain
trap must be vertical.
2.
Drill open the new bottom stub of the ID blower (if not
already open). Be sure to remove all debris.
9.
3.
Reroute the ID blower drain tube from the bottom of the
ID blower casing to one of the 1/2” stub. Do not screw
the drain trap to the furnace casing.
4.
Block the other open ID blower drain with a 1/2’’ black
cap.
10. Connect the outlet from the drain trap to the condensate
drain piping using a ½’’ PVC tee. Such a drain shall be in
compliance with local building codes or to a condensate
pump approved for use with acidic furnace condensate.
5.
Reroute the condensate box drain tube from the bottom
of the condensate box through the casing.
6.
Block the other opening of the condensate box with a
5/8’’ black cap.
7.
Reroute the vent collector drain tube to one of the 1/2”
stubs.
8.
Apply the neoprene gasket around the 5/8’’ and 1/2”
tubes at the point where they cross the furnace casing to
seal the passage.
11. Make sure the unused stub ends of the drain trap are
plugged with furnished plastic caps.
4.4.2-
Multiposition pressure switch connection horizontal
The 3/16” stub just beside the drain of the condensate box must
be drilled or cut open. The tubing of the pressure switch (-0.2
nearest to the ID blower) must be connected to this stub.
The pressure switch must now be electrically connected in
series with the low fire pressure switch (top) with the brown
jumper. See Figure 16 Pressure switch assembly and wiring
diagrams.
Figure 12 Condensate pressure switch
18
Figure 13 Unused stub in the horizontal right position
Figure 14 Horizontal Right Drain connection of the condensation box
19
Figure 15 Horizontal right drain trap position
Figure 16 Pressure switch assembly
20
Figure 17 Horizontal left condensate drain connection (1)
Figure 18 Horizontal left condensate drain connection (2)
21
5- DUCT INSTALLATION
5.4- Filter arrangement
5.1- General requirements
There are no provisions for an internal filter rack in these furnaces. An
external filter is required.
Dettson doesn’t provide any air filter or filter rack.
The duct system should be designed and sized according to accepted
national standards such as those published by: Air Conditioning
Contractors Association (ACCA), Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning
Contractors National Association (SMACNA) or American Society of
Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) or
consult The Air Systems Design Guidelines reference tables available
from your local distributor.
5.5- Supply air ducts
The supply air duct must be connected ONLY to the furnace supply outlet
air duct flanges or air conditioning coil casing (when used). DO NOT cut
main furnace casing side to attach supply air duct, humidifier, or other
accessories. All accessories MUST be connected to the supply or return
ductwork external to furnace main casing.
The duct system should be sized to handle the required system design
CFM at the design external static pressure. The furnace airflow rates are
provided at the end of this manual. When a furnace is installed so that the
supply ducts carry air circulated by the furnace to areas outside the space
containing the furnace, the return air shall also be handled by duct(s)
sealed to the furnace casing and terminating outside the space containing
the furnace.
NOTE: Many states, provinces and localities are considering or have
implemented standards and/or restrictions on duct sizing
practices, ductwork leakage, and/or ductwork thermal, airflow and
electrical efficiencies. CONSULT LOCAL CODE OFFICIALS for
ductwork design and performance requirement in your area.
Secure ductwork with proper fasteners for type of ductwork used. Seal
supply and return duct connections to furnace with code approved tape or
duct sealer.
5.5.1-
Duct work acoustical treatment
Metal duct systems that do not have a 90 degree elbow and 10 ft. (3 M) of
main duct to the first branch take-off may require internal acoustical lining.
As an alternative, fibrous ductwork may be used if constructed and
installed in accordance with the latest edition of SMACNA construction
standard on fibrous glass ducts. Both acoustical lining and fibrous
ductwork shall comply with NFPA 90B as tested by UL Standard 181 for
Class 1 Rigid air ducts.
Ductwork passing through an unconditioned space should be insulated to
enhance system performance. When air conditioning is used, a vapour
barrier is recommended.
Maintain a 1 in. (25 mm) clearance from combustible materials to supply
air ductwork for a distance of 36 in. (914 mm) horizontally from the
furnace. See NFPA 90B or local code for further requirements.
NOTE: Flexible connections can be used between ductwork and furnace
to prevent transmission of vibration.
6- GAS PIPING
Proper airflow is necessary for the correct operation of this furnace. If
ductwork is not sized properly, the furnace can operate erratically.
Installer should size the ducts according to industry standards and
methods. The total static pressure drop of the supply and return ducts
should not exceed 0.3’’ w.c. if this furnace is installed with traditional
ductwork.
6.1- General
Gas piping must be installed in accordance with national and local codes.
Refer to current edition of NFGC in the U.S.A.
Refer to current edition of CAN/CSA B149.1 in Canada.
Installations must be made in accordance with all authorities having
jurisdiction.
CFM Tables are provided at the end of this manual to help installer
size the ducts.
NOTE: Use a back-up wrench on the inlet of the gas valve when
connecting the gas line to the gas valve.
5.2- Smart Duct System
In the state of Massachusetts:
Dettson Industries also offers Smart Duct System. Please refer to the
Smart Duct Manual (X40240) for proper installation of this system.
1.
Gas supply connections MUST be performed by a licensed
plumber or gas fitter.
5.3- Return air connections
2.
The return air duct must be connected to the bottom, left side or right side.
If necessary (depending on your filter restriction), provision should be
made for a double return.
When flexible connectors are used, the maximum length shall
not exceed 36 in. (915 mm).
3.
When lever handle type manual equipment shutoff valves are
used, they shall be "T" handle valves.
4.
The use of copper tubing for gas piping is NOT approved by the
state of Massachusetts.
NOTE: In downflow configuration, side return air is not permitted, it must
be connected to bottom.
5.3.1-
Report to Table 3 Maximum capacity of pipe for recommended gas pipe
sizing. Support all gas piping with appropriate straps, hangers, etc. Use a
minimum of 1 hanger every 6 ft (1.8 m). Joint compound (pipe dope)
should be applied sparingly and only to male threads of joints. Pipe dope
must be resistant to the action of propane gas.
Bottom return air inlet
In Upflow orientation, for the bottom inlet, installer can use a return air
base. This base allows the connection of the duct on the side with a bottom
inlet. See Table 45 Part list – Modulating – ECM 3.0. Options for the part
number corresponding to your furnace.
An accessible manual equipment shut off valve MUST be installed
external to furnace casing.
Cut a rectangular opening on the bottom plate of the furnace. To know
what dimension to be used, refer to the input of the furnace as showed on
Figure 3 Dimensional drawing. Install the return air inlet as per local codes.
5.3.2-
Install a sediment trap in riser leading to furnace as shown in Figure 19
Typical gas pipe arrangement. Connect a capped nipple into lower end of
tee. Capped nipple should extend below level of furnace gas controls.
Place a ground joint union between furnace gas control valve and exterior
manual equipment gas shutoff valve (for ridged black pipe).
Side return air inlet
Remove 4 knock-outs on the side of the furnace of the 8 knock-outs
available. Use the knock-outs related to the furnace size as shown on
Figure 3 Dimensional drawing. Install the return air inlet as per local
codes.
22
Table 3 Maximum capacity of pipe in Ft³ of gas/hr
Nominal
Iron pipe
size in.
(mm)
1/2 (13)
Internal
dia. in.
(mm)
3/4 (19)
1 (25)
1-1/4 (32)
1-1/2 (39)
0.622 (158)
0.824
(20.9)
1.049
(26.6)
1.380
(35.0)
1.610
(40.9)
and accessible manual equipment shutoff valve before and during supply
pipe pressure test. After all connections have been made, purge lines and
check for leakage prior to operating furnace.
Length of pipe - FT (M)
10
(3.0)
20
(6.0)
30
(9.1)
40
(12.1)
50
(15.2)
175
120
97
82
73
360
250
200
170
151
680
465
375
320
285
1400
950
770
660
580
2100
1460
1180
990
900
The gas supply pressure shall be within the maximum and minimum inlet
supply pressures marked on the rating plate and in Table 4 Inlet Gas
pressure.
6.2- Gas valve and propane conversion kit
To convert from natural to L.P. gas, installer should use the appropriate
conversion kit. Please refer to Table 45 Part list – Modulating – ECM 3.0
at the end of this manual.
The conversion kit consist of orifices, jumper and stickers to clearly identify
conversion on the gas valve.
1. Move the switch located on the valve to the «off» position.
2. Remove the «NAT. GAS» label from the top of the gas valve.
3. Using a pair of tweezers or needle nose pliers, place the jumper
(supplied) on the receptacle located beneath the label that was
removed in step 2. Use care to make sure that both prongs of
receptacle engage the jumper.
4. Place the «LP» label (supplied with the kit) on the gas valve
over the opening to the jumper.
5. Attach the “WARNING” label (supplied with this kit) to the gas
valve where it can readily be seen.
6. Move the switch located on gas valve back to the “ON” position.
7. Unscrew the manifold.
8. Replace the natural gas burner orifices with the LP orifice (#56)
supplied with the kit.
9. Replace the manifold and make sure it’s properly aligned with
the burners.
10. Make sure the gas valve outlet pressure (measured on the
outlet pressure tap) is compliant with the outlet pressure. Outlet
pressure is specified on the nameplate of the furnace.
* Cubic feet of gas per hr for gas pressures of 0.5 psig (14 in. w.c)
(Based on a 0.60 specific gravity gas)
Ref: Table 6.2 of NFPA54/ANSI Z223.1-2009
Figure 19 Typical gas pipe arrangement
6.3- Gas pipe grommet
For direct vent (2 pipe) applications, the hole for the gas pipe on the
cabinet must be sealed to prevent air leakage. Install the grommet in the
hole, then insert the gas pipe and apply fillet paste.
7- ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS
WARNING
FIRE HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal injury, death, or
property damage.
Do not connect aluminium wire between disconnect switch and
furnace. Use only copper wire.
Piping should be pressure and leak tested in accordance with the current
edition of the NFGC in the United States, local, and national plumbing and
gas codes before the furnace has been connected. Refer to current edition
of NSCNGPIC in Canada. After all connections have been made, purge
lines and check for leakage at furnace prior to operating furnace.
Check all factory and field electrical connections for tightness.
NOTE: The furnace gas valve inlet pressure tap connection is suitable
to use as test gauge connection providing test pressure.
7.1- 120 V wiring
Supplied field wiring shall conform to the limitations of 63°F (33°C) rise.
Furnace must have a 120 V power supply properly connected and
grounded.
Table 4 Inlet Gas pressure
Gas Pressure
in w.c. (psig)
Natural gas
Propane
Maximum
Minimum
10.5 (0.38)
4.5 (0.16)
13.0 (0.47)
11.0 (0.40)
NOTE: Proper polarity must be maintained for 120 V wiring. If polarity is
incorrect, control LED status indicator light will flash rapidly and
furnace will NOT operate.
Verify that the voltage, frequency, and phase correspond to that specified
on unit rating plate. Also, check to be sure that service provided by utility
is sufficient to handle load imposed by this equipment. Refer to rating plate
or Table 5 Electrical data for equipment electrical specifications.
If pressure exceeds 0.38 psig (10.5 in. W.C.), gas supply pipe must be
disconnected from furnace and capped before and during supply pipe
pressure test. If test pressure is equal to or less than 0.38 psig (10.5 in.
W.C.), turn off electric shutoff switch located on furnace gas control valve
23
U.S.A. Installations:
Make all electrical connections in accordance with the current edition of
the Canadian Electrical Code CSA C22.1 and any local codes or
ordinances that might apply.
Make all electrical connections in accordance with the current edition of
the National Electrical Code (NEC) ANSI/NFPA 70 and any local codes or
ordinances that might apply.
Use a separate fused branch electrical circuit with a properly sized fuse or
circuit breaker for this furnace. See Table 5 Electrical data for fuse
specifications. A readily accessible means of electrical disconnect must
be located within sight of the furnace.
Canada Installations:
Table 5 Electrical data
Operating voltage range
Min.
Maximum
unit amps
Units
ampacity
Maximum
fuse or CKT
BRK amp
127
127
127
127
127
127
104
104
104
104
104
104
10.7
10.7
10.7
13.1
13.1
15.8
12.6
12.6
12.6
15.6
15.6
19
15
15
15
20
20
20
127
104
15.8
19
20
Unit size
Volts-HertzPhase
Max.
15,000
30,000
45 000
60,000
75,000
105,000
120-60-1
120-60-1
120-60-1
120-60-1
120-60-1
120-60-1
120,000
120-60-1
7.2- 24 V wiring
7.3- Thermostats
Make field 24 V connections at the 24 V terminal strip. Use only AWG No.
18 minimum, color-coded, copper thermostat wire.
The furnace must be installed with the Modulating Touch-Screen
Thermostat R02P030 (#1F95M). If the furnace is to be installed with the
modulating cooling option, use the Communicating Thermostat R02P029
(#1F991292).
NOTE: Use AWG No. 18 color coded copper thermostat wire for lengths
up to 100ft. (30.5m). For wire lengths over 100 ft., use AWG No
16 wire.
Consult the thermostat installation instruction for specific information
about configuring the thermostat.
The 24 V circuit contains an automotive type, 3-amp fuse located on the
control board. Any 24v direct shorts during installation, service, or
maintenance could cause this fuse to blow. If fuse replacement is required,
use ONLY a 3 amp fuse. Refer to Figure 20 Wiring diagram for the location
of the fuse.
To know exactly what thermostat should be used with your system
(cooling, ERV/HRV), please refer to the table below:
Table 6 Thermostat choice vs system
Heating system
Cooling system
Thermostat
HRV interlock at low
CFM
Interface board
needed
Smart duct
Compliant
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Communicating
Alizé
R02P029
Modulating Chinook
1 stage Non-Alizé
Cooling Unit
Communicating
1 & 2 Stage Non Alizé
Cooling/Heat pump
Modulating
R02P029
R02P030
Power from an alternate power supply that is non-sinusoidal may damage
the furnace electronics or cause erratic operation.
7.4- Alternate power supply
The furnace is designed to operate on utility generated power which has
a smooth sinusoidal waveform. If the furnace is to be operated on a
generator or other alternate power supply, it must produce a smooth
sinusoidal waveform for compatibility with furnace electronics. The
alternate power supply must generate the same voltage, phase, and
frequency (Hz) as shown in Table 5 Electrical data or the furnace rating
plate.
Contact the alternate power supply manufacturer for specifications and
details.
24
Figure 20 Wiring diagram
25
U.S.A. Installations: Section 5.3 of the NFPA 54/ANSI Z223.1-2009, Air
for Combustion and Ventilation and applicable provisions of the local
building codes.
8- VENTING AND COMBUSTION AIR PIPING
8.1- Introduction
8.1.1-
Canada: Part 8 of the CAN/CSA-B149.1-2010, Venting Systems and Air
Supply for Appliances.
Direct vent (2 pipe applications)
8.2- Special venting requirements for installations in
Canada
When this furnace is installed as a direct vent (2 pipe) furnace; no special
provisions for air for combustion are required. However, other gas
appliances installed in the space with the furnace may require outside air
for combustion. Follow the guidelines below to insure that other gas
appliances have sufficient air for combustion.
The special vent fittings and accessory concentric vent termination kits
and accessory external drain trap have been certified to ULC S636 for use
with Royal Pipe, IPEX PVC and CPVC vent components.
Direct vent installations require a dedicated combustion air and venting
system. All air for combustion is taken from outside and all combustion
products are discharged to the outdoors.
In Canada, S636 certified primers and cements must be used and be of
the same manufacturer of the S636 venting system- do not mix primers
and cements from one manufacturer with a vent system from a
different manufacturer. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions in the use
of primer and cement and never use primer or cement beyond its
expiration date.
Therefore, no ventilation or combustion air openings are required.
In Canada, refer to manufacturer's instructions for supporting ULC S636
venting.
In a direct vent (2 pipes) system, all air for combustion is taken directly
from outdoor atmosphere, and all flue products are discharged to outdoor
atmosphere. Combustion air and vent pipes must terminate either through
the roof or sidewall. See Figure 22 Direct venting for references to
clearances required by National code authorities.
Safe operation, as defined by ULC S636, of the vent system is based on
following the vent system manufacturer installation instructions, and
proper use of required primers and cements.
All fire stop and roof flashing used with this system must be UL listed
material.
TERMINATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA
AND SASKATCHEWAN:
Acceptability under Canadian standard CAN/CSA B149 requires full
compliance with all installation instructions.
The Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan require a minimum
unobstructed distance of 4 ft. (1.2 M) from the foundation to the property
line of the adjacent lot for vent termination of any appliance with an input
over 35,000 BTU/h. If there is less than 4 ft. (1.2 M) of unobstructed
distance to the property line of the adjacent lot, no type of vent termination
is permitted for appliances with inputs greater than 35,000 BTU/h. There
are no additional restrictions on unobstructed distances greater than 8 ft.
(2.4 M).
The authority having jurisdiction (gas inspection authority, municipal
building department, fire department, etc.) should be consulted before
installation to determine the need to obtain a permit.
8.3- General
All single, two pipe and concentric vents may be used, providing all other
Codes and manufacturer’s requirements in these instructions are adhered
to.
If this furnace replaces a furnace that was connected to a vent system or
chimney, the vent or vent connectors of other remaining appliances may
need to be re-sized. Vent systems or vent connectors of other appliance
must be sized to the minimum size allowable.
If the unobstructed distance from the foundation to the property line of the
adjacent lot is no less than 4 ft. (1.2 M) and no greater than 8 ft. (2.4 M),
it will be necessary to re-direct the flue gas. In this situation, a concentric
vent kit cannot be used.
An abandoned masonry chimney may be used as a raceway for properly
insulated and supported combustion-air (when applicable) and vent pipes.
Each furnace must have its own set of combustion air and vent pipes and
be terminated individually.
A 2 pipe system (or single pipe system when permitted) that redirects the
flue gas away by use of an elbow or tee, certified to ULC S636 from the
adjacent property line must be used.
A furnace shall not be connected to a chimney flue serving a separate
appliance designed to burn solid fuel.
8.1.2-
Other gas appliances with their own venting system may also use the
abandoned chimney as a raceway providing it is permitted by local code,
the current edition of the National Fuel Gas Code, and the vent or liner
manufacturer’s installation instructions. Care must be taken to prevent the
exhaust gases from one appliance from contaminating the combustion air
of other gas appliances.
Non direct vent (1 pipe) applications
When the furnace is installed as a non-direct vent (1 pipe) furnace, it will
be necessary to ensure there is adequate air for combustion. Other gas
appliances installed with the furnace may also require air for combustion
and ventilation in addition to the amount of combustion air and ventilation
required for the furnace.
8.4- Connecting to furnace
Do not common vent with any other appliance. Do not install in the same
chase or chimney with a metal or high temperature plastic pipe from
another gas or fuel-burning appliance unless the required minimum
clearances to combustibles are maintained between the approved PVC
pipe and other pipes. Clean and deburr all pipe cuts. The shavings must
not allowed to block the exhaust, inlet or condensate drain pipes.
When the furnace is installed using the ventilated combustion air option,
the attic or crawlspace must freely communicate with the outdoors to
provide sufficient air for combustion. The combustion air pipe cannot be
terminated in attics or crawlspaces that uses ventilation fans designed to
operate during the heating season. If ventilation fans are present in these
areas, the combustion pipe must terminate outdoors as a direct vent (2
pipe) system.
A 2” diameter PVC pipe is supplied with your furnace. Depending of your
cabinet size, this pipe length is either 1.5” or 6.75”. Connect this piece of
PVC to the rubber coupling over the induce draft blower. If this piece is
not installed properly, flue gases will circulate in the cabinet and cause
burner to shut off.
All air for combustion is piped directly to the furnace from a space that is
well ventilated with outdoor air (such as an attic, crawlspace or equipment
closet) and the space is well isolated from the living space or garage. In
addition, other gas appliances installed in the space with the furnace may
require outside air for combustion.
The exhaust pipe connection is a 2” female PVC pipe fitting extending
through the back right side of the furnace top plate. (See Figure 21 Vent
coupling and adapter with gasket). When 2” pipe is used, connect it
directly to this fitting. When 3” pipe is used, connect a 2” to 3” coupling to
this fitting with a short piece of 2” PVC pipe. The inlet combustion air
connection is at the front right side of the top plate.
Provisions for adequate combustion, ventilation, and dilution air must be
provided in accordance with:
26
All exhaust piping must be installed in compliance with Part 7, “Venting of
Equipment,” of the latest edition of the National Fuel Gas Code NPFA 54,
90A and 90B ANSI Z223.1-, local codes or ordinances and these
instructions:
1.
2.
density, foil faced fiberglass or equivalent Rubatex/Armaflex
insulation. (In Canada per the vent manufacturer’s instructions)
Provide the space with sufficient air for proper combustion,
ventilation, and dilution of flue gases using permanent
horizontal or vertical duct(s) or opening(s) directly
communicating with the outdoors or spaces that freely
communicate with the outdoors.
3.
For runs where condensate could collect and freeze, wrap the
vent pipe with self-regulating, 3 or 5 Watt heat tape. The heat
tape must be U.L./CSA. listed and installed per the
manufacturer’s instructions.
4.
All piping between the furnace and the roof or outside wall
penetration is either 2" or 3".
Insulate all vent runs through unconditioned spaces where
below freezing temperatures are expected with 1" thick medium
Figure 21 Vent coupling and adapter with gasket
8.4.1-
The exhaust vent must terminate at least 12” above the combustion air
termination inlet. The maximum length of the exposed vent pipe above the
roof is 30".
Combustion air piping
Use a 90° elbow or two medium-radius sweep elbows to keep the inlet
downward and prevent the entry of rain. The inlet opening of the
combustion air termination must be a minimum of 12” above the
anticipated level of snow accumulation.
NOTE: The combustion air and exhaust terminations must be at least 12”
above grade. Use alternate horizontal terminations when
termination locations are limited and higher snow levels are
anticipated.
Install termination as follow:
NOTE: Ensure the location of the combustion air inlet with respect to
the exhaust vent terminal complies with Figure 22 Direct venting.
1.
Install a 2" coupling to the combustion air pipe at the outside
wall to prevent the termination from being pushed inward.
2.
Cut the needed length of 2" PVC pipe and connect this to the
coupling.
3.
Attach the termination in the final length of 2” PVC pipe in the
vertical position with PVC cement.
8.5- Materials
USA:
NOTE: Furnaces may have a drain tee assembly and trap installed in
the combustion air pipe as close to the furnace as possible. This is to
drain any water that may enter the combustion air pipe to prevent it from
entering the furnace vestibule area.
8.4.2-
Combustion air and vent pipe, fittings, primers, and solvents
must conform to American National Standards Institute (ANSI)
standards and American Society for Testing and Materials
(ASTM) standards. See Table 9 Approved combustion air and
vent pipe, fitting and cement materials (U.S.A. Installation) - (In
Canada all vent material s shall comply to ULC S636) for
approved materials for use in the U.S.A.)
CANADA: Special Venting Requirements for Installations in Canada must
conform to the requirements of CAN/CSA B149 code. PVC and
CPVC vent systems must be composed of pipe, fittings,
cements, and primers listed to ULC S636.
Exhaust vent piping
The rubber coupling that attaches to the vent pipe adapter must be used.
The adapter seals the vent pipe to the casing and reduces the strain the
inducer and the elbow (when present).
8.6- Size of the vent and combustion air pipes
Furnace combustion air and vent pipe connections are sized for 2” pipe.
Any pipe diameter change should be made outside furnace casing in
It is necessary to properly seal on either side of the adapter with an
appropriate adhesive. This is to prevent any condensate leakage.
27
vertical pipe. Any change in diameter to the pipe must be made as close
to the furnace as reasonably possible.
6.
Subtract the equivalent lengths of the fittings and terminations
from the Maximum Equivalent Vent Length.
When installing vent systems of short pipe lengths use the smallest
allowable pipe diameter.
7.
If the Maximum Vent Length calculated is shorter than the
individual measured length of either the vent pipe or the
combustion air pipe, then the diameter of pipe selected may be
used.
8.
If the Maximum Vent Length calculated is longer than the
individual measured length of either the vent pipe or the
combustion air pipe, recalculate the Maximum Vent Length
using the next larger diameter pipe.
The Maximum Vent Length for the vent and combustion air pipe (when
used) is determined from Table 7 Maximum equivalent vent length (ft.)
minus the number of fittings multiplied by the deduction for each type of
fitting used. The measured length of pipe used in a single or 2 pipes
termination is included in the total vent length. Include a deduction for a
Tee when used for Alberta and Saskatchewan terminations.
1.
Measure the linear pipe distance from the furnace to the
termination for each pipe.
NOTE: The vent pipe and combustion air pipe must be the same
diameter.
2.
Select a Maximum Equivalent Vent Length (MEVL) longer than
the measured distance of the individual vent and combustion air
connections to the vent termination.
3.
Count the number of elbows for each pipe.
4.
For each pipe, multiply the number of elbows by the equivalent
length for the type of elbow used. Record the equivalent length
of all the elbows for each pipe.
NOTE: If the Maximum Vent Length for diameter of the pipe selected is
longer than the measured length and the equivalent length of all
the fitting and terminations, recalculate using the next smaller
diameter. If the recalculated Maximum Vent Length is longer than
the measured length of the vent pipe and combustion air pipe,
then that diameter of pipe selected may be used.
5.
NOTE: Slope horizontal vent piping upward a minimum of 1/4" per foot of
run so that condensate drains toward the furnace.
If a Tee is used on the termination, record the equivalent length
of the Tee used (Table 8 Deduction for fitting). Record the
equivalent length of the termination to be used.
NOTE: Support horizontal vent piping at least every five feet. No sags or
dips are permitted
28
Figure 22 Direct venting
29
Figure 23 Other than direct vent clearance
30
Table 7 Maximum equivalent vent length (ft.)
Vent pipe diameter (in.)
Unit size
(Btu/hr)*
Altitude (ft)
2"
3" and 4"
15,000
300
N/A
30,000
180
N/A
45,000
70
90
60,000
70
90
75,000
70
90
105,000
15
80
120,000
10
40
0 to 4500 ft
Table 8 Deduction for fitting
Type of elbow
45° Standard
45° Long sweap
90° Standard
90° Long sweap
Equivalent Length (ft.)
5
2½
10
5
Tee
1.5
Table 9 Approved combustion air and vent pipe, fitting and cement materials (U.S.A. Installation) - (In Canada all vent material s shall comply to
ULC S636)
ASTM SPECIFICATION
MATERIAL
(MARKED ON MATERIAL)
PIPE
FITTINGS
SOLVENT CEMENT
AND PRIMERS
DESCRIPTION
D1527
ABS
PIPE
-
-
Schedule-40
D1765
PVC
PIPE
-
-
Schedule-40
D2235
For ABS
-
-
Solvent Cement
For ABS
D2241
PVC
PIPE
-
-
SDR-21 & SDR-26
D2466
PVC
-
Fittings
-
Schedule-40
D2468
ABS
-
Fittings
-
Schedule-40
D2564
For ABS
-
-
Solvent Cement
For PVC
D2661
ABS
PIPE
Fittings
-
DWV at Schedule-40 IPS Sizes
D2665
PVC
PIPE
Fittings
-
DWV at Schedule-40 IPS Sizes
F438
CPVC
-
Fittings
-
Schedule-40
F441
CPVC
PIPE
-
-
Schedule-40
F442
CPVC
PIPE
-
-
SDR
F493
For CPVC
-
-
Solvent Cement
For CPVC
F628
ABS
PIPE
-
-
Cellulare Core DWV at Schedule-40 IPS sizes
F656
For PVC
-
-
Primer
For PVC
F891
PVC
PIPE
-
-
Cellulare Core Schedule-40 & DWV
8.7- Combustion air and vent piping insulation
guidelines
5.
Insulate all vent runs through unconditioned spaces where
below freezing temperatures are expected with 1" thick medium
density, foil faced fiberglass or equivalent Rubatex/Armaflex
insulation.
6.
For horizontal runs where water may collect, wrap the vent pipe
with self-regulating, 3 or 5 Watt heat tape. The heat tape must
be U.L./CSA. listed and installed per the manufacturer’s
instructions.
7.
Insulate combustion air inlet piping when run in warm, humid
spaces.
8.
Install the insulation per the insulation manufacturer’s
installation instructions.
The vent pipe may pass through unconditioned areas.
1.
Using winter design temperature (used in load calculations), find
appropriate temperature for your application and furnace model.
2.
Determine the amount of total and exposed vent pipe.
3.
Determine required insulation thickness for exposed pipe
length(s).
4.
When combustion air inlet piping is installed above a suspended
ceiling, the pipe MUST be insulated with moisture resistant
insulation such as Armaflex™ or other equivalent type of
insulation.
31
NOTE:
Pipe length specified for maximum pipe lengths located in
unconditioned spaces cannot exceed total allowable pipe length
as calculated from Table 7 and Table 8.
9.
Apply the wall pipe flange gaskets to the vent wall pipe and
combustion air wall pipe flanges.
NOTE:
The vent wall pipe flange and the combustion air wall pipe flange
have the same ID.
8.8- Installing the vent termination
A roof termination of any type will require a 4” (102 mm) flashing for a 2”
(51 mm) concentric vent or a 5” diameter (127 mm) flashing for a 3” (76
mm) concentric vent kit. For two-pipe or single pipe vent systems, a
flashing for each pipe of the required diameter will be necessary. It is
recommended that the flashing be installed by a roofer or competent
professional prior to installing the concentric vent. The terminations can
be installed on a flat or pitched roof.
10. For the exhaust vent, place the wall pipe flange over the 2”
diameter pipe provided. Take good care to glue the piece of
PVC to the wall pipe flange to avoid any condensate
leakage.
8.8.1-
Concentric vent
11. Align the pipe on the rubber coupling with drain and tighten
the clamp around the rubber coupling.
Cut one 4” (102 mm) diameter hole for 2” (51 mm) kit, or one 5” (127 mm)
diameter hole for 3” (76 mm) kit in the desired location. Loosely assemble
concentric vent/combustion air termination components together using
instructions in kit. Slide assembled kit with rain shield REMOVED through
hole in wall or roof flashing.
Single or multiple concentric vent must be installed as shown in Figure 22
Direct venting. Maintain the required separation distance between vents
or pairs of vents and all clearances.
12. Align the screw holes in the plastic wall pipe flange with the
dimples in the casing.
13. Pilot drill the screw holes for the flange in the casing and attach
the vent wall pipe flange to the furnace with sheet metal screws
NOTE: Do not allow insulation or other materials to accumulate inside
of pipe assembly when installing it through hole. Disassemble loose pipe
fittings. Clean and cement using same procedures as used for system
piping.
14. Repeat step 12 and 13 for the air combustion wall pipe flange
and secure to the top casing.
15. Install the remaining vent and combustion air pipes. It is
recommended that all pipes be cut, prepared, and
preassembled before permanently cementing any joint.
8.8.2-
Two pipe termination
Two pipe vent must be installed as shown in Figure 22 Direct venting.
Maintain the required separation distance between vents or pairs of vents
and all clearance. Cut the required number of holes in the roof or sidewall
for vent and combustion air pipes. Sidewall holes for two pipes vent
terminations should be side-by-side, allowing space between the pipes for
the elbows to fit on the pipes. Holes in the roof for two pipe terminations
should be spaced no more than 18” (457 mm) apart. Termination elbows
will be installed after the vent and combustion air pipe is installed.
16. Working from furnace to outside, cut pipe to required length(s).
17. Deburr inside and outside of pipe.
18. Chamfer outside edge of pipe for better distribution of primer
and cement.
19. Clean and dry all surfaces to be joined.
20. Check dry fit of pipe and mark insertion depth on pipe.
8.8.3-
21. Insert the combustion air pipe into the adapter.
Sidewall termination
Determine an appropriate location for termination kit using Figure 22 and
Figure 23
1. Cut one 4” diameter hole for 2” kit, or one 5” diameter hole for
3” kit.
22. Seal around the combustion air pipe with silicone or foil tape.
23. After pipes have been cut and preassembled, apply generous
layer of cement primer to pipe fitting socket and end of pipe to
insertion mark. Quickly apply approved cement to end of pipe
and fitting socket (over primer). Apply cement in a light, uniform
coat on inside of socket to prevent build-up of excess cement.
Apply second coat.
2.
Loosely assemble vent/combustion air termination components
together using instructions in kit.
3.
24. While cement is still wet, twist pipe into socket with 1/4” turn. Be
sure pipe is fully inserted into fitting socket.
Slide assembled kit with rain shield REMOVED through hole
(NOTE: Do not allow insulation or other materials to accumulate
inside of pipe assembly when installing it through hole).
4.
25. Wipe excess cement from joint. A continuous bead of cement
will be visible around perimeter of a properly made joint.
Locate assembly through sidewall with rain shield positioned no
more than 1” (25 mm) from wall.
5.
Disassemble loose pipe fittings. Clean and cement using same
procedures as used for system piping.
6.
Cut 2 holes, 1 for each pipe, of appropriate size for pipe size
being used.
7.
Loosely install elbow in bracket and place assembly on
combustion-air pipe.
8.
Disassemble loose pipe fittings. Clean and cement using same
procedures as used for system piping.
26. Handle pipe joints carefully until cement sets.
27. Horizontal portions of the venting system shall be supported to
prevent sagging. Support combustion air piping and vent piping
a minimum of every 5 ft. (1.5 M) [3 ft. (.91 M) for SDR-21 or -26
PVC] using perforated metal hanging strap or commercially
available hangars designed to support plastic pipe.
28. Prevent condensate from accumulating in the pipes by sloping
the combustion air piping and vent piping downward towards
furnace a minimum of 1/4” per linear ft. with no sags between
hangers.
29. Complete the vent and combustion air pipe installation by
installing the required termination elbows. See Figure 22 Direct
venting.
30. Use appropriate methods to seal openings where combustion
air pipe and vent pipe pass through roof or sidewall.
32
9- START UP, ADJUSTMENT AND SAFETY
CHECK
1.
2.
3.
4.
WARNING
Replace the burner compartment control access door.
Furnace must have a 120 V power supply properly connected
and grounded (NOTE: Proper polarity must be maintained for
120 V wiring. Control status indicator light flashes rapidly and
furnace does not operate if polarity is incorrect.)
Failure to replace the burner door can cause products of combustion
to be released into the conditioned area resulting in personal injury or
death.
If the modulating thermostat is used, thermostat wire
connections at terminals R, W/W1, G, Y/Y2, etc. must be made
at 24 V terminal block on furnace control
Natural gas service pressure must not exceed 0.38 psig (10.5
in. w.c.), but must be no less than 0.16 psig (4.5-in. w.c.).
Propane service pressure must not exceed 0.47 psig (13 in.
w.c.) but must be no less than 0.40 psig (11 in. w.c.)
Blower door must be in place to complete 120 V electrical circuit
to furnace.
9.1- To start the furnace
This appliance is equipped with a hot surface ignition device. This device
lights the main burners each time the room thermostat calls for heat. See
the lighting instructions on the furnace.
IMPORTANT: Be sure that the manual gas control has been in
the “OFF” position for at least five minutes. Do not attempt to
manually light the main burners.
3.
Set the room thermostat to its lowest setting and turn off the
furnace electrical power.
4.
Turn the gas control knob to the “ON” position.
7.
Put thermostat to “Heat” mode and set the room thermostat at
least 10°F above room temperature to light the main burners.
8.
After the burners are lit, set the room thermostat to a desired
temperature.Unit operation hazard
The furnace control has setup switches that may be set to meet the
application requirements. To set these setup switches for the appropriate
requirement:
The furnace has negative pressure switches that are a safety during a call
for heat. The induced draft blower must pull a negative pressure on the
heat exchanger to close the negative pressure switch. The induced draft
blower must maintain at least the negative pressure switch set point for
the furnace to operate. If the induced draft blower fails to close or maintain
the closing of the negative pressure switch, an error code would result.
2.
Turn on the furnace electrical power.
9.3- Setup switches
During initial start-up, it is not unusual for odour or smoke to come out of
any room registers. To ensure proper ventilation, it is recommended to
open windows and doors before initial firing.
Remove the burner compartment control access door.
6.
Before operating furnace, check flame rollout manual reset switch for
continuity. If necessary, press the button to reset switch.
Lighting instructions
1.
Turn on the manual gas control.
These furnaces are equipped with a manual reset limit switch in burner
assembly. This switch opens and shuts off power to the gas valve if an
overheat condition (flame rollout) occurs in burner assembly. Correct
inadequate combustion-air supply or improper venting condition before
resetting switch. DO NOT jumper this switch.
EAC-1 terminal is energized whenever blower operates.
HUM terminal is only energized when blower is energized in heating.
9.1.1-
5.
1.
Turn off electrical power.
2.
Remove upper door.
3.
Locate setup switches on furnace control.
4.
Configure the set-up switches as necessary for the application.
5.
Replace upper door and turn on electrical power.
These switches are ignored on communicating system (using the
Alizé and the communicating T-stat).
See Table 10 Dipswitch S1 - Air flow adjustment - Dip switch setting to
Table 14 Dipswitch S5 – Dehumidification and 1st stage cooling for more
details.
33
Table 10 Dipswitch S1 - Air flow adjustment - Dip switch setting
S1-1
S1-2
S1-3
S1-4
DESCRIPTION
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
NO ADJUSTMENT
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
-7.5% AIR FLOW AT
LOW HEAT
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
-15% AIR FLOW AT
LOW HEAT
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
+7.5% AIRLFOW AT
LOW HEAT
OFF
ON
ON
ON
+15% AIRFLOW AT
LOW HEAT
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
-7.5% AIR FLOW AT
HIGH HEAT
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
-15% AIR FLOW AT
HIGH HEAT
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
+7.5% AIR FLOW
AT HIGH HEAT
ON
OFF
ON
ON
+15% AIR FLOW AT
HIGH HEAT
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
-7.5% AIR FLOW
ON
ON
OFF
ON
-15% AIR FLOW
ON
ON
ON
OFF
+7.5% AIR FLOW
ON
ON
ON
ON
+15% AIR FLOW
FACTORY DEFAULT
LOW HEAT
ADJUSTMENT ONLY
(40%)
HIGH HEAT
ADJUSTMENT ONLY
(100%)
ADJUSMENT TO ALL
RISE RATE
34
Table 11 Dipswitch S3 - Cooling airflow select for non-communicating condenser
S3-1
S3-2
½ HP
1/3 HP
1 HP
OFF
OFF
1200
1600
2000
ON
OFF
1000
1200
1600
OFF
ON
800
1000
1400
ON
ON
600
800
1200
Table 12 Dipswitch S3 - Cooling/heat pump airflow adjustment for non-communicating system
S3-3
S3-4
ALL MOTORS
OFF
OFF
NO ADJUST
ON
OFF
+10%
OFF
ON
-10%
ON
ON
+10%
Table 13 Dipswitch S4 - Heat rise – test mode – continuous fan selection
S4-1
HEAT RISE
TEST MODE AND
T-STAT
S4-2
S4-3
S4-4
DESCRIPTION
OFF
55°F
ON
60-65°F
OFF
OFF
MODULATING OR 1 STAGE T-STAT
ON
OFF
40% TEST MODE
OFF
ON
100% TEST MODE
ON
ON
CONTINUOUS FAN
2-STAGE OPERATION (WITH 2 STAGE T-STAT)
OFF
NORMAL CFM
ON
HIGHER CFM
Table 14 Dipswitch S5 – Dehumidification and 1st stage cooling
S5-1
S5-2
Description
OFF
No On demand dehumidification
ON
On demand dehumidification based on HUM STAT
terminal (Humidistat required)
OFF
Normal 1st stage cooling airflow (approx. 70-80% of 2nd
stage cooling airflow)
ON
1st stage cooling airflow is 50% of 2nd stage cooling
airflow
35
Table 15 Dipswitch S3 and S5 – Setting cooling airflow demand
Motor Hp
S5-2
S5-1
OFF
1HP AND
¾ HP
ON
ON
OFF
½ HP
ON
OFF
ALL
OFF
ON
CFM
S3-1
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-2
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
Y1 + Y2
1800
1600
1400
1200
1460
1280
1120
960
1200
1000
800
600
960
800
675
480
Please refer to tech
CFM table in the
annex at the end of
the manual
A learning sequence pre-purge will be initiated under the following
conditions:
9.4- Fault code reset
To clear the fault code memory, push and hold the Fault Recall Button for
more than 5 seconds and less than 10 seconds. The right-most SevenSegment display will energize horizontal upper and lower segments for
four seconds. This will clear faults in the buffer displayed at power-up.
9.5- Diagnostic features
The control continuously monitors its own operation and the operation of
the system. If the failure is internal to the control, the light will stay on. In
this case, the entire control should be replaced, as the control is not field
repairable.

First heat call after power reset.

Every 25th heat call.

Next heat attempt after a failed pre-purge (pressure switch (es)
does not close).

Next heat attempt after a pressure switch has opened
unexpectedly during normal heating operation.
A normal pre-purge will not go through the incremental stepping process
of the inducer motor and should be much quicker. The inducer will start at
a pre-determined RPM (determined during learning-sequence pre-purge)
and this should close both pressure switches quickly. Once both pressure
switches are sensed to be closed, the inducer will run for 25 seconds
before the ignition trial starts.
If the sensed failure is in the system (external to control), the dual 7
segment red LED will flash error codes.
Refer to Table 17 Fault code for diagnostic.
9.6- Normal operation codes

Hot-surface igniter is energized during the pre-purge period.

The modulating gas valve is set to the highest possible rate (no
flow yet).

The main solenoids on the gas valve are energized allowing gas
to flow to the burners.

When flame is proven, the ignition control is de-energized - 8
second maximum trial times.

The gas valve maintains 90% rate through the warm-up period 20 seconds (aka «Blower On Delay»).
Refer to Table 16 Normal operation codes/messages.
9.7- Sequence of operation
9.7.1-
Y1
1400
1200
1050
900
1080
960
840
720
900
750
600
450
720
600
480
360
Heating cycle initiation
The heating cycle is always initiated by a 24 volt signal on W of the
thermostat. When the controller senses 24 volts on W or the
communicated message for heat call, the following sequence occurs:
9.7.2-
Heating cycle response
MODULATING FUNCTION:

High and low pressure switches are checked to insure contacts
are open.
(“W” and “V” signal inputs)

Inducer is powered on high speed for a thirty (30) second prepurge.

After the warm-up period, the furnace will respond to the thermostat
demand by adjusting the gas valve pressure and blower speed anywhere
between 40 % to 100 % heating capacity.
Pre-Purge:
HEATING CYCLE TERMINATION:
There are two different types of pre-purge; a normal pre-purge and a
learning-sequence pre-purge. During a learning-sequence pre-purge, the
inducer motor will incrementally increase in RPM (stepping) until the low
and high pressure switches are both closed. After both switches are
sensed to be closed, the inducer motor will continue to run for an additional
30 seconds before the ignition trial.
(“W” signal only)
When the 24 volt signal is removed from W1, the heating cycle will end
and the furnace will shut down and return to the proper off cycle operation.
36
9.7.3-
Setting input rate
10-
Checking furnace input is important to prevent over firing beyond its
design-rated input. NEVER SET INPUT ABOVE THAT SHOWN ON THE
RATING PLATE. Prior to checking the furnace input, make certain that all
other gas appliances are shut off, with the exception of pilot burners. Time
the meter with only the furnace in operation. Start the furnace, in Furnace
Test Mode (see Table 13 Dipswitch S4 - Heat rise – test mode –
continuous fan selection), 100% rate, and measure the time required to
burn one cubic foot of gas.
THERMOSTAT
WARNING
Do not apply 24Vac to V/W2 at the furnace control (this is sometimes
done during setup, troubleshooting and/or while diagnosing problems).
Doing so will damage the thermostat.
The furnace is shipped from the factory with #48 orifices. They are sized
for natural gas having a heating value of 1075 BTU/cu. ft. and a specific
gravity of .60.
10.1- Non-communicating modulating thermostats
The furnace must be installed with the Modulating TouchScreen Thermostat R02P030 (#1F95M).
Since heating values vary geographically, the manifold pressure may
need to be changed to adjust the furnace to its nameplate input. Consult
the local gas utility to obtain the yearly average heating value.
NOTE: Do not use 24 volt control wire smaller than No. 18 AWG.
Wire all non-communicating thermostats to the 24V connections on the
integrated furnace control. Figure 24 Wiring diagram for modulating heat
(no dual fuel) (non-communicating).
NOTE: A larger wire gage may be required for longer lengths of
thermostat wire.
Operations with a non-communicating modulating thermostat are fully
modulating between 40% and 100% of furnace capacity. The firing rate is
first determined by the thermostat and then sent to the furnace. This is the
optimum mode of operation and will give the best temperature control with
minimal temperature variation from the desired set point.
Figure 24 Wiring diagram for modulating heat (no dual fuel) (non-communicating)
V/W2 – This terminal is used to connect the modulating signal (V) from a
non-communicating, fully modulating thermostat specified for use with this
furnace. It is used to transmit the firing rate (determined by the thermostat)
to the furnace control.
10.2- 24 VAC thermostat (TSTAT) INPUT (J4 & J6)
These connections are used with any traditional 24 V AC modulating noncommunicating, thermostat specified for this modulating furnace. W1, Y1,
Y2, G, C and R are the traditional thermostat inputs used in nearly all
HVAC equipment. Installation of the thermostat to these connections is
straight- forward and simple.
NOTE: Do not apply 24 VAC to the V/W2 terminal (as with a jumper to R
for diagnostic purposes) with a non-communicating, modulating
thermostat.
B - This terminal is used to pass a reversing valve signal to a condenser.
It is only a holding place for connecting a wire from the thermostat and a
wire from the condenser. It does not change the airflow of the cool/heat
commands.
HUM STAT – This terminal is used to connect the output of a humidistat
to the furnace control to control humidification and/or dehumidification.
Optional equipment is required for these features.
37
10.3- Fuse (F1)
See Figure 25 15-Pin connector; J1 with pin designations.
A three-amp automotive-style (ATC blade type) fuse is supplied on the
furnace control board. This fuse should provide protection from shortcircuits on the control board and associated 24 VAC wiring.
Pin 1. HLI HIGH LIMIT INPUT
Pin 2. PS1 LOW PRESSURE SWITCH OUTPUT
Pin 3. RLI ROLL OUT SWITCH INPUT
Any direct shorts during installation, service, or maintenance could cause
this fuse to blow. If fuse replacement is required, use ONLY a 3 amp. It is
located on the control board. Refer to Figure 20 Wiring diagram for the
location of the fuse.
Pin 4. TH 24V HOT
Pin 5. GND GROUND
Pin 6. NOT USED
10.4- 120 VAC terminals
Pin 7.PSO PRESSURE SWITCH OUTPUT
These terminals supply 120 VAC to the furnace control. Additionally, spare
terminals are provided for use with electronic air cleaners and other
accessories as needed (Check the voltage rating of your equipment.)
Pin 8.MVC MAIN VALVE COMMON
Pin 9.ILI INDUCER LIMIT INPUT
Pin 10.HLO HIGH LIMIT OUTPUT
10.5- INDUCED DRAFT MOTOR (INDUCER) CONTROL
OUTPUT (E8)
Pin 11.TR 24V RETURN
This four-pin connector is white and provides control command to both the
high and low speed inducer outputs.
Pin 12.PS2 SECOND PRESSURE SWITCH OUTPUT
Pin 1 to Inducer 12V
Pin 14.MVH MAIN VALVE HIGH
Pin 13.MVL MAIN VALVE LOW
Pin 2 to Inducer Rx
Figure 25 15-Pin connector; J1 with pin designations
Pin 3 to inducer GND
Pin 4 to inducer Tx
10.6- Electronic air cleaner (E.A.C.) output (E-103)
This output is used to energize an electronic air cleaner. The output will
provide 1.0 amp at 120 VAC. This output is energized any time the blower
motor is above 40% of maximum airflow capacity. Airflow below this value
is not considered to be enough for a typical electronic air cleaner to
perform properly.
For ½ HP and ¾ HP motors – Electronic air cleaner is energized any time
the blower is above 320 CFM
For 1 HP motors - Electronic air cleaner is energized any time the blower
is above 800 CFM
10.7- Stepper gas valve control
The furnaces is equipped with a stepper modulating gas valve. A five-pin
connector is used to control and sense the gas valve. The valve uses a
PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) signal to control the firing rate. The duty
cycle of this signal is five percent less than the expected firing rate. For
example, if the firing rate is 90%, the PWM to (and from) the valve will be
85% duty cycle. The connector also provides the 24 VAC signal to
energize the main valve solenoid. For troubleshooting purposes, follow the
wiring diagram in this manual and on the inside of the furnace blower door.
Additionally, the pin designations for the connector are specified below:
10.9- Communicating ECM motor communications
(control) connection (E114)
Pin 1 to stepper modulating gas valve connector Pin 1 (TH)
This connector sends and receives messages to and from the blower
motor through a single peer-to-peer network. The blower motor does not
communicate on the same communications buss as the furnace,
condenser and thermostat. Further, a different communications protocol
is used.
Pin 2 to stepper modulating gas valve connector Pin 2 (RX)
Pin 3 to stepper modulating gas valve connector Pin 3 (TX)
Pin 4 to stepper modulating gas valve connector Pin 4 (COMMON)
Pin 5 to stepper modulating gas valve connector Pin 5 (MVTH)
For troubleshooting purposes, follow the wiring diagram supplied in this
manual and on the inside of the furnace blower door. Additionally, the pin
designations for the connector are specified below:
10.8- Pin Mate-V-Lok connector (J1)
Pin 1 to communicating blower motor connector Pin 1 (+V)
The 15-pin connector provides connections for a variety of inputs and
outputs to the furnace control. The flame sense, pressure switches sense
and limits sense (Main Limit, MRLC and HALC) are connected to the I.F.C.
through this connector. Reference the wiring diagram for the furnace
printed in this document or on the inside of the furnace blower door for pin
assignments for troubleshooting.
Pin 2 to communicating blower motor connector Pin 2 (TX)
Pin 3 to communicating blower motor connector Pin 3 (RX)
Pin 4 to communicating blower motor connector Pin 4 (C)
For troubleshooting purposes, follow the wiring diagram in this manual and
on the inside of the furnace blower door.
Additionally, the pin designations for the connector are specified below:
38
10.10- Communications L.E.D.’s (Light emitting
diodes)
WARNING
“RX” (Green) L.E.D. – This L.E.D. indicates that communications is
being sensed to or from (i.e.: something on the network is trying to
communicate) other components (e.g. a condenser) on the network. This
L.E.D. will blink randomly any time a message is received by the furnace
control. If no blinking is seen within five minutes, it can be assumed that
there is not valid communications established. Check wiring to make sure
that all points are connected properly.
Do not replace the furnace control or memory card of the furnace with
a furnace control or memory card of another furnace or another
component (e.g. a memory card from a condenser or air handler). The
wrong furnace control or memory card may specify parameters which
will make the furnace run at undesired conditions including (but not
limited to) reduced airflow during heating causing excessive undesired
operation of the main limit control. Further, the memory card is specific
to the model number and BTU input rating for a specific furnace and
this information should not be transported from one furnace (or
component) to another.
Further, if this L.E.D. is on continuously, it is an indication that mis-wiring
has occurred.
“STAT” (STATUS) (Red) L.E.D. – This L.E.D. blinks twice slowly (¼
second ON, ¾ second OFF) upon power-up.
The memory card is the default memory location to be used first when
there is any conflict. If the memory card has been replaced with a card
that has data for another furnace, the furnace will assume the identity of
the “other” furnace. In all cases, the memory card has the final say about
the data to use. It is only when the memory card is not present, is corrupt
or specifies a motor larger or smaller than what is found in the furnace that
the furnace control will use the data stored in the microprocessor (a mirror
of the most recent memory card with blower size matching that found in
the furnace). The hierarchy of data to be used in the event of a lost card
or conflict is listed in order of importance below.
Pressing the learn button for two seconds will cause the green “RX” L.E.D.
to blink rapidly (for a short period) to indicate an attempt at
communications. If the L.E.D. does not blink, communications cannot be
established.
10.11- Memory card
A memory card is defined as an electronic card that carries a copy of the
furnace shared data.
If no memory card present:
RULES FOR WRITING, DISTRIBUTION AND ARBITRATION OF
MULTIPLE COPIES OF FURNACE SHARED DATA FOR
COMMUNICATING - CAPABLE FURNACES
A. Furnace shared data from the “network” is used. Furnace network
shared data is defined as a redundant copy (or copies) of the
critical furnace shared data stored at various places and
components on the communicating network. The “network” can
be defined as follows:
Furnace shared data is defined as data specific to a given furnace that
is critical for proper furnace operation. More specifically, it is data which
defines the operation of the furnace and is unique to a given furnace
platform and model. The most critical of these data are the coefficients
that control the blower operation (i.e. define the blower speed-torque
operation). Because of this, each furnace control is programmed with
furnace shared data for that model furnace only. The furnace shared data
from any given furnace can NOT be transferred to another furnace for any
reason. Doing so can adversely affect operation of the furnace. Further, if
no furnace shared data is present, the furnace will not operate in any mode
and a fault will be displayed.
Valid Furnace Shared Data is defined as furnace shared data for the
furnace series in question with the correct motor horsepower. However, it
is impossible for the furnace control to determine if the furnace shared
data is matched to the furnace input BTU’s if the motor horsepower is
correct. This means, for example, furnace shared data for a 120K BTU
upflow furnace could be installed and recognized as valid furnace shared
data in a 105KBTU downflow furnace. VALID FURNACE SHARED DATA
simply means that there is no motor horsepower conflict and that the
furnace shared data is for the series of furnace in question. VALID
FURNACE SHARED DATA is data that will be used by the furnace control
with no fault reported. VALID FURNACE SHARED DATA may not
necessarily mean that the furnace shared data is correct for the furnace in
question. The input BTU’s could still be incorrect and this is why it is
important to never exchange memory cards from one furnace to
another.
B.
i.
The “network” can be the furnace control itself if it was
programmed at the factory and the memory card has been
removed for some reason.
ii.
The “network” can be a furnace control which has had a
valid card previously (either attached or inserted) and
removed for some reason.
iii.
The “network” can be a furnace control attached to a
communicating condenser and/or thermostat which has
copies of the furnace shared data that can be retrieved by
the furnace control.
A furnace control sent as a replacement part will have no
furnace shared data either in the microprocessor or on the
memory card. The replacement control does not include a valid
memory card. The furnace shared data can be added by:
i. Inserting a valid memory card (e.g. the original memory
card sent with the original furnace control or a valid
replacement memory card)
OR
ii. By attaching the furnace control to a communicating
network (e.g. a condenser and thermostat) which was
previously connected to (and operating with) a valid
furnace control with valid furnace shared data.
Furnace shared data is programmed into the furnace control
microprocessor and attached memory card at the factory. The attached
memory card cannot be programmed in the field but furnace shared data
inside the furnace IFC microprocessor may be written or rewritten in the
field through the network depending on the circumstances.
Regardless, the memory card of a replacement control cannot be
programmed or reprogrammed in the field with furnace shared data and
will always remain blank. In fact, this card does not even contain the
electronic components necessary to turn it into a valid memory card.
C.
In the event that the original memory card is lost, the original
furnace control has been replaced and there is no furnace
shared data on the network, the replacement memory card must
be ordered and installed into the connector at E117 to give the
furnace valid furnace shared data. The furnace will not operate
properly without the correct furnace shared data. When no
furnace shared data is present (either at the memory card or on
the network) a “d1” (NO SHARED DATA) fault code will be
displayed at the furnace control (I.F.C.) seven-segment
displays.
If the original memory card is lost, it should be replaced even if there is
valid furnace shared data on the network. The valid furnace shared data
39
on the network should only be considered as a backup to the memory
card.
D.
10.13- Dipswitch
NOTE: The integrated furnace control does not recognize switch setting
changes while energized.
If valid furnace shared data is available from the network and
no memory card is present, a “d4” (MEM CARD INVALID) fault
is displayed at the furnace seven-segment displays when in
standby mode only (see fault code table).
Dipswitches are ignored on communicating system.
10.13.1- S1 – Heat air flow adjustment
Dipswitch bank S1 is used to fine-tune the airflow in the heating mode.
The switches of bank S1 can be set to adjust either the minimum heat rate
airflow or the maximum heat rate airflow or both. Also, every firing rate in
between these points will be adjusted accordingly.
If furnace shared data from the memory card is not valid or is not present
and shared data from network can be used, the appropriate fault (d4, d5,
d6, d7 or d8 – see fault codes in this manual) is displayed at the furnace
seven-segment displays during standby mode only.
NOTE: All dip switches on S1 will be shipped in the “OFF” position. See
Table 10 Dipswitch S1 - Air flow adjustment - Dip switch setting for Heating
Adjustment Selections.
If memory card present:
Furnace shared data from the memory card (if valid) will be used to write
(or rewrite) the network furnace shared data and furnace shared data from
card will be used. If the data on that card is not valid:
A.
i.
If furnace shared data on the memory card
10.13.2- S3-1 and S3-2 – Cooling airflow select
is corrupt or invalid (“d4”–MEM CARD INVALID”),
These dipswitches are used to select the appropriate cooling airflow
based on the amount required. The switch settings do not affect cooling
airflow when installed with a fully communicating condenser. In that case,
the condenser supplies the information for cooling airflow which is pre-set
at the factory and not adjustable.
and/or
ii.
is for another component or different furnace series (“d5”–
CARD-HARD CNFLCT),
and/or
iii.
The target cooling airflow will be determined by the adjustments of S3-1
and S3-2. Furnaces with ½ HP motors will have a maximum target airflow
setting of 800 CFM. Furnace with 1 HP motors will have a maximum target
airflow setting of 2,000 CFM. The airflow achieved may be less than the
target depending of the static pressure in the supply air duct.
does not match the horsepower of the attached motor (“d6”BLWR HP CNFLCT),
and/or
iv.
does not support the motor manufacturer of the motor present
(“d7”-BLWR MFG CNFLCT),
See Table 11 Dipswitch S3 - Cooling airflow select for non-communicating
condenser. Cooling airflow is also affected by the settings of dipswitch
position S5-2. This switch will determine the appropriate amount of airflow
to be used for the low stage (1st stage) of cooling.
is from an older furnace and is missing critical newer furnace
shared data (“d8”-OLD SHARED DATA), furnace shared data
from the network (if valid) is used to control the furnace (see
description of “network” under “If no memory card present” (item
i above). Furnace shared data on the network will not be written
or rewritten from the memory card. If the furnace shared data
on the network is valid, the appropriate fault for the memory card
will be displayed at the furnace seven-segment displays when
in standby mode only
Target airflow settings and adjustments are based on the positions of the
dipswitches S3-1, S3-2, S3-3, S3-4 and S5-2.
If neither the furnace shared data on the memory card is valid
nor the furnace shared data on the network is valid, the fault
code status is elevated. The fault code d1 (NO VALID SHARED
DATA) is displayed at the furnace seven-segment displays
provided a higher priority fault is not also present (in which case
the higher priority fault is displayed).
These dipswitches are used to adjust the cooling and heat-pump airflow
slightly based on the user’s preference.
and/or
v.
B.
C.
10.13.3- S3-3 and S3-4 – Cooling and heat pump air flow
adjustment
Cooling airflow can be adjusted approximately +/- 10% by using the cool
trim adjustment dipswitches; S3-3 and S3-4. See Table 12 Dipswitch S3 Cooling/heat pump airflow adjustment for non-communicating system.
10.13.4- S4 – Heat rise adjust
S4-1 HEAT RISE ADJUST – This dipswitch is used to select desired
temperature rise in the heating mode. The heat rise will always be closer
to the target if the supply air sensor is properly installed.
If no furnace shared data is available on either the memory card
or the network, the fault code “d1” (NO SHARED DATA) is
displayed at the furnace seven-segment displays.
“OFF” will yield the minimum heat rise. (Target heat rise is 55°F or 65°F
but this value may vary between low and high fire.)
10.12- Replacing the furnace control
“ON” will decrease the airflow to yield the maximum heat rise. (Target heat
rise is 60°F - 65°F but this value may vary between low and high fire.)
In the event that the furnace control must be replaced, the memory card
must be detached from the original furnace control and retained with the
furnace. Failure to save and connect the memory card properly to the
replacement control may result in no operation or undesired operation of
the furnace.
S4-4 FAN SPEED SELECT – This dipswitch is used to select the
continuous fan speed. This switch is ignored on a communicating
system.
S4-2 and S4-3 - FURNACE TEST and OPERATING MODES
When replacing the furnace control, be sure to match the dipswitch
settings of the original control on the replacement.
The Test Switches will place the IFC into a test mode, operating the
furnace at continuous input rates of either 100% of full rate (maximum fire)
or 40% of full rate (minimum fire). This is accomplished by setting the Test
Switches. See Table 13 Dipswitch S4 - Heat rise – test mode – continuous
fan selection.
NEVER USE A CONTROL BOARD TAKEN FROM ANOTHER
FURNACE AS A REPLACEMENT CONTROL FOR THIS FURNACE.
FURNACE CONTROLS TAKEN FROM OTHER FURNACES MAY
CONTAMINATE THE NETWORK WITH THE WRONG SHARED DATA
WHICH CAN ONLY BE FIXED BY REPLACING THE MEMORY CARD
WITH THE ORIGINAL MEMORY CARD FROM YOUR FURNACE OR A
REPLACEMENT MEMORY CARD DESIGNED FOR YOUR FURNACE.
To enter the Furnace Test Mode, proceed as follows:
40
1.
Switch the 120 volt power to the furnace OFF. Do not change
settings with control energized.
2.
Position Test Switches for the desired test mode.
3.
Switch the 120 volt power to the furnace ON.
4.
Set the thermostat mode to HEAT; adjust the set point at least
4°F above room temperature to demand a call for heating.
1.
The furnace area must be kept clear and free of combustible
materials, gasoline, and other flammable vapors and liquids.
2.
Insulating materials may be combustible. A furnace installed in
an attic or other insulated space must be kept free and clear of
insulating materials. Examine the furnace when it is installed and
also any time insulation is added.
3.
For proper safe operation, the furnace needs air for combustion
and ventilation. Do not block or obstruct air openings to the area
in which the furnace is installed, and the spacing around the
furnace.
4.
This furnace is equipped with an ignition device which
automatically lights the burners. See OPERATING YOUR
FURNACE for information on lighting and shutting down the
furnace.
5.
Should the gas supply fail to shut off or if overheating occurs,
shut off the gas valve to the furnace before shutting off the
electrical supply.
6.
Do not use the furnace if any part has been under water. A flood
damaged furnace is extremely dangerous. Attempts to use the
furnace can result in fire or explosion. A qualified service agency
should be contacted to inspect the furnace and to replace all gas
controls, control system parts, electrical parts that have been wet,
or the entire furnace if deemed necessary.
7.
Examine the furnace installation to determine that:
The furnace will operate at the fixed Test mode until one of the following
conditions:
A.
The thermostat is satisfied and the call for heat is removed.
B.
The furnace has been in test mode continuously for sixty
minutes, at which time the furnace control (IFC) will exit the test
mode and proceed to normal heating operation as configured.
Test mode cannot be activated again unless line voltage power
to the furnace is cycled off and back on. This is true even if the
dipswitches remain configured to the test settings
To set the furnace for normal operation:
1. Set the thermostat mode to OFF.
2. Always allow furnace to complete the cool down cycle.
3. Switch the 120 volt power to the furnace OFF. Do not change
settings with control energized.
4. Position dipswitches for modulating/single-stage mode.
5. Switch the 120 volt power to the furnace ON.
6. Set the thermostat.
10.13.5- S5 – Cooling
S5-1 - ODD “ON” or “OFF” select:
This switch will ignore the input from the 24 volt terminal labeled “HUM
STAT” during cooling when in the “OFF” position. However, the “HUM
STAT” input is always read in the heating mode to turn on and off the
humidifier relay.
S5-2:
Placing S5-2 in the “ON” position will establish the low (Y1) cooling airflow
at half of the max cool (Y2) airflow. This setting will be useful with cooling
systems where two compressors are used to control two cooling stages
(one compressor for first stage and two compressors for second stage)
11-
USER’S INFORMATION MANUAL
a)
All flue gas carrying areas external to the furnace, such as the
chimney and vent connector, are clear and free of obstructions.
b)
Vent connector is in place, slopes upward, and is physically
sound without holes or excessive corrosion.
c)
Return air duct connection(s) is physically sound, sealed to the
furnace casing, and terminates outside the space containing the
furnace.
d)
Physical support of the furnace is sound without sagging,
cracks, gaps, etc. around the base as to provide a seal between
the support and the base.
e)
There are no obvious signs of deterioration of the furnace.
f)
Burner flames are in good adjustment.
8.
Do not store or use gasoline or other flammable vapors and liquids in the
vicinity of this or any other appliance. Installation and service must be
performed by a qualified installer, service agency, or the gas supplier.
11.1- Operating your furnace
Read all instructions in this manual and retain this and all additional
instructions for future reference.
These furnaces are equipped with an ignition device which automatically
lights the burners. Do not try to light the burners by hand.
To keep your operating costs low and to eliminate unnecessary service
calls, we have provided a few guidelines. These guidelines will help you
understand how your gas furnace operates and how to maintain it so you
can get years of safe and dependable service. Read all the instructions in
this manual, and keep all manuals for future reference.
Before operating, smell around furnace area for gas. Be sure to smell
near floor because some gas is heavier than air and will settle to the lowest
point. See WHAT TO DO IF YOU SMELL GAS under User’s information
manual if the odour of gas is present. Use only your hand to turn the gas
control knob; never use tools. If the knob will not turn by hand, don’t try
to repair it. Call a qualified service technician. Force or attempted repair
may result in a fire or explosion.
WHAT TO DO IF YOU SMELL GAS

Do not try to light any appliance.

Do not touch any electrical switch; do not use any phone in your
building
It is important that you conduct a physical inspection of the
furnace at least twice a year. It is also recommended that the
furnace should be inspected by a qualified service agent at least
once per year.
11.2- Lighting instructions
1.
STOP! Read the previous safety information.
Set the thermostat to the lowest setting.

Leave the building immediately
2.

Immediately call your gas supplier. Follow the gas supplier’s
instructions.
3.
Turn off all electric power to the furnace.
4.
Remove the burner compartment access panel.

If you cannot reach the gas supplier, call the fire department.
5.
This appliance is equipped with an automatic ignition device.
Do not try to light the burners by hand.
For your safety, read the following before operating your furnace:
41
Move the gas control switch to “OFF” (see Figure 26 Control switch
modulating valve).
can result if you are not qualified to do this work. Please call your
dealer when service is needed.
Your gas furnace is designed to give many years of efficient, satisfactory
service. However, the varied air pollutants commonly found in most areas
can affect longevity and safety. Chemicals contained in everyday
household items such as laundry detergents, cleaning sprays, hair sprays,
deodorizers, and other products which produce airborne residuals may
have an adverse effect upon the metals used to construct your appliance.
The cabinet of the furnace can be cleaned with soap and water. Grease
spots can be removed with a household cleaning agent.
Figure 26 Control switch modulating valve
It is important that you conduct periodic physical inspections of your
appliance, paying special attention to the gas burner and the flue outlet
from the furnace. These components are located at the front of the unit. A
flashlight will be useful for these inspections. Make one inspection prior to
the beginning of the heating season and another during the middle.
Should you observe unusual amounts of any of the following conditions, it
is important that you call your authorized dealer at once to obtain a
qualified service inspection:
6.
Wait 5 minutes to clear out any gas, then smell for gas (including
at the bottom of the unit near the ground). If you smell gas, stop
and follow the directions in WHAT TO DO IF YOU SMELL GAS.
If you don’t smell gas, continue to next step.
7.
Move the gas control knob or switch to “ON”.
8.
Replace the burner compartment access panel.
9.
Turn on all electric power to the furnace.

Rust, flakes, or other deposits

Coatings

Corrosion
Even if no unusual rust or other conditions are observed, it is
recommended that the furnace be inspected and serviced at least once
per year by a qualified service technician. Regular inspections and
planned maintenance will assure many years of economic performance
from your gas furnace.
10. Set the thermostat to the desired setting.
11.6- Combustion and ventilation air
11. If the furnace will not operate, follow the instructions found
below in to turn off Gas to Furnace and call your service
technician or gas supplier.
Adequate air supply in single pipe application must be provided to
furnaces located in a closet, alcove, or utility room by means of a grilles in
the lower part of the door, or by the introduction of outside air, or both, in
accordance with the National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223.1/ NFPA 54
(latest edition) or the CSA B149.1, Natural Gas and Propane Installation
Codes, and local codes.
11.3- Shutting down the furnace
To shut down the furnace, set the thermostat to the “OFF” position.
Adequate combustion and ventilation air must reach the furnace to provide
for proper and safe operation. Air openings in front of furnace must be
kept free of obstructions. Any obstruction may cause improper operation
that can result in a fire hazard or carbon monoxide injury.
11.4- To turn off gas to the furnace
1.
Set the thermostat to the lowest setting.
2.
Turn off all electric power to the furnace if service is to be
performed.
3.
Remove the burner compartment access panel.
4.
Move the gas control knob or switch to “OFF” (see Figure 26
Control switch modulating valve). Do not force.
Venting of this furnace must comply with the unit Installation Instructions.
Be sure the installer has followed these requirements. If not, you should
request the installer to comply.
For your safety, please note the following:
1.
Condensing furnaces must not be vented with any other
appliance. The flue (vent) system is under positive pressure
from the power venter. Connection of any other appliance to the
furnace flue may create a hazardous condition that could cause
either appliance to malfunction.
2.
This furnace is not designed for use with a vent damper. Use of
such a device will not improve the efficiency of this furnace. The
vent from your furnace may rise vertically and terminate above
the roof. The vent may also be run horizontally through an
exterior wall. Make sure all flue product materials external to the
furnace are clear and free of any obstruction, slope upward, and
have no holes or leaks. For proper venting terminations, see
Figure 22 Direct venting. If this furnace is a direct vent (2 pipe)
installation, it requires that all the air necessary for combustion
be supplied from outside the dwelling through an air intake pipe.
You should inspect the air intake and flue product carrying
areas external to the furnace to determine they are clear and
free of obstructions. You should also check to see that the vent
air intake system is in place, physically sound, sealed to the
furnace casing, and terminating outside the space containing
the furnace.
11.5- Maintenance of your furnace
WARNING
ELECTRICAL SHOCK, FIRE,OR EXPLOSION HAZARD
Failure to follow the safety warnings exactly could result in dangerous
operation, serious injury, death, or property damage.
Improper servicing could result in dangerous operation, serious injury,
death, or property damage.

Before servicing, disconnect all electrical power to furnace.

When servicing controls, label all wires prior to disconnecting.
Reconnect wires correctly.

Verify proper operation after servicing.
There are routine maintenance steps you should take to keep your furnace
operating efficiently. This maintenance will assure longer life, lower
operating costs, and fewer service calls.
Check to see that the furnace cabinet is sound and firmly supported,
without sagging. There should be no cracks or gaps between the furnace
and the base or floor, which would permit entry of unfiltered air.
In addition to the maintenance procedures listed in this manual, there are
also other service and maintenance procedures that require the skills of a
service person that has specialized tools and training. Personal injury
42
Figure 27 Typical flame appearance
It is important that the outside area where the vent terminates is kept clear
of any obstructions which might block or impede the venting of the furnace.
Should venting become blocked at any time, your furnace is equipped with
a special safety control to prevent operation of the furnace until the
condition has been corrected. Contact your dealer if you desire more
information about this important safety feature.
NOTE: After any heavy snow, ice or frozen fog event the furnace vent
pipes may become restricted. Always check the vent system and
remove any snow or ice that may be obstructing the intake or
exhaust plastic pipes.
Should any unusual conditions be observed during your inspections, call
an authorized service dealer immediately.
11.7- Return air
11.11- Condensate collection and disposal system
All return air duct connections must be tight and sealed to furnace cabinet
and all return air grilles or registers must be located outside the space
containing the furnace.
The condensate system must not be exposed to temperatures under 32°F.
Make sure the condensate drain line does not become blocked or
plugged. Visual inspection of condensate flow can easily be made while
the furnace is operating. Use a flashlight to illuminate the discharge end
of the condensate drain that is placed in the sewer opening. The furnace
will not operate properly if the condensate drain line becomes blocked or
plugged. If this event occurs, have the furnace inspected by a qualified
service technician.
11.8- Filter location
The filter on your furnace will be located in one of two different locations:

On one side of the furnace

On the bottom of the furnace
11.8.1- Cleaning/replacing the filter
11.12- Rollout switch
It is very important to clean or replace the air filter regularly.
This unit is equipped with a manual reset high temperature sensor or
rollout switch. In the unlikely event of a sustained burner flame rollout, the
rollout switch will shut off the flow of gas by closing the gas valve. The
switch is located inside the gas burner area. Flame rollout can be caused
by blockage of the power vent system, a blocked heat exchanger, or
improper gas pressure or adjustment. If this event occurs, the unit will not
operate properly. The gas supply to the unit should be shut off and no
attempt should be made to place it in operation. The system should be
inspected by a qualified service technician.
Dirty filters are the most common cause of inadequate heating or cooling
performance and can sharply increase the operational costs of your unit.
In some cases, they can double the cost. The air filter should be
inspected at least every 6 weeks and cleaned or replaced as required.
Your furnace may use either a disposable filter or a cleanable filter. The
type of filter may be indicated on a label attached to the filter. If a
disposable filter is used, replace with the same type and size. To remove
excess dirt from a cleanable filter, shake filter and/or use a vacuum
cleaner. Wash filter in soap or detergent water and replace after filter is
dry.
11.13- Safety interlock switch
The blower compartment door on your high efficiency gas furnace is
equipped with a safety interlock switch that will automatically shut off your
complete system (including blower) once the door is removed. This is for
your personal safety. Be sure to check your furnace for proper operation
once the door or panel has been replaced. If the system does not operate
once the panel has been replaced, try removing and replacing it once
again. If the furnace still does not operate, call your dealer for service.
Cleanable filters do not need to be oiled after washing. Cleanable filters
may be replaced with disposable filters.
11.9- Lubrication
Lubrication of the bearings in the circulating air blower motor and the
combustion blower motor is not recommended. These motor are
permanently lubricated.
11.14- Repair parts
The repair parts are available from your local distributor. When ordering
parts, include the complete furnace model number and serial number,
which are printed on the rating plate, located on the furnace.
11.10- Burner flame
While the furnace is in operation, observe the burner flames. Compare
these observations to Figure 27 Typical flame appearance to determine if
proper flame adjustment is present. If your observations indicate improper
flame adjustment, call your authorized service dealer for service. Do not
attempt to adjust flame! Your service representative will perform this
adjustment correctly.
11.15- Dual seven segment display
The dual seven-segment diagnostic display will either display the status
of the system (e.g. “H” for Heat) or a diagnostic error code in the event of
an active fault. Fault and status codes and their meanings can be
determined from Table 17 Fault code
11.16- Fault code buffer
Upon power reset, the last five fault codes from the furnace will be
displayed on the seven-segment display. These will be displayed in
chronological order from newest (displayed first) to oldest (displayed last).
NOTE: The following fault codes will not be stored back-to-back in the
fault buffer. These will only be stored in the buffer if the previous
fault stored was a different fault: 11, 45, 46 & 57.
43
Two levels of fault codes exist: (1) Non- critical and (2) Critical. In general
a non-critical fault permits all (or nearly all) operations to proceed and a
critical fault prevents all (or nearly all) operations from proceeding.
11.16.1- Clearing diagnostic fault codes from the buffer
To clear the fault codes in the fault buffer, push and hold down the “Fault
Recall” button for 3 seconds. When this is done, the right-most sevensegment display will energize the upper and lower horizontal segments for
four seconds as confirmation that the fault codes have been cleared from
the buffer. Be sure to return the switch to the original position after clearing
the faults.
When using communicating thermostat (with the Alize system), active
faults of either level will be displayed at the thermostat in the “ACTIVE
FAULT” area. To enter the furnace “ACTIVE FAULT” area using a
communication thermostat, see the installation and operation instruction
provided with the thermostat.
11.17- Active fault codes
Table 16 Normal operation codes/messages
NORMAL OPERATION CODES / MESSAGES
CODE
DISPLAYED AT FURNACE
0
c
C
F
hp
HP
H (steady)
h (steady)
DESCRIPTION
Standby mode - no thermostat calls, no active faults.
Low-stage cooling
High-stage cooling (displayed during both low and high cooling in comm.
Continuous Fan Operation
Low-stage heat-pump operation
High-stage heat-pump operation
Furnace heat with valid modulation signal
Heat call with no valid modulation signal (legacy modes only)
NOTE: The text in the box shows combinations of upper-case and lower-case letters.
Table 17 Fault code
DISPLAYED TEXT
CODE AT DUAL 7-SEGMENT DISPLAY OF IFC& FAULT AREA OF COMM.
THERMOSTAT
STATUS
FAULT CODE
DESCRIPTION
EXPECTED OPERATION
CAUSE
SOLUTION
44
Table 18 D1 - No shared data
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
D1
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in any mode.
Description :
This code displays anytime there is no shared data at the furnace. The shared data is electronically stored
data that is used to define (among other things) blower operation. Without the shared data, the furnace
cannot function. Note that shared data may be available even if there is no card attached to the furnace
control. A missing memory card will display fault code ‘’D4’’ if shared data is available to the network.
Expected operation
No operation (including thermostat) will be permitted without the shared data. The shared data defines the
IBM (Indoor blower motor) speed-torque curve. Without this information, the IBM cannot operate.
Cause :
Typically, the memory card will be missing from the furnace. In most cases, the cause of this fault will be the
loss or disconnection of the original memory card from the furnace contral (or I.F.C) . When the furnace
control (I.F.C.) is replaced, the memory card must be broken away, saved and installed int the replacement
control. This is explained in details in the section of this book titled “Replacing the furnace control”.
Solution :
Replace the missing memory card into the connector labelled J15 on the furnace control (I.F.C.). If the
original card cannot be found, a replacement card can be ordered. Be sure to order the correct memory card
for the furnace.
NOTE : Furnace power must be cycled off and then on again after replacing the card or the shared data will
not be read.
45
Table 19 D4 - Memory card
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
Cause :
Solution :
D4
This is non-critical fault. The furnace should operate in any mode.
The memory card inserted into the slot at position E117 of the furnace control is corrupt OR there is no
memory card installed at all. However, a valid copy of shared data for the furnace can be retrieved from the
network.
Shared data from the memory card cannot be used because it is invalid. During the first (up to) five minutes
of operation after power reset, the furnace may not respond to the thermostat calls and/or fan calls (from
either the thermostat or the condenser) while the furnace is searching the network for valid shared data. Until
valid shared data is found, no operation will take place. Once valid network shared data has been found,
operation should proceed as normal with this fault (d4) only being displayed during the standby mode. If no
valid network shared data is found, the d4 fault will be replaced by d1 fault (see d1) and no operation will
take place until the issue is repaired.
This fault is displayed when there is no information on the memory card (blank) or the memory card has
corrupted and cannot be properly used.
Remove the memory card and replace with the original memory card from the furnace or the correct
replacement memory card. Never replace the memory card of a furnace with a memory card from
another furnace or component (e.g. condenser or air handler). Doing so could result in improper
operation of the blower which may cause damage to the heat exchanger. If the original memory card
for the furnace control is available and working, it must be used.
A correct replacement memory card can be ordered. Be sure to have the furnace model and serial number
available when ordering.
Table 20 D5 - Card hardware conflict
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
D5
This is a non-critical fault. The furnace should operate in any mode.
The memory card inserted into the slot at position E117 of the furnace control is not correct for the furnace
application.
Shared data from the memory card cannot be used because it is invalid. During the first (up to) five minutes
of operation after power reset, the furnace may not respond to thermostat calls and/or fan calls (from either
the thermostat or the condenser) while the furnace is searching the network for valid shared data. Until valid
shared data is found, no operation will take place. Once valid network shared data has been found,
operation should proceed as normal with this fault (d5) only being displayed during the standby mode. If no
valid network shared data is found, the d5 fault will be replaced by a d1 fault (see d1) and no operation will
take place until the issue is repaired.
There are a couple of reasons that this fault might be displayed:
Cause :
(1) The memory card inserted is from a different type of furnace (e.g.: from a two stages furnace).
(2) The memory card inserted is from another invalid unit.
Remove the memory card and replace with the original memory card from the furnace or the correct
replacement memory card.
Solution :
Never replace the memory card of a furnace with a memory card from another furnace or component
(e.g. condenser or air handler). Doing so could result in improper operation of the blower which may
cause damage to the heat exchanger. If the original memory card for the furnace control is available
and working, it must be used. A correct replacement memory card can be ordered. Be sure to have the
furnace model and serial number available when ordering.
46
Table 21 D6 - Blower horsepower conflict
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
D6
This is a non-critical fault. The furnace should operate in any mode.
Description :
The horsepower reported by the motor does not match the horsepower stored in memory in the shared data
of the memory card or furnace control.
Expected operation
Shared data from the memory card cannot be used because it is invalid during the first (up to five minutes of
operation after power reset, the furnace may not respond to thermostat calls and/or fan calls from either the
thermostat or the condenser) while the furnace is searching the network for valid shared data. Until valid
shared data is found, no operation will take place. Once valid network shared data has been found,
operation should proceed as normal with this fault (D5) only being displayed during the standby mode. If no
valid network shared data is found, the D5 fault will be replaced by a D1 fault (see D1) and no operation will
take place until the issue is repaired.
Cause :
A motor manufactured by a non-supported OEM at the time of production of the furnace control and/or an
invalid memory card is used to replace the blower motor.
Either
(1) replace the blower motor with a supported motor or
Solution :
(2) replace the memory card and/or furnace control with a newer updated version that supports the newer
motor.
Never replace the memory card of a furnace with a memory card from another furnace or component
(e.g. condenser or air handler). Doing so could result in improper operation of the blower which may
cause damage to the heat exchanger.
Table 22 D7 - Blower manufacturer conflict
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
D7
This is a non-critical fault. The furnace should operate in any mode.
Description :
This fault code is displayed any time the blower motor attached is able to communicate with the furnace
control but is not recognized by the furnace control. If the motor attached is from a new manufacturer which
was not supported at the time of production of the furnace control or memory card. The furnace control will
not recognize the newer motor. For example, the motor available to be used in production at the time of this
writing was Regal Beloit (RB) (formerly GE) and Emerson. If a Panasonic motor were added in the future,
the Panasonic motor would not be recognize by the production control board and memory card made today.
The d7 fault code would be displayed. Refer to the section of this manual titled “INTEGRATED FURNACE
CONTROL” under the subsection titled “MEMORY CARD” for details on the hierarchy to use of multiple
copies of shared data and distribution (among other details) of shared data.
Expected operation
Shared data from the memory card cannot be used because it is invalid. During the first (up to) five minutes
of operation after power reset, the furnace may not respond to thermostat calls and/or fan calls. (from) either
the thermostat or the condenser) while the furnace is searching the network for valid shared data. Until valid
shared data is found, no operation will take place. Once valid network shared data has been found,
operation should proceed as normal with this fault (d7) only being displayed during the standby mode. If no
valid network shared data is found, the d7 fault will be replaced by a d1 fault (see d1) and no operation will
take place until the issue is repaired.
Cause :
Solution :
A motor manufactured by a non-supported OEM at the time of production of the furnace control and/or
memory card is used to replace the blower motor.
Either (1) replace the blower motor with a supported motor or (2) replace the memory Card and/or furnace
control with a newer updated version that supports the newer motor. Never replace the memory card of a
furnace with a memory card from another furnace or component (e.g. condenser or air handler).
Doing so could result in improper operation of the blower which may cause damage to the heat
exchanger.
47
Table 23 D8 - old shared data
Code at dual 7 segment
display of I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
Cause :
Solution :
D8
This is a non-critical fault. The furnace should operate in any mode.
This message is intended for future applications where the shared data of a newer furnace has been replaced with
shared data from an older furnace. If, in the future, a new parameter is added to the shared data, an older memory
card in this hypothetical furnace will force this fault to be displayed. If the new shared data parameter is critical to
furnace operation, the furnace will use shared data from the network if available.
Shared data from the memory card cannot be used because it is invalid. During the first (up to) five minutes of
operation after power reset, the furnace may not respond to thermostat calls and/or fan calls. (from) either the
thermostat or the condenser) while the furnace is searching the network for valid shared data. Until valid shared data
is found, no operation will take place. Once valid network shared data has been found, operation should proceed as
normal with this fault (d8) only being displayed during the standby mode. If no valid network shared data is found, the
d8 fault will be replaced by a d1 fault (see d1) and no operation will take place until the issue is repaired.
The incorrect memory card has been used with the furnace control. Specifically, an older memory card has been
used with a newer furnace and some operation (perhaps critical) cannot be performed by the furnace.
Replace the older memory card with a newer card. If the original memory card for the furnace is available, it must be
used. Never replace the memory card of a furnace with a memory card from another furnace or component
(e.g. condenser or air handler). Doing so could result in improper operation of the blower which may cause
damage to the heat exchanger. If the original memory card for the furnace control is available and working, it
must be used. A correct replacement memory can be ordered. Be sure to have the furnace model and serial
number available when ordering.
48
Table 24 h – NO V
Code at dual 7 segment
display of I.F.C.:
Status :
h
This message is displayed only when using a 24v non modulating thermostat. The status is low-level and is not
critical to furnace operation. However, the furnace’s capacity to function in the best possible manner is slightly
compromised. The code will only be displayed at the furnace control (or I.F.C.) dual seven-segment display.
Description :
When the lower-case “h” is displayed at the furnace control (or I.F.C.) dual seven-segment display, it indicates that
the furnace is operating in heat mode and providing heat but the modulation function has been compromised. Two
stages or even three-stage operation is possible (through a timed algorithm) but full modulation will not be possible.
Expected operation
Operation should proceed as normal with a perceivable difference in heating mode. This operation may either be
single or two stage staging operation as defined by the dipswitches at SW2-2 and SW2-3 and may be as expected if
neither a fully communicating thermostat nor non-communicating, fully modulating thermostat is used and indicates
that the “V” signal is not present as it should be. If this is the case, operation will be compromised and (most likely)
only low-stage heat will be delivered. The thermostat may not satisfy properly and it will seem as if the furnace will
not be able to deliver enough heat to “keep-up”.
Cause :
The modulating “V” signal cannot be sensed by the furnace control. This may be OK if either a traditional single
stage or two stages, non-communicating thermostat is used with a modulating furnace. If this is the case, the lower
case “h” is normally displayed during heating operation and does not indicate abnormal operation. However, if a fully
modulating, non-communicating thermostat is used and this message is displayed. It indicates the furnace control is
not sensing the modulating “V” signal from the thermostat. A lower-case “h” should never be displayed during any
operation with a fully communicating thermostat.
Solution :
If a single stage or two stage, non-communicating thermostat is used, this operation is normal and no action needs
to be taken. However, if the thermostat is fully modulating and non-communicating, the “V” signal is not being sensed
by the furnace control (or I.F.C.) microprocessor. The connection (including wiring, wire nuts and etc.) should be
checked first. If the connection is correct and OK, check the thermostat and then the furnace control (or I.F.C.).
Table 25 10 - Ignition 1 hour retry
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
10
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling) the
furnace control (or I.F.C.) will attempt to light three more times before displaying “10” again and entering the
second one-hour lockout. This cycle will repeat indefinitely until gas heat is established or the heat call has
ended.
This fault is displayed after four failed ignition attempts. After four attempts to ignite without success, the
furnace control (or I.F.C.) goes into a lockout mode and will not attempt ignition again for one hour.
After four failed ignition attempts (see fault code “11”), the furnace control (I.F.C.) will display “10” and will
wait one hour before removing the “10” from the display and attempting the next ignition cycle provided the
heat call is still present. If the first attempt at ignition after the one hour lockout is unsuccessful, the furnace
control (I.F.C.) will attempt to light three more times before displaying “10” again and entering the second
one-hour lockout. This cycle will repeat indefinitely until gas heat is established or the heat call has ended.
1.
2.
Is unable to sense flame. It may need cleaning or may not be properly connected.
The igniter is not working properly. It may not be properly connected or the spark location may not
be correct.
Cause :
3.
The furnace control may not be working properly and may need to be replaced.
4.
The flame may not be properly spreading from the first burner to the last.
The solution will depend on the cause. Solutions to noted causes (1), (2), (3) and (4) Above are:
1.
2.
Solution :
Clean or replace the flame sense rod or check all connections and wire between the rod and the
gas furnace control (or I.F.C.).
Replace or reposition the igniter or check all connections and wire between the igniter and the
furnace control (or I.F.C.)
3.
4.
Replace the furnace control.
Check the manifold pressure during ignition. For natural gas it should be approx. 3.5” w.c. and for
LP gas it should be 11” w.c. If manifold pressure is good, watch the burner during ignition. If the
first burner lights, but the second, third and so on do not light, the burner may need to be replaced.
49
Table 26 11 - Failed ignition
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
11
Status :
Up to three failed ignitions will not constitute a critical condition. Critical condition (with no heating operation)
is only noted when the furnace has failed to ignite four or more ties in a row. After four failed ignition
attempts, the fault code will change from “11” to “10” and will read as described under the description for
fault code “10”.
Description :
The fault is displayed at the furnace control after the first failed ignition attempt. It continues to be displayed
until successful ignition or the furnace control has failed to ignite four consecutive times. After four attempts,
the status of the fault is elevated to “10” and the furnace control (or I.F.C.) reacts as described under
description for the fault code “10”.
Expected operation
After the first failed ignition attempt, the fault (“11”) is displayed and the inducer will complete a 20 second
post-purge followed by a second ignition attempts. This cycle will be repeat until gas heat is established or
until the fourth ignition attempt. After the fourth attempt, the furnace control (I.F.C.) will proceed to one-hour
lockout as described under the fault code “10”.
There can be several causes for a failed ignition attempt(s). The most common are:
Cause :
1.
The flame sense rod is unable to sense flame. It may need cleaning or may not be properly
connected.
2.
The gas valve may be turned off.
3.
The igniter is not working properly. It may not be properly connected or the spark location may not
be correct.
4.
The furnace control may not be working properly and may need to be replaced.
5.
The flame may not be properly spreading from the first burner to the last.
The solutions depend on the cause. Solutions to noted causes (1) to (5) above are:
Solution :
1.
Clean or replace the flame sense rod or check all connections and wire between the rod and the
furnace control (or I.F.C.) Make sure furnace ground is properly connected.
2.
Turn the valve on.
3.
Replace or reposition the igniter or check all connections and wire between the igniter and the
furnace control (or I.F.C.).
4.
Replace the furnace control.
5.
Check the manifold pressure during ignition. For natural gas it should be approx. 3.5” W.C. and for
LP gas it should be 11” W.C. If manifold pressure is good, watch the burner during ignition. If the
first burner lights, but the second, third and so on do not light, the burner may need to be replaced.
50
Table 27 12 - Low flame sense
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
12
The status of this fault is non-critical and furnace operation will continue as normal in heating (and all other)
mode(s).
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
If flame sense is low, the furnace control (or I.F.C.) may soon no longer be able to properly sense the flame
and status of the problem may be elevated to the level of fault code “13” or fault “11” (if flame cannot be
sensed at all).
The flame sense current from the flame sense rod at the furnace control (or I.F.C.) is weak or marginal at
best.
All operation (including gas heat) will proceed as normal with only the fault code (“12”) displayed at the
furnace control (or I.F.C.) and “LOW FLAME SENSE” displayed in the fault area of a communicating
thermostat.
1.
The most common cause for low flames sense during heat operation is that the flame sense rod
may need cleaning or may not be properly connected or wiring between the rod and the furnace
control may be shorted or opened.
2.
Another cause for low flame may be an improperly mounted or poorly grounded flame sensor.
1.
Clean or replace the flame sense rod or check all connections and wire between the rod and the
furnace control (or I.F.C.).
2.
Reinstall or replace flame sensor and check wiring and connections. Also make sure the furnace is
properly grounded.
Cause :
Solution :
51
Table 28 13 - Flame lost
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
13
Flame lost is not a critical fault. Subsequent ignition attempts will follow and normal operation should
resume.
Status :
Description :
However, a lost flame can often be followed by failed ignition attempts then a one-hour lockout. Once the
status has reached one-hour lockout, the fault condition is critical (although attempts at ignition will be made
again after the 1 hour lockout) and furnace operation will proceed as described under "10" ("IGN 1 HR
RTRY").
After a successful ignition trial, the flame (which was properly sensed) is no longer sensed. This can happen
any time after successful ignition while a valid heat call is present.
When flame is lost, the fault code ("13") is immediately displayed at the IFC SSD’s.
Expected operation
The IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) is energized (if it was not already) at the correct speed (based on the
demand from the thermostat) and completes a 90 second blower off delay. The IDM (Induced Draft Motor)
remains energized at the most recent speed (based on the demand from the thermostat or as required for
ignition cycle) for a 20 second post-purge. After both the post-purge and blower off delay are complete, the
fault code (“13”) is removed and a new attempt at ignition is made. Often, the new ignition attempt will fail
and operation will proceed as though a failed ignition has occurred from that point (see fault code “11”).
Note: This fault will not be displayed to the homeowner on communicating systems unless it occurs at least
three times within a single heat call. It will not be displayed to the homeowner after the first or even second
failure. However, it will be displayed in the active fault screen of thermostat immediately after the first failure
(and all subsequent failures) during a single heat call. Further, this fault (13) will only be logged into the fault
buffer one time. It will not log more than once in the buffer.”
1.
The most common cause for low flame sense during heat operation is that the flame sense rod
may need cleaning or may not be properly connected or wiring between the rod and the furnace
control may be shorted or opened.
2.
Another cause for low flame may be an improperly mounted or poorly grounded flame sensor.
3.
Flame pattern may be unsafe.
1.
Clean or replace the flame sense rod or check all connections and wire between the rod and the
furnace control (or I.F.C.).
2.
Reinstall or replace flame sensor and check wiring and connections. Also make sure the furnace is
properly grounded.
3.
Check that all burner assembly components are properly installed. Check for good seals between
the burner and blower compartments. Insure that the combustion door gasket is in place and the
door is properly installed and sealed.
Cause :
Solution :
52
Table 29 16 - Igniter fail
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
16
Status :
Description :
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in any mode.
This code is displayed anytime there is an igniter failure. It may also be displayed if the furnace control relay
for the igniter is not closing or cannot be sensed indicating a faulty control board. The fault may also be
displayed if there is improper grounding of the control board.
Expected operation
Cause :
Heating operation will not be permitted.
The control cannot sense the igniter. The igniter may be out of spec, the control may be faulty or there may
be a large potential difference between ground and neutral to the furnace control.
Check the igniter and the connections between the igniter and the control board.
Solution :
If these are OK, check ground potential between neutral and ground. There should be no more than 5 volts
difference. If this is OK, check the furnace control. Replace if necessary.
Table 30 14 - Unexpected flame
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
14
This is an extremely critical fault and should rarely (if ever) be seen in the field. The furnace will not operate
with this fault present.
This fault indicates flame is present when it should not be. Flame is seen to be present when the gas valve is
supposed to be off.
When unexpected flame is sensed, the IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) is energized at maximum.
Expected operation
Cause :
Solution :
Response to any thermostat call is not permitted until the fault is cleared, the IDM will complete a 20 second
post-purge and the IBM will complete a 90 second blower off-delay. Note that the gas valve circuit should
not have been energized at high speed. Both will remain energized until the fault is cleared.
1.
Field miswiring of 24VAC to the gas valve main solenoid.
2.
Faulty gas valve stuck in the “OPEN” position.
3.
Faulty furnace control (signal improperly sensed when it should not be sensed at all).
1.
Wire properly.
2.
Replace gas valve.
3.
Replace furnace control.
53
Table 31 22 - Main limit open
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
22
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling)
should function.
The main limit has opened or is sensed to be opened. This normally means that the temperature inside the
heat exchanger area has gone above a certain predetermined critical value and heating operation is not
permitted until the limit cools to within normal parameters.
When the main limit opens, the IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) will be energized at maximum heat speed.
The gas valve circuit is de-energized
1.
Insufficient airflow.
2.
Faulty limit control.
3.
Loose or faulty wiring.
4.
Input too high.
1.
Check for proper blower operation. Is the blower turning during heat (or any other) mode? If not, a
blower motor fault should also be present. Check the wiring to the motor then check the motor. It
may need replacing.
2.
Check ductwork and filters. Determine the static pressure and make sure it is not above the
published values for the furnace. Check the rate and outlet air temperature at high and low-fire
heat (use the test mode dipswitches SW2-2 and SW2-3) and compare to the nameplate maximum
values.
3.
Replace the limit control.
4.
Check wiring and connections. Replace and/or repair as necessary.
5.
Insure properly sized burner orifices are installed. Check the manifold pressure at high fire and
compare to the nameplate values. Adjust as needed.
Cause :
Solution :
Table 32 26 - Line neutral reverse
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
26
Status :
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat or any other modes.
This fault code is an indication that line voltage and neutral are reversed to the furnace control.
Description :
No operation is allowed to proceed until the problem is corrected.
Expected operation
No heating or cooling operation will take place.
1.
Line and neutral to the furnace have been interchanged at the furnace.
2.
Line voltage and neutral have been interchanged at the disconnect or at the breaker box.
1.
Check voltage with meter and reverse line and neutral if necessary.
2.
Check voltage with meter and reverse line and neutral if necessary.
Cause :
Solution :
54
Table 33 33 - MRLC (Manually Reset Limit Control) OPEN
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
33
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling)
should function.
The Manually Reset Limit Control (M.R.L.C.) is also known by the name “Rollout Limit”.
Description :
There can be several on any given furnace. When one or more of these limits open, they must be manually
pushed back to open (hence the name; Manually Reset) to force the acknowledgement of a critical fault. This
fault will occur when flames have rolled out of the normal area in the heat exchanger and into the burner
compartment. This fault should rarely (if ever) be seen in the field and indicates a very serious problem that
must be fixed before furnace operation can continue.
When the MRLC (Manually Reset Limit Control) circuit has been opened, the IBM (Indoor Blower
Expected operation
Cause :
Solution :
Motor) is energized at maximum heating speed. The gas valve circuit is de-energized (if it was energized)
and the IDM (Induced Draft Motor) is energized at high speed. Response to thermostat cooling calls will take
place as normal with IBM energizing at the higher of the two blower speeds (high heat or cool). When the
fault is cleared, the IDM will remain energized for a 20 second post-purge and the IBM will remain energized
for the 90 second blower off-delay period.
1.
Insufficient venting through either the inlet or exhaust.
2.
Loose or faulty wiring.
3.
Unstable flame pattern.
1.
Check that the pressure switch (es) have not been welded closed or bypassed. Check that the
inducer is operating at the proper rpm. Ensure that the venting does not exceed the maximum
specified lengths. Check for obstructions in combustion venting. Check that all gaskets between
the inducer and center panel/heat exchanger are properly installed and sealed.
2.
Check wiring and connections. Replace and/or repair as necessary.
3.
Check that all burner assembly components are properly installed. Check that all seals between
the burner and blower compartments are tight. Ensure that the door seals are in place and that the
burner door is properly installed and does not leak. Check to make sure that the heat exchanger
has not been damaged; i.e.: crushed tubes, breached collector box and etc.
55
Table 34 44 - LPC (low pressure control (switch)) Closed
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
44
Status :
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat mode but all other modes (e.g. cooling) should
function if present simultaneously with a heating call (e.g. defrost call in dual-fuel mode).
Description :
The low pressure control (or switch) should not be closed when the inducer is not running. If it is, this is a
sign of a serious condition. The switch may be welded closed or purposely bypassed in the field. Before any
heat cycle can begin, the pressure switch is tested to make sure that it is opened. The switch is ignored
except in gas heating modes.
Expected operation
There will be no other operation than displaying of the fault code and diagnostic messages to the
homeowner and technician. The fault code is only present during a heat call before pre-purge begins.
1.
Faulty switch.
2.
Pressure switch physically bypassed in the field.
3.
Loose or faulty wiring.
4.
Abnormally high negative pressure present on vent system without inducer running.
1.
Replace low pressure control (switch).
2.
Remove bypass and restore correct operation. Determine reason for bypass (e.g. vent length too
long) and correct issue. Notify homeowner and proper authorities of illegal tampering if necessary.
3.
Check wiring and connections. Replace and/or repair as necessary.
4.
Check for proper venting and terminations as defined in the furnace installation instruction.
Cause :
Solution :
56
Table 35 46 - LPC (low pressure control (switch)) Open
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
46
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling)
should function if present simultaneously with a heating call (e.g. defrost call in dual-fuel mode).
This fault indicates that the low pressure switch is open when the inducer is energized at low speed. The
switch must close after the inducer is energized and before the ignition sequence can begin. The switch is
ignored except in heating modes.
1.
DISPLAYED BEFORE HEAT IS ESTABLISHED: The IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) will not be
energized. The fault code will not be displayed until the IDM (Induced Draft Motor) has been
energized for a minimum five minutes after the beginning of the pre-purge attempt. After five minutes,
the IDM is de-energized and second pressure switch closes or the heat call is lost.
2.
DISPLAYED AFTER HEAT IS ESTABLISHED: If this fault is displayed after heat is established, the
gas valve will be de-energized, the IBM will be energized (if not already energized) at the correct
heat speed (determined by the firing rate required by the thermostat) and the IDM will remain
energized at high speed. The IBM will complete a 90 second blower off-delay and the IDM will
complete a 20 second post-purge (at high speed). After these delays, a new attempt at ignition will
be made provided the call for heat is still present.
1.
Blockage or improper termination in either the inlet or exhaust vents.
2.
The flue vent length and/or number of elbows exceed the maximum number specified.
3.
Faulty or disconnected inducer.
4.
Faulty control board (inducer relay).
5.
Loose or faulty wiring.
6.
Disconnected, blocked, split or cut pressure switch hoses.
7.
Wind gusts (sporadic).
8.
Faulty pressure switch.
1.
Check the vent system for blockage and proper termination and repair as necessary.
2.
Check the specification sheets and/or installation instructions. Remove excess venting.
3.
Repair or replace inducer and/or inducer wiring and/or electrical connections.
4.
Replace control board.
5.
Check wiring and connections. Replace and/or repair as necessary.
6.
Replace hoses as necessary.
7.
Insure proper termination.
8.
Replace the pressure switch.
Cause :
Solution :
57
Table 36 55 - HPC (High Pressure Control (switch)) CLOSED
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
55
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling)
should function if present simultaneously with a heating call (e.g. defrost call in dual-fuel mode).
The high pressure control (or switch) should not be closed when the inducer is not running.
Description :
Expected operation
If it is, this is a sign of a serious condition. The switch may be welded closed or purposely bypassed in the
field. Before any heat cycle can begin, the pressure switch is tested to make sure that it is opened. The
switch is ignored except in gas heating modes.
There will be no other operation than displaying of the fault code and diagnostic messages to the
homeowner and technician. The fault code is only present during a heat call before pre-purge begins.
1.
Faulty switch.
2.
Pressure switch physically bypassed in the field.
3.
Loose or faulty wiring.
4.
Abnormally high negative pressure present on vent system without inducer running.
1.
Replace high pressure control (switch).
2.
Remove bypass and restore correct operation. Determine reason for bypass (e.g. vent length too
long) and correct issue. Notify homeowner and proper authorities of illegal tampering if necessary.
3.
Check wiring and connections. Replace and/or repair as necessary.
4.
Check for proper venting and terminations as defined in the furnace installation instructions.
Cause :
Solution :
58
Table 37 57 - HPC (High Pressure Control (switch)) OPEN
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
57
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling)
should function if present simultaneously with a heating call (e.g. defrost call in dual-fuel mode). if this is
experienced during high heat operation (above 50% rate) and the low pressure switch remains engaged, the
furnace will switch to low fire heat and continue to run (if possible) to try to satisfy the thermostat.
This fault indicates that the high pressure switch is open when the inducer is energized at high speed. This
fault can be displayed any time during the heat call except during low heat call and only after the pre-purge
and blower on delays are complete.
1.
DISPLAYED BEFORE HEAT IS ESTABLISHED: The IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) will not be
energized. The fault code will not be displayed until the IDM (Induced Draft Motor) has been
energized for a minimum of ten seconds. The IDM will remain energized at the high speed (high
speed is default pre-purge speed) for a period of five minutes after the beginning of the pre-purge
attempt. After five minutes, the IDM is de-energized and second attempt at pre-purge is made (as
long as the heat call is still present). This cycle is repeated indefinitely until either the pressure switch
closes or the heat call is lost.
2.
DISPLAYED AFTER HEAT IS ESTABLISHED: if this fault is displayed after heat is established, the
IDM will remain energized at high speed and the firing rate will drop to low (40%) provided the low
pressure switch remains closed. The IBM will energize at, or switch to, the low-fire rate (also provided
the low pressure switch remains closed). Low heat is provided until the heat call ends or the high
pressure switch closes. If the high pressure switch closes, the heat rate and blower speed will be
adjusted to the correct (higher) rate required by the thermostat and the IDM will remain energized at
high speed. If the low pressure switch also will not remain closed, operation will be as described
under fault code # 46 (“LPC OPEN”) above.
1.
Blockage or improper termination in either the inlet or exhaust vents.
2.
The flue vent length and/or number of elbows exceed the maximum number specified.
3.
Faulty or disconnected inducer.
4.
Faulty control board (inducer relay).
5.
Loose or faulty wiring.
6.
Disconnected, blocked, split or cut pressure switch hoses.
7.
Wind gusts (sporadic).
8.
Faulty pressure switch.
1.
Check the vent system for blockage and proper termination and repair as necessary.
2.
Check the specification sheets and/or installation instructions. Remove excess venting.
3.
Repair or replace inducer and/or inducer wiring and/or electrical connections.
4.
Replace control board.
5.
Check wiring and connections. Replace and/or repair as necessary.
6.
Replace hoses as necessary.
7.
Insure proper termination.
8.
Replace the pressure switch.
Cause :
Solution :
59
Table 38 60 - Blower fault - running
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
Cause :
Solution :
60
This is a non-critical fault experienced by the furnace. All operations (including thermostat calls) should
continue as normal with no perceivable difference in operation.
A blower fault which is non-critical allows the blower to continue to run but at less than optimal conditions.
All (including thermostat) operation should continue as normal. Blower operation may be slightly
compromised but will continue.
The blower has hit the maximum speed or torque limit specified by the manufacturer or is running at the
temperature limit because the static pressure is too high.
The static pressure is too high because the ductwork is improperly designed or is restricted for some other
reason or the filter needs cleaning or replacing. Remove the obstruction or repair the duct so that static
pressure does not exceed published values in the specification sheets or installation instructions.
Table 39 61 - Blower fault – not running
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
61
Status :
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in any mode.
Description :
The blower has failed critically or there is a critical motor fault – such as thermal limit trip that prevents the
blower motor from running.
Expected operation
If the furnace was in heating operation when this fault occurred, blower operation will immediately stop and
the furnace will shut down normally with post-purge at the correct speed. After the post purge (or
immediately if no heat call was present), no other operation (including thermostat calls) will occur until this
fault is cleared.
Cause :
Solution :
1.
The motor has tripped on thermal limit because of a restriction or bearing failure.
2.
The motor Power Factor Correction (P.F.C.) choke is faulty and needs replacing.
3.
The furnace shared data is faulty or corrupted.
4.
Wiring to the motor and/or P.F.C. has become compromised.
5.
The motor has failed catastrophically.
1.
Remove obstruction or replace motor.
2.
Replace the Power Factor Correction choke.
3.
Replace the furnace memory card with the correct replacement part.
4.
Inspect and replace or repair wiring and/or connectors to the motor and/or P.F.C. as necessary.
5.
Replace the motor.
60
Table 40 66 - Blower overspeed
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
Cause :
Solution :
66
This is a non-critical fault experienced by the furnace. All operations (including thermostat calls) should
continue as normal with no perceivable difference in operation.
The blower motor is operating at the highest rpm or torque that specifications allow but the application
requires more torque or speed in order to get the desired airflow under the current static pressure conditions.
The motor will continue to operate because internal software will prevent operation above the permitted
range. However, a fault is sent to the furnace control (or I.F.C.) from the motor.
Note: this fault will not be displayed after the first hour of blower operation after power reset. Further, this
fault will not be logged in the fault buffer or fault history after the first hour of operation and will only be
logged into the fault buffer a maximum of one time. This code (66) indication is intended as a tool to notify
the installer of inadequate airflow due to excessive static pressure in the duct of the system. The code is not
intended to be a fault code. It is merely an operating indicator.
All (including thermostat) operation should continue as normal. Blower operation may be slightly
compromised but will continue.
The blower has hit the maximum speed or torque limit specified by the manufacturer because the static
pressure is too high.
The static pressure is too high because the ductwork is improperly designed or is restricted for some other
reason or the filter needs cleaning or replacing. Remove the obstruction or repair the duct so that static
pressure does not exceed published values in the specification sheets or installation instructions for the
furnace.
Table 41 68 - No blower communication
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
68
Status :
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in any mode.
Description :
Expected operation
The furnace control (I.F.C.) cannot communicate with the blower motor.
If the furnace was in heating operation when this fault occurred, the gas valve will immediately close (flame
will be lost), IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) operation will immediately stop and the furnace will shut down
normally (except without IBM operation) with IDM (Inducer Draft Motor) post-purge at the correct speed.
After the post purge (or immediately if no heat call was present), no other operation (including thermostat
calls) will occur until this fault is cleared.
1.
The wires between the blower motor have been disconnected or there is a poor connection.
2.
There is no line voltage to the motor.
3.
The furnace shared data is faulty or corrupted.
4.
The motor has failed catastrophically.
1.
Check wiring, connectors and terminals – repair or replace as necessary.
2.
Check line voltage wiring, connectors and terminals to the Power Factor Correction choke and ECM
motor. Repair and replace as necessary.
3.
Replace the furnace memory card with the correct replacement part.
4.
Replace the motor.
Cause :
Solution :
61
Table 42 71 - No inducer communications
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
71
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling)
should function.
Description :
When attempting to communicate with the inducer controller module (electronic control board in blower
compartment), communications cannot be established or response from the inducer controller module is not
as expected.
Expected operation
Upon fault declaration, if currently in steady-state heating mode, the gas valve will be immediately de
energized. Commands to operate the inducer at post purge will attempt to be sent but will likely not be
received because the communications link has been interrupted. The Air Circulating Blower (A.C.B.) will
complete the 90 second blower off delay. Further heating operation will not take place until communications
with the inducer controller can be established again. This fault will not affect the furnace during any other
operation except heating.
Cause :
The cause can be interrupted wiring between the main furnace control and the inducer controller module or
interrupted wiring between the inducer controller module and the inducer itself. Other causes can be a
defective inducer controller module or a defective inducer.
Solution :
Check the wiring between the furnace controller (I.F.C.) and the inducer controller module. Check wiring
between the inducer controller module and the inducer. Check line voltage to the inducer controller module.
If these are ok, replace the inducer controller module and/or inducer.
Table 43 77 - No gas valve feedback
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
Status :
77
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in gas heat modes but all other modes (e.g. cooling)
should function.
Description :
Expected operation
Cause :
Solution :
The furnace control has lost communications with the gas valve.
If the furnace was in heating operation when this fault occurred, the gas valve will immediately close (flame
will be lost), IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) operation will immediately stop and the furnace will shut down
normally (except without IBM operation) with IDM (Inducer Draft Motor) post-purge at the correct speed.
After the post purge (or immediately if no heat call was present), no other operation (including thermostat
calls) will occur until this fault is cleared.
1.
The wires, connectors or terminals between the furnace control (or I.F.C.) have become
disconnected or there is a poor connection.
2.
The gas valve is faulty.
3.
The furnace control is faulty.
1.
Check the wires, connectors or terminals between the gas valve and furnace control (or I.F.C.).
Replace or repair as necessary.
2.
Replace the gas valve.
3.
Replace the furnace control.
62
Table 44 93 - Control fault
Code at dual 7 segment display of
I.F.C.:
93
Status :
Description :
Expected operation
This is a critical fault. The furnace will not operate in any mode of operation.
This is a severe fault that should rarely (if ever) be discovered in the field. It is an indicator of an internal
microprocessor fault on the furnace control (or I.F.C.) or voltage applied to the main gas valve solenoid when
there should be none.
If the furnace was in heating operation when this fault occurred, the gas valve will immediately close (flame
will be lost), IBM (Indoor Blower Motor) operation will immediately stop and the furnace will shut down
normally (except without IBM operation) with IDM (Induced Draft Motor) post-purge at the correct speed.
After the post purge (or immediately if no heat call was present), no other operation (including thermostat
calls) will occur until this fault is cleared. However, this fault may also indicate an internal microprocessor
failure. This may mean that the heat call will not end as expected and that all outputs will be de-energized
and gas valve closed immediately when the fault is sensed.
1.
24VAC or similar voltage applied to the main gas valve solenoid circuit unexpectedly.
2.
Furnace control software test failure – failed furnace control (or I.F.C.).
1.
Check for miswiring in the furnace.
2.
Replace the furnace control (or I.F.C.).
Cause :
Solution :
63
Figure 28 Exploded View – Modulating
64
65
Table 45 Part list – Modulating – ECM 3.0
#
Description
C15-M-V
C30-M-V
C45-M-V
C60-M-V
C75-M-V
C105-M-V
C120-M-V
1
Heat exchanger ass.
B40511-04
B40511-04
B40511-04
B40511-05
B40511-05
B40511-06
B40511-06
2
Right pannel ass.
B40510-34
B40510-34
B40510-34
B40510-34
B40510-34
B40510-34
B40510-34
3
Loose part bag
B40569-01
B40569-01
B40569-01
B40569-02
B40569-02
B40569-02
B40569-02
4
Hose 5/8
B30157-34
B30157-34
B30157-34
B30157-34
B30157-34
B30157-34
B30157-34
5
Hose 1/2
B30157-38
B30157-38
B30157-38
B30157-38
B30157-38
B30157-38
B30157-38
6
Hose 3/16
B30157-40
B30157-40
B30157-40
B30157-40
B30157-40
B30157-40
B30157-40
7
Floor
B40546-01
B40546-01
B40546-01
B40546-02
B40546-02
B40546-03
B40546-03
8
Blower ass.
B40603-01
B40603-01
B40603-01
B40603-02
B40603-03
B40603-04
B40603-04
9
Electric blower kit
B40581-03
B40581-03
B40581-03
B40581-03
B40581-03
B40581-04
B40581-04
10
Electric blower kit
B40587-01
B40587-01
B40587-01
B40587-01
B40587-01
B40587-02
B40587-02
11
Inducer restrictor
B40563-01
B40699
B40563-07
B40563-04
B40698
B40563-06
B40563-06
12
Pressure switch ass.
B40675-25
B40675-26
B40675-27
B40675-28
B40675-29
B40675-31
B40675-32
13
Gas valve
R01K005
R01K005
R01K005
R01K005
R01K005
R01K005
R01K005
14
Electrical kit gas
valve/board
B40582-01
B40582-01
B40582-01
B40582-01
B40582-01
B40582-02
B40582-02
15
Control card assembly
B40516
B40516
B40516
B40516
B40516
B40516
B40516
16
Electrical kit ignitor/board
B40586-01
B40586-01
B40586-01
B40586-01
B40586-01
B40586-02
B40586-02
17
Memory card assembly
B40634-01
B40634-02
B40634-03
B40634-04
B40634-05
B40634-07
B40634-08
18
Lower door assembly
B40570-10
B40570-10
B40570-10
B40570-11
B40570-11
B40570-12
B40570-12
19
Upper door assembly
B40571-01
B40571-01
B40571-01
B40571-02
B40571-02
B40571-03
B40571-03
20
Left pannel ass.
B40509-02
B40508-02
B40509-02
B40509-02
B40509-02
B40509-02
B40509-02
21
Electrical kit main harness
B40588-01
B40588-01
B40588-01
B40588-01
B40588-01
B40588-02
B40588-02
22
Elect. Kit inverter blower
B40585-01
B40585-01
B40585-01
B40585-01
B40585-01
B40585-02
B40585-02
23
Complete gas manifold
ass.
B40514-01
B40514-02
B40514-03
B40514-04
B40514-05
B40514-07
B40514-08
24
ID blower ass.
B40578-06
B40578-06
B40578-06
B40578-03
B40578-03
B40578-03
B40578-03
25
Top pannel ass.
B40512-01
B40512-01
B40512-01
B40512-02
B40512-02
B40512-03
B40512-03
26
Door switch
L07H001
L07H001
L07H001
L07H001
L07H001
L07H001
L07H001
27
Dettson observation port
B40565
B40565
B40565
B40565
B40565
B40565
B40565
28
Observation port
L04Z022
L04Z022
L04Z022
L04Z022
L04Z022
L04Z022
L04Z022
29
Grommet
G14F017
G14F017
G14F017
G14F017
G14F017
G14F017
G14F017
30
Pressure switch
(condensate box)
R99F035
R99F035
R99F035
R99F035
R99F035
R99F035
R99F035
31
Pressure switch (high fire)
R99F055
R99F048
R99F044
R99F042
R99F049
R99F041
R99F048
32
Pressure switch (low fire)
R99F050
R99F036
R99F050
R99F037
R99F036
R99F036
R99F036
33
Drain trap gasket
B40568
B40568
B40568
B40568
B40568
B40568
B40568
34
PVC pipe
B40573-02
B40573-02
B40573-02
B40573-01
B40573-01
B40573-01
B40573-01
35
Drain trap
B40760
B40760
B40760
B40760
B40760
B40760
B40760
36
Venting flange gasket
B40567
B40567
B40567
B40567
B40567
B40567
B40567
66
#
Description
C15-M-V
C30-M-V
C45-M-V
C60-M-V
C75-M-V
C105-M-V
C120-M-V
37
Venting flange
B40533
B40533
B40533
B40533
B40533
B40533
B40533
38
Ignitor
R03K005
R03K005
R03K005
R03K005
R03K005
R03K005
R03K005
39
Burner high limit
R02N022
R02N022
R02N022
R02N022
R02N022
R02N022
R02N022
40
Gas manifold
B40576
B40577
B40527
B40528
B40529
B40531
B40532
41
Orifice #48 natural gas
R04I001
R04I001
R04I001
R04I001
R04I001
R04I001
R04I001
42
Flame sensor
R03J004
R03J004
R03J004
R03J004
R03J004
R03J004
R03J004
43
5/8" clamp
G99Z035
G99Z035
G99Z035
G99Z035
G99Z035
G99Z035
G99Z035
44
5/8" elbow
G07J007
G07J007
G07J007
G07J007
G07J007
G07J007
G07J007
45
Condensation box
B40526-01
B40526-01
B40526-01
B40526-02
B40526-02
B40526-03
B40526-04
46
High limit
R02N027
R02N026
R02N026
R02N024
R02N023
R02N024
R02N024
47
Baffles
B40572
B40572
B40572
B40572
B40572
B40572
B40572
48
Smoke box
B40539-01
B40539-01
B40539-01
B40539-02
B40539-02
B40539-03
B40539-04
49
Rubber vent coupling
B40580
B40580
B40580
B40580
B40580
B40580
B40580
50
Induce draft blower
Z01K005
Z01K005
Z01K005
Z01K005
Z01K005
Z01K005
Z01K005
51
1/2'' elbow
G07J006
G07J006
G07J006
G07J006
G07J006
G07J006
G07J006
52
1/2" clamp
G99Z034
G99Z034
G99Z034
G99Z034
G99Z034
G99Z034
G99Z034
53
Inducer
B03141-02
B03141-02
B03141-02
B03141-01
B03141-01
B03141
B03141
54
ECM 3.0 motor ass.
B03240-13
B03240-13
B03240-13
B03716-04
B03716-04
B03241-11
B03241-11
55
Motor ECM 3.0
L06H020
L06H020
L06H020
L06I014
L06I014
L06K008
L06K008
56
Belly band ass.
B01889
B01889
B01889
B01889
B01889
B01889
B01889
57
Blower
Z01I033
Z01I033
Z01I033
Z01I035
Z01I036
Z01I038
Z01I038
58
24v control board
R99G014
R99G014
R99G014
R99G014
R99G014
R99G014
R99G014
59
Electrical box
B40559
B40559
B40559
B40559
B40559
B40559
B40559
60
ID blower Control board
R99G017
R99G017
R99G017
R99G017
R99G017
R99G017
R99G017
61
Transformer 120v-24v
L01F009
L01F009
L01F009
L01F009
L01F009
L01F009
L01F009
62
Elbow and ID blower ass.
-
-
-
B40766-03
B40766-03
B40766-03
B40766-03
63
ID blower elbow ass.
-
-
-
B40818
B40818
B40818
B40818
64
Extruded seal
B04435-01
B04435-01
B04435-01
B04435-01
B04435-01
B04435-01
B04435-01
Options
Bottom return base ass.
Downflow base
Cooling coil base
Propane conversion kit
Orifice #56 for propane
Drain trap replacement kit
C15-M-V
B40691-01
B40632-01
B40693-01
B40574-03
R04I002
K01021
C30-M-V
B40691-01
B40632-01
B40693-01
B40574-06
R04I002
K01021
C45-M-V
B40691-01
B40632-01
B40693-01
B40574-09
R04I002
K01021
67
C60-M-V
B40691-02
B40632-02
B40693-02
B40574-12
R04I002
K01021
C75-M-V
B40691-02
B40632-02
B40693-02
B40574-15
R04I002
K01021
C105-M-V
B40691-03
B40632-03
B40693-02
B40574-21
R04I002
K01021
C120-M-V
B40691-03
B40632-03
B40693-03
B40574-24
R04I002
K01021
Annex 1 - CFM TABLES FOR COOLING AND HEATING
Table 46 Heating CFM C15-M-V
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
240
240
240
240
240
235
223
219
219
226
221
218
200
200
200
200
200
55
55
55
55
55
56
59
60
60
58
60
61
66
66
66
66
66
238
238
238
238
238
235
221
223
221
225
222
214
197
197
197
197
197
22
22
22
22
22
22
24
24
24
23
24
25
27
27
27
27
27
Table 47 Cooling CFM demand C15-M-V and C15-M-S1
S5-2
OFF
Dipswitch
S5-1
S3-2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1st stage
2nd stage
590
505
380
245
675
550
420
285
760
630
505
320
765
725
550
380
CFM can be increase for C15-M-S unit, please refer to Table 15 Dipswitch S3 and S5 –
Setting cooling airflow demand
1
68
Table 48 Heating CFM C15-M-S
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
240
240
240
240
240
235
223
219
219
226
221
218
200
200
200
200
200
55
55
55
55
55
56
59
60
60
58
60
61
66
66
66
66
66
238
238
238
238
238
235
221
223
221
225
222
214
197
197
197
197
197
22
22
22
22
22
22
24
24
24
23
24
25
27
27
27
27
27
Table 49 Heating CFM C30-M-V
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
354
354
354
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
75
75
75
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
Table 50 Cooling CFM demand for C30-M-V and C30-M-S1
S5-2
OFF
Dipswitch
S5-1
S3-2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1st stage
2nd stage
600
335
430
310
695
350
520
315
780
420
595
310
900
460
695
320
CFM can be increase for C30-M-S unit, please refer to Table 15 Dipswitch S3 and S5 – Setting cooling airflow
demand
1
69
Table 51 Heating CFM for C30-M-S
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
408
354
354
354
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
75
75
75
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
303
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
35
Table 52 Heating CFM for C45-M-V
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
675
675
675
715
730
750
760
780
775
780
780
775
770
755
735
715
690
62
62
62
60
59
58
57
56
56
56
56
56
57
58
60
61
63
325
325
355
360
360
365
360
365
360
350
350
345
345
340
330
310
275
48
48
44
43
43
42
42
41
40
41
41
41
41
42
42
45
51
Table 53 Cooling CFM demand for C45-M-V and C45-M-S1
S5-2
OFF
Dipswitch
S5-1
S3-2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1
1st stage
2nd stage
530
420
315
310
625
460
325
315
695
530
375
315
810
625
435
315
CFM can be increase for C45-M-S unit, please refer to Table 15 Dipswitch S3 and S5
– Setting cooling airflow demand
70
Table 54 Heating CFM for C45-M-S
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
710
710
710
745
780
785
795
800
805
810
805
820
820
825
830
820
810
57
57
57
56
54
53
53
53
53
52
52
52
52
52
52
52
53
385
385
385
370
355
345
325
335
335
330
325
320
320
315
295
275
250
32
32
32
35
36
37
38
36
36
35
35
35
35
35
36
38
41
Table 55 CFM in heating for C60-M-V
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
850
900
950
975
985
990
1015
1010
1020
1020
1025
1025
1030
1020
1015
1010
1000
57
57
57
57
54
54
54
53
53
52
52
53
52
53
53
53
53
480
465
465
470
480
475
450
410
380
375
365
340
330
320
320
310
295
56
56
56
57
60
69
73
75
80
83
83
83
83
83
83
83
83
Table 56 Cooling CFM demand for C60-M-V1
S5-2
OFF
Dipswitch
S5-1
S3-2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1st stage
2nd stage
1245
850
1025
520
1475
1000
1265
585
1475
1175
1460
710
1475
1425
1470
825
CFM can be increase, please refer to Table 15 Dipswitch S3 and S5 – Setting
cooling airflow demand
1
71
Table 57 Heating CFM for C75-M-V
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
1290
1290
1318
1318
1336
1337
1350
1346
1340
1335
1330
1325
1289
1260
1186
1113
1050
57
57
56
55
55
55
56
56
56
56
57
57
59
61
64
68
71
512
522
525
543
545
551
556
561
572
566
522
493
465
445
431
419
391
54
56
56
55
55
54
53
53
52
52
57
60
64
68
70
72
75
Table 58 Cooling CFM demand for C75-M-V
S5-2
OFF
Dipswitch
S5-1
S3-2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1st stage
2nd stage
1090
745
640
505
1254
925
770
580
1430
1055
875
680
1650
1270
1090
800
Table 59 Heating CFM for C105-M-V
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
CFM@100%
1775
1775
1775
1750
1735
1700
1660
1630
1595
1580
ΔT (°F)
52
52
52
53
53
54
56
57
58
58
72
CFM@40%
685
665
640
640
630
620
610
605
595
575
ΔT (°F)
54
56
58
58
59
60
61
61
62
64
Table 60 Cooling CFM demand for C105-M-V
S5-2
OFF
Dipswitch
S5-1
S3-2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1st stage
2nd stage
1265
860
1020
710
1590
1055
1240
870
1700
1220
1375
975
1750
1465
1695
1245
Table 591 Heating CFM for C120-M-V
external static
pressure
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
CFM@100%
ΔT (°F)
CFM@40%
ΔT (°F)
1925
1925
1925
1865
1835
1820
1815
1800
1795
1775
55
55
55
57
58
58
58
59
59
59
700
700
675
660
645
635
625
635
635
630
60
60
63
64
65
66
68
66
66
67
Table 602 Cooling CFM demand for C120-M-V
S5-2
OFF
Dipswitch
S5-1
S3-2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
S3-1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
73
1st stage
2nd stage
1375
1070
915
1395
1645
1265
1105
924
1870
1500
1245
1880
2040
1760
1535
1245
Annex 2 - SPECIFICATION SHEET
Model
HIGH
INPUT
LOW
HIGH
OUTPUT
LOW
EFFICIENCY
TEMP. RISE
HEATING
HIGH
AIRFLOW HEATING
LOW
(CFM)
MAX*
MAX**
MAX COOLING CAPACITY
MOTOR HP
Model
HIGH
INPUT
LOW
HIGH
OUTPUT
LOW
EFFICIENCY
TEMP. RISE
HEATING
HIGH
AIRFLOW HEATING
LOW
(CFM)
MAX*
MAX**
MAX COOLING CAPACITY
MOTOR HP
CC15-M-V
C15-M-S
C15-M-V
15000
15000
15000
6000
6000
6000
14352
14352
14352
5741
5741
5741
95.6
95.6
95.6
40 - 70°F (22 - 38°C)
C30-M-S
C30-M-V
30000
30000
12000
12000
28613
28613
11445
11445
95.3
95.3
50 - 80°F (27 - 44°C)
240
310
240
410
410
240
310
240
305
305
480
420
1
1/3
1200
860
3
3/4
1000
600
2.5
1/2
1345
950
3
3/4
1200
720
3
1/2
C45-M-S
45000
18000
43101
17240
95.7
C45-M-V
45000
18000
43101
17240
95.7
810
766
970
330
330
1400
980
3.5
3/4
1285
770
3
1/2
C60-M-V
C75-M-V
60000
75000
24000
30000
57654
71798
23062
28605
96.0
95.7
40 - 70°F (22 - 38°C)
C105-M-V
105000
42000
101010
40427
96.2
C120-M-V
120000
48000
15200
46080
96.0
1200
1735
1835
388
480
630
645
1680
1140
4
3/4
1700
1100
4
3/4
1961
N/A
5
1
2138
N/A
5
1
*MAX CFM for ESP of 0.5'' w.c.
**MAX CFM for Smart Duct™
INPUT
15K
COMPACT
15K
30K
45K
60K
75K
105K
120K
SHIP WEIGHT
LB/KG
79/35.8
115/52.2
116/52.6
119/54.0
136/61.7
138/62.6
161/73.0
171/77.6
MAXIMUM CONSUMPTION
(Amps/Breaker size)
8.6/10
10.7/15
10.7/15
12.6/15
15.6/20
15.6/20
19.0/20
19.0/20
115 Volts - 60 Hertz - 1 Phase
SUPPLY
74
Maximum equivalent straight vent length
Altitude (ft)
Unit size (Btu/hr)
0 to 4500 ft
2"
3"
15,000
300
N/A
30,000
180
N/A
45,000
70
90
60,000
70
90
75,000
70
90
105,000
15
80
120,000
10
40
Deduction for fittings
Type of elbow
Equivalent Length (ft.)
45° Standard
5
45° Long sweap
2½
90° Standard
10
90° Long sweap
5
Tee
Vent pipe diameter (in.)
1.5
75
INFORMATION PAGE
MODEL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
NATURAL GAS OR PROPRANE?
IF PROPANE, CONVERSION KIT NUMBER
GAS SUPPLY PRESSURE
MANIFOLD PRESSURE
SUPPLY VOLTAGE
DUCT STATIC PRESSURE (SUPPLY AND RETURN)
AIR TEMPERATURE RISE
DOES THE DRAIN TRAP IS FILLED WITH WATER?
IS THE DRAIN TRAP VENTED WITH A TEE?
DOES THE CONDENSATE LINES ARE PROPERLY SLOPED?
IF THE UNIT IS UPFLOW, IS IT LEVELED?
IF THE UNIT IS IN POSITION OTHER THAN UPFLOW, IS IT TILTED?
DIAMETER OF PIPE
LENGTH OF EQUIVALENT PIPE
Comments:
76