Compex SCSI TO S-ATA RAID Product specifications

SCSI to SATA RAID
Subsystems
Operation Manual
Version 1.2 (03, 2006)
Firmware Revision: 3.47x
Contact Information
Asia Pacific
(International Headquarters)
Infortrend Technology, Inc.
8F, No. 102 Chung-Shan Rd., Sec. 3
Chung-Ho City, Taipei Hsien, Taiwan
Tel: +886-2-2226-0126
Fax: +886-2-2226-0020
sales@infortrend.com
support@infortrend.com
http://www.infortrend.com.tw
China
Infortrend Technology, Limited
Room 1210, West Wing, Tower One, Junefield
Plaza, No. 6 Xuanwumen Street, Xuanwu District,
Beijing, China
Post code: 100052
Tel: +86-10-6310-6168
Fax: +86-10-6310-6188
sales@infortrend.com.cn
support@infortrend.com.cn
http://www.infortrend.com.cn
Japan
Infortrend Japan, Inc.
6F Okayasu Bldg., 1-7-14 Shibaura,
Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0023 Japan
Tel: +81-3-5730-6551
Fax: +81-3-5730-6552
sales@infortrend.co.jp
support@infortrend.co.jp
http://www.infortrend.co.jp
ii
Americas
Infortrend Corporation
3150 Coronado Dr., Unit C
Santa Clara, CA 95054
USA
Tel: +1-408-988-5088
Fax: +1-408-988-6288
sales.us@infortrend.com
support.us@infortrend.com
http://www.infortrend.com
Europe (EMEA)
Infortrend Europe Limited
5 Elmwood Chineham Business Park
Basingstoke, Hampshire
RG24 8WG, UK
Tel: +44-1256-70-77-00
Fax: +44-1256-70-78-89
sales.eu@infortrend.com
support.eu@infortrend.com
http://www.infortrend-europe.com
Copyright 2006
This Edition First Published 2006
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted,
transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language or
computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
magnetic, optical, chemical, manual or otherwise, without the prior written
consent of Infortrend Technology, Inc.
Disclaimer
Infortrend Technology makes no representations or warranties with respect to
the contents hereof and specifically disclaims any implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose. Furthermore, Infortrend
Technology reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes
from time to time in the content hereof without obligation to notify any person
of such revisions or changes. Product specifications are also subject to
change without notice.
Trademarks
Infortrend, Infortrend logo, EonStor and RAIDWatch are all registered
trademarks of Infortrend Technology, Inc. Other names prefixed with “IFT”
and “ES” are trademarks of Infortrend Technology, Inc.
PowerPC® is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation
and Motorola Inc.
Solaris and Java are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
All other names, brands, products or services are trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective owners.
RMA Policy
Please visit our websites (www.infortrend.com, www.infortrend.com.tw,
www.infortrend.com.cn, or www.infortrend-europe.com) where our RMA
policy is given a detailed explanation.
iii
Table of Contents
Chapter 1 LCD Screen Messages
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
The Initial Screen..........................................................................................1-1
Quick Installation Screen ............................................................................1-1
Logical Drive Status .....................................................................................1-2
Logical Volume Status.................................................................................1-4
Drive Status...................................................................................................1-4
Channel Status .............................................................................................1-5
Controller Voltage and Temperature..........................................................1-6
View and Edit Event Logs............................................................................1-7
Chapter 2 LCD Keypad Operation
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
iv
Power On the RAID Enclosure...................................................................2-1
Caching Parameters....................................................................................2-1
2.2.1 Optimization Modes ...............................................................................2-1
2.2.2 Optimization Mode and Stripe Size........................................................2-3
2.2.3 Optimization for Random or Sequential I/Os .........................................2-3
2.2.4 Write-back/Write-through Cache Enable/Disable ..................................2-4
2.2.5 Periodic Cache Flush .............................................................................2-4
View Connected Drives: .............................................................................2-5
Creating a Logical Drive .............................................................................2-6
2.4.1 Choosing a RAID Level..........................................................................2-6
2.4.2 Choosing Member Drives.......................................................................2-6
2.4.3 Logical Drive Preferences ......................................................................2-7
2.4.4 Maximum Drive Capacity .......................................................................2-7
2.4.5 Spare Drive Assignments.......................................................................2-7
2.4.6 Disk Reserved Space.............................................................................2-7
2.4.7 Write Policy ............................................................................................2-7
2.4.8 Initialization Mode ..................................................................................2-8
2.4.9 Stripe Size ..............................................................................................2-8
2.4.10 Beginning Initialization .........................................................................2-8
Creating a Logical Volume .........................................................................2-9
2.5.1 Initialization Mode ................................................................................2-10
2.5.2 Write Policy ..........................................................................................2-10
Partitioning a Logical Drive/Logical Volume ...........................................2-11
Mapping a Logical Volume/Logical Drive to Host LUN ..........................2-12
Assigning Spare Drive and Rebuild Settings ..........................................2-13
2.8.1 Adding a Local Spare Drive .................................................................2-13
2.8.2 Adding a Global Spare Drive ...............................................................2-14
2.8.3 Rebuild Settings ...................................................................................2-14
Viewing and Editing Logical Drives and Drive Members .......................2-15
2.9.1 Deleting a Logical Drive .......................................................................2-15
2.9.2 Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive..................................................2-16
2.9.3 Assigning a Name to a Logical Drive ...................................................2-17
2.9.4 Rebuilding a Logical Drive (Manual Rebuild).......................................2-18
2.9.5 Regenerating Logical Drive Parity .......................................................2-19
2.9.6 Media Scan ..........................................................................................2-19
2.9.7 Write Policy ..........................................................................................2-20
2.10 Viewing and Editing Host LUNs .............................................................. 2-21
2.11 Viewing and Editing Drives...................................................................... 2-21
2.12 Viewing and Editing Channels ................................................................ 2-22
2.12.2 Adding a Channel ID.......................................................................... 2-22
2.12.3 Deleting a Channel ID........................................................................ 2-22
2.12.4 Data Rate........................................................................................... 2-23
2.13 System Functions ..................................................................................... 2-25
2.13.1 Mute Beeper ...................................................................................... 2-25
2.13.2 Change Password ............................................................................. 2-25
2.13.3 Reset Controller................................................................................. 2-26
2.13.4 Shutdown Controller .......................................................................... 2-26
2.13.5 Controller Maintenance ..................................................................... 2-27
2.13.6 Saving NVRAM to Disks .................................................................... 2-27
2.13.7 Restore NVRAM from Disks .............................................................. 2-27
2.13.8 Adjust LCD Contrast .......................................................................... 2-28
2.14 Controller Parameters .............................................................................. 2-28
2.14.1 Controller Name................................................................................. 2-28
2.14.2 LCD Title Display Controller Name.................................................... 2-28
2.14.3 Password Validation Timeout ............................................................ 2-29
2.14.4 Controller Unique Identifier................................................................ 2-29
2.14.5 Controller Date and Time .................................................................. 2-29
2.15 Drive Utilities ............................................................................................. 2-30
2.15.1 Drive Read/Write Test ....................................................................... 2-31
Chapter 3 Terminal Screen Messages
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
The Initial Screen ......................................................................................... 3-1
Main Menu..................................................................................................... 3-3
Quick Installation ......................................................................................... 3-3
Logical Drive Status .................................................................................... 3-4
Logical Volume Status ................................................................................ 3-6
Drive Status .................................................................................................. 3-6
Channel’s Status.......................................................................................... 3-8
Controller Voltage and Temperature ......................................................... 3-9
Viewing Event Logs on the Screen .......................................................... 3-10
Chapter 4 Terminal Operation
4.1
4.2
Power on RAID Enclosure .......................................................................... 4-1
Caching Parameters .................................................................................... 4-2
4.2.1 Optimization Modes ............................................................................... 4-2
4.2.2 Optimization Mode and Stripe Size ....................................................... 4-3
4.2.3 Optimization for Random or Sequential I/Os ......................................... 4-3
4.2.4 Write-Back Cache Enable/Disable ........................................................ 4-4
4.2.5 Periodic Cache Flush............................................................................. 4-5
4.3 Viewing the Connected Drives ................................................................... 4-6
4.4 Creating a Logical Drive.............................................................................. 4-7
4.4.1 Choosing a RAID Level ......................................................................... 4-7
4.4.2 Choosing Member Drives ...................................................................... 4-7
4.4.3 Logical Drive Preferences ..................................................................... 4-8
4.4.3.1 Maximum Drive Capacity.................................................................... 4-8
v
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.4.3.2 Assign Spare Drives............................................................................4-9
4.4.3.3 Disk Reserved Space..........................................................................4-9
4.4.3.4 Write Policy .........................................................................................4-9
4.4.3.5 Initialization Mode ...............................................................................4-9
4.4.3.6 Stripe Size .........................................................................................4-10
RAID Migration............................................................................................4-11
4.5.1 Requirements for Migrating a RAID5 Array ........................................4-12
4.5.2 Migration Methods...............................................................................4-12
4.5.3 Migration: Exemplary Procedure.........................................................4-14
Creating a Logical Volume ........................................................................4-17
Partitioning a Logical Drive/Logical Volume ...........................................4-19
Mapping a Logical Volume to Host LUNs ................................................4-20
Assigning a Spare Drive and Rebuild Settings .......................................4-22
4.9.1 Adding Local Spare Drive ....................................................................4-22
4.9.2 Adding a Global Spare Drive ...............................................................4-23
Viewing and Editing Logical Drives and Drive Members .......................4-24
4.10.1 Deleting a Logical Drive .....................................................................4-25
4.10.2 Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive................................................4-25
4.10.3 Assigning a Name to a Logical Drive .................................................4-26
4.10.4 Rebuilding a Logical Drive .................................................................4-26
4.10.5 Expand Logical Drive .........................................................................4-27
4.10.6 Migrate Logical Drive .........................................................................4-27
4.10.7 Add Drive............................................................................................4-28
4.10.8 Regenerating Logical Drive Parity .....................................................4-29
4.10.9 Media Scan ........................................................................................4-29
4.10.10 Write Policy ......................................................................................4-31
Viewing and Editing Host LUNs................................................................4-32
4.11.1 Viewing or Deleting LUN Mappings ...................................................4-32
4.11.2 Edit Host ID/WWN Name List ............................................................4-33
Viewing and Editing Drives .......................................................................4-33
4.12.1 Deleting Spare Drive (Global / Local Spare Drive) ............................4-34
4.12.2 Disk Reserved Space.........................................................................4-34
4.12.3 Identifying Drives................................................................................4-35
4.13 System Functions.......................................................................................4-38
4.13.1 Mute Beeper.......................................................................................4-38
4.13.2 Change Password..............................................................................4-39
4.13.3 Changing the Password .....................................................................4-39
4.13.4 Setting a New Password ....................................................................4-40
4.13.5 Disabling the Password......................................................................4-40
4.13.6 Reset Controller .................................................................................4-40
4.13.7 Shutdown Controller...........................................................................4-41
4.13.8 Adjust LCD Contrast ..........................................................................4-41
4.14 Controller Parameters................................................................................4-42
4.14.1 Controller Name .................................................................................4-42
4.14.2 LCD Title Display - Controller Name..................................................4-43
4.14.3 Saving NVRAM to Disks ....................................................................4-43
4.14.4 Restore NVRAM from Disks ..............................................................4-43
4.14.5 Password Validation Timeout ............................................................4-44
4.14.6 Controller Unique Identifier ................................................................4-44
4.14.7 Set Controller Date and Time.............................................................4-45
4.15 View Drive Information ..............................................................................4-46
4.16 Drive Utilities...............................................................................................4-47
4.16.1 Drive Read/Write Test........................................................................4-47
vi
Chapter 5 Host Side and Drive Side Parameter
5.1
HOST-SIDE PARAMETERS ......................................................................... 5-1
5.1.1 Maximum Concurrent Host LUN Connection (“Nexus” in SCSI)........... 5-2
5.1.2 Number of Tags Reserved for Each Host-LUN Connection.................. 5-3
5.1.3 Maximum Queued I/O Count ................................................................. 5-3
5.1.4 LUNs per Host ID................................................................................... 5-4
5.1.5 LUN Applicability.................................................................................... 5-5
5.1.6 Peripheral Device Type ......................................................................... 5-5
5.1.7 In-band (SCSI or Fibre) ......................................................................... 5-5
5.1.8 Peripheral Device Type Parameters for Various Operating Systems ... 5-6
5.1.9 Cylinder/Head/Sector Mapping.............................................................. 5-8
5.2 DRIVE-SIDE PARAMETERS: .................................................................... 5-10
5.2.1 Disk Access Delay Time ...................................................................... 5-11
5.2.2 Drive I/O Timeout................................................................................. 5-11
5.2.3 Maximum Tag Count: Tag Command Queuing (TCQ) and Native
Command Queuing (NCQ) Support ................................................... 5-12
5.2.4 Drive Spindown Idle Delay Period ....................................................... 5-14
5.2.5 Drive Delayed Write............................................................................. 5-14
Chapter 6 Enclosure Management
6.1
ENCLOSURE MONITORING ........................................................................ 6-1
6.1.1 Enclosure Devices ................................................................................. 6-1
6.1.2 Auto Shutdown: Elevated Temperature................................................. 6-3
6.1.3 RAID Controller Self-monitoring ........................................................... 6-4
6.2 UPS SUPPORT ............................................................................................. 6-7
6.3 SAF-TE and SES Enclosure Monitoring .................................................... 6-7
6.3.1 Enclosure Devices Status: View Peripheral Device Status
Chapter 7 Data Integrity
7.1
FAILED DRIVE DETECTION ....................................................................... 7-2
7.1.1 Periodic Drive Check Time .................................................................... 7-2
7.1.2 Periodic Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check Time......................... 7-3
7.1.3 Auto-Assign Global Spare Drive............................................................ 7-4
7.2 SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE ........................................................................ 7-5
7.2.1 Task Scheduler...................................................................................... 7-5
Creating a New Schedule ..................................................................... 7-6
Adding or Deleting a Schedule ............................................................. 7-6
7.2.2 Task Scheduler Options ........................................................................ 7-6
Execute on Controller Initialization ....................................................... 7-7
Start Time and Date.............................................................................. 7-7
Execution Period................................................................................... 7-7
Media Scan Mode................................................................................. 7-8
Media Scan Priority............................................................................... 7-8
Select Logical Drives ............................................................................ 7-9
vii
7.2.3 Confirming the Creation of a Task Schedule .........................................7-9
REGENERATING LOGICAL DRIVE PARITY............................................7-10
7.3. 1 Overwrite Inconsistent Parity ..............................................................7-10
7.3. 2 Generate Check Parity Error Event ....................................................7-10
7.4 DISK ARRAY PARAMETERS....................................................................7-10
7.4. 1 Rebuild Priority ....................................................................................7-11
7.4. 2 Verification on Writes ..........................................................................7-11
7.3
Chapter 8 Array Expansion
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
Overview........................................................................................................8-1
Notes on Expansion.....................................................................................8-1
Mode 1 Expansion:.......................................................................................8-3
Mode 2 Expansion:.......................................................................................8-6
Making Use of the Added Capacity: Expand Logical Drive .....................8-9
Expand Logical Volume ........................................................... ……… 8-11
Configuration Example: Volume Extension in Windows 2000® ...........8-11
Chapter 9 S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9.1
S.M.A.R.T. OVERVIEW
9.1.1 CLONE FAILING DRIVE........................................................................9-1
9.1.2 REPLACE AFTER CLONE ....................................................................9-2
9.1.3 PERPETUAL CLONE: ...........................................................................9-3
9.1.4 S.M.A.R.T. (SELF-MONITORING, ANALYSIS AND REPORTING
TECHNOLOGY ) ...................................................................................9-5
9.2 CONFIGURATION PROCEDURE.................................................................9-7
Chapter 10 Implementations for AV Applications
10.1 MAXIMUM DRIVE RESPONSE TIME .........................................................10-1
10.2 AV OPTIMIZATION MODE..........................................................................10-2
Appendix A. Firmware Functionality Specifications
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
A.9
A.10
A.11
A.12
A.13
viii
Basic RAID Management:........................................................................... A-1
Advanced Features: .................................................................................... A-3
Caching Operation: ..................................................................................... A-5
RAID Expansion: ......................................................................................... A-7
Fibre Channel Support: .............................................................................. A-8
S.M.A.R.T. Support:..................................................................................... A-8
Redundant Controller: ................................................................................ A-9
Data Safety:................................................................................................ A-10
System Security: ....................................................................................... A-11
Environment Management: ...................................................................... A-12
User Interface: ........................................................................................... A-13
High Availability: ....................................................................................... A-13
JBOD-Specific: .......................................................................................... A-14
Appendix B. System Functions: Upgrading Firmware
B.1 Upgrading Firmware ....................................................................................B-1
B.1.1 Background RS-232C Firmware Download: Single Controller............. B-1
B.1.2 Note for Redundant Controller Firmware Upgrade:.............................. B-2
B.2 Upgrading Firmware Using RAIDWatch Manager ....................................B-2
B.2.1 Establish the In-band SCSI connection in RAIDWatch Manager......... B-2
B.2.2 Upgrade Both Boot Record and Firmware Binaries ............................. B-3
B.2.3 Upgrade the Firmware Binary Only ...................................................... B-4
B.3 Upgrading Firmware Using RS-232C Terminal Emulation ......................B-5
B.3.1 Establishing the connection for the RS-232C Terminal Emulation ...... B-5
B.3.2 Upgrading Both Boot Record and Firmware Binaries .......................... B-5
B.3.3 Upgrading the Firmware Binary Only ...................................................B-6
Appendix C. Event Message
Event Messages
C.1 Logical Drive Events....................................................................................C-2
C.1.1 Critical: ..................................................................................................C-2
C.1.2 Notification: ...........................................................................................C-2
C.2 Channel and Individual Drive Events.........................................................C-4
C.2.1 Critical: ..................................................................................................C-4
C.2.2 Warning:................................................................................................C-4
C.2.3 Notification: ...........................................................................................C-5
C.3 General Target Events.................................................................................C-6
C.3.1 Critical: ..................................................................................................C-6
C.3.2 Notification: ...........................................................................................C-6
C.4 Controller Events .........................................................................................C-8
C.4.1 Critical: ..................................................................................................C-8
C.4.2 Warning:................................................................................................C-8
C.4.3 Notification: ...........................................................................................C-8
Event Description..................................................................................................C-9
C.5 Logical Drive Events....................................................................................C-9
C.5.1 Critical: ..................................................................................................C-9
C.5.2 Notification: .........................................................................................C-13
C.6 Channel and Individual Drive Events.......................................................C-18
C.6.1 Critical: ................................................................................................C-18
C.6.2 Warning:..............................................................................................C-18
C.6.3 Notification: .........................................................................................C-24
C.7 General Target Events...............................................................................C-26
C.7.1 Critical: ................................................................................................C-26
C.7.2 Notification: .........................................................................................C-29
C.8 Controller Events .......................................................................................C-33
C.8.1 Critical: ................................................................................................C-33
C.8.2 Warning:..............................................................................................C-35
C.8.3 Notification: .........................................................................................C-35
ix
About This Manual
This manual provides all of the necessary information that a system
administrator needs to configure and maintain EonStor SCSI to SATA RAID
subsystems.
There are several other manuals that came with your RAID subsystem:
Installation and Hardware Reference Manual:
For hardware-related information.
RAIDWatch User’s Manual
For the Java-based, GUI RAIDWatch manager providing remote and
concurrent management of RAID subsystems.
RAID Planning Guide
For RAID basic concepts, configurations and subsystem management.
The order of the chapters is arranged in accordance with the steps necessary
for creating a RAID array.
The terminal screen displays and the LCD messages may vary when using
subsystems running different firmware revisions.
x
Chapter 1
Helps the user to understand screen messages on the LCD
display.
Chapter 2
Gives step-by-step instructions on creating a RAID using
the LCD keypad panel.
Chapter 3
Teaches the user how to interpret the information found
on the RS-232C terminal emulation.
Chapter 4
Gives step-by-step instructions on how to create a RAID
via the RS-232C session.
Chapter 5
Provides the advanced options for the host and drive
channel configurations including I/O queuing, number of
LUNs, host loop, in-band, and disk access characteristics
settings.
Chapter 6
Shows how to supervise system operating and component
status.
Chapter 7
Details various methods, either manual or automatic, for
maintaining array data integrity.
Chapter 8
Shows how to expand a configured array or logical
volume.
Chapter 9
Shows how to use the SMART-related functionality.
Chapter 10
Describes the detail for AV optimization implementation.
Appendix A
Lists the important firmware features supported with the
firmware version, arranged in accordance with the latest
firmware version as of press date.
Appendix B
Teaches the user how to upgrade firmware and boot
record.
Appendix C
Lists all of the controller event messages.
Revision History
•
Initial release
Who should read this manual?
This manual assumes that its readers are experienced with computer hardware
installation and are familiar with storage enclosures.
Related Documentations
•
Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
•
RAIDWatch User’s Manual
These two documents can be found in the product utility CD included with
your subsystem package.
xi
Conventions
Naming
From this point on and throughout the rest of this manual, the EonStor series
is referred to as simply the “subsystem” or the “system” and EonStor is
frequently abbreviated as “ES.”
Lists
Bulleted Lists: Bulleted lists are statements of non-sequential facts. They can
be read in any order. Each statement is preceded by a round black dot “•.”
Numbered Lists: Numbered lists are used to describe sequential steps you
should follow in order.
Important information that users should be aware of is indicated with the
following icons:
NOTE:
These messages inform the reader of essential but non-critical
information. These messages should be read carefully as any directions
or instructions contained therein can help you avoid making mistakes.
CAUTION!
Cautionary messages should also be heeded to help you reduce the
chance of losing data or damaging the system.
IMPORTANT!
The Important messages pertain to use the EonStor subsystem
introduced in this manual.
WARNING!
Warnings appear where overlooked details may cause damage to the
equipment or result in personal injury. Warnings should be taken
seriously.
xii
Software and Firmware Updates
Please contact your system vendor or visit Infortrend’s FTP site
(ftp.infortrend.com.tw) for the latest software or firmware updates.
Problems that occur during the updating process may cause unrecoverable
errors and system down time. Always consult technical personnel before
proceeding with any firmware upgrade.
NOTE:
The firmware version installed on your system should provide the
complete functionality listed in the specification sheet/user’s manual.
We provide special revisions for various application purposes.
Therefore, DO NOT upgrade your firmware unless you fully understand
what a firmware revision will do.
xiii
Chapter
1
LCD Screen Messages
1.1 The Initial Screen
Product Model
Firmware Version
AXXU
Ready
v3.**
Status/Data Transfer Indicator
Figure 1 - 1: LCD Initial Screen
Status/Data Transfer Indicator:
Ready
There is at least one logical drive or logical volume
mapped to a host ID/LUN combination.
No Host
LUN
No logical drive created or the logical drive has not
yet been mapped to any host ID/LUN.
Indicates the statistic of internal processing
resources, not the host bus throughput. Each block
indicates 256Kbytes of data being processed.
1.2 Quick Installation Screen
Quick
Drive
Logical
Install
↓
Figure 1 - 2: Quick Installation Screen
LCD Screen Messages
1-1
Press [ENT] to create a logical drive. The subsystem/controller will start
initialization of one logical drive to include all connected disk drives and
automatically map the logical drive to the first ID and LUN number of the
first host channel. The “Quick Installation” can only be performed when
there is no logical drive.
1.3 Logical Drive Status
Logical Drive
RAID level
Number of drives
LG0
LG=0RAID5
RAID5DRV=3
DRV=3
2021MB
GD
2021MB GD SB=1
SB=1
Logical Drive status
Figure 1 - 3: Logical Drive Status Screen
1-2
Logical Drive:
The Logical Drive number.
RAID level:
The RAID level applied for this logical
drive.
Number of Drives:
The number of physical drives included in
this configuration.
Infortrend
Logical Drive status:
XxxxMB
The capacity of this logical drive.
SB=x
Standby drives available to this logical
drive. Except the spares dedicated to other
logical configurations, all spare drive(s)
will be counted in this field, including
Global and Local Spares.
xxxxMB INITING
The logical drive is now initializing.
xxxxMB INVALID
For firmware version before 3.31:
The logical drive has been created with
“Optimization for Sequential I/O”, but the
current setting is “Optimization for
Random I/O.”
-ORThe logical drive has been created with
“Optimization for Random I/O,” but the
current setting is “Optimization for
Sequential I/O.”
Firmware versions 3.31 and later have
separate settings for array optimization and
array stripe size. This message will not
appear when the optimization mode is
changed.
xxxxMB GD SB=x
The logical drive is in good condition.
xxxxMB FL SB=x
One member drive failed in this logical
drive.
xxxxMB RB SB=x
Logical Drive is rebuilding.
xxxxMB DRVMISS
One of the drives is missing.
INCOMPLETE
ARRAY
Two or more drives failed in this logical
drive.
LCD Screen Messages
1-3
1.4 Logical Volume Status
Logical Volume
Logical Volume ID
Status
LV=0 ID=09816DE9
00002021MB DRV=1
Volume capacity
Number of drives
Figure 1 - 4: Logical Volume Status Screen
Logical Volume:
The Logical Volume number.
DRV=x:
The number of logical drive(s) contained
in this logical volume.
Logical Volume ID
Status:
The unique ID number of the logical
volume
(randomly
generated
by
firmware).
Logical Volume Status:
xxxMB
1.5
The capacity of this logical volume.
Drive Status
Drive Slot Number
Drive Capacity
SLOT=1
C=1 I=0 10100MB
LG=0
LG=0 LN
LNMaxtor
Logical Drive
Number
Drive Status
Drive Vendor
Figure 1 - 5: Drive Status Screen
1-4
Infortrend
Drive Status:
LG=x IN
LG=x LN
Initializing
On-line (already a member of a logical
configuration)
Rebuilding
Local Spare Drive
Global Spare Drive
New drive
Failed drive
Drive does not exist; an empty drive tray
Drive missing (drive was once there)
Spare drive missing
LG=x RB
LG=x SB
GlobalSB
NEW DRV
BAD DRV
ABSENT
MISSING
SB-MISS
1.6 Channel Status
Host Channel
Channel
Number
Channel
Mode
C0=Host ID
SXF=160M
Available Host IDs
=*
CH0=Host =
SID=NA
Default Bus
Data Rate
Figure 1 - 6: Host Channel Status Screen
Drive Channel (Single Controller Configuration)
Channel
Number
Channel
Mode
CH4=Drive
SXF=AUTO
Interface
Type
SATA
CH0=Host =
SID=NA
Default Bus
Data Rate
Figure 1 - 7: Drive Channel Status Screen
LCD Screen Messages
1-5
Channel Mode:
Host
Drive
Host channel mode
Drive channel mode
Default SCSI Bus Sync Clock:
160M
The default setting of this channel is
set to the 160Mhz mode
Async, 2.5 to 160Mhz Data rate can be manually configured
if the need arises
Available Host IDs:
*
(ID number)
NA
Multiple IDs applied (Host channel
mode only)
Controller is using this ID for host
LUN mapping.
No ID applied
1.7 Controller Voltage and Temperature
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Peripheral Dev,” then press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select "Ctlr Peripheral Device Config..”,
press ENT and then choose “View Ctlr
Periph Device Status..”, then press
ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
choose either “Voltage Monitor”, or
“Temperature Monitor”.
View and Edit
Peripheral Dev
Ctlr Peripheral
Device Config..
View Ctlr Periph
Device Status..
Voltage Monitor
..
Temperature
Monitor
Select “Temperature and Voltage
Monitor” by pressing ENT. Press the
up or down arrow keys to browse
through the various voltage and
temperature statuses.
1-6
..
[+12V] 12.077V
Operation Normal
Infortrend
[+5v]
4.938v
Operation Normal
[CPU] 43.5°C
in Safe Range
[+3.3V] 3.384V
Operation Normal
[Board1]46.5°C
in Safe Range
[CPU] 43.5°C
in Safe Range
[Board2]46.5°C
in Safe Range
[+12v] 12.077v
Operation Normal
1.8 View and Edit Event Logs
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select "View and Edit Event
Logs,” then press ENT.
View and Edit
Event Logs
Press the up or down arrow keys to
browse through the existing event log
items.
UPS Power
Failure Detected
To delete a specified item and all events
prior to this event, press ENT for 2
seconds.
Press 2 Seconds
to Clear Events
↑
IMPORTANT!
The event log will be cleared after the controller is powered off or
reset.
LCD Screen Messages
1-7
LCD Screen Messages.................................................................... 1-1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
The Initial Screen ....................................................................................................... 1-1
Quick Installation Screen ........................................................................................... 1-1
Logical Drive Status................................................................................................... 1-2
Logical Volume Status............................................................................................... 1-4
Drive Status................................................................................................................ 1-4
Channel Status............................................................................................................ 1-5
Controller Voltage and Temperature.......................................................................... 1-6
View and Edit Event Logs ......................................................................................... 1-7
Controller Voltage and Temperature ..... 1-6
LCD ................................................... 1-6
event logs
viewing and editing.....................1-6, 1-7
Initial Screen .......................................... 1-1
LCD ................................................... 1-1
logical drive
status .................................................. 1-2
Logical Drive Status .............................. 1-2
1-8
LCD ................................................... 1-2
Logical Volume Status........................... 1-4
LCD ................................................... 1-4
Quick Installation............................1-1, 1-2
LCD ................................................... 1-1
SCSI Drive Status .................................. 1-4
LCD ................................................... 1-4
View and Edit Event Logs ..................... 1-7
LCD ................................................... 1-7
Infortrend
Chapter
2
LCD Keypad Operation
A navigation roadmap for the configuration menu options of LCD keypad
is separately available as a PDF file. You may check your Product Utility
CD or visit Infortrend’s FTP site for the latest update.
2.1 Power On the RAID Enclosure
Before you start to configure a RAID system, make sure that
hardware installation is completed before any configuration takes
place. Power on your RAID enclosure.
2.2
Caching Parameters
2.2.1 Optimization Modes
Mass storage applications can be divided into two major categories
according to its read/write characteristics: database and
video/imaging. To optimize a subsystem for these two categories,
two embedded optimization modes are available with system
behaviors adjusted to different read/write parameters. They are the
Optimization for Random I/O and the Optimization for Sequential
I/O.
Limitations: There are limitations on the use of optimization
modes.
1. System default is Optimization for Sequential I/O.
LCD Keypad Operation
2-1
2. You can select the stripe size of each array (logical drive) during
the initial configuration. However, changing stripe size is only
recommended for experienced engineers who have tested the
effects of tuning stripe sizes for different applications.
3. The array stripe size can only be changed during the initial
configuration process.
4. Once the controller optimization mode is applied, access to
different logical drives in a RAID system will follow the same
optimized pattern.
Database and Transaction-based Applications:
These kinds of applications usually include SQL server, Oracle
server, Informix, or other database services. These applications
keep the size of each transaction down to the minimum, so that
I/Os can be rapidly processed. Due to their transaction-based
nature, these applications do not read or write a bunch of data in
sequential order - access to data occurs randomly. The transaction
size usually ranges from 2K to 4K. Transaction performance is
measured in “I/Os per second” or “IOPS.”
Video Recording/Playback and Imaging Applications:
These kinds of applications usually includes video playback, video
post-production editing, or other similar applications. These
applications have the tendency to read or write large files from and
into storage in sequential order. The size of each I/O can be 128K,
256K, 512K, or up to 1MB. The efficiency of these applications is
measured in “MB/sec.”
When an array works with applications such as video or image
oriented applications, the application reads/writes from the drive
as large-block, sequential threads instead of small and randomly
accessed files.
The controller optimization modes have read-ahead buffer and
other R/W characteristics tuned to obtain the best performance for
these two major application categories.
2-2
Infortrend
2.2.2 Optimization Mode and Stripe Size
Each controller optimization mode has preset values for the stripe
size of arrays created in different RAID levels. If you want a
different setting for a subsystem with configured arrays, you have
to backup or move the stored data and re-create the arrays:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Stop host I/O access.
Move or backup all of your stored data in the subsystem.
Change the optimization mode.
Reset the controller.
Re-create the array(s). Once the array(s) are created, stripe
size cannot be changed.
Listed below are the default stripe sizes implemented with
different optimization modes and RAID levels. These values
should be sufficient for most applications:
Table 2 - 1 RAID Level, Optimization Modes, and Stripe Sizes
RAID0
RAID1
RAID3
RAID5
RAID6
NRAID
Opt. For Sequential I/O
128KB
128KB
16KB
128KB
128KB
128KB
Opt. for Random I/O
32KB
32KB
4KB
32KB
32KB
32KB
2.2.3 Optimization for Random or Sequential I/Os
Select from Main Menu “View and Edit
Config Parms,” “Caching Parameters,”
and press ENT. Choose “Optimization for
Random I/O” or “Optimization for
Sequential I/O,” then press ENT for two
seconds to confirm. Press ESC to leave
and the setting will take effect after the
controller is restarted.
Caching
Parameters
..
Optimization I/O
Random
..
Optimization for
Sequential I/O?
IMPORTANT!
The original 512GB threshold on array optimization mode has been
canceled. If the size of an array is larger than 16TB, only the
optimization for sequential I/O can be applied. Logical drives of this size
may not be practical; therefore, there is actually no limitation on the
optimization mode and array capacity.
LCD Keypad Operation
2-3
2.2.4 Write-back/Write-through Cache Enable/Disable
As one of the submenus in "Caching
Parameters," this option controls the
cached write function. Press ENT to
enable or disable “Write-back Cache.”
Press ENT for two seconds to confirm.
The current status will be displayed on the
LCD.
Write-Back Cache
Enabled
..
The Write-through mode is safer if your Disable Write
subsystem is not managed by a controller -Back Cache
pair and there is no UPS or battery backup.
?
Write-back caching can dramatically improve write performance by
caching the unfinished writes in memory and letting them be
committed to drives latter in a more efficient manner. In the event
of power failure, a battery module can hold cached data for days. In
the event of controller failure in a dual-active configuration, data
cached in the failed controller has an exact replica on its counterpart
controller and therefore remains intact.
2.2.5 Periodic Cache Flush
If for a reason Write-Back caching is preferred for better
performance and yet data integrity is of the concern, e.g., lack of the
battery protection, the system can be configured to flush the cached
writes at every preset interval.
Note that the “Continuous Sync” option holds data in cache for as
long as necessary to complete a write operation and immediately
commits it to hard drives if it does not come in a series of sequential
writes.
Select from Main Menu “View and Edit
Config Parms,” “Caching Parameters,”
and press ENT. Use the arrow keys to
scroll through the options and select
“Periodic CachFlush Time”, and then
press ENT to proceed. The “Set Cache
Flush Time – Disable” appears.
The
default is “Disable.” Use your arrow keys
to select an option from “ConSync,”
“1/2min,” to “10min.” “ConSync” stands
for “continuously synchronized.” Press
ENT to select and press ESC to leave and
the setting will take effect immediately.
2-4
Period CachFlush
Time - Disable
Set Cache Flush
Time - Disable
Infortrend
IMPORTANT!
• Every time you change the caching parameters, you must reset
the controller for the changes to take effect.
2.3 View Connected Drives:
A RAID system consists of many physical drives that can be
modified and configured as the members of one or several logical
drives.
Press the front panel ENT button for two
seconds to enter the Main Menu. Use the
up or down arrow keys to navigate
through the menus. Choose "View and
Edit Drives," then press ENT.
Use the up or down arrow keys to scroll
down the list of connected drives’
information screens.
View and Edit
Drives
Slot=* 1010MB
New DRV SEAGATE
You may first examine whether there is any drive installed but not
shown here. If there is a drive installed but not listed, the drive may
be defective or not installed correctly. Please check your enclosure
installation and contact your system vendor.
Press ENT on a drive. Choose "View
Drive Information" by pressing ENT.
Use the up or down arrow keys to
navigate through the screens.
View Drive
Information
The Revision Number of the selected
drive will be shown. Press the down
arrow key to see other information.
Revision Number:
0274
..
Other information screens include "Serial
Number" and "Disk Capacity" (displayed
in blocks; each block equals 512K Bytes).
LCD Keypad Operation
2-5
IMPORTANT!
•
Drives of the same brand/model/capacity might not feature the
same block number.
• The basic read/write unit of a hard drive is a block. If members
of a logical drive have different block numbers (capacity), the
smallest block number will be taken as the maximum capacity
to be used in every drive. Therefore, use drives of the same
capacity.
• You may assign a Local/Global Spare Drive to a logical drive
whose members have a block number equal to or smaller than
the Local/Global Spare Drive but you should not do the
reverse.
2.4 Creating a Logical Drive
To create a logical drive, press ENT for
two seconds to enter the Main Menu.
Use the up or down arrow keys to
navigate through the menus. Choose
"View and Edit Logical Drives," and
then press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a logical drive entry, then press
ENT for two seconds to proceed. "LG"
is short for Logical Drive.
View and Edit ↕
Logical Drives..
LG=0
Not Defined
?
2.4.1 Choosing a RAID Level
Press the up or down arrow keys to
choose the desired RAID level, then
press ENT for two seconds. "TDRV"
(Total Drives) refers to the number of
all available drives.
TDRV=24 Create
LG Level=RAID6 ?
2.4.2 Choosing Member Drives
2-6
Press ENT for two seconds; the
message, “RAID X selected To Select
drives”, will prompt. Confirm your
selection by pressing ENT.
RAID 6 Selected
To Select drives
Press ENT, then use the up or down
arrow keys to browse through the
Slot=* 239367MB
New DRV SEAGATE
Infortrend
available drives. Press ENT again to
select/deselect the drives. An asterisk
(*) mark will appear on the selected
drive(s). To deselect a drive, press
ENT again on the selected drive. The (*)
mark will disappear.
SLOT=1 239367MB
*LG=0 SL
After all the desired drives have been
selected, press ENT for two seconds to
continue.
2.4.3 Logical Drive Preferences
You may also choose “Change Logical
Drive Parameter,” then press ENT to
change related parameters before
initializing the logical drive.
Change Logical
Drive Parameter?
2.4.4 Maximum Drive Capacity
Choose “Maximum Drive Capacity,”
then press ENT. The maximum drive
capacity refers to the maximum capacity
that will be used in each member drive.
Maximum Drive
Capacity
..
If necessary, use the up and down arrow
keys to change the maximum size that
will be used on each drive.
MaxSiz= 239367MB
Set to 239367MB?
2.4.5 Spare Drive Assignments
The Local (Dedicated) Spare Drive can
also be assigned here. Press the up or
down arrow keys to choose “Spare Drive
Assignments,” then press ENT.
Available drives will be listed. Use the
up or down arrow keys to browse
through the drive list, then press ENT to
select the drive you wish to use as the
Local Spare Drive. Press ENT again for
two seconds.
Spare Drive
Assignments
..
Slot=* 239367MB
New DRV SEAGATE
Slot=* 239367MB
*LG=0 SL SEAGATE
2.4.6 Disk Reserved Space
This menu allows you to see the size of
disk reserved space. Default is 256MB.
Disk Rev. Space
256MB
..
2.4.7 Write Policy
This menu allows you to set the caching
mode policy for this specific logical drive.
“Default” is a neutral value that is
LCD Keypad Operation
Write Policy
Default
..
2-7
coordinated with the subsystem’s
caching mode setting. Other choices are
“Write-back” and “Write-through.”
2.4.8 Initialization Mode
This menu allows you to determine if the
logical drive is immediately accessible. If
the Online method is used, data can be
written onto it before the array’s
initialization is completed. Users may
proceed with array configuration, e.g.,
including this array in a logical volume.
Initialization
Mode
Online..
Array initialization can take a long time especially for those
comprising large capacity. Setting to “Online” means the array is
immediately accessible and that the controller will complete the
initialization when I/O demands become less intensive.
2.4.9 Stripe Size
This menu allows you to change the
array stripe size. Setting to an
incongruous value can severely drag
performance. This item should only be
changed when you can be sure of the
performance gains it might bring you.
Stripe size
Default
?
Listed below are the default values for an array. For each logical
drive, the default value for the stripe size is determined by the
Optimization Mode and the RAID level chosen.
Table 2 - 2 RAID Level, Optimization Modes, and Stripe
Size
RAID0
RAID1
RAID3
RAID5
RAID6
NRAID
Opt. for Sequential I/O
128KB
128KB
16KB
128KB
128KB
128KB
Opt. for Random I/O
32KB
32KB
4KB
32KB
32KB
32KB
When you are done setting logical drive preferences, press ESC and
use your arrow keys to select “Create Logical Drive?”. Press ENT
for two seconds to proceed.
2.4.10 Beginning Initialization
Press ESC to return to the previous menu.
Use the up or down arrow keys to choose
“Create Logical Drive,” then press ENT
2-8
Create Logical
Drive
?
Infortrend
for two seconds to start initializing the
logical drive.
The Online Mode:
If the online initialization method is
applied, the array will be available for
use immediately. The array initialization
runs in the background while data can be
written onto it and users can continue
configuring the RAID system.
LG=0 Creation
Completed!
The Offline Mode:
The controller will start to initialize the
array parity if using the “offline” mode.
Note that if NRAID or RAID 0 is selected,
initialization time is short and completes
almost immediately.
The logical drive’s information displays
when the initialization process is
completed. If the “online” mode is
adopted, array information will be
displayed immediately.
Initializing090%
Please Wait!
LG=0 Initializat
Ion Completed
LG=0 RAID6 DRV=4
478734MB GD SB=0
NOTE:
Due to the operation complexity, the RAID Migration option is not
available using the LCD keypad panel.
2.5 Creating a Logical Volume
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select "View and Edit Logical
Volume," then press ENT.
View and Edit
Logical Volume
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select an undefined entry for logical
volume, then press ENT for two seconds
to proceed. "LV" is short for Logical
Volume.
LV=0
Not Defined
LCD Keypad Operation
?
2-9
Proceed to select one or more logical
drives. Press ENT to proceed. “LD” is
short for Logical Drive.
LV=0 Selected To
Select LD Drives?
Use the up or down arrow keys to
browse through the logical drives. Press
ENT again to select/deselect the drives.
An asterisk (*) mark will appear when
the logical drive is selected. After all the
desired logical drive(s) have been
selected, press ENT for two seconds to
continue.
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2021MB GD SB=0
Two submenus will appear.
2.5.1 Initialization Mode
Array initialization can take a long time
especially for those comprised of large
capacity. Setting to “Online” means the
array is immediately accessible and that
the controller will complete the
initialization when I/O demands become
less intensive.
Initialization
Mode
Online..
Write Policy
Default
..
2.5.2 Write Policy
This menu allows you to set the
caching mode policy for this specific
logical volume. “Default” is a neutral
value that is coordinated with the
controller’s caching mode setting.
Other choices are “Write-back” and
“Write-through.”
When you are finished setting the
preferences, press ENT for two
seconds to display the confirm box.
Press ENT for two seconds to start
initializing the logical volume.
The logical volume has been successfully
created.
Press ESC to clear the message. Another
message will prompt; press ESC to clear it.
Logical volume information will be
displayed below.
2-10
Create
Logical Volume ?
Lv=0 Creation
Completed
Lv=0 ID=07548332
0024488MB DRV=2
Create Logical
Volume Successed
Infortrend
2.6
Partitioning a Logical Drive/Logical
Volume
Partitioning and the creation of a logical volume, are not
requirements for creating a RAID system. The configuration
processes for partitioning a logical drive are the same as those for
partitioning a logical volume.
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Logical Volume," then press ENT.
View and Edit
Logical Volume
Use the up or down arrow keys to
select a logical volume, then press ENT.
LV=0 ID=685AE502
2021MB DRV=1
Use the up or down arrow keys to
select “Partition Logical Volume,” then
press ENT.
Partition
Logical Volume..
The total capacity of the logical volume
will be displayed as one partition.
Press ENT for two seconds to change
the size of the first partition.
LV=0
Prt=1:
2021MB
Use the up or down arrow keys to
change the number of the flashing
digit, (see the arrow mark) then press
ENT to move to the next digit. After
changing all the digits, press ENT for
two seconds to confirm the capacity of
this partition. You may also use arrow
keys to move down to the next
partition to configure more partitions.
The rest of the drive space will be
automatically allocated as the last
partition. You may go on to create up
to 16 partitions using the same method
described above.
?
LV=0
Part=0:
2021MB
LV=0 Part=0:
700MB
?
LV=0 Partition=1
1321MB
?
Press ESC several times to go back to
the Main Menu.
LCD Keypad Operation
2-11
IMPORTANT!
If operated with a Unix-based system, reset the subsystem for the
configuration to take effect if any changes have been made to partition
sizes and partition arrangement.
2.7
Mapping a Logical Volume/Logical
Drive to Host LUN
The process of mapping a logical drive is identical to that of
mapping a logical volume. The process of mapping a logical
volume is used as an example.
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Use the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Host Luns," then press ENT.
The first available ID on the first host
channel appears (usually channel 0).
View and Edit ↕
Host Luns
..
CH=0 ID=0
..
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a configured host ID, and then
press ENT for two seconds to confirm.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select the type of logical configuration
to be associated with a host ID/LUN.
Available choices are “Map to Logical
Drive” or “Map to Logical Volume”.
Confirm your choice by pressing ENT
for two seconds.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a LUN number, then press ENT
to proceed.
2-12
Map to
Logical Drive ?
Map to
Logical Volume ?
CH0 ID0 LUN0 Not
Mapped
Press ENT for two seconds to confirm
the selected LUN mapping.
Map Host LUN
?
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a logical drive, a logical volume,
or a partition of them. Press ENT for
two seconds to map the selected
partition to this LUN. If the logical
configuration has not been partitioned,
LV=0 ID=685AE502
478734MB DRV=1
Infortrend
you can map the whole capacity to a
host LUN.
Press ENT for two seconds when
prompted by “Map Host LUN” to
proceed.
LV=0 PART=0
700MB
?
Map Host LUN
..
Mapping
information
will
be
displayed on the subsequent screen.
Press ENT for two seconds to confirm
the LUN mapping.
CH0 ID0 LUN0
MAP to LV0 PRT0?
The mapping information will appear
for the second time. Press ENT or ESC
to confirm, and the host ID/LUN
screen will appear. Use the arrow keys
to select another ID or LUN number to
continue
mapping
your
logical
configurations or press ESC for several
times to leave the configuration menu.
CH0 ID0 LUN0
MAPto LV0 PRT0
CH=0 ID=0
..
With any of the host ID/LUN successfully associated with a logical
capacity, the “No Host LUN” message in the initial screen will
change to “Ready.”
If you want to create more host IDs, please move to
Section 2.12
Viewing and Editing Channels for more details on
channel mode and channel IDs setting.
2.8
Assigning Spare Drive and Rebuild
Settings
2.8.1 Adding a Local Spare Drive
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Drives," then press ENT.
Disk drive information will be
displayed on the LCD. Press the up or
down arrow keys to select a drive that
is stated as “NEW DRV” or “USED
DRV” that has not been included in
any logical drive, nor specified as a
LCD Keypad Operation
View and Edit
Drives Slot=* 1010MB
NEW DRV SEAGATE
2-13
spare drive or failed drive, then press
ENT to select it.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “Add Local Spare Drive,” then
press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select the logical drive where the Local
Spare Drive will be assigned, then
press ENT for two seconds to confirm.
The message “Add Local Spare Drive
Successful” will be displayed on the
LCD.
Add Local Spare
Drive
..
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2012MB GD SB=0
Add Local Spare
Drive Successful
2.8.2 Adding a Global Spare Drive
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Drives," then press ENT.
Disk drive information will be
displayed on the LCD. Press the up or
down arrow keys to select a disk drive
that has not been assigned to any
logical drive, then press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “Add Global Spare Drive,” then
press ENT.
Press ENT again for two seconds to
add the spare drive. The message,
“Add Global Spare Drive Successful,”
will be displayed on the screen.
View and Edit
Drives Slot=* 1010MB
NEW DRV SEAGATE
Add Global Spare
Drive
..
Add Global Spare
Drive Successful
2.8.3 Rebuild Settings
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Config Parms," then press ENT.
View and Edit
Config Parms
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “Disk Array Parameters,” then
press ENT.
Disk
Array
Parameters..
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “Rebuild Priority Low,” then
2-14
Rebuild Priority
Low
..
Infortrend
press ENT.
“Low” refers to the
temporary default setting.
Press ENT again and the abbreviation
mark “..” will change to a question
mark “?”. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select priority “Low,”
“Normal,” “Improved,” or “High”.
Press ENT to confirm and the question
mark “?” will turn into “..”.
Rebuild Priority
Low
?
Rebuild Priority
High
..
NOTE:
The rebuild priority determines how much of the system resources are used
when rebuilding a logical drive. The default setting of the rebuild priority is
“Normal.” Rebuild will have less impact on host I/O access, but will take a
longer time to complete. Changing the priority to a higher level will achieve a
faster rebuild, but will significantly increase the host I/O response time. The
default setting “Normal” is recommended.
2.9
Viewing and Editing Logical Drives and
Drive Members
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Logical Drives..,” then press ENT.
View and Edit
Logical Drives
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select the logical drive, then press ENT.
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2012MB GD SB=1
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “View Drives..", then press ENT .
View Drives
Press the up or down arrow keys to
scroll through the list of member
drives.
Slot=* 1010MB
LG=0 LN SEAGATE
..
2.9.1 Deleting a Logical Drive
WARNING!
LCD Keypad Operation
2-15
Deleting a logical drive erases all data stored in it.
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Logical Drives," then press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a logical drive, then press ENT.
Use the up or down arrow keys to
select “Delete Logical Drive," then
press ENT .
Press ENT for two seconds to delete.
The selected logical drive has now
been deleted.
View and Edit
Logical Drives
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2012MB GD SB=1
Delete Logical
Drive
..
LG=0
Not Defined
?
2.9.2 Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Logical Drives..,” then press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a logical drive, then press ENT.
View and Edit
Logical Drives
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2012MB GD SB=1
Press the up or down arrow keys to
choose “Partition Logical Drive," then
press ENT.
Partition
Logical Drive ..
The first partition’s information will be
shown on the LCD. Press the up or
down arrow keys to browse through
the existing partitions in the logical
drive. Select a partition by pressing
ENT for two seconds.
LG=0 Prt=0
200MB
?
LG=0 Prt=1
300MB
?
LG=0 Prt=2
600MB
?
Use the up or down arrow keys to
change the number of the flashing
digit to “0," then press ENT to move to
the next digit. After changing all the
digits, press ENT for two seconds.
The disk space of the deleted partition
will be automatically allocated to the
previous partition as diagrammed
below. If partition 1 is deleted, its disk
space will be added to partition 0.
2-16
Infortrend
Figure 2 - 1 Drive Space Allocated to the Previous
Partition
WARNING!
Whenever there is a partition change, data will be erased. Prior to
partition change, you have to remove its associated host LUN
mappings. After the partition change, you also need to re-arrange
the disk volumes from your host system OS.
2.9.3 Assigning a Name to a Logical Drive
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Logical Drives..," then press ENT.
View and Edit
Logical Drives
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a logical drive, then press ENT.
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2012MB GD SB=1
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “Logical Drive Name," then
press ENT.
Logical Drive
Name
..
Press the up or down arrow keys to
change the character of the flashing
cursor. Press ENT to move the cursor
to the next space. The maximum
number of characters for a logical
drive name is 14.
LCD Keypad Operation
Enter LD Name:
_
2-17
2.9.4 Rebuilding a Logical Drive (Manual Rebuild)
If you want the controller to auto-detect a replacement drive, make
sure you have the following options set to enabled:
1.
Periodic Drive Check Time
2.
Periodic Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check Time
These two configuration options can be found under “View and Edit
Configuration Parameters” -> “ Drive-Side Parameters”.
A manual rebuild takes place after you
replace the failed drive with a new drive
that is known to be good.
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select "View and Edit Logical
Drives..", then press ENT.
View and Edit
Logical Drives
Use the up or down arrow keys to select
the logical drive that has a failed member,
then press ENT.
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2012MB FL SB=0
Use the up or down arrow keys to select
“Rebuild Logical Drive," then press ENT.
Rebuild Logical
Drive
..
Press ENT for two seconds to start
rebuilding the logical drive.
Rebuild Logical
Drive
?
The rebuilding progress will be
displayed (as a percentage) on the LCD.
When rebuild is already started or the
logical drive is being rebuilt by a Local
Spare Drive or Global Spare Drive,
choose “Rebuild Progress” to see the
rebuild progress.
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
2012MB RB SB=0
Rebuilding
25%
Please Wait!
Rebuild Progress
..
IMPORTANT!
2-18
•
The Rebuild function will appear only if a logical drive (with
RAID level 1, 3, 5 or 6) has a failed member.
•
Carefully verify the physical location of a failed drive before
replacement takes place. Removing the wrong drive may cause a
logical drive to fail and data loss is unrecoverable.
Infortrend
2.9.5 Regenerating Logical Drive Parity
If no verifying method is applied to data writes, this function can be
manually performed to ensure that parity errors can be mended.
From the Main Menu, press the up or
down arrow keys to select "View and
Edit Logical Drives."
View and Edit
Logical Drives
If you have more than one logical drive,
use the up or down arrow keys to select
the logical drive you would like to check
the parity for, and then press ENT.
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
4095MB GD SB=0
Regenerate
Parity
..
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select "Regenerate Parity" and then press
ENT.
To stop the regeneration process, press
ESC and enter the submenu to select
“Abort Regenerate Parity”.
Abort Regenerate
Parity
..
IMPORTANT!
If the Parity Regenerating process is stopped by a drive failure, the
process cannot restart until the logical drive is rebuilt.
2.9.6 Media Scan
Media Scan is used to examine drives and detect the presence of bad
blocks. If any data blocks have not been properly committed, data
from those blocks are automatically recalculated, retrieved,
rewritten or stored onto undamaged sectors. If bad blocks are
encountered on yet another drive during the rebuild process, the
block LBA (Logical Block Address) of those bad blocks will be listed.
If rebuild is carried out in this situation, rebuild will continue with
the unaffected sectors, salvaging a majority of the stored data.
From the Main Menu, press the up or
down arrow keys to select "View and
Edit Logical Drives".
The first logical drive displays. If you
have more than one logical drive, use the
up or down keys to select the logical
drive you want to scan, and then press
ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select "Media Scan" and then press ENT.
LCD Keypad Operation
View and Edit
Logical Drives
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
4095MB GD SB=0
Media Scan
..
2-19
Press ENT again to display the first
configuration option, “Priority.” Press
ENT on it and use arrow keys to select
an option. Press ENT to confirm the
change on priority level.
Use arrow keys to move one level down
to another option, “Iteration Count”.
This option determines how many times
the scan is performed on the logical drive.
If set to “Continuous,” the scan will run
in the background continuously until it is
stopped by user.
Priority
Normal
..
Priority
To High
?
Iteration Count
Single
..
Iteration Count
to
If Media Scan continuously runs in the
background,
considerable
system
resources will be consumed.
Press ENT on your option to confirm.
Press ENT for two seconds to display the
confirm message, then press ENT to start
scanning the array.
Execute Media
Scanning
?
2.9.7 Write Policy
From the Main Menu, use the up or
down arrow keys to select "View and
Edit Logical Drives".
The first logical drive displays. If you
have more than one logical drive, use the
up or down keys to select the logical
drive you want to change the write
policy of; and then press ENT.
Use arrow keys to select "Write Policy"
and then press ENT.
View and Edit
Logical Drives
LG0 RAID5 DRV=3
4095MB GD SB=0
Write Policy
..
Write Policy
The
Write-Back
cache
setting
is Write-Back
?
configurable on a per array basis. Setting
to the default value means the array setting is coordinated with the
controller’s general setting. The controller’s general setting option
can be found in “View and Edit Config Parms” -> “Caching
Parameters” -> “Write-Back Cache”. Note that cached writes are
lost if a power failure occurs unless cached data has been duplicated
to a partner controller and a battery is supporting cache memory.
2-20
Infortrend
2.10 Viewing and Editing Host LUNs
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select "View and Edit Host Luns",
then press ENT.
View and Edit
Host Luns
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select a host ID, then press ENT to
proceed.
CH0 ID0
Use the up or down arrow keys to
browse through the LUN number and its
LUN mapping information.
CH0 ID0 LUN0
Mapto LG0 PRT0
Press ENT on the LUN you wish to
delete.
Delete CH0 ID0
LUN=00 Mapping ?
Press ENT for two seconds to confirm
deletion. The deleted LUN has now been
unmapped.
CH0 ID0 LUN0
Not Mapped
..
2.11 Viewing and Editing Drives
Deleting Spare Drive (Global / Local Spare Drive)
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select "View and Edit Drives,"
then press ENT.
View and Edit
Drives Drive information will be displayed on
the LCD. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select the spare drive you wish to
delete, then press ENT.
Slot=* 1010MB
GlobalSB WDC
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “Delete Spare Drive," then press
ENT to continue.
Delete Spare
Drive
Press ENT for two seconds to delete the
spare drive.
Delete Spare
Drive Successful
LCD Keypad Operation
..
2-21
2.12
Viewing and Editing Channels
2.12.1 Viewing IDs
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down arrow
keys to select "View and Edit Channels,"
then press ENT.
View and Edit
Channels Channel information will be displayed.
Press ENT on the host channel you wish
the ID changed.
CH0=Host ID=0
SXF=160M
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select “Set SCSI Channel ID," then press
ENT.
Set SCSI Channel
ID
..
Use the up or down arrow keys to
browse through the existing host IDs.
Press ENT on any ID combination to
continue.
CHL=0 ID=0
..
2.12.2 Adding a Channel ID
Press ENT on a host channel, on “Set
Channel ID”, and then on an existing ID.
Use the up or down arrow keys to choose
“Add Channel SCSI ID", then press ENT.
Add Channel SCSI
ID
Use the up or down arrow keys to choose
the ID you wish to add, then press ENT
for two seconds to complete the process.
Add CHL=0 ID=0
?
A prompt will remind you to reset the
subsystem for the configuration change
to take effect. You may press ENT to
reset the subsystem immediately or you
may press ESC to continue adding other
host IDs and reset the subsystem later.
Change Setting
Do Reset Ctlr ?
2.12.3 Deleting a Channel ID
Press ENT for two seconds to enter the
Main Menu. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select "View and Edit
Channels," then press ENT.
The first host channel should appear.
Press ENT to select a host channel.
Press ENT on “Set SCSI Channel ID..”
2-22
View and Edit
Channels
↕
CHL=Host ID=0
SXF=160M
..
Set SCSI Channel
ID
..
Infortrend
A list of host channel and host ID
combinations will appear. Use the up or
down arrow keys to select an ID you
wish to remove. Press ENT to select a
channel ID combination.
CHL=0 ID=0
You will then be prompted by the
“Add Channel SCSI ID” option. Press
the down arrow key to proceed.
Add Channel SCSI
ID
The “Delete Channel SCSI ID” option
will appear. Press ENT to display the
confirm box.
Press ENT for two
seconds to remove the ID.
Delete Channel
SCSI ID
..
A prompt will remind you to reset the
subsystem for the configuration
change to take effect. You may press
ENT
to
reset
the
subsystem
immediately or you may press ESC to
continue adding other host IDs and
reset the subsystem later.
CHL=0 ID=0
Delete ID=0
..
..
?
Change Setting
Do Reset Ctlr ?
IMPORTANT!
•
Every time you make changes to channel IDs, you must reset
the subsystem for the configuration to take effect.
•
For IDs reserved in different subsystem configurations, please
refer to the Installation and Hardware Reference Manual
that came with your system. For subsystems featuring backend PCB connection, firmware can detect their board types
and automatically apply the preset IDs. There is no need to
set IDs for these models.
LCD Keypad Operation
2-23
2.12.4 Data Rate
This option is available in the configuration menu of SCSI host
channel and the drive channel configuration menus of SATA-based
subsystems. Default is “AUTO” and should work fine with most
drives. Changing this setting is not recommended unless some
particular bus signal issues occur.
Most SATA/ATA-based systems connect only one drive per
SATA/ATA channel (4 for multi-lane with SATA-II). This helps to
avoid a single drive failure from affecting other drives. The
maximum mechanical performance of today’s drives can reach
around 30MB/second (sustained read). This is still far below the
bandwidth of a drive channel bus. Setting the SATA/ATA bus
speed to a lower value can get around some problems, but will not
become a bottleneck to system performance.
Note that the SATA/ATA speed is the maximum transfer rate of the
SATA/ATA bus in that mode. It does not mean the drive can
actually carry out that amount of sustained read/write performance.
For the performance of each drive model, please refer to the
documentation provided by drive manufacturer.
Host Channel:
Select from Main Menu, “View and
Edit Channels,” and then a host
channel you wish to change its data
rate. Press ENT on the channel and
use the arrow keys to find the “Set
Transfer Speed” option. Press ENT on
the Transfer Speed option to display
“Chl=X Clk=160 Change to=160?”,
where “X” stands for the channel
number.
C0=Host PID=0
SID=NA SXF=160M
Set
Transfer
Speed
..
Chl=x
Change
Clk=160
to=160 ?
Use your arrow keys to display a
different data rate (160MHz to Async).
Press ENT to confirm a selection.
Drive Channel:
Select from Main Menu, “View and
Edit Channels,” and then a drive
channel you wish to change its data
rate. Press ENT on the channel and use
the arrow keys to find the “Data Rate”
option. Press ENT on the Data Rate
option to display “Set Chl=X Data Rate
2-24
CHX=Drive SATA
SXF=AUTO
View Chip
Information
..
Infortrend
Data Rate
To AUTO?”, where “X” stands for the
channel number.
Use your arrow keys to display a data
rate value which ranges from 33 to
150MB/s (SATA drive channels).
Press ENT to confirm a selection.
..
Set Chl=X Data
Rate to AUTO ?
2.13 System Functions
Choose “System Functions” in the Main Menu, then press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to select a submenu, then press
ENT.
2.13.1 Mute Beeper
When the controller’s beeper has been
activated, choose “Mute Beeper," then
press ENT to turn the beeper off
temporarily for the current event. The
beeper will still activate on the next event.
Mute Beeper
..
2.13.2 Password
Use the controller’s password to protect the system from
unauthorized entry. Once the controller’s password is set,
regardless of whether the front panel, the RS-232C terminal
interface or the RAIDWatch Manager is used, the user can only
configure and monitor the RAID controller by providing the correct
password.
IMPORTANT!
•
The controller requests a password whenever a user is entering
the main menu from the initial screen or a configuration change
is made. If the controller is going to be left unattended, the
“Password Validation Timeout” should be set to “Always
Check.”
•
The controller password and controller name share a 32character space. The maximum number of characters for a
controller password is 32. If 31 characters are used for a
controller name, there will be only one character left for the
controller password and vice versa. Since 3.42J09, later
firmware revisions will support a 32-character space.
LCD Keypad Operation
2-25
2.13.2.1 Change Password
To set or change the controller password,
press the up or down arrow keys to select
“Change Password,” then press ENT.
If the password has previously been set,
the controller will ask for the old
password first. If password has not yet
been set, the controller will directly ask for
the new password. The password cannot
be replaced unless the correct old
password is provided.
Press the up or down arrow keys to select
a character, then press ENT to move to the
next space. After entering all the
characters (alphabetic or numeric), press
ENT for two seconds to confirm. If the
password is correct, or there is no preset
password, it will ask for the new
password. Enter the password again to
confirm.
Change Password
..
Old
Re-Ent
Password
..
Password
..
Change Password
Successful
2.13.2.2 Disable Password
To disable or delete the password, press ENT on the first flashing
digit for two seconds when requested to enter a new password. The
existing password will be deleted. No password checking will occur
when entering the Main Menu from the initial terminal screen or
making configuration changes.
2.13.3 Reset Controller
To reset the controller without powering
off the system, Press the up or down
arrow keys to “Reset Controller,” then
press ENT. Press ENT again for two
seconds to confirm. The controller will
now reset.
Reset This
Controller
..
Reset This
Controller
?
2.13.4 Shutdown Controller
Before powering off the controller,
unwritten data may still reside in cache
memory. Use the “Shutdown Controller”
function to flush the cache content. Press
the up or down arrow keys to “Shutdown
Controller,” then press ENT. Press ENT
again for two seconds to confirm.
The controller will now flush the cache
memory. Press ENT for two seconds to
confirm and to reset or power off the
subsystem.
2-26
Shutdown This
Controller
?
Shutdown This
Controller
..
ShutdownComplete
Reset Ctlr?
Infortrend
2.13.5 Controller Maintenance
For Controller Maintenance functions, please refer to Appendix C.
2.13.6 Saving NVRAM to Disks
You can choose to backup your controller-dependent configuration
information to disks. We strongly recommend using this function to
save the configuration profile whenever a configuration change is
made. The information will be distributed to every logical drive in
the RAID system. If using the RAIDWatch manager, you can save
your configuration details as a file to a computer system drive.
A RAID configuration of drives must exist for the controller to write
NVRAM content onto it.
From the Main Menu, choose “System
Functions.” Use arrow keys to scroll
down
and
select
“Controller
Maintenance,” “Save NVRAM to Disks,”
then press ENT. Press ENT for two
seconds on the message prompt, “Save
NVRAM to Disks?”.
Controller
Maintenance
Save NVRAM
To Disks
..
?
A prompt will inform you that NVRAM information has been
successfully saved.
2.13.7 Restore NVRAM from Disks
If you want to restore your NVRAM information that was
previously saved onto the array, use this function to restore the
configuration setting.
From the Main Menu, choose “System
Functions.” Use arrow keys to scroll
down
and
select
“Controller
Maintenance,” “Restore NVRAM from
Disks..,” and then press ENT. Press ENT
for two seconds to confirm.
In case your previous password
(reserved at the time you saved your
NVRAM configuration contents) is
different from your current password,
you are provided with the options
whether to restore the password you
previously
saved
with
your
configuration profile.
Restore NVRAM
from Disks
?
Restore without
Password
?
Restore with
Password
?
A prompt will inform you that the
controller NVRAM data has been
successfully restored from disks.
LCD Keypad Operation
2-27
2.13.8 Adjust LCD Contrast
The controller LCD contrast is set at the
factory to a level that should be generally
acceptable. The controller is equipped
with an LCD contrast adjustment circuit
in case the factory-preset level needs to
be adjusted either via the RS-232
terminal emulation menus or using the
LCD keypad panel.
From the main menu, choose “View and
Edit Peripheral Dev.” Press ENT on it,
press arrow keys to scroll down, and
select “Adjust LCD Contrast,” press ENT
to proceed, and then use the arrow keys
to find an optimal setting. Press ESC to
return to the previous menu.
2.14
View and Edit
Peripheral Dev
Adjust LCD
Contrast
..
LCD Contrast :
------
Controller Parameters
2.14.1 Controller Name
Select “View and Edit Config Parms” from
the Main Menu. Choose “View and Edit
Configuration Parameters,” “Controller
Parameters," then press ENT. The current
name will be displayed. Press ENT for two
seconds and enter the new controller name
by using the up or down arrow keys.
Press ENT to move to another character
and then press ENT for two seconds on
the last digit of the controller name to
complete the process.
Controller Name:
_ _ _ _
Enter Ctlr Name:
2.14.2 LCD Title Display Controller Name
Choose “View and Edit Configuration LCD Title Disp –
Parameters,” “Controller Parameters,” Controller Logo?
then press ENT. Use the up or down
arrow keys to choose to display the
LCD Title Disp –
embedded controller logo or any given
Controller Name?
name on the LCD initial screen.
2-28
Infortrend
2.14.3 Password Validation Timeout
Choose “View and Edit Configuration
Parameters,” “Controller Parameters,”
then press ENT.
Select “Password
Validation Timeout,” and press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
choose to enable a validation timeout from
one to five minutes to Always Check. The
Always Check timeout will invalidate any
configuration change without entering the
correct password.
PasswdValidation
Timeout-5 mins..
2.14.4 Controller Unique Identifier
Choose “View and Edit Configuration
Parameters,” “Controller Parameters,"
then press ENT. Press the up or down
arrow keys to select “Ctlr Unique ID-,”
then press ENT. Enter any hex number
between “0” and “FFFFF” and press ENT
to proceed.
Ctlr Unique (Hex)ID-
Enter a unique ID for any RAID controller in a single or dualcontroller configuration. The unique ID is recognized by the
controller as the following:
1.
The unique ID is combined to generate a unique WWN node
name for controllers or RAID systems using Fibre Channel host
ports. The unique node name helps prevent host computers
from mis-addressing the storage system during a controller
failback/failover process.
2.
MAC addresses for the controller’s Ethernet port that should be
taken over by a surviving controller in the event of controller
failure.
2.14.5 Controller Date and Time
This submenu is only available for controllers or subsystems that
come with a real-time clock on board.
View and Edit
Config Parms
Time Zone
Choose “View and Edit Configuration
Parameters,” “Controller Parameters,"
then press ENT. Press the up or down
arrow keys to scroll down and select “Set
Controller Date and Time”, then press
ENT.
LCD Keypad Operation
Controller
Parameters
..
Set Controller
Date and Time ..
2-29
The controller uses GMT (Greenwich Mean Time), a 24-hours clock.
To change the clock to your local time zone, enter the hours later
than the Greenwich mean time after a plus (+) sign. For example,
enter “+9” for Japanese time zone.
Choose “Time Zone” by pressing ENT.
Use the down key to enter the plus sign
and the up key to enter numeric
representatives.
Date and Time
Time Zone
..
GMT +08:00
GMT Date and Time
Use your arrow keys to scroll down and
select “Date and Time” by pressing ENT.
Use the arrow keys to select and enter
the numeric representatives in the
following order: month, day, hour,
minute, and the year.
..
[MMDDhhmm[YYYY]]
2.15 Drive Utilities
From the “View and Edit Drives” menu,
select the drive that the utility is to be
performed on; then press ENT. Select
“Drive Utilities; then press ENT. Choose
“Read/Write Test”.
These options are not available for drives
already configured in a logical
configuration, and can only be
performed before a reserved space is
created on a drive.
2-30
View and Edit
Drives
Slot=* 1010MB
NEW DRV SEAGATE
Drive
Utilities
..
Drive Read/Write
Test
..
Infortrend
2.15.1 Drive Read/Write Test
From the “View and Edit Drives”
menu, select a new or used drive that
the utility is to be performed on; then
press ENT.
Select “SCSI Drive
Utilities;" then press ENT. Choose
“Read/Write Test” and press ENT.
Press the up or down arrow keys to
select and choose to enable/disable the
following options:
1.
Abort When Error Occurs
2.
Drive Test for - Read Only/Read
and Write.
3.
Execute Drive Testing
Drive Read/Write
Test
..
Abort When Error
OccurEnabled ....
Drive Test for
Read and Write..
Execute Drive
Testing
..
When finished with configuration,
select "Execute Drive Testing" and
press ENT to proceed.
The Read/Write test progress will be
indicated as a percentage.
Drv Testing 23%
Please Wait !
You may press ESC and select
"Read/Write Test" later and press or
to select to "View Read/Write
Testing Progress" or to "List Current
Bad Block Table." If you want to stop
testing the drive, select "Abort Drive
Testing" and press ENT to proceed.
View Read/Write
Test Progress ..
LCD Keypad Operation
List Current
Bad Block Table.
Abort Read/Write
Testing
..
2-31
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left blank
2-32
Infortrend
Power On the RAID Enclosure
2.1
2.2
Caching Parameters
2.2.1 Optimization Modes
2.2.2 Optimization Mode and Stripe Size
2.2.3 Optimization for Random or Sequential I/Os
2.2.4 Write-back/Write-through Cache Enable/Disable
2.2.5 Periodic Cache Flush
2.3
View Connected Drives:
2.4
Creating a Logical Drive
2.4.1 Choosing a RAID Level
2.4.2 Choosing Member Drives
2.4.3 Logical Drive Preferences
2.4.4 Maximum Drive Capacity
2.4.5 Spare Drive Assignments
2.4.6 Disk Reserved Space
2.4.7 Write Policy
2.4.8 Initialization Mode
2.4.9 Stripe Size
2.4.10 Beginning Initialization
2.5
Creating a Logical Volume
2.5.1 Initialization Mode
2.5.2 Write Policy
2.6
Partitioning a Logical Drive/Logical Volume
2.7
Mapping a Logical Volume/Logical Drive to Host LUN
2.8
Assigning Spare Drive and Rebuild Settings
2.8.1 Adding a Local Spare Drive
2.8.2 Adding a Global Spare Drive
2.8.3 Rebuild Settings
2.9
Viewing and Editing Logical Drives and Drive Members
2.9.1 Deleting a Logical Drive
2.9.2 Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive
2.9.3 Assigning a Name to a Logical Drive
2.9.4 Rebuilding a Logical Drive (Manual Rebuild)
2.9.5 Regenerating Logical Drive Parity
2.9.6 Media Scan
2.9.7 Write Policy
2.10 Viewing and Editing Host LUNs
2.11 Viewing and Editing Drives
Deleting Spare Drive (Global / Local Spare Drive)
2.12 Viewing and Editing Channels
2.12.2 Adding a Channel ID
2.12.3 Deleting a Channel ID
2.12.4 Data Rate
2.13 System Functions
2.13.1 Mute Beeper
2.13.2 Password
2.13.2.1 Change Password
2.13.2.2 Disable Password
2.13.3 Reset Controller
2.13.4 Shutdown Controller
2.13.5 Controller Maintenance
2.13.6 Saving NVRAM to Disks
2.13.7 Restore NVRAM from Disks
LCD Keypad Operation
2-1
2-1
2-1
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-6
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-8
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-10
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-13
2-14
2-14
2-15
2-15
2-16
2-17
2-18
2-19
2-19
2-20
2-21
2-21
2-21
2-22
2-22
2-22
2-24
2-25
2-25
2-25
2-26
2-26
2-26
2-26
2-27
2-27
2-27
2-33
2.13.8 Adjust LCD Contrast
2.14 Controller Parameters
2.14.1 Controller Name
2.14.2 LCD Title Display Controller Name
2.14.3 Password Validation Timeout
2.14.4 Controller Unique Identifier
2.14.5 Controller Date and Time
Time Zone
Date and Time
2.15 Drive Utilities
2.15.1 Drive Read/Write Test
Adding a SCSI Channel’s ID, 22
Adding a SCSI Channel’s ID LCD, 22
Adjust LCD Contrast, 28
Assigning a Logical Drive Name, 17
Assigning a Logical Drive Name LCD,
17
Assigning Spare Drive, 13
Assigning Spare Drive LCD, 13
beeper mute, 25
block LBA, 19
block number, 6
cache parameters, 2
Caching Parameters, 1, 3, 4, 5
Caching Parameters LCD, 1
Change Password, 25
Change Password LCD, 25
changing password, 25
Changing Password, 26
Choosing Member Drives, 6
Choosing Member Drives LCD, 6
Continuous Sync, 4
Controller Date and Time, 29
Controller Maintenance, 27
Controller Name, 28
Controller Name LCD, 28
Controller Parameters, 28
Controller Parameters LCD, 28
controller reset, 26
Controller Unique Identifier, 29
Controller Unique Identifier LCD, 29
Creating a Logical Drive, 6
LCD, 6
Creating a Logical Volume LCD, 9
Date and Time, 30
default setting restoring, 24
deleting
partition of logical drive, 16
SCSI channel ID, 22
Deleting a Logical Drive, 15
Deleting a Logical Drive LCD, 15
2-34
2-28
2-28
2-28
2-28
2-29
2-29
2-29
2-29
2-30
2-30
2-31
Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive,
16
Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive
LCD, 16
Deleting a SCSI Channel’s ID, 22
Deleting a SCSI Channel’s ID LCD, 22
Deleting Spare Drive, 21
Deleting Spare Drive LCD, 21
deleting spare drive, global or local, 21
Disabling Password, 26
Disabling Password LCD, 26
Disk Reserved Space LCD, 7
Global Spare LCD, 14
Initialization Mode, 10
LCD, 8
Iteration Count, 20
LCD Title Display Controller Name, 28
LCD Title Display Controller Name LCD,
28
Limitations on optimization
modes, 1
Local Spare LCD, 13
logical drive
assigning a name, 17
deleting, 16
rebuilding, 18
logical drive parity check, 19
logical drive preferences, 8
Logical Drive Preferences, 7
Logical Drive Preferences LCD, 7
logical drive viewing drive members, 15
Mapping a Logical Volume/Logical
Drive to Host LUN LCD, 12
Maximum Drive Capacity, 7
Maximum Drive Capacity LCD, 7
Media Scan, 19
mute
beeper, 25
Mute Beeper, 25
Mute Beeper LCD, 25
naming logical drive, 17
Infortrend
Off-Line Mode Initialization, 9
On-Line Mode Initialization, 9
Optimization Mode, 1
Optimization Mode LCD, 1
parameters
cache, 2
parameters cache, 1
parity check logical drive, 19
partition
logical drive, deleting, 16
Partitioning a Logical Drive/Logical
Volume LCD, 11
password
changing, 25
password disabling, 26
Password Validation Timeout, 29
Password Validation Timeout LCD, 29
RAID Level, 6
RAID Level LCD, 6
RAID Migration, 9
rebuild
logical drive, 18
rebuild priority, 15
Rebuild Settings, 14
Rebuild Settings LCD, 13
Rebuilding a Logical Drive, 18
Rebuilding a Logical Drive LCD, 18
Regenerating Logical Drive Parity, 19
Regenerating Logical Drive Parity LCD,
19
reset controller, 26
Reset Controller, 26
Reset Controller LCD, 26
Restore NVRAM from Disks, 27
Restore NVRAM from Disks LCD, 27
Restoring the Default Setting, 24
LCD Keypad Operation
Restoring the Default Setting LCD, 24
Saving NVRAM to Disks, 27
Saving NVRAM to Disks LCD, 27
SCSI
channel ID, deleting, 22
SCSI Drive Read/Write Test LCD, 31
SCSI Drive Utilities, 30
SCSI Drive Utilities LCD, 30
Shutdown Controller, 26
Shutdown Controller LCD, 26
Spare Drive, 6
Spare Drive Assignments, 7
Spare Drive Assignments LCD, 7
Stripe Size for different RAID levels, 3
Stripe Size LCD, 8
System Functions, 25
System Functions LCD, 25
the “Password Validation Timeout, 25
View Connected Drives, 5
LCD, 5
Viewing and Editing Host LUNs LCD,
21
Viewing and Editing Logical Drives
LCD, 15
Viewing and Editing SCSI Channels, 22
Viewing and Editing SCSI Channels
LCD, 22
Viewing and Editing SCSI Drives, 21
Viewing and Editing SCSI Drives LCD,
21
Write Policy, 10, 20
Write Policy LCD, 7
Write-Back, 4
Write-Back cache, 20
Write-Through, 4
2-35
Chapter
3
Terminal Screen Messages
3.1
The Initial Screen
Figure 3 - 1: The RC-232C Initial Screen
Terminal Screen Messages
3-1
Cursor Bar:
Move the cursor bar to a desired item, then
press [ENTER] to select
Subsystem Name:
Identifies the type of controller/subsystem or
a preset name
Transfer Rate Indicator:
Indicates the current data transfer rate
Gauge Range:
Use + (Shift+”+”) or - keys to change the
gauge range in order to view the transfer rate
indicator
Cache Status:
Indicates current cache status
Write Policy:
Indicates current write-caching policy
Date & Time:
Current system date and time, generated by
controller real-time clock
PC Graphic (ANSI Mode):
Enters the Main Menu and operates in ANSI
mode
Terminal (VT-100 Mode):
Enters the Main Menu and operates in VT-100
mode
PC Graphic (ANSI+Color
Mode):
Enters the Main Menu and operates in ANSI
color mode
Show Transfer Rate+Show
Cache Status:
Press [ENTER] on this item to show the cache
status and transfer rate
Ongoing Processing:
e#: logical drive # is being expanded
i#: logical drive # is being initialized
R#: logical drive # is being rebuilt
P#: logical drive # Parity Regeneration
completion ratio
S#: logical drive # Media Scan completion
ratio
For more details, please refer to Section 6.4
Logical Drive Status
3-2
Infortrend
3.2
Main Menu
Figure 3 - 2: The RC-232C Main Menu
Use the arrow keys to move the cursor bar through the menu items, then press
[ENTER] to choose a menu, or [ESC] to return to the previous menu/screen.
In a subsystem or controller head where battery status can be detected, battery
status will be displayed at the top center. Status will be stated as Good, Bad,
several “+ ” (plus) signs (VT-100 mode), or color blocks (ANSI mode) will be
used to indicate battery charge. A battery fully-charged will be indicated by
five plus signs or color blocks.
When initializing or scanning an array, the controller displays progress
percentage on the upper left corner of the configuration screen. An “i”
indicates array initialization. An “s” stands for scanning process. The
number(s) next to them indicate the logical drive number (e.g., logical drive 0).
3.3
Quick Installation
Figure 3 - 3: Quick Installation Page
Terminal Screen Messages
3-3
Type Q or use the ↑ ↓ keys to select "Quick installation", then press [ENTER].
Choose Yes to create a logical drive.
All possible RAID levels will be displayed. Use the ↑ ↓ keys to select a RAID
level, then press [ENTER]. The assigned spare drive will be a Local Spare Drive,
not a Global Spare Drive.
All available disk drives in the enclosure will be included in one logical drive.
The subsystem will start initialization and automatically map the logical drive
to LUN 0 of the first host channel available.
3.4
Logical Drive Status
Figure 3 - 4: Logical Drive Status Screen
NOTE:
•
A logical drive in a single-controller subsystem is always managed by one
controller, and the “P” or “S” indicator will not appear.
LG
Logical Drive number
LV
The Logical volume to which this logical drive belongs
ID
Controller-generated unique ID
RAID
RAID level
SIZE (MB)
Capacity of the Logical Drive
Status 1
Logical Drive Status – Column 1
GOOD
3-4
The logical drive is in good condition
DRV FAILED
A drive member failed in the logical drive
CREATING
Logical drive is being initiated
DRV ABSENT
An empty drive tray
INCOMPLETE
Two or more drives failed in the logical drive
Infortrend
INVALID
The logical drive was created but has not been
fully initialized when another version of firmware
is being loaded. After the subsystem resets, the
array status should return to normal.
FATAL FAIL
Two member drives failed at the same time, the
array is inaccessible
DRV MISS
A member drive is missing; could result from
insecure installation
REBUILDING
The logical drive is being rebuilt
I
Logical Drive Status – Column 2
Initializing drives
A
Adding drive(s)
E
Expanding logical drive
H
Add drive operation on hold
R
Rebuilding the logical drive
P
Regenerating array parity
Status 2
Logical Drive Status – Column 3
Status 3
Column O
Logical Drive Status – Stripe size
N/A
Default
2
4KB
6
64KB
3
8KB
7
128KB
4
16KB
8
256KB
5
32KB
9
512KB
A
1024KB
Column C
Logical Drive Status – Write Policy setting
B
Write-back
T
Write-through
#LN
Total drive members in the logical drive
#SB
Standby drives available for the logical drive. This
includes all the spare drives (local spare, global spare)
available for the specific logical drive
#FL
Number of Failed member(s) in the logical drive
Name
Logical drive name (user configurable)
Terminal Screen Messages
3-5
3.5
Logical Volume Status
Figure 3 - 5: Logical Volume Status Screen
NOTE:
•
3.6
A logical volume in a single-controller subsystem is always managed by one
controller, and the “P” or “S” indicator will not appear.
LV
Logical Volume number.
ID
Logical Volume ID number (controller randomly generated)
Size (MB)
Capacity of the Logical Volume
#LD
The number of Logical Drive(s) included in this Logical Volume
Drive Status
Figure 3 - 6: Drive Status Screen
3-6
Infortrend
Slot
Slot number of the disk drive
Size (MB)
Drive capacity
Speed
XXMB Maximum transfer rate of the drive channel interface
LG_DRV
X
The disk drive is a member of logical drive
“X.”
If the Status column shows “STAND-BY”,
the drive is a Local Spare belonging to logical
drive “X.”
Status
Vendor and
Product ID
Terminal Screen Messages
Global
The disk drive is a Global Spare Drive
INITING
Proceeding with array initialization
ON-LINE
The drive is in good condition
REBUILD
Proceeding with array Rebuild process
STAND-BY
Local Spare Drive or Global Spare Drive. The
Local Spare Drive’s LG_DRV column will
show the logical drive number. The Global
Spare Drive’s LG_DRV column will show
“Global”.
NEW DRV
A new drive has not been included in any
logical drive or configured as a spare drive
USED DRV
An used drive that is not a member of any
logical drive or configured as a spare
FRMT DRV
Formatted drive (drive formatted with a
reserved section)
BAD
Failed drive
ABSENT
Drive does not exist
MISSING
Drive once existed, but is missing now
SB-MISS
Spare drive missing
The vendor and product model information of the drive
3-7
3.7
Channel’s Status
Figure 3 - 7:
Channel Status Screen
Chl
Channel number
Mode
Channel mode
ID
Host
Host Channel mode
Drive
Drive Channel mode
IDs managed by the Controller
*
Multiple IDs were applied (Host Channel mode only)
(ID
number)
Host Channel:
Specific IDs managed by the Controller for host LUN
mapping
Drive Channel:
Specific ID reserved for the channel processor on the
Controller
AUTO
Channel bus data rate set to auto speed negotiation
DefSynClk
Default bus synchronous clock:
DefWid
S
??.?M
The default setting of the channel is ??.? MHz in
Synchronous mode.
Async.
The default setting of the channel is Asynchronous mode.
Default bus width:
Width
SCSI transfer protocol
SATA
As regulated by SATA specifications
Signal:
L
Term
3-8
SCSI-320
Terminator Status:
On
Terminator is enabled.
Off
Terminator is disabled.
Infortrend
CurSynClk
CurWid
3.8
Diff
The channel is a Differential channel. The terminator can
only be installed/removed physically.
N/A
Non-SCSI bus
Current bus synchronous clock:
??.?GHz
The default setting of the channel bus is ??.? GHz
Async.
The default setting of the channel bus is Asynchronous
mode.
(empty)
The default bus synchronous clock has changed. Reset
the controller for the changes to take effect.
Current Bus Width:
Narrow
SCSI transfer protocol
SATA
As regulated by SATA specifications
Controller Voltage and Temperature
Controller Voltage and Temperature Monitoring
Figure 3 - 8: Controller Voltage and Temperature Monitoring Page
Choose from Main Menu “View and Edit Peripheral Devices,” and press
[ENTER]. From the submenu, choose “Controller Peripheral Device
Configuration,” “View Peripheral Device Status”, then press [ENTER].
Terminal Screen Messages
3-9
Figure 3 - 9: Controller Voltage and Temperature Status Screen
The current status of voltage and temperature detected by the controller will be
displayed on-screen and will be stated as normal, out of order, within or within
the safety range.
3.9
Viewing Event Logs on the Screen
When errors occur, you may want to trace the records to see what has
happened to your system. The controller’s event log management records all
events starting from the time when the system is powered on, recording up to
1,000 events. Powering off or resetting the controller will cause an automatic
deletion of all the recorded event logs. To view the events log on-screen, from
the Main Menu “View and Edit Event Logs” by pressing [ENTER].
Figure 3 - 10: Event Logs Screen
3-10
Infortrend
To clear the saved event logs, scroll the cursor down to select an event and
press [ENTER] to delete the event and the events below.
Figure 3 - 11: Clear Event Logs Dialogue Box
Choose Yes to clear the recorded event logs.
Terminal Screen Messages
3-11
This page is intentionally
left blank
3-12
Infortrend
Terminal Screen Messages ..............................................3-1
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
The Initial Screen................................................................................................................................3-1
Main Menu .........................................................................................................................................3-3
Quick Installation ...............................................................................................................................3-3
Logical Drive Status ...........................................................................................................................3-4
Logical Volume Status .......................................................................................................................3-6
Drive Status ........................................................................................................................................3-6
Channel’s Status .................................................................................................................................3-8
Controller Voltage and Temperature ..................................................................................................3-9
Controller Voltage and Temperature Monitoring.............................................................................3-9
3.9
Viewing Event Logs on the Screen ..................................................................................................3-10
A
M
ANSI Mode......................................................3-2
ANSI+Color Mode..........................................3-2
Main Menu .......................................................3-3
terminal.........................................................3-3
B
N
battery charge ...................................................3-3
NEW DRV......................................................3-7
C
P
Cache Status....................................................3-2
Controller Name .............................................3-2
Controller Voltage and Temperature terminal3-10
Cursor Bar ......................................................3-2
CurSynClk ...................................................3-10
CurWid .........................................................3-10
PID ..................................................................3-9
D
Date & Time ....................................................3-2
DefSynClk .....................................................3-9
DefWid ...........................................................3-9
E
Event Logs terminal........................................3-11
G
Gauge Range ...................................................3-2
I
Q
Quick Installation
terminal.........................................................3-3
R
RAID level ......................................................3-4
Rebuild............................................................3-7
S
SCSI Channel’s Status terminal .......................3-9
SCSI drive status ..............................................3-7
SCSI Drive’s Status terminal ...........................3-7
Spare drive .....................................................3-7
STAND-BY ....................................................3-7
T
Initial Screen.....................................................3-1
terminal.........................................................3-1
initialization....................................................3-7
terminal emulation
terminology ..................................................3-3
Transfer Rate..................................................3-2
Transfer Rate Indicator.................................3-2
L
U
Local Spare......................................................3-4
Logical Drive Status .........................................3-4
terminal.........................................................3-4
Logical Volume Status terminal .......................3-6
unique ID........................................................3-4
USED DRV ....................................................3-7
Terminal Screen Messages
3-13
V
W
VT-100 Mode ..................................................3-2
Write Policy .................................................... 3-2
錯誤! 找不到圖表目錄。
3-2
Infortrend
Chapter
4
Terminal Operation
4.1
Power on RAID Enclosure
Hardware installation should be completed before powering on your RAID
enclosure. The subsystem and disk drives must be configured and properly
initialized before the host computer can access the storage capacity. The
configuration and administration utility resides in the controller's firmware.
Open the initial terminal screen: use the arrow keys to move the cursor bar
through the menu items, then press [ENTER] to choose the terminal
emulation mode, and [ESC] to return to the previous menu/screen.
Figure 4 - 1: RS-232C Initial Screen
NOTE:
All figures in this chapter are showing examples using the management
hyper terminal screen.
Terminal Operation
4-1
4.2
Caching Parameters
4.2.1 Optimization Modes
Mass storage applications can be roughly divided into two categories—
database and video/imaging—according to their read/write characteristics.
To optimize system operation, there are two embedded optimization modes
with system behaviors pre-adjusted to different read/write parameters:
“Optimization for Random I/O” and the “Optimization for Sequential I/O.”
Limitations
The following are the limitations on the use of optimization modes.
1.
The system default is Optimization for Sequential I/O.
2.
You can select the stripe size of each array (logical drive) during the
initial configuration.
However, changing stripe size is only
recommended for experienced engineers who have tested the effects of
tuning stripe sizes for different applications.
3.
The array stripe size can only be changed during the initial
configuration process.
4.
Carefully consider the outcome before choosing an optimization mode.
Once the controller optimization mode is applied, access to different
arrays in a RAID system will follow the same optimized pattern. You
can only change the optimization mode after recreating the arrays.
Database and Transaction-based Applications
These kinds of applications usually include SQL server, Oracle server,
Informix, or other database services that keep the size of each transaction
down to a minimum, so that I/Os can be rapidly processed. Due to their
transaction-based nature, these applications do not read or write a bunch of
data in a sequential order—access to data occurs randomly. The transaction
size usually ranges from 2K to 4K. Transaction performance is measured
in “I/Os per second” or “IOPS.”
Video Recording/Playback and Imaging Applications
These kinds of applications usually include video playback, video postproduction editing, or applications of a similar nature that tend to read or
write large files to and from storage in a sequential order. The size of each
I/O can be 128K, 256K, 512K, or up to 1MB. The efficiency of these
applications is measured in MB per second (MBps).
When an array works with applications such as video or image-oriented
applications, the application reads/writes from the drive as large-block,
sequential threads instead of small and randomly accessed files.
4-2
Infortrend
The controller optimization modes have read-ahead buffer and other
Read/Write characteristics tuned to obtain the best performance for these
two major application categories.
4.2.2 Optimization Mode and Stripe Size
Each controller optimization mode has preset values for the stripe size of
arrays created in different RAID levels. If you want a different
optimization mode for a configured array, you must backup or move the
stored data and recreate the arrays following the steps below:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Stop host I/O access.
Move or backup all of your stored data in the subsystem.
Change the optimization mode.
Reset the subsystem.
Recreate the array(s). Once the array(s) are created, stripe size
cannot be changed.
Listed below are the default stripe sizes implemented with different
optimization modes and RAID levels. These values should be sufficient
for most applications.
Stripe Size:
Opt. for Sequential I/O
RAID0
RAID1
RAID3
RAID5
RAID6
NRAID
128KB
128KB
16KB
128KB
128KB
128KB
Stripe Size:
Opt. for Random I/O
32KB
32KB
4KB
32KB
32KB
32KB
Table 4-1: RAID Levels, Optimization Modes, and Stripe
Sizes
4.2.3 Optimization for Random or Sequential I/Os
Figure 4 – 2: Optimization for Random or Sequential I/Os
Terminal Operation
4-3
Page
Choose “Optimization for Random I/O” or “Optimization for Sequential
I/O,” then press [ENTER]. The “Random” or “Sequential” dialog box will
appear, depending on the option you have selected. Choose Yes in the
dialog box that follows to confirm the setting. Press [ESC] to exit and the
setting will take effect after the subsystem is restarted.
NOTE:
There is no longer a 512GB threshold for array optimization modes. If
an array is larger than 16TB, only the optimization mode for sequential
I/Os can be applied. Since logical drives of this size may not be
practical, there is actually no limitation on the optimization mode and
array capacity.
4.2.4 Write-Back Cache Enable/Disable
Figure 4 – 3: Write-Back Cache Enable/Disable Page
As one of the submenus in “Caching Parameters,” this option controls the
cached write policy.
Choose Caching Parameters, then press [ENTER]. Select Write-Back
Cache, then press [ENTER]. “Enabled” or “Disabled” will display the
current setting with Write-back caching. Choose Yes in the dialog box that
follows to confirm the setting.
Write-back caching can dramatically improve write performance by
caching the unfinished writes in memory and letting them be committed to
drives in a more efficient manner. In the event of power failure, a battery
backup module can hold cached data for days.
4-4
Infortrend
4.2.5 Periodic Cache Flush
Figure 4 - 4: Periodic Cache Flush Page
If Write-back caching is preferred for better performance yet data integrity
is also a concern, e.g., no battery protection, the system can be configured
to flush the cached writes at preset intervals.
Note that the “Continuous Sync” option holds data in cache for as long as
necessary to complete a write operation and immediately commits it to
hard drives if it does not come in a series of sequential write requests.
IMPORTANT!
Terminal Operation
•
If the size of an array is larger than 16TB, only the optimization
for sequential I/O can be applied. Since a logical drive of this
size may not be practical, there is actually no limitation on the
combination of optimization mode and array capacity.
•
Every time you change the Caching Parameters you must reset
the controller for the changes to take effect.
•
The Adaptive Write Policy is applicable to subsystems working
under normal conditions. If, for example, a drive fails in an
array, the firmware automatically restores the array’s original
write policy.
4-5
4.3
Viewing the Connected Drives
Prior to configuring disk drives into a logical drive, it is necessary to
understand the status of the physical drives in your enclosure.
Figure 4 - 5: View and Edit Drives Page
Use the arrow keys to scroll down to “View and Edit Drives” to display
information on all the physical drives installed.
Drives are listed in the “View and Edit Drives” table. Use the arrow keys
to scroll the table. First examine whether there is any drive installed but
not listed here. If a disk drive is installed but not listed, the drive may be
defective or not installed correctly. If so, please contact your RAID
supplier.
IMPORTANT!
4-6
•
Drives of the same brand/model/capacity might not have the
same block number.
•
The basic read/write unit of a hard drive is block. If members
of a logical drive have different block numbers (capacity), the
smallest block number will be taken as the maximum capacity
to be used in every drive. Therefore, use drives of the same
capacity.
•
You may assign a Spare Drive to a logical drive whose
members have a block number equal or smaller than the
Local/Global Spare Drive, but you should not do the reverse.
Infortrend
4.4
Creating a Logical Drive
Browse through the Main Menu and select View and Edit Logical Drive.
Figure 4 - 6: View and Edit Logical Drive Page
For the first logical drive on the RAID subsystem, simply choose the first
logical drive entry, LG 0, and press [ENTER] to proceed. You may create
as many as 16 logical drives or more using drives in a RAID subsystem or
in a cascaded enclosure.
When prompted to “Create Logical
Drive?,” select Yes and press
[ENTER] to proceed.
4.4.1 Choosing a RAID Level
A pull-down list of supported RAID levels will
appear. Choose a RAID level for this logical drive. In
this chapter, RAID 6 will be used to demonstrate the
configuration process.
NOTE:
Some specific functions associate with RAID 6 only work with certain
product models.
Terminal Operation
4-7
4.4.2 Choosing Member Drives
Choose your member drive(s) from the list of available physical drives.
Tag the drives for inclusion by positioning the cursor bar on the drive and
then pressing [ENTER]. A star sign “*” will appear on the selected
physical drive(s). To deselect the drive, press [ENTER] again on the
selected drive and the “∗” will disappear. Use the same method to select
more drives.
Figure 4 - 7: Choose Member Drives Page
4.4.3 Logical Drive Preferences
Figure 4 - 8: Logical Drive Preferences Screen
After all member drives have been selected, press [ESC] to continue with
the next option. A list of array options is displayed.
4.4.3.1 Maximum Drive Capacity
Figure 4 - 8: Maximum Drive Capacity Screen
As a rule, a logical drive should be composed of drives of the same
capacity. A logical drive can only use the capacity of each drive up to the
maximum capacity of the smallest member selected for the array.
4-8
Infortrend
4.4.3.2 Assign Spare Drives
Figure 4 - 9: Assign Spare Drives Page
You can add a spare drive from the list of the unused drives. The spare
chosen here is a Local spare and will automatically replace any failed drive.
The controller will then rebuild data onto the replacement drive.
A logical drive composed in a non-redundancy RAID level (NRAID or
RAID 0) does not support spare drive rebuild.
4.4.3.3 Disk Reserved Space
The reserved space is a small section of disk space formatted for storing
array configuration and RAIDWatch program data. This item is for
display only—you cannot change the size of the reserved space.
4.4.3.4 Write Policy
Figure 4 - 10: Write Policy Sub-menu
This sub-menu allows you to set the caching mode for this specific logical
drive. “Default” is a neutral value that is coordinated with the subsystem’s
general caching mode setting shown in brackets in the Write Policy status.
4.4.3.5 Initialization Mode
Figure 4 - 11: Initialization Mode Sub-menu
This sub-menu allows you to see if the logical drive is immediately
available. If the online (default) mode is used, data can be written onto it
immediately and you may continue with array configuration, e.g.,
Terminal Operation
4-9
including the array into a logical volume, before the array’s initialization
process is completed.
4.4.3.6 Stripe Size
Figure 4 - 12: Stripe Size Option Box
This option should only be changed by experienced engineers. Setting to
an incongruous value can severely drag performance, therefore, this
option should only be changed when you can be sure of the performance
gains it might bring you.
The default value is determined by the combination of the controller
Optimization Mode setting and the RAID level used for the array.
Press [ESC] to continue when all the preferences have been set.
Figure 4 - 13: Logical Drive Preferences Screen
A confirm box will appear on the screen. Verify all information in the box
before choosing Yes to confirm and proceed.
If the online initialization mode is applied, the logical drive will first be
created and the controller will find an appropriate time to initialize the
array.
The completion of array creation is indicated by the message prompt above.
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A controller event will then prompt to indicate that the logical drive
initialization has begun. Press [ESC] to cancel the “Notification” prompt,
and a progress indicator will display on the screen as a percentage bar.
While the array initialization runs in the background, you can start using
the array or continue configuring your RAID subsystem.
When a fault-tolerant RAID level (RAID 1, 3, 5 or 6) is selected, the
subsystem will start initializing parity.
Use the [ESC] key to view the status of the created logical drive.
Figure 4 - 14: Logical Drive Status Screen
IMPORTANT!
Only logical drives with RAID levels 1, 3, 5, or 6 will take the time
to initialize the logical drive. Logical drives with RAID level 0 and
NRAID do not perform logical drive initialization; the drive
initialization will be finished almost immediately.
4.5
RAID Migration
Currently RAID migration function supports migrate between RAID5 and
RAID 6.
Terminal Operation
4-11
Before proceeding with RAID migration, make sure you have sufficient
free capacity or unused drives in your RAID array. RAID6 arrays require
at least four (4) member drives and use additional capacity for the
distribution of secondary parity. For example, if you want to migrate a
RAID5 array consisting of three (3) drives to RAID6, one additional disk
drive must be available.
The different features of RAID5 and RAID6 arrays is summarized as
follows:
RAID5
Min. No. of
Member Drives
Raw Capacity
Usable Capacity
3
4
N
N-1 (parity drive)
•
•
•
Redundancy
RAID6
N
N-2 (parity drives);
N>=2
If individual disk capacity = 100G,
Capacity of a 4-drive RAID5 =
(4-1) x 100G = 300G
Capacity of a 4-drive RAID6 =
(4-2) x 100G = 200G
1 drive failure
2 drive failures
NOTE:
Some specific functions associate with RAID migration only work with
certain product models.
4.5.1
Requirements for Migrating a RAID5 Array
The preconditions for migrating a RAID5 array is:
The usable capacity of the RAID6 array should be equal or larger
than the usable capacity of the original RAID5 array.
To obtain the larger capacity, you can:
4.5.2
1).
Add Drive(s): Include one or more disk drives into the array.
2).
Copy and Replace: Use larger disk drives in the array to replace the
original members of the RAID5 array.
Migration Methods
The conditions for migrating an array to RAID6 is diagrammed as
follows:
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1.
Fault condition:
The usable capacity of the RAID6 array is smaller than the usable
capacity of the original RAID5 array.
Figure 4 - 15: Migration Not Allowed for Insufficient Capacity
2.
Migration by adding drive(s):
The additional capacity for composing a RAID6 array is acquired by
adding a new member drive.
Figure 4- 16: Migration Condition Met by Adding Drive(s)
3.
Migration by copy and replace:
The additional capacity for composing a RAID6 array is
acquired by using larger drives as members of the array.
Terminal Operation
4-13
Figure 4 - 17: Migration Condition Met by Using Larger
Drives
4.5.3
Migration: Exemplary Procedure
To migrate a RAID5 array to RAID6, follow the steps below:
From the “View and Edit Logical Drives” status screen, select an existing
RAID5 array and press [ENTER]. A sub-menu will appear. Move your
cursor bar to select Migrate Logical Drive.
Figure 4 - 18: Migrate Logical Drive Sub-menu
A confirm box should appear. Select Yes to proceed.
Figure 4 - 19: Confirm Box
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A selection box should prompt allowing you to choose a RAID level to
migrate to. Press [ENTER] on RAID6.
Figure 4 - 20: RAID Level Selection Box
A list of member drives and unused disk drives (new or used drives)
should prompt. In the case of migrating a 3-drive RAID5 to 4-drive
RAID6, you can select the original members of the RAID5 array and select
one more disk drive to meet the minimum requirements of RAID6. You
may also select different disk drives for composing the new RAID6 array.
Figure 4 - 21: Member Drives and Unused Drives List
Press [ESC] to proceed to the next configuration screen. A sub-menu
should prompt.
You may either change the maximum capacity to be included in the new
RAID6 array or change the array stripe size.
Figure 4 - 22: Drives Configuration Screen
A confirm box should prompt. Check the configuration details and select
Yes to start the migration process.
Figure 4 - 23: Confirm Box
A message should prompt indicating the migration process has started.
Terminal Operation
4-15
Press [ESC] to clear the message. The initialization progress is shown
below.
Since the migration includes adding a new member drive, the completion
of RAID migration is indicated as follows:
Once the migration is completed, associate the RAID6 array with the
ID/LUN number originally associated with the previous RAID5 array.
Please refer to Section 4.8 Mapping a Logical Volume to Host LUNs
for more information.
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4.6
Creating a Logical Volume
Figure 4 - 24: View and Edit Logical Volumes Screen
A logical volume consists of one or
several logical drives. Choose View
and Edit Logical Volumes in the
Main Menu to display the current
logical volume configuration and
status on the screen. Choose a
logical volume number (0-7) that has
not yet been defined, then press
[ENTER] to proceed. A prompt
“Create Logical Volume?” will appear.
Select Yes and press [ENTER].
Figure 4 - 25: Select Logical Drive Page
Select one or more logical drive(s) available on the list. The same as
creating a logical drive, the logical drive(s) can be tagged for inclusion by
positioning the cursor bar on the desired drive and pressing [ENTER] to
select. An asterisk (*) will appear on the selected logical drive. Pressing
[ENTER] again will deselect a logical drive.
Terminal Operation
4-17
Figure 4 - 26: Selection Sub-menu
Use the arrow keys to select a sub-menu and change the initialization mode,
write policy, or the managing controller.
Logical volumes can be assigned to different controllers (primary or
secondary). The default is primary.
Figure 4 - 27: Confirm Box
Note that if a logical volume is manually assigned to a specific controller,
all its members’ assignments will also be shifted to that controller.
When all the member logical drives have been selected, press [ESC] to
continue. The confirm box displays. Choose Yes to create the logical
volume.
Figure 4 - 28: View Logical Drive Selection Box
Press [ENTER] on a configured volume, and the information of the
created logical volume displays.
LV:
ID:
Size:
#LD:
4-18
Logical Volume ID
Unique ID for the logical volume, randomly generated by the
RAID controller firmware
Capacity of this volume
Number of the included members
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4.7
Partitioning a Logical Drive/Logical
Volume
The process of partitioning a logical drive is the same as that of
partitioning a logical volume. The partitioning of a logical volume is used
as an example in the proceeding discussion.
Note that partitioning can be very useful when dealing with a very large
capacity; however, partitioning a logical drive or logical volume is not a
requirement for RAID configuration.
Figure 4 - 29: Partition Logical Volume Page
Choose the logical volume you wish to partition, then press [ENTER].
Choose Partition logical volume, then press [ENTER]. Select from the
list of undefined partitions and press [ENTER].
A list of partitions displays. If the logical volume has not yet been
partitioned, all volume capacity will list as “partition 0.”
Figure 4 - 30: Partition List
Press [ENTER] and type the desired size for the selected partition, and
then press [ENTER] to proceed. The remaining size will be automatically
allotted to the next partition.
When prompted by the “Partition Logical Volume?” message, choose Yes
to confirm then press [ENTER]. Follow the same procedure to partition
the remaining capacity of your logical volume.
Terminal Operation
4-19
Figure 4 - 31: Confirm Box
When a partition of a logical drive/logical volume is deleted, the capacity
of the deleted partition will be added to the previous partition.
WARNING!
4.8
•
Whenever a partition is changed, it is necessary to reconfigure
all host LUN mappings. All data in it will be lost and all host
LUN mappings will be removed when there is any change to the
partition capacity.
•
If operating in a Unix-based system, reset the subsystem for the
configuration changes to take effect if any changes were made
to partition sizes and partition arrangement.
Mapping a Logical Volume to Host
LUNs
Select View and Edit Host luns in the Main Menu, then press [ENTER].
Figure 4 - 32: View and Edit Host Luns Screen
A list of host channel/ID combinations appears on the screen. The diagram
above shows two host channels and each is designated with a default ID.
More can be added on each channel.
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Multiple IDs on host channels are necessary for redundant controller
configuration. Details on creating multiple IDs and changing channel
modes will be discussed later. Choose a host ID by pressing [ENTER].
Figure 4 - 33: Host Channel/ID List
Choose the channel-ID combination you wish to map, then press [ENTER]
to proceed. Choose mapping a Logical Drive or a Logical Volume on the
drop box.
Figure 4 - 34: Mapping Result Page
1.
A list of LUN entries and their respective mappings will display. To
map a host LUN to a logical volume’s partition, select an available
LUN entry (one not mapped yet) by moving the cursor bar to the LUN,
then press [ENTER].
2.
A list of available logical volumes displays. Move the cursor bar to
the desired logical unit, then press [ENTER].
3.
A list of available partitions will prompt. Move the cursor bar to the
desired partition, then press [ENTER]. If you have not partitioned
the logical volume, the whole capacity will be displayed as one logical
partition.
4.
When prompted to “Map Host LUN," press [ENTER] to proceed.
Terminal Operation
4-21
5.
When prompted to "Map Logical Volume?,” select Yes to continue.
A prompt will display the
mapping you wish to create.
Choose Yes to confirm the LUN
mapping you selected.
The detail in the confirm box
reads: partition 0 of logical
volume 0 will map to LUN 0 of
ID 0 on host channel 0.
Continue to map other partitions to host LUNs.
Once any host ID/LUN is successfully associated with a logical capacity,
the “No Host LUN” message in the LCD screen will change to “Ready.”
If your controller has not been configured with a host channel and assigned
an ID.
Please proceed to Section 4.13
4.9
Viewing and Editing Channels.
Assigning a Spare Drive and Rebuild
Settings
4.9.1 Adding Local Spare Drive
A spare drive is a standby drive automatically initiated by controller
firmware to replace a failed drive. A spare drive must have an equal or
larger capacity than the array members. A Local Spare should have a
capacity equal to or larger than the members of the logical drive it is
assigned to. A Global Spare should have a capacity equal to or larger
than all physical drives in a RAID subsystem.
Figure 4 - 35: Add Local Spare Drive Page
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Choose View and Edit Drives on the Main Menu, then press [ENTER].
Move the cursor bar to a drive that is not assigned to a logical drive or as
a spare drive (usually indicated as a "New Drive"), and then press
[ENTER].
Figure 4 - 36: Logical Drives List
Choose Add Local Spare Drive and press [ENTER]. A list of logical
drives displays.
Move the cursor bar to a logical drive, then press [ENTER]. The
unassigned disk drive will be associated with this logical drive as a Local
Spare.
Figure 4 - 37: Confirming Adding Local Spare Drive
When prompted to “Add Local Spare Drive?,” choose Yes to confirm.
4.9.2 Adding a Global Spare Drive
A Global Spare replaces the failed drive in any logical drive of a RAID
subsystem.
Figure 4 - 38: Add Global Spare Drive Page
Move the cursor bar to the drive that is not a member drive or a spare
(usually indicated as a "New Drive"), and then press [ENTER]. Choose
Add Global Spare Drive. When prompted to “Add Global Spare Drive?,”
choose Yes.
Terminal Operation
4-23
4.10
Viewing and Editing Logical Drives and
Drive Members
Choose View and Edit Logical Drives in the Main Menu to display the
array status. Refer to the previous chapter for more details on the legends
used in the Logical Drive’s status. To see the drive member information,
choose the logical drive by pressing [ENTER].
Figure 4 - 39: View and Edit Logical Drives Page
The disk drive-related functions include:
4-24
Selections
Function
1. View Drive
Display drive member information
2. Delete Logical Drive
To delete a logical drive
3. Partition Logical Drive
To delete a partition of a logical drive
4. Logical Drive Name
Assign a name to a logical drive
5. Rebuild Logical Drive
Rebuild a logical drive when a drive failed
6. Expand Logical Drive
To expand the size of a logical drive
7. Migrate Logical Drive
8. Add Drives
To migrate a logical drive to different
RAID level
Add physical drive to a logical drive
9. Regenerate Parity
Regenerate logical drive parity
10. Copy and Replace Drive
Copy or replace a logical drive
11. Media Scan
Set media scan priority, iteration count
dt k h d l
Infortrend
12. Write Policy
and task schedules
Choose an appropriate write policy
4.10.1 Deleting a Logical Drive
Choose the logical drive you wish to delete, then press [ENTER]. Choose
Delete logical drive, then choose Yes when prompted to confirm.
Figure 4 - 40: Delete Logical Drive Page
4.10.2 Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive
Figure 4 - 41: Delete Partition Page
Choose the logical drive which has a partition you wish to delete, then
press [ENTER]. Choose Partition logical drive. Partitions of the logical
drive will be displayed in tabulated form. Move the cursor bar to the
partition you wish to delete, then press [ENTER]. Enter “0” on the
partition size to delete the partition.
Terminal Operation
4-25
Figure 4-42: Drive Space Allocated to the Previous
Partition
As illustrated above, the capacity of the deleted partition will be added to
the previous partition.
WARNING!
Whenever a partition is changed, it is necessary to reconfigure all
host LUN mappings. All data kept in the partition and the host LUN
mappings will be removed with any partition change.
4.10.3 Assigning a Name to a Logical Drive
Naming can help identify different arrays in a multi-array configuration.
This function is also useful in special situations. For example, when one or
more logical drives have been deleted, the array indexing is changed after
system reboot. The second logical drive might become the first on the list.
Figure 4 - 43: Name a Logical Drive Page
Choose the logical drive for which you wish to assign a name, then press
[ENTER]. Choose logical drive name, then press [ENTER] again. The
current name will be displayed. You may now enter a new name in this
field. Enter a name, then press [ENTER] to save the configuration. The
maximum number of characters for a logical drive name is 14.
4.10.4 Rebuilding a Logical Drive
If there is no spare drive in the system, a failed drive should be
immediately replaced by a drive known to be good. Once the failed drive is
replaced, the rebuild process can be manually initiated.
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Infortrend
If you want the controller to auto-detect a replacement drive, make sure
you have the following items set to “enabled”:
1.
Periodic Drive Check Time
2.
Periodic Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check Time
These two configuration options can be found under “View and Edit
Configuration Parameters” -> “Drive-Side Parameters.”
Figure 4 - 44: Rebuild Logical Drive Screen
Choose the logical drive that has a failed member drive, then press
[ENTER]. Choose Rebuild logical drive, then press [ENTER]. When
prompted to “Rebuild Logical Drive?,” select Yes.
The rebuild progress will be displayed.
Once rebuild has started, choose Rebuild progress to track its progress.
IMPORTANT!
The Rebuild function is only available when a logical drive with
RAID level 1, 3, 5, or 6 has a failed member. NRAID and RAID 0
configurations provide no data redundancy.
4.10.5 Expand Logical Drive
If there is an amount of unused capacity in a logical drive, the LD may be
expanded. If there is no available unused capacity, then the LD cannot be
expanded.
To expand a logical drive, first select Expand Logical Drive selection.
Press [Enter] to perform the option.
4.10.6 Migrate Logical Drive
After a logical drive has been setting up, the RAID level can be reassigned
using the Migrate Logical Drive selection. This function supports RAID 5
and RAID 6 currently. Each RAID level required a certain amount of hard
disk drives. You need a minimum of three (3) drives for RAID 5 and four
(4) drives for RAID 6. After answering Yes to the prompt up dialog box,
Terminal Operation
4-27
the available RAID levels according to the number of physical drives you
selected will be shown on the screen. Use the Up and Down arrow keys to
select the RAID level and press [Enter].
Figure 4 - 45: Migrate Logical Drive Page
NOTE:
Some specific functions associate with RAID migration only work with
certain product models.
WARNING!
1.
Different RAID configurations use different sizes of disk space
to store parity or mirrored data. When migrating from one to
another, disk space might not be enough to hold the original
data. So the total drive spaces of new RAID level must not less
than original RAID level.
4.10.7 Add Drive
More drives can be added into a logical drive to expand the logical drive
capacity. To add a drive, first choose Add Drive selection and press
[Enter]. All available disks will be shown on the screen. Use the Up and
Down arrow keys to select the drive you wish to add then press [Enter].
When the drive is selected, a start “*” sign will appear in front of the slot
number. Press [ESC], and then click Yes to confirm the action.
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Figure 4 - 46: Add Drive Screen
4.10.8 Regenerating Logical Drive Parity
(Applies to RAID Levels 1, 3, 5, and 6)
If no verifying method is applied to data writes, this function can often be
performed to verify parity blocks of a selected array. This function
compares and recalculates parity data to correct parity errors.
Figure 4 - 47: Confirm Box
Choose the logical drive that you want to regenerate the parity for, and
then press [ENTER]. Choose Regenerate Parity, then press [ENTER].
When prompted to “Regenerate Parity?,” select Yes.
Please refer to Chapter 11 Data Integrity for more information on parity
regeneration.
4.10.9 Media Scan
Media Scan examines drives and detects the presence of bad blocks. If any
data blocks have not been properly committed and are found during the
scanning process, data from those blocks are automatically recalculated,
retrieved and stored onto undamaged sectors. If bad blocks are encountered
on yet another drive during the rebuild process, the block LBA (Logical
Block Address) of those bad blocks will be shown. If rebuild is carried out
under this situation, rebuild will continue with the unaffected sectors,
salvaging the majority of the stored data.
Terminal Operation
4-29
Figure 4 - 48: Media Scan Screen
There are two options with performing the Media Scan:
1.
Media Scan Priority: determines how much of the system resources
will be used for the drive scanning and recalculating process.
2.
Iteration Count: determines how many times the scan is performed.
If set to “continuous,” the scan will run in the background
continuously until it is stopped by a user.
The system can automatically perform a Media Scan according to a preset
task schedule. For more details, please refer to Chapter 11 Data Integrity.
4.10.10 Write Policy
Figure 4 - 49: Write Policy Screen
The Write-back cache setting can be configured differently on each array.
Setting to the default value means the array setting is coordinated with the
controller’s general setting. The controller’s general setting option can be
found in “View and Edit Configuration Parameters” -> “Caching
Parameters” -> “Write-Back Cache.” Note that cached writes are lost if a
power failure occurs.
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Infortrend
4.11
Viewing and Editing Host LUNs
4.11.1 Viewing or Deleting LUN Mappings
Choose the host channel and host ID combination you wish to view or
delete.
Figure 4 - 50: View and Edit Host Luns Page
A list of the current LUN mapping will be displayed on the screen. Move
the cursor bar to the LUN mapping you wish to delete, then press
[ENTER]. Select Yes to delete the LUN mapping, or No to cancel.
4.12
Viewing and Editing Drives
Figure 4 - 51: View and Edit Drives Main Menu
Choose View and Edit Drives in the Main Menu. All drives attached to the
drive channels will be displayed on the screen.
Terminal Operation
4-31
Press [ENTER] on a selected drive to view a sub-menu featuring functions
related to the individual hard drive.
Figure 4 - 52: View Drive Information Sub-menu
The disk drive-related functions include:
Function
Availability
1. View Drive Information
Every drive type
2. Identify Drives
Every drive type
3. Clone Failing Drive
Members of logical drives
4. Delete Global/Local Spare
Drive
Global/Local Spare drive
5. Add Global/Local Spare Drive
Non-configured drives
6. Media Scan
Non-configured drives; Media Scan
on drive members can be found in
View and Edit Logical Drives
New drives
7. Drive Utilities: Read/Write Test
8. Disk Reserved Space
9. Media Error Reassign Count
View only on member drives,
reserved space removable on the
used or formatted drives
View the number of media error
encountered on each drive
Using Media Scan is described in the previous Section 7.10. Details on the
use of Clone Failing Drive can be found in Chapter 13. The Drive Utilities
function is discussed in the last section of this chapter.
4.12.1 Deleting Spare Drive (Global / Local Spare Drive)
Move the cursor to a Local Spare Drive or Global Spare Drive, then press
[ENTER]. Choose Delete Global/Local Spare Drive, then press [ENTER]
again. Choose Yes to confirm.
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Figure 4 - 53: Delete Global/Local Spare Drive Page
NOTE:
The spare drive you deleted or any drive you replaced from a
logical unit will be indicated as a "used drive."
4.12.2 Disk Reserved Space
The 256MB of reserved space can be removed from a drive once the drive
is excluded from a logical drive. The reserved space, a space formatted
with a micro-file system, can also be manually created from a new disk
drive.
Figure 4 - 54: Remove Disk Reserved Space Screen
Figure 4 - 55: Format Disk Reserved Space Screen
Terminal Operation
4-33
4.12.3 Identifying Drives
Figure 4 - 56: Identify Drive Page
Whenever there is a failed drive in a logical drive, make it a point to
replace the failed drive with a new, healthy drive to keep the logical
drive working.
If you replaced the wrong drive when trying to replace a failed
drive you will no longer be able to access the logical drive because
you have inadvertently failed another drive.
To prevent this from happening, the controller provides an easy
way to identify the faulty drive. By forcing certain drive LEDs to
light for a configurable period of time, the faulty drive can be
identified, and thus reduce the chance of removing the wrong drive.
This function can be especially helpful in an installation site
operating with hundreds of drives.
4.12.3.1 Flash Selected Drive
The Read/Write LED of the drive you selected will light steadily for
a configurable period of time, from 1 to 999 seconds.
Figure 4 – 57: Flash Selected Drive
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Infortrend
4.12.3.2 Flash All Drives
The Read/Write LEDs of all connected drives will light for a
configurable period of time. If the LED of the defective drive did
not light on the “Flash Selected Drive” function, use “Flash All
Drives” to verify the fault. If the “Flash All Drives” function is
executed, and the defective drive’s LED still does not respond, it can
be a drive tray problem or the drive is dead.
Figure 4 – 58: Flash All Drives
4.12.3.3 Flash All but Selected Drives
Except the selected drive, the Read/Write LEDs of all connected
drives will light for a configurable period of time ranging from 1 to
999 seconds. If an administrator cannot be sure of the exact location
of a specific drive, this function will help to indicate where it is.
This can prevent removal of the wrong drive when a drive fails and
is about to be replaced.
Figure 4 – 59: Flash All but Selected Drives
Terminal Operation
4-35
The drive-identifying function can be selected from “Main
Menu”/”View and Edit Drives”/”Identify Drives.”
4.12.4 Media Error Reassign Count
Figure 4 - 60: Media Error Reassign Count Page
This option provides information about the occurrence of drive’s
media error. If a disk drive has encountered media errors, users may
enable drive S.M.A.R.T. function to detect drive failure status. If
messages show media error come frequent, the target disk drive
might have reached its life expectancy, and should be replaced
immediately.
4.13
Viewing and Editing Channels
EonStor subsystems come with preset data paths and there is no
need to modify channel configurations, e.g., channel mode.
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Figure 4 - 61: View and Edit Channels Page
Choose View and Edit Channels in the Main Menu to display
channel status.
Figure 4 - 62: View and Edit ID Page
IMPORTANT!
Most EonStor subsystems have preset host, drive channels that
cannot be changed. Therefore the channel mode option is not
available.
4.13.1 Viewing and Editing IDs - Host Channel
Figure 4 - 63: Existing ID List
Choose a host channel, then press [ENTER]. Choose View and Edit ID.
A list of existing ID(s) will be displayed on the screen. Select one of the
existing IDs and press [ENTER]. You may then choose to add or delete
an existing ID.
Terminal Operation
4-37
4.13.2 Adding an ID
Figure 4 - 64: Add ID Screen
Press [ENTER] on one of the existing IDs. Choose Add Channel ID, and
then choose to assign an ID. A list of host IDs will appear. Choose an ID.
DO NOT choose an ID used by another device on the same channel.
4.13.3 Deleting an ID
Figure 4 - 65: Delete ID Screen
Choose the host bus ID you wish to delete. Choose Delete Channel ID.
The dialog box “Delete ID#?” will appear. Select Yes, then press
[ENTER] to confirm.
IMPORTANT!
4-38
•
Every time you change a channel ID, you must reset the
subsystem/controller for the changes to take effect.
•
Multiple target IDs can be applied to a host channels while
each drive channel has only one ID.
Infortrend
•
At least one controller’s ID has to be present on each channel
bus.
4.13.4 Data Rate (Channel Bus)
Figure 4 - 66: Data Rate Screen
This option is available in the configuration menu of Fibre host channel
and the drive channel configuration menus of Fibre- or SATA-based
subsystems. Default is “AUTO” and should work fine with most disk
drives. Changing this setting is not recommended unless some particular
bus signal issues occur.
Most SATA/ATA-based systems connect only one drive per SATA/ATA
channel (4 for multi-lane with SATA II) to help avoid a single drive failure
from affecting other drives. The maximum mechanical performance of
today’s drives can reach around 30MBps (sustained read) which is still far
below the bandwidth of a drive channel bus. Setting the SATA bus speed
to a lower value can get around some problems, but will not become a
bottleneck to system performance.
Note that the SATA/ATA speed is the maximum transfer rate of the
SATA/ATA bus in that mode. It does not mean the drive can actually carry
out that amount of sustained read/write performance. For the performance
of each drive model, please refer to the documentation provided by drive
manufacturer.
Terminal Operation
4-39
4.13.5 View Chip Information
Figure 7 - 67: View Chip Information
This is a view only option showing basic information about the SCSI-320
Channel chip processor.
4.14
System Functions
Figure 4 - 68: System Functions Page
Choose System Functions in the Main Menu, then press [ENTER] to
display the System Functions menu. Move the cursor bar to an item, then
press [ENTER].
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4.14.1 Mute Beeper
Figure 4 - 69: Mute Beeper Screen
When the subsystem’s beeper (onboard alarm) has been activated, choose
Mute Beeper,” then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes and press [ENTER] in
the next dialog box to turn the beeper off temporarily for the current event.
The beeper will still be activated by the next event.
4.14.2 Change Password
Figure 4 - 70: Change Password Screen
Use the subsystem’s password to protect the array from unauthorized entry.
Once the subsystem password has been set, regardless of whether the front
panel, the RS-232C terminal interface or RAIDWatch Manager is used,
you can only access the subsystem by providing the correct password.
IMPORTANT!
Terminal Operation
•
The controller verifies the password when entering the Main
Menu from the initial screen or when making a configuration
change. If the controller is going to be left unattended, the
“Password Validation Timeout” can be set to “Always Check.”
Setting the validation timeout to “Always Check” will protect
the controller configuration from any unauthorized access.
•
The controller password and controller name share a 164-41
character space. The maximum numbers of characters for the
controller password is 32. If the controller name occupies 32
characters, there is only one character left for the controller
password, and vice versa.
4.14.3 Changing the Password
To set or change the controller password, move the cursor bar to Change
Password, then press [ENTER].
If a password has previously been set, the controller will ask for the old
password first. If the password has not yet been set, the controller will
directly ask for the new password. The password cannot be replaced unless
the correct old password is provided.
Key-in the old password, then press [ENTER]. If the password is incorrect,
it will not allow you to change the password. Instead, it will display the
message “Password incorrect!,” then go back to the previous menu.
If the password is correct, or there is no preset password, it will ask for the
new password.
4.14.4 Setting a New Password
Figure 4 - 71: Set New Password Screen
Enter the desired password in the column, then press [ENTER]. The next
dialog box will display “Re-Enter Password.” Enter the password again to
confirm and press [ENTER].
The new password will now become the controller’s password. Providing
the correct password is necessary when entering the Main Menu from the
initial screen.
4.14.5 Disabling the Password
To disable or delete the password, press [ENTER] in the empty column
that is used for entering a new password. The existing password will be
deleted. No password checking will occur when entering the Main Menu
or when making a configuration change.
4-42
Infortrend
4.14.6 Reset Controller
Figure 4 - 72: Reset Controller Screen
To reset the controller without powering off the system, move the cursor
bar to Reset Controller, then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog
box that follows, then press [ENTER]. The controller will now reset as
well as power off or re-power on.
4.14.7 Shutdown Controller
Before powering off the controller, unwritten data may still reside in cache
memory. Use the “Shutdown Controller” function to flush the cache
content. Move the cursor bar to Shutdown Controller, then press
[ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that follows, then press [ENTER].
The controller will now flush the cache memory.
Figure 4 - 73: Shutdown Controller Screen
For Controller Maintenance functions, such as Download Firmware, please
refer to Appendix B.
Terminal Operation
4-43
4.14.8 Adjust LCD Contrast
Figure 4 - 74: Adjust LCD Contrast Page
The controller LCD contrast is set at the factory to a level that should be
generally acceptable. If changes are required, the controller is equipped
with an LCD contrast adjustment circuit, allowing the contrast to be
adjusted either via the RS-232 Terminal Emulation Menus or by the LCD
User Interface.
4.15
Controller Parameters
4.15.1 Controller Name
Figure 4 - 75: View and Edit Configuration Parameters
Page
Choose View and Edit Configuration Parameters, Controller Parameters,
then press [ENTER]. The current name displays. Press [ENTER]. Enter a
name in the dialog box that prompts, then press [ENTER].
4-44
Infortrend
4.15.2 LCD Title Display - Controller Name
Figure 4 - 76: Controller Parameters Screen
Choose View and Edit Configuration Parameters, Controller Parameters,
then press [ENTER]. Choose to display the embedded controller logo or
any given name on the LCD. Giving a specific name to each controller
will make them easier to identify if you have multiple RAID systems
remotely monitored.
4.15.3 Saving NVRAM to Disks
You can choose to backup your controller-dependent configuration
information to disks. We recommend using this function to save
configuration information whenever a configuration change is made. The
information will be duplicated and distributed to all logical configurations
of drives.
At least a RAID configuration must exist for the controller to write your
configuration data onto it.
From the Main Menu, choose System Functions. Use the arrow keys to
scroll down and select Controller Maintenance, Save NVRAM to Disks,
then press [ENTER].
Figure 4 - 77: Save NVRAM to Disk Screen
Choose Yes to confirm.
Terminal Operation
4-45
A prompt will inform you that NVRAM information was successfully
saved.
4.15.4 Restore NVRAM from Disks
Use this function to restore your NVRAM information that you previously
saved onto disk.
From the Main Menu, choose System Functions. Use the arrow keys to
scroll down and select Controller Maintenance, Restore NVRAM from
disks, and then press [ENTER].
Figure 4 - 78: Restore NVRAM from Disks Screen
Press [ENTER] on one of the selections to confirm.
A prompt will notify you that the controller NVRAM data was successfully
restored from disks.
4.15.5 Password Validation Timeout
Figure 4 - 79: Password Validation Timeout Page
Choose View and Edit Configuration Parameters, Controller Parameters,
then press [ENTER]. Select Password Validation Timeout, and press
[ENTER]. Choose to enable a validation timeout from “1 minute” to
“Always Check.” The Always Check timeout will disable any
configuration change made without entering the correct password.
4-46
Infortrend
4.15.6 Controller Unique Identifier
Figure 4 - 80: View and Edit Configuration Parameters
Enter any hex number between “0” and “FFFFF” for the unique identifier.
The value you enter MUST be different for each controller.
Enter a unique ID for every RAID subsystem whether it is configured in a
single-controller configuration. The unique ID is necessary for the
following:
1.
MAC addresses for the controller’s Ethernet port that will be taken
over by a surviving controller in the event of single RAID controller
failure.
The unique identifier setting can be accessed from "View and Edit
Configuration Parameters" -> "Controller Parameters" -> "Controller
Unique ID."
4.15.7 Set Controller Date and Time
This sub-menu only appears when the controller is equipped with a realtime clock.
Terminal Operation
4-47
Time Zone
Figure 4 - 81: Set Controller Date and Time Page
The controller uses GMT (Greenwich Mean Time), a 24-hour clock. To
change the clock to your local time zone, enter the numbers of hours later
than the Greenwich Mean Time after a plus (+) sign. For example, enter
“+9” for Japan’s time zone.
Date and Time
Figure 4 - 82: Enter Date and Time Screen
Enter time and date in its numeric representatives in the following order:
month, day, hour, minute, and the year.
4-48
Infortrend
4.16
View Drive Information
Figure 4 - 83: View Drive Information Page
From the “View and Edit Drives” menu, select the drive that the utility is
to be performed on, then press [ENTER]. Select View drive information,
then press [ENTER].
4.17
Drive Utilities
4.17.1 Drive Read/Write Test
From the “View and Edit Drives” menu, select a new or used drive that the
utility is to be performed on, then press [ENTER]. Select Drive Utilities,
then press [ENTER]. Choose Read/Write Test and press [ENTER]. You
can choose to enable/disable the following options:
1.
2.
3.
Abort When Error Occurs
Drive Test for - Read Only/Read and Write
Execute Drive Testing
Figure 4 - 84: Drive Read/Write Test Page
Terminal Operation
4-49
When finished with the configuration, select Execute Drive Testing and
press [ENTER] to proceed.
The Read/Write test progress will be indicated by a status bar.
Figure 4 - 85: Disk Read/Write Testing Completion
Percentage
You may press [ESC] and select "Read/Write Test" later and choose to
"View Read/Write Testing Progress." If you want to stop testing the drive,
select Abort Drive Testing and press [ENTER] to proceed.
Figure 4 - 86: View Read/Write Testing Progress Screen
IMPORTANT!
The disk drive on which a read/write test will be performed cannot
be a spare drive (local or global) or a member of a logical drive.
The "Read/Write Test" option will not appear if the drive is not
indicated as a "New Drive" or a "Used Drive." Also, a drive
formatted with a 256MB reserved space is also excluded from
selection.
4-50
Infortrend
4
............................................................................................................................................... 1
Terminal Operation .................................................................................. 1
4.1
Power on RAID Enclosure ................................................................................................ 1
4.2
Caching Parameters ........................................................................................................... 2
4.2.1 Optimization Modes ......................................................................................................... 2
4.2.2 Optimization Mode and Stripe Size.................................................................................. 3
4.2.3 Optimization for Random or Sequential I/Os ................................................................... 3
4.2.4 Write-Back Cache Enable/Disable ................................................................................... 4
4.2.5 Periodic Cache Flush ........................................................................................................ 5
4.3
Viewing the Connected Drives.......................................................................................... 6
4.4
Creating a Logical Drive ................................................................................................... 7
4.4.1 Choosing a RAID Level ................................................................................................... 7
4.4.2 Choosing Member Drives................................................................................................. 8
4.4.3 Logical Drive Preferences ................................................................................................ 8
4.4.3.1 Maximum Drive Capacity ............................................................................................. 8
4.4.3.2 Assign Spare Drives ...................................................................................................... 9
4.4.3.3 Disk Reserved Space ..................................................................................................... 9
4.4.3.4 Write Policy................................................................................................................... 9
4.4.3.5 Initialization Mode ........................................................................................................ 9
4.4.3.6 Stripe Size.................................................................................................................... 10
4.5
RAID Migration .............................................................................................................. 11
4.5.1
Requirements for Migrating a RAID5 Array........................................................... 12
4.5.2
Migration Methods .................................................................................................. 12
4.5.3
Migration: Exemplary Procedure............................................................................. 14
4.6
Creating a Logical Volume.............................................................................................. 17
4.7
Partitioning a Logical Drive/Logical Volume ................................................................. 19
4.8
Mapping a Logical Volume to Host LUNs...................................................................... 20
4.9
Assigning a Spare Drive and Rebuild Settings................................................................ 22
4.9.1 Adding Local Spare Drive.............................................................................................. 22
4.9.2 Adding a Global Spare Drive ......................................................................................... 23
4.10 Viewing and Editing Logical Drives and Drive Members .............................................. 24
4.10.1 Deleting a Logical Drive .............................................................................................. 25
4.10.2 Deleting a Partition of a Logical Drive......................................................................... 25
4.10.3 Assigning a Name to a Logical Drive........................................................................... 26
4.10.4 Rebuilding a Logical Drive .......................................................................................... 26
4.10.5 Expand Logical Drive................................................................................................... 27
4.10.6 Migrate Logical Drive .................................................................................................. 27
4.10.7 Add Drive ..................................................................................................................... 28
4.10.8 Regenerating Logical Drive Parity ............................................................................... 29
(Applies to RAID Levels 1, 3, 5, and 6).................................................................................. 29
4.10.9 Media Scan ................................................................................................................... 29
4.10.10 Write Policy................................................................................................................ 30
4.11 Viewing and Editing Host LUNs..................................................................................... 31
4.11.1 Viewing or Deleting LUN Mappings ........................................................................... 31
4.12 Viewing and Editing Drives ............................................................................................ 31
4.12.1 Deleting Spare Drive (Global / Local Spare Drive) ..................................................... 32
4.12.2 Disk Reserved Space .................................................................................................... 33
Terminal Operation
4-51
4.12.3 Identifying Drives .........................................................................................................34
4.12.3.1 Flash Selected Drive ..................................................................................................34
4.12.3.2 Flash All Drives .........................................................................................................35
4.12.3.3 Flash All but Selected Drives.....................................................................................35
4.12.4 Media Error Reassign Count.........................................................................................36
4.13 Viewing and Editing Channels ........................................................................................36
4.13.1 Viewing and Editing IDs - Host Channel .....................................................................37
4.13.2 Adding an ID ................................................................................................................38
4.13.3 Deleting an ID...............................................................................................................38
4.13.4 Data Rate (Channel Bus)............................................................................................39
4.13.5 View Chip Information...............................................................................................40
4.14 System Functions .............................................................................................................40
4.14.1 Mute Beeper..................................................................................................................41
4.14.2 Change Password ..........................................................................................................41
4.14.3 Changing the Password.................................................................................................42
4.14.4 Setting a New Password................................................................................................42
4.14.5 Disabling the Password.................................................................................................42
4.14.6 Reset Controller ............................................................................................................43
4.14.7 Shutdown Controller.....................................................................................................43
4.14.8 Adjust LCD Contrast ....................................................................................................44
4.15 Controller Parameters.......................................................................................................44
4.15.1 Controller Name............................................................................................................44
4.15.2 LCD Title Display - Controller Name ..........................................................................45
4.15.3 Saving NVRAM to Disks .............................................................................................45
4.15.4 Restore NVRAM from Disks........................................................................................46
4.15.5 Password Validation Timeout.......................................................................................46
4.15.6 Controller Unique Identifier..........................................................................................47
4.15.7 Set Controller Date and Time .......................................................................................47
Time Zone................................................................................................................................48
Date and Time..........................................................................................................................48
4.16 View Drive Information...................................................................................................49
4.17 Drive Utilities...................................................................................................................49
4.17.1 Drive Read/Write Test ..................................................................................................49
4-52
Infortrend
Chapter
5
Host-side and Drive-side
Parameters
This chapter discusses the advanced options for configuring and
maintaining a RAID system. Each function is given a brief
explanation as well as a configuration sample. Terminal screens are
used in the configuration samples. Some of the operations require
basic knowledge of RAID technology and are only recommended
for an experienced user.
NOTE:
All figures in this chapter are showing examples using the management
hyper terminal screen.
5.1
Host-side Parameters
Foreword: SCSI Channel, SCSI ID, and LUN
A SCSI channel (SCSI bus) can connect up to 15 devices (not
including the controller itself) when the Wide function is enabled
(16-bit SCSI). It can connect up to 7 devices (not including the
controller itself) when the Wide function is disabled (8-bit SCSI).
Each device has one unique SCSI ID. Two devices contending for
the same SCSI ID are not allowed.
Host-side and Drive-side Parameters
8-1
Figure 5 - 1: SCSI ID/LUNs
Figure 8-1 illustrates this idea. If you file a document into a cabinet,
you must put the document into one of the drawers. From a SCSI’s
point of view, a SCSI ID is like a cabinet, and the drawers are the
LUNs (Logical units). Each SCSI ID enables up to 32 LUNs. Data
can be stored into one of the LUNs of the SCSI ID. Most SCSI host
adapters treat a LUN like another SCSI device.
5.1.1 Maximum Concurrent Host LUN Connection (“Nexus”
in SCSI)
The configuration option adjusts the internal resources for use with
a number of current host nexus. If there are four host computers (A,
B, C, and D) accessing the array through four host IDs/LUNs (ID 0,
1, 2 and 3), host A through ID 0 (one nexus), host B through ID 1
(one nexus), host C through ID 2 (one nexus) and host D through ID
3 (one nexus) - all queued in the cache - that is called 4 nexus. If
there are I/Os in the cache through four different nexus, and
another host I/O comes down with a nexus different than the four
in the cache (for example, host A access ID 3), the controller will
return "busy.” Note that it is "concurrent" nexus; if the cache is
cleared up, it will accept four different nexus again. Many I/Os can
be accessed via the same nexus.
Figure 5 - 2: Maximum Concurrent Host LUN Connection
8-2
Infortrend
From the Main Menu, select “View and Edit Configuration
Parameters,” “Host-side Parameters,” then press [ENTER]. Choose
“Max Number of Concurrent Host-LUN Connection,” then press
[ENTER]. A list of available selections will appear. Move cursor bar
to an item, then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that
follows to confirm your setting. The default is “4.”
5.1.2 Number of Tags Reserved for Each Host-LUN
Connection
Each nexus has 32 (the default setting) tags reserved. When the host
computer sends 8 I/O tags to the controller, and the controller is too
busy to process them all, the host might start to send less than 8 tags
during every certain period of time since then. This setting ensures
that the controller will accept at least 32 tags per nexus. The
controller will be able to accept more than that as long as the
controller internal resources allow - if the controller does not have
enough resources, at least 32 tags can be accepted per nexus.
Figure 5 - 3: Number of Tags Reserved for Each Host-LUN
Connection
Choose “Host-side Parameters,” then press [ENTER]. Choose
“Number of Tags Reserved for each Host-LUN Connection,” then
press [ENTER]. A list of available selections will appear. Move the
cursor bar to an item, then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog
box that follows to confirm the setting.
5.1.3 Maximum Queued I/O Count
This function allows you to configure the maximum queued I/O
count the controller can receive from the host computer.
Host-Side and Drive-Side Parameters
8-3
Figure 5 - 4: Maximum Queued I/O Count
Choose “Host-side Parameters,” then press [ENTER]. Choose
“Maximum Queued I/O Count,” then press [ENTER]. A list of
available selections will appear. Move the cursor bar to an item,
then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that follows to
confirm the setting.
The controller supports the following Host-side configurations:
“Maximum Queued I/O Count,” “LUNs per Host ID,” “Num of
Host-LUN Connect,” “Tag per Host-LUN Connect,” “Peripheral
Dev Type Parameters,” and “Cyl/Head/Sector Mapping Config.”
5.1.4 LUNs per Host ID
Figure 5 - 5: LUNs per Host ID
Choose “LUNs per Host ID,” then press [ENTER]. A list of
selections will appear. Move the cursor bar to an item, then press
[ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that follows to confirm the
setting.
8-4
Infortrend
5.1.5 LUN Applicability
If no logical drive has been created and mapped to a host LUN, and
the RAID controller is the only device connected to the host SCSI
card, usually the operating system will not load the driver for the
host adapter. If the driver is not loaded, the host computer will not
be able to use the in-band utility to communicate with the RAID
controller. This is often the case when users want to start
configuring a RAID using management software from the host. It
will be necessary to configure the "Peripheral Device Type" setting
for the host to communicate with the controller. If the "LUN-0's
only" is selected, only LUN-0 of the host ID will appear as a device
with the user-defined peripheral device type. If "all undefined
LUNs" is selected, each LUN in that host ID will appear as a device
with the user-defined peripheral device type.
Different "LUN applicability" selections are available: “Device
Type” selection, “Device Qualifier Support,” “Support Removable
media,” "LUN-0's only," and "All undefined LUNs." Please refer to
5.1.8 Peripheral Device Type Parameters for Various Operating Systems
for details concerning various operating systems.
5.1.6 Peripheral Device Type
For connection without a pre-configured logical unit and Ethernet
link to a host, the in-band SCSI protocol can be used in order for the
host to “see” the RAID subsystem. Please refer to the reference table
below. You will need to make adjustments in the following
submenus: Peripheral Device Type, Peripheral Device Qualifier,
Device Support for Removable Media, and LUN Application.
Figure 5 - 6: Peripheral Device Type
5.1.7 In-band (SCSI channel)
External devices (including a RAID subsystem; from the view of
operation on an application server or management PC) require
communication links with a management computer for device
Host-Side and Drive-Side Parameters
8-5
monitoring and administration. In addition to the regular RS-232C
or Ethernet connection, in-band SCSI can serve as an alternative
means of management communications. In-band SCSI translates
the original configuration commands into standard SCSI commands.
These SCSI commands are then sent to and received by the
controller over the existing host links, either SCSI or Fibre.
5.1.8 Peripheral Device Type Parameters for Various
Operating Systems
IMPORTANT!
There is no need to configure the Peripheral Device setting if you
are trying to manage a RAID subsystem from a RAIDWatch
station through an Ethernet connection (to the EonStor subsystem’s
Ethernet port). An Ethernet connection to RAID uses TCP/IP as
the communication protocol.
With an in-band connection, a host computer cannot “see” a RAID
controller UNLESS the following have been configured:
1. (a) A logical unit has been created.
(b) At least one logical unit is mapped to a host ID or LUN via
the RS-232/LCD keypad interface.
2. (a) Host bus connection is established.
(b) The RAID subsystem/controller is configured to appear as
a peripheral device on the channel bus connected to a host
computer.
With a brand new array, there is no association between disk drive
configurations and the logical ID/LUN presentations on the host
bus. If users want to start configuring a RAID system from an
application server before any RAID configuration is made, the host
will not be able to “see” the RAID subsystem. In order for a host to
“see” the subsystem, it will be necessary to define the controller as a
peripheral device.
Different host operating systems require different adjustments. See
the tables below to find the proper settings for your host operating
system. References to “Peripheral Device Qualifier” and “Device
Support for Removable Media” are also included.
8-6
Infortrend
Figure 5 - 7: Peripheral Device Type Parameters
Operating
System
Peripheral
Device
Type
Peripheral
Device
Qualifier
Device
Support for
Removable
Media
LUN
Applicability
Windows
2000/2003
0xd
Connected
Either is
okay
LUN-0’s
Solaris™ 8/9
(x86 and
SPARC)
Linux
RedHat 8/9;
SuSE 8/9
0xd
Connected
Either is
okay
LUN-0’s
0xd
Connected
Either is
okay
LUN-0’s
Table 5 - 1: Peripheral Device Type Parameters
Device Type
Enclosure Service Device
No Device Present
Direct-access Device
Sequential-access Device
Processor Type
CD-ROM Device
Scanner Device
MO Device
Storage Array Controller Device
Unknown Device
Setting
0xd
0x7f
0
1
3
5
6
7
0xC
0x1f
Table 5 - 2: Peripheral Device Type Settings
Host-Side and Drive-Side Parameters
8-7
5.1.9 Cylinder/Head/Sector Mapping
Drive capacity is decided by the number of blocks. For some
operating systems (Sun Solaris, for example) the capacity of a drive
is determined by the cylinder/head/sector count. For Sun Solaris,
the cylinder cannot exceed 65535; choose "cylinder<65535,” then the
controller will automatically adjust the head/sector count for your
OS to read the correct drive capacity. Please refer to the related
documents provided with your operating system for more
information.
Cylinder, Head, and Sector counts are selectable from the
configuration menus shown below. To avoid any difficulties with a
Sun Solaris configuration, the values listed below can be applied.
Capacity
Cylinder
Head
Sector
< 64 GB
64 - 128 GB
128 – 256 GB
256 – 512 GB
512 GB - 1 TB
variable
variable
variable
variable
variable
64
64
127
127
255
32
64
64
127
127
Table 5 - 3: Cylinder/Head/Sector Mapping under Sun
Solaris
Older Solaris versions do not support drive capacities larger than 1
terabyte.
Solaris 10 now supports array capacity larger than 1TB. Set the
values to the values listed in the table below:
Capacity
Cylinder
Head
Sector
>1TB
<65536
255
variable
variable
255
Table 5 - 4
8-8
Cylinder/Head/Sector Mapping under Sun
Solaris 10
Infortrend
Configuring Sector Ranges/Head Ranges/Cylinder Ranges:
Selecting Sector Ranges
Figure 5 - 8: Selecting Sector Ranges
Selecting Head Ranges
Figure 5 - 9: Selecting Head Ranges
Selecting Cylinder Ranges
Host-Side and Drive-Side Parameters
8-9
Figure 5 - 10: Selecting Cylinder Ranges
5.2
Drive-side Parameters:
Figure 5 - 11: Drive Side Parameters Screen
Choose “Drive-side Parameters,” then press [ENTER]. The Driveside parameters menu displays.
8-10
Infortrend
5.2.1 Disk Access Delay Time
This feature sets the delay time before the subsystem tries to access
the hard drives after power-on. Default may vary 15 seconds to 30
seconds, and from one model to another. This parameter can be
adjusted to fit the spin-up speed of different models of disk drives
installed in your subsystem.
Figure 5 - 12: Selecting Disk Access Delay Time
Choose “Disk Access Delay Time,” then press [ENTER]. A list of
selections displays. Move the cursor bar to a selection, then press
[ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that follows to confirm the
setting.
5.2.2 Drive I/O Timeout
The “Drive I/O Timeout” is the time interval for the controller to
wait for a drive to respond. If the controller attempts to read data
from or write data to a drive but the drive does not respond within
the Drive I/O Timeout value, the drive will be considered as a
failed drive.
When the drive itself detects a media error while reading from the
drive platter, it usually retries the previous reading or re-calibrates
the head. When the drive encounters a bad block on the media, it
reassigns the bad block onto a spare block. However, it takes time to
perform the above actions. The time to perform these operations can
vary between different brands and different models.
During channel bus arbitration, a device with higher priority can
utilize the bus first. A device with lower priority will sometimes
Host-Side and Drive-Side Parameters
8-11
receive an I/O timeout when devices of higher priority keep
utilizing the bus.
The default setting for “Drive I/O Timeout” is 7 seconds. It is
highly recommended not to change this setting. Setting the timeout
to a lower value will cause the controller to judge a drive as failed
while a drive is still retrying, or while a drive is unable to arbitrate
the SCSI bus. Setting the timeout to a greater value will cause the
controller to keep waiting for a drive, and it may sometimes cause a
host timeout.
Figure 5 - 13: Selecting Drive I/O Timeout
Choose “Drive I/O Timeout –Default (7 seconds),” then press
[ENTER]. A list of selections will appear. Move the cursor bar to a
selection, then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that
follows to confirm the setting.
5.2.3 Maximum Tag Count: Tag Command Queuing (TCQ)
and Native Command Queuing (NCQ) Support
8-12
Infortrend
Figure 5 - 14: Selecting Maximum Tag Count
This sub-menu facilitates the support for both Tagged Command
Queuing (TCQ) and Native Command Queuing (NCQ). TCQ is a
traditional feature on SCSI or Fibre disk drives, while NCQ is
recently implemented with SATA disk drives. The queuing feature
requires the support of both host adapters and hard disk drives.
Command queuing can intelligently reorder host requests to
streamline random accesses for IOPS/multi-user environments.
Infortrend’s subsystems support tag command queuing with an
adjustable maximum tag count from 1 to 128. The default setting is
“Enabled” with a maximum tag count of 32 (SCSI or Fibre drives) or
16 (default for SATA drives). Choose “Maximum Tag Count”, then
press [ENTER]. A list of available tag count numbers displays.
Move the cursor bar to a number, then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes
in the dialog box that follows to confirm the setting.
IMPORTANT!
•
Every time you change this setting, you must reset the
controller for the changes to take effect.
•
Disabling Tag Command Queuing will disable the hard drives’
built-in cache for Write-Back operation.
NOTE:
The following options are categorized as related to array
maintenance and data integrity:
•
Periodic Drive Check Time
•
Periodic Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check Time
•
Auto-Assign Global Spare Drive
Details of these options can be found in Chapter 10.
Another option is associated with disk drive SMART support and
details can be found in Chapter 12:
•
Drive Predictable Failure Mode (SMART)
Host-Side and Drive-Side Parameters
8-13
5.2.4 Drive Spindown Idle Delay Period
Figure 5 - 15: Selecting Drive Spindown Idle Delay Period
This is power saving feature which allows hard drive motor to spin
down after a configurable period of time with no I/O requests
directed to the hard drives.
The drive spin down command is designed for usage on disk-todisk (D2D) backup system. In normal case, the RAID system serves
as I/O interface between hosts and drives. On disk-to-disk (D2D)
backup system, the I/Os only occur when the backup command is
valid. Without backup requirements, the spin down command can
make drives enter an idle state hence reduce the power
consumption of drives.
User can setup an idle period for the drives. Drives will
automatically spin down while there is no read/write command to
drives within the idle period. Then if any I/O command is issued,
such as disk backup, the drives will wake up and serve the I/O
requirement.
Choose “Drive Spindown Idle Delay Period,” then press [ENTER].
A list of selections will appear. Move the cursor bar to a selection,
then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that follows to
confirm the setting.
5.2.5 Drive Delayed Write
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Figure 5 - 16: Enabling/Disabling Delayed Write
This option allows to utilize the cache buffer embedded with disk drives.
Note that if power outage or hard drive failure occur with data still kept
within the disk buffer, data inconsistency might occur.
Host-Side and Drive-Side Parameters
8-15
HOST-SIDE PARAMETERS................................................................................. 1
5.1
Foreword: SCSI Channel, SCSI ID, and LUN......................................................................1
5.1.1 Maximum Concurrent Host LUN Connection (“Nexus” in SCSI) ...................................2
5.1.2 Number of Tags Reserved for Each Host-LUN Connection ............................................3
5.1.3 Maximum Queued I/O Count ...........................................................................................3
5.1.4 LUNs per Host ID.............................................................................................................4
5.1.5 LUN Applicability ............................................................................................................5
5.1.6 Peripheral Device Type.....................................................................................................5
5.1.7 In-band (SCSI channel).....................................................................................................5
5.1.8 Peripheral Device Type Parameters for Various Operating Systems................................6
5.1.9 Cylinder/Head/Sector Mapping ........................................................................................8
5.2
DRIVE-SIDE PARAMETERS: ........................................................................... 10
5.2.1 Disk Access Delay Time.................................................................................................11
5.2.2 Drive I/O Timeout...........................................................................................................11
5.2.3 Maximum Tag Count: Tag Command Queuing (TCQ) and Native Command Queuing
(NCQ) Support.........................................................................................................................12
5.2.4 Drive Spindown Idle Delay Period .................................................................................14
5.2.5 Drive Delayed Write .......................................................................................................14
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Chapter
6
Enclosure Management
This chapter discusses the configuration options related to enclosure
monitoring. Each function is given a brief explanation as well as a
configuration sample. Terminal screens will be used in the
configuration samples. Some of the operations require basic
knowledge of RAID technology and are only recommended for an
experienced user.
NOTE:
All figures in this chapter are showing examples using the management
hyper terminal screen.
6.1
Enclosure Monitoring
6.1.1 Enclosure Devices
6.1.1.1 Event Triggered Operations
Figure 9 - 1: Event Triggered Operations
Enclosure Management
9-1
Select “View and Edit Peripheral Devices” on the Main Menu and
press [ENTER]. Choose “Set Peripheral Device Entry”, press
[ENTER], then select “Event Trigger Operations” by pressing
[ENTER]. The event trigger menu displays.
The Operations
To reduce the chance of data loss, the controller/subsystem
automatically commences the following actions to prevent loss of
data:
1). Switches its caching mode from write-back to write-through
2). Flushes all cached data
The Trigger
The mode switching and cache flush operations can be triggered by
the detection of the following conditions:
1.
BBU low or failed:
If battery fails or is under-charge, the unfinished writes
cannot be supported if power outage occurs.
2.
UPS AC power loss:
Even with the buffer provided by the UPS, if the mains
power fails, cached data should be immediately
distributed to hard drives.
3.
Power supply failure
4.
Fan failure
5.
Temperature exceeds threshold
If critical conditions occur, such as the enclosure
component failure, chance of system downtime will
increase and it is best to temporarily disable write-back
caching.
When enabled, each of the above conditions forces the
controller/subsystem to adopt the write-through caching mode.
When the fault condition is corrected, the controller/subsystem
automatically restores the previous caching mode.
Figure 6 - 2: Controller Write-Through Alert
Note that the temperature thresholds refer to those set for both
sensors on the RAID controller boards and those placed within the
subsystem enclosure. In terms of the controller temperature, board
1 refers to the main circuit board and board 2 refers to the second-
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level I/O board or the daughter card. If any of the threshold values
set for any sensor is exceeded, the trigger automatically applies.
NOTE:
If a battery is not installed in your RAID subsystem, the “BBU Low or
Failed “ option should be disabled.
6.1.2 Auto Shutdown: Elevated Temperature
System components can be damaged if operated under elevated
temperature. You can configure the time periods between the
detection of exceeded thresholds and the controller’s commencing
an automatic shutdown.
The shutdown does not electrically disconnect the subsystem.
When shutdown is commenced, the subsystem stops responding to
I/O requests and flushes all cached writes in its memory. During
that time, system administrators should have been notified of the
condition and have begun restoring proper cooling of the subsystem.
Figure 6 - 3: Set Auto-Shutdown Period Time
Select “View and Edit Peripheral Devices” on the Main Menu and
press [ENTER]. Choose “Set Peripheral Device Entry” and “Event
Trigger Option” by pressing [ENTER]. The auto-shutdown options
display.
Select a configurable time span between the detection of exceeded
temperature and the controller’s commencing an automatic
shutdown. Extended operation under critical conditions like
elevated temperature greatly reduces system efficiency and will
eventually cause component failure.
Enclosure Management
9-3
6.1.1.2 Dynamic Caching Mode Switch
Controller Auto-Shutdown - Event Triggered
Operations
Figure 6- 4: Change Controller Shutdown Period
Select “View and Edit Peripheral Devices” on the Main Menu and
press [ENTER]. Choose “Set Peripheral Device Entry” and “Event
Trigger Option” by pressing [ENTER]. The auto-shutdown option
displays.
Select a configurable time span between the detection of exceeded
temperature and the controller’s commencing an automatic
shutdown. Extended operation under critical conditions like
elevated temperature greatly reduces system efficiency and may
cause component failure.
6.1.3 RAID Controller Self-monitoring
Open your PC Terminal Emulation screen. Enter the Main Menu
and select “View and Edit Peripheral Devices.” Use the arrow keys
to scroll down and select “Controller Peripheral Device
Configuration,” “View Peripheral Device Status,” and then press
[ENTER].
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Figure 6 - 5: View Peripheral Device Status
The controller operation status displays. The enclosure fan status is
shown in the 6.3.1 Enclosure Devices Status: View Peripheral Device
Status.
6.1.2.1 Changing Monitoring Thresholds
Open your PC Terminal Emulation utility. Enter the Main Menu
and select “View and Edit Peripheral Devices.” Use the arrow keys
to scroll down and select “Controller Peripheral Device
Configuration,” “Voltage and Temperature Parameters,” and
confirm by pressing [ENTER].
Note that it is not recommended to change the threshold values
unless you need to coordinate the RAID controller’s values with
that of your RAID enclosure. If a value exceeding the safety range is
entered, an error message will prompt and the new parameter will
be ignored.
For example, if the controller operates in a system enclosure where
the upper limit on ambient temperature is relatively high or low,
adjusting the default thresholds can coordinate the controller status
monitoring with that of the system enclosure.
Enclosure Management
9-5
Figure 6 - 6: Set Trigger Thresholds
Scroll down and select an item to configure.
Figure 6 - 7: Change Threshold for CPU Temperature
Select an item, such as “Trigger Thresholds for CPU Temperature
Events.” Press [ENTER] and a list of selections will appear. You
can change the upper or lower threshold values. Press [ENTER] to
confirm.
Figure 6 - 8: Enter Trigger Threshold Value
A configuration window will prompt. Enter any value within the
safety range. Values exceeding the safety range will be rejected by
controller firmware.
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Figure 6 - 9: Warning Message for Out of Range
Follow the same method to modify other threshold parameters.
6.2
UPS Support
UPS status monitoring is available from firmware release 3.34
onward. This feature enables the RAID subsystem to observe and
respond to the status of the UPS (battery charge or AC power) by
dynamically switching the write policy.
Requirements for UPS Status Monitoring:
1.
Connect the UPS device to the controller/subsystem’s COM2
serial port.
2.
Set the same Baud Rate to the system COM2 and the UPS serial
port. Please refer to Chapter 3, RS-232C Serial Port Settings.
3.
Set the UPS option in the 6.1.1.1 to “Enabled.”
Condition Reports and Reactions:
1.
When mains power is lost or when the UPS charge is low, an
event is issued; the subsystem commences an auto cache-flush
and is forced to adopt the Write-Through mode.
2.
When the serial port connection is lost or when the UPS is
removed, an event is issued to notify the system manager that
the external UPS is absent.
3.
When the UPS battery charge or mains power is restored to a
safe functioning level, the subsystem automatically restores the
original write policy.
6.3 SAF-TE and SES Enclosure Monitoring
(Periodic SAF-TE and SES Device Check Time)
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9-7
Figure 6 - 10: Set SAF-TE and SES Check Time
If there are remote components in your RAID enclosure being
controlled via SAF-TE/S.E.S. devices, use this function to select how
often the controller will check the status of these devices. Choose
“Periodic SAF-TE and SES Device Check Time”; then press
[ENTER]. Move the cursor to the desired interval, then press
[ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that follows to confirm the
setting.
Unless there is an I2C link between enclosures, there must be a valid
check time when multiple enclosures are cascaded together; e.g., an
EonStor A16F-R RAID subsystem connected to expansion JBOD
enclosures using Fibre links. Infortrend’s Fibre-to-SATA JBODs
simulate a Fibre Channel device ID and appears as a device on the
FC links.
6.3.1 Enclosure Devices Status: View Peripheral Device
Status
Select “View and edit Peripheral Devices” on the Main Menu and
press [ENTER]. Choose “View Peripheral Device Status,” then
press [ENTER] again. The device list displays.
Below is a list of peripheral devices (enclosure modules) supported
by enclosure monitoring. Monitoring of device status depends on
enclosure implementation and is accessed through different
interfaces, e.g., SAF-TE, S.E.S., or I2C serial bus.
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1.
Device type
2.
Enclosure descriptor
3.
Power supply
4.
Cooling element
5.
Temperature Sensors
6.
Audible alarm
7.
Enclosure services controller electronics
Below is a screen display showing enclosure devices through an I2C
serial bus:
Figure 6 - 11: I2C Device Information
Select the device interface and then press [ENTER] on a connected
module to examine its operating status as shown below.
Figure 6 - 12: Display I²C Device Information
Enclosure Management
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This page is intentionally
left blank
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Infortrend
6.1
ENCLOSURE MONITORING ...................................................................................... 1
6.1.1
ENCLOSURE DEVICES ..................................................................................................... 1
The Operations ...................................................................................................................... 2
The Trigger ............................................................................................................................ 2
6.1.2 AUTO SHUTDOWN: ELEVATED TEMPERATURE ...................................................................... 3
6.1.1.2 Dynamic Caching Mode Switch................................................................................ 4
Controller Auto-Shutdown - Event Triggered Operations .................................................... 4
6.1.2
RAID CONTROLLER SELF-MONITORING......................................................................... 4
6.1.2.1 Changing Monitoring Thresholds ............................................................................ 5
6.2
UPS SUPPORT ................................................................................................................ 7
6.3 SAF-TE AND SES ENCLOSURE MONITORING ......................... 7
(Periodic SAF-TE and SES Device Check Time)................................................................... 7
6.3.2 ENCLOSURE DEVICES STATUS: VIEW PERIPHERAL DEVICE STATUS .................................... 8
Enclosure Management
9-11
Chapter
7
Data Integrity
This chapter discusses various firmware mechanisms that help to
secure the integrity of array data.
No system is completely safe from the threat of hardware faults.
For example, although the chance of occurrence is considerably low,
the occurrences of bad blocks on two (RAID 5) or three (RAID 6)
hard drives can fail a whole data set. When properly configured,
the functions below help to minimize the chance of data loss:
1.
Event Triggered Operations (refer to Chapter. 9)
2.
Failed Drive Detection
3.
Scheduled Maintenance
4.
Regenerate Logical Drive Parity
5.
Rebuild Priority
6.
Verification on Writes
NOTE:
Some of the configuration options may not be available to all subrevisions of firmware.
NOTE:
All figures in this chapter are showing examples using the management
hyper terminal screen.
Data Integrity
7-1
7.1
Failed Drive Detection
7.1.1
Periodic Drive Check Time
The “Periodic Drive Check Time” is the time interval for the
controller to check all disk drives that were on the drive bus at
controller startup (a list of all the drives that were detected can be
seen under “View and Edit Drives”).
The default value is “1 second.” If set to “Disabled,” it means that if
a drive is removed from the bus, the subsystem will not be able to
know – so long as no host accesses that drive. Changing the check
time to any other value allows the controller to check – at the
selected time interval – all of the drives that are listed under “View
and Edit Drives.” If any drive is then removed, the controller will
be able to know – even if no host accesses that drive.
Figure 7 - 1: Set for Periodic Drive Check Time
Choose “Periodic Drive Check Time,” then press [ENTER]. Move
the cursor to the desired interval, then press [ENTER]. Choose Yes
in the dialog box that follows to confirm the setting.
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7.1. 2 Periodic Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check Time
The “Drive-Swap Check Time” is the interval at which the
controller checks to see if a failed drive has been swapped.
When a logical drive’s member drive fails, the controller
will detect the failed drive (at the selected time interval).
Once the failed drive has been swapped with a drive that
has the adequate capacity to rebuild the logical drive, the
rebuild will begin automatically
Figure 7 - 2: Set for Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check
Time
Choose “Periodic Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check Time”;
then press [ENTER]. Move the cursor to the desired interval; then
press [ENTER]. Choose Yes in the dialog box that follows to
confirm the setting.
Data Integrity
7-3
IMPORTANT!
•
The "Periodic Drive Check Time” is enabled by choosing a time
value. The RAID controller will poll all connected drives
through the controller’s drive channels at the assigned interval.
Drive removal will be detected even if a host does not attempt to
access data on that specific drive.
•
If the "Periodic Drive Check Time" is set to "Disabled" (the
default setting is "Disabled"), the controller will not be able to
detect any drive removal that occurs after the controller
initialization process. The controller will only be able to detect
drive removal when host access is directed to the drive side.
7.1.3 Auto-Assign Global Spare Drive
Figure 10 - 3: Enable Auto-Assign Global Spare Drive
The “Auto-Assign” function automatically assigns any “new”
drives that are not included in logical configurations as Global
Spares.
The Fault Scenario:
Spare drives accelerate rebuild of a logical drive. In the example as
described below, multiple faults can occur at the same time making
the array exposed to the risk of data loss:
There is only one Global Spare in a RAID subsystem.
That Global Spare has been used to rebuild a logical drive.
The failed drive is swapped out and replaced by a new one.
Chances are system administrators forgot to configure the
replacement drive as a spare.
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Infortrend
A member of another logical drive fails.
The subsystem has no spare left. Performance decreases for a
considerable portion of system resources has to be conducted
to generate data from the remaining members of the logical
drive. If yet another member fails in the logical drive, data is
lost.
The chance of failing two drives increases when a failed drive in the
array cannot be replaced immediately for the lack of spare drives.
The Function:
If a drive has a capacity smaller or apparently larger than the
members of configured arrays, the controller may avoid using it as a
global spare.
Enable the function and reset the controller for the configuration to
take effect.
7.2.
Scheduled Maintenance
7.2.1 Task Scheduler
The Task Scheduler functionality allows Media Scans to be
scheduled beginning at a specified start time and repeating at
regular intervals defined by a configurable interval period. Each
such schedule can be defined to operate on individual drives, all
drives of a certain class, all member drives of a specified logical
drive, or all member drives of all logical drives. UIs supported are
RS232C terminal menus and RAIDWatch GUI manager.
Figure 7 - 4: Media Scan Function
Data Integrity
7-5
The scheduler is accessed through the “View and Edit Logical
Drives” menu by selecting a configured array to display the list of
array-related functions. Select “Media Scan” by pressing [ENTER].
Figure 7 - 5: Task Scheduler Function
Select “Task Scheduler” by pressing [ENTER].
Creating a New Schedule
Figure 7 - 6: Enable Task Scheduler
If there is no preset schedule, a confirm box as shown above will
prompt.
Adding or Deleting a Schedule
Figure 7 - 7: Adding or Deleting Task Scheduler
Press [ENTER] on an existing schedule to display the configuration
options. You may choose to check information of a task schedule, to
create a new schedule, or to remove a configured schedule.
7.2.2 Task Scheduler Options
To configure a task schedule, you have the option to do any of the
following:
Set the following values/intervals:
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Infortrend
Execute on Controller Initialization
Figure 7 - 8: Set for Task Scheduler Function
This option determines whether Media Scan is automatically
conducted whenever the RAID system is reset or powered on.
Start Time and Date
Figure 7 - 9: Set for Date on Task Scheduler Function
Enter time and date in its numeric representatives in the following
order: month, day, hour, minute, and the year.
Execution Period
Figure 7 - 10: Set for Time on Task Scheduler Function
The scheduler memorizes the date and the time the actions are to be
executed. Select one of the following:
Data Integrity
7-7
•
If the action is intended to be executed for one time only,
select “Execution Once.”
•
In the case of a periodic action, the action is executed at the
specified “start time,” and then re-enacted at the time
interval indicated in the execution period so as to be
executed again later. The selectable interval ranges from
one second to several weeks.
Media Scan Mode
Figure 7 - 11: Set for Media Scan Mode
If the maintenance schedule includes more than one logical drive,
the scan can be performed simultaneously or separately on one disk
at a time in a sequential order.
Media Scan Priority
Figure 7 - 12: Set for Media Scan Priority
The scan priority determines how much of the system’s resources
will be consumed to perform the scheduled task. Select “Low” for
better array performance and longer time to complete the media
scan. Higher priority allows higher scan performance at the cost of
reduced array performance.
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Infortrend
Select Logical Drives
Figure 7 - 13: Set for Logical Drive
Press [ENTER] on “Select Logical Drives” to bring out a sub-menu.
From there you may include all configured arrays or press [ENTER]
on “To Select Logical Drives” to select one or more specific logical
drive(s).
Logical drives can be tagged for inclusion by positioning the cursor
bar on the logical drive and then pressing [ENTER]. An asterisk (∗)
mark will appear on the selected physical drive(s). To deselect the
drive, press [ENTER] again on the selected drive. The “∗” mark
will disappear. Use the same method to select more logical drives if
required.
When selection is done, press [ESC] to continue.
7.2.3 Confirming the Creation of a Task Schedule
Figure 7 - 14: Enable Task Scheduler Function
When finished with setting the scheduler options, press [ESC] to
display a confirm box.
Verify all information in the box before choosing “Yes” to confirm
and to complete the configuration process.
Data Integrity
7-9
7.3
Regenerating Logical Drive Parity
Figure 7 - 15: Regenerate Logical Drive Parity
Parity regeneration is a function manually performed onto RAID1/3/5/6 arrays to determine whether inconsistency has occurred
with data parity.
You may perform the parity check directly without changing the
two options below, or set preferred options and then press [ENTER]
on “Execute Regenerate Logical Drive Parity” to begin the operation.
7.3. 1 Overwrite Inconsistent Parity
Default is “enabled.”
If an array’s data parity is seriously damaged, restoring parity data
by regenerating and overwriting the original data may cause data
loss. Disable this option if you suspect parity data has been
seriously corrupted.
7.3. 2 Generate Check Parity Error Event
Default is “enabled.”
When enabled, parity inconsistency will be reported as system
events.
IMPORTANT!
If a regenerating process is stopped by a drive failure, the process
cannot be restarted until the logical drive is successfully rebuilt by
having its failed member replaced.
7.4
7-10
Disk Array Parameters
Infortrend
Figure 7 - 16: Set for Disk Array Parameters
Select “View and Edit Configuration Parameters” on the Main
Menu and press [ENTER]. Choose “Disk Array Parameters,” then
press [ENTER] again. The Disk Array Parameters menu will appear.
7.4. 1 Rebuild Priority
Figure 7 - 17: Change Rebuild Priority
Choose “Rebuild Priority,” then press [ENTER]. A list of the
priority selections (Low, Normal, Improved, or High) displays.
Move the cursor bar to a selection, then press [ENTER].
7.4. 2 Verification on Writes
Errors may occur when a hard drive writes data. To avoid the write
error, the controller can force hard drives to verify written data.
There are three selectable methods:
Data Integrity
7-11
Verification on LD Initialization Writes
Performs Verify-after-Write when initializing a logical drive
Verification on LD Rebuild Writes
Performs Verify-after-Write during the rebuild process
Verification on LD Normal Drive Writes
Performs Verify-after-Write during normal I/Os
Each method can be enabled or disabled individually. Hard drives
will perform Verify-after-Write according to the selected method.
Figure 7 - 18: Configure Verification on Write
Move the cursor bar to the desired item, then press [ENTER].
Figure 7 - 19: Enable Verification on LD Initialization
Writes
Choose Yes in the confirm box to enable or disable the function.
Follow the same procedure to enable or disable each method.
IMPORTANT!
The “verification on Normal Drive Writes” method will affect the
“write” performance of your RAID system.
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Infortrend
7.1
FAILED DRIVE DETECTION .................................................................................... 2
7.1.1
Periodic Drive Check Time................................................................................... 2
7.1. 2 Periodic Auto-Detect Failure Drive Swap Check Time............................................ 3
The “Drive-Swap Check Time” is the interval at which the controller checks to see if a
failed drive has been swapped. When a logical drive’s member drive fails, the controller will
detect the failed drive (at the selected time interval). Once the failed drive has been
swapped with a drive that has the adequate capacity to rebuild the logical drive, the rebuild
will begin automatically ........................................................................................................ 3
7.1.3 Auto-Assign Global Spare Drive .................................................................................. 4
7.2.
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE .................................................................................... 5
7.2.1 Task Scheduler............................................................................................................. 5
Creating a New Schedule....................................................................................................... 6
Adding or Deleting a Schedule .............................................................................................. 6
10.2. 2 Task Scheduler Options ............................................................................................. 6
Execute on Controller Initialization ...................................................................................... 7
Start Time and Date............................................................................................................... 7
Execution Period ................................................................................................................... 7
Media Scan Mode .................................................................................................................. 8
Media Scan Priority............................................................................................................... 8
Select Logical Drives............................................................................................................. 9
7.2.3 Confirming the Creation of a Task Schedule ............................................................. 9
7.3
REGENERATING LOGICAL DRIVE PARITY ................................................................ 10
7.3. 1 Overwrite Inconsistent Parity ................................................................................... 10
7.3. 2 Generate Check Parity Error Event ......................................................................... 10
7.4
DISK ARRAY PARAMETERS ........................................................................................ 10
7.4. 1 Rebuild Priority......................................................................................................... 11
7.4. 2 Verification on Writes............................................................................................... 11
Data Integrity
7-13
Chapter
8
Array Expansion
The array expansion functions allow you to expand storage capacity
without the cost of buying new equipment. Expansion can be
completed on-line while the system is serving host I/Os.
8.1
Overview
What is RAID Expansion and how does it work?
Before the invention of RAID Expansion, increasing the capacity of
a RAID system meant backing up all data in the disk array, recreating the disk array configuration with new drives, and then
restoring data back into system.
Infortrend’s RAID Expansion technology allows users to expand a
logical drive by adding new drives, or replacing drive members
with drives of larger capacity. Replacing is done by copying data
from the original members onto larger drives; the smaller drives can
then be replaced without powering down the system.
8.2
Notes on Expansion
1. Added Capacity:
When a new drive is added to an existing logical drive, the
capacity brought by the new drive appears as a new partition.
For example, if you have 4 physical drives (36GB each) in a
logical drive, and each drive’s maximum capacity is used, the
capacity of the logical drive will be 108GB. (One drive’s capacity
is used for parity, e.g., RAID 3). When a new 36GB drive is
Array Expansion
8-1
added, the capacity will be increased to 144GB in two separate
partitions (one is 108GB and the other 36GB).
2. Size of the New Drive:
A drive used for adding capacity should have the same or more
capacity as other drives in the array.
3. Applicable Arrays:
Expansion can only be performed on RAID 0, 1, 3, 5, and 6
logical drives. Expansion cannot be performed on logical
configurations that do not have parity, e.g., NRAID or RAID 1.
NOTE:
Expansion on RAID0 is not recommended, because the RAID0 array
has no redundancy. Interruptions during the expansion process may
cause unrecoverable data loss.
4. Interruption to the Process:
Expansion should not be canceled or interrupted once begun. A
manual restart should be conducted after the occurrence of a
power failure or interruption of any kind.
Expand Logical Drive: Re-striping
Figure 8 - 1:
8-2
Logical Drive Expansion
Infortrend
RAID levels supported: RAID 0, 1, 3, 5 and 6
Expansion can be performed on logical drives or logical volumes
under the following conditions:
1.
There is unused capacity in a logical unit
2.
Capacity is increased by using member drives of larger capacity
(see Copy and Replace in the discussion below)
Data is recalculated and distributed to drive members or members
of a logical volume. Upon the completion of the process, the added
or the previously unused capacity will become a new partition. The
new partition must be made available through host LUN mapping
in order for a host adapter to recognize its presence.
8.3
Mode 1 Expansion:
Adding Drives to a Logical Drive
Use drives with the same capacity as the original drive members.
Once completed, the added capacity will appear as another
partition (new partition). Data is automatically re-striped across the
new and old members during the add-drive process. See the
diagram below to get a clear idea:
Figure 8- 2: Expansion by Adding Drive
Array Expansion
8-3
RAID levels supported: RAID 0, 1, 3, 5, and 6.
The new partition must be made available through a host ID/LUN.
Add Drive Procedure
First select from the Main Menu, “View and Edit Logical Drive,”
and select a logical drive to add a new drive to. The drive selected
for adding should have a capacity no less than the original member
drives. If possible, use drives of the same capacity because all
drives in the array are treated as though they have the capacity of
the smallest member in the array.
NOTE:
The following figures in this chapter are showing examples using the
management hyper terminal screen.
Figure 8 – 3: Add Drive on Logical Drive
Press [ENTER] to select a logical drive and choose “Add Drives”
from the submenu. Proceed with confirming the selection.
Figure 8 – 4: Choose Add Drives Function
8-4
Infortrend
Available drives will be listed. Select one or more drive(s) to add to
the target logical drive by pressing [ENTER]. The selected drive will
be indicated by an asterisk “*” mark.
Figure 8 – 5: Select Drives
Press [ESC] to proceed and the notification will prompt.
Figure 8 – 6: Notice Starting Add Drive Operation
Press [ESC] again to cancel the notification prompt; a status bar will
indicate the percentage of progress.
Figure 8 – 7: View the Percentage of Progress
Upon completion, there will appear a confirming notification. The
capacity of the added drive will appear as an unused partition.
Array Expansion
8-5
Figure 8 – 8: Completion of Add Drive Function
The added capacity will be automatically included, meaning that
you do not have to "expand logical drive" later. Map the added
capacity to another host ID/LUN to make use of it.
As diagrammed above, in "View and Edit Host LUN," the original
capacity is 9999MB, its host LUN mapping remains unchanged, and
the added capacity appears as the second partition.
IMPORTANT!
•
Expansion by adding drives can not be canceled once started. If
power failure occurs, the expansion will be paused and the
controller will NOT restart the expansion when power comes
back on. Resumption of the RAID expansion must be performed
manually.
•
If a member drive of the logical drive fails during RAID
expansion, the expansion will be paused. The expansion will
resume after the logical drive rebuild is completed.
8.4 Mode 2 Expansion:
Copy and Replace Drives with Drives of
Larger Capacity
You may also expand your logical drives by copying and replacing
all member drives with drives of higher capacity. Please refer to the
diagram below for a better understanding. The existing data in the
array is copied onto the new drives, and then the original members
can be removed.
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Infortrend
When all the member drives have been replaced, execute the
“Expand Logical Drives” function to make use of the added
capacity.
RAID levels supported: RAID 0, 1, 3, 5 and 6
Figure 8 – 9: Expansion by Copy & Replace
Copy and Replace Procedure
Select from Main Menu “View and Edit Logical Drives.” Select a
target array, press [ENTER] and scroll down to choose “Copy and
Replace Drive.” Press [ENTER] to proceed.
Figure 8 – 10: Choose Copy & Replace
Array Expansion
8-7
The array members will be listed. Select the member drive (the
source drive) you want to replace with a larger one.
Figure 8 – 11: Select Source Drive
Select one of the members as the "source drive" (status indicated as
ON-LINE) by pressing [ENTER]; a table of available drives will
prompt. Select a "new drive" to copy the capacity of the source
drive onto. The channel number and ID number of both the
“Source Drive” and the “Destination Drive” will be indicated in the
confirming box.
Figure 8 – 12: Confirm Copy and Replace Drive
Choose Yes to confirm and proceed.
Figure 8 – 13: Notice Starting Clone
Press [ESC] to view the progress.
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Infortrend
Figure 8 – 14: View Copy and Replace Progress
Completion of the Copy and Replace process will be indicated by a
notification message. Follow the same method to copy and replace
every member drive. You may now perform “Expand Logical
Drive” to make use of the added capacity, and then map the
additional capacity to a host LUN.
Figure 8 – 15: Completed Copy and Replace
8.5
Making Use of the Added Capacity:
Expand Logical Drive
In the following example, the logical drive is originally composed of
three member drives and each member drive has the capacity of
1GB. “Copy and Replace” has been performed on the logical drive
and each of its member drives has been replaced by a new drive
with the capacity of 2GB. The next step is to perform “Expand
Logical Drive” to utilize the additional capacity brought by the new
drives.
Array Expansion
1.
Select “View and Edit Logical Drives” from the Main Menu and
select the logical drive with its members copied and replaced.
2.
Select “Expand Logical Drive” in the sub-menu and press
[ENTER] to proceed. A confirming box will appear.
3.
Proceed by pressing [ENTER] or entering any value no larger
than the "maximum drive expand capacity" and press [ENTER].
8-9
Figure 8 – 16: Expand Logical Drive
Choose Yes to confirm and proceed.
Figure 8 – 17: Choose Expand Logical Drive
Upon completion, you will be prompted by the notification message.
Figure 8 – 18: Completed Expand Logical Drive
Press [ESC] to return to the previous menu screen.
The total capacity of logical drive has been expanded to 6GB.
Figure 8 – 19: View Logical Drive Information
8-10
Infortrend
8.6
Expand Logical Volume
To expand a logical volume, expand its logical drive member(s) and
then perform “expand logical volume.”
Figure 8 – 20: Expand Logical Volume
When prompted by "Expand Logical Volume?", choose Yes to
confirm and the process will be completed immediately.
8.7
Configuration Example: Volume
Extension in Windows 2000®
Limitations When Using Windows 2000
Array Expansion
1.
This limitations apply only to the Windows NT Server or
Windows 2000 Server Disk Management which includes the
Extend Volume Set function; Windows NT Workstation does
not support this feature. The Volume Set Expansion formats
the new area without affecting existing files on the original
volume.
2.
The system drive (boot drive) of a Windows NT/2000 system
cannot be expanded.
3.
The drive to be expanded should be using the NTFS file system.
8-11
Example
The following example demonstrates the expansion of a 16988MB
RAID 5 logical drive. The HyperTerminal emulation software that
comes with Windows Server is used to connect to the RAID
controller via RS-232C.
Figure 8 – 21: View Logical Drive
You can view information about this drive in the Windows 2000
Server’s Computer Management -> Storage -> Disk Management.
Figure 8 – 22: View Disk Management on Windows
Place the cursor on Disk 1, right-click your mouse, and select
“Properties.” You will see that the total capacity for the Drive E: is
about 16.5GB.
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Infortrend
Figure 8 – 23: View Disk Information
Follow the steps described in the previous section to "add" or "copy
& replace" disk drives and perform “Logical Drive Expansion.”
Figure 8 – 24: View Logical Drive Expansion of progress
The 16.5GB logical drive has become a 25GB logical drive. Place the
cursor on that logical drive, and then press [ENTER].
Array Expansion
8-13
Figure 8 – 25: Choose Logical Drive
From the menu, select "Partition Logical Drive." You will see that
the 25GB logical drive is composed of a 17GB partition and an
8.4GB partition.
Figure 8 – 26: View Partition of Logical Drive
Follow the directions in Chapter 5 and Chapter 7 to map the new
partition to a host LUN. The new partition must be "mapped" to a
host LUN in order for the HBA (host-bus adapter) to see it. Once
you have mapped the partition, reboot your Windows server. The
HBA should be able to detect an additional disk during the
initialization process.
Return to Windows 2000 Server’s Disk Management. There now
exists a Disk 2 with 8.3GB of free space. You may use the “rescan
disks” command to bring up the new drive.
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Infortrend
Figure 8 – 27: View Disk information on Windows
Select an existing volume (Disk1) and then right-click on the disk
column. Select “Extend Volume” to proceed.
Figure 8 – 28: Extend the Disk Volume on Windows
Array Expansion
8-15
The Extend Volume Wizard will guide you through the rest of the
process.
Figure 8 – 29: Configure Disk Volume
The screen will display that the volume set of Drive E: has been
extended into a spanned volume by the 8.3GB in Disk2.
Figure 8 – 30: View Disk Management on Windows
Logical Drive E: is now composed of two partitions with a total
volume of 2500MB. To see this, hold down on the <Ctrl> key and
select both Disk 1 and Disk2; then right-click your mouse and select
“Properties.”
Drive E: now has a capacity of about 25GB.
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Figure 8 – 31: View Disk Information
Array Expansion
8-17
This page is intentionally
left blank
8-18
Infortrend
Overview ........................................................................................................................... 1
8.1
8.2
Notes on Expansion ........................................................................................................... 1
8.3
Mode 1 Expansion:............................................................................................................ 3
Adding Drives to a Logical Drive ................................................................................................. 3
Add Drive Procedure ................................................................................................................. 4
8.4
Mode 2 Expansion:............................................................................................................ 6
Copy and Replace Drives with Drives of Larger Capacity ........................................................... 6
Copy and Replace Procedure..................................................................................................... 7
8.5
Making Use of the Added Capacity: Expand Logical Drive ............................................. 9
8.5
Expand Logical Volume .................................................................................................. 11
8.6
Configuration Example: Volume Extension in Windows 2000® .................................... 11
Array Expansion
8-19
Chapter
9
S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9.1 Overview
S.M.A.R.T.
With the maturity of technologies like S.M.A.R.T., drive failures can
be predicted to certain degree. Before S.M.A.R.T., receiving
notifications of drive bad block reassignments may be the most
common omen that a drive is about to fail. In addition to the
S.M.A.R.T.-related functions as will be discussed later, a system
administrator can also choose to manually perform “Clone Failing
Drive” on a drive which is about to fail.
This function provides system administrators a choice on when and
how to preserve data from a failing drive. Although not necessary
under normal conditions, you may also replace any drive at-will
even when the source drive is healthy.
The “Clone Failing Drive” can be performed under the following
conditions:
1. Replacing a failing drive either detected by S.M.A.R.T. or
notified by the controller.
2. Manually replacing and cloning any drive with a new drive.
9.1 Clone Failing Drive
Unlike the similar functions combined with S.M.A.R.T., the “Clone
Failing Drive” is a manual function. There are two options for
cloning a failing drive: “Replace after Clone” and “Perpetual
Clone.”
S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9-1
9.1.2 Replace after Clone
Data on the source drive, the drive with predicted errors (or any
selected member drive), will be cloned to a standby spare and
replaced later by the spare. The status of the replaced drive, the
original member drive with predicted errors, will be redefined as a
“used drive.” System administrators may replace the “used drive”
with a new one, and then configure the new drive as a spare drive.
Locate the logical drive to which the drive with predictable errors
belongs. Select the “Clone Failing Drive” function.
Select “Replace After Clone.” The controller will automatically start
the cloning process using the existing “stand-by” (dedicated/global
spare drive) to clone the source drive (the target member drive with
predicted errors). If there is no standby drive (local/global spare
drive), you need to add a new drive and configure it as a standby
drive.
Figure 9 – 1: Select Clone and Replace Drive
Figure 9 – 2: Starting Clone and Replace Drive
The cloning process will begin with a notification message. Press
[ESC] to proceed.
Figure 9 – 3: Cloning Status
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Infortrend
The cloning process will be indicated by a status bar.
You may quit the status bar by pressing [ESC] to return to the table
of the connected drives. Select the drive indicated as “CLONING”
by pressing [ENTER].
Figure 9– 4: Cloning Status
Select “Clone Failing Drive” again to view the current status. You
may identify the source drive and choose to “View Clone Progress,”
or “Abort Clone” if you happen to have selected the wrong drive.
When the process is completed, you will be notified by the
following message.
Figure 9 – 5: Cloning Drive Completed
9.1.3 Perpetual Clone:
The standby spare will clone the source drive, the member drive
with predicted errors or any selected drive, without substituting it.
The status of the spare drive will be displayed as “clone drive” after
the cloning process. The source drive will remain a member of the
logical drive. If the source drive fails, the clone drive can readily
take its place in the array.
In “View and Edit Drives,” locate the member drive that shows
predicted errors.
Select “Clone Failing Drive,” and choose
“Perpetual Clone.”
S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9-3
Figure 9 – 6: Select Perpetual Clone Drive
The controller will automatically start the cloning process using the
existing “stand-by” (local/global spare drive) to clone the source
drive (the target member drive).
The cloning process will begin with a notification message:
Figure 9 – 7: Notice Starting Clone Status
Press [ESC] to view the current progress:
Figure 9 – 8: Cloning Progress Status
You may quit viewing the status bar by pressing [ESC] to return to
the previous menu. Select the drive indicated as “CLONING” by
pressing [ENTER]. Select “Clone Failing Drive” again to view the
progress. You may identify the source drive and choose to “View
Clone Progress” or “Abort Clone” if you happen to have selected
the wrong drive.
9-4
Infortrend
Figure 9 – 9: Identify The Source Drive
The cloning progress will be completed by a notification message as
displayed below:
Figure 9 – 10: Notice Clone Completed
You may press [ESC] to clear the notification message to see the
drives’ status after the cloning process. The source drive (Channel 1
ID 5) remains as a member of logical drive “0,” and the “stand-by”
drive (Channel 1 ID 2, the dedicated/global spare drive) has
become a “CLONE” drive.
Figure 9 – 11: View the Drive Status
9.1.4 S.M.A.R.T.
(Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology )
This section provides a brief introduction to S.M.A.R.T. as one way
to predict drive failure and Infortrend’s implementations with
S.M.A.R.T. for preventing data loss caused by drive failure.
A. Introduction
Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology (S.M.A.R.T.) is
an emerging technology that provides near-term failure prediction
S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9-5
for disk drives. When S.M.A.R.T. is enabled, the drive monitors
predetermined disk drive attributes that are susceptible to
degradation over time.
If a failure is likely to occur, S.M.A.R.T. makes a status report
available so that the host can prompt the user to backup data from
the failing drive. However, not all failures can be predicted.
S.M.A.R.T. predictions are limited to the attributes the drive can
monitor which are selected by the device manufacturer based on the
attribute’s ability to contribute to predict degrading or fault
conditions.
Although attributes are drive specific, a variety of typical
characteristics can be identified:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Head flying height
Data throughput performance
Spin-up time
Re-allocated sector count
Seek error rate
Seek time performance
Spin try recount
Drive calibration retry count
Drives with reliability prediction capability only indicate whether
the drive is “good” or “failing.” In a SCSI environment, the failure
decision occurs on the disk drive and the host notifies the user for
action. The SCSI specification provides a sense bit to be flagged if
the disk drive determines that a reliability issue exists. The system
then alerts the user/system administrator.
B. Infortrend's Implementations with S.M.A.R.T.
Infortrend uses the ANSI-SCSI Informational Exception Control
(IEC) document X3T10/94-190 standard.
There are four selections related to the S.M.A.R.T. functions in
firmware:
Disabled
Disables S.M.A.R.T.-related functions
Detect Only:
When the S.M.A.R.T. function is enabled, the controller will send a
command to enable all drives' S.M.A.R.T. function, if a drive
predicts a problem, the controller will report the problem in an
event log.
9-6
Infortrend
Detect and Perpetual Clone
When the S.M.A.R.T. function is enabled, the controller will send a
command to enable all drives' S.M.A.R.T. function. If a drive
predicts a problem, the controller will report the problem in an
event log. The controller will clone the drive if a Dedicated/Global
spare is available. The drive with predicted errors will not be taken
off-line, and the clone drive will still act as a standby drive.
If the drive with predicted errors fails, the clone drive will take over
immediately. If the problematic drive is still working and another
drive in the same logical drive fails, the clone drive will resume the
role of a standby spare and start to rebuild the failed drive
immediately. This prevents a fatal drive error if yet another drive
should fail.
Detect and Clone + Replace
The controller will enable all drives' S.M.A.R.T. function. If a drive
predicts a problem, the controller will report the problem in the
form of an event log. The controller will then clone the problematic
drive to a standby spare and take the problematic drive offline as
soon as the cloning process is completed.
NOTE:
•
If you are using drives of different brands in your RAID system, as long as
they are ANSI-SCSI Informational Exception Control (IEC) document
X3T10/94-190-compatible, there should not be any problems working with
the controller/subsystem.
9.2 Configuration Procedure
Enabling the S.M.A.R.T. Feature
Follow the procedure below to enable S.M.A.R.T. on all drives.
Step 1. First, enable the “Periodic Drive Check Time” function.
In \View and Edit Configuration Parameters\Driveside Parameters\Periodic Drive Check Time, choose a
time interval.
S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9-7
Figure 9 – 12: Select Drive Check Time
Step 2. In \View and Edit Configuration Parameters\Driveside Parameters\Drive Predictable Failure Mode
<SMART>, choose one from “Detect Only,” “Detect,
Perpetual Clone” and “Detect, Clone+Replace.”
Figure 9 – 13: Select Drive Failure Mode
9-8
Infortrend
Examining Whether Your Drives Support S.M.A.R.T.
To see if your drive supports S.M.A.R.T., follow the steps below:
Step 1. Enable “S.M.A.R.T.” for your drives in the RAID
system.
Step 2. In “View and Edit Drives,” choose one drive to test to.
Press [ENTER] on the drive; a sub-menu will appear.
Step 3. Note that a new item “Predictable Failure Test”
appears in the sub-menu. If the S.M.A.R.T.” feature is
not properly enabled, this item will not appear in the
sub-menu.
Figure 9 – 14: Predictable Failure Test
Step 4. Choose “Predictable Failure Test.,” The controller will
force the drive to simulate predictable drive errors.
Figure 9 – 15: Choose Predictable Failure Testing
Step 5. Press [ENTER], and after a while (the next time the
controller performs “Periodic Drive Check”), the
controller will detect the errors simulated by the drive.
An error message displays like this: “SMART-CH:? ID:?
Predictable Failure Detected (TEST).” If this error
S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9-9
message appears, it means your drive supports
S.M.A.R.T. features.
Step 6. If the error message does not appear, you may simply
refer to related documentation or contact your drive
manufacturer for information about whether the drive
model and drive firmware version support S.M.A.R.T.
Using S.M.A.R.T. Functions
Step 1. Enable “S.M.A.R.T.” on the RAID controller.
Step 2. Make sure your drives do support S.M.A.R.T. so that
your system will work properly.
Step 3. The “Detect Only” Setting
3a. In \View and Edit Configuration Parameters\Drive-side
Parameters\Drive Predictable Failure Mode <SMART>,
choose “Detect Only.”
Figure 9– 16: Choose Detect Only on SMART Function
3b. Whenever a drive detects symptoms of predictable drive
failure, the controller will issue an error message.
Step 4. The “Detect, Perpetual Clone” Setting
9-10
Infortrend
4a. In \View and Edit Configuration Parameters\Drive-side
Parameters\Drive Predictable Failure Mode <SMART>,
choose “Detect, Perpetual Clone.”
4b. You should have at least one spare drive for the logical
drive (either Local Spare or Global Spare Drive).
4c. When a drive (logical drive member) detects predictable
drive errors, the controller will “clone” the drive with a
spare drive. You may enter the "View and Edit Drives"
menu and click on the spare drive (either Local or Global
one). Choose from the menu items if you want to know
the status of the source drive, the cloning progress, or to
abort cloning.
Figure 9 – 17: Choose Source Drive Status
NOTE:
As a precaution against the untimely failure of yet another drive, when
configured as “perpetual clone,” the spare drive will only stay mirrored to the
source drive (the drive with signs of failure), but not replace it until the
source drive actually fails.
4d. While the spare drive is mirroring the source drive, any
occurrence of drive failure (when there are no other spare
drives) will force the spare drive to give up the mirrored
data and resume its original role – it will become a spare
drive again and start rebuilding the failed drive.
Step 5. The “Detect, Clone + Replace” Function
5a. In \View and Edit Configuration Parameters\Drive-side
Parameters\Drive Predictable Failure Mode <SMART>,
choose “Detect, Clone+Replace.”
5b. Make sure you have at least one spare drive to the logical
drive. (Either Local Spare Drive or Global Spare Drive)
S.M.A.R.T. Configuration
9-11
5c. When a drive (a logical drive member) detects the
predictable drive failure, the controller will “clone” the
drive with a spare drive. After the “clone” process is
completed, it will replace the source drive immediately.
The source drive will be identified as a “used drive.”
If you want to see the progress of cloning, press [ESC] to
clear the notification message and see the status bar.
The source drive’s status will be defined as a “used drive”
and will be immediately replaced and pulled offline. This
drive should be replaced with a new one as soon as
possible.
OVERVIEW ................................................................................................................. 0-1
9.1
S.M.A.R.T.............................................................................................................................. 0-1
9.1
CLONE FAILING DRIVE................................................................................................ 0-1
9.1.2 REPLACE AFTER CLONE ................................................................................................. 0-2
9.1.3 PERPETUAL CLONE: ....................................................................................................... 0-3
9.1.4 S.M.A.R.T..................................................................................................................... 0-5
(SELF-MONITORING, ANALYSIS AND REPORTING TECHNOLOGY ).......................................... 0-5
9.2
CONFIGURATION PROCEDURE........................................................................... 0-7
Enabling the S.M.A.R.T. Feature......................................................................................... 0-7
Examining Whether Your Drives Support S.M.A.R.T. ....................................................... 0-9
Using S.M.A.R.T. Functions.............................................................................................. 0-10
9-12
Infortrend
Chapter
10
Implementations for AV
Applications
This chapter introduces some new firmware functions for AV applications.
More options will be available for AV applications with future firmware
releases.
NOTE:
All figures in this chapter are showing examples using the management
hyper terminal screen.
10.1 Maximum Drive Response Time
In situations such as drive failure or the occurrence of media error, a read
or write action returned after several hundreds milliseconds would prove
too long and cause choppy audio or dropped video frames.
The maximum response time option, as displayed below, provides a
timeout value for processing read/write requests. If timeout is reported on a
specific member of an array, the subsystem immediately retrieves data
from the parity data and other members of the array. In this way, causes of
delay can be eliminated.
Implementations for AV Applications
13-1
Figure 10 - 1: Selecting Maximum Drive Response
Timeout Value
To prepare the array for read-intensive applications, the following are
recommended:
1.
Performance using the write-through caching mode is better than
that using the write-back mode on subsystems equipped with
redundant RAID controllers.
2.
Arrays should not be partitioned.
3.
The priorities for Rebuild or Add-drive operations should be set to
“low.”
4.
Another timeout value, the “Drive I/O Timeout” which
determines whether a drive has eventually failed to respond to I/O
requests, is required as the first-level timeout.
10.2 AV Optimization Mode
The AV optimization is applied for the emerging streaming Audio/Video
applications. This option prepares the array for applications requiring
continuous reading such as video streaming.
13-2
Infortrend
Figure 10 - 2: Selecting An AV Optimization Mode
The applicable number of streaming for fewer/multiple streaming will
depend on the field applications.
NOTE:
No matter what user configures for the Maximum Drive Response
Timeout, once the AV optimization is set, the Maximum Drive Response
Timeout is fixed at its predefined value.
Implementations for AV Applications
13-3
10.1
10.2
13-4
MAXIMUM DRIVE RESPONSE TIME .................................................................................1
AV OPTIMIZATION MODE ...............................................................................................2
Infortrend
Appendix
A
Firmware Functionality
Specifications
A.1 Basic RAID Management:
Specification
RAID levels
Maximum number of
logical drives
Maximum logical drive
capacity
RAID level
dependency to each
logical drive
Maximum number of
logical drive members
Configurable stripe
size
Feature
0, 1(0+1), 3, 5, 6, 10, 30, 50, 60, JBOD and
NRAID.
Levels 10, 30, 50, and 60 are the multi-level
RAID with the logical volume implementations;
logical volumes consist of logical drives of
different RAID levels that are striped together.
16 as default, up to 32 with a 1GB or above
memory size
64TB – when optimization mode is set to
Sequential
16TB – when optimization mode is set to
Random
Independent. Logical drives configured in
different RAID levels can co-exist in a logical
volume and within a RAID subsystem
128 - 512MB memory size
112 - 256MB memory size
4KB, 16KB, 32KB, 64KB, 128KB, 256KB, 512KB,
or 1024KB per logical drive
128KB is the default for earlier firmware with
optimization for Sequential I/Os
Configurable Write
Policy
(write policy per array)
Logical drive
identification
32KB is the default for earlier firmware with
optimization for Random I/Os
Write-Back or Write-Through per logical drive.
This policy can be modified later.
Unique, controller randomly generated logical
drive ID;
Logical drive name user-configurable for ease of
identification in a multiple arrays configuration
Firmware Functionality Specifications
A-1
Maximum number of
partitions for each
logical drive
Maximum number of
logical volumes
Maximum number of
LUNs Mappable
Maximum number of
LUNs per host ID
Maximum number of
Media Scan task
schedules
Concurrent I/O
Tag Command
Queuing (TCQ)
Native Command
Queuing (NCQ)
Dedicated spare drive
Global spare drive
Global spare autoassign
Co-existing dedicated
and global spare
drives
Auto-rebuild onto
spare drive
Auto-scan of
replacement drive
upon manually
initiated rebuild
One-step rebuild onto
a replacement drive
Immediate logical
drive availability
Auto-rebuild onto
failed drive
replacement
Concurrent rebuild /
expansion
A-2
16 as default, up to 64 with a 1GB memory size
8 as default, up to 16 with a 1GB or above
memory size
Default is 128, up to 1024 with a 1GB or above
memory size
Up to 32, user configurable
16
Supported
Supported
Supported
Supported, hereby defined as the spare drive
specifically assigned to a logical drive
Supported, the spare drive that serves all logical
drives (as long as it is equal in size or larger than
logical drive members)
Supported, applies to non-configured drive(s);
safeguards the array if a spare has been used in
the previous array rebuild and users forget to
configure a new drive as a spare.
Supported
Supported
Supported
Supported
Supported;
Logical arrays are immediately ready for Host
I/Os. Initialization task is completed in the
background except when the logical array is
stated as “INCOMPLETE” or “BAD;” e.g., has a
failed member right after the creation.
Supported. With no spare drive, the subsystem
will auto-scan the failed drive and starts rebuild
automatically once the failed drive has been
replaced.
Multiple logical drives can proceed with a
Rebuild/Regenerating Parity, and/or
Expansion/Initialization/Add Drive operation at
the same time.
Infortrend
NOTE:
Regenerate Parity and Rebuild cannot take place
on a logical drive at the same time.
Background firmware
download
Auto recovery from
logical drive failure
(configuration on
drives)
Create, Expand, and Add Drive operations
cannot take place on a logical drive at the same
time.
Firmware can be downloaded during active I/Os.
Supported. When user accidentally removed the
wrong drive to cause the 2nd drive failure of a
one-drive-failed RAID5 / RAID3 logical drive, fatal
error may occur. However, you may force the
subsystem to reaccept the logical drive by
switching off the subsystem, installing the drive
back to its original drive slot, and then power on
the subsystem. The logical drive will be restored
to the one-drive-failed status.
NOTE:
To ensure smooth operation, sufficient cache memory buffer is
required for configurations made up of numerous logical units. An
intelligent trigger mechanism is implemented with firmware version
3.47 and later. If a subsystem/controller comes with a DIMM
module of the size equal or larger than 1GB, firmware automatically
enlarges the maximum numbers of logical units.
DIMM size < 1G
DIMM
size >=
1G
Max. no. of LD
16
32
Max. no. of LV
8
16
Max. partitions per LD/LV
16
64
Max. no. of LUN
128
1024
A.2 Advanced Features:
Media Scan
Supported. Verify written data on drives to avoid
bad blocks from causing data inconsistency. If bad
blocks are found, data can be reconstructed by
comparing and recalculating parity from adjacent
drives (RAID1/3/5/6).
The “Reconstruction Writes” are followed by “Write
Verification” operation.
Firmware Functionality Specifications
A-3
Bad Block Handling
in degraded mode
A method for handling low quality drives. The
operation is performed on both the logical drive in
degraded mode or that being rebuilt. If bad blocks
should be encountered during Rebuild, Add Drive,
Host Write, or Regenerate Parity operation, the
controller will first attempt to reconstruct affected
data and those unrecoverable bad blocks are
stated as bad and passed to host.
Users have the option to abandon data on the
unrecoverable sectors to continue rebuild in a
degraded mode.
Transparent reset of
hung HDDs
Auto cache flush on
critical conditions
(caching mode
dynamic switch)
Drive low-level
format
RAID parity update
tracking and
recovery
Host-side Ordered
Tag support
When critical conditions occur, e.g., component
failure, or BBU under charge, cached data will be
flushed and the write policy will be changed to
write-through mode.
Configurable “Trigger Events” for Writethrough/Write-Back Dynamic Switch. The
configuration can also be set with the Oem
“Iappend” utility.
Supported
Yes
Supports write commands with embedded Ordered
Tags
Drive identification
(flash drive function)
Supported. Force a drive to light on its activity
indicator for users to recognize its location
Drive information
listing
Supported. Drive vendor name, model number,
firmware revision, capacity (blocks), serial number,
narrow/wide and current sync. speed
Supported
Supported. The logical drive information is
recorded on drive media. The logical drives can
still be accessed if using different Infortrend RAID
controllers/subsystems, e.g., drives removed and
installed in a different subsystem.
Supported. Save all the settings stored in the
controller NVRAM to the logical drive members
Drive read/write test
Configuration on
disks
Save/ restore
NVRAM to / from
disks
Save / restore
NVRAM to / from a
file
Host-side 64-bit LBA
support
A-4
Low quality drive handling comes with transparent
resetting of hung hard drives.
Supported
Supported. Save all the settings stored in the
controller NVRAM to a file (via GUI manager) on
user’s computer
Supports array configuration (logical drive, logical
volume, or a partition of them) of a capacity up to
64TB.
Infortrend
Host LUN geometry:
user configurable
default geometry
(Solaris OSes)
User configurable
geometry range:
Drive motor spin-up
1. Capacity <64GB: Head=63, Sector=32,
Cylinder=? (depends on capacity)
2. 64GB<capacity<128GB:Head=64, Sector=64,
Cylinder=? (depends on capacity)
3. 128GB<capacity<256GB: Head=127,
Sector=64, Cylinder=? (depends on capacity)
4. 256GB<capacity<512GB: Head=127,
Sector=127, Cylinder=?
5. 512GB<capacity<1TB: Head=255, Sector=64,
Cylinder=? (depends on capacity)
6. 1TB<capacity: Head=225, Sector=225,
Cylinder=? (depends on capacity)
7. For capacity larger than 1TB, please refer to
Chapter 9
Sector: 32, 64, 127, 255 or Variable
Head: 64, 127, 255 or Variable
Cylinder: <1024, <32784,<65536 or Variable
Supported. The controller will send spin-up (start
unit) command to each drive at the 4 sec. intervals.
Drive-side tagged
command queuing
Host-side maximum
queued I/O count
Supported. User adjustable up to 128 for each
drive
User adjustable up to 1024
Maximum
concurrent host LUN
connection
Number of tags
reserved for each
Host-LUN
connection
Controller shutdown
User adjustable up to 64
Drive I/O timeout
I/O channel
diagnostics
Maximum Drive
Response Time
(Guaranteed Latency
I/O)
Drive roaming
User adjustable up to 256
Flushes cached contents upon the detection of
critical conditions, e.g., a high temperature
condition persists for a long time
User adjustable
Supported; please contact your dealer for more
details
User adjustable from 160 to 960ms. If a disk drive
fails to return data on read requests before the
timeout value is exceeded, the array immediately
generates data from the parity data and the other
members of a logical drive.
Supported; array configuration stored on disk
drives
A.3 Caching Operation:
Write-back cache
Write-through cache
Supported.
Supported.
Firmware Functionality Specifications
A-5
Supported memory
type
Read-ahead
operation
Multi-threaded
operation
Scatter / Gather
I/O sorting
Adaptive Writeback/Write-through
switching
Periodic Cache
Flush
SDRAM or DDR memory for enhanced
performance
Fast Page Memory with Parity for enhanced data
security
Intelligent and dynamic read-ahead operation for
processing sequential data requests
Yes
Supported
Supported. Optimized I/O sorting for enhanced
performance.
For a better performance when handling large
sequential writes, firmware temporarily disables
write-cache and the synchronized cache
operation between partner controllers if operating
with dual-active RAID controllers. Firmware
automatically restores the write-back mode when
later encountering random and small writes.
Firmware can be configured to flush the cached
contents in memory at every preset interval:
1.
If data integrity is of the concern, e.g.,
the lack of a battery backup protection.
2.
Cache flush on preset intervals to avoid
the latency when cache memory is full
due to write delays.
Variable stripe size
RAID0
RAID1
RAID3
RAID5
RAID6
Opt. for
Sequential I/Os
Opt.
for
Rando
m
I/Os
128
128
16
128
128
32
32
4
32
32
Caching
Optimization
•
•
•
•
•
•
A-6
Cache buffer sorting prior to cache flush operation
Gathering of writes during flush operation to minimize the number
of I/Os required for parity update
Elevator sorting and gathering of drive I/Os
Multiple concurrent drive I/Os (tagged commands)
Intelligent, predictive multi-threaded read-aheads
Multiple, concurrent host I/O threads (host command queuing)
Infortrend
A.4 RAID Expansion:
On-line RAID expansion
Mode-1 RAID expansion add drive
Mode-2 RAID expansion –
copy and replace drives
Expand capacity with no
extra drive bays required
Operating system support
for RAID expansion
Supported.
Capacity brought by array expansion is
immediately ready for Host I/Os when its
status changes from “EXPAND” to
“INITIALIZING.” Initialization task is then
completed in the background except when
the logical array is stated as
“INCOMPLETE” or “BAD;” e.g., has a failed
member right after creation.
Supported. Multiple drives can be added
concurrently.
Add Drive can even be performed in
degraded mode.
Supported. Replace members with drives of
larger capacity.
Supported in Mode 2 RAID expansion,
which provides “Copy and Replace Drive”
function to replace drives with drives of
greater capacity. No need for hardware
upgrade, e.g., adding a new enclosure for
the extra drives.
No. No operating system driver required.
No software need to be installed for this
purpose.
A.5 S.M.A.R.T. Support:
Copy & replace drive
Drive S.M.A.R.T.
support
User selectable modes
for S.M.A.R.T.
Supported. User can choose to clone a member
drive showing symptoms of defects before it fails.
Supported, with intelligent error handling
implementations.
1. Detect only
2. Perpetual Clone: using a hot-spare to clone
the drive reporting SMART errors; the hotspare remains a clone drive
3. Clone + Replace: using a hot-spare to replace
the drive reporting SMART errors; the drive
reporting errors is pulled offline
A.6 Redundant Controller:
Active-active
redundant controller
Supported
Firmware Functionality Specifications
A-7
Synchronized cache
Write-back cache
enabled in redundant
controller mode
Automatic failover
Synchronized cache can be disabled when using
write-through mode in a redundant controller
configuration to prevent performance trade-offs.
Yes, with synchronized cache connection
between controllers.
Yes (user's interaction necessary)
Automatic failback
Yes (user's interaction necessary)
Controller hot-swap
No need to shut down the failed controller
before replacing the failed controller.
Support online hot-swap of the failed
controller. There is no need to reset or
shutdown the failed controller. One controller
can be pulled out during active I/Os to
simulate the destructive controller failure.
(Customer's design-in hot-swap mechanism
necessary)
Supported.
Parity synchronization
in redundant controller
write-back mode to
avoid write-hole
Redundant controller
communication over
Fibre loops
No single-point-offailure
Automatic
engagement of
replacement controller
Dynamic cache
memory allocation
Environment
management
Cache battery backup
A-8
Supported. Through one or multiple, dedicated
synchronizing channels on a common backplane
or external cabling. Synchronized cache over
SCSI channels, Fibre loops, or SATA channels is
supported.
Dedicated loops or distribution over drive loops
selectable
Supported.
Supported.
Yes. Cache memory is dynamically allocated,
not fixed.
Supported. SAF-TE, S.E.S., ISEMS (I2C
interface); and on-board controller voltage/temp
monitor are all supported in both single and
redundant controller mode. In the event of
controller failure, services can be taken over by
the surviving controller.
Supported. Battery backup modules support
cached data during a power outage in both single
controller and redundant controller modes.
Infortrend
Load sharing
User configurable
channel mode
Require a special
firmware for redundant
controller?
Supported. Workload can be flexibly divided
between different controllers by assigning logical
configurations of drives (LDs/LVs) to different
controllers.
Supported. Channel modes configurable (SCSI
or Fibre) as HOST or DRIVE on specific models
such as the EonRAID 2510FS and EonStor
F16F.
No.
A.7 Data Safety:
Regenerate parity of
logical drives
Scheduled Media Scan
Supported. Can be manually executed to ensure
that bad sectors do not cause data loss in the
event of drive failure.
Revision 3.34 and above allows Media Scan to be
scheduled starting at a specified start time and
repeated at regularly timed intervals. The start
time and time intervals can be selected from
drop-down menus. Start time is manually
entered using its numeric representatives in the
following order [MMDDhhmm[YYYY]], and it
reads the date and time set for the controller’s
real-time clock.
The selectable time intervals (the Execution
Period) range from one (1) second to seven (7)
weeks.
Bad block autoreassignment
Battery backup for
cache memory
Verification on normal
writes
Verification on rebuild
writes
Each such schedule can be defined to operate on
individual hard drives, all members of a
specified logical drive, or members of selected
logical drives. Each schedule can include up to
five (5) logical drives. The RS-232C terminal
interface and RAIDWatch revision 2.0 support
this functionality.
Supported. Automatic reassignment of bad
block
Supported. The battery backup solutions provide
long-lasting battery support to the cache memory
when power failure occurs. The unwritten data in
the cache memory can be committed to drive
media when power is restored.
Supported. Performs read-after-write during
normal write processes to ensure data is properly
written to drives.
Supported. Performs read-after-write during
rebuild write to ensure data is properly written to
Firmware Functionality Specifications
A-9
Verification on LD
initialization writes
Drive S.M.A.R.T.
support
Clone failing drive
Automatic shutdown
on over-temperature
condition
drives.
Supported. Performs read-after-write during
logical drive initialization to ensure data is
properly written to drives.
Supported. Drive failure is predictable with
reference to the variables detected. Reaction
schemes are selectable from Detect only,
Perpetual Clone and Copy + Replace. These
options help to improve MTBF.
Users may choose to clone data from a failing
drive to a backup drive manually
Controller automatically starts a shutdown
sequence (entering an idle state receiving no I/O
requests) upon the detection of high-ambient
temperature for an extended period of time.
A.8 System Security:
Password protection
User-configurable
password validation
timeout
SSL-enabled
RAIDWatch Agents
A-10
Supported. All settings require the correct
password (if set) to ensure system security.
Supported. After certain time in absence of user
interaction, the password will be requested
again. This helps to avoid unauthorized
operation when user is away.
Agents communicate to the controller through
limited set of authorization options.
Infortrend
A.9 Environment Management:
SAF-TE/S.E.S. support
Dynamic on-lining of
enclosure services
SAF-TE/S.E.S. polling
period
ISEMS (Infortrend Simple
Enclosure Management
Service)
Multiple SAF-TE/S.E.S.
modules on the same
channel
Multiple SAF-TE /S.E.S.
modules on different
channels
Mapping SAF-TE/S.E.S.
device to host channel
for use with host-based
SAF-TE/S.E.S.
monitoring
Event Triggered
Operation
Dual-speed cooling fan
control
Dual-LED drive status
indicators
SAF-TE/ S.E.S.
temperature value
display
On-board controller
voltage monitors
Firmware Functionality Specifications
Supported. The SAF-TE/S.E.S. modules can
be connected to the drive channels. The RAID
controller will detect errors from SAFTE/S.E.S. devices or notify drive failures via
SAF-TE/S.E.S.
• Both SAF-TE/S.E.S. via drive and deviceself-interfaced methods are supported.
• Redundant SAF-TE/S.E.S. devices are
supported
• Multiple S.E.S. devices are supported
Once an expansion unit (JBOD) with
supported monitoring interface is combined
with a RAID system, its status will be
automatically polled.
User configurable (50ms, 100ms, 200ms,
500ms, 1~60sec)
Supported.
Supported.
Supported.
Supported.
When any of the following happens, the
firmware disables write-back caching to
minimize the chance of losing data:
- Battery, controller, cooling fan, or
PSU failure
- The upper temperature thresholds
are exceeded
- Low battery charge
- UPS AC loss or low battery
charge
The triggering factors are userconfigurable
Yes
Supported. Both single-LED and dual-LED
drive status indicators are supported.
Supported. Display the temperature value
provided by enclosure SAF-TE module (if
available).
Supported. Monitors the 3.3V, 5V, and 12V
voltage status. Event triggered thresholds
A-11
On-board controller
temperature sensors
Enclosure redundant
power supply status
monitoring
Enclosure fan status
monitoring
Enclosure UPS status
monitoring
Enclosure temperature
monitoring
user configurable.
Supported. Monitors the CPU and board
temperature status. Event trigger threshold
user configurable.
Supported. SAF-TE/S.E.S./ISEMS
Supported. SAF-TE/S.E.S/ISEMS
Supported. SAF-TE/S.E.S/ISEMS
Supported. SAF-TE/S.E.S/ISEMS
A.10 User Interface:
RAIDWatch on-board
RS-232C terminal
Graphical user interface
(Java-based GUI
manager)
SSH support
External interface API for
customized host-based
management
LCD front panel
Buzzer alarm
Out-of-band configuration and monitoring via
Ethernet. Browser accessible configuration
options by installing RAIDWatch to reserved
space on drive via ftp.
Supports terminal modes: ANSI, VT-100,
ANSI Color.
Provides menu-driven user-friendly text-based
interface.
Provides user-friendly graphical interface.
Communicates with RAID controller via Outof-band Ethernet, In-band SCSI, In-band Fibre
or SNMP (Windows-based GUI).
Secure Shell over Telnet supported
Supported.
Provides easy access for user instinct
operation.
Warns users when any failures or critical
events occur.
A.11 High Availability:
Custom inquiry serial
number
A-12
Custom Inquiry Serial Number (for support of
multi-pathing software like Veritas, QLogic,
etc)
Infortrend
Firmware Functionality................................................................. 1
Specifications.................................................................................................. 1
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
A.9
A.10
A.11
Basic RAID Management: ............................................................................................. 1
Advanced Features:........................................................................................................ 3
Caching Operation: ........................................................................................................ 5
RAID Expansion:........................................................................................................... 7
S.M.A.R.T. Support: ...................................................................................................... 7
Redundant Controller:.................................................................................................... 7
Data Safety:.................................................................................................................... 9
System Security: .......................................................................................................... 10
Environment Management:.......................................................................................... 11
User Interface:.......................................................................................................... 12
High Availability: .................................................................................................... 12
Firmware Functionality Specifications
A-13
Appendix
B
System Functions:
Upgrading Firmware
B.1 Upgrading Firmware
The RAID controller’s firmware resides in flash memory that can
be updated through the COM port, LAN port, or via In-band
SCSI/Fibre. New releases of firmware are available in the form of
a DOS file in the "pub" directory of Infortrend’s FTP site or on a
3.5" diskette. The file available at the FTP site is usually a selfextracting file that contains the following:
FW30Dxyz Firmware Binary (where "xyz" refers to the firmware
version)
B30Buvw Boot Record Binary (where "uvw" refers to the boot
record version)
README.TXT Read this file first before upgrading the
firmware/boot record. It contains the most upto-date information which is very important to
the firmware upgrade and usage.
These files must be extracted from the compressed file and copied
to a directory in boot drive.
B.1.1 Background RS-232C Firmware Download: Single
Controller
Host I/Os will not be interrupted during the download process.
After the download process is completed, user should find a
chance to reset the controller for the new firmware to take effect.
System Functions: Upgrading Firmware
B-1
B.1.2 Note for Redundant Controller Firmware Upgrade:
A controller used to replace a failed unit in a dual-controller
system is often running a newer release of firmware version. To
solve the contention, make sure the firmware on a replacement
controller is downgraded to that running on the surviving
controller.
IMPORTANT!
•
Allow the downloading process to finish. Do not reset or turn
off the computer or the controller while it is downloading the
file. Doing so may result in an unrecoverable error that
requires the service of the manufacturer.
•
When upgrading the firmware, check the boot record version
that comes with it. If the boot record version is different from
the one installed on the surviving controller previously, the
new boot record binary must be installed.
NOTE:
•
The COM 2 serial port cannot be used to download firmware.
B.2 Upgrading Firmware Using RAIDWatch
Manager
B.2.1 Establish the In-band SCSI connection in RAIDWatch
Manager
Please refer to RAIDWatch User's Manual for details on
establishing the management session for RAIDWatch Manager.
B-2
Infortrend
B.2.2 Upgrade Both Boot Record and Firmware Binaries
Figure B - 1: Upgrading Boot Record and Firmware
Binaries Using RAIDWatch Program
1. Connect to the RAID system locally or from a remote computer
using RAIDWatch Manager. While connected to the RAID
system, there will be icon(s) with IP address specified on the
left of the menu screen. Select by double-clicking the icon of
the RAID system which firmware is to be upgraded. Select the
“Configuration Parameters” icon and then select the “System”
tab. Single-click the “Download FW+BR” check circle. Click
the Apply button to proceed. A message prompt should
display. Click Yes and then a file location prompt will appear.
2. Provide the boot record binary filename, the RAIDWatch
Manager will start to download the boot record binary to the
controller.
3. After the boot record download is completed, provide the
firmware filename to the RAIDWatch Manager. It will start to
download the firmware to RAID controller.
4. Shutdown the application server(s) or stop the application(s)
which are accessing the RAID, then reset the RAID
subsystem/controller in order to use the new downloaded
firmware. With firmware release 3.21 and above, host I/Os
will not be interrupted by the download process. Users may
find a chance to stop host I/Os and reset the controller for new
firmware to take effect.
System Functions: Upgrading Firmware
B-3
B.2.3 Upgrade the Firmware Binary Only
Figure B - 2: Upgrading Firmware Binaries Using
RAIDWatch Program
1. Connect to the RAID system locally or from a remote
computer using RAIDWatch Manager. While connected to the
RAID system, there will be icon(s) with IP address specified
on the left of the menu screen. Select by double-clicking the
icon of the RAID subsystem which firmware is to be upgraded.
Select the “Configuration Parameters” icon and then select the
“System” tab. Single-click the “Download FW” check circle.
Click the Apply button to proceed. A message prompt should
display. Click Yes and then a file location prompt will appear.
2. Provide the firmware filename to the RAIDWatch Manager. It
will start to download the firmware to RAID controller.
3. Shutdown the application server(s) or application(s) which are
accessing the RAID, then reset the controller in order to use
the new downloaded firmware.
B-4
Infortrend
B.3 Upgrading Firmware Using RS-232C
Terminal Emulation
The
firmware
can
be
downloaded
to
the
RAID
controller/subsystem by using an ANSI/VT-100 compatible
terminal emulation program. Whichever terminal emulation
program is used must support the ZMODEM file transfer protocol.
The following example uses the HyperTerminal in Windows NT®.
Other terminal emulation programs (e.g., Telix and PROCOMM
Plus) can perform the firmware upgrade as well.
B.3.1 Establishing the connection for the RS-232C Terminal
Emulation
Please refer to Chapter 4, “Connecting to Terminal Emulation,”
and also your hardware manual for details on establishing the
connection.
B.3.2 Upgrading Both Boot Record and Firmware Binaries
Figure B - 3: Upgrading Boot Record and Firmware
Binaries Using Hyper Terminal Screen
1. From the Main Menu, scroll down to "System Functions."
2. Go to "Controller Maintenance."
3. Choose "Advanced Maintenance."
4. Select "Download Boot Record and Firmware."
5. Set ZMODEM as the file transfer protocol of your terminal
emulation software.
System Functions: Upgrading Firmware
B-5
6. Send the Boot Record Binary to the controller.
In
HyperTerminal, go to the "Transfer" menu and choose "Send
file." If you are not using Hyper Terminal, choose "Upload" or
"Send" (depending on the software).
7. After the Boot Record has been downloaded, send the
Firmware Binary to the controller. In HyperTerminal, go to
the "Transfer" menu and choose "Send file." If you are not
using Hyper Terminal, choose "Upload" or "Send" (depending
on the software).
8. When the Firmware completes downloading, the controller
will automatically reset itself. For a newer version of firmware,
you need to manually reset the subsystem/controller for the
new firmware to take effect.
B.3.3 Upgrading the Firmware Binary Only
Figure B - 4: Upgrading Firmware Binaries Using Hyper
Terminal Screen
1. From the Main Menu, scroll down to "System Functions."
2. Go to "Controller Maintenance."
3. Choose "Download Firmware."
4. Set ZMODEM as the file transfer protocol of your terminal
emulation software.
5. Send the Firmware Binary to the controller. In Hyper Terminal,
select "Send file." If you are not using Hyper Terminal, choose
"Upload" or "Send" (depending on the software).
B-6
Infortrend
Figure B - 5: Sending Files
6. When the Firmware completes downloading, the controller
will automatically reset itself. If the subsystem/controller is
running firmware later than version 3.21, you need to
manually reset the subsystem/controller for the new firmware
to take effect.
Figure B - 6: Receiving Firmware Files
System Functions: Upgrading Firmware
B-7
This page is intentionally
left blank
B-8
Infortrend
System Functions: Upgrading Firmware.............................................................................. 1
B.1
Upgrading Firmware............................................................................................... 1
B.1.1
Background RS-232C Firmware Download: Single Controller ................. 1
B.1.2
Note for Redundant Controller Firmware Upgrade: .................................. 2
B.2
Upgrading Firmware Using RAIDWatch Manager ............................................ 2
B.2.1
Establish the In-band SCSI connection in RAIDWatch Manager.............. 2
B.2.2
Upgrade Both Boot Record and Firmware Binaries.................................... 3
B.2.3
Upgrade the Firmware Binary Only ............................................................. 4
B.3
Upgrading Firmware Using RS-232C Terminal Emulation ............................... 5
B.3.1
Establishing the connection for the RS-232C Terminal Emulation ........... 5
B.3.2
Upgrading Both Boot Record and Firmware Binaries ................................ 5
B.3.3
Upgrading the Firmware Binary Only.......................................................... 6
Advanced Maintenance .........................5
ANSI/VT-100 ..........................................5
Background Download ..........................1
Boot Record .....................................1, 3, 5
COM port.................................................1
Controller Maintenance .........................5
Download Boot Record and Firmware 5
Download FW/BR..............................3, 4
firmware
upgrading ............................................1
Firmware Binaries...............................3, 5
Firmware Binary .................................1, 4
Firmware Sync-version ..........................2
flash memory...........................................1
System Functions: Upgrading Firmware
In-band SCSI ........................................1, 2
IP address.............................................3, 4
LAN port..................................................1
PROCOMM..............................................5
RAID-to-host-bus................................3, 4
RAIDWatch Manager .............................2
RS-232 upgrading firmware via............5
System Functions ....................................5
Telix ..........................................................5
transfer protocol......................................5
upgrading
firmware...............................................1
upgrading using RAIDWatch ...............2
ZMODEM ............................................5, 6
B-9
Appendix
C
Event Messages
The controller events can be categorized as follows according to the severity
levels:
Critical
Warning
Notification
Errors that need to attend to immediately
Errors
Command processed message sent from Firmware
The RAID subsystem records all system events from power on, it can record up
to 1,000 events. To power off or to reset the controller will cause an automatic
deletion of all the recorded event logs.
The RAIDWatch manager can be used to record events on multiple subsystems
especially when controller reset or power-off is an expected action. The events
can also be seen from RAIDWatch’s Configuration Client utility. Associated
details can be found in the RAIDWatch user's manual and online help.
Descriptions below may contain abbreviations. Abbreviations and Capitalized
letters are preserved for the coherency with the event messages shown on LCD
screen or terminal.
Event Messages
C-1
Event Index
C.1 Logical Drive Events
C.1.1 Critical:
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Drive Missing
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Drive Failure
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Rebuild Aborted
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Rebuild Failed
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Parity Regeneration Aborted
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Parity Regeneration Failed
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Creation Aborted
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Creation Failed
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Initialization Failed
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Expansion Aborted
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Expansion Failed
ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Media Scan Failed
LG:0 ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Media Scan Failed
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT:CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Failed
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT:CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Aborted
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT:CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Failed
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT:CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Aborted
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Logical Drive Bad Block Table FULL
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Logical Drive Bad Block Table BAD
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Logical Drive On-Line Init Table BAD
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Bad Data Block Marked 000000084
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: UNPROTECTED Block Marked 000000084
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTIFY: Bad Data Block Encountered 000000084
LG:0 ALERT:Inconsistent Parity Encountered Block 20000000B
C.1.2
Notification:
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Continue Rebuild Operation
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Rebuild
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Rebuild of Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Continue Parity Regeneration Operation
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Parity Regeneration
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Parity Regeneration of Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Creation
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Creation of Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting On-Line Initialization
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: On-Line Initialization of Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Off-Line Initialization
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Off-Line Initialization of Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting On-Line Expansion
C-2
Infortrend
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: On-Line Expansion of Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Off-Line Expansion
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Off-Line Expansion of Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Continue Add Drive Operation
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Add Drive Operation
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Add Drive Operation Paused
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Add Drive to Logical Drive Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Add Drive Operation Paused
NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Starting Media Scan
LG:0 NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Starting Media Scan
NOTICE: Media Scan of CHL:0 ID:132 Completed
LG:0 NOTICE: Media Scan of CHL:0 ID:132 Completed
LG:0 ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Media Scan Aborted
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE:CHL:0 ID:132 Continue Clone Operation
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE:CHL:0 ID:132 Starting Clone
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE:CHL:0 ID:132 Copy and Replace Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE:CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Completed
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTIFY: Bad Data Block Recovered 000000084
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTIFY: Bad Data Block Recovered 000000084
Event Messages
C-3
C.2 Channel and Individual Drive Events
C.2.1
Critical:
CHL:0 ID:132 ALERT:Media Error Unrecoverable-0xD8001C7C
CHL:0 FATAL ERROR(0)
C.2.2
Warning:
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Unexpected Select Timeout
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Unexpected Select Timeout
CHL:1 Drive Channel ALERT: Unexpected Select Timeout
CHL:1 RCC Channel ALERT: Gross Phase/Signal Error Detected
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Gross Phase/Signal Error Detected
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Gross Phase/Signal Error Detected
CHL:1 Drive Channel ALERT: Gross Phase/Signal Error Detected
CHL:1 RCC Channel ALERT: Unexpected Disconnect Encountered
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Unexpected Disconnect Encountered
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Unexpected Disconnect Encountered
CHL:1 Drive Channel ALERT: Unexpected Disconnect Encountered
CHL:1 RCC Channel ALERT: Timeout Waiting for I/O to Complete
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Timeout Waiting for I/O to Complete
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Timeout Waiting for I/O to Complete
CHL:1 Drive Channel ALERT: Timeout Waiting for I/O to Complete
CHL:1 RCC Channel ALERT: Parity/CRC Error Detected
CHL:1 ID:1 Host Channel ALERT: Parity/CRC Error Detected
CHL:1 Host Channel ALERT: Parity/CRC Error Detected
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive ALERT: Unexpected Drive Not Ready (00B)
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive ALERT: Drive HW Error (00B)
CHL:0 RCC Channel ALERT: Unit Attention Received
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Unit Attention Received (10B)
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Unit Attention Received
CHL:0 Drive Channel ALERT: Unit Attention Received
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive ALERT: Aborted Command (00B)
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive ALERT: Unexpected Sense Received (00B)
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive NOTIFY: Block Reassignment Failed - 0 (10B)
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive NOTIFY: Block Reassignment Failed - 0x0
CHL:0 RCC Channel ALERT: Data Overrun/Underrun Detected
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Data Overrun/Underrun Detected
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Data Overrun/Underrun Detected
CHL:0 Drive Channel ALERT: Data Overrun/Underrun Detected
CHL:0 RCC Channel ALERT: Negotiation Error Detected
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Negotiation Error Detected
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Negotiation Error Detected
CHL:0 Drive Channel ALERT: Negotiation Error Detected
CHL:0 RCC Channel ALERT: Invalid Status/Sense Data Received
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Invalid Status/Sense Data Received (10B)
CHL:0 ID:0 Target ALERT: Invalid Status/Sense Data Received
CHL:0 Drive Channel ALERT: Invalid Status/Sense Data Received
CHL:0 ALERT: Redundant Loop Connection Error Detected on ID:11
C-4
Infortrend
CHL:0 Host Channel ALERT: Channel Failure
SMART-Slot:-1 Predictable Failure Detected-Clone Failed
SMART-Slot:-1 Predictable Failure Detected
SMART-Slot:-1 Predictable Failure Detected-Starting Clone
SMART-Slot:-1 Predictable Failure Detected(TEST)
SMART-Slot:-1 Predictable Failure Detected(TEST)
SMART-Slot:-1 Predictable Failure Detected(TEST)
SMART-Slot:-1 Predictable Failure Detected(TEST)
CHL:0 ALERT: Fibre Channel Loop Failure Detected
CHL:0 ALERT:Redundant Loop for Chl:0 Failure Detected
CHL:0 ALERT:Redundant Path for Chl:0 ID:0 Expected but Not Found
CHL:0 ID:0 ALERT:Redundant Path for Chl:0 ID:0 Failure Detected
C.2.3
Notification:
CHL:0 ID:132 NOTICE:Media Error Recovered-0xD8001C7C
CHL:0 ID:132 NOTICE:Media Error Recovered-0xD8001C7C
CHL:0 NOTICE:Fibre Channel Loop Connection Restored
CHL:0 ID:255 NOTICE:Redundant Path for Chl:0 Restored
CHL:0 NOTICE:Redundant Path for Chl:0 ID:0 Restored
CHL:0 ID:0 NOTICE:Redundant Path for Chl:0 ID:0 Restored
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive NOTICE: Drive Recovered Error Reported
CHL:0 LIP(FF B) Detected
CHL:0 Host Channel Notification: Bus Reset Issued
CHL:0 Host Channel ALERT: Bus Reset Issued
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive NOTICE: Scan Drive Successful
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive NOTIFY: Block Successfully Reassigned - 0 (10B)
CHL:0 ID:0 Drive NOTIFY: Block Successfully Reassigned - 0x0
Event Messages
C-5
C.3 General Target Events
C.3.1
Critical:
SAF-TE Device(0)ALERT: Power Supply Failure Detected(Idx:132)
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT:Power Supply 0 Failure Detected
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT:Power Supply 0 Not Present
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Low Voltage Detected(-1073939240.5V)
SES(C0 I0)Power Supply 0:Device Not Supported !
SAF-TE Device(0)ALERT: Cooling Fan Not Installed(Idx:2)
SAF-TE Device(0)ALERT: Cooling Fan Failure Detected(Idx:2)
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Cooling fan2 Failure Detected
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Cooling fan2 Not Present
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Low Speed Detected(-1073870808 RPM)
SES(C0 I0)Cooling Fan 0:Device Not Supported !
SAF-TE Device(0)ALERT: Elevated Temperature Alert
Peripheral Device ALERT: CPU Cold Temperature Detected(0.0(C))
Peripheral Device ALERT: Elevated Temperature Alert
Peripheral Device ALERT: Elevated Temperature Alert
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Temperature Sensor 0 Failure Detected
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Temperature Sensor 0 Not Present
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Cold Detected(0(C))
SES(C0 I0)Temp Sensor 0:Device Not Supported !
UPS Connection Is Absent
SAF-TE Device(2)ALERT: UPS Power Failure Detected
Peripheral Set 2 Device ALERT: UPS 2 AC Power Failure Detected
Peripheral Set 2 Device ALERT: UPS 2 Battery Failure Detected
Warning: UPS AC Power-Loss Detected
Warning: UPS Battery Low - 0%.
SES(C0 I0)UPS 2:Device Not Supported !
C.3.2
Notification:
SAF-TE Device(2) NOTICE: Fan Back On-Line(Idx:11)
NOTICE: FAN Module A Back On-Line(FAN0 0RPM)
NOTICE: Controller FAN 1 Back On-Line(0 RPM)
Peripheral Device NOTICE: Fan Back On-Line
Peripheral Set 1 Device NOTICE: FAN 1 Back On-Line
Peripheral Set 1 Device NOTICE: FAN 1 is Present
Peripheral Set 1 Device NOTICE: FAN 1 Back On-Line(0 RPM)
SES(C0 I0)Cooling Fan 1:Fan Back On-Line
SAF-TE Device(1) NOTICE: Temperature Back To Non-Critical LVs
Peripheral Set 1 Device NOTICE: Temperature 1 Back To Non-Critical LVs
Peripheral Set 1 Device NOTICE: Temperature 1 is Present
Peripheral Set 1 Device NOTICE: Temperature 1 Back To Non-Critical LVs(0(C))
SES(C0 I0)Temp Sensor 1:Temperature Back To Non-Critical LVs
SAF-TE Device(1) NOTICE: Power Supply Back On-Line(Idx:4)
Power Supply 0 Back-Online
Peripheral Set 2 Device NOTICE: PSU0 +12V Back On-Line
Peripheral Set 2 Device NOTICE: PSU0 +12V is Present
C-6
Infortrend
Peripheral Set 2 Device NOTICE: PSU0 +12V Back On-Line(5.0V)
SES(C0 I0)Power Supply 2:Power Supply Back On-Line
UPS Connection Detected
UPS AC Power Restored
UPS Battery Restored To Safe Level 0
SAF-TE Device(2) NOTICE: UPS Power Back On-Line
Peripheral Set 2 Device NOTICE: UPS 2 AC Power Back On-Line
Peripheral Set 2 Device NOTICE: UPS 2 Battery Back On-Line
SES(C0 I0)UPS 2:UPS Power Back On-Line
Event Messages
C-7
C.4 Controller Events
C.4.1
Critical:
ALERT: +3.3V Low Voltage Detected(205.9V)
ALERT: Controller FAN 0 Low Speed Detected(0 RPM)
Controller NOTICE: Redundant Controller Firmware Updated
Controller ALERT: Redundant Controller Failure Detected
Controller SDRAM ECC Multi-bits Error Detected
Controller SDRAM ECC Single-bit Error Detected
Controller SDRAM Parity Error Detected
Controller PCI Bus Parity Error Detected
Controller ALERT: Power Supply Unstable or NVRAM Failed
BBU Absent or Failed!Correct It and Reset Ctlr to Take Effect
Controller BBU Absent or Failed! !
Controller BBU Failure Detected !
Controller BBU Thermal Shutdown/Enter Sleep-Mode !
C.4.2
Warning:
Memory Not Sufficient to Fully Support Current Config.
C.4.3
Notification:
Board1 Cold Temperature Back To Non-Critical LVs(0(C) )
+12V Upper Voltage Back within Acceptable Limits(0.0V)
+12V Lower Voltage Back within Acceptable Limits(0.0V)
Memory is Now Sufficient to Fully Support Current Config.
Controller NOTICE: NVRAM Factory Defaults Restored
Controller NOTICE: NVRAM Factory Defaults Restored
Controller NOTICE: NVRAM Factory Defaults Restored
Controller BBU is Charging !
NOTICE: Controller BBU Present !
NOTICE: Controller BBU Back On-Line !
NOTICE: Controller BBU Fully Charged !
Force Controller Write-Through on Trigger Cause
C-8
Infortrend
Event Description
C.5 Logical Drive Events
C.5.1 Critical:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Drive Missing
The specified hard drive in the specified logical drive has is
missing.
The drive could have been accidentally removed or drive
connection problems occurred. Check drive connection and
related enclosure status.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG: Logical Drive ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Drive Failure
The specified hard drive in the specified logical drive has failed
IF a spare is available, the subsystem will automatically start
rebuild. If there is no spare, replace the faulty drive and rebuild
will be automatically initiated provided that a replacement drive
can be recognized by the subsystem. For example, in a SCSI-based
subsystem, a manual “Scan Drive” command should be executed.
In subsystems using other types of disk drives, drive swap
auto-detection should be enabled on the drive channels.
Message
What Happens?
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Rebuild Aborted
Logical drive rebuild aborted. It could result from the one of the
following reasons:
1. The rebuild has been manually canceled by a user.
2. The replacement drive used for a rebuild may have failed
during the rebuild or the drive contains immanent defects.
3. Bad blocks are encountered on another member drive
during the rebuild. (RAID 1, 3, and 5 arrays)
4. System faults occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive and perform logical
drive rebuild again. It is best to stop host I/Os temporarily to this
logical drive.
What to Do?
Event Messages
C-9
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-10
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Rebuild Failed
Logical drive rebuild failed. It could result from the one of the
following reasons:
1. The rebuild has been manually canceled by a user.
2. The replacement drive used for a rebuild may have failed
during the rebuild or the drive contains immanent defects.
3. Bad blocks are encountered on another member drive
during the rebuild. (RAID 1, 3, and 5 arrays)
4. System faults occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive and perform logical
drive rebuild again. It is best to stop host I/Os temporarily to this
logical drive.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Parity Regeneration Aborted
System faults or integrity problems forced system to abandon the
operation. Irrecoverable parity inconsistency may also cause a halt
to the operation.
Check proper system working conditions. Contact system vendor
for help.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Parity Regeneration Failed
System faults or integrity problems forced system to abandon the
operation. Irrecoverable parity inconsistency may also cause a halt
to the operation.
Check proper system working conditions. Contact system vendor
for help.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Creation Aborted
Logical drive creation process manually aborted or that some
system integrity problems forced the subsystem to abort logical
drive creation process.
Check proper system working conditions.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Creation Failed
Logical drive creation process failed when one or more drive
members failed or have been accidentally removed. Drive
abnormality may also be the cause of the problems.
Check proper system working conditions and drive connection.
Replace the faulty drives and repeat the creation process.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Initialization Failed
Logical drive initialization failed. It could result from one of the
following reasons:
1. One of the disk drives used for a logical drive might have
failed during rebuild.
2. Media errors are encountered on another member drive
during the initialization process.
3. Drive hardware faults occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive and perform logical
drive initialization again.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Expansion Aborted
Logical drive expansion failed. It could result from one of the
following reasons:
1. The expansion has been canceled by a user.
2. The drive used for expansion might have failed during
expansion.
3. Media errors are encountered on another member drive
during the expansion process.
4. One member drive has failed.
5. Drive hardware faults occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive and perform logical
drive expansion again.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Expansion Failed
Logical drive initialization failed. It could result from one of the
following reasons:
1. The drive(s) used for expansion might have failed during
expansion.
2. Media errors are encountered on another member drive
during the expansion process.
3. One member drive has failed.
4. Drive hardware faults occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive and perform logical
drive expansion again.
LG:0 ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Media Scan Failed
Media Scan failed to carry on with scanning drive(s) for certain
reasons, e.g., a logical drive or a disk drive has fatally or physically
failed.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive if rebuild is
possible.
LG:0 ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Media Scan Aborted
Media Scan operation is aborted for certain reasons, e.g., it has
been manually canceled.
Check disk drive and system operation status.
C-11
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-12
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Failed
Drive cloning failed. It could result from one of the following
reasons:
1. Cloning has been manually canceled by a user.
2. The drive used for cloning might have failed during the
cloning process.
3. Bad blocks are encountered on another member drive
during the cloning process.
4. The source drive has failed.
5. System faults occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Aborted
Logical drive cloning aborted. It could result from one of the
following reasons:
1. The cloning process has been manually canceled by a user.
2. The drive used for cloning might have failed during
cloning.
3. Media errors are encountered on another member drive
during the cloning process.
4. The source drive has failed.
5. System has been reset or drive hardware faults occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Logical Drive Bad Block Table FULL
Available bad block table entries full. Media Scan or host access
has discovered and marked too many damaged sectors.
The target disk drive may have become physically unreliable.
Contact system vendor for help.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Logical Drive Bad Block Table BAD
System failed to generate a bad block table. Logical drive may
have generated serious integrity problems.
The members of a logical drive may have become physically
unreliable. Locate, replace, and replace the logical drive if
possible. Contact system vendor for help.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Logical Drive On-Line Init Table Bad
Serious system faults might have occurred, unstable voltage or
damaged components, and forced the initialization to halt.
Check proper system working conditions. Contact system vendor
for help.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: Bad Data Block Marked 000000084
Media errors caused data inconsistency; e.g., concurrent
occurrences of media errors on more than one RAID5 member
drive. The affected data blocks # are marked bad. The situation
may result from the following:
1. One member drive failed, and media errors are found on
another member drive.
2. Media errors occurred consequentially on two member
drives.
The data affected by data blocks failure will be lost. The host
computer will return media error messages if host accesses fall
within the affected blocks.
LG:0 Logical Drive ALERT: UNPROTECTED Block Marked
000000084
Media errors are found in an unprotected array, e.g., RAID0. The
affected data blocks will be marked bad.
The data affected by data blocks failure will be lost. The host
computer will return media error messages if host access falls ithin
the affected blocks. Restoring data from a backup source is
recommended.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTIFY: Bad Data Block encountered
000000084
Data blocks previously marked bad are re-encountered during
host I/O access or certain operations such as Media Scan.
The data affected by data blocks failure is lost. Restoring data
from a backup source is recommended. The host computer will
return media error messages if host access fallswithin the affected
blocks.
LG:0 ALERT: Inconsistent Parity Encountered Block 000000084
Parity inconsistency encountered on block address _____
It is recommended to perform the “Regenerate Parity” function to
correct the parity faults.
C.5.2 Notification:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Continue Rebuild Operation
The target logical drive has been stored to its previous
one-drive-failed status, and the rebuild operation is automatically
resumed by firmware. This may occur when the system is
powered off or reset during the rebuild process or that media
errors have been discovered and corrected during the rebuild.
Press ESC to clear the message.
C-13
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Rebuild
The rebuild process has begun.
This is the message displayed when a stand-by spare is available
when a member drive fails or when a faulty drive is physically
replaced. The subsystem should automatically detect a drive for
rebuild if the hot-swap detection mechanism has been enabled.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Rebuild of Logical Drive Completed
The subsystem has successfully rebuilt a logical drive.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Continue Parity Regeneration
Operation
Start
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Parity Regeneration
Start regenerating parity of a logical drive.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Parity Regeneration of Logical Drive
Completed
The parity regeneration process on logical drive _ is completed.
Press ESC to clear the message.
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-14
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Creation
Logical drive creation process started. Note that the creation and
initialization processes are separated. Creation of a logical drive
only takes a second while the initialization may take hours with
the arrays containing large capacity drives.
Press ESC to clear the message.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting On-Line Initialization
Creation process is completed, initialization process has begun to
generate parity sectors and readying member drives. The On-line
initialization mode takes a longer time to complete and allows the
logical drive to receive host I/Os immediately if appropriate host
ID/LUN mapping has been applied.
Press ESC to clear the message.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: On-Line Initialization of Logical
Drive Completed
Logical drive on-line initialization completed
Press ESC to clear the message.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Off-Line Initialization
Creation process is completed, initialization process has begun to
generate parity sectors and readying member drives. The Off-line
initialization mode takes place immediately after the creation of a
logical drive, and does not allow host I/Os to be distributed to the
logical drive at the same time.
Press ESC to clear the message.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Off-Line Initialization of Logical
Drive Completed
Logical drive off-line initialization completed. The logical drive is
now ready for host ID/LUN mapping, and then receiving host
I/Os.
Press ESC to clear the message.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting On-Line Expansion
Start expanding the logical drive’s added or free capacity
(previously not included) when system find appropriate time after
selecting to expand its capacity. The On-Line mode allows the
added capacity of a logical drive to appear immediately as a usable
partition and ready for host I/Os. This partition may require
being associated with a separate ID/LUN on the host bus.
Response to host I/Os will be slower because the expansion
process requires distributing data blocks and parity data across
new drive sectors.
Press ESC to clear the message.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: On-Line Expansion of Logical Drive
Completed
Logical drive on-line expansion completed. The added capacity
will appear as a new partition, and this partition may require
being associated with a separate ID/LUN on the host bus.
Adjustments should also be made through the host OS volume
management utility.
Press ESC to clear the message.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Off-Line Expansion
Start expanding the logical drive’s added or free capacity
(previously not included) when system find appropriate time after
selecting to expand its capacity. The Off-Line mode does not allow
the added capacity of a logical drive to be immediately available
for host I/Os. This partition can only be associated with a
separate ID/LUN on the host bus after the expansion process is
completed. Access to the data already stored on the logical drive is
not affected.
Press ESC to clear the message.
C-15
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Continue Add Drive Operation
The target logical drive has been restored to its previous status,
e.g., power-off or media errors, and the add drive operation can
continue.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Starting Add Drive Operation
Add drive expansion process started
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Add Drive Operation Paused
The add drive expansion process is halted by:
1. Logical drive expansion is canceled by a user.
2. One of the member drives failed during logical drive
expansion.
3. Media errors are found on one or more of the logical drive
members.
4. System faults have occurred.
Carefully identify and replace the faulty drive and correct system
faults. The add drive expansion should continue once the faults
are corrected.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: Add Drive to Logical Drive
Completed
The add drive expansion process is completed.
Press ESC to clear the message. Please remember to rearrange the
added capacity which will appear as a new partition volume.
NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Starting Media Scan
Media Scan is manually or automatically started by the preset Task
Schedules on a specific disk drive.
Press ESC to clear the message.
What to Do?
LG:0 NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Starting Media Scan
Media Scan is manually or automatically started by the preset Task
Schedules on a specific member of Logical Drive 0.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
NOTICE: Media Scan of CHL:0 ID:132 Completed
Media Scan on a specific disk drive is completed.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 NOTICE: Media Scan of CHL:0 ID:132 Completed
Media Scan on a specific member of Logical Drive 0 is completed.
Press ESC to clear the message.
C-16
Infortrend
Message
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Continue Clone
Operation
The target logical drive has been restored to its previous status,
e.g., a failed drive is restored, and the cloning process can
continue.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Starting Clone
Cloning process started on one of the members of Logical Drive 0
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Copy and Replace
Completed
Copy and replace is completed with a specific member of Logical
Drive 0. The original member drive is replaced by another disk
drive.
Press ESC to clear the message.
What Happens?
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTICE: CHL:0 ID:132 Clone Completed
Cloning is completed with a specific member of Logical Drive 0,
whether it is replaced (Copy and Replace) or cloned (Perpetual
Clone) to a spare drive.
Press ESC to clear the message.
LG:0 Logical Drive NOTIFY: Bad Data Block Recovered 000000084
Host writes fall onto the data blocks previously marked bad and
overwrite the drive sectors.
Press ESC to clear the message.
C-17
C.6 Channel and Individual Drive Events
C.6.1 Critical:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:0 ID:132 Target ALERT: Media Error
Unrecoverable-0xD8001C7C
Drive surface media errors found and after rewrite the drive
sectors are determined as physically damaged and unusable.
Data will be reassigned to other drive sectors. Host writes
should continue without problems.
CHL:0 Fatal Error (0)
Channel 0 has fatally failed.
Contact your system vendor for help.
C.6.2 Warning:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:1 ID:0 Target ALERT: Unexpected Select Timeout
Drive target select timeout. The specified hard drive cannot be
selected by the RAID controller/subsystem. Whether the drive
has been removed, or the cabling/termination/canister is out of
order.
This could occur if a disk drive is not properly installed or
accidentally removed, or when cable links become unreliable.
Check cabling and drive installation, and contact your RAID
system supplier.
CHL:1 Drive Channel ALERT: Unexpected Select Timeout
Drive Channel target select timeout. The specified drive channel
cannot be selected by the RAID controller/subsystem. Faults
might have occurred with the cabling/termination/internal data
paths.
Check cabling and drive installation, and contact your RAID
system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Gross Phase/Signal Error Detected
Phase/signal abnormality detected on the specific RCC channel.
Rare occurrence of phase/signal error could be recovered by
firmware retry. Contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Gross Phase/Signal Error Detected
Phase/signal abnormality detected with a specific target disk
drive.
Check proper installation of disk drives and contact your RAID
system supplier.
What to Do?
C-18
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ Drive Channel ALERT: Gross Phase/Signal Error
Detected
Phase/signal abnormality detected on the specific drive channel.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Unexpected Disconnect
Encountered
Unexpected disconnect detected on the specific RCC channel.
Check cabling/termination and canister connections, and contact
your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Unexpected Disconnect Encountered
Unexpected disconnect detected on the specific target disk drive.
Check cabling/termination and canister installation, and contact
your RAID system supplier.
Message
CHL:_ Drive Channel ALERT: Unexpected Disconnect
Encountered
Unexpected disconnect detected on the specific drive channel.
Check cabling/termination and canister connections, and contact
your RAID system supplier.
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Timeout Waiting for I/O to
Complete
I/O timeout on specific RCC channel.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Timeout Waiting for I/O to Complete
Drive-side target I/O timeout. Possible drive-side
cabling/termination and canister connection abnormal or drive
malfunctioning.
Check drive-side cabling/termination/canister/disk drive
connections and contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ Drive Channel ALERT: Timeout Waiting for I/O to
Complete
I/O timeout on specific drive channel.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Parity/CRC Error Detected
RCC channel parity or CRC errors detected.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
C-19
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ ID:_ Host Channel ALERT: Parity/CRC Error Detected
Parity or CRC errors detected through host ID, CHL_ ID_.
Occurrences of these faults usually can be negotiated between
RAID subsystems and application servers. If occurrences
become frequent, contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ Host Channel ALERT: Parity/CRC Error Detected
Host channel parity or CRC errors detected.
Parity and CRC faults can often be negotiated between
application servers and RAID subsystems. Contact your RAID
system supplier if this occurs too frequently.
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive ALERT: Unexpected Drive Not Ready (00B)
Unexpected Drive Not Ready returned from a disk drive on
CHL:_ ID:_.
Check proper installation of disk drives or cabling connection.
This event often occurs when hot-swapping disk drives and may
be caused by signal glitches. If the disk drive fails to respond, the
subsystem should consider the disk drive as a failed drive when
the timeout threshold is reached. Contact your RAID system
supplier.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive ALERT: Drive HW Error (00B)
Drive hardware error returned from a disk drive on CHL:_ ID:_.
The target disk drive may have failed. Contact your RAID
system supplier for a replacement.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Unit Attention Received
Unit attention received from RCC channel CHL:_.
Rare occurrences of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Unit Attention Received (10B)
Drive-side target unit attention receive on a disk drive CHL:_
ID:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-20
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Unit Attention Received (10B)
Drive-side target unit attention receive on a disk drive CHL:_
ID:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Check disk drive connection and contact your RAID system
supplier.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ Drive Channel ALERT: Unit Attention Received (10B)
Drive-side target unit attention receive on a drive channel CHL:_
ID:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Check proper installation and contact your RAID system
supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive ALERT: Aborted Command (00B)
Aborted command reported from a disk drive CHL:_ ID:_
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive ALERT: Unexpected Sense Received (00B)
Drive-side target unexpected sense received on a disk drive
CHL:_ ID:_.
Check drive-side cabling/installation/working conditions. This
may result from bad signal quality or poor connection. Contact
your RAID system supplier.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive NOTIFY: Block Reassignment Failed – 0(10B)
Data regeneration and reassignment failed.
The Bad Block Table is full. Too many bad blocks have been
found on the disk drive.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
The adjacent data blocks on other member drives might have
also been damaged.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Data Overrun/Underrun Detected
Data overrun/underrun errors detected on the RCC channel
CHL:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Data Overrun/Underrun Detected
Data overrun/underrun errors detected on a disk drive CHL:_
ID:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ Drive Channel ALERT: Data Overrun/Underrun
Detected
Data overrun/underrun errors detected on the drive channel
CHL:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
C-21
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Negotiation Error Detected
Negotiation errors occurred on the RCC channel CHL:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Negotiation Error Detected
Negotiation errors occurred with the communications with a
disk drive CHL:_ ID:_. The event could also occur with drive
target data bus sync/wide negotiation abnormality.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-22
CHL:_ Drive Channel ALERT: Negotiation Error Detected
Negotiation errors occurred with the communications with a
drive channel CHL:_. The event could also occur with drive
target data bus sync/wide negotiation abnormality.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ RCC Channel ALERT: Invalid Status/Sense Data
Received
Invalid status/sense data received on the RCC channel CHL:_
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ ID:_ Target ALERT: Invalid Status/Sense Data Received
(10B)
Invalid status/sense data received by a disk drive CHL:_ ID:_.
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ Drive Channel ALERT: Invalid Status/Sense Data
Received
Invalid status/sense data received on the drive channel CHL:_
Rare occurrence of these errors can be managed by firmware.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
CHL:_ ALERT: Redundant Loop Connection Error Detected on
ID:_
One of the dual loop members might have failed or been
disconnected. Make sure all cabling are properly connected and
topological configurations properly set.
Check cabling and channel bus working conditions. If the
problem does not result from cabling problems, contact your
RAID system supplier.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ Host Channel ALERT: Channel Failure
Host channel CHL:_ link failure or disconnection occurred.
Check proper cabling connection and host HBA, link connection
devices, etc. Contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
SMART-Slot:_ Predictable Failure Detected-Clone Failed
Hard Drive(s) report SMART-detected defects. A spare drive is
commenced to clone or replace the member drive showing
defects. The cloning operation failed. The member drive
suspected of errors might have failed, or the clone process has
been interrupted, e.g., yet another member has failed or the spare
drive used for cloning has shown immanent faults.
Carefully check drive status and replace the unstable/failed
drive. Contact your RAID system supplier.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
SMART-Slot:_ Predictable Failure Detected
Hard drive slot:_ reported SMART-detected errors, e.g.,
abnormal rotation speed, seek time delay, etc.
Carefully check drive status and replace the unstable/failed
drive. Contact your RAID system supplier.
SMART-Slot:_ Predictable Failure Detected-Starting Clone
One or more hard Drive(s) reports SMART-detected defects. Starts
using a pre-defined spare drive to clone the member drive suspected of
inherent errors. This happens when SMART detection is enabled with
the “Copy & Replace” or “Perpetual Clone” reaction schemes.
Press ESC to clear the message. After the cloning process, you
may consider replacing the defective drive with a good one and
configure it as a spare drive in case drive failure might happen in
the future.
SMART-Slot:_ Predictable Failure Detected (TEST)
This results from a manually executed test command. This ensures your
disk drive supports SMART detection and report functionality.
Press ESC to clear the message.
CHL:_ ALERT: Fibre Channel Loop Failure Detected
Fibre Channel loop integrity alert. Lack of bypass or nodes on a loop
caused a Fibre loop to fail.
Check host- or drive-side connection. Contact your RAID system
supplier.
CHL:_ ALERT: Redundant Loop for CHL:_ Failure Detected
One of the dual loop members may have failed or been disconnected.
Make sure all channels are properly connected and topological
configurations properly set.
Check cabling and system installation. Contact your supplier if
no connection errors could be found.
C-23
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ ALERT: Redundant Path for CHL:_ ID:_ Expected but
Not Found
One of the dual loop members may have failed or been disconnected.
This event is regenerated in the event when the one of dual loop
connections to an expansion enclosure can not be found after power-up.
Make sure all channels are properly connected and topological
configurations properly set.
Check cabling and system installation. A manual “Issue LIP”
command may restore the connection. Contact your supplier if
no connection errors could be found.
CHL:_ ID:_ ALERT: Redundant Loop for CHL:_ ID:_ Failure
Detected
One of the dual loop members connecting device CHL:_ ID:_ may have
failed or been disconnected. Make sure all channels are properly
connected and topological configurations properly set.
Check cabling and system installation. Contact your supplier if
no connection errors could be found.
C.6.3 Notification:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ ID:_ NOTICE: Media Error Recovered-0xD8001C7C
Data once stored on bad drive sectors has been successfully
re-conducted from adjacent data blocks/stripes onto the original
drive blocks or distributed onto other healthy sectors.
** Infortrend firmware translates SATA error codes into SCSI
standard sense keys and sense codes. That’s the error codes at
the end of message.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ NOTICE: Fibre Channel Loop Connection Restored
Specific Fibre Channel loop connection restored.
Check proper host- or drive-side activities. Press ESC to clear the
message.
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ NOTICE: Redundant Path for CHL:_ Restored
Redundant path, one of the drive-side loop members, for CHL:_
ID:_ is restored.
Check proper host- or drive-side activities. Press ESC to clear the
message.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-24
CHL:_ NOTICE: Redundant Path for CHL:_ ID:_ Restored
The redundant path (CHL:_) connecting drive (CHL:_ ID:_) is
restored.
Check proper host- or drive-side activities. Press ESC to clear the
message.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive NOTICE: Drive Recovered Error Reported
Hard drive unrecoverable media error reported. A bad block is
encountered in the specified hard drive. The RAID controller will
ask the hard drive to retry.
Press [ESC] to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ LIP(FF B) Detected
A LIP is issued on CHL:_.
Check proper host- or drive-side activities. Press ESC to clear the
message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
CHL:_ Host Channel Notification: Bus Reset Issued.
Bus reset on the CHL:_ host channel.
Check proper host- or drive-side activities. Press ESC to clear the
message.
Message
What Happens?
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive NOTICE: Scan Drive Successful
A new drive or a replacement drive has been successfully
scanned/recognized by the subsystem.
Press ESC to clear the message.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
CHL:_ ID:_ Drive NOTIFY: Block Successfully Reassigned – 0
(10B)
Writes conducted, retried, and media errors were discovered.
Writes will then be re-directed to other drive sectors.
Press ESC to clear the message. If this message becomes
frequent, the target disk drive might have developed serious
media errors.
CHL:_ ID_ Drive #SEV#: Media Error Encountered
Media errors are encountered in a hard drive.
Press ESC to clear the message. If this message becomes
frequent, the target disk drive might have developed serious
media errors.
C-25
C.7 General Target Events
C.7.1 Critical:
Message
What to Do?
SAF-TE Device(0) ALERT: Power Supply Failure
Detected(Idx:132)
Power supply failure detected through SAF-TE monitoring
device.
Contact your RAID supplier for a replacement module.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Power Supply 0 Failure Detected
Power supply failure detected through an I2C serial bus.
Contact your RAID supplier for a replacement module.
Message
What Happens?
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Power Supply 0 Not Present
No power supply module is installed in the expected module
slot.
Check proper module installation. If an installed module can not
be detected, contact your RAID supplier.
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Low Voltage Detected
(-1073939240.5V)
Low voltage detected from the power supply. Power supply
may have become unstable.
Check proper module installation and contact your RAID
supplier for a replacement module.
SES(C0 I0)Power Supply 0:Device Not Supported!
Unrecognizable device type. This event may result from an
incorrect configuration with the SES remote device monitoring.
Check proper module installation and contact your RAID system
supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
SAF-TE Device(0) ALERT: Cooling Fan Not Installed(Idx:2)
No cooling fan module is installed in the expected module slot.
Check proper module installation. If an installed module can not
be detected, contact your RAID supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
SAF-TE Device(0) ALERT: Cooling Fan Failure Detected(Idx:2)
Cooling fan failure detected through SAF-TE monitoring device.
Contact your RAID supplier for a replacement module.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Cooling Fan 2 Failure Detected
Cooling fan failure detected through an I2C serial bus.
Contact your RAID supplier for a replacement module.
C-26
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Cooling Fan 2 Note Present
No cooling fan module is installed in the expected module slot.
Check proper module installation or contact your RAID supplier
for a replacement module.
Message
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Low Speed
Detected(-1073870808 RPM)
Low rotation speed detected on cooling fan. This is a fault
detected through an I2C serial bus.
Check proper module installation or contact your RAID supplier
for a replacement module.
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
SES(C0 I0)Cooling Fan 0:Device Not Supported!
Unrecognizable device type. This event may result from an
incorrect configuration with the SES remote device monitoring.
Check proper module installation and contact your RAID system
supplier.
SAF-TE Device(0) ALERT: Elevated Temperature Alert
Elevated temperature detected through SAF-TE monitoring
device. Improper installation site condition or cooling fan failure
might have caused the system temperature to rise.
Check proper cooling and cooling fan working condition.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
Peripheral Device ALERT: CPU Cold Temperature
Detected(_._C))
Temperature below the lower CPU threshold detected.
Improper installation site condition might have caused the
situation.
Correct your installation site condition. Contact your RAID
system supplier.
Peripheral Device ALERT: Elevated Temperature Alert
High temperature threshold violated and detected through an
I2C serial bus. Improper installation site condition or cooling fan
failure might have caused the situation.
Correct your installation site condition and cooling fan failure.
Contact your RAID system supplier if a replacement is
necessary.
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Temperature Sensor 0 Failure
Detected
Temperature sensor failure reported through an I2C serial bus.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
C-27
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Temperature Sensor 0 Not
Present
Temperature sensor failed or serial bus
configuration/connection faults occurred.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: Cold Detected
Temperature dropped below the lower system threshold
detected. Improper installation site condition might have
caused the situation.
Correct your installation site condition. Contact your RAID
system supplier.
SES(C0 I0)Temp Sensor 0: Device Note Supported!
Unrecognizable device type. This event may result from an
incorrect configuration with the SES remote device monitoring.
Check proper module installation and contact your RAID system
supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
UPS Connection Is Absent
The COM2 link to a UPS device is absent.
Check cabling to the UPS device. If hardware faults occurred,
contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
SAF-TE Device(2) ALERT: UPS Power Failure Detected
UPS power failure detected through SAF-TE monitoring device.
Contact your UPS supplier.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: UPS Power Failure Detected
UPS power failure is detected through an I2C serial bus.
Contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: UPS 2 AC Power Failure
Detected
AC power source failure reported by UPS and to the subsystem
firmware through an I2C serial bus.
Check your power source connection or contact your RAID
system supplier.
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-28
Peripheral Set 0 Device ALERT: UPS 2 Battery Failure Detected
UPS battery failure reported by UPS and to the subsystem
firmware through an I2C serial bus.
Contact your UPS supplier.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Warning: UPS AC Power-Loss Detected
UPS AC power loss reported through the COM2 serial port
connection.
Contact your UPS supplier.
Warning: UPS Battery Low - __%
UPS battery charge low, may not be able to support subsystem
during a power outage.
Wait for the UPS to recharge or you may use the Event Triggered
mechanisms implemented with firmware. These mechanisms
use conservative operation modes to reduce the chance of data
loss in the event of power outage. Contact your UPS supplier.
SES(C0 I0)UPS 2: Device Not Supported!
Unrecognizable device type. This event may result from an
incorrect configuration with the SES remote device monitoring.
Check proper module installation and contact your RAID system
supplier.
C.7.2 Notification:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
SAF-TE Device(2) NOTICE: Fan Back On-Line(Idx:11)
A once missing or failed cooling fan is restored. This message is
reported through the SAF_TE monitoring device.
Press ESC to clear this message.
NOTICE: Fan Module A Back On-Line(FAN0 _RPM)
A once missing or failed cooling fan is restored. This message is
reported through an I2C serial bus with RPM reading.
Press ESC to clear this message.
What to Do?
Peripheral Device NOTICE: Fan Back On-Line
An I2C serial bus message indicating a once missing or failed
cooling fan is restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: FAN 1 Back On-Line
An individual cooling fan once missing or failed is restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: FAN 1 is Present
An individual cooling fan once missing or failed is restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Event Messages
C-29
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: FAN 1 Back On-Line(_RPM)
An individual cooling fan once missing or failed is restored, and
the PRM reading displays. This applies to enclosure
implementations using cooling fans capable of reporting rotation
speed.
Press ESC to clear this message.
What to Do?
SES(C0 I0) Cooling Fan 1:Fan Back On-Line
A cooling fan once missing or failed is restored. This message is
reported through an SES monitoring device.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: FAN 1 Back On-Line
An individual cooling fan once missing or failed is restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
SAF-TE Device(1) NOTICE: Temperature Back To Non-Critical
LVs
Operating temperature back within normal temperature range.
Press ESC to clear this message.
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-30
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: Temperature 1 Back To
Non-Critical LVs
Temperature sensor 1 reports operating temperature is now
within normal temperature range.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: Temperature 1 is Present
Temperature sensor 1 once missing and is now present on the
serial bus.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: Temperature 1 Back To
Non-Critical LVs (_(C)
Temperature sensor 1 reports operating temperature is now
within normal temperature range and the Celsius reading
displays.
Press ESC to clear this message.
SES(C0 I0) Temp Sensor 1: Temperature Back to Non Critical LVs
Temperature sensor 1 reports operating temperature is now
within normal temperature range.
Press ESC to clear this message.
SAF-TE Device(1) NOTICE: Power Supply Back On-Line (Idx:4)
A power supply once missing or failed is now restored. This
event is reported through the SAF-TE monitoring interface.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Power Supply 0 Back-Online
Power supply module 0 is back online
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: PSU0 +12V Back On-Line
Power supply module 0 restored normal +12V voltage range
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: PSU0 +12V is Present
Power supply module 0 restored normal +12V voltage range
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
SES(C0 I0)Power Supply 2: Power Supply Back On-Line
Power supply module 2 once missing or failed is now restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
UPS Connection Detected
The COM2 serial link to UPS device is now valid.
Press ESC to clear this message.
UPS AC Power Restored
UPS reports AC power source is now restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
UPS Battery Restored to Safe Level 0
UPS battery is charged to a safe level, able to protect system
operation.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
SAF-TE Device(2) NOTICE: UPS Power Back On-Line
Power supplied by UPS is now restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: UPS 2 AC Power Back On-Line
UPS 2 AC power source restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: UPS 2 Battery Back On-Line
UPS 2 Battery charge or battery failure restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Peripheral Set 0 Device NOTICE: UPS 2 AC Power Back On-Line
UPS 2 AC power source restored.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Event Messages
C-31
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-32
SES(C0 I0)UPS 2: UPS Power Back On-Line
UPS 2 connected through SES interface reports power back
online.
Press ESC to clear this message.
Infortrend
C.8 Controller Events
C.8.1 Critical:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
ALERT: +3.3V Low Voltage Detected(_._V)
The detected +3.3V voltage source is lower than the preset
voltage threshold.
Check power supply working condition, voltage threshold
settings, and contact your RAID system supplier if necessary.
ALERT: Controller FAN 0 Low Speed Detected (_RPM)
This only applies to controller fans in the SentinelRAID series.
Low rotation speed detected.
Contact your RAID system supplier for a replacement.
Controller NOTICE: Redundant Controller Firmware Updated
Firmware updated on a redundant controller RAID subsystem.
Resetting the subsystem may be required for the new firmware
to take effect.
Updating firmware on a complex system configuration is
recommended for experienced engineers only. Unless for bug
fixing, updating firmware is not always necessary.
Controller ALERT: Redundant Controller Failure Detected
One RAID controller in a controller pair failed. This message
indicates that its partner has taken the workload and managed
the failover operation.
Contact your RAID system supplier for a replacement controller
and restore the dual-active configuration.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Controller SDRAM ECC Multi-bits Errors Detected
Memory multi-bits errors.
Contact your RAID system supplier to return the
subsystem/RAID controller for repair.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Controller SDRAM ECC Single-bit Errors Detected
Memory single-bit errors.
Subsystem firmware should be able to manage the single-bit
errors. Contact your RAID system supplier if this message
becomes frequent.
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Controller SDRAM Parity Errors Detected
Memory parity errors.
Subsystem firmware should be able to manage the parity errors
in memory. Contact your RAID system supplier if this message
becomes frequent.
Event Messages
C-33
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Controller PCI Bus Parity Errors Detected
Serious system faults have occurred.
Stop host I/Os immediately to prevent further data dis-integrity
and contact your RAID system supplier.
Message
What Happens?
Controller ALERT: Power Supply Unstable or NVRAM Failed
Power supply voltage fluctuating or internal system faults have
occurred. Different system faults may trigger this event, e.g.,
memory pins contact problems or incongruent firmware
versions, etc.
Check proper system operation conditions and contact your
RAID system supplier.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-34
BBU Absent or Failed! Correct It and Reset Ctlr to Take Effect
BBU (battery cell pack) has failed or is accidentally removed.
When a new module is installed, reset the subsystem for the
configuration to take effect.
Check proper installation of the module or contact your RAID
system supplier for a replacement module.
Controller BBU Absent or Failed!
BBU (battery cell pack) has failed or is accidentally removed.
When a new module is installed, reset the subsystem for the
configuration to take effect.
Check proper installation of the module or contact your RAID
system supplier for a replacement module.
Controller BBU Failure Detected!
BBU (battery cell pack) has failed or is accidentally removed.
When a new module is installed, reset the subsystem for the
configuration to take effect.
Check proper installation of the module or contact your RAID
system supplier for a replacement module.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
Controller BBU Thermal Shutdown/Enter Sleep-Mode!
The following conditions will cause the charger circuits to enter a
low-power and self-protection state:
1.
The temperature sensor on the charger circuit reports
elevated temperature reading (>= 45 degree Celsius).
2.
What to Do?
The BBU (battery cell pack) has been charged for over 7
hours. The BBU charger will enter a timer fault state.
1. Check proper ventilation within the subsystem. You
may also check the readings from other sensors within
the enclosure. Airflow might have been disrupted by the
absence of one or several major modules or the failure of
a cooling fan. Once the thermal condition is improved,
charging will resume automatically.
2. If a new battery module has been charged for over seven
(7) hours and this event is issued, you may remove and
re-install the battery module. An empty battery module
may take more than 7 hours to be fully charge. There is a
timer embedded with the charger, doing so can reset the
timer. Charging will resume automatically.
C.8.2 Warning:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Memory Not Sufficient to Fully Support Current Config.
The installed memory size does not support current
configuration. Try using a DIMM module of a larger size.
Check proper installation of the module or contact your RAID
system supplier for a certified module.
C.8.3 Notification:
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
Board1 Cold Temperature Back to Non-Critical LVs(_(C))
Board1 (usually the RAID controller main board) ventilation
condition is restored to normal.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
+12V Upper Voltage Back within Acceptable Limits (_._V)
+12V voltage dropped back within preset thresholds.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
C-35
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
+12V Lower Voltage Back within Acceptable Limits (_._V)
+12V voltage dropped back within preset thresholds.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
Message
What Happens?
Memory is Now Sufficient to Fully Support Current Config.
Memory of a sufficient capacity is installed and the subsystem
should work properly.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Controller NOTICE: NVRAM Factory Defaults Restored
The factory defaults for configuration profile is restored.
Press ESC to clear the message.
Message
What Happens?
Controller BBU is Charging!
Once a new BBU is installed or BBU charge drops below a
preconfigured level, the subsystem will start charging its
batteries.
Press ESC to clear the message. All batteries have a limited life
expectancy. If this message appears too frequently, the BBU may
have gradually lost its ability to hold charge.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
+12V Upper Voltage Back within Acceptable Limits (_._V)
+12V voltage dropped back within preset thresholds.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
Message
What Happens?
NOTICE: Controller BBU Present!
A BBU once missing or removed is now electrically connected to
the subsystem.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
C-36
NOTICE: Controller BBU Back On-Line!
A BBU once missing or removed is now restored to its normal
working condition.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
NOTICE: Controller BBU Fully Charged!
A BBU is fully charged.
Check proper working condition and press ESC to clear the
message.
Infortrend
Message
What Happens?
What to Do?
Event Messages
Force Controller Write-Through on Trigger Cause
Preset conditions, e.g., elevated temperature or component
failure, has forced the subsystem to adopt a more conservative
operating mode by disabling the Write-Back caching.
Check proper working condition and correct system faults. Press
ESC to clear the message.
C-37
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left blank
C-38
Infortrend
Event Messages.............................................................................................................................. 1
C.1
Logical Drive Events .................................................................................................. 2
C.1.1
Critical:.............................................................................................................. 2
C.1.2
Notification: ...................................................................................................... 2
C.2
Channel and Individual Drive Events ......................................................................... 4
C.2.1
Critical:.............................................................................................................. 4
C.2.2
Warning: ............................................................................................................ 4
C.2.3
Notification: ...................................................................................................... 5
C.3
General Target Events................................................................................................. 6
C.3.1
Critical:.............................................................................................................. 6
C.3.2
Notification: ...................................................................................................... 6
C.4
Controller Events ........................................................................................................ 8
C.4.1
Critical:.............................................................................................................. 8
C.4.2
Warning: ............................................................................................................ 8
C.4.3
Notification: ...................................................................................................... 8
Event Description .......................................................................................................................... 9
C.5
Logical Drive Events .................................................................................................. 9
C.5.1
Critical:.............................................................................................................. 9
C.5.2
Notification: .................................................................................................... 13
C.6
Channel and Individual Drive Events ....................................................................... 18
C.6.1
Critical:............................................................................................................ 18
C.6.2
Warning: .......................................................................................................... 18
C.6.3
Notification: .................................................................................................... 24
C.7
General Target Events............................................................................................... 26
C.7.1
Critical:............................................................................................................ 26
C.7.2
Notification: .................................................................................................... 29
C.8
Controller Events ...................................................................................................... 33
C.8.1
Critical:............................................................................................................ 33
C.8.2
Warning: .......................................................................................................... 35
C.8.3
Notification: .................................................................................................... 35
Event Messages
C-39