Craftsman 220 User's Manual

Metal Fold-Up Utility Trailer
Model No. 0220
Sears Item No. 123.24201
op
y
User’s Manual and Maintenance Guide
Questions?
Please call 1-800-422-3865
DO NOT RETURN TO THE STORE
C
Call 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday (Central Standard Time)
Store this manual in the glove compartment of your tow vehicle.
Warning: For safe operation of this trailer, be sure to read all
instructions and warnings. Failure to follow instructions and
warnings could result in property damage, serious injury and death.
Instruction No. 1028859 D
10/26/2007
Register your product at www.lifetime.com.
C
op
y
www.lifetime.com
Craftsman Metal Fold-Up Utility Trailer
Model No. 0220
Sears Item No. 123.24201
WARNING
This User’s Manual contains safety information and instructions for your trailer. You
must read this manual before loading or towing your trailer. You must follow all
safety precautions and instructions.
For parts and service, call our customer service line at: 1-800-422-3865
NHTSA Notification Statement:
If you believe that your vehicle has a defect that could cause a crash or could cause
injury or death, you should immediately inform the National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration (NHTSA) in addition to notifying Lifetime Products.
If NHTSA receives similar complaints, it may open an investigation, and if it finds
that a safety defect exists in a group of vehicles, it may order a recall and remedy
campaign. However, NHTSA cannot become involved in individual problems
between you, Sears, or Lifetime Products.
To contact NHTSA, you may either call the Vehicle Safety Hotline toll-free at 1888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-424-9153), go to http://www.safecar.gov; or write to:
Administrator, NHTSA, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590. You can
also obtain other information about motor vehicle safety from http://www.safecar.gov.
Call 1-800-422-3865 to reach our Customer Service line.
Table of Contents
Section 1: Safety Information
Section 2: Trailer Parts & Hardware
Section 3: FIRST-TIME SET-UP Requirements
Section 4: Trailer setup
Section 5: Coupling to the Tow Vehicle
5.1 Using an Adequate Tow Vehicle and Hitch
5.2 Coupling and Uncoupling the Trailer
5.2.1 Trailer with Ball-Hitch Coupler
5.2.1.1 Before coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle
5.2.1.2 Prepare the coupler and hitch
5.2.1.3 Coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle
5.2.1.4 Rigging the safety chains
5.2.1.5 Connecting the electrical cables
5.2.1.6 Uncoupling the Trailer
Section 6: Tire & Safety Information
6.1 Determining Correct Load Limit – Trailer
6.1.1 Trailers 10,000 Pounds GVWR or Less
6.2 Determining Correct Load Limit – Tow Vehicle
6.3 Glossary of Tire Terminology
6.4 Tire Safety - Everything Rides on It
6.4.1 Safety first–Basic tire maintenance
6.4.2 Finding your vehicle’s recommended tire pressure and load limits
6.4.3 Understanding tire pressure and load limits
6.4.4 Checking tire pressure
6.4.5 Steps for maintaining proper tire pressure
6.4.6 Tire size
6.4.7 Tire tread
6.4.8 Tire balance and wheel alignment
6.4.9 Tire repair
6.4.10 Tire Fundamentals
6.4.10.1 Information on Passenger Vehicle Tires
6.4.10.2 UTQGS Information
6.4.10.3. Additional Information on Light Truck Tires
6.4.11 Tire Safety Tips
6.4.11.1 Preventing Tire Damage
6.4.11.2 Tire Safety Checklist
6.5 Changing a Flat Tire
6.6 Checking the Tire Pressure
Section 7: Loading the Trailer
7.1. CHECKING THE TONGUE WEIGHT
7.1.1 Checking Tongue Weight — Using a lever and bathroom scale
7.2 Securing the Cargo
7.2.1 Loading Cargo
7.2.1.1 Preparing the Trailer for Loading
7
11
12
17
19
19
19
19
20
20
20
21
22
23
24
24
24
24
24
27
28
28
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29
29
29
30
30
30
30
30
32
32
33
33
33
33
35
36
38
38
38
38
39
7.2.1.2 Loading the Trailer
Section 8: Check trailer before & during towing
Section 9: Breaking in a New Trailer
Section 10: Maintenance
10.1 Inspection, Service & Maintenance Summary Charts
10.2 Inspection and Service Instructions
10.2.1 Axle Bolts, Frame, Suspension, & Structure
10.2.2 Trailer Structure
10.2.2.1 Fasteners and Frame Members
10.2.2.2 Welds
10.2.3 Trailer Connection to Tow Vehicle
10.2.3.1 Coupler and Ball
10.2.4 Landing Leg or Jack
10.2.5 Lights and Signals
10.2.6 Tires
10.2.7 Wheel Rims
10.2.8 Wheels, Bearings and Lug Nuts
10.2.8.1 Unsealed Bearings (Hubs)
10.2.9 Lug Nuts (Bolts)
10.2.10 Suspension
Section 11: Exploded Trailer Views
Section 12: Warranty Information
39
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44
45
45
46
46
46
47
47
47
47
48
48
48
48
49
49
50
56
This Page Intentionally Left Blank
Section 1: Safety
Information
Safety alert symbols and Signal Words
The safety information in this
manual is denoted by the safety
alert symbol:
The level of risk is indicated by the following signal words:
SIGNAL WORDS
Warning
Hazards or unsafe practices
which COULD result in severe
personal injury or death if the
warning is ignored.
Caution
Hazards or unsafe practices
which could result in minor or
moderate injury if the warning is
ignored.
If a label becomes unreadable, you can re-order them from Customer Service:
1-800-422-3865
Warning Labels & Locations
1
2
9
5
2
2
3
4
8
6
10
2
7
3
1
5
Lug Nuts and Tire Pressure
WArninG
Tire, wheel or lug nut failure can cause loss of control.
before towing, you must CHeCK:
1. Tire pressure and tread.
2. Tires and wheels for damage.
3. Lug nuts for tightness.
For new and remounted wheels,
Retighten lug nuts at the first
10, 25 and 50 miles of driving.
AdverTenCiA
Las fallas en las llantas, ruedas o tuercas a las llantas pueden provocar
pérdida del control. Antes de realizar un acarreo, debe revisAr:
1. Presión y costura de las llantas.
2. daños en llantas y ruedas.
3. Tuercas a las llantas bien apretadas.
Para llantas nuevas y reacondicionadas, apriete nuevamente las tuercas
a las llantas a los primeros 16 kilómetros, 40,2 Kilómetros y 80,5
kilómetros de manejo.
© 2002 NATM
Lug nuts TiGHT?
Tuercas a las llantas
¿bien APreTAdAs?
Tires and Wheels OK?
Las llantas y ruedas ¿esTán bien?
# 1027939
1
Re-order #1027939
The proper tightness (torque) for lug nuts is 95-120 ft./lb. Do not exceed 120 ft./lb.
Use a torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts. If you do not have a torque wrench, use
a lug wrench (from your tow vehicle) and tighten the nuts as much as you can. Then
have a service garage or trailer dealer tighten the lug nuts to the proper torque. See
the section on Tire and Safety Information for more details concerning tire safety.
Lug nuts are also prone to loosen after first being assembled. When driving a new
trailer (or after wheels have been remounted), check to make sure they are tight after
the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and before each tow thereafter.
Failure to perform this check can result in a wheel parting from the trailer and a crash,
leading to death or serious injury.
Securely Latching the Trailer Gate
2
CAUTION
SECURE GATES
BEFORE MOVING
TRAILER
Ensure the trailer gates are secure during towing. Failure to
insert gates securely could result in the load separating from
the trailer causing serious property damage, personal injury
and death.
PRECAUCIÓN
¡ASEGURE LOS
PORTONES ANTES
DE MOVER EL
REMOLQUE!
#1027932
Re-order #1027932
3
Assist Wheel Caution
Always keep the Assist Wheel up when loading, unloading or towing the Trailer.
CAUTION
CAUTION
Part #1024838
Trailer
while
ALWAYS load and tow the
Trailer
Assistthe
Wheel
is up.
Failure
heed
while
Assist
Wheel
is up.toFailure
this
warning
could result
permanent
to
heed
this warning
couldinresult
in
damage to the
AssisttoWheel
and Wheel
void
permanent
damage
the Assist
warranty.
and
void warranty.
Part #1024838
Part #1025229
Part #1025229
Coupler, Load Weight and Distribution and Electrical
Connections
4
WARNING
ADVERTENCIA
WARNING
Uncoupling will cause trailer to come loose from tow vehicle. You must:
Attach hooks to tow vehicle
sujetar los ganchos al vehículo remolcador
1. ChECk that ball load rating is same or greater than coupler load rating.
2. ChECk that ball size is same as coupler.
3. ClosE CoUplER ClAmp on ball.
4. lIfT coupler upwards to test that it will not separate from ball.
5. loCk coupler clamp with pin or padlock.
El
desenganche
hará
que
el
remolque
quede
suelto
del
vehículo
remolcador.
Usted
deberá:
pin or padlock
1. VERIfICAR que la CApACIDAD DE CARGA de la bola sea igual o mayor que la
Enough slack
In place
CApACIDAD DE CARGA del enganche.
for turns
Colocar el candado o
2. VERIfICAR que el tamaño de la bola sea igual que el enganche.
Suficientemente
gancho
3. CERRAR el ToRNIllo DE AjUsTE DEl ENGANChE sobre la bola.
Cross chains
flojo para poder
lift coupler to check
4. lEVANTAR el enganche para probar que no se separe de la bola.
Cruzar las cadenas
girar
Levantar el enganche para verificar 5. CERRAR el tornillo de ajuste del enganche con un gancho o candado.
open
Abierto
Closed
Cerrado
ADVERTENCIA
WARNING
ADVERTENCIA
WARNING
Always use safety chains.
Improper loading can cause trailer sway and sudden loss of control. You must:
Balance load side to side
secure load to trailer
DIsCoNNECTED
Chains hold trailer if connection fails. You must:
Asegurar la carga
Balancear la carga de lado a lado • Ensure weight of load plus trailer weight does not exceed trailer’s capacity
DEsCoNECTADAs
1. CRoss chains underneath coupler.
(GVWR - Gross Vehicle Weight Rating).
al remolque
2. AlloW slack for trailer to turn.
• load heavier items in front of wheels.
3. ATTACh chain hooks securely to tow vehicle frame.
• load evenly side to side.
less load in rear
• secure load to trailer.
Utilice siempre cadenas de seguridad. las cadenas
Una
carga
impropia
puede
causar
que
el
remolque
se
tambalee
o
que
menos
carga
sobre
la
sostienen el remolque en caso de que la conexión falle.
parte posterior de las repentinamente pierda el control. Usted deberá:
Usted deberá:
• Asegurar que el peso de la carga más el peso del remolque no exceda la
ruedas
1. CRUzAR las cadenas por debajo del enganche.
capacidad del remolque (Clase de peso del Vehículo).
2. pERmITIR que las cadenas queden flojas para que
• Cargar los elementos más pesados en la parte delantera de las ruedas.
el remolque pueda girar.
more load in front of wheels
• Cargar de forma equitativa de lado a lado.
3. sUjETAR de forma segura los ganchos de la
más carga sobre la parte delantera de las ruedas • Asegurar la carga al remolque.
#1031540
cadena a los bordes del vehículo remolcador.
CoNNECTED
CoNECTADAs
ADVERTENCIA
lights can prevent trailer from being hit by other vehicles.
You must:
1. CoNNECT trailer and tow vehicle electrical connectors.
2. ChECk all lights: tail lights, turn signals, and brake lights.
3. Do NoT ToW if lights are not working.
las luces pueden prevenir que otros vehículos choquen el
remolque. Usted deberá:
1. CoNECTAR los conectores eléctricos del remolque y del
vehículo remolcador.
2. VERIfICAR todas las luces, las luces traseras, las luces
de guiño, y las luces del freno.
3. No UTIlICE El REmolqUE si las luces no funcionan.
Re-order #1031540
Loads can suddenly move or topple, which can result in death or serious injury.
Overloaded trailers and improper tongue weight can result in loss of control of the
trailer. Ensure the trailer is coupled correctly and the chains are crossed over each other.
Ensure the load is tied securely and doesn’t exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW).
Ensure the electrical connections are tightly fitted and functioning properly. Always
check brake lights and turn signals before each tow.
5
Pinch Point Warning
WARNING
Watch for pinch
points while
folding or
deploying trailer
as serious injury
could occur.
Always use the
Hand Crank
when folding
and deploying
Trailer. Ensure
others keep a safe
distance to avoid
any potential
pinch points.
6
Folded Trailer Warning
You can store
the Trailer in
NEVER tow
folded position,
Trailer while in
but do NOT tow
folded position.
the Trailer while
Failure to heed this it’s folded. The
warning may void Trailer may tip
warranty and could over resulting in
result in property property damage,
damage, serious
serious injury or
death.
injury or death.
WARNING
Part #1025112
Part
#1024837
Part #1024837
7
Tire and Loading Information
No re-orders
Always check tire pressure to ensure optimum life and performance from your tires.
The tires that came with your trailer should have a tire pressure of 80 psi. Sears,
Roebuck and Co. cannot be held responsible for damages caused by uneven tread
wear and blow outs from an under-inflated or over-inflated tire.
The Trailer and load should never exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW).
Whenever loading the trailer, always check to see if you’re within this limit. See the
section on Loading the Trailer for information regarding how to check .
This sticker also displays your Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) in the bottom,
left-hand corner.
8
NATM Compliance
9
Patent Advisory
No re-orders
Re-order #1014245
This
sticker
displays the various patents
Your trailer is in compliance with the
applicable
to
the trailer.
guidelines of the National Association of
Trailer Manufacturers. Your trailer has its
own unique number. Note: This is not
your Vehicle Identification Number (VIN).
10
10
Ball and Hitch Size
Your new trailer comes with a 2-inch coupler. The ball
on the tow vehicle must be 2 inches in diameter. An
incorrect ball size can cause the separation of the trailer
from the tow vehicle resulting in possible property
damage, serious injury and death.
Re-order #1013499
Section 2: Trailer Parts &
Hardware
Before beginning assembly, inventory all parts using the Parts List and the Hardware Identifier (below). If all parts are not present, do NOT assemble the trailer.
Call 1-800-422-3865.
PARTS LIST
IDDescriptionQty
AA
Gate/Ramp
2
AB
Hand Crank
1
AC
2” x 4” Distance Indicator (Do Not Discard)
1
AD
Locking Pin w/ Lanyard (Connected)
1
AE
Cotter Key (Connected)
1
Hardware Identifier
(*Not to Scale)
*AE
*AA
*AD
*AB
Do Not Discard
*AC
TOOLS NEEDED (NOT INCLUDED)
1. 13/16” Lug Wrench or Tire Iron (For changing Tires and periodic tightening of Lug
Nuts).
11
Section 3:
FIRST-time set-up requirements
Lug Nuts: Tightening Sequence, Torque Requirements
• Before unfolding your Trailer, remove the plastic Zip Tie holding the Locking Pin
to the Tongue of the Trailer. Do not cut the Lanyard.
Locking Pin
Lanyard
WARNING
Lug nuts are prone to loosen after initial installation possibly causing
the wheel to separate from the trailer leading to property damage, death
or serious injury.
• Check lug nuts for tightness on a new trailer or when wheel(s) have
been remounted after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and
after any impact.
• Lug nuts for the tires must be tightened by the user before each use.
• Sears cannot be held responsible for damages caused by loosened
lug nuts.
• Before towing the Trailer, you must ensure the lug nuts are tightened to the proper
torque.
• The torque requirements for the Lug Nuts are 95 - 120 ft./lb. Do not exceed 120
ft./lb of torque. Tighten the Lug Nuts in the sequence below before you leave the
dealer.
Tighten lug nuts
in the following
order:
1
4
3
5
2
Verify the proper PSI for your tire.
• Tire pressure for the 12” rim & tire should be at 80 psi.
Follow local and state laws, but do not exceed 65 mph.
WARNING
Before loading Trailer, Trailer must be properly connected to
the Tow Vehicle to stabilize the Trailer. Failure to follow this
warning could result in property damage, personal injury and
death.
12
Connecting Temporary License Plate
If your state requires a temporary license on your trailer, secure the license to the
license plate holder located on the left blinker before towing your trailer home.
Temporary
License
Note: Before leaving the dealer, ensure you have the Manufacturers Certificate of
Origin (Title) signed over to you.
Note: For all inquiries regarding trailer title and registration, please contact your
local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) or your local county tax assessor’s
office.
Connecting the Electrical Cables
Connect the trailer lights to the tow vehicle’s electrical system using the
electrical connectors.
• Check all lights for proper operation.
1. Clearance and Running Lights (Turn on tow vehicle headlights).
2. Brake Lights (Step on tow vehicle brake pedal).
3. Turn Signals (Operate tow vehicle directional signal lever).
Warning: To ensure your trailer lights function properly, firmly insert the
Plug (Trailer) into the Receptor (Tow Vehicle).
Note: If your connector does not look like the one pictured, you need to purchase
an adapter.
From Trailer
From Tow Vehicle
From Tow Vehicle From Trailer
Note: Please read Sections 4 and 5 for additional information on deploying,
coupling and towing your trailer.
WARNING
Do not transport people in the trailer. Failure to heed this warning could result in serious injury such as broken bones, brain
damage, paralysis or death.
13
Section 4:
Trailer Setup
Hardware Used:
*AB
*Not actual size
Before towing your trailer home you must first unfold it and assemble the front and
rear panels.
4.1 Before unfolding your Trailer, remove the plastic Zip Tie holding the Locking
Pin to the Tongue of the Trailer. Do not cut the Lanyard.
4.2 Tilt the front of the Trailer upward and lower the Assist Wheel to the ground.
Locking Pin
Lanyard
Assist Wheel
Tongue
4.3 Pull forward on the Trailer until the side of the Trailer rests on the Assist Wheel.
WARNING
Do NOT tow trailer in folded position. Trailer will tip and
fall over causing property damage and possible injury to other
motorists and pedestrians or death.
14
With the right side of the Trailer resting on the Assist Wheel, you can now unfold the
Trailer.
4.4 Remove the Hand Crank (AB) from the clips just inside wall of the Trailer.
Note: You may need to remove the Gate/Ramp to access the Hand Crank from the
insde wall of the Trailer.
4.5 Insert the Hand Crank into the jack’s Hand Crank Coupler Plate at the rear of
the Trailer (as shown).
Hand Crank Coupler Plate
Hand Crank
WARNING
Watch for pinch points while folding and deploying trailer as
serious injury could occur.
4.6 Turn the Hand Crank counter-clockwise to unfold the Trailer. Continue
turning the Hand Crank until you cannot turn it any further.
15
4.7 Remove the Cotter Key (AE) from the Locking Pin (AD) and insert the Locking
Pin into the Bed Pin Retainer and through the Tongue.
Note: If the holes in the Bed Pin Retainer and Tongue do not align, you must fully
unfold the trailer.
4.8 Secure the Locking Pin (AD) in place with the Cotter Key (AE).
AD
AE
CAUTION
ALWAYS tow the Trailer with Locking Pin and Cotter Key in place
through Trailer bed and Tongue. Ensure you remove Cotter Key and
Locking Pin when folding Trailer.
16
4.9 After unfolding the Trailer, lift up on the front of the Trailer and retract the Assist
Wheel.
CAUTION
ALWAYS load and tow the Trailer while the Assist Wheel is up. Failure
to heed this warning could result in permanent damage to the Assist
Wheel and void warranty.
4.10 Insert the Front and Rear Gates (AA) in place. Both Gates are the same; you
can insert each in either the front or rear position.
WARNING: Watch for pinch points as serious injury could
occur.
4.11 Press down firmly
on the Gates until they
lock into place under the
Lips of the Side Panels.
Lip
WARNING
Do NOT use the Gates for tie-down locations. All articles being
towed must be tied to the side walls of the Trailer. Gates can
dislodge causing property damage and possible injury or death to
other motorists and pedestrians.
17
4.12 Use the Front and Rear Gates as ramps. Simply remove each Gate and place
the ends into the channel at the rear of the Trailer Bed.
WARNING
Only load Trailer while it is connected to the Tow Vehicle or
Trailer could tip causing property damage, possible injury or
death.
4.13 When driving vehicles such as ATVs up the ramps, first place the 2” x 4” x 63”
Distance Indicator in the grooves of the side panels where the front gate should go to
help you avoid driving too far.
CAUTION
The 2” x 4” Distance Indicator will not prevent you from driving
off the front of the Trailer. It is used to let you know you’re going
too far. Drive slowly and cautiously when driving vehicles up
the ramps.
2” x 4” x 63” Distance Indicator
Do Not Discard
Note: To fold the Trailer, simply remove the Locking Pin and Gates and turn the
Hand Crank clockwise. Store the Gates and Hand Crank in the Trailer.
WARNING
Do not transport people in the trailer. Failure to heed this warning could result in serious injury such as broken bones, brain
damage, paralysis or death.
18
Section 5: Coupling to
the Tow Vehicle
Attaching the trailer to TOW vehicle
You must follow all of the safety precautions and instructions in this manual to
ensure safety of persons, cargo, and satisfactory life of the trailer.
5.1 Warning: Using an Adequate Tow Vehicle and Hitch
If the vehicle or hitch is not properly selected and matched to the Gross Vehicle
Weight Rating (GVWR) of your trailer, you can cause an accident that could lead to
death or serious injury. If you already have a tow vehicle, know your vehicle tow
rating and make certain the trailer’s rated capacity is less than or equal to the tow
vehicle’s rated towing capacity. If you already have (or plan to buy) a trailer, make
certain that the tow rating of the tow vehicle is equal to or greater than that of the
trailer.
5.2 Warning: Coupling and Uncoupling the Trailer
A secure coupling (or fastening) of the trailer to the tow vehicle is essential. A loss
of coupling may result in death or serious injury. Therefore, you must understand
and follow all of the instructions for coupling your trailer to your tow vehicle.
The following parts are involved in ensuring a secure coupling between the trailer
and tow vehicle:
Coupler: A device on the tongue of the trailer that connects to the hitch on the
tow vehicle.
Hitch: A device on the tow vehicle that supports the weight of the trailer tongue
and pulls the trailer. The coupler attaches to the hitch.
Safety chains: If the coupler connection comes loose, the safety chains can keep
the trailer attached to the tow vehicle. With properly rigged safety chains, it is
possible to keep the tongue of the trailer from digging into the road pavement,
even if the coupler-to-hitch connection comes apart.
Trailer lighting (and braking) connector: A device that connects electrical
power from the tow vehicle to the trailer. Electricity is used to turn on brake
lights, running lights, and turn signals as required.
5.2.1 Trailer with Ball-Hitch Coupler
A ball hitch coupler connects to a ball that is located on or under the rear bumper
of the tow vehicle. This system of coupling a trailer to a tow vehicle is sometimes
referred to as “bumper pull.”
Warning: We have utilized a 2-inch Ball Hitch coupler that is suitable for the
size and weight of the trailer. You must provide a hitch and 2-inch ball for
your tow vehicle, where the load rating of the hitch and ball is equal to or greater
19
than that of your trailer. Also, the ball size must be the same as the coupler size. If
the hitch ball is too small, too large, is underrated, is loose or is worn, the trailer can
come loose from the tow vehicle, and may cause death or serious injury.
THE TOW VEHICLE, HITCH AND BALL MUST HAVE A RATED TOWING
CAPACITY EQUAL TO OR GREATER THAN THE TRAILER Gross
Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).
IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT THE HITCH BALL BE OF THE SAME SIZE AS THE
COUPLER (2 INCHES).
The ball size and load rating (capacity) are marked on the ball; hitch capacity is
marked on the hitch.
5.2.1.1 Before coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle
• Ensure the size and rating of hitch ball match the 2-inch coupler on your trailer.
Hitch balls and couplers are marked with their size and rating.
• Wipe the hitch ball clean, inspect it visually and feel for flat spots, cracks and
pits.
• Rock the ball to make sure it is tight to the hitch, and visually check that the
hitch ball nut is solid against the lock washer and hitch frame.
• Wipe the inside and outside of the coupler clean and inspect it visually for cracks
and deformations; feel the inside of the coupler for worn spots and pits.
• Be sure the coupler is tight to the tongue of the trailer. All coupler fasteners
must be visibly solid against the trailer frame.
• Raise the bottom surface of the coupler above the top of the hitch ball. Use
wood or concrete blocks to support the trailer tongue.
5.2.1.2 Preparing the coupler and hitch
• Lubricate the hitch ball and the inside of the coupler with a thin layer of
automotive bearing grease.
• Open the coupler locking mechanism. Ball couplers have a locking mechanism
with an internal moving piece and an outside handle.
In the open position, the coupler is able to drop fully onto the hitch ball.
See “Uncoupling the Trailer” for details on placing the coupler in the “open”
position.
• Slowly back up the tow vehicle so that the hitch ball is near or aligned under the
coupler.
5.2.1.3 Coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle
Lift the coupler and place it over the ball.
• Lower the trailer until the coupler fully engages the hitch ball. If the coupler
does not line up with the hitch ball, adjust the position of the tow vehicle.
• Engage the coupler locking mechanism. In the engaged position, the locking
mechanism securely holds the coupler to the hitch ball.
20
• Insert a pin or lock through the hole in the locking mechanism.
• Ensure the coupler is all the way on the hitch ball and the locking mechanism is
engaged.
• Lower the trailer so that its entire tongue weight is held by the hitch. Push the
safety latch downward to a horizontal position to lock it in place.
• Pull up on the coupler to ensure it is securely fastened to the tow vehicle.
If the coupler cannot be secured to the hitch ball, do not tow the trailer.
Refer to Section 10.2.3 for information on coupling your trailer.
WARNING
Use 30W Motor Oil to lubricate the ball and inside of coupler.
Always check ball and coupler before each tow for damaged or
worn edges. Damaged balls and couplers should be replaced
immediately. Failure to follow this warning could result in
property damage, personal injury and death.
5.2.1.4 Rigging the safety chains
• Visually inspect the safety chains and hooks for wear or damage. Replace worn
or damaged safety chains and hooks before towing.
• Rig the safety chains so that they:
1. cross underneath the coupler;
2. loop around a frame member of the tow vehicle or to holes provided in the
hitch system (but, do not attach them to an interchangeable part of the hitch
assembly); and
3. have enough slack to permit tight turns, but not be close to the road surface,
so if the trailer uncouples, the safety chains can hold the tongue up above the
road.
21
WARNING
Improper rigging of the safety chains can result in loss of control
of the trailer and the tow vehicle, leading to death or serious
injury, if the trailer uncouples from the tow vehicle.
• Fasten chains to frame of tow vehicle. Do not fasten chains
to any part of the hitch unless the hitch has holes or loops
specifically for that purpose.
• Cross chains underneath hitch and coupler with enough slack
to permit turning, and to hold tongue up, if the trailer comes
loose.
5.2.1.5 Connecting the electrical cables
Connect the trailer lights to the tow vehicle’s electrical system using the electrical
connectors.
• Check all lights for proper operation.
1. Clearance and Running Lights (Turn on tow vehicle headlights).
2. Brake Lights (Step on tow vehicle brake pedal).
3. Turn Signals (Operate tow vehicle directional signal lever).
Warning: To ensure your trailer lights function properly, firmly insert the
Plug (Trailer) into the Receptor (Tow Vehicle).
Follow local and state laws, but do not exceed 65 mph.
WARNING
Do not transport people in the trailer. Failure to heed this warning could result in serious injury such as broken bones, brain
damage, paralysis or death.
22
Note: If your connector does not look like the one pictured, you need to purchase
an adapter.
From Tow Vehicle
From Trailer
From Tow Vehicle
From Trailer
WARNING
Check the connection periodically to ensure tail and break lights
function properly. Failure to follow this warning could result in
property damage, personal injury and death.
5.2.1.6 Uncoupling the Trailer
Follow these steps to uncouple your ball hitch trailer from the tow vehicle:
1. Remove the load from the trailer.
2. Block trailer tires to prevent the trailer from rolling.
3. Place wood or concrete blocks under the coupler for support.
4. Disconnect the electrical connector.
5. Disconnect the safety chains from the tow vehicle.
6. Unlock the coupler and pull the safety latch upward to a vertical position and
lift the trailer off the ball.
Unlock
23
Section 6: Tire & Safety
Information
Checking & changing tires
6.1 Determining Correct Load Limit – Trailer
6.1.1 Trailers 10,000 Pounds GVWR or Less
1. Locate the statement, “The weight of cargo should never exceed XXX kg or
XXX lb.,” on your vehicle’s placard.
2. This figure equals the available amount of cargo and luggage load capacity.
3. Determine the combined weight of luggage and cargo being loaded on the
vehicle. That weight may not safely exceed the available cargo and luggage load
capacity.
The trailer’s placard refers to the Tire Information Placard attached adjacent to or
near the trailer’s VIN (Certification) label at the left front of the trailer.
6.2 Determining Correct Load Limit – Tow Vehicle
1. Locate the statement, “The combined weight of occupants and cargo should
never exceed XXX lb.,” on your vehicle’s placard.
2. Determine the combined weight of the driver and passengers who will be riding
in your vehicle.
3. Subtract the combined weight of the driver and passengers from XXX kilograms
or XXX pounds.
4. The resulting figure equals the available amount of cargo and luggage capacity.
For example, if the “XXX” amount equals 1400 lb. and there will be five 150 lb.
passengers in your vehicle, the amount of available cargo and luggage capacity is
650 lb. (1400-750 (5 x 150) = 650 lb.).
5. Determine the combined weight of luggage and cargo being loaded on the
vehicle. That weight may not safely exceed the available cargo and luggage capacity
calculated in Step # 4.
6. If your vehicle will be towing a trailer, load from your trailer will be transferred
to your vehicle. Consult the tow vehicle’s manual to determine how this weight
transfer reduces the available cargo and luggage capacity of your vehicle.
6.3 Glossary of Tire Terminology
Accessory weight: The combined weight (in excess of those standard items which
may be replaced) of automatic transmission, power steering, power brakes, power
windows, power seats, radio and heater, to the extent that these items are available
as factory-installed equipment (whether installed or not).
Bead: The part of the tire that is made of steel wires, wrapped or reinforced by ply
cords and that is shaped to fit the rim.
Bead separation: This is the breakdown of the bond between components in the
bead.
Bias ply tire: A pneumatic tire in which the ply cords that extend to the beads are
laid at alternate angles substantially less than 90 degrees to the center line of the
tread.
24
Carcass: The tire structure, except tread and sidewall rubber which, when inflated,
bears the load.
Chunking: The breaking away of pieces of the tread or sidewall.
Cold inflation pressure: The pressure in the tire before you drive.
Cord: The strands forming the plies in the tire.
Cord separation: The parting of cords from adjacent rubber compounds.
Cracking: Any parting within the tread, sidewall, or inner liner of the tire
extending to cord material.
CT: A pneumatic tire with an inverted flange tire and rim system in which the rim
is designed with rim flanges pointed radially inward and the tire is designed to fit
on the underside of the rim in a manner that encloses the rim flanges inside the air
cavity of the tire.
Curb weight: The weight of a motor vehicle with standard equipment including
the maximum capacity of fuel, oil, and coolant, and, if so equipped, air conditioning
and additional weight optional engine.
Extra load tire: A tire designed to operate at higher loads and at higher inflation
pressures than the corresponding standard tire.
Groove: The space between two adjacent tread ribs.
Inner liner: The layer(s) forming the inside surface of a tubeless tire that contains
the inflating medium within the tire.
Inner-liner separation: The parting of the inner liner from cord material in the
carcass.
Intended outboard sidewall The sidewall that contains a white-wall, bears white
lettering or bears manufacturer, brand, and/or model name molding that is higher or
deeper than the same molding on the other sidewall of the tire or the outward facing
sidewall of an asymmetrical tire that has a particular side that must always face
outward when mounted on a vehicle.
Light truck (LT) tire: A tire designated by its manufacturer as primarily intended
for use on lightweight trucks or multipurpose passenger vehicles.
Load rating: The maximum load that a tire is rated to carry for a given inflation
pressure.
Maximum load rating: The load rating for a tire at the maximum permissible
inflation pressure for that tire.
Maximum permissible inflation pressure: The maximum cold inflation pressure
to which a tire may be inflated.
Maximum loaded vehicle weight: The sum of curb weight, accessory weight,
vehicle capacity weight, and production options weight.
Measuring rim: The rim on which a tire is fitted for physical dimension
requirements.
Non-pneumatic rim: A mechanical device which, when a non-pneumatic tire
assembly incorporates a wheel, supports the tire, and attaches, either integrally or
separably, to the wheel center member and upon which the tire is attached.
Non-pneumatic spare tire assembly: A non-pneumatic tire assembly intended
for temporary use in place of one of the pneumatic tires and rims that are fitted to a
passenger car in compliance with the requirements of this standard.
Non-pneumatic tire: A mechanical device which transmits, either directly or
through a wheel or wheel center member, the vertical load and tractive forces from
25
the roadway to the vehicle, generates the tractive forces that provide the directional
control of the vehicle and does not rely on the containment of any gas or fluid for
providing those functions.
Non-pneumatic tire assembly: A non-pneumatic tire, alone or in combination with
a wheel or wheel center member, which can be mounted on a vehicle.
Normal occupant weight: This means 68 kilograms (150 lb.) times the number of
occupants specified in the second column of Table I of 49 CFR 571.110.
Occupant distribution: The distribution of occupants in a vehicle as specified in
the third column of Table I of 49 CFR 571.110.
Open splice: Any parting at any junction of tread, sidewall, or inner liner that
extends to cord material.
Outer diameter: The overall diameter of an inflated new tire.
Overall width: The linear distance between the exteriors of the sidewalls of an
inflated tire, including elevations due to labeling, decorations, or protective bands or
ribs.
Ply: A layer of rubber-coated parallel cords.
Ply separation: A parting of rubber compound between adjacent plies.
Pneumatic tire: A mechanical device made of rubber, chemicals, fabric and
steel or other materials, that, when mounted on an automotive wheel, provides the
traction and contains the gas or fluid that sustains the load.
Production options weight: The combined weight of those installed regular
production options weighing over 2.3 kilograms (5 lb.) in excess of those standard
items which they replace, not previously considered in curb weight or accessory
weight, including heavy duty brakes, ride levelers, roof rack, heavy duty battery,
and special trim.
Radial ply tire: A pneumatic tire in which the ply cords that extend to the beads
are laid at substantially 90 degrees to the center line of the tread.
Recommended inflation pressure: This is the inflation pressure provided by the
vehicle manufacturer on the Tire Information label and on the Certification / VIN
tag.
Reinforced tire: A tire designed to operate at higher loads and at higher inflation
pressures than the corresponding standard tire.
Rim: A metal support for a tire or a tire and tube assembly upon which the tire
beads are seated.
Rim diameter: This means the nominal diameter of the bead seat.
Rim size designation: This means the rim diameter and width.
Rim type designation: This means the industry of manufacturer’s designation for
a rim by style or code.
Rim width: This means the nominal distance between rim flanges.
Section width: The linear distance between the exteriors of the sidewalls of an
inflated tire, excluding elevations due to labeling, decoration, or protective bands. Sidewall: That portion of a tire between the tread and bead.
Sidewall separation: The parting of the rubber compound from the cord material
in the sidewall.
Special Trailer (ST) tire: The “ST” is an indication the tire is for trailer use only.
Test rim: The rim on which a tire is fitted for testing, and may be any rim listed as
26
appropriate for use with that tire.
Tread: That portion of a tire that comes into contact with the road.
Tread rib: A tread section running circumferentially around a tire.
Tread separation: Pulling away of the tread from the tire carcass.
Tread-wear indicators (TWI): The projections within the principal grooves
designed to give a visual indication of the degrees of wear of the tread.
Vehicle capacity weight: The rated cargo and luggage load plus 68 kilograms (150
lb.) times the vehicle’s designated seating capacity.
Vehicle maximum load on the tire: The load on an individual tire that is
determined by distributing to each axle its share of the maximum loaded vehicle
weight and dividing by two.
Vehicle normal load on the tire: The load on an individual tire that is determined
by distributing to each axle its share of the curb weight, accessory weight, and
normal occupant weight (distributed in accordance with Table I of CRF 49 571.110)
and dividing by 2.
Weather side: The surface area of the rim not covered by the inflated tire.
Wheel center member: In the case of a non-pneumatic tire assembly incorporating
a wheel, a mechanical device which attaches, either integrally or separably, to the
non-pneumatic rim and provides the connection between the non-pneumatic rim
and the vehicle; or, in the case of a non-pneumatic tire assembly not incorporating
a wheel, a mechanical device which attaches, either integrally or separably, to the
non-pneumatic tire and provides the connection between tire and the vehicle.
Wheel-holding fixture: The fixture used to hold the wheel and tire assembly
securely during testing.
6.4 Tire Safety - Everything Rides on It
The National Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has published a brochure (DOT
HS 809 361) that discusses all aspects of Tire Safety, as required by CFR 575.6.
This brochure is reproduced in part below. It can be obtained and downloaded from
NHTSA, free of charge, from the following web site:
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/TireSafety/ridesonit/tires_index.html
Studies of tire safety show that maintaining proper tire pressure, observing tire
and vehicle load limits (not carrying more weight in your vehicle than your tires
or vehicle can safely handle), avoiding road hazards, and inspecting tires for cuts,
slashes, and other irregularities are the most important things you can do to avoid
tire failure, such as tread separation or blowout and flat tires. These actions, along
with other care and maintenance activities, can also:
• Improve vehicle handling
• Help protect you and others from avoidable breakdowns and accidents
• Improve fuel economy
• Increase the life of your tires.
This booklet presents a comprehensive overview of tire safety, including
information on the following topics:
• Basic tire maintenance
27
• Uniform Tire Quality Grading System
• Fundamental characteristics of tires
• Tire safety tips.
Use this information to make tire safety a regular part of your vehicle maintenance
routine. Recognize that the time you spend is minimal compared with the
inconvenience and safety consequences of a flat tire or other tire failure.
6.4.1 Safety first–Basic tire maintenance
Properly maintained tires improve the steering, stopping, traction, and loadcarrying capability of your vehicle. Under-inflated tires and overloaded vehicles
are a major cause of tire failure. Therefore, as mentioned above, to avoid flat tires
and other types of tire failure, you should maintain proper tire pressure, observe
tire and vehicle load limits, avoid road hazards, and regularly inspect your tires.
6.4.2 Finding your vehicle’s recommended tire pressure and load limits
Tire information placards and vehicle certification labels contain information on
tires and load limits. These labels indicate the vehicle manufacturer’s information
including:
• Recommended tire size
• Recommended tire inflation pressure
• Vehicle capacity weight (VCW–the maximum occupant and cargo weight a
vehicle is designed to carry)
• Front and rear gross axle weight ratings (GAWR– the maximum weight the
axle systems are designed to carry).
Both placards and certification labels are permanently attached to the trailer near
the left front.
6.4.3 Understanding tire pressure and load limits
Tire inflation pressure is the level of air in the tire that provides it with loadcarrying capacity and affects the overall performance of the vehicle. The tire
inflation pressure is a number that indicates the amount of air pressure– measured
in pounds per square inch (psi)–a tire requires to be properly inflated. (You will
also find this number on the vehicle information placard expressed in kilopascals
(kPa), which is the metric measure used internationally.)
Manufacturers of passenger vehicles and light trucks determine this number
based on the vehicle’s design load limit, that is, the greatest amount of weight a
vehicle can safely carry and the vehicle’s tire size. The proper tire pressure for
your vehicle is referred to as the “recommended cold inflation pressure.” (As you
will read below, it is difficult to obtain the recommended tire pressure if your tires
are not cold.)
Because tires are designed to be used on more than one type of vehicle, tire
manufacturers list the “maximum permissible inflation pressure” on the tire
sidewall. This number is the greatest amount of air pressure that should ever be
put in the tire under normal driving conditions.
28
6.4.4 Checking tire pressure
It is important to check your vehicle’s tire pressure at least once a month for the
following reasons:
• Most tires may naturally lose air over time.
• Tires can lose air suddenly if you drive over a pothole or other object or if you
strike the curb when parking.
• With radial tires, it is usually not possible to determine under-inflation by visual
inspection.
For convenience, purchase a tire pressure gauge to keep in your vehicle. Gauges
can be purchased at tire dealerships, auto supply stores, and other retail outlets.
The recommended tire inflation pressure that vehicle manufacturers provide
reflects the proper psi when a tire is cold. The term cold does not relate to the
outside temperature. Rather, a cold tire is one that has not been driven on for at
least three hours. When you drive, your tires get warmer, causing the air pressure
within them to increase. Therefore, to get an accurate tire pressure reading, you
must measure tire pressure when the tires are cold or compensate for the extra
pressure in warm tires.
6.4.5 Steps for maintaining proper tire pressure
• Step 1: Locate the recommended tire pressure on the vehicle’s tire information
placard, certification label, or in the owner’s manual.
• Step 2: Record the tire pressure of all tires.
• Step 3: If the tire pressure is too high in any of the tires, slowly release air by
gently pressing on the tire valve stem with the edge of your tire gauge until you
get to the correct pressure.
• Step 4: If the tire pressure is too low, note the difference between the measured
tire pressure and the correct tire pressure. These “missing” pounds of pressure are
what you will need to add.
• Step 5: At a service station, add the missing pounds of air pressure to each tire
that is under-inflated.
• Step 6: Check all the tires to make sure they have the same air pressure (except
in cases in which the front and rear tires are supposed to have different amounts of
pressure).
If you have been driving your vehicle and think that a trailer tire is under-inflated,
fill it to the recommended cold inflation pressure indicated on your vehicle’s tire
information placard or certification label. While your tire may still be slightly
under-inflated due to the extra pounds of pressure in the warm tire, it is safer
to drive with air pressure that is slightly lower than the vehicle manufacturer’s
recommended cold inflation pressure than to drive with a significantly underinflated tire. Since this is a temporary fix, don’t forget to recheck and adjust the
tire’s pressure when you can obtain a cold reading.
6.4.6 Tire size
To maintain tire safety, purchase new tires that are the same size as the vehicle’s
original tires or another size recommended by the manufacturer. Look at the
tire information placard, the owner’s manual, or the sidewall of the tire you are
29
replacing to find this information. If you have any doubt about the correct size to
choose, consult with the tire dealer.
6.4.7 Tire tread
The tire tread provides the gripping action and traction that prevent your vehicle
from slipping or sliding, especially when the road is wet or icy. In general, tires
are not safe and should be replaced when the tread is worn down to 1/16 of an
inch. Tires have built-in tread-wear indicators that let you know when it is time
to replace your tires. These indicators are raised sections spaced intermittently in
the bottom of the tread grooves. When they appear “even” with the outside of the
tread, it is time to replace your tires. Another method for checking tread depth is
to place a penny in the tread with Lincoln’s head upside down and facing you. If
you can see the top of Lincoln’s head, you are ready for new tires.
6.4.8 Tire balance and wheel alignment
To avoid vibration or shaking of the vehicle when a tire rotates, the tire must be
properly balanced. This balance is achieved by positioning weights on the wheel
to counterbalance heavy spots on the wheel-and-tire assembly. A wheel alignment
adjusts the angles of the wheels so that they are positioned correctly relative
to the vehicle’s frame. This adjustment maximizes the life of your tires. These
adjustments require special equipment and should be performed by a qualified
technician.
6.4.9 Tire repair
The proper repair of a punctured tire requires a plug for the hole and a patch for
the area inside the tire that surrounds the puncture hole. Punctures through the
tread can be repaired if they are not too large, but punctures to the sidewall should
not be repaired. Tires must be removed from the rim to be properly inspected
before being plugged and patched.
6.4.10 Tire Fundamentals
Federal law requires tire manufacturers to place standardized information on the
sidewall of all tires. This information identifies and describes the fundamental
characteristics of the tire and also provides a tire identification number for safety
standard certification and in case of a recall.
6.4.10.1 Information on Passenger Vehicle Tires
Please refer to the diagram on the next page.
30
Radial
Ratio of height to
width (aspect ratio)
Nominal width of
tire in millimeters
Rim diameter
code
Load index &
speed symbol
Passenger
car tire
Tire ply
composition
and materials
used
Max.
permissable
inflation
pressure
Treadwear, traction
and temperature grades
U.S. DOT tire
identification number
Sever snow
conditions
Max. load rating
P: The “P” indicates the tire is for passenger vehicles.
Next number: This three-digit number gives the width in millimeters of the tire
from sidewall edge to sidewall edge. In general, the larger the number, the wider
the tire.
Next number: This two-digit number, known as the aspect ratio, gives the tire’s
ratio of height to width. Numbers of 70 or lower indicate a short sidewall for
improved steering response and better overall handling on dry pavement.
R: The “R” stands for radial. Radial ply construction of tires has been the industry
standard for the past 20 years.
Next number: This two-digit number is the wheel or rim diameter in inches. If
you change your wheel size, you will have to purchase new tires to match the new
wheel diameter.
Next number: This two- or three-digit number is the tire’s load index. It is
a measurement of how much weight each tire can support. You may find this
information in your owner’s manual. If not, contact a local tire dealer. Note: You
may not find this information on all tires because it is not required by law.
M+S: The “M+S” or “M/S” indicates that the tire has some mud and snow
capability. Most radial tires have these markings; hence, they have some mud and
snow capability.
Speed Rating: The speed rating denotes the speed at which a tire is designed to be
driven for extended periods of time. The ratings range from 99 miles per hour
(mph) to 186 mph. Note: You may not find this information on all tires because it is
not required by law.
* For tires with a maximum speed capability over 149 mph, tire manufacturers
sometimes use the letters ZR. For those with a maximum speed capability over 186
mph, tire manufacturers always use the letters ZR.
U.S. DOT Tire Identification Number
This begins with the letters “DOT” and indicates that the tire meets all
31
federal standards. The next two numbers or letters are the plant code where it was
manufactured, and the last four numbers represent the week and year the tire was
built. For example, the numbers 3197 means the 31st week of 1997. The other
numbers are marketing codes used at the manufacturer’s discretion. This
information is used to contact consumers if a tire defect requires a recall.
Tire Ply Composition and Materials Used
The number of plies indicates the number of layers of rubber-coated fabric in the
tire. In general, the greater the number of plies, the more weight a tire can support
Tire manufacturers also must indicate the materials in the tire, which include steel,
nylon, polyester, and others.
Maximum Load Rating: This number indicates the maximum load in kilograms
and pounds that can be carried by the tire.
Maximum Permissible Inflation Pressure: This number is the greatest amount
of air pressure that should ever be put in the tire under normal driving conditions.
6.4.10.2 UTQGS Information
Tread-wear Number: This number indicates the tire’s wear rate. The higher the
tread-wear number is, the longer it should take for the tread to wear down. For
example, a tire graded 400 should last twice as long as a tire graded 200.
Traction Letter: This letter indicates a tire’s ability to stop on wet pavement. A
higher graded tire should allow you to stop your car on wet roads in a shorter
distance than a tire with a lower grade. Traction is graded from highest to lowest as
“AA”,”A”, “B”, and “C”.
Temperature Letter: This letter indicates a tire’s resistance to heat. The
temperature grade is for a tire that is inflated properly and not overloaded.
Excessive speed, under inflation or excessive loading, either separately or in
combination, can cause heat build-up and possible tire failure. From highest to
lowest, a tire’s resistance to heat is graded as “A”, “B”, or “C”.
6.4.10.3. Additional Information on Light Truck Tires
Please refer to the following diagram:
Maximum load
Load
range
& inflation when
used as a dual
Severe snow
conditions
Light truck tire
Maximum load
& inflation when
used as a single
32
Load inflation
limits
Tires for light trucks have other markings besides those found on the sidewalls of
passenger tires.
LT: The “LT” indicates the tire is for light trucks or trailers.
ST: An “ST” is an indication the tire is for trailer use only.
Max. Load Dual kg (lb) at kPa (psi) Cold: This information indicates the
maximum load and tire pressure when the tire is used as a dual, that is, when four
tires are put on each rear axle (a total of six or more tires on the vehicle).
Max. Load Single kg (lb) at kPa (psi) Cold: This information indicates the
maximum load and tire pressure when the tire is used as a single.
Load Range: This information identifies the tire’s load-carrying capabilities and
its inflation limits.
6.4.11 Tire Safety Tips
6.4.11.1 Preventing Tire Damage
• Slow down if you have to go over a pothole or other object in the road.
• Do not run over curbs or other foreign objects in the roadway, and try not to
strike the curb when parking.
6.4.11.2 Tire Safety Checklist
• Check tire pressure regularly (at least once a month), including the spare.
• Inspect tires for uneven wear patterns on the tread, cracks, foreign objects, or
other signs of wear or trauma.
• Remove bits of glass and foreign objects wedged in the tread.
• Make sure your tire valves have valve caps.
• Check tire pressure before going on a long trip.
• Do not overload your vehicle.
6.5 Changing a Flat Tire
6.5.1 If possible, get the Trailer on level ground.
6.5.2 Keep the Trailer coupled to the Tow Vehicle and engage the Tow Vehicle’s
emergency brake.
WARNING
Never attempt to change the tire while trailer is in folded
position. Trailer can tip over.
Failure to heed this warning could result in property damage, serious injury and death.
33
6.5.3 Chock the Wheel you are not changing with bricks or wooden blocks.
WARNING
Do not use the Assist Wheel to support the Trailer while
changing your tires. Trailer could tip over causing serious injury
or death.
6.5.4 Place a Tire Jack under the part of the axel near the flat tire.
6.5.5 Jack up the axle to lift the wheel a few inches off the ground.
Place a Tire Jack here.
6.5.6 Remove the Lug Nuts and Wheel.
6.5.7 Place Spare Tire on the axle and tighten Lug Nuts between 95 - 120 ft./lb.
Do not exceed 120 ft./lb.
6.5.8 Tighten Lug Nuts in the following sequence:
1
3
5
34
4
2
6.5.9 Lower Tire Jack and remove from under Trailer.
WARNING
Never crawl under a trailer on jacks. The trailer could slip off
the jack or the jack could fail resulting in serious injury or death.
WARNING
Lug nuts are prone to loosen after initial installation, which can
lead to death or serious injury.
Check lug nuts for tightness on a new trailer or when wheel(s)
have been remounted after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and after any impact.
Lug nuts for the tires must be tightened by the user before each
use. Sears cannot be held responsible for damages caused by
loosened lug nuts.
6.6 Checking the Tire Pressure
Always check the tire pressure before each tow. Use a pressure gauge to ensure
proper tire pressure. The tires provided with your Trailer should be filled to 80 psi.
Tire pressure must be checked when the tire is cold. If the trailer has been towed
for at least one mile, allow at least three hours after a tow for the tire to cool before
checking the pressure.
WARNING
To help ensure long tread life and your safety. Always check
tire pressure to ensure optimum life and performance from your
tires. The tires that came with your trailer should have a tire
pressure of 80 psi. Sears cannot be held responsible for damages caused by uneven tread wear and blow outs from an underinflated or over-inflated tire.”
35
Section 7: Loading the
Trailer
Loading the cargo
Improper trailer loading causes many accidents and deaths. To safely load a trailer,
you must consider:
• Overall load weight;
• Load weight distribution;
• Proper tongue weight; and
• Securing the load properly.
To determine that you have loaded the trailer within its rating, you must consider
the distribution of weight, as well as the total weight of the trailer and its contents.
The trailer axles carry most of the total weight of the trailer and its contents (Gross
Vehicle Weight, or “GVW”). The remainder of the total weight is carried by the tow
vehicle hitch. For safe towing, it is essential that the trailer tongue and tow vehicle
hitch carry the proper amount of the loaded trailer weight, otherwise the trailer can
suddenly sway wildly at towing speed. Read the “Tongue Weight” section below.
The load distribution must be such that no component part of the trailer is loaded
beyond its rating. This means that you must consider the rating of the tires, wheels
and axles. For tandem and triple axle trailers, you must make sure that the front-torear load distribution does not result in overloading any axle.
Towing stability also depends on keeping the center of gravity as low as possible.
Load heavy items on the floor and over the axles. When loading additional items, be
sure to maintain even side-to-side weight distribution and proper tongue weight. The
total weight of the trailer and its contents must never exceed the total weight rating of
the trailer (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating, or “GVWR”).
WARNING
An overloaded trailer can result in loss of control of the trailer,
leading to death or serious injury.
Do not load a trailer so that the weight on any tire exceeds its
rating.
Do not exceed the trailer Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)
or an axle Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR).
Tongue Weight
It is critical to have a portion of the trailer load carried by the tow vehicle. That is,
the trailer tongue must exert a downward force on the hitch. This is necessary for two
reasons. First, the proper amount of tongue weight is necessary for the tow vehicle
to be able to maintain control of the tow vehicle/trailer system. If, for example, the
36
tongue exerts an upward pull on the hitch, instead of pushing down on it (because
the trailer is overloaded behind its axle(s)), the rear wheel of the tow vehicle can
lose traction or grip and cause loss of control. Also, even if there is some weight on
the tongue, but not enough weight on the tongue, the trailer can suddenly become
unstable at high speeds.
If, on the other hand, there is too much tongue weight, the front wheels of the tow
vehicle can be too lightly loaded and cause loss of steering control and traction, as
well, if the front wheels are driving.
In addition to tow vehicle control, tongue weight is necessary to insure that the trailer
axle(s) do not exceed their Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR).
The table below has “rules of thumb” for proper tongue weight.
In the table below, the second column notes the rule of thumb percentage of total
weight of the trailer plus its cargo (Gross Vehicle Weight, or “GVW”) that should
appear on the tongue of the trailer. For example, a trailer with a ball hitch and a
loaded weight of 1,000 pounds, should have 10-15% of 1,000 pounds on the tongue.
That is, the example trailer would have no more than 100 to 150 pounds on its tongue.
Tongue Weight as a Percentage of Loaded Trailer Weight
Type of Hitch
Percentage
Ball Hitch (or Bumper Hitch)
10–15%
WARNING
Never go under the trailer unless it has been properly supported
with jack stands that have been rated for the load. Without being properly supported, the trailer may fall suddenly which may
result in serious injury or death.”
WARNING
Improper tongue weight (load distribution) can result in loss of
control of the trailer, leading to death or serious injury.
Make certain that tongue weight is within the allowable range.
Be sure to:
• Distribute the load front-to-rear to provide proper tongue
weight (see chart);
• Distribute the load evenly, right and left, to avoid tire overload; and
• Keep the center of gravity low.
37
7.1. CHECKING THE TONGUE WEIGHT
To check the tongue weight, the tow vehicle and trailer must be on level ground, as
they will be when the trailer is being towed.
If you know the weight on your tow vehicle axles when you are not towing a trailer,
trailer tongue weight can be determined with the use of a truck axle scale.
The recommended method of checking tongue weight is to use an accessory called a
“tongue weight scale.” If a tongue weight scale is not available, you can check the
tongue weight using a bathroom scale.
Using a bathroom scale to check tongue weight: The loaded trailer must be on a
smooth and level surface, and you must block the trailer wheels, front and rear.
7.1.1 Checking Tongue Weight — Using a lever and bathroom scale
WARNING
An unrestrained trailer can fall off its support, resulting in serious injury or death.
Before checking tongue weight, block trailer wheels, front and rear.
• Raise the tongue of the trailer with the tongue jack.
• Place a bathroom scale on the ground, directly below the coupler.
• Place a strong block support (such as a cement block) on the scale – note the
scale reading for the weight of the block support.
• Lower the tongue until the coupler rests on the block support and the jack is ½
inch above the ground.
• The scale reading, minus the weight of the block support is the tongue weight.
7.2 Securing the Cargo
Since the trailer “ride” can be bumpy and rough, you must secure your cargo so that
it does not shift while the trailer is being towed.
WARNING
Shifting cargo can result in loss of control of the trailer, and can
lead to death or serious injury.
Tie down all loads with proper sized fasteners, ropes, straps, etc.
7.2.1 Loading Cargo
Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle before loading. This is essential because the
tongue can rise during loading, before the cargo is properly distributed. To
measure the tongue weight, you will have to uncouple the trailer after it is loaded.
Do not transport people in the trailer. Do not transport containers of hazardous
substances, cans or containers of flammable substances, such as gasoline,
38
kerosene, paint, etc. However, fuel in the tank of an off-road vehicle, or a car or
motorcycle, etc. may be carried on your open trailer.
WARNING
Do not transport flammable, explosive, poisonous or other
dangerous materials in your trailer. Failure to heed this warning
could result in property damage, serious injury and death.
Exceptions:
• Fuel in the tanks of vehicles that are being towed
• Fuel stored in proper containers used in trailer living quarters for cooking
• Fuel stored in the tank of an on-board generator
7.2.1.1 Preparing the Trailer for Loading
Before loading cargo onto the trailer:
• inspect the deck of the trailer for corrosion or damage; and
• inspect the hold down openings and/or “D”-rings. Hold down openings must
be sturdy with no visible cracks or kinks. D-rings must be tight to the deck and
must not be bent.
If the deck or any required hold-down is damaged, do not load the cargo. Bring
the trailer to your dealer or a competent repair service before using it to carry
cargo.
WARNING
Damaged or loose “D”-rings can break, allowing cargo to become
loose inside the trailer. Loose cargo can shift the center of gravity,
and result in loss of control of the trailer.
Inspect “D”-rings, and test them for looseness before loading
cargo.
Do not use a damaged or loose “D”-ring to secure cargo.
Failure to head this warning could result in property damage,
serious injury and death.
7.2.1.2 Loading the Trailer
Before loading the trailer, couple the trailer to the tow vehicle and ensure the
deck is level. Do not load or unload the trailer when the deck is not level or
when the Trailer is not coupled to the tow vehicle.
1. Ensure the top of the ramp (or ramps) is secure to the trailer, and the bottom
is resting on firm ground. Pockets may be provided to hold the ramp to the
frame of the trailer.
2. Load the cargo onto the trailer.
3. Secure the cargo to the trailer using appropriate straps, chains and tensioning
devices.
39
Since the trailer “ride” can be bumpy and rough, you must secure your cargo so
that it does not shift while the trailer is being towed.
WARNING
Load can suddenly move or topple, which can result in death or
serious injury.
Do not load or unload your open trailer unless it is prevented
from tipping and is on firm and level ground.
4. Return the ramp(s) to their stowed position(s), and secure them so that they will
not move during transit.
WARNING
Shifting cargo can result in loss of control of the trailer, and can
lead to death or serious injury.
Tie down all loads with proper sized fasteners, ropes, straps, etc.
WARNING
Before loading Trailer, Trailer must be properly connected to the
Tow Vehicle. This stabilizes the Trailer. Failure to follow this
warning could result in property damage, personal injury and
death.
WARNING
Do NOT use the Gates for tie-down locations. All articles being
towed must be tied to the side walls of the Trailer. Gates can
dislodge causing property damage and possible injury or death to
other motorists and pedestrians.
WARNING
Do not transport people in the trailer. Failure to heed this warning could result in serious injury such as broken bones, brain
damage, paralysis or death.
40
Section 8: check trailer
before & during towing
Pre-tow checklist
8.1 Before Towing, Double Check All These Items:
• Tires, wheels and lug nuts (see the section “Breaking in New Trailer“ and the
section “Tire & Safety Information“.
• Coupler secured and locked (see the section “Coupling to the Tow Vehicle”)
• Safety chains properly rigged to tow vehicle, not to hitch or ball (see the section
“Coupling to the Tow Vehicle” of this manual)
• Test of lights: Tail, Stop, Turn and Backup
• Cargo properly loaded, balanced and tied down (see the section “Loading the
Trailer” of this manual)
• Tongue weight
• Doors and gates latched and secured
• Flares and reflectors
WARNING
An improperly coupled trailer can result in death or serious
injury.
Do not move the trailer until:
• The coupler is secured and locked to hitch;
• The safety chains are secured to the tow vehicle; and
• Assist Wheel is fully retracted.
• You secure Tongue to Bed using Locking Pin and Cotter Key.
Do not tow the trailer on the road until:
• Tires and wheels are checked;
• The load is secured to the trailer; and
• The trailer lights are connected and checked.
Make regular stops
8.2 After Each 50 Miles, or One Hour of Towing, Stop and Check the Following
Items:
• Coupler secured
• Safety chains are fastened and not dragging
• Cargo secured
• Cargo door latched and secured
41
WARNING
Since roads can be bumpy and rough, lug nuts can loosen over
time and even separate from the wheel and possibly causing the
separation of the wheel from the trailer. The lug nuts must be
tightened by the user before each use.
The tires must be maintained at the proper tire pressure before
each use. Sears cannot be held responsible for damages caused
by loosened lug nuts, or uneven tread wear and blow outs from
an under inflated or over inflated tire.
Failure to heed these warnings could result in personal injury,
property damage and death.
WARNING
Do NOT use the Gates for tie-down locations. All articles being
towed must be tied to the side walls of the Trailer. Gates can
dislodge causing property damage and possible injury or death to
other motorists and pedestrians.
Follow local and state laws, but do not exceed 65 mph.
WARNING
Do not transport people in the trailer. Failure to heed this warning could result in serious injury such as broken bones, brain
damage, paralysis or death.
42
Section 9: Breaking in a
New Trailer
Lug nuts & Tire Pressure
9.1 Retightening Lug Nuts at First 10, 25 & 50 Miles
Wheel lugs can shift and settle quickly after being first assembled, and must be
checked after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and after any impact. Failure
to perform this check may result in a wheel coming loose from the trailer, causing a
crash leading to death or serious injury.
WARNING
Lug nuts are prone to loosen after initial installation, which can
lead to death or serious injury.
Check lug nuts for tightness on a new trailer or when wheel(s)
have been remounted after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and after any impact.
WARNING
The lug nuts for the tires must be tightened by the user before
each use. The tires must be maintained at the proper tire pressure
before each use. Sears cannot be held responsible for damages
caused by loosened lug nuts, or uneven tread wear and blow outs
from an under-inflated or over-inflated tire.
Failure to heed this warning could result in property damage,
serious injury and death.
WARNING
If tow vehicle brakes do not work properly, death or serious
injury can occur.
Road test your tow vehicle’s brakes in a safe area at no more
than 30 mph before each tow.
9.2 Tire Pressure
Check the pressure in each tire to ensure tire is set to the tire manufacturers
recommended pressure. The tires that came with your trailer should be filled to
80 psi. Use a tire gauge to get an accurate reading. You should check the pressure
before each tow.
43
Section 10: Maintenance
Inspection, Service & Maintenance
10.1 Inspection, Service & Maintenance Summary Charts
You must inspect, maintain and service your trailer regularly to insure safe and
reliable operation. If you cannot or are unsure how to perform the items listed here,
have your dealer perform them.
Note: In addition to this manual, also check the relevant component
manufacturer’s manual.
Inspection and Service before Each Use
Item
Inspection/Service
Coupler and Hitch Ball
Check for cracks, pits, and
flats. Replace w/ball & coupler
having trailer GVW Rating
Grease
Check locking device & replace
Manual Section Reference
Section 10.2.3.1
Safety Chain(s) & Hooks
Check for wear and damage
Sections 8.1 & 8.2
Tires
• Air Pressure
Check tire pressure when cold
Inflate tires to 80 psi
Sections 6.6, 9.2 & 10.2.6
Wheels
• Lug Nuts (Bolts) & Hub
Check for tightness
Tighten to 95 - 120 ft/lb. Do
not exceed 120 ft./lb. For new
and remounted wheels, check
torque after first 10, 25 & 50
miles of driving and after any
impact
Section 6.5.7 & 9.1
Sections 10.2.8, 10.2.8.1 & 10.2.9
Inspection and Service each 3 Months or 3,000 Miles
Item
Inspection/Service
Manual Section Reference
Structure
• Hinges, Doors
Inspect. Repair or replace
damaged, worn or broken parts
Section 10.2.2.1
Wheels
• Rims
Inspect for dents, damage or out
of round
10.2.7
Tires
Inspect for cuts wear and
bulging
Basic tire maintenance
Sections 6.4, 6.4.1, 6.4.2, 6.4.3,
6.4.4, 6.4.5, 6.4.6, 6.4.7, 6.4.8,
6.4.9, 6.4.10, 6.4.11, 6.6 & 10.2.6
Inspection and Service each 6 Months or 6,000 Miles
Item
Inspection/Service
Manual Section Reference
Tires
Rotate @ 5,000 miles
Section 10.2.6
Wheels
• UNSEALED Bearings (Hubs)
Check and confirm free running.
Replace if not.
Disassemble / inspect / assemble and repack. Replace
promptly if immersed in water
Section 10.2.7 & 10.2.8
Section 10.2.8.1
44
Inspection and Service each 6 Months or 6,000 Miles
Suspension
Inspect for bending loose fasteners, wear
Section 10.2.10
Inspection and Service Each Year or 12,000 Miles
Item
Inspection/Service
Structure
• Frame members
• Welds
• Slide-out
Inspect all frame members, bolts
& rivets. Repair or replace damaged, worn or broken parts.
Inspect all welds. Repair as
needed
Clean dirt build-up. Lubricate
slides, shafts and gears
Structure
• Axle Attachment Bolts
Check WITH DEALER
Manual Section Reference
Section 10.2.2
Section 10.2.2.1
Section 10.2.2.2
Section 10.2.1
10.2 Inspection and Service Instructions
10.2.1 Axle Bolts, Frame, Suspension, & Structure
WARNING
Worn or broken suspension parts can cause loss of control and
property damage, serious injury and death may result. Have
trailer professionally inspected annually and after any impact.
To perform many of the inspection and maintenance activities, you must jack up the
trailer.
When jacking and using jack stands, place them so as to clear wiring and suspension
parts (springs, torsion bars, etc.). Place jacks and jack stands inside of the perimeter
strip on the supporting structure to which the axles are attached.
WARNING
Never crawl under your trailer unless it is on firm and level ground
and resting on properly placed and secured jack stands.
Never attempt to change the tire while trailer is in folded
position. Trailer can tip over.
Failure to heed these warnings could result in property damage,
serious injury and death.
WARNING
Do not use the Assist Wheel to support the Trailer while
changing your tires. Trailer could tip over causing serious injury
or death.
45
Figure 10 - 1: Jacking Points
Place Tire Jack here.
10.2.2 Trailer Structure
Because the trailer floor receives the most abuse, it will most likely corrode before
any other part of the structure. Using a power washer, wash the floor and walls of
the trailer after each use.
10.2.2.1 Fasteners and Frame Members
Inspect all of the fasteners and structural frame members for bending and other
damage, cracks, or failure. Repair or replace any damaged fastener and repair the
frame member. If you have any questions about the condition or method of repair
of fasteners or frame members, get the recommendation of, or have the repair done
by your dealer.
The various fastener types used on your trailer are:
• Bolts, which are used mainly for attaching door and gate hinges to the trailer
body;
• Buck Rivets, which are used to attach the sides and roof panels of the body to
each other, and to the frame of the trailer; and
• Huck Bolts may be at various locations on the sub-frame. Huck bolts are not
user serviceable. If you detect a loose huck bolt fastener, do not tow the trailer.
Call your dealer for instructions.
WARNING
Broken or damaged fasteners or welds can cause serious injury,
damage to trailer and contents and death. Inspect for, and repair
all damaged parts at least once a year.
10.2.2.2 Welds
All welds can crack or fail when subjected to heavy loads or movement of cargo
that was not properly tied to prevent movement. Any time you know or suspect
the trailer has been subjected to heavy loads or movement of cargo, immediately
inspect the welds and fasteners for damage. To prevent severe damage to your
46
trailer, inspect all of the welds for cracks or failure at least once a year.
WARNING
Improper weld repair will lead to early failure of the trailer structure and can cause serious injury or death. Do not repair cracked
or broken welds unless you have the skills and equipment to
make a proper repair. If not, have the welds repaired by a certified welder
10.2.3 Trailer Connection to Tow Vehicle
10.2.3.1 Coupler and Ball
The coupler on the trailer connects to the ball attached to the hitch on the tow
vehicle. The coupler, ball and hitch transfer the towing forces between the
tow vehicle and the trailer. Before each tow, coat the ball with a thin layer of
automotive bearing grease to reduce wear and ensure proper operation; and check
the locking device that secures the coupler to the ball for proper operation.
If you see or feel evidence of wear, such as flat spots, deformations, pitting or
corrosion, on the ball or coupler, immediately have your dealer inspect them to
determine the proper action to prevent possible failure of the ball and coupler
system. All bent or broken coupler parts must be replaced before towing the trailer.
The coupler handle lever must be able to rotate freely and automatically snap into
the latched position. Oil the pivot points, sliding surfaces, and spring ends with
SAE 30W motor oil. Keep the ball pocket and latch mechanism clean. Dirt or
contamination can prevent proper operation of the latching mechanism.
When replacing a ball, the load rating must match or exceed the GVWR of the
trailer.
10.2.4 Jack
If a grease fitting is present, you must use a grease gun to lubricate the jack
mechanism. Grease the gears in the top of hand-cranked jacks once a year, by
removing the top of the jack and pumping or hand packing grease into the gears.
10.2.5 Lights and Signals
Before each tow, check the trailer taillights, stoplights, turn signals and any
clearance lights for proper operation.
WARNING
Improper operating taillights, stoplights and turn signals can
cause collisions. Check all lights before each tow. Failure to
heed this warning could result in property damage, serious injury
and death.
47
10.2.6 Tires
Before each tow, be sure the tire pressure is at the value indicated on the sidewall.
Tire pressure must be checked while the tire is cold. Do not check the tire pressure
immediately after towing the trailer. Allow at least three hours for a tire to cool, if
the trailer has been towed for as much as one mile. Replace the tire before towing
the trailer if the tire treads have less than 1/16 inch depth or the telltale bands are
visible.
A bubble, cut or bulge in a side wall can result in a tire blowout. Inspect both side
walls of each tire for any bubble, cut or bulge; and replace a damaged tire before
towing the trailer.
Tires do not wear evenly. Depending on the load balance, some will wear faster
than others. To help increase the life of your tires, rotate tires every 5000 miles.
WARNING
Worn, damaged or under-inflated tires can cause loss of control,
resulting in damage, serious injury and possibly death. Inspect
tires before each tow.
10.2.7 Wheel Rims
If the trailer has been struck, or impacted, on or near the wheels, or if the trailer has
struck a curb, inspect the rims for damage (e.g., being out of round); and replace
any damaged wheel. Inspect the wheels for damage every year, even if no obvious
impact has occurred. Also check the tires to ensure they’re at the recommended
pressure.
10.2.8 Wheels, Bearings and Lug Nuts
To check your bearings, jack trailer and check wheels for side-to-side looseness.
If the wheels are loose, or spin with a wobble, the bearings must be serviced or
replaced.
Most trailer axles are built with sealed bearings that are not serviceable. Sealed
bearings must be replaced as complete units.
10.2.8.1 Unsealed Bearings (Hubs)
You must inspect and lubricate the bearings once a year or every 12,000 miles to
insure safe operation of your trailer.
If a trailer wheel bearing is immersed in water, it must be replaced.
If your trailer has not been used for an extended amount of time, have the bearings
inspected and packed more frequently, at least every six months and prior to use.
Follow the steps below to disassemble and service the UNSEALED wheel
bearings.
48
• After removing the grease cap, cotter pin, spindle nut and spindle washer,
remove the hub and drum to inspect the bearings for wear and damage.
• Replace bearings that have flat spots on rollers, broken roller cages, rust or
pitting. Always replace bearings and cups in sets. The inner and outer bearings
are to be replaced at the same time.
• Replace seals that have nicks, tears or wear.
• Lubricate the bearings with a high quality EP-2 automotive wheel bearing
grease.
Every time the wheel hub is removed and the bearings are reassembled, follow the
steps below to check the wheel bearings for free running and adjust.
• Turn the hub slowly, by hand, while tightening the spindle nut, until you can no
longer turn the hub by hand.
• Loosen the spindle nut just until you are able to turn it (the spindle nut) by
hand. Do not turn the hub while the spindle nut is loose.
• Put a new cotter pin through the spindle nut and axle.
• Check the adjustments. Both the hub and the spindle nut should be able to
move freely (the spindle nut motion will be limited by the cotter pin).
10.2.9 Lug Nuts (Bolts)
Lug nuts are prone to loosen right after a wheel is mounted to a hub. When driving
on a remounted wheel, check to see if the lug nuts are tight after the first 10, 25 and
50 miles of driving and before each tow thereafter.
WARNING
Lug nuts are prone to loosen after initial installation, which can
lead to death or serious injury.
Check lug nuts for tightness on a new trailer or when wheel(s)
have been remounted after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of
driving.
WARNING
Metal creep between the wheel rim and lug nuts will cause rim to
loosen and could result in a wheel coming off, leading to death or
serious injury. Tighten lug nuts before each tow.
WARNING
Do not use the Assist Wheel to support the Trailer while
changing your tires. Trailer could tip over causing serious injury
or death.
49
1
3
5
4
2
Figure 10 - 2: Lug nut sequence of tightening
Tighten the lug nuts to the proper torque for the axle size on your trailer, to prevent
wheels from coming loose. Use a torque wrench to tighten the fasteners. If you do
not have a torque wrench, tighten the fasteners with a lug wrench as much as you
can, then have a service garage or dealer tighten the lug nuts to the proper torque.
Over-tightening will result in breaking the studs or permanently deforming the
mounting stud holes in the wheels. Do not exceed 120 ft./lb.
10.2.10 Suspension
All suspension components should be visually inspected at least every 6000
miles or 6 months. Check for loose fasteners and tighten to proper torque values.
Excessively worn or damaged parts should be replaced with original parts.
50
51
BD BE
BC
BF
BG
BI
DT
BR
EK
BJ
BH
BQ
BO
BI
BJ
BK
BP
BJ
DT
BU
BM
BI
BJ
BJ
BN
BU
BI
BI
BJ
BJ
BU
BI
BO
BJ
BV
BI
Bed Frame Assembly and Parts
Part No.Description
1028701
Diamond Plate Side Panel
1010045
Amber Marker Light
1024948
Gate Pusher
1023985
Gate Pusher Spring
1025228
3/4” Roll Pin
1023984
Gate Pusher Pin
1010030
Tail Light (Right)
1025184
3/8”-16 x 2 1/2” Hex Bolt
300013
3/8”-16 Nylock Nut
1025177
3/8”-16 x 3” Hex Bolt
1024946
Bed Lift Guide
1025799
Bed Locating Tab
1024906
Short J-Channel
1025800
Pin Retainer Bracket
1024904
Front Bed Tube Weldment
1028124
Right Frame Weldment
1024904
Bed Tube Weldment
1024903
Rear Tube Weldment
1019803
1/4”-20 Keps Nut
To order parts, call our customer service department at 1-800-422-3865.
BI
BJ BI
BJ
ID
EK
BC
BD
BE
BF
BG
BH
BI
BJ
BK
BM
BN
BO
BP
BQ
BR
BU
BV
DT
Part No.Description
1026464
Diamond Plate Side Panel
1016476
Tail Light (Left)
1010045
Reflector Light
1025184
3/8”-16 x 2 1/2” Hex Bolt
300013
3/8”-16 Nylock Nut
1028123
Left Side Weldment
1024902
Long J-Channel
1024900
Hat Channel Weldment
1024899
Rear Hat Channel Weldment
1012733
Assist Wheel
1025180
1/2”-13 Nylock Nut
1024941
Assist Wheel Spring
1025187
1/2”-13 x 3” Hex Bolt
1019803
1/4”-20 Keps Nut
1024865
Caster Weldment
Bed Frame Assembly and Parts
ID
BA
BB
BC
BI
BJ
BL
BS
BT
BW
BX
BY
BZ
DF
DT
FA
BT
BS
BT
To order parts, call our customer service department at 1-800-422-3865.
BT
BI
BT
BS
BJ
BJ
BW
BI
BJ
DT
BI
BI
BJ
BA
BI
BJ
BL
BC
BX
BI
BB
DT
FA
BY BZ
BJ
DF
52
53
BJ
DA
BY
BY
DD
DC
DU
DS
DS
DO
DO
DF
DN
DM
Folding Jack
DP
DQ
DS
BJ
DF
BJ
DV
DL
BJ
DM
DR
DS
DS
DI
DE
To order parts, call our customer service department at 1-800-422-3865.
DB
DS
DS
DH
Tongue Assembly and Parts
BY
DI
ID
BJ
BY
DA
DB
DC
DD
DE
DF
DG
DH
DI
DL
DM
DN
DO
DP
DQ
DR
DS
DU
DV
DD
DH
DS
DS
BJ
Part No.Description
300013
3/8”-16 Nylock Nut
1025180
1/2”-13 Nylock Nut
1012278
Safety Chain
1011472
Coupler
1025941
Tongue Weldment
1025862
Alignment Guide Tube
1024858
Axle Actuator Tube
1025187
1/2”-13 x 3” Hex Bolt
1014296
#10 x 3/4” Self-Tapping Screw
300137
3/8”-16 x 1” Hex Bolt
1025227
1/2”-13 x 2” Hex Bolt
1027957
1/4”-28 x 1 1/4” Hex Bolt
1027959
1/4”-28 Centerlock Nut
1026118
Folding Jack
1025651
Jack-to-Axle Bracket
1024329
Jack Spacer
1027958
1/4”-28 x 2 1/4” Hex Bolt
1025798
Crank Plate
300031
3/8” Standard Washer
1025751
3/8”-16 x 1 3/4” Hex Bolt
1019384
3/8”-16 x 1 1/4” Tap Bolt
DE
BJ (4)
DH (4)
ID
BY
CA
CC
CD
CE
CF
CG
CH
CI
CJ
CK
CL
CM
CO
CP
CQ
CR
CS
CY
CM
BY
CA
CM
CY
CO
CP
BY
CZ
CM
CA
CC
CD
Part No.Description
CE
1025180
1/2”-13 Nylock Nut
1025181
1/2”-13 x 6” Hex Bolt
CG
(4)
1022781
3/8” U-Bolt
CF
1027274
Leaf Spring
CM
BY
1026130
Leaf Spring Bracket
1009889
9/16” x 2.925” Standard Hex Bolt
1025192
3/8”-24 Nylock Nut
1027352
Leaf Spring Spindle Weldment
1021745
Hub
1009585
Tire
1010432
Rim
1016243
Lug Nut
1025186
1/2” Standard USS Washer
1024795
Center Axle Assembly
1025179
1/2”-13 x 4 1/2” Hex Bolt
1012279
Chrome Hub Cap
1024860
U-Bracket
1025435
1”-14 Slotted Axle Nut
CZ
CH
CV
ID
CT
CU
CV
CW
CX
CY
CZ
CF
CK
CQ
CL
Part No.Description
1025431
1 1/16” Bearing
1025433
Dust Cap
1025434
Seal
1025436
1” Spindle Washer
1025437
1/8” x 2” Cotter Pin
1015762
Pivot Plate
1016915
9/16” Standard Hex Nut
Axle Assembly and Parts
CS
CU
CT
CX
CR
CI
CW
CJ
CL
To order parts, call our customer service department at 1-800-422-3865.
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55
EE
DG
EC
AD
AE
AB
EA
EB
Miscellaneous Parts
EF
EK
ED
EL
EH
To order parts, call our customer service department at 1-800-422-3865.
EG
AC
Part No.Description
1032680
Hand Crank
1025072
2” x 4” x 63” Distance Indicator
1025051
Locking Pin w/ Lanyard
1016242
3” Cotter Key
1014296
#10 x 3/4” Self-Tapping Screw
1026123
Gate Weldment
1024910
Diamond Plate
1023448
Left Decking (Wide)
1023444
Right Decking (Narrow)
1026660
Hand Crank Holder
1025216
Rubber Wiring Grommet
1025050
3/4” Rubber Wiring Grommet
1016473
License Plate Holder
1016474
Wiring Harness (Not shown)
1015282
Wiring Conduit (Not shown)
1025052
Assist Wheel Rubber Bumper
1028013
Jack Retainer Clip
Do Not Discard
ID
AB
AC
AD
AE
DG
EA
EB
EC
ED
EE
EF
EG
EH
EI
EJ
EK
EL
Section 12: Warranty
Information
Limited Warranty on Craftsman Fold-Up Trailer
When operated and maintained according to all supplied product instructions, if
the following components of this Craftsman Fold-Up Trailer fail due to defects in
material or workmanship within the time periods listed below, call 1-800-422-3865 to
arrange for free repair.
• Two Years: All components except tires, wheels, hubs, springs and axle
• One Year: Tires, wheels, hubs, springs and axle
This warranty does not cover:
• Scratching or scuffing of the product that may result from normal use.
• Defects resulting from intentional damage, negligence, unreasonable use, improper
loading, overloading, installation of improper equipment, improper towing, and
failure to ensure lug nuts are tight.
• Liability for incidental or consequential damages to the extent permitted by law.
While every attempt is made to embody the highest degree of safety in this trailer,
freedom from injury cannot be guaranteed. The user assumes all risk of injury
resulting from use of this product.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights
which vary from state to state.
Sears, Roebuck and Co., Hoffman Estates, IL 60179
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