‘J
.
.
LJseandCareof
ModelJHC56G
Energy-saving
tips
p5
Featuresofyourrange
Surfacecooking
p7
pm
Ovencooking
Howto carefor the
continuous-cleaning
oven p16
Savetimeandmoney.
Beforeyourequestservice,
usetheProblemSolver p25
pti
YourDirectLineto GeneralElectric
The~~hswer
Before Using Your Range. .. .....2
Safety Instructions . ..........3-4
Energy Saving Tips. . . . . ........5
Features of Your Range .. .......6
Surface Cooking . ............7-8
Automatic Timer and Clocks .. ..9
UsingYourOven. . . . . . .. ......10
How To Bakeand Time Bake .. .11
How To Roast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
How To Broil. . . . . . . . . .. ......13
RemovableOven Door . .......14
How To Care For
YourRange . . . t.. . . . . . . . IQ-15
CleaningYourOven . . . . .......16
CleaningChart . . . . . .. .... ....17
Surface CookingChart ... ..18-19
BakingChart . . . . . . . . . . ..-. ...20
RoastingChart . . . . . . . .. ......21
BroilingChart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ●22
Exhaust System=. . . . . . . . . .. ...23
Home CanningTips . . . . .......24
Problem Solver . . . . . . . . ....25...
ConsumerServices. . . . . . . .“.”.J:.27
Warranty . . . . . . c. . . . BackCover
●
Read This Book Carefully
It will help you operate and maintain your new Range properly.
Keep it handy for answers to your
questions.
If you don’t understand something
or need more help. . .
Call, toll free:
TheGEAnswerCenterTM
800.626.2000
consumer information service
or write: (include your phone
number);
Consumer Affairs
General Electric Company
Appliance Park
Louisville, KY 40225
WriteDown the Model and
Serial Numbers
You’llfind them on a label on the
front of the Range behind the oven
door.
These numbers are also on the
Consumer Product Ownership Registration Card that came with your
Range. Before sending in this card,
please write these numbers here:
ModelNo.
SerialNo.
Use these numbers in any correspondence or service calls concerning your Range,
*
2
If You Received
a Damaged Range9
immediately contact the dealer (or
builder) that sold you the Range.
EkiveTime and ‘Money. . .
BeforeYou Request Service
Check the Problem Solver (page
25). It lists minor causes of operating problems that you can correct
yourself.
E#Ez.
au
before Using
When using electricalappliances
basic safety precautions should be
followed,includingthe following:
@ Use this appliance only for its
intended use as described in this
manual.
@ Be sure your appliance is properly installedand grounded by a
qualifiedtechnicianin accordance
with the provided installation
instructions.
@ Don’t attempt to repair or
replaceany part of your range
unlessit is specificallyrecommended in this book. All other
servicingshould be referred to
a qualified technician.
@ Beforeperforming any service,
DISCONNECT THE RANGE
POWER SUPPLY AT THE
HOUSEHOLD DISTRIBUTION
PANEL BY REMOVING THE
FUSE OR SWITCHING OFF
THE CIRCUIT BREAKER.
e Do not kwvechikhxmalone——
~ children should not be left alone
or unattended in area where
appliance is in use. They should
never be allowed to sit or stand
on any part of the appliance,
@ Don’t allowanyoneto climb,
standor hang on the door9drawer
or rangetop. Theycould damage
the rangeand eventip it over
causingseverepersonalinjury.
@ CAUTION:IX) NOT STORE
ITEMS OF INTERESTTO
CHILDREN IN CABINETS
ABOVEA RANGE OR ON THE
BACKSPLASHOF A RANGECHILDREN CLIMBINGION
THE RANGE TO REACH
ITEMSCOULDBE SERIOUSLY
INJURED.
ti—
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this
@ Wearproperclothing,Loose
fitting or hanginggarments should
never be worn whileusing the
appliance. Flammable material
could be ignited if brought in contact with hot heating elementsand
may cause severeburns.
@ Use ordy drypothoMersmoist or damp potholders on hot
surfaces may result in burns from
steam. Do not let potholders
touch hot heating elements. Do
not use a towel or other bulky
cloth.
@ Neveruse yourappliancefor
warmingor heatingthe room.
@ Storagein or on ApplianceFlammable materials should not
be stored in an oven or near surface units.
@ Keep hood and greasefilters
cleanto maintain good venting
and to avoid greasefires.
@ Do not let cookinggreaseor
otherflammablematerialsaccumulatein the rangeor nearit.
@ Do not use wateron grease
fires.Neverpick up a flamingpan.
Smotherflamingpan on surface
unit by coveringpan completely
with wellfittinglid, cookiesheet
or flat tray.I?iaminggreaseoutside a pan can be put out by
coveringwithbakingsoda or, if
avai1able3
a multi-purposedry
chemicalor foam.
@ Do not touch heatingelements
or interiorsurfaceof oven. These
surfaces may be hot enough to
burn even though they are dark in
color. During and after use, do
not touch, or let clothing or other
flammable materials contact surface units, areas nearby surface
units or any interior area of the
oven;allow sufficienttime for
cooling,first.
Potentially hot surfacesinclude
the cooktop and areas facing the
cooktop, oven vent opening and
surfaces near the openings,and
crevicesaround the oven door.
Remember:The insidesurface of
the oven may be hot when the
door is opened.
@ Whencookingporkfollow our
directions exactly and always cook
the meat to at least 170°.This
assures that, in the remote possibility that trichina may be present
in the meat, it will be killed and
meat will be safe to eat.
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chum:
@Sand
Sw’ke
away fromthe range
whenopeningoven door. The hot
airor steamwhichescapescan
causeburnsto hands,face and/
or eyes.
@ Donl heat unopenedfood containersin the oven. Pressurecould
build up and tirecontainercouki!
burstcausingan injury.
@ Keep oven vent ducts
unobstructed.
@ Keep oven free from grease
build up.
@ Place oven rack in desired position whileoven is cool. If racks
must be handled when hot, do not
let potholder contact heating units
in the oven.
@ Pulling out shelfto the shelf
stop is a conveniencein lifting
heavy foods. It is also a precaution against burns from touching
hot surfaces of the door or oven
walls.
@ When using cooking or
roasting bags in oven, follow the
manufacturer’sdirections.
@ DO not use your oven to dry
newspapers. If overheated, they
can catch fire.
IJ1-lits:
@ Use Proper Pan Sb-=—This
applianceis equipped with one or
more surface units of different
size.Selectutensilshavingflat
bottoms large enough to cover the
surface unit heating element.The
use of undersizedutensilswill
exposea portion of the heating
elementto direct contact and may
result in ignition of clothing.
Proper relationship of utensil
to burner willalso improve
efficiency.
e Neverleavesurfaceunits
unattendedat highheatsettings.
Boilovercauses smoking and
greasy spilloversthat may catch
on fire.
@ Be sure drip pans and vent
ducts are not covered and are in
place. Their absenceduring cooking could damage range parts and
wiring.
* I)orn’tuse aluminumfoil to line
drippans or anywhere in the oven
except as describedin this book.
Misusecould result in a shock,
fire hazard, or damage to the
range.
@ (My certain types of glass,
glass/ceramic, ceramic, earthen-
ware, or other glazed containers
are suitablefor range-top service;
others may break because of the
sudden change in temperature
(See Section on “Surface Cooking”
for suggestions.)
@ TOminimizeburns,ignition of
flammable materials, and spillage;
the handle of a container should
be positioned so that it is turned
toward the center of the range
without extending over nearby
surface units.
@ Don’t immerseor soak remov-
ablesurfaceunits.Donl put them
in a dishwasher.
49 A]ways hum surfaceunit to
(!)FFbeforeremovingutensil.
@ Keep an eye on foods being
fried at HIGH or MEDHJM
HIGH heats.
e TOavoidthe possibilityof a
burnor electricshock,alwaysbe
certainthat the controlsfor all
surfaceunitsareat OFF position
and all coilsarecool before
attemptingto removethe unit.
@ When flamingfoods underthe
hood, turnthe fan off. Thefan, if
operating,may spreadthe flame.
@ F’OOdS
for fryingshouldbe as
dryas possible.Frost on frozen
foods or moisture on fresh foods
can cause hot fat to bubble up
and over sides of pan.
@ Use little fat for effective
shallow or deep-fatfrying. Filling
the pan too full of fat can cause
spilroverswhen food is added.
@ If a combination of oils or fats
will be used in frying, stir together
before heating, or as fats melt
slowly.
@ Ahvays heatfat slowly,and
watch as it heats.
@ Use deep fat thermometer
wheneverpossibleto prevent overheating fat beyond the smoking
point.
many other household item, is heavy and cm settle
into soft floor coveringssuch 8s
cushionedviny]or carpeting.When
moving the range on this type of
flooring. use care, and it is recommended that these simple and inexpensi~e instructions be followed.
The range should be installed on a
sheet of plywood (or similar material) as follows: When fhefloor
covering is terminated at thejront
of the range, the area that the range
will rest on should be built up with
pl~wood to the same level or higher
than the floor covering. This will
then allow the range to be moved
for cleaning or servicing.
}’OUI- range,
like
the
Leveling screws are located on each
corner of the base of the range. By
removing the bottom drawer you
can level the range to an uneven
floor with the use of a nutdriver.
To remove drawer, pull drawer out
all the way, tilt up the front and
remove it. To replace. insert glides
at back of drawer beyond stop on
range glides. Lift drawer if necessary to insert easily. Let front of
drawer down. then push in to C1OSC.
ovenchoking
surface
cooking
@ Use cooking utensils of medium
weight aluminum, tight-fitting
covers, and flat bottoms which
completely cover the heated portion of the surface unit.
@ Cook fresh vegetables with a
minimum amount of water in
a covered pan.
63 Watch foods when bringing them
quickly to cooking temperatures
at HIGH heat. When food
reaches cooking temperature,
reduce heat immediately to
lowest setting that will keep it
cooking.
69 Use residual heat with surface
cooking whenever possible. For
example, when cooking eggs in
the shell, bring water to boil,
then turn to OFF position to
complete the cooking.
e Use correct heat for cooking
task. . .HIGH—to start cooking
(if time allows, do not use HIGH
heat to start), MEDIUM HI—
quick brownings, MEDIUM—
slow frying, LOW—finish cooking
most quantities, simmer-double
boiler heat, finish cooking, and
special for small quantities.
‘@ When boiling water for tea or
coffee, heat only the amount
needed . It is not economical to
boil a container full of water for
only one or two cups.
Preheat the oven only when
necessary. Most foods will cook
satisfactorily without preheating.
If you find preheating is necessary, watch the indicator light,
and put food in the oven
promptly after the light goes out.
Always turn oven OFF before
removing food.
During baking, avoid frequent
door openings. Keep door open
as short a time as possible when
it is opened.
Cook comple~eoven meals
instead of just one food item.
Potatoes, other vegetables, and
some desserts will cook together
with a main-dish casserole, meat
loaf, chicken or roast. Choose
foods that cook at the same temperature and in approximately
the same time.
Use residual heat in oven whenever possible to finish cooking
casseroles, oven meals, etc. Also
add rolls or precooked desserts
to warm oven, using residual
heat to warm them.
mafal
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5
1. Model and Serial Number
Plate. Located on right side of
oven frame just below cooking
surface.
2. Surface Unit Controls. Push in
to set.
3. “ON” IndicatorLightfor Surface Units. Light comes on
when any surface unit is on.
4. Oven Set ControL
5, Oven Ternp ControL
6. Oven CyclingLight.
7. Automatic(MenTimerClock
and Minute ‘1’imer.
8. Plug-InCalrod@
SurfaceUnit.
IMaybe removed when cleaning
under unit.
9. One-Piece Chrome Trim Rings
and Drip Pans or Separate
Chrome Trim Rings and Porcelain Drip Pans.
10. Oven Vent Duct. Lift right rear
surface unit and/ or pan to
clean. Excess oven heat is
vented through opening.
11. Oven InteriorLight. Comes on
automatically when door is
opened.
12. OvtmLight Switch.
13. Broil Unit.
14. Bake Unit. May be lifted gently
for wiping oven floor.
15. Oven Shelves.
16. Oven Shelf Supports. Letters A,
B, C, & D indicate cooking
positions for shelves as recommended on cooking charts.
17. Broiler Pan and Rack.
18. Storage Drawer.
*“G” in model number indicates
Black Glass Door.
I
11
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JJHC56G
.
6
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See %.u-faceCooking Chart on pages 18-19.
—–
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Your range top is designed to give
you flexibility of boiling, steaming,
sauteing, browning, frying, canning, or pressure cooking. It heats
through the metal coils of four
Calrod@units thus giving the correct amount of energy for each
setting you choose.
Surface Cooking with
Miiite Heat Controls
Your surface units and controls are
designed to give you an infinite
choice of heat settings for surface
unit cooking.
At both OFF and HIGH positions,
there is a slight niche so control
“clicks” at those positions; “click”
on HIGH marks the highestsetting;
the lowest setting is between the
words WM and OFF. In a quiet
kitchen you may hear slight “clicking” sounds during cooking, indicating heat settings selected are
being maintained.
Switching heats to higher settings
always show a quicker change than
switching to lower settings.
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How tb Set the Controls
Cooking Guide
for Using Heats
I-H
Quick start for cooking;
bring water to boil.
MEll Fast fry, pan broil; maintain
fast boil on largeamount of
HI
food.
MED Saute and brown;maintain
slowboil on largeamount
of food.
LOW Cook after startingat
HIGH; cook with little
water in coveredpan.
Wlt!lSteam rice, cereal;maintain
step1
Grasp contol knob and push in. . .
serving temperature of most
foods.
NOTE:
1. At HIGH, MED HI, never leave
food unattended. F30iloverscause
smokin,g;greasy spillovers may
catch fire.
2. At WARM, LOW, melt chocolate, butter on small unit.
step 2
Turn either clockwise or counterclockwise to desired heat setting.
Control must be pushed in to set
only from OFF position. When
control is in any position other
than OFF, it may be rotated
without pushingin.
Be sure you turn control to OFF
whenyou finishcooking,An indicator light will glow when ANY
heat on any surface unit is on.
7
(continued next page)
Q. .MayI
. can foods and preserves
on my surfaceunits?
.4. Yes, but only use utensils designed for canning purposes. Check
the manufacturer’s instructions and
recipes for preserving foods. Be
sure canner is flat-bottomed and
fits over the center of your Calrod@
unit. Since canning generates large
amounts of steam, be careful to
avoid burns from steam or heat.
Canning should only be done on
surface units.
Q. Can I caver my drip pans with
foil?
A. No. Clean as recommended in
Cleaning Chart.
Q. Can I use specialcooking equipment like an orientalwok$on any
surfaceunits?
A. Utensils without flat surfaces are
not recommended. The life of your
surface unit can be shortened and
the range top can be damaged from
the high heat needed for this type
of cooking.
Q. Why do my utensilstilt when I
place them on the surfaceunit?
A. Because the surface unit is not
flat. Make sure that the “feet” o
.your Calrod@units are sitting
tightly in the range top indentat
and the trim ring is flat on the
range surface.
Q. Why is the porcelainfinish on
my containerscoming off?
A. If you set your Calrod@unit
higher than required for the container material, and leave it, the
finish may smoke, crack, pop, or
burn depending on the pot or pan.
Also, a too high heat for long
periods, and small amounts of dry
food, may damage the finish.
—
8
-.—-
The automatic timer and clock on
your Range are helpful devices that
serve several purposes.
‘!&O
set Ckxk
Time Bake Uses
Automatic Timer
Using Automatic Timer, you can
TIME BAKE with the oven starting immediately and turning off at
the Stop Time set or set both Start
and Stop dials to automatically
start and stop oven at a later time
of day. It takes the worry out of
not being home to start or stop
the oven.
Setting the dials for TIME BAKE
is explained in detail on page 11.
TO SET THE CLOCK, pushthe
centerknobin and turn the clock
hands to the correct time. (The
Minute Timer pointer will move
also, let knob out, turn the Timer
pointer to OFF.)
To Set Minute Timer
The Minute Timer has been combined with the range clock. Use it
to time all your precise cooking
operations. You’llrecognize the
Minute Timer as the pointer which
is different in color and shape than
the clock hands.
TO SET THE MINUTE TIMER,
turn the center knob, without pushing in, until pointer reaches number
of minutes you wish to time. (Minutes are marked, up to 60, in the
center ring on the clock.) At the
end of the set time, a buzzer sounds
to tell you time is up. ‘I-urnknob,
without pushing in, until pointer
reaches OFF and buzzer stops.
.-
9
Questions
and Answers
Q. How canI use myMinute
Timerto makemy surfacecooking
easier?
A. Your Minute Timer will help
time total cooking whiqh includes
time to boil food and change temperatures. Do not judge cooking
time by visible steam only. Food
will cook in covered containers
even though you can’t see any
steam.
Q. Must the Cl!ockbe set on correct
time of day when I wish to use the
Automatic Timerfor baking?
A. Yes,if you wish to set the Start
or Stop Dials to turn on and off at
set times during timed functions.
Q. Can I use the Minute Timer
during oven cooking?
A. The Minute Timer can be used
during any cooking function. The
Automatic Timers (Start and Stop
Dials) are used with TIME BAKE
function only.
Q. Can I change the clock while
I’mTime Cooking in the oven?
A. No. The clock cannot be
changed during any program that
uses the oven timer. You must
either stop those programs or wait
until they are finished before
changing time.
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Before LTsh’lg
Your oven
shelf Positions
1. Look at the controls. Be sure
you understand how*to set them
properly. Read over the directions
for the Automatic Oven Timer so
you understand its use with the
controls.
2. Check oven interior. Look at the
shelves.Take a practice run at removing and replacing them properly, to give sure sturdy support.
3. Read over information and tips
that follow.
4. Keep this book handy so you can
refer to it, especially during the first
weeks of getting acquainted with
}’ouroven.
I
HVIPORTANT:
For normal
cooking, line up the desired temperatures (marked on the outer
edge of the control knob) with the
index marker located immediately
above the control.
The oven has four shelf supports
marked A (bottom), B, C and D
(top). Shelf positions for cooking
food are suggested on Baking,
Roasting and Broiling pages.
(hen InteriorShelves
(hen Light
oven Controls
The controls for the oven(s) are
marked OVEN SET and OVEN
TEMP. OVEN SET has settings for
BAKE, TIME BAKE, BROIL and
OFF. When you turn the knob to
the desired setting, the proper
heating units are then activated for
that operation.
OVEN TEMP maintains the tenl.
perature you set from WARM
(150°) to BROIL (5500). The Oven
Cycling Light glows until oven
reaches the selected temperature,
then goes off and on with the oven
unit(s) during cooking. PREHEATING the oven, even to high temperature settings, is speedy-rarely
more than about 10 minutes. Preheat the oven only when necessary.
Most foods will cook satisfactorily
without preheating. If you find preheating is necessary, keep an eye
on the indicator light and put food
in the oven promptly after light
goes out.
The shelve(s) are designed with
stop-locks so that when placed correctly on the shelf supports, (a) will
stop before coming completely
from the oven, (b) will not tilt when
removing food nor when placing
food on them.
TO REMOVE shelve(s) from the
oven, lift up rearof shelf, pull forward with stop-locks along top of
shelf supports. Be certain that shelf
is cool before touching.
TO REPLACE shelve(s) in oven,
insert shelf with stop-locks resting
on shelf supports. Push shelf
toward rear of oven; it will fall into
place. When shelf is in proper position, stop-locks on shelf will run
under shelf support when shelf is
pulled forward.
10
The light comes on automatically
when the door is opened. Use
switch to turn light on and off
when door is closed.
Switch is located on front of door.
to
%x Baking Chart on Page 20.
When cooking a food for the first
time in your new oven, use time
given on recipes as a guide. Oven
thermostats. over a period of years,
may “drift” from the factory setting
and differences in timing between
an old and a new oven of 5 to 10
minutes are not unusual and you
may be inclined to think that the
new oven is not performing correctly. However, your new oven has
been set correctly at the factory and
is more apt to be accurate than the
oven it replaced.
How to Set YourRange
for Baking
Step 1: Place food in oven, being
certain to leave about 1-inch of
space between pans and walls of
oven for good circulation of heat.
Close oven door. During baking,
avoid frequent door openings to
prevent undesirable results.
Step 2: Turn OVEN SET Knob to
BAKE and OVEN TEM P Knob to
temperature on recipe or on Baking
Chart.
Step 3: Check food for doneness
at minimum time on recipe. Cook
longer if necessary. Switch off heat
and remove foods.
How to Time Bake
you set it to turn off automatically)
or Delay Start and Stop (setting the
oven to turn on automatically at a
later time and turn off at a preset
stop time) will be described.
Efam#_.
lkma&—
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How to EMhmnmkte Start and
Automatic Stop
NOTE: Before beginning make sure
the hands of the range clock show
the correct time of day.
Immediate Start is simply setting
oven to.start baking now and
turning off at a I.ate;time automatically. Remember, foods continue
cooking after controls are off.
Step 1:To set Stop Time, push
in knob on STOP dial and turn
pointer to time you want oven to
turri off; for example 6:00. The
Start Dial should be at the same
position as the time of day on
clock.
Step 1: To set start time, push in
knob on START dial and turn
pointer to time you want oven to
turn on, for example 3:30.
Step 2: To set Stop Time, push in
knob on STOP dial and turn
pointer to time you want oven to
turn off, for example 6:00. This
means your recipe called for two
and one-half hours of baking time.
NOTE: Time on Stop Dial must be
later than time shown on range
clock and Start Dial.
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—
Step 2: Turn OVEN SET Knob to
TIME BAKE. Turn OVEN TEMP
Knob to oven temperature, for
example 250°.
How to setDelay
and Stop
The automatic oven timer controls
are designed to turn the oven on or
off automatic[illy at specific times
!hat you set. Examples of Immediate Start (oven turns on now and
—
—
Step3: Turn OVEN SET Knob to
TIME BAKE. Turn OVEN TEMP
Knob to 250° or recommended
temperature,
Place food in oven, close the door
and automatically the oven will be
turned on and off at the times you
have set. Turn OVEN SET to OFF
and remove food from oven,
start
Delay Start and Stop is setting the
oven timer to turn the oven on and
off automatically at a later time
than the present time of day.
m.
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-
OVEN INDICATOR LIGHT(s) at
TIME BAKE setting may work differently than they do at BAKE setting, Carefully recheck the steps
given above, If all operations are
done as explained, oven will operate as it should,
to
EkeRoasting Charton Page U.
Roasting is cooking by dry heat.
Tender meat or poultry can be
roasted uncovered in your oven.
Roasting temperatures, which
should be low and steady, keep
spattering to a minimum. When
roasting, it is not necessary to sear,
baste, cover, or add water to your
meat.
Roasting is really a baking procedure used for meats. Therefore,
oven controls are set to BAKE.
(You may hear a slight clicking
noise to indicate the oven is
working properly.) Roasting is
easy, just follow these steps:
——..—-
––-—,
.~.~—————
Ste~ 1: Check weight of meat, and
pla~e, fat side up, on roasting rack
in a shallow pan. (Broiler pan with
rack is a good pan for this.) Line
broiler pan with aluminum foil
when using pan for marinating,
cooking with fruits, cooking heavily
cured meats, or for basting food
during cooking. Avoid spilling
these materials on oven liner or
door.
Step 2: Place in oven on shelf in A
or B position. No preheating is
necessary.
QWMims‘andAnswers
Q. ISit necessaryto check for done-
!!$te~4: Most meats continue to
coo’kslightly while standing after
being removed from the oven. For
rare or medium internal doneness,
if meat is to stand 10-20minutes
while making gravy or for easier
carving, you may wish to remove
meat from oven when internal temperature is 5-10”F below temperature suggested on chart. If no
standing is planned, cook meat to
suggested temperature on chart on
page 21.
NOTE:You may wish to use TIME
BAKE as described on preceding
page to turn oven on and off
automatically.
Ren-iemberthat food will continue
to cook in the hot oven and therefore should be removed when the
desired internal temperature has
been reached.
For Frozen Roasts
o Frozen roasts of beef, pork,
lamb, etc., can be started without
thawing, but allow 10-25minutes
per pound additional time (10 min.
per pound for roasts under 5
pounds, more time for larger
roasts).
@Thaw most frozen poultry before
roasting to ensure even doneness.
Some commercial frozen poultry
can be cooked successfully without
thawing. Follow directions given on
packer’s label.
Step 3: Turn OVEN SET to BAKE
and OVEN I“EMP to 325°. Small
poultry may be cooked at 375° for
best browning.
12
ness with a meat therrnometdr?
A. Checking the finished internal
temperature at the completion of
cooking time is recommended. Temperatures are shown on Roasting
Chart on-page 21. For roasts over
8 lbs., cooked at 300° with reduced
time, check with thermometer at
half-hour intervals after % of time
has passed.
Q. Why is my roast crumbling
when I try to*carveit?
A. Roasts are easier to slice if
allowed to cool 10to 20 minutes
after removing from oven. Be sure
to cut across the grain of the meat.
Q. Do 1 need to preheatmy oven
each time I cook a roast or poultry?
A. It is rarely necessary to preheat
your oven, only for very small,
roasts, which cook a short length
of time.
Q. Whenbuying a roast are there
any specialtips that would help me
cook it more evenly?
A. Yes. Buy a roast as even in
thickness as possible or buy rolled
roasts.
Q. Can I seal the sides of my foil
“tent” when roastinga turkey?
A. Sealing the foil will steam the
meat. Leaving it unsealed allows
the air to circulate and brown the
meat.
EMfa
W#5m
—.
See kiting
—
Chart on Page Z!.
—-
—
Broiling is cooking food by intense
radiant heat from the upper unit in
the oven. Most fish and tender cuts
of meat can be broiled. Follow
these steps to keep spattering and
smoking to a minimum.
Step 1: If meat has fat or gristle
near edge, cut vertical slashes
through both about 2-in. apart. If
desired fat may be trimmed, leaving
layer about %-in. thick.
.
Step 2: Place meat on broiler rack
in broiler pan which comes with
range. Always use rack so fat drips
into broiler pan; otherwise juices
may become hot enough to catch
fire= Aluminum
foil may be used to
line broiler pan and rack. But, be
CERTAINTto cut opening in foil, to
correspond with slots in the rack so
fat drips into pan below.
Step 3: Position shelf on recommended shelf position as suggested
on Broiling Chart on page 22. Most
broiling is done on C position, but
if your range is connected to 208
volts, you may wish to use higher
position.
1
f
Questionsand Answers
Q. ‘WhyshouldI leavethe door
Step !5:Turn OVEN SET Knob and
OVEN TEMP Knob to BROIL. Preheating units is not necessary. (See
notes on Broiling Chart page 22.)
Step 6: Turn food only once during
cooking. Time foods for first side
as on Broiling Chart page 22. Turn
food, then use times given for second side as a guide to preferred
doneness. (Where two thicknesses
and times are given together, use
first times given for thinnest food.)
Step 7: Turn OVEN SET Knob to
OFF, Serve food immediately,
leave pan outside oven to cool
during meal for easiest cleaning.
Step 4: Leave door ajar about 3
inches. The door stays open by
itself, yet the proper temperature
is maintained in the oven.
—
13
closed when broilingchicken?
A. Chicken is the only food recommended for closed-door broiling.
This is because chicken is relatively
thicker than other foods you broil.
Closed door holds more heat in
oven, so chicken may be broiled
weILdone inside.
Q. When bro~ling,is it necessaryto
always use a rack in the pan?
A. Yes. Using the rack suspends the
meat over the pan. As the meat
cooks, the juices fall into the pan
thus keeping meat dryer. Juices are
protected by the rack and stay
cooler, thus preventing excessive
spatter and smoking.
Q. Should I salt the meat before
broiling?
A. No. Salt draws out the juices
and allows them to evaporate,
Always salt after cooking. Turn
meat with tongs; piercing meat with
a fork also allowsjuices to escape.
When broiling poultry or fish,
brush each side often with butter.
Q. Why are my meats not turning
out as brown as they shouhi?
A. In some areas, the power (voltage) to the range may be low. In
these cases, preheat the broil unit
for 10 minutes before placing
broiler pan with food in oven,
Check to see if you are using the
recommended shelf position, Lroil
for the longest period of time indicated in the Broil Chart in this
book. Turn food only once during
broiling.
Q. Do 1 need to greasemy broiler
rack to prevent meat from sticking’?
A. No. The broiler rack is designed
to reflect broiler heat thus keeping
the surface cool enough to prevent
meat sticking to the surface.
—–
—
—
-.
—
——
-—
—
Bmm!!’—
—
m
m-.
-—
——
—.
—
-.
-
————.
Proper care and cleaning are
important so your Range will give
you efficient and satisfactory
service. Follow these directions
carefully in caring for your range
to assure safe and proper
maintenance.
Finishes
The porcelain enamel finish is
sturdy but breakable if misused.
This finish is acid resistant. However, any acid foods spilled (such as
fruit juices, tomato, or vinegar)
should not be permitted to remain
on the finish.
CleaningUnder the Range
The area under the range of models
equipped with a bottom drawer can
be reached easily for cleaning by
removing the bottom drawer. l-o
remove, pull drawer out all the way,
tilt up the front and remove it. To
replace, insert glides at back of
drawer beyond stop on range
glides. Lift drawer if necessary to
insert easily. Let front of drawer
down, then push in to close.
Removable Oven Door
oven Vent Duct
Oven Lamp
Your Range is vented through a
duct located under the right rear
surface unit. Clean the duct often.
To remove:
@Make sure unit is cool.
~ Lift up right rear surface unit.
@Remove drip pan and ring.
@ Lift out oven vent duct.
CAUTION: Before replacing your
oven bulb, disconnect the electrical
power for your range at the main
fuse or circuit breaker panel or pull
plug. Be sure to let the-lamp cover
and bulb cool completely before
removing or replacing.
I
The oven lamp (bulb) is covered
with a glass, removable cover which
is held in place with a bail-shaped
wire. Remove oven door, if desired,
to reach cover easily.
1. TO REMOVE, hold hand under
cover so it doesn’tfall when released.
With fingers of same hand firmly
push down wire bail until it clears
cover. Lift off cover, DO NOT
REMOVE ANY SCREWS TO
REMO.VE THIS TYPE OF
COVER.
2, Replace lamp with 40-watt,
home appliance bulb.
3. TO REPLACE cover, place it
into groove of lamp receptacle. Lift
wire bail up to center of cover until
it snaps into place. When in place,
wire holds cover firmly, but be certain wire bail is not below depression in center of cover.
40 Connect electric power to range.
To replace:
@Place the part over the oven vent
located below the cooktop with
opening of the duct under the
round opening in the drip pan. It
is important that the duct is in the
correct position so moisture and
vapors from the oven can be
released during oven use. NOTE:
Never cover the hole in the oven
vent duct with aluminum foil or
any other material. This prevents
the oven vent from working properly during any cooking cycle.
Cooktop Surface Lamp
WHEN CHANGI.NG LAMP, DO
NOT TOUCH THE METAL END
OF THE LAMP.
a. Disconnectelectricpowerto
To REMOVE door, open to BROIL
position, or where you feel hinge
catch slightly. Grasp door at sides;
lift door up and away from hinges.
To REPLACE, grasp door at sides.
Line up door with hinges and push
door firmly into place.
rangeat main fuse or circuit
breaker panel.
b. Hold glasspanel assemblyand
removethe three screwsfrom the
metalframe that holds top of
assemblyin place.
c. Hold assemblyin both hands and
lowerit until it is removed,
d. Removelamp and replacewith
bulb of the same wattage.Lift glass
panel assemblyinto placeand
replacescrewsin top of assemblyto
hoid it in place.
e. Reconnect electricpowerto
range.
14
—
Plug-h surface
units
Clean the area under the drip pans
To replace:
@ Place the drip pan/ring in the
surface unit cavity found on top
of the range. Line up the drip pan
so the unit receptacle can be seen.
@Insert the terminals of the plugin unit through the opening in the
pan/ring and into the receptacle,
@Guide the surface unit into place
so it fits evenly and fits snugly into
drip pan or trim ring.
Note: If your range has separate
trim rings, the drip pan must be
under the trim ring.
often. Built-up soil, especially
grease, may catch fire. To make
cleaning easier, the plug-in surface
units are removable.
I
MEDALLION
RECEPTACLE
I
TERMINALS
I
CHROi4E-PLATED
DRIPPAN/RING
SPIOER
PULL KNOB OFF OF SHAFT,
LOOK AT BACK OF KNOB AND
NOTE CURRENT SETTING,
BEFORE MAKING ANY
ADJ US’TMENT.
—.—
—.
—
—.——
~
—.
—
—–
——-—
To increase temperature, turn
toward HI or RAISE; to decrease
turn toward LO or LOWER, Each
notch changes temperature 10degrees. Temperature can be raised
by 20 degrees or lowered by 30
degrees.
CAUTION
/’
//-
I
R
RIN
To clean:
* Wipe around the edges of the
surface unit opening in the range
top. Clean the area below the unit.
Rinse all washed areas with a damp
cloth or sponge.
Caution: Be sure all controls are
turned OFF before attempting to
clean under the cooktop or removing the Calrod@units,
To remove:
* Raise the unit coil opposite the
receptacle. Lift about one inch
above the trim ring and pull away
from the receptacle. Caution: Be
sure the coils are cool before removing a Calrod@ unit.
@After removing the plug-in surface unit, lift the drip pan/ring to
clean under the unit.
e Do not attempt to clean plug-in
I
surfaceunits in an automatic
dishwasher.
e Do not immerse plug-in surface
units in liquids of any kind.
g Do not bend the plug-in surface
unit plug terminals.
@Do not attempt to clean, adjust
or in any way repair the plug-in
receptacle.
To Reposition SurfaceUnit:
o Replace drip pan into recess in
cooktop.
e Put trim ring in place over drip
pan.
* Guide the surface unit into place
so it fits evenly into trim ring. Pan
must be under trim ring.
1. Pull off knob, loosen both
screws on back of knob holding
skirt of knob firmly. 2. Turn black
handle to move pointer one notch
in desired direction. Tighten screws.
3. Return knob to range, matching
flat area of knob to shaft. Recheck
oven performance before making
an additional adjustment.
—-.—.—
Adjusting Oven Thermostat
Use time given on recipe when
cooking first time. Oven thermostats, in time, may “drift” from the
factory setting and differences in
timing between an old and a new
oven of 5 to 10 minutes are not
unusual, Your oven has been set
correctly at the factory and is more
apt to be accurate than the oven
which it replaced. However, if you
find that your foods consistently
brown too little or too much, you
ma}fmake a simple adjustment in
the thermostat (Oven Tcmp) knob,
15
Do
notattempt to dean
The top, bottom, sides, and back of
the oven liner, and door inner liner
are finished with a special coating
which cannot be cleaned in the
usual manner with soap, detergents,
commercial oven cleaners, coarse
abrasive pads or coarse brushes.
Their use and/ or the use of oven
sprays will cause permanent
damage.
The special coating is a porous
ceramic material which is dark in
color and feels slightly rough to the
touch. If magnified, the surface
would appear as peaks, valleys, and
sub-surface “tunnels.” This rough
finish tends to prevent grease spatters from forming little beads or
droplets which run down the side
walls of a hard-surface oven liner
leaving unsightly streaks that
require hand cleaning. Instead,
when spatter hits the porous finish
it is dispersed and is partially
absorbed. This dispersal action
increases the exposure of oven soil
to heated air, which results in oxidation of soil. This finish also
reduces the visual effect of residual
soil. It may not disappear completely and at some time after
extended usage, stains may appear.
The special coaling works best on
small amounts of spatter. It does
not work well with larger spills,
especially sugars, egg, or dairy mixtures. For this reason, the oven is
equipped with a removable, replaceable aluminum foil oven bottom
liner which protects the porous
finish on the bottom of the oven
“from spillovers. Avoid spills on
inside surface of the oven door.
This special finish is not used on
oven s-helves.Shelves are removable
and can be taken to the sink for
cleaning. See “Cleaning Chart” on
page 17for cleaning directions.
the oven
mti~you
have read this
‘r(’)clean owl:
Use the following steps when
cleaning your Continuous-Clean
Oven.
1. Let range parts cool before handling. It is recommended that
rubber gloves be worn when
cleaning range parts manually.
2. Remove all cooking utensils
including the broiler pan and raclc.
3. Remove oven shelvesand clean
them manually with scouring pads
or mild abrasive.
4. Remove excess spills and boilovers from aluminum foil oven
bottom liner before removing liner
from oven. This is to prevent excess
liquids from spilling ~nto the
porous finish. Then remove aluminum foil bottom liner and clean
manually. (Before cleaning or removing the aluminum foil liner, lift
bake unit out of the way.)
section.
DURING THE
OPERATION OF THE OVEN,
THE DOOR, WINDOW AND
O~”HER RANGE SURFACES
WILL GET HOT ENOUGH TO
CAUSE BURNS. DO NOT
TOUCH. LET THE RANGE
COOL BEFORE REPLACING
ALUMINUM FOIL OVEN BOTTOM AND OVEN SHELVES IF
THEY WERE REMOVED.
7. If a spillover or heavy soiling
occurs on the porous surJace, as
soon as the oven has cooled, remove as much of the soil as possible using a small amount of water
and a stiff bristle nylon brush.
When using water,-use it sparingly
and change it frequently, keeping it
as clean as possible, and be sure to
blot it up with paper towels, cloths,
or sponges. Do not rub or scrub
with paper towels, cloths or
sponges-,sincethesewillleave
unsightlylint on the oven finish. If
water leavesa whitering on the
finish as it dries, apply water again
and blot it with a clean spcnge,
starting at the edge of the ring and
working toward the center.
Use care in removing and replacing
aluminum foil oven bottom liner
and shelvesand in placingand removingdishesand food to avoid
scratching,rubbing or otherwise
5. Clean oven window. Use mild
non-scratching cleanser and damp
cloth. Avoid spilling water or
cleaner on porous surface.
6. Soil visibility may be reduced by
operating oven at 400°F. Close
door; set oven switch to bake and
oven temperature control to 400°F.
Time for at least 4 hours, Repeated
cycles may be necessary before
improvement in appearance is
apparent, particularly on oven
door. For moderate to heavy
soiling of oven door, use method
described in item (7) below before
running 400°F, cycle. The oven
timer can be used to control the
cycle automatically at a time convenient for you. Some slight
smoking may occur, similar to that
which may occur during Time Bake
cooking.
16
damagin~ the pordusjinish on the
oven walls and door.
Do not use soap, detergent, commercial oven cleaner, s[licone oven
sprays, coarse steel pads or coarse
brushes on the porous surface.
These prod ~ictswill spot, clog, and
mar the porous surfa& and reduce
its ability to work.
—
rmaw?r..
-!lE#mw
—.
—
MATERIALS TO USE
Do not clean the bake unit or broil unit. Anysoil willburn off when the
unit is heated. NOTE:The bake unit is hingedand can be liftedgently tc
Bake Unit and
clean the ovenfloor. Jf spillover,residue, or ash accumulatesaround the
Broil [Jnit
bake unit. aentlv wit)earound the unit with warm water.
Drain fat, cool pan and rack slightly.(Do not let soiledpan and rack
e Soap and Water
stand in ovento cool). Sprinkle on detergent. Fill the pan with warm
@Soap-Filled
water and spread cloth or paper towel over the rack. Let pan and rack
Broiler Pan and Rack
Scouring Pad
stand for a fewminutes. Wash;scour if necessary.Rinseand dry.
e plastic Scouring Pad
OPTION: The broiler pan and rack may also be cleanedin a dishwasher
Pull off knobs. Wash gentlybut do not soak. Dry and return controls to
Control Knobs:
e Mild Soap and water
range making sure to match flat area on the knob and shaft.
Range Top and (hen
Washall glasswith cloth dampened in soapy water. Rinseand polish
e Soap and Water
with a dry cloth. If knobs are removed,do r!otallow water to run down
Outside Glass Finish
insidethe surface of class whilecleaning.
Wash, rinse,and then polish with a dry cloth. DO NOT USE steel wool,
Metal, including
e Soap and Water
abrasives, ammonia, acids, or commercialoven cleanerswhichmay
Brushed Chrome
damage the finish.
and Cooktop
Avoidcleaningpowdersor harsh abrasiveswhichmay scratchthe enamel
If acids should spill on the range whileit is hot, use a dry paper towel or
CJPaper Towel
Porcelain Enamel
cloth to wipeup right away. When the surfacehas cooled,washand rinse
~ Dry Cloth
Surface*
e Soap and Water
For other spills,such as fat smatterings,etc., wash with soap and water
when cooled and then rinse. Polish with a dry cloth.
Usea mild solution of soap and water. Do not use any harsh abrasives
e Soap and Water
Painted Surfaces
or cleaningpowderswhichmay scratch or mar surface.
To clean ovendoor; removeby openingto BROIL positionand grasping
door at sides, Liftdoor up and away from hinges.Clean with soap and
o Soap and Water
nside Oven Door*
water, Replaceby graspingdoor at sidesand lining up door with hinges.
Push door firmly into place,
Cool beforecleaning.Frequent wipingwith mild soap and water will
o Soap and Water
)ven Liner
prolong the time bctwccnmajor ’cleanings.Besure to rinse thoroughly.
Removethe Oven Vent Duct found under the right rear
e Soap and Water
lven Vent Duct
surface unit. Wash in hot, soapy water and dry and replace.
Yourshelvescan be cleaned by hand usingany and all mentioned matero Soap and Water
iheives
ials. Rinse thorowzhlvto removeall materials after cleaninz.
Spatters and spills burn away when the coilsarc heated. .Atthe cnd of a
meal, rcmovcall utensils from the Calrod@unit and heat the soiledunits
:lt i-I!,Let the soil burn off about a minute and switchthe units to OFF.
Avoidgetting cleaning materials on the coils. Wipe off any cleaning
;alrod@ Surface
materialswith a damp paper towel b~fow heating the Calrod@unit,
Jnit Coils
DO NOT handle the unit beforecompletelycooled.
DO NOT self-cleanplug-inunits.
DO NOT immerse~lu~-inunits in anv kind ot’iiauid.
For cleaning, removedrawer by pulling it all the way open, tilt up the
front and lift out, Wipewith damp cloth or spongeand replace. Never
itorage Drawers
o Soap and Water
use harsh abrasivesor scouring pads,
Clean as describedbelow or in the dishwasher. Wipeall rings atlcr each
s Soap and Water
Mrome-lPiated Rings
cookingso unnoticed spatter will not “burn on” next time you cook. To
~ Stiff-i3ristlcdBrush
m Chrome Trim
rcrnove“burned-on” spatters use any or all cleaning materiak mentioned
* Soap-Filled Scouring Pad
?ings and Pans
scratching of the surface,
Rub /i.g/7~/J’with scouring pad to prevent —
(Non Metallic)
Cool pan slightly,Sprinkle on detergent iil~dwash or scour Piillwith
BSoap and Water
warm water, Rinse and dry, In addition, pan may also bc cleaned in the
PSoap-Filled Scouring Pad
‘orceiain Drip Pans
dishwasher.
~ Plastic Scouring Pad
~ Dishwasher ..— —
—
—
jIIin~a~idsInayC;lUSCd iscolo1“:1
tiOtl, Spillovcrs SI1OI.I1[1IX wipfxl Up im IIICII iilttly,with C:l1.C
-=+:s~ojl
]:lgcof ~,l;lrjn:lclCS,fruit iujc~s,~1IldfxIS[i11~III;It~rj:i]$COHt:I
bci ng tdkcn 10 not touch anj hot portion Of’the oven. Whenthesurfaceiscool.cleanand rinse,
t#E$sw—.
—.
—
—
—.
~
—.
———.
—.
--––
u%w---mimw
A.
—
—
—.
—
.——
—.=——-
I.JfensiiTips
1. Use medium or heavy-weight cooking containers.
Aluminum containers generally conduct heat faster
than other metals. Cast iron and coated cast iron
containers are slow to absorb heat, but generally
cook evenly at LOW or MEDIUM settings. Steel
pans may cook uneverdy if not combined with other
metals. L’senon-stick coated or coated metal containers. Flat ground pyroceram saucepans or skillets
coated on the bottom with aluminum generally cook
evenly. Glass saucepans should be used with the
heat-spreading trivets available for that purpose.
Food
Container
2. To conserve the most cooking energy, pans should
be flat on the bottom, have straight sides and tight
fitting lids. Match the size of the saucepan to the size
of the surface unit. A pan that extends more than
one inch beyond the edge of the trim ring traps heat
which causes “crazing” (fine hairline cracks) on the
porcelain and discoloration ranging from blue to
dark gray on the trim rings.
Directionsand Setting
to Start Cooking
Setting to Complete
Cooking
Comments
Cereal
Cornmeal,grits,
oatmeai
Covered
Saucepan
HI. in covered pan bring
water to boil before adding
cereal.
LOW or WM, then add
cereal. Finish timing
according to package
directions.
Cereals bubble and expand as
they cook; use large enough
saucepan to prevent boilover.
Cocoa
Uncovered
Saucepan
H]. Stir together water or
milk, cocoa ingredients.
Bring just to a boil.
MED, to cook 1 or 2 min.
to coinpletely blend
ingredients.
Milk boils over rapidly, Watch as
boiling point approaches.
Coffee
Percolator
HI. At first perk, switch
heat to LOW.
LOW to maintain gentle
but steady perk.
Percolate 8 to 10 min. for 8
cups, less for fewer cups.
Covered
Saucepan
H], Cover eggs with cool
Cover pan, cook
until steaming.
MED H1. Melt butter. add
eggs and cover skillet,
LOW. Cook Oiliy 3 to 4
min. for soft cooked; 15
rein, for hard cooked.
Continue cookiilg at MED
HI until whhcs are just set,
about 3 to 5 miil.
LOW, then add eggs,
Wheil bottoins of eggs
have just set, carefully
turn over to cook other
side.
LOW. C:ircfully add eggs.
Cook tincovci”cdabotit 5
min. at M ED, H1,
MED. Add cgg mixture,
C’ook, srii”riilgto dcsii+cd
doneness.
.
Eggs
Cookedinshell
water.
Friedsunny-side-up
Cover’cd
Skillet
Friedo!ereasy
Uncovered
Skillet
HI. Melt butter.
Poached
Covered
Skillet
HI. In covcrcd pan bring
watci t. a boil,
Scrarnblcdor omelets
Uncovci-cd
Skillet
H1, Heat buttci<until light
golden ii~Coloi-.
Fruits
Covered
%uccpan
HI, In covcrcd pan briilg
fi-uit and water to boil.
LOW, Stir occasionally
and check for stick iilg.
Fresh fruit: Use 1Ato YZcup water
per pound of fruit,
Drieci fr-uit: Use water as package
directs. Time dcpeilds on whether
fiwit has been presoaked. if not,
a Ilow more cook ii~gtiinc.
Meats, Poultry
Braked: Pot roasts of
beef, lamb or veal:
pork steaks and
chops
Covered
Skillet
H1. Melt fat then add meat.
Switch to MED HI to
brown meat. Add wmtcror
other liquid.
LOW. Simmer until fork
tender.
Pan-fried: “I”endcr
chops: !hin stc:iks up
[0 Win.: minute
stca ks; hamburgers:
franks; and sausage:
thin fish fil~cts
IJncovcred
Skillet
H1. Prcbcat skillet, then
g:casc !ightly.
MED H1 or MED. Bl”O\Yll
iind cook to dcsircd
Meat can be seasoned and floured
before it is browned, it’desired.
Liquid variations for flavor could
be wine, fruit or tomato juice or
mciit broth.
Timing: Steaks 1 to 2-in.: 1 to
2 hrs, Beef Stew: 2 to 3 hrs.
pot ro:,st: zyl to 4 Ili’s.
1>:1,, fl.l)ing
isbest I’01”
thin steaks
.
uild chops, If i.ai”eis dmircd, prcbcat skillet before udciing meat.
doneness,
nccdccl.
18
turniilg
over i2s
If you do not cover skillet, baste
eggs with fat to cook tops evenly
Rcmovc cooked eggs with slotted
spoon oi”panca kc t ui.ilci..
Eggs coi~tintic to set slightly aftci”
cooking, For omelet do not stir
last fe\v minutes. When set fold in
half.
utensil
Tips
(continued)
—
—
—
—.
—
L?a&EaK
—.
—
—.
3. Deep Fat Frying. Do not overfill kettle with fat
that may spill over when adding food. Frosty foods
bubble vigorously. Watch foods frying at HIGH
temperatures and keep range and hood clean from
accumulated grease.
~.
i&aRw
—
—
ifs%i%—.
—
—
-.-?
U%#a=&
Food
Container
Directions and Setting
to Start Cooking
Setting to Complete
Cooking
Fried Chicken
Covered
Skillet
HI. Melt fat. Switch to MEIl
HI to brown chicken.
LOW. Cover skillet and
cook until tender.
Uncover last few minutes.
Pan broiled bacon
Uncovered
Skillet
MED HI. Cook, turning
o\,cr as needed.
Sautee~: Less tender
thin steaks (chuck,
round, etc.); liver;
thick or whole fish
Simmered or stewed
meat; chicken: corned
beef; smoked pork;
stewing beef; tongue;
etc.
Covered
Skillet
H1. In cold skillet arrange
bacon slices, Cook just
until starting to sizzle.
H]. Melt fat. Switch to MED
to brown slowly.
For crisp dry chicken, cover only
af!er switching to LOW for !0
min. Uncover and cook turning
occasionally 10 to 20 min.
A more attention-free method
is to start and cook at MED.
LOW. Cover and cook
until tender.
Meat may be breaded or marinated in sauce before frying.
LOW. Cook until fork
tender. (Water should
slowly boil). For very large
loads medium heat may
be needed.
Add salt or other seasoning
before cooking if meat has not
been smoked or otherwise
cured.
Comments
Covered
Dutch Oven,
Kettle or
Large
Saucepan
HI. Cover meat with water
and cover pan or kettle.
Cook until steaming.
-Melting chocolate,
butter,
marshmaNows
Small
Covered
saucepan.
Use small
surface unit
WM. Allow 10 to 15 min. to
melt through. Stir to
smooth.
Pancakes or
French toast
Skillet or
Griddle
MED HI. Heat skillet 8 to
10 min. Grease lightly.
Cook 2 to 3 min. per side.
Thick batter takes slightly longer
time. Turn over pancakes when
bubbles rise to surface.
Covered
Large KettIe
or Pot
HI. In covered kettle, bring
salted water to a boil,
uncover and add pasta
slowly so boiling docs not
stop,
M ED H]. Cook uncovcrcd
until tender, For large
amounts HI maybe
nccdcd to keep water at
rolling boil throughout
entire crmking timc,
Use large enough kettle to prevent boilovcr, Pasta doubles in
size when cooked,
Pressure Cooking
Pressure
Cooker or
Canner
H]. Heat until first jiggic is
heard.
MED HI for f’oociscooking
10 min. or less. MED for
foods over 10 min.
Cooker should jiggle 2 to 3 times
per minute.
Puddings, Sauces,
Candies, Frostings
Uncovered
Saucc~an
H1. Bring just to boil.
1.OW. To finish cooking.
Stir frequently to prevent
sticking.
Vegetables
Fresh
Covered
Saucepan
MED. Cook l-lb. 101030
more min., depend ing on
tenderness of vegetable.
Uncovered pan requires more
water and iongcr time.
F“rozen
Covered
Saucepan
LOW. Cook according to
time on package,
Break up or stir as needed while
cooking.
%uteeci: Onions;
green peppers: mushrooms; celery: etc.
Uncovcrcd
Skillet
HI. Measure YZto l-in.
water in suucepan, Add
salt and prepared vcgctablc, In covered saucepan
bring to boil.
HI. Measure water and salt
as abcwc. Add frozen biock
of vegetable, in covcrcd
saucepan bring to boil,
H 1. In skillc[ melt fat.
MED. Add VC~Ct:ibiC,
Cook until desired tcndurncss is retichccl.
“1.urnover or stir vcgctablc as
ncccssary for even browning.
Rice and Grits
Ccwcrcd
% ucepan
WM. COVC14iitld cook
accord ing to timc,
Triples in volume after cooking.
‘1’imcat WM. Rice: 1 cup rice and
2 cups wtiter-–25 reins, Grits: 1
cup grits and 4 cups wwtcr-40
min.
Pasta
Noodles or spaghetti
.—
-..
Hi. f3ring Silltc(l
w~t~l”
toii
boi 1,
..
19
—
Elm!wL.
——
—
—
—.
—
—
————.
—
When melting marshmallows, add
milk or water.
—
1. Aluminum pans conduct heat quickly, For most conventional
baking li.gh[shiny finishes generally give best results because they
help prevent overbrowning in the time it takes for heat to cook the
center areas. Dull (satin-finish) bottom surfaces of pans are recommended for cake pans and pie plates to be sure those areas brown
completely.
2. Dark or non-shiny finishes, also glass and pyroceram, generally
absorb heat which may result in dry, crisp crusts. Reduce oven heat
25° if lighter crusts are desired. Preheat cast iron for baking some
foods for rapi(i browning when food is added.
3. Prctwating the oven is not always necessary, especially for foods
which cooklonger than 30 or 40 minutes. For food with short
cooking times, preheating gives best appearance and crispness.
4, Open the oven door to check food as little as possible to prevent
uneven heating and to save energy.
Container
Shelf
Position
Oven
Temp.
Time,
Min.
Biscuits(~z-in.thick)
Shiny Cookie Sheet
B, C
400”-475”
]5-~f)
Coffeecake
B, A
350”-400”
20-30
B
B
400”-450”
350”
20-40
45-55
Preheat cast iron pan for crisp crust.
Muffins
Popo\’ers
Shiny Metal Pan with
Satin-finish bottom
Cast Iron or Glass
Shiny Metal Pan with
Satin-finish bottom
Shiny Metal Muffin Pans
Deep Glass or Cast Iron Cups
A, II
R
400°-4250
375”
20-30
45-60
Dccreascabout 5 min. for muffin mix,
Or bake at 450° for 25 min., then at
350° for 1O-I5min.
Quick Loaf Bread
Yeastbread (2 loaves)
Metal or Glass Loaf Pans
Metal or Glass Loaf Pans
B
A, B
350”-375”
375°-425”
45-60
45-60
Plain rolls
Sweet rolls
Shiny Oblong or Muffin Pans
Shiny Oblong or Muffin Pans
A, B
B, A
375°-4250
350”-375”
10-25
20-30
Cakes
(without shortening)
Angel food
Jelly roll
Sponge
Aluminum Tube Pan
Metal Jelly Roll Pan
Metal or Ceramic Pan
A
B
A
325°-3750
375”-400”
325”-350”
30-55
IO-15
45-60
Cakes
Bundt cakes
Cupcakes
Metal or Ceramic Pan
Shiny Metal Muffin Pans
A, B
B
325°-3500
350”-375”
45-65
20-25
Metal or Glass Loaf or
Tube Pan
Shiny Metal Pan with
Satin-finish bottom
Shiny Metal Pan with
Satin-finish bottom
Metal or Glass Loaf Pans
A, B
‘2750-3000
2-4 hl”S
B
350°-3750
20-35
B
350”-375”
25-30
R
350”
40-60
Food
Comments
Bread
Corn bread or muffins
Gingerbread
Fruit cakes
Layer
La}’cr,Chocolate
Loaf
Canned refrigerated biscuits take
2-4 min. less,time,
Dark metal or glass give deepest
browning.
For thin rolls, Shelf B may be used.
For thin rolls, Shelf B may be used.
Two piece pan is convenient.
Line pan with waxed paper.
[Jape,. \illcrs prodllc~
moremoist
crusts,
Usc 300° and Shelf B for small or individual cakes,
C:ookies
Drop
Metal or Olass Pans
Cookie Slvxt
B, c’
B, c
325”-350°
350”400”
25-35
10.’20
Refrigerator
Rolled or sliced
Cookie Sheet
Cookie Sheet
B, c
B, C
400°-4250
375”-400”
6-12
7-12
A, B, C
B
350”-400”
300”.350”
30-60
30-60
Puddings, Rice and
Cu>tard
Glass or Metal
Glass Custard Cups or
Casserole(set in pan of
hot water)
Glass Custard Cups or
Casserole
B
325°
50-90
Pies
Frozen
Foil Pan on Cookie Sheet
400°-425”
45-70
Meringue
Spread to crust edges
325°-350’
15-25
One crust
Two crust
Glass m Satin-finish Metal
Glass or Satin-finish Mcta]
(llass or Satin-finish ,Mc&l
400°-425’
4000-4250”
450”
45-60
40-60
12-15
325°-4000”
60”90
30-60”
30-75
Bmwnics
Fruits,
Other Desserts
Baked apples
Custard
Pastry
Shell
tW?iscelianeous
f3akcdpotatoes
Scalloped dishes
Souffles
Set on Oven Shelf
(;i~SS or Mctat
Glass
A. B, C
A, 11,C
f]
325°-3750
300”-350”
20
Bar cookies from mix usc same time.
Usc Shc]f C and incrcasc temp. 25-50°
for more browning.
Rcducc tcmp. to 3000for large custard. Cook bread or rice pudding
with custard base 80 to 90 minutes.
Large pies usc 400° and increase
time,
To c]uickiybrown meringue usc 4000
for 8-10 min.
Custard fillings require lower tcmp,,
longer time.
Incrctiw time for
size.
liirgC
amount or
SK?4wa
-“A
—.
—
—
1, Position oven shelf at B for small-size roasts (3 to 7 lbs.) and at
A for larger roasts.
4, Standing time recommended for roasts is 10to 20 min. to
allow roast to firm up and make it easier to carve. It will rise
2. Place ;neat fat side up or poultry breast-side up on broiler pan
or other shallow pan with trivet. Do not cover. Do not stuff
poultry until just before roasting. Use meat thermometer, for
more accurate doneness. (Do not place thermometer in stuffing.)
3. Remove fat and drippings as necessary. Basteas desired.
5° to !OOinternaltemperature;to compensatefor temperature rise,if desired,removeroast fromovenat 5° to 10°lessthan
temperatureon chart.
5. Frozen roasts can be conventionally roasted by adding 10to 25
Oven
Temp.
Doneness
Tender cuts: rib, high quality
sirloin tip. rump or top round*
325”
Rare:
Medium:
Well Done:
Lamb Leg or bone-in shouider*
325°
Rare:
325°
325°
325°
Medium:
Well Done:
We]]Done:
Well Done:
To Warm:
Type
L~~(!at
about
min. per pound more time than given in chart for refrigerated.
(10 min. per lb. for roasts under 5-lbs.) Defrost poultry before
roasting,
ApproximateRoastingTime,
in Minutesper Pound
6 to t+lbs.
18-22
22-25
30-35
3545
28-33
21-25
%0-23
25-30
24-28
30-35
28-33
3545
30-40
35-45
30-40
IOreins. pcr lb, (any weight)
Internal
Temp.0F
3 tO 5-lbs.
veal shoulder, leg or Ioin*
Pork loin, rib or shoulder*
Ham, pre-cooked
24-30
I
Under10-lbs.
Well Done:
I-tam, raw’
325°
20-30
*For boneless rolled roasts over 6-in. thick. add 5 to 10 min ler lb. to times given above.
Poultry
Chicken or Duck
Chicken pieces
“Turkey
——
—
—
—.
—
—
.-——
—
L
325°
375”
Well Done:
WC]]Donc:
325°
Well Done:
3 to 5-lbs.
35-40
35-40
10 to IS-lbs.
20-25
10 to 15-lbs.
17-~o
Over 5 Ibs.
30-35
Over154bs.
15-20
30”-140”
50°-1600
70°-1850
30”-140”
50°-1600
170°-1850
1700-180°
170°-1800
1250-130°
160°
185°-1900
185°-1900
In thigh:
185°-1900
—.
— -
—
—.
—
——.
——--..=.
—
5. When arranging food on pan, do not let fatty edges hang over
sides, which could soil oven with dripping fat.
6. Broiler docs not need to be preheated. However, for very thin
foods or to increase browning, preheat if desired.
7$ Frozen Steaks can be ~onventional]y broiled by positioning the
oven shelf at next lowest shelf position and increasing cooking time
given in this chart 1% times per side,
8. If your range is connected to 208 Volts rare steaks may bc broiled
by preheating the broil heater and positioning the oven shelf one
position higher.
1. A1wia~’s
use broiler pan and rack that comes with your oven. lt is
designed to minimize smoking and spattering by trapping juices in the
shielded lower part of the pan.
2. Oven door should be ajar for most foods: there is a special position
on door which holds door open correctly.
3. For steaks and chops, slash fat evenly around outside edges of
meat. To slash, cut crosswise through outer fat surface just to the
edge of the meat. Use tongs to turn meat over to prevent piercing
meat and loosing juices.
4. If desired, marinate meats or chicken before broiling. Or, brush
with barbeque sauce last 5 to 10 minutes only.
Food
Quantity
and/or
Thickness
Bacon
%-lb. (about 8
thin slices)
Ground Beef,
Well done
l-lb. (4 patties)
% to %-in. thick
BeefSteaks
Rare
Medium
1 inch thick
(1-1% lbs.)
Shelf
Position
First Side
Time, Min.
Second Side
Time, Min.
I
3%
3%
I
7
4-5
7
9
13
Steaks less than l-in. cook through
before browning. Pan frying is
recommended.
S1ash fat.
Reduce times about 5-10 min. per side
for cut-up chicken. Brush each side with
melted butter, Broil with skin side down
first and broil with door closed.
Comments
Arrange in single iayer.
Space evenly.
Up to 8 patties take about same
time.
c
c
c
c
c
c
15
25
7
9
13
7-8
14-16
20-25
1 whole
(2 to 2%-!bs.).
split lengthwise
A
35
10-15
2-4 slices
1 pkg, (2)
2-split
c
1r/2-2
c
3-4
Lobster tails
(6 to 8-oz.each)
2-4
B
13-16
(Do not
turn over)
Cut through back of shell. Spread open.
Brush with melted butter before and
after half time.
F“ish
l-lb. fillets 1Ato
%in, thick
c
5
5
Handle and turn very carcfuily.Brush
withIcmon butter bc!’oreand during
Well Done
Rare
Medium
Well Done
Chicken
Bakery Products
Bread (Toast)or
Toaster Pastries
EnglishMuffins
1%-in. thick
(2-2% lbs.)
10
Space evenly. Place i%glish muffins
cut-side-up and brush with butter, if
desired.
cooking if desired. Preheat broiler to
increasebrowning,
Ham slices
(precooked)
l-in. thick
I
B
8
8
2(% inch)
2 ( l-in. thick)
about 1 lb.
c
10
10
B
13
13
Medium
Well Done
Medium
Well Done
2(1 inch)
about 10-12 oz.
2 (1% inch)
about I lb.
c
c
c
8
10
10
4-7
B
17
4-6
12-14
Wieners and similar
precooked sausages,
bratwurst
l-lb. pkg. (10)
c
6
I-2
Pork chops
Well Done
I
increase times 5-10 min. per side for
Ir,/2-in,thick or home cured.
slash fat .
Lamb chops
Slash fat.
10
I
22
I
If desired, split sausages in half lengthwise into 5 to 6-in, pieccso
FmIEa
Famm”.
———.
—
The Americana model with a builtin exhaust system is equipped with
a damper, a two-speed exhaust
blower, and removable filters.
Exhaust openings are located over
cooking top and in hood over oven.
The exhaust system functions only
when the blower is operating.
Locate the button for exhaust
system at the bottom of the vertical
control panel. For high speed push
in top of button; for low speed
push-in bottom of button and to
stop blower push center of button.
When blower is operating and hood
over oven is closed, it exhausts over
surface units only. When blower
operates with hood in open position, it exhausts through op~nings
over surface units and over oven
simultaneously.
THE EXHAUST’ SYSTEM
SHOULD BE OPERATED
WHENEVER ODORS, VAPORS,
OR SMOKE ARE EXPECTED
TO BE THE RESULT OF A
— COOKING OPERATION. START
AN AT THE BEGINNING OF
— COOKING.
To open hood above the oven, lift
up handle at right of hood; to close
push down on handle. Use hood in
its fully extended position whenever
vapor or smoke results from
cooking, such as when pan broiling
or deep-fat frying on the surface
units. See information on use of
surface units.
mm%
Two filters are located over cooking
top and one behind hood extension. Filters are removable for
cleaning.
Filter(s) becomes soiled over a
period of time. The efficiency of
your exhaust system depends on
how clean the filter(s) is. Frequency
of cleaning, or replacing, depends
on the type of cooking you do, but
filters should be cleaned AT
LEAST ONCE A MONTH. Also,
clean frequently the grease-laden
surfaces adjacent to the filter(s).
To
Removeand
Replace
Filters
1. Cooking top: Place finger in
recess at front edge of filter, push
filter to rear until front edge clears
the exhaust opening, lower the
front and remove. When clean,
replace. Place edge of filter against
spring at rear of exhaust opening,
Push to rear, lift front edge, and let
spring push filter forward into
place under edge of exhaust
opening.
2. Hood: Extend hood as far as
possible, or rerriovehood extension
if desired, see illustration. place
fingers on each side at bottom of
filter, Press filter to left until it
clears the holder on right side,
remove. When clean, replace. Push
filter against clip at left and press
left until filter clears holder at right
side. Push filter toward opening
and release so it slips behind
holder.
Extension
(a) To remove, extend hood as far
as it will open.
(b) With thumbs curved around
edge of hood extension, hook
a finger between spring and
bracket at each side and push
toward center of hood. This
moves Dinsout of holes in
bracke~ and hood extension can
be removed.
2.
To Clean
(a) To replace,fit bottom of halfcircle flanges into side of hood.
(b) Secureone sideat a time, Align
1, Filters,agitate in hot detergent
solution.Light brushingmay be
used to help removeimbeddedsoil
and dust, With carefuluse and
hand;ingthe filter willlast for
years. However,if replacement
becomesnecessary,obtain a filter
from your GeneralElectricdealer
for your specificrangemodel.
2. Hood extension,removeand
wash with hot detergentsolution,
Rinseand dry with soft cloth.
pin with holesin bracketand
hood extension,then push pin
through holes.This secures
hood extensionso it cannot be
removed by mistake,
HOOD EXTENSION .
Motor
The blower motor is permanently
lubricated so does not need oiling.
23
———
—
—
—.
—
—
—
—
—.
—
—
=#—
—
—
—.
—
-—
Canning should be done on tmcdi-
observeFmn’fvingPoints
toponly.
incanning:
In surface cooking of foods other
than canning, the use of largediameter utensils (extending more
than l-inch beyond edge of trim
ring) is not recommended. However, when canning with water-bath
or pressure canner, large-diameter
utensils may be used. This is
because boiling water temperatures
(even under pressure) are not harmful to cooktop surfaces surrounding
heating unit.
HOWEVER, DO NOT USE
LARGE DIAMETER CANNERS
OR OTHER LARGE DIAMETER
UTENSILS FOR FRYING OR
BOILING FOODS OTHER THAN
WATER. Most syrup or sauce
mixtures—and all types of frying—
cook at temperatures much higher
than boiling water. Such temperatures could eventually harm cooktop surfaces surrounding heating
units.
1. Bring water to boil on HIGH
heat, then after boiling has begun,
adjust heat to lowest setting to
maintain boil (saves energy and
best uses surface unit.)
2. Be sure canner fits over center of
surface unit. If your model surface
section does not allow canner to be
centered on surface unit, use
smaller-diameter containers for
good canning results.
3. Flat-bottomed canners give best
canning results. Be sure bottom of
canner is flat or slight indentation
fits snugly over surface unit. Canners with flanged or rippled bottoms (often found in enamel-ware)
are not recommended.
WRONG
RIGHT
4. When canning, use recipes from
reputable sources. Reliable recipes
are available from the manufacturer of your canner; manufacturers
of glassjars for canning; such as
Ball and Kerr; and, the United
States Department of Agriculture
Extension Service.
5. Remember, in following the
recipes, canning is a process that
generates large amounts of steam.
Be careful while canning to prevent
burns from steam or heat.
NOTE: If your surface section is
being operated on low power (voltage), canning may take longer than
expected, even though directions
have been carefully followed. The
process may be improved by: (1)
using a pressure canner, and (2) for
fastest heating of large water quantities, begin with HOT tap water.
—
24
mm%
Eam
--
m
ruw3i
~~~e
Tim? and
w3ggw’~
iMoney—
beforeyou request service,
check the Problem Solver
1PROBLEM
OVEN WjLL NOT WORK
OVEN LIGHT
DOES NOT WORK
FOOD DOES NOT
BROIL PROPERLY
FOOD DOES NOT ROAST
– 1OR BAKE PROPERLY
—
CALROD@ SURFACE UNITS
NOT FUNCTIONING
PROPERLY
If .vou have a ,~roblem. it mav be
minor. You may be able to c;rrect
it yourself. Just use thk problem
Solver to locate .vour ,uroblem and
then follow the suggested
recommendations,
-m
mfr.-~
POSSIBLE CAUSE AND REMEDY
Plug on range is not completely inserted in the outlet receptacle.
The circuit breaker in your house has been tripped, & a fuse has been
blown.
Oven controls are not properly set.
—
Light bulb is loose.
Bulb is defective. Replace.
Switch operating oven light is broken. Call for service.
OVEN SET Knob not set at BROIL.
OVEN TEMP Knob not set at BROIL.
Door not left ajar as recommended.
Improper shelf position is being used. Check Broiling Chart.
Necessary preheating was not done.
Food is being cooked on hot pan.
Utensils are not suited for broiling.
~
OVENSET Knob not set on BAKE.
OVEN TEMP Knob not set correctly.
Shelf position is incorrect. Check Roasting or Baking Charts,
Oven shelf is not level,
Wrong cookware is being used. When roasting, pan is too small.
Surface units are not seated properly in pan trim rings.
Trim rings/drip pans are not set securely in the range top.
Surface unit controls are not.properly set.
—w.
E#mr.L
.——
-.
-
ma’~
—-..
—.
-1
~-
Es5Es---
EIEw
-.
~ .
—
-–
—.
-=
-—.
-.
————-
-———
—————
.-
At General Electricwe’recommitted to providing you with the best applianceswe know how to build and we know
that you want your appliancesto give you many years of dependableservice.
Our Consumer Servicesare designedwith your needs and wants in mind.
W’arrantyProtection
Beforeyour newapplianceleft the factory, it went
through rigoroustests to detect manufacturingdefects.
And you have a written warranty to protect you. Seethe
warranty on the back page of this book for details.
Convenient Service
Whether your applianceis in or out of warranty,you’re
just a phone call away from our nationwidenetwork of
Factory TrainedServiceprofessionals.
Simplycall our GE serviceorganization. Look in the
White or YellowPages of your telephone directory for
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY,GENERAL
ELECTRIC FACTORYSERVICE,GENERAL
ELECTRIC-HOTPOINT FACTORYSERVICEor
GENERAL ELECTRIC CUSTOMERCARE@
SERVICE.
Servicecan normallybe scheduledat your convenience
and the techniciandrivesa fully-stockedparts service
truck so that, in most cases, the repair can be completed
in one visit.
We’reproud of our serviceand want you to be pleased,
but if for some reason you are not happy with the service
you receive,here are three stepsto followfor further help.
Service Contracts
For trouble-freeservicebeyond
thewrittenwarrantyperiod.
If you prefer to budget your repair expenditures
instead of beingsurprised by them, GE offers
servicecontracts for varyinglengths of time on
all GE major appliances. With a contract, we’ll
keep your appliancein good operating condition
during the contract period at no additional
charge.
FIRST,contact the people who servicedyour appliance.
Explainwhyyou are not pleased. In most cases, this will
solvethe problem.
NEXT, if you are still not pleased writeall the
details—includingyour phone number to:
Manager,Consumer Relations
General Electric
AppliancePark
Louisville,Kentucky40225
FINALLY,if your problem is still not resolved,write:
Major ApplianceConsumer Action Panel
20 North Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois60606
..
L“_.J
m
~ ‘-”
‘
Servicecontracts let you pay today’s prices for
! Z----:--”.’’=*’-””’
~
:~~JŠ•9›•Ì•³••ò²• servicea month, a year, or severalyears from
now,And, you’llreceiveservicefrom GE
#
.>
.,.Ie‘
trained servicetechniciansusingonly genuine
..:*:.!
.”f:-n...
,&,,?r’::.p
, i’
GE parts. If you have any questionsabout
ServiceContracts, call TOLL-FRE’E
800.626.2224.(In Kentucky,call 800.292.2057.)
The QuickFix” System
Youcan savemoneyand time
by doing it Yourseif.
For do-it-yourselferswho would prefer to fix . ~
GE major appliancesthemselves.,. GE offers /
an industry first, the Quick Fix”System,
r
A program for do-it-yourselfappliance repair,
the systemincludesstep-by-steprepairmanuals
for refrigerators, most non-microwaveelectric
ranges, dishwashers,and standard and large
capacity washersand dryers, plus specially
packagedreplacernerrtparts,
and technical help
Jree 800 numbex
with a 1o11
Help For You By Phone
—
—
Should you need help in the selectionand
purchase of newappliances, or have questions
about the operatiorrof the GL app!~ancesyou
now own—or have any other questions about
GE consumer products or services,you are
only a TOLL FREE callaway.
The GE Answer Centerl”~~
consumer
information serviceis open 24 hours a day,
sevendays a week,
Our staff of experts stands ready to assist you
anytime,
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Save proof of original purchase date such as your sales slip or cancelled check to establish warranty period.
.——
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FuLuoNE-YEAR
tiiRRANTYThis–warranty is extended to the
————.————-—.—.——
-
For one year from date of original
purchase, we will provide, free of
charge, parts and service labor in
your home to repair or replace any
part of the range that fails because
of a manufacturing defect.
original purchaser and any succeeding owner for products purchased
for ordinary home use in the 48
mainland states, Hawaii and
‘ashington~ ‘PC” ‘n ‘Iaska ‘i]e
warranty ISthe same except that it
is LIMITEDbecause you must pay
to ship the product to the service
shop or for the service technician’s
travel costs to your home.
All warranty service will be provided
by our Factory ‘ServiceCenters or
by our authorized Customer Care@
servicers during normal working
hours.
-——
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~01/13?J33
-- -
Look in the White or Yellow Pages
of your telephone directory for
GENERAL ELECTRICCOMPANY,
GENERAL ELECTRICFACTORY
SERVICE,GENERAL ELECTRiCHOTPOINTFACTORYSERVICEor
GENERAL ELECTRICCUSTOMER
CARE” SERViCE.
--.- - . ----- . - -..- -.-———
~ Service trips to your home to
teach you hbw to use the product.
ReadyourUseandCarematerial.
If you then have any questions
about operating the product,
please contagt your dealer or our
Consumer Affairs office at the
address below, or call, toll free:
The GE Answer CenterTM
800.626.2000
consumer information service
~ Improper installation.
If you have an installation problem,
contact your dealer or installer.
You are responsible for providing
adequate electrical, gas, exhausting and other connecting facilities.
. Replacement of house fuses
or resetting of circuit breakers.
* Failure of the product if it is
used for other than its intended
purpose or used commercially.
. Damage to product caused
by accident, fire, floods or acts
of God.
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WARRANTORIS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES.
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Somestates do not aHowthe exclusion or Iirnitation of incidental or consequential
.-
damages, so the above limitation or exclusion
may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to ~tate,
To knowwhat your legalrights are in your state,consult your local or state consumeraffairs office or yourstate’sAttorney General.
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Warrantor:GeneralElectricCompany
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If furtherhelpis neededconcerning
thiswarranty,contact:
Manager-ConsumerAffairs,GeneralElectricCompany,AppliancePark,Louisville,KY 40225
7
Part No. 862A7’25 P137
@b. No. 49-4629
4
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