hp surestore
tape library
2/20, 4/40,
6/60, 8/80, and
10/100 series
user’s guide
hp surestore tape library
user guide
Product Number: C9521-90002
Edition 5
June 2002
© 2002 Hewlett-Packard Company
2/20, 4/40,
6/60, 8/80, and
10/100 series
Notice
WARNING
This document contains information that is
protected by copyright. All rights are reserved.
No part of this document may be photocopied,
reproduced, or translated into another
language. The information contained in this
document is subject to change without notice.
Typographical Conventions
and Terms
Bold:
Menu choices and screens on the
library.
[Bold]:
Soft keys to press on the library.
Computer:
Host and SCSI commands.
Emphasis:
Draws attention to items within
text.
This table format indicates the menus you need
to enter on the library front panel:
In This Manual
Chapter 1
Installing the Library: Describes
how to install, rackmount, connect,
and power on the library.
Chapter 2
Operating the Library: Describes
the front panel menu structure,
menu trees, and drive and tape
operations.
Chapter 3
Library Administration: Describes
configuration options, diagnostic
tests, and retrieving information
about the library.
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics:
Describes how to troubleshoot
library problems, resolve error
conditions, and use HP diagnostic
tools.
Chapter 5
Replacing Parts and Upgrading
Firmware: Describes how to
replace library components and
upgrade library and drive
firmware.
Appendix A
Technical specifications: Describes
environmental, library, physical,
SCSI cable, and Fibre Channel
cable specifications.
Appendix B
Customer Support: Includes
support information for the library.
Appendix C
Error Code Reference: Includes
hard error codes for the library
and suggestions for recovery.
Main Menu -> Operations -> Mailslot Access
Note
Notes explain significant concepts
or operating instructions.
Caution
Cautions call attention to an
operating procedure or practice
that could damage the product if
not correctly performed. Do not
proceed until you understand and
meet these required conditions.
2 Notice
Warnings call attention to a
procedure or practice that could
result in personal injury if not
correctly performed. Do not
proceed until you fully understand
and meet the required conditions.
hp surestore tape library
Glossary
Glossary: Includes technical terms
used in this manual.
Updates
Revision History
For the most current version of this manual, and
other information regarding your tape library,
visit the HP Customer Care website:
Edition 1
June 1999: C7200-90000
Initial release.
http://www.hp.com/go/support
Edition 2
April 2000: C7200-90011
Updated Fibre Channel, remote
management card, and front
panel information.
Edition 3
December 2000: C9521-90000
Added the reader comment sheet
and references to the HP Tape
Library & Autoloader Drive
Manual. Updated the
troubleshooting procedures,
technical specifications, Fibre
Channel configuration, remote
management card features,
mailslot options, and front panel
information.
Edition 4
December 2001: C9190-90000
Revised the format to include HP’s
branding standards. Added an
illustration of the accessory kit,
modified the model description to
reference slot capacity, and added
more information on Support
Packs and the HP Library & Tape
Tools diagnostic tool. Deleted the
Fibre Channel overview appendix
and added additional replacement
procedures for the cosmetics and
power supply.
Edition 5
June 2002: C9521-90002
Added information for the 8/80
and 10/100 series tape libraries,
drives and media, front panel
magazine access, and library
error codes.
hp surestore tape library
Revision History 3
4 Updates
hp surestore tape library
contents
Notice 2
Typographical Conventions and Terms 2
In This Manual 2
Revision History 3
Updates 3
Chapter 1
Installing the Library 11
Chapter Overview 11
Identifying Product Components 12
Choosing a Location 14
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack 17
Tools and Parts 17
Rackmounting the Library 19
Preparing the Host for Installation 31
Connecting and Powering on the Library 32
Library Back Panel 33
SCSI Cable Connections 34
Fibre Channel Cable Connections 41
Verifying the Host Configuration 50
Backup Software Compatibility 50
Using HP Library & Tape Tools 50
Windows NT 51
Windows 2000 51
Sun Solaris 52
HP-UX and MPE/iX 52
Getting Started 53
Moving or Shipping the Library 54
Chapter 2
Operating the Library 59
5
Chapter Overview 59
Front Panel Overview 60
Status Bar 61
Nesting 63
Understanding the Menu Structure 64
Using Tapes 65
Mixed Media 66
Media Migration 67
HP Library & Tape Tools 67
Service Provider 68
Using HP Ultrium Cartridges 69
Maintaining Ultrium Cartridges 69
Write-Protecting Ultrium Cartridges 70
Using Ultrium Cartridge Bar Code Labels 71
Ordering Ultrium Cartridges and Bar Code Labels 72
Using Ultrium Cleaning Cartridges 73
Using DLT Tape Cartridges 74
Inspecting DLT Cartridges 74
Write-Protecting DLT Cartridges 76
Using DLT Cartridge Bar Code Labels 77
Ordering DLT Cartridges and Bar Code Labels 79
Using DLT Cleaning Cartridges 80
Accessing Tapes in the Library 81
Magazine Access 81
Mailslot Access 85
Drive and Tape Operations 86
Loading a Tape Into a Drive 86
Unloading a Tape from the Drive 87
Cleaning a Drive 87
Moving Tapes Between Slots 88
Chapter 3
Library Administration 89
Chapter Overview 89
Configuring the Library 90
Enabling and Changing the Password 92
Configuring the Mailslot 93
Using the Remote Management Card 96
Overview 96
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) 97
BOOTP 98
6
Management Programs 98
Configuring the Remote Management Card 99
Retrieving Information about the Remote Management Card 101
Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel 102
Configuration 102
Retrieving information about Fibre Channel 105
Setting SCSI IDs 106
Setting the Date and Time 108
Retrieving Library Information 110
Library Information 110
Drive Information 112
Configuration Information 112
Date and Time 113
Firmware Revisions 113
Power Supplies 113
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 115
Chapter Overview 115
Troubleshooting Overview 116
Understanding Error Types 117
Understanding Error States 118
Soft (Recovered) Errors 118
Partial Availability State 120
Hard (Unrecovered) Errors 126
Host Software and Media Errors 128
Backup Software Errors 129
Interpreting Library LEDs 130
Troubleshooting Common Problems 140
Manually Rewinding a Stuck DLT Tape 151
Removing a Stuck DLT Tape 152
Diagnostic Support Tools 154
HP Library & Tape Tools 154
Support Tools Manager and Sysdiag 155
Running Library Diagnostic Tests 156
Chapter 5
Replacing Parts and Upgrading Firmware 159
Chapter Overview 159
7
Removing and Replacing Cards 160
Removing a Card 160
Replacing a Card 161
Removing and Replacing Drive Modules 162
Unloading a Tape from a Drive 162
Taking a Drive Offline (for on-line drive replacement only) 162
Removing a Drive Module 163
Installing a Drive Module 165
Removing and Replacing the Power Supply 167
Removing the Power Supply 167
Replacing the Power Supply 168
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply 169
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply Module 170
Removing the Library Cover and Feet (2/20 & 4/40 Series Only) 172
Removing and Replacing a Cosmetic Door 174
Removing a Cosmetic Door Face 174
Replacing a Cosmetic Door 174
Upgrading Firmware 176
Checking the Firmware Revision 176
Using HP Library & Tape Tools (library and drive firmware) 177
Using the Remote Management Card (library and LTO drive firmware) 178
Using a Firmware Upgrade Tape (drive firmware only) 179
Appendix A
Technical Specifications 181
Appendix Overview 181
Environmental Specifications 182
Library Specifications 183
Physical Specifications 184
Cable Specifications 186
Drive Compatibility Specifications 187
Drive Compatibility 187
Media Compatibility 187
HP Ultrium Drive and Media Specifications 189
DLT Drive and Media Specifications 192
Appendix B
Customer Support 195
Appendix Overview 195
8
Registering Your Product 196
Support Services 197
SupportPacks 197
Service Contracts 199
Backup Software Support 201
Contacting HP Customer Support 202
Information Needed for Support 202
Telephone Support 203
North and South America 203
European Customer Support Centers 204
Asia Pacific Customer Support Centers 205
Elsewhere 206
Warranty Information 207
Appendix C
Error Code Reference 209
Library Error Codes 209
glossary 221
9
10
1
Installing the Library
Chapter Overview
This chapter describes the following:
■
Identifying Product Components on page 12
■
Choosing a Location on page 14
■
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack on
page 17
■
Preparing the Host for Installation on page 31
■
Connecting and Powering on the Library on page 32
■
Verifying the Host Configuration on page 50
■
Getting Started on page 53
■
Moving or Shipping the Library on page 54
Chapter Overview
11
Identifying Product Components
The components listed in Table 1 may be supplied with the library, depending
on the library configuration.
Note
Table 1
Callout
Number
Visit http://www.hp.com/go/support for additional information
on the HP Library & Tape Tools diagnostic utility, backup
software compatibility information, accessories, and upgrade
kits.
Accessories
Component
Description
1
SCSI interface cable(s)
Four-meter SCSI cable(s) with 68-pin high-density connectors.
2
SCSI jumper cable(s)
68-pin VHD (Very High Density) cable that connects the
library controller or Fibre Channel controller to a drive.
3
Fibre Channel cable(s)
Optical short-wave cable (16 meters) that connects the Fibre
Channel controller to the host, hub, or switch (for Fibre
Channel configurations).
4
Label kit
Bar code labels for data and cleaning cartridges, and
reordering information.
5
Power cord(s)
Localized power cord(s).
6
SCSI terminator(s)
68-pin high-density SCSI terminator (HVDS or LVDS) to
terminate the SCSI chain.
7
Fibre Channel GBIC
Connects the Fibre Channel cable to the host, hub, or switch
when necessary.
8
Data cartridge
Data cartridge included for data backup.
9
Cleaning cartridge
Cleaning cartridge used when cleaning a drive.
10
User’s Guide
Printed English user’s guide describing installation,
operations, and troubleshooting information.
12
Identifying Product Components
Chapter 1
Table 1
Accessories
Component
Chapter 1
Callout
Number
Description
11
Regulatory Insert
Contains safety and regulatory information.
12
Quick setup poster
Overview of installation and configuration procedures.
N/A
Miscellaneous
information
May include data sheets, upgrade information, product
information, and additional promotions.
Accessories
Figure 1
3
6
2
7
8
1
9
5
4
11
10
Note
Chapter 1
12
Your cables may look different from those in Figure 1. Cable
types vary depending on library model.
Identifying Product Components
13
Choosing a Location
Choose a location that meets the criteria listed in Table 2. For additional
specifications, refer to Technical Specifications on page 181.
Table 2
Room temperature
Power source
Location Criteria
10-35º C (50-95º F)
■
AC power voltage: 100-127 V or 200-240 V
■
Line frequency: 50-60 Hz
■
A dedicated circuit is required.
Caution: The AC power cord is the library’s main AC disconnect device and
must be easily accessible at all times.
LAN connection
Locate the library near a LAN connection for connecting the RMC (remote
management card).
Library power
consumption
2/20 series
Max: 200W
4/40 series
Max: 375W
6/60 series
Max: 560W
8/80 series
Max: 725W
10/100 series
Max: 1,200W
Air quality
Minimal sources of particulate contamination. Avoid areas near frequently used
doors and walkways, stacks of supplies that collect dust, and smoke-filled rooms.
Caution: Excessive dust and debris can damage tapes and tape drives.
Humidity
14
20-80% RH
Choosing a Location
Chapter 1
Table 2
2/20, 4/40, and 6/60 series stand-alone configurations — located on or
below a table:
Back:
56 cm (22 in) for cooling and service.
Front:
86 cm (34 in) for operator access.
Sides:
56 cm (22 in) for removal of the external cover.
Chapter 1
Clearance
Location Criteria
2/20, 4/40, and 6/60 series rackmounted configurations:
Back:
61 cm (24 in) minimum to allow adequate room for service
access.
Front:
86 cm (34 in) for operator access.
Sides:
56 cm (22 in) minimum
Height:
For ease of use and optimum safety, the top of the library
should be mounted approximately 120 cm (48 in) above the
floor.
8/80 and 10/100 series tape libraries
Floor rating
Back:
56 cm (22 in) minimum
Front:
191 cm (75 in) minimum
Sides:
5 cm (2 in) minimum
For 8/80 and 10/100 series tape libraries only.
A fully loaded library can weigh up to 325 kg (715 lbs). Each caster supports
up to 96 kg (213 lbs). To support the weight exerted on the floor by the casters,
the floor rating must meet or exceed 1,694 kg per square meter (347 lbs per
square foot).
Tip rating
For 8/80 and 10/100 series libraries only.
Do not tip the library more than 10°. Ensure that the location for the library has
a level surface.
Chapter 1
Choosing a Location
15
Table 2
Rack location
requirements
16
Location Criteria
For 8/80 and 10/100 series libraries only.
Refer to the Rack Systems User’s Manual (included with the accessory kit or
available at http://www.hp.com/racksolutions) for more information on
installing the rack. This information includes: using the anti-tip mechanism,
securing the rack to the floor, and weight/space requirements.
Choosing a Location
Chapter 1
The instructions in this section apply to 2/20, 4/40, and 6/60 series libraries
mounted in a standard 19-inch rack with a depth between 24 and 34 inches.
Caution
Make sure that the rack and all equipment mounted in the rack
have a reliable ground connection.
Verify that the total current of the rack components does not
exceed the current rating of the power distribution unit or outlet
receptacles.
WARNING
Do not move the library without additional help or an
appropriately rated lift device. The 2/20 series library weighs
40 kg (87 lb). The 4/40 series library weighs 75 kg (165 lb).
The 6/60 series library weighs 104 kg (249 lb).
Tools and Parts
Before you begin, ensure that you have the following:
Chapter 1
■
Phillips #2 screwdriver
■
Torx screwdriver with T20 and T25 bits
■
1/2-inch open-end wrench
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
17
Chapter 1
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Rack Kit Parts
Figure 2
9
10
1
2
8
13
7
3
12
5
4
11
6
1
Upper left rail (1)
8
Flush-mount trim brackets (2)
2
Upper right rail (1)
9
2/20 series stop bracket (1)
3
Lower left rail (1)
10
4/40 and 6/60 series stop bracket (1)
4
Lower right rail (1)
11
2/20 series trim brackets (2)
5
10-32 Screws (20)
12
4/40 series trim brackets (2)
6
10-32 Clip nuts (20)
13
6/60 series trim brackets (2)
7
Clip nut template
(3 packaged together, one per model)
Note
18
The rack kit includes extra trim brackets. The smaller flush-mount
trim brackets are used with flush-mount racks. The larger trim
brackets are typically used with older HP racks that have a
55mm bezel depth.
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Chapter 1
Rackmounting the Library
Before you begin, lower the rack’s leveler feet with the openended wrench, and extend the rack’s anti-tip foot. Failure to
extend the anti-tip foot could result in personal injury or damage
to the tape library if the rack tips over.
Note
For easiest access to the display panel and to the tape drawers,
mount the top of the library in the middle of the rack or 120 cm
(48 in) above the floor.
1. Use the template for your model library as a guide, and install five clip
nuts into each front column of the rack (Figure 3 on page 20, Figure 4 on
page 20, or Figure 5 on page 21, depending on your library model). The
upper grey clip nuts (item “a” below) are used for older HP racks (55-mm
bezel depth). The lower grey clip nuts (item “b” below) are used for flushmount racks.
#
#
#
a
#
#
#
#
b
#
#
#
Use the template as a guide, and install four clip nuts into each back
column of the rack.
Note
Chapter 1
Use the EIA markers as a reference point to ensure that the holes
on the rack correspond to the holes on the template. The EIA
markers on the template are represented by #>. Your rack might
look different from the illustration. If the holes in the rack do not
align with the template, move the template up one or two holes
to create proper alignment.
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
19
Chapter 1
WARNING
Clip Nut Placement (2/20 Series)
Figure 3
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
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#
#
Front
Clip Nut Placement (4/40 Series)
Figure 4
a
Back
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
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#
#
b
Front
20
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Back
Chapter 1
Clip Nut Placement (6/60 Series)
Figure 5
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
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#
Chapter 1
a
#
b
Front
Back
2. Align the upper (black) rail with the top two clip nuts and loosely install a
screw into each clip nut. Slide the rail out so that it equals the rack depth,
and attach to the back clip nuts. To allow for enough clearance, do not
tighten these screws until you have installed the library.
Note
Chapter 1
Ensure that you are using the appropriate holes in the upper rail
to allow enough clearance, illustrated in Figure 6 on page 22.
The clearance between the top and bottom rails should be
approximately: 2/20 series = 22 cm (9 in); 4/40 series = 43 cm
(17 in); 6/60 series = 65 cm (26 in).
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
21
3. Align the lower (black/silver) rail with the lower two clip nuts, and loosely
install a screw into each clip nut. (See Figure 6.)
a. Slide the rail so that it equals the rack depth, and loosely install the
screws.
b. Tighten all screws to secure the rails.
c.
Figure 6
Tighten the two pre-installed screws inside each mounting rail to
secure the rail in position.
Upper and Lower Rails
20
40
60
22
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Chapter 1
4. Install the library.
Chapter 1
WARNING
The majority of the weight is near the back of the library. Use
appropriate force when lifting the library, while ensuring the
library remains level to avoid overturning.
Note
To reduce the weight of the library, you can easily remove all the
drives. See Removing and Replacing Drive Modules on
page 162 for more information.
2/20 Series Library:
With the help of another person, use the lifting straps built into the sides of
the library, and slide the library between the upper and lower sets of
mounting rails. Remove the lifting straps once the library is partially
installed. Save these straps for future use when moving the library.
Figure 7
Chapter 1
Lifting Straps
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
23
4/40 and 6/60 Series Libraries:
Use a mechanical lift that is rated to the weight of the library, and follow
the steps below to install the library.
a. Break away the edges of the packing material at the bottom of the
library.
b. Use the straps to ease the library onto an appropriately rated
mechanical lift. Use the lift to raise the library so that it aligns with the
bottom rails.
c.
Slide the library onto the lower rails. Have at least one person guide
the library from the front and one person pull the library from the
back, using the vertical handle (Figure 8 on page 24).
d. Remove the lifting straps once the library is partially installed. Save
the straps for future use when moving the library.
Figure 8
Library Installation
Caution
24
Do not push the library from the front. Use the handle shown in
Figure 8. DO NOT pull on the handle(s) located on the back of
the power supply or drive modules.
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Chapter 1
WARNING
Chapter 1
Do not move the library without additional help or an
appropriately rated lift device. The 2/20 series library weighs
40 kg (87 lb). The 4/40 series library weighs 75 kg (165 lb).
The 6/60 series library weighs 104 kg (249 lb).
5. Tighten the screws on the top mounting rail to secure the library.
6. Install the stop bracket to ensure the library is secured inside the rack, and
will not come out past the service position (approximately 2/3 of the
library is out of the rack).
2/20 Series Library:
a. From the back of the library, unscrew the power supply thumbscrew
by hand or with a screwdriver.
b. Install the stop bracket by sliding the edge of the bracket under the
thumbscrew and threading the tab through the latch stop.
c.
Figure 9
Chapter 1
Tighten the power supply thumbscrew to secure the bracket to the
library.
Installing the Stop Bracket for the 2/20 Series Library
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
25
4/40 and 6/60 Series Libraries:
a. Ensure access to the top of the library. If necessary, push the library to
the service position to access the top cover. Do not push the library
past the latch stop tabs.
b. Remove the left back screw from the top cover.
c.
Install the stop bracket by inserting the tab into the latch stop.
d. Re-install the screw into the top cover.
Figure 10
26
Installing the Stop Bracket for 4/40 and 6/60 Series Libraries
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Chapter 1
7.
Trim Brackets (2/20 Series)
(larger trim brackets)
Note
Chapter 1
Chapter 1
Figure 11
Insert trim brackets into the slots on each side of the library (Figure 11
through Figure 13).
(flush-mount trim brackets)
The rack kit includes extra trim brackets. The smaller flush-mount
trim brackets are used with flush-mount racks. The larger trim
brackets are typically used with older HP racks that have a
55mm bezel depth.
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
27
Figure 12
Trim Brackets (4/40 Series)
(larger trim brackets)
Note
28
(flush-mount trim brackets)
The rack kit includes extra trim brackets. The smaller flush-mount
trim brackets are used with flush-mount racks. The larger trim
brackets are typically used with older HP racks that have a
55mm bezel depth.
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Chapter 1
Figure 13
Trim Brackets (6/60 Series)
Chapter 1
(larger trim brackets)
Note
Chapter 1
(flush-mount trim brackets)
The rack kit includes extra trim brackets. The smaller flush-mount
trim brackets are used with flush-mount racks. The larger trim
brackets are typically used with older HP racks that have a
55mm bezel depth.
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
29
8. Open the tape drawers and tighten the screws to secure the library into
place (Figure 14).
— For trim brackets, tighten the existing thumbscrews.
— For flushmount brackets, use two 10-32 x .50 screws.
Note
Figure 14
Location of Securing Screws
(larger trim brackets)
30
The drawers may be key locked. The keys are attached to the
power supply handle on the back of the library.
(flush-mount trim brackets)
Installing the 2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series Libraries into a Rack
Chapter 1
Install the SCSI host bus adapter card(s) and compatible driver(s). Refer to the
host computer user manual and host bus adapter card instructions, and follow
these general procedures:
■
When the host is powered on, install software and/or driver(s) into the
host that are compatible with the library.
■
If the host computer is connected to a network, check with the system
administrator before turning off power.
■
Properly power off all peripheral devices connected to the host computer.
■
Power off the host.
■
Use proper procedures to prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD).
■
Make sure that the host computer has an appropriate number of card
expansion slots available for your library model.
■
Ensure the host bus adapter card is supported by your backup software
application.
■
For optimum performance, there should be a maximum of one tape drive
per bus. HP supports up to two drives per SCSI host bus adapter, but
recommends only one drive per bus. If compression is used when
attaching two drives per bus, keep in mind the combined transfer rate of
the drives and overhead of the bus must not exceed the throughput of the
host bus adapter used.
■
Refer to Appendix A and the ANSI SCSI cable specification for more
information on SCSI cable length requirements.
■
Check for available SCSI IDs if you are installing the library onto the same
SCSI bus as other devices. You might need to change the SCSI ID from the
library front panel display if you think there will be an ID conflict with
other devices.
Note
Chapter 1
You can use HP Library & Tape Tools to identify available SCSI
IDs. See page 154 for installing and using this diagnostic utility.
Preparing the Host for Installation
31
Chapter 1
Preparing the Host for Installation
Connecting and Powering on the Library
This section includes information and illustrations for the following:
■
Library back panel
■
SCSI cabling connections
■
Fibre Channel cabling connections
Note
32
The figures in this section depict 2/20, 4/40, 6/60, 8/80, and
10/100 series tape libraries. The number of drives and cards
will vary, depending on your model.
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
Library Back Panel
Chapter 1
Library Back Panel Features
Figure 15
1
6
5
DRV
DRV
9
10
DRV
DRV
7
8
DRV
DRV
5
6
DRV
DRV
3
4
DRV
DRV
1
2
7
10/100
4
1
1
5
7
8/80
4
1
1
5
7
6/60
4
1
1
5
7
4/40
4
1
2
3
7
2/20
4
1
Vacant slot
5
Slave controller card
2
Remote management card
6
Library expansion card (For the 8/80 and
10/100 series tape libraries only)
3
Library controller card
7
Power supply (standard or redundant)
4
Fibre Channel controller (optional)
Chapter 1
Connecting and Powering on the Library
33
SCSI Cable Connections
Note
Refer to Fibre Channel Cable Connections on page 41 if the
library is configured with Fibre Channel.
This section illustrates a standard SCSI configuration that produces a high level
of data storage performance (one SCSI host bus adapter card for each drive in
the library with the library controller daisy-chained to the first drive). HP
supports up to two drives per SCSI host bus adapter, but recommends only one
drive per bus. If compression is used when attaching two drives per bus, keep
in mind the combined transfer rate of the drives and the overhead of the bus
must not exceed the throughput of the host bus adapter used.
Note
Dual port cards are available and will reduce slot usage in the
host system.
Connect the library as follows (refer to Figure 16 on page 36 through Figure
19 on page 39):
1. Properly power off all peripheral devices connected to the host computer.
2. Power off the host. If the host is connected to a network, check with the
system administrator before turning off power.
3. Connect a 68-pin jumper cable from the top connector of the library
controller to the left drive module on level 1 (drive module 1).
Caution
Use SCSI cables and HVDS differential terminators for highvoltage SCSI interfaces. Use SCSI cables and LVDS differential
terminators for low-voltage SCSI interfaces. The label on the
library controller indicates high or low voltage.
4. Connect the appropriate 68-pin SCSI terminator to the bottom connector
on the library’s controller card.
5. Connect a 68-pin SCSI cable from a host SCSI card to each drive module.
Add the appropriate terminators to the remaining SCSI connectors.
34
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
Note
7.
The AC power cord is the library’s main AC disconnect device
and must be easily accessible at all times.
For 2/20, 4/40, and 6/60 Series Libraries:
— Connect a power cord to each power supply module on all levels.
For 8/80 and 10/100 Series Libraries:
— Connect the power cords on the rack to a power outlet on each
library level.
— Connect the power cord from the power distribution unit to a
dedicated, grounded power receptacle.
8. Power on the library. The power (standby) switch is recessed and on the
lowest level on the front of the library.
After the power-up test is complete (after several minutes), you will see the
Home Screen on the library's front panel. The Home Screen displays the
status of the drives and library. See Front Panel Overview on page 60.
9.
Chapter 1
Power on other peripherals, and then the host.
Connecting and Powering on the Library
35
Chapter 1
6. Connect a category 5 ethernet cable from the remote management card to
an active network port (see Using the Remote Management Card on
page 96).
Figure 16
36
2/20 Series SCSI Cable Connections
1
Host (user configured)
2
Remote management card LAN connection
3
Appropriate 68-pin SCSI terminator
4
Jumper cable with SCSI 68-pin connectors
5
SCSI cable from drive 1 to host
6
SCSI cable from drive 2 to host
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
Figure 17
4/40 Series SCS Cable Connections
Chapter 1
7
8
3
LAN
1
Chapter 1
2
3
4
5
1
Host (user configured)
2
Remote management card LAN connection
3
Appropriate 68-pin SCSI terminator
4
Jumper cable with SCSI 68-pin connectors
5
SCSI cable from drive 1 to host
6
SCSI cable from drive 2 to host
7
SCSI cable from drive 3 to host
8
SCSI cable from drive 4 to host
6
Connecting and Powering on the Library
37
Figure 18
6/60 Series SCS Cable Connections
10
9
8
3
7
LAN
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
Host (user configured)
6
SCSI cable from drive 2 to host
2
Remote management card LAN connection
7
SCSI cable from drive 3 to host
3
Appropriate 68-pin SCSI terminator
8
SCSI cable from drive 4 to host
4
Jumper cable with SCSI 68-pin connectors
9
SCSI cable from drive 5 to host
5
SCSI cable from drive 1 to host
10
SCSI cable from drive 6 to host
38
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
8/80 and 10/100 Series SCSI Cable Connections
Figure 19
Chapter 1
3
DRV
9
DRV
10
DRV
7
DRV
8
3
DRV
5
DRV
6
3
DRV
3
DRV
4
DRV
1
DRV
2
13
14
11
12
1
9
10
3
7
8
3
LAN
2
Chapter 1
3
4
5
6
Connecting and Powering on the Library
39
Table 3
40
8/80 and 10/100 Series SCSI Cable Connections
1
Host (user configured)
2
Remote management card LAN connection
3
Appropriate 68-pin SCSI terminator
4
SCSI cable from the library controller card to drive 1
5
Host SCSI cable to drive 1
6
Host SCSI cable to drive 2
7
Host SCSI cable to drive 3
8
Host SCSI cable to drive 4
9
Host SCSI cable to drive 5
10
Host SCSI cable to drive 6
11
Host SCSI cable to drive 7
12
Host SCSI cable to drive 8
13
Host SCSI cable to drive 9
14
Host SCSI cable to drive 10
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
Fibre Channel Cable Connections
Note
Figure 20
When using hubs or switches, consult the user documentation for
those products. For detailed information on HP supported
topologies, refer to the SAN Solution Installation Guide available
from http://www.hp.com/go/support.
Fibre Channel Cabling Alternatives
CABLING ALTERNATIVE #1:
Connecting the library
directly to a host
Host
CABLING ALTERNATIVE #2:
Connecting the library to
the host through a hub or
switch (more detailed
instructions are on the
following pages)
Host
Library
Hub/Switch
Library
Hub/Switch
Library
Host
CABLING ALTERNATIVE #3:
Connecting the library to
multiple hosts through a
hub or switch
Host
Chapter 1
Connecting and Powering on the Library
41
Chapter 1
There are several Fibre Channel cabling options. Figure 20 provides an
overview.
The following steps illustrate a Fibre Channel connection between the host,
hub or switch, and library. Refer to Figure 22 on page 45 through Figure 25
on page 48, and connect the library as follows:
1. Ensure that the library and host are inactive, and the library is
disconnected from the host.
2. Ensure that the required host software has been installed.
3. Power off the host, hub, or switch. If the host is connected to a network,
check with the system administrator before turning off power.
4. Install a host bus adapter into the host computer. Use proper procedures to
prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD). Use wrist-grounding straps and antistatic mats when removing internal components.
5. Connect the hardware.
a. On each level of the library, connect the supplied SCSI jumper cable
from bus 1 on each Fibre Channel controller to the left connector on
the left drive module.
b. On each level of the library, connect the supplied SCSI jumper cable
from bus 2 on each Fibre Channel controller to the left connector on
the right drive module.
c.
Connect the supplied SCSI jumper cable from the top connector on the
library controller card to the right connector on the left drive module
(drive module 1) to daisy chain the library controller to the drive.
d. Terminate the bottom connector on the library controller card.
e.
42
Connect the appropriate SCSI terminator to the remaining connectors
on the drive modules. Ensure that the interface type matches your
library.
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
f.
Chapter 1
Figure 21
Connect the Fibre Channel cable(s) to the host, hub, or switch. If
necessary, connect the Fibre Channel cable to the GBIC provided
before connecting to the host, hub, or switch.
Connecting Fibre Channel Cables to the GBIC
Caution
The Fibre Channel printed circuit boards may contain a laser
system (GBIC or GLM module) that is classified as a “Class-I
Laser Product” under a U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services (DHHS) Radiation Performance standard according to
the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968 and
EN60825-1(+A11) safety of laser products. The compliance
statement is located on the module.
6. Power on the hub or switch (if present).
Note
Chapter 1
The AC power cord is the library’s main AC disconnect device
and must be easily accessible at all times.
Connecting and Powering on the Library
43
7.
For 8/80 and 10/100 Series Libraries:
Connect the power cords on the rack to a power outlet on each library
level.
For 2/20, 4/40, and 6/60 series libraries, skip to the next step.
8. Connect the power cord(s) from the library to a grounded power
receptacle, and power on the library. The power (standby) switch is
recessed and on the lowest level of the library.
After the power-up test is complete (after several minutes), you will see the
Home Screen on the library’s front panel. The Home Screen displays the
status of the drives and library.
9.
From the front panel, configure the library for Fibre Channel. See
Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel on page 102 for more
information.
10. Connect a category 5 ethernet cable from the remote management card to
an active network port (see Using the Remote Management Card on
page 96).
11. Power on the host.
44
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
2/20 Series Fibre Channel Connections
Figure 22
Chapter 1
8
LAN
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
Hosts (user configured)
5
SCSI cable from the library controller card to drive 1
2
Hub or switch
6
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel controller
to drive 1
3
Remote management card LAN
connection
7
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel controller
to drive 2
4
Appropriate SCSI terminator
8
Fibre Channel cable to hub or switch
Chapter 1
Connecting and Powering on the Library
45
4/40 Series Fibre Channel Connections
Figure 23
8
10
9
LAN
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
Hosts (user configured)
6
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 1
2
Hub or switch
7
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 2
3
Remote management card LAN
connection
8
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 3
4
Appropriate SCSI terminator
9
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 4
5
SCSI cable from the library
controller card to drive 1
10
Fibre Channel cable to hub or switch
46
Connecting and Powering on the Library
Chapter 1
Figure 24
6/60 Series Fibre Channel Connections
Chapter 1
10
12
11
4
8
12
9
4
LAN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1
Hosts (user configured)
7
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 2
2
Hub or switch
8
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 3
3
Remote management card LAN
connection
9
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 4
4
Appropriate SCSI terminator
10
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 5
5
SCSI cable from the library controller
card to drive 1
11
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel
controller to drive 6
6
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre
Channel controller to drive 1
12
Fibre Channel cable to hub or switch
Chapter 1
Connecting and Powering on the Library
47
8/80 and 10/100 Series Fibre Channel Connections
Figure 25
15
4
DRV
9
DRV
10
DRV
7
DRV
8
DRV
5
DRV
6
DRV
3
DRV
4
DRV
1
DRV
2
6
16
13
4
1
6
14
11
4
6
12
4
9
6
10
2
6
LAN
3
48
Connecting and Powering on the Library
4
5
6
7
8
Chapter 1
Chapter 1
8/80 and 10/100 Series Fibre Channel Connections
Chapter 1
Table 4
1
Host (user configured)
2
Hub or switch
3
Remote management card LAN connection
4
Fibre Channel cable
5
SCSI cable from library controller to drive 1
6
Appropriate SCSI terminator
7
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 1
8
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 2
9
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 3
10
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 4
11
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 5
12
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 6
13
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 7
14
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 8
15
SCSI cable from bus 1 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 9
16
SCSI cable from bus 2 on the Fibre Channel interface to drive 10
Connecting and Powering on the Library
49
Verifying the Host Configuration
Once the library is connected to a host, the operating system must be
configured to recognize it (if it has not already been configured). The
procedures are different, depending on the host system:
■
Windows NT on page 51
■
Windows 2000 on page 51
■
Sun Solaris on page 52
■
HP-UX and MPE/iX on page 52
Backup Software Compatibility
Consult your software documentation for more information on installing,
configuring, and operating your backup software.
For software compatibility information, visit http://www.hp.com/go/
automated or the Website for the backup software manufacturer:
■
HP Omniback II™ (http://www.openview.hp.com/products/omniback)
■
Veritas Backup Exec™ (http://www.veritas.com)
■
Veritas NetBackup™ (http://www.veritas.com)
■
Computer Associates ARCserve 2000™ (http://www.ca.com/arcserve)
■
Legato Networker™ (http://www.legato.com)
■
Tivoli Storage Manager™ (http://www.tivoli.com)
Using HP Library & Tape Tools
In addition to the following procedures, you can also check the installation with
HP Library & Tape Tools available from http://www.hp.com/support/
TapeTools. See HP Library & Tape Tools on page 154 for more information.
With HP Library & Tape Tools installed on your host computer, you can do the
following and much more:
50
■
Identify all SCSI and Fibre Channel devices connected to your system
■
View detailed configuration, identification, inventory, and drive
information for the library
Verifying the Host Configuration
Chapter 1
Windows NT
■
Install the appropriate host bus adapter(s)
■
Install the corresponding drivers for the interface card(s)
■
To verify the hardware installation, look for the library and drives after
powering up the host. Go into Settings -> Control Panel -> SCSI Adapter.
■
Install the backup software
■
Run a test backup to ensure that all components are properly configured.
Windows 2000
For Windows 2000™ operating systems, perform the following operating
system configurations:
■
Install the appropriate host bus adapter(s)
■
Install the corresponding drivers for the interface card(s)
■
To verify the hardware installation, look for the library and drives after
powering up the host:
— Right click on My Computer
— Select Manage -> System Tools -> Device Manager
— Medium Changer and Tape Drives should be listed
Chapter 1
■
Install the backup software
■
Run a test backup to ensure that all components are properly configured.
Verifying the Host Configuration
51
Chapter 1
For Windows NT™ operating systems, perform the following operating system
configurations:
Sun Solaris
For Sun Solaris™ operating systems, perform the following operating system
configurations:
■
Install the appropriate host bus adapter(s)
■
Install the corresponding drivers for the interface card(s)
■
To verify the hardware installation, look for the library and drives after
powering up the host.
— Close all open applications and exit the Common Desktop
Environment (CDE).
— Type “init 0” at any prompt. This will shut down all processes, and
take you to the OpenBoot PROM.
— Type “reset”.
— At the OK prompt, type “probe-scsi-all”.
■
Install the backup software
■
Run a test backup to ensure that all components are properly configured.
HP-UX and MPE/iX
For more information on configuring these operating systems and verifying the
connection, see the online configuration and diagnostic guide at http://
www.hp.com/go/support. Select your product and then select [manuals].
52
Verifying the Host Configuration
Chapter 1
After you install and configure the library, you must complete the following
setup tasks from the library’s front panel:
■
Setting the date and time: When you first set up the library or if it has
been unplugged for an extended period of time (around 8 days), set the
library’s real-time clock. See Setting the Date and Time on page 108 for
more information.
■
Setting the mailslot configuration: The default setting is for a one-slot
mailslot. You can select a 0-slot, 1-slot, 1-magazine, or 2-magazine
mailslot. See Configuring the Mailslot on page 93 for more information.
Note
■
Configuring the library for web monitoring: You can monitor and
manage your library anywhere on the network through user friendly web
pages. See Using the Remote Management Card on page 96 for more
information.
■
Enabling the password: The library does not have an administrator
password enabled when it arrives. To ensure security and to get full use of
the remote management card, enable and select a password. Be sure to
remember this password. See Enabling and Changing the Password on
page 92 for more information.
Note
Chapter 1
Mailslot configuration must be set prior to installing the backup
software.
You must first set a library password through the front panel to
configure the library using the remote management card (see
Enabling and Changing the Password on page 92).
Getting Started
53
Chapter 1
Getting Started
Moving or Shipping the Library
WARNING
Do not move the library without additional help or an
appropriately rated lift device. The 2/20 series library weighs
40 kg (87 lb). The 4/40 series library weighs 75 kg (165 lb).
The 6/60 series library weighs 104 kg (249 lb). The 8/80 and
10/100 series libraries weigh approximately 227 kg (500 lb).
Caution
To avoid damage to the library, ensure that it is in an upright
position at all times. Never place the library on its sides.
Note
During normal operation, changes to configurations are stored
in Non-Volatile (NV) RAM for eight days. All configuration
settings can be permanently saved to flash memory by power
cycling the library. This allows the settings to be recovered if the
library is unplugged for more than eight days. If this step is not
completed and the library is unplugged for more than eight
days, any new settings may be lost. Before shipping the library,
verify that the configuration settings were saved permanently by
first powering down the library, and then powering back up to
store the settings and to view them.
To move or ship the library:
1. Verify that all drives are empty. If a drive contains a tape, unload it. Refer
to the backup software documentation, use the remote management card
(see page 96), or use the front panel menu as follows:
a. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select Unload Tape from
Drive.
b. Use the [-] or [+] keys to select the drive you want to unload.
c.
54
Moving or Shipping the Library
Select [Unload] to move the tape from the drive to the tape’s original
location (the slot it occupied before being loaded into the drive). If
that slot is occupied, you will be asked to select another slot location.
Chapter 1
d. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select [Back] to return to
the Operations menu.
2. If shipping the library, remove tape cartridges from the magazines:
a. From the Magazine Access menu, select one of the following options:
—Unlock Door
—Unlock All Doors
Use the [-] and [+] keys to change the door selection.
b. Pull the unlocked drawer(s) out to access magazines and tapes. The
drawer may also be physically locked with a key. The key is typically
attached to the back of the power supply.
c.
Remove the magazine by lifting it straight up with the handle.
d. To remove a tape, set the magazine on its back and grasp the top and
bottom corners of the tape. Pull the tape straight out of the magazine
and return the magazine to the library.
3. If shipping the library, lock the transport:
a. From the Administration menu, select the Run Test menu.
b. From Run Test, use the [-] or [+] keys to select Lock Transport.
c.
Select [OK].
d. Select [Run]. The front panel display will indicate that the transport
has been locked.
Caution
Do not power off the library until the interface is inactive.
Removing power from a SCSI or Fibre Channel peripheral when
the bus is active can result in data loss and/or indeterminate bus
states.
4. Power off the library. The power “standby” switch is recessed to avoid
accidental power cycles.
Chapter 1
Moving or Shipping the Library
55
Chapter 1
The tape automatically rewinds before it is unloaded. A status screen
displays the library’s progress as the tape is relocated.
5. To ship the library, remove all external cords, cables, and terminators. For
an internal move, only disconnect the power cables, SCSI cables, the RMC
ethernet cable, and the Fibre Channel connection from the host, hub, or
switch.
Note
You do not need to remove the SCSI cables that connect the
controller or the Fibre Channel controller to the drive modules,
unless the library is being shipped.
WARNING
Before moving the library, the leveler feet must be fully raised to
allow for ground clearance. Once the library is in place, the
leveler feet should be fully lowered. Failure to follow these
precautions could result in personal injury or damage to the
library.
6. When moving a stand-alone library, raise the library’s leveler feet (for the
6/60 series library only) before moving it to its new location. Reconnect
the library using the procedures in Connecting and Powering on the
Library on page 32.
7.
For shipping, place the library in the original packing materials.
For 8/80 and 10/100 Series Libraries:
Refer to the Rack System User Manual for more information on
repackaging the library. The manual is available at http://www.hp.com/
racksolutions.
Secure library components for shipping by doing the following:
— Remove the filler panels from the rack
— Wrap the filler panels with bubble-wrap
— Secure the outer rack side panels to the rack with shrink-wrap or
bands
Note
If you no longer have the original packaging, contact your sales
or service representative to obtain packaging materials.
— For libraries mounted in a rack, proceed to the next step.
56
Moving or Shipping the Library
Chapter 1
8. Extend the rack’s anti-tip foot.
9.
Failure to extend the anti-tip foot could result in personal injury
or damage to the library.
Open the magazine drawers and loosen the screws that lock the library
into place (Figure 14 on page 30). The screws are located in front of the
trim brackets.
10. Remove the stop bracket. (See Figure 9 on page 25 and Figure 10 on
page 26.)
11. Push the library out of the rack until it hits the latch stops (approximately
2/3 of the library is out of the rack).
12. Reattach the lifting straps to the sides of the library.
13. Release the library from the rack.
4/40 and 6/60 Series Libraries:
Depress the latch stops at the top of the library with a screwdriver or
similar tool (Figure 26 on page 58).
2/20 Series Libraries:
If the library does not have enough clearance above for a tool to be
inserted, unscrew the four screws (two on each side) from the top (black)
mounting rail on the front of the library. Pull the library partially out, then
lower the front half of the library to ease it under the latch stops.
WARNING
Chapter 1
Once you have loosened the mounting screws, the library is no
longer secured inside the rack and can cause bodily harm and/
or damage to the library if it is dropped.
Moving or Shipping the Library
57
Chapter 1
WARNING
Figure 26
Latch Stops
14. Remove the library from the rack.
2/20 Series Libraries:
With the help of two people or a lift, slide the library out of the rack and
place it in the original packaging materials.
4/40 and 6/60 Series Libraries
a. Position the original shipping pallet in front of the rack.
b. With at least one person on each side, slide the library out of the rack
and onto an appropriately rated mechanical lift. Lower the library
onto the shipping pallet.
58
WARNING
Do not move the library without additional help or an
appropriately rated lift device. The 2/20 series library weighs
40 kg (87 lb). The 4/40 series library weighs 75 kg (165 lb).
The 6/60 series library weighs 104 kg (249 lb).
Note
If you no longer have the original packaging, contact your sales
or service representative to obtain packaging materials.
Moving or Shipping the Library
Chapter 1
Operating the Library
2
Chapter Overview
This chapter describes the following:
■
Front Panel Overview on page 60
■
Understanding the Menu Structure on page 64
■
Using Tapes on page 65
■
Accessing Tapes in the Library on page 81
■
Drive and Tape Operations on page 86
Chapter Overview
59
Front Panel Overview
The front panel displays icons and text that provide library, drive, and tape
status information. It also uses text prompts and warnings to guide you while
making changes. Use the button immediately below the label to execute the
desired function. The function of the buttons varies between screens.
The display defaults to the Home Screen. Figure 27 on page 60 shows a
typical Home Screen view, using a four-drive model as an example.
Figure 27
Home Screen
The Home Screen shows the following:
■
Statement indicating the general condition of the library
■
Drive and tape status
■
Tape bar code (if applicable)
■
[Main] option to go to the Information, Operations, and Administration
menus
60
Front Panel Overview
■
[Icon] option to display the icons with a description
■
An icon that indicates the general status of the library. This icon may
display a reverse video reminder (icon background reverses to black)
when there has been a change in the status of the library. Select this key to
obtain more information about the library.
■
[Mail] option to access the mailslot
■
[Map] option to view information about the drive and tape slots
Chapter 2
Status Bar
The status bar shows a reverse video reminder (icon background reverses to
black) for drive or library errors that have been entered in the media log or
hard error log. You may clear this reminder by viewing either the Drive Log or
Library Hard Error Log screens.
The library’s reverse video reminder will also be set if the library’s partial
availability status changes (see Partial Availability State on page 120). You
can clear this reminder by viewing the Library Status screen by selecting the
center icon button on the Home screen.
Figure 28
Chapter 2
Status Bar from Main Menu Screen
Front Panel Overview
61
Chapter 2
All screens, except the Home and Map screens, show a status bar that
summarizes library and drive status (Figure 28 on page 61).
The status bar can display the icons listed in Table 5 on page 62 and Table 6
on page 62.
Table 5
Drive Icons
Power is off
Online
Failed, offline
Full and idle
Needs to be cleaned
Unloading a tape
Offline
Seeking data on a tape
Failed, online
Writing data to a tape
Tape is cleaning a drive
Rewinding a tape
Tape is write protected
Reading a tape
Empty
Erasing a tape
Loading a tape
Table 6
Library Icons
Failed
62
Front Panel Overview
Partially
available
Healthy
Chapter 2
Nesting
Nesting
Figure 29
Information
Operations
Administration
Service
Library Information
Drive and Tape
Operations
Information
Information
Drive Information
Magazine Access
Operations
Operations
View Configuration
Mailslot Access
Change
Configuration
Change
Configuration
Run Test
Run Test (with
additional capability)
Online Drive Repair
Online Drive Repair
Set Date and Time
Set Date and Time
Upgrade Drive
Firmware
Upgrade Drive
Firmware
Date and Time
Firmware Revisions
Power Supplies
Note
Chapter 2
The front panel defaults back to the home or logo screen after
approximately three minutes of inactivity, unless an error
message or confirmation message is displayed that needs to be
acknowledged.
Front Panel Overview
63
Chapter 2
Each level of password-protected menus (Administration and Service) includes
all options available in the subordinate menu. For example, all options
available in the Administration Menu are also included in the Service Menu. This
functionality reduces the need to return to the Main Menu or re-enter a
password. Figure 29 illustrates this “nesting” concept.
Understanding the Menu Structure
Figure 30
64
Front Panel Menu Structure
Understanding the Menu Structure
Chapter 2
Chapter 2
Using Tapes
This section includes information on:
■
Mixed Media on page 66
■
Media Migration on page 67
■
Using HP Ultrium Cartridges on page 69
■
Using DLT Tape Cartridges on page 74
Caution
Chapter 2
It is critical to ensure that the media you use matches the format
of your tape drive. Cleaning cartridges and formatted data
cartridges are unique for each drive technology. Damage may
occur if inappropriate media is used in tape drives.
Using Tapes
65
Mixed Media
Mixed media refers to the option to backup to more than one drive type, such
as DLT and LTO, within the same physical tape library.
General considerations when using mixed media:
66
Using Tapes
■
Some backup software packages do not support mixed media. Consult
your software provider to verify that your configuration is supported.
■
In order to provide full mailslot support in a mixed media library, one
magazine is required for each drive type for a possible total of 10
mailslots, depending on library model.
■
Only DLT tapes can be used in a DLT magazine, and only Ultrium tapes
can be used in an Ultrium magazine.
■
When mixing drive types, HP only supports using the same type of drive
per level of the library.
■
HP Library & Tape Tools version 2.2 or greater is required for diagnostic
support.
■
Upgrade kits are available from HP for Ultrium tape drives, magazines,
and tape cartridges.
Chapter 2
Media Migration
Chapter 2
Utilities and services are available to assist you in migrating from one drive
technology to another.
HP Library & Tape Tools
The HP Library & Tape Tools diagnostic assists you in installing and supporting
your tape library. This tool provides an intuitive graphical user interface with
integrated context-sensitive help. It can be downloaded free of charge from
http://www.hp.com/support/tapetools.
Among the many features is a Migrate Backup Media option available from the
Utility menu. This utility will copy data from DLT drives to DLT or Ultrium drives.
See Figure 31 for a screen shot from HP Library & Tape Tools.
Figure 31
HP L&TT Media Migration Utility
Note
Chapter 2
Before using the media migration utility in HP Library & Tape
Tools, ensure that the source media is write-protected. This utility
does not provide any library control. You must load media into
the selected drives using the library or autoloader front panel,
Web-Based Library Administrator, or your backup software
utility.
Using Tapes
67
For more information on using HP Library & Tape Tools for media migration,
refer to http://www.hp.com/support/tapetools.
Service Provider
Vogon International provides migration, recovery, and forensic services with
offices in the United Kingdom, Germany, and the United States. Vogon offers a
standard service and a fast-track service that generally has a 50% quicker
turnaround time from the standard service. Prices vary, depending on the
complexity of the service requested.
Vogon International Ltd.
68
Using Tapes
Web address:
http://www.vogon-international.com
Mailing address:
Talisman Business Centre
Talisman Road
Bicester, Oxfordshire
OX6 OJX
Telephone:
United States: (405) 321 2585
UK: 44 (0) 1869 355255
Germany: 49 (0) 89 3235030
Chapter 2
Using HP Ultrium Cartridges
Caution
HP Ultrium tape drives require special cleaning cartridges and
data cartridges formatted specifically for HP Ultrium. To avoid
damage to your tape drive, it is critical to use appropriate
cleaning cartridges and properly formatted data cartridges.
A unique feature of Ultrium tape cartridges is LTO-Cartridge Memory (LTOCM). LTO-CM is an intelligent memory chip embedded into the cartridge. It
uses a radio frequency interface that eliminates the need for a physical power
or signal connection between the cartridge and drive. Information normally
stored in the header at the beginning of the tape is contained in the LTO-CM,
including identification and usage information such as the number of times the
cartridge has been loaded, when it was last cleaned, and error logs.
In addition to the information provided in this manual, you may also want to
refer to the documentation provided with your Ultrium media.
Maintaining Ultrium Cartridges
Make it a practice to visually inspect your tape cartridges when loading or
removing them from your tape library. Taking a few minutes to check the
condition of your cartridges will lower the risk of repeated failures and help
ensure uninterrupted backup.
Do not apply more than one label onto Ultrium cartridges, as extra labels can
cause the cartridges to jam in the tape drive.
Caution
Chapter 2
Do not bulk erase Ultrium formatted cartridges. This will destroy
pre-recorded servo information and make the cartridges
unusable.
Using Tapes
69
Chapter 2
In addition to the information provided in this manual, refer to the
documentation provided with your media for more information.
Write-Protecting Ultrium Cartridges
Each cartridge has a sliding write-protect switch. Using the write-protect switch
ensures data safety for files that have been previously written to tape,
preventing additional files from being written to that tape.
To change the write-protect setting, slide the red tab on the base of the
cartridge (Figure 32):
■
Right to prevent data from being written to the cartridge. The red tab on
the cartridge displays a padlock when the write-protect switch is in the
“ON” position.
■
Left to allow data to be written to the cartridge (unless the tape is writeprotected electronically through your backup software). The padlock on
the red tab cannot be seen and the hole is exposed when the write-protect
switch is in the “OFF” position.
With the write-protect switch in either position, data can be read from the
cartridge.
Figure 32
70
Using Tapes
Ultrium Write-Protect Switch Settings
Chapter 2
Using Ultrium Cartridge Bar Code Labels
■
Date of format or initialization
■
Cartridge owner (such as a group or department)
■
Storage purpose
Note
Chapter 2
Make it a practice to use barcode labels on your tape cartridges. Your host
software may need to keep track of the following information and the
associated bar code:
If the host software does not keep track of this information,
create a method for doing so.
Ultrium cartridges have a recessed area located on the face of the cartridge
next to the write-protect switch. Use this area for attaching the bar code label
(Figure 33 on page 71). Do not apply labels onto the cartridge except in this
designated area.
Caution
Figure 33
Chapter 2
The bar code label should be applied as shown in Figure 33 on
page 71 with the alphanumeric portion facing the hub side of
the tape cartridge. Never apply multiple labels onto a cartridge,
as extra labels can cause the cartridge to jam in a tape drive.
Proper Ultrium Label Position
Using Tapes
71
Ordering Ultrium Cartridges and Bar Code Labels
Ultrium Tape
Cartridges
HP Ultrium tape cartridges can be purchased in a variety of ways.
Outside of North America, contact your nearest HP authorized
dealer or sales representative.
Note
■
Call 1-800-752-0900 (North America only) for the location of the nearest
authorized Hewlett-Packard dealer
■
Contact HP Direct:
— 1-800-538-8787 (North America only)
— HP Direct
Hewlett-Packard
ATTN: Mail Order
P.O. Box 1145
Roseville, CA 95678
■
Visit the HP Business Store at http://www.bstore.hp.com (where available)
Table 7 lists HP Ultrium tape cartridges and their part numbers.
Table 7
Ultrium Tape Cartridges
Part Number
Description
Data Cartridges
C7970A
100 GB
C7971A
200 GB
Cleaning Cartridges
C7978A
72
Using Tapes
HP Ultrium Universal Cleaning Cartridge
Chapter 2
Ensure that you use HP qualified bar code labels only. Contact an HP
authorized dealer or sales representative for current compatibility and
availability.
Chapter 2
Ultrium Bar Code
Labels
You can order Ultrium bar code labels through the following supplier:
■
Colorflex:
— Website: http://www.colorflex.com
— Phone: (800) 522-3528 (800-LABEL2U)
Table 8 lists for part numbers for Colorflex bar code labels.
Table 8
Colorflex Ultrium Bar Code Labels
Part Number
Description
1700-LD
Ultrium Data Cartridge Label
1700-CNDH
Ultrium Cleaning Cartridge Label
1700-DGH
Ultrium Diagnostic Cartridge Label
Using Ultrium Cleaning Cartridges
HP Ultrium drives should only be cleaned if the clean drive icon displays on the
tape library status bar. Only use appropriately formatted data cartridges and
approved cleaning cartridges (see Table 7 on page 72), and follow the
instructions for Cleaning a Drive on page 87. In general, replace cleaning
cartridges after fifteen uses. Marking the label on the cleaning cartridge after
each use will help you keep track of the number of uses.
Caution
Chapter 2
Excessive use of the cleaning cartridge can cause unnecessary
wear on the drive head. The tape library front panel will display
a message when the cleaning cartridge needs to be replaced.
Using Tapes
73
Using DLT Tape Cartridges
In addition to the information provided in this manual, refer to the
documentation provided with your media for more information.
Caution
Quantum DLT tape drives require special cleaning cartridges
and data cartridges formatted specifically for Quantum DLT. To
avoid damage to your tape drive, it is critical to use appropriate
DLT cleaning cartridges and properly formatted DLT data
cartridges.
Inspecting DLT Cartridges
Note
Make it a practice to visually inspect your tape cartridges when
removing or loading them into your tape library. Taking a few
minutes to check the condition of the cartridges will lower the risk
of repeated failures and help ensure uninterrupted backup.
Repeated drive failures may indicate defective tapes. Tapes need to be
inspected and replaced if they have been dropped, damaged, or used with a
failed drive. To determine if the tapes have been damaged:
■
Gently shake the tape cartridge to verify that no internal parts are rattling,
indicating that they may be loose.
■
Look at the tape cartridge to check for any obvious cracks or other
physical damage. Look for broken or missing parts.
■
Verify that the spring-loaded hub (item B in Figure 34) is centered within
the circular opening on the bottom of the tape cartridge.
■
Gently press the hub and make sure that it springs back into place.
■
Visually inspect the tape for a broken, unseated, or misaligned tape
leader (item A in Figure 34 on page 75).
To check the leader position:
Press in the door lock (item C in Figure 34) to release the cartridge door.
While pressing in the door lock, push the tab down to open the door. Be
careful not to touch the tape after opening the door. Ensure that the leader
is in the correct position (item A in Figure 34).
74
Using Tapes
Chapter 2
Figure 34
Leader in Correct Position, Hub, and Door Lock Tab
Chapter 2
A
C
B
Chapter 2
A
Tape leader
B
Spring-loaded hub
C
Door lock
Using Tapes
75
Do NOT Use Cartridges with:
■
Tape or leaders that have been touched with bare fingers (may transfer
oils to the tape head).
■
Labels used on the top, bottom, sides, or back of the cartridge. Use the
label slot only.
Caution
Always discard damaged tape cartridges. If a defective tape
cartridge is loaded into a tape drive, it may in turn damage the
drive, potentially requiring drive replacement.
Write-Protecting DLT Cartridges
Each cartridge has a sliding write-protect switch. Using the write-protect switch
ensures data safety for files that have been previously written to tape,
preventing additional files from being written to that tape.
To change the write-protect setting, move the write-protect switch (Figure 35):
■
Left to prevent data from being written to the cartridge. The orange
indicator on the cartridge can be seen when the write-protect switch is in
the “ON” position.
■
Right to allow data to be written to the cartridge. The orange indicator on
the cartridge cannot be seen when the write-protect switch is in the “OFF”
position.
Note
76
Using Tapes
With the write-protect switch in either position, data can be read
from the cartridge.
Chapter 2
Figure 35
DLT Write-Protect Switch Settings
Chapter 2
Using DLT Cartridge Bar Code Labels
Make it a practice to use barcode labels on your tape cartridges. Your host
software may need to keep track of the following information and the
associated bar code:
■
Date of format or initialization
■
Cartridge owner (such as a group or department)
■
Storage purpose
Note
Chapter 2
If the host software does not keep track of this information,
create a method for doing so.
Using Tapes
77
DLT cartridges have a front slide slot located on the face of the cartridge next to
the write-protect switch. Use this slot for inserting the barcode label by sliding
it into the slot (Figure 36 on page 78).
Caution
Figure 36
78
Using Tapes
Do not apply labels onto the top, bottom, sides, or back of the
cartridge as this may cause damage to the tape drive or interfere
with reliable operation.
Proper DLT Label Position
Chapter 2
Ordering DLT Cartridges and Bar Code Labels
HP DLT tape cartridges can be purchased in a variety of ways.
Outside of North America, contact your nearest HP authorized
dealer or sales representative.
Note
■
Call 1-800-752-0900 (North America only) for the location of the nearest
authorized Hewlett-Packard dealer
■
Contact HP Direct:
— 1-800-538-8787 (North America only)
— HP Direct
Hewlett-Packard
ATTN: Mail Order
P.O. Box 1145
Roseville, CA 95678
■
Visit the HP Business Store at http://www.bstore.hp.com (where available)
Table 9 lists HP DLT tape cartridges and their part numbers.
Table 9
DLT Tape Cartridges
Part Number
Description
Data Cartridge
C5141F
40/70/80 GB
Cleaning Cartridge
C5142A
Chapter 2
HP DLT Cleaning Cartridge
Using Tapes
79
Chapter 2
DLT Tape Cartridges
DLT Bar Code
Labels
Ensure that you use HP qualified bar code labels only. Contact an HP
authorized dealer or sales representative for current compatibility and
availability.
You can order DLT bar code labels through the following supplier:
■
Colorflex:
— Website: http://www.colorflex.com
— Phone: (800) 522-3528 (800-LABEL2U)
Table 10 lists part numbers for Colorflex bar code labels.
Table 10
Colorflex DLT Bar Code Labels
Part Number
Description
1703-0D
DLT Data Cartridge Label
1703-CN
DLT Cleaning Cartridge Label
1703-DG
DLT Diagnostic Cartridge Label
Using DLT Cleaning Cartridges
DLT drives should only be cleaned if the clean drive icon displays on the tape
library status bar. Only use appropriately formatted data cartridges and
approved cleaning cartridges (see Table 9 on page 79), and follow the
instructions for Cleaning a Drive on page 87. In general, replace DLT cleaning
cartridges after twenty uses. Marking the label on the cleaning cartridge after
each use will help you keep track of the number of uses.
Caution
Excessive use of the cleaning cartridge can cause unnecessary
wear on the drive head. The tape library front panel will display
a message when the DLT cleaning cartridge needs to be
replaced.
See Troubleshooting Common Problems on page 140 for information on
troubleshooting common cleaning problems.
80
Using Tapes
Chapter 2
Chapter 2
Accessing Tapes in the Library
Tapes in the library may be accessed using the following features:
■
Magazine access
■
Mailslot access (if configured, see Configuring the Mailslot on page 93
for configuration information)
Magazine Access
Main Menu -> Operations -> Magazine Access
1. From the Magazine Access menu, select one of the following options:
— Unlock Door
— Unlock All Doors
Use the [-] and [+] keys to change the door selection.
Note
The library will inventory only the drawers opened, regardless of
how many were unlocked.
2. Pull the unlocked drawer(s) out to access magazines and tapes. The
drawer may also be key locked. Unlock the drawer if needed.
Chapter 2
Note
Select [Lock] to re-lock the drawers that have been unlocked, but
not opened. If only one drawer was unlocked, it will
automatically lock when the drawer is closed.
Caution
If all drawers are unlocked, opened, and then closed, you must
press [Lock] from the front panel. Otherwise, the library will be
in a hung state.
Accessing Tapes in the Library
81
Figure 37
Removing/Replacing a Magazine
3. Remove the magazine by lifting it straight up with the handle
(Figure 37 on page 82).
4. To remove a tape, set the magazine on its back and grasp the top and
bottom corners of a tape. Pull the tape straight out of the magazine.
82
Accessing Tapes in the Library
Chapter 2
— When inserting Ultrium cartridges into the tape library magazine,
ensure that each cartridge is positioned with the write-protect switch
facing out of the magazine and towards the magazine handle (Figure
38). Push the tape into the slot until it “clicks” into place.
Figure 38
Loading Ultrium Tapes into a Magazine
Write-Protect Switch
Chapter 2
Accessing Tapes in the Library
83
Chapter 2
5. If desired, insert tapes into the magazine. Ensure that you use the
appropriate tape type for the magazine.
— When inserting DLT cartridges into the tape library magazine, ensure
that each cartridge is positioned with the write-protect switch facing
out of the magazine and away from the magazine handle (Figure
39). Push the tape into the slot until it “clicks” into place.
Figure 39
Loading DLT Tapes into a Magazine
Write-Protect Switch
6. Reload the magazine into the drawer, and close the drawer. The library
will run an inventory check on the contents of that tape drawer.
Note
84
Accessing Tapes in the Library
If the library does not have all magazines, it will report a partial
availability message (see Partial Availability State on
page 120).
Chapter 2
Mailslot Access
Chapter 2
Note
The mailslot is located in the upper right-hand drawer of the
library.
The mailslot can be accessed from the Operations sub-menu or from the Home
screen.
Main Menu -> Operations -> Mailslot Access
Home Screen -> Mail
1. The Mailslot Access screen displays a message indicating the number of
tapes in the mailslot and how to open the appropriate drawer.
Open the drawer. The drawer will open only to the number of storage slots
that have been configured for the mailslot (see Configuring the Mailslot
on page 93).
2. Close the drawer. The library automatically detects the closure, locks the
drawer, and initiates an inventory check.
Chapter 2
Accessing Tapes in the Library
85
Drive and Tape Operations
Main Menu -> Operations -> Drive and Tape Operations
Look at the product information labels on the back of the library and the labels
inside each tape drawer for more information about drive and slot numbering.
The numbering scheme is also illustrated in Library Back Panel Features on
page 33.
Note
The “Home” and “Map” front panel screens illustrate the drive,
slot, and mailslot numbering schemes. Slot numbers displayed in
reverse video indicate those reserved for the mailslot.
Loading a Tape Into a Drive
1. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select [Load Tape from Drive].
2. Use the [-] or [+] key to select any slot. Only full slots are available for
selection.
Select [OK].
3. Use the [-] or [+] key to select the desired drive. You can only select empty
drives that are compatible with the tape type.
4. Select [Load] to move the tape from a slot to a drive.
A confirmation screen indicates that the tape is loaded.
86
Drive and Tape Operations
Chapter 2
Unloading a Tape from the Drive
2. Use the [-] or [+] keys to select the drive you want to unload. You can only
select a full drive.
3. Select [Unload] to move the tape from the drive to the tape’s original
location (the slot it occupied before being loaded into the drive). If that slot
is occupied, you will be asked to select another slot location.
4. The tape automatically rewinds before it is unloaded. A status screen
displays the library’s progress as the tape is relocated.
5. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select [Menu] to return to the
Operations menu.
Cleaning a Drive
Main Menu -> Operations -> Drive and Tape Operations
Chapter 2
Note
Use a cleaning cartridge to clean a drive. The drive mechanism
should only be cleaned if the clean drive icon displays (see Table
5 on page 62).
Caution
Ensure you use the correct cleaning cartridges for your tape
drive. Damage may occur if inappropriate media is used. For
more information, refer to Table 36 on page 188.
Drive and Tape Operations
87
Chapter 2
1. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select [Unload Tape from Drive].
1. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select [Clean Drive].
2. From Choose Cleaning Slot, use the [-], [+] or [++] key to select the slot
location of the cleaning tape. Refer to the label inside the library drawer,
the front panel display, or Library Back Panel Features on page 33 for a
list of the slot numbers.
Select [OK].
3. Using the [-] or [+] keys, select the number of the drive to be cleaned.
Select [Clean].
When the cleaning process is complete, the cleaning tape will be returned
to the original slot location. If the cycle failed, the screen will display the
appropriate status information. See Troubleshooting Common Problems
on page 140 for possible cleaning problems.
Note
Drives can also be cleaned from remote access. See Using the
Remote Management Card on page 96.
Moving Tapes Between Slots
Main Menu -> Operations -> Drive and Tape Operations
1. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select [Move Tape Slot-to-Slot].
2. Select the slot where you want to move the tape from using the [-], [+] or
[++] keys, and press [OK].
3. Select the slot where you want to move the tape to using the [-], [+] or [++]
keys, and press [OK]. A message will display if the destination slot chosen
is reserved or is the original “home” slot for a tape in the drive.
A status screen indicates the tape is being moved.
88
Drive and Tape Operations
Chapter 2
3
Library Administration
Chapter Overview
This chapter describes the following:
■
Configuring the Library on page 90
■
Enabling and Changing the Password on page 92
■
Configuring the Mailslot on page 93
■
Using the Remote Management Card on page 96
■
Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel on page 102
■
Setting SCSI IDs on page 106
■
Setting the Date and Time on page 108
■
Retrieving Library Information on page 110
Chapter Overview
89
Configuring the Library
Main Menu -> Administration -> Change Configuration
Note
When you reconfigure the library, you may also need to
reconfigure your backup software. For more information, consult
the documentation provided with your software.
You can change the following configuration options for the library:
Table 11
Configuration Options
Menu Item
Description
Default
Options
Password
See Enabling and Changing the Password on
page 92.
Off
On or Off
Network
Access
See Using the Remote Management Card on
page 96.
DHCP Off
Assign an IP
address or use
DHCP
Mailslot
Configuration
See Configuring the Mailslot on page 93.
One-slot
0 slots, 1 slot, 1
magazine, or 2
magazines
Fibre Channel
or SCSI IDs
See Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel
on page 102 or Setting SCSI IDs on page 106.
N/A
N/A
Save Element
Reserve After
a Power Cycle
Allows the host to continue reserving drive or
slots after a power cycle (a SCSI element
reservation). This is typically used to ensure that
only one host can access a slot or drive. See
Configuration Information on page 112.
Off
On or Off
90
Configuring the Library
Chapter 3
Table 11
Configuration Options
Menu Item
Default
Options
■
Report Recovered (Soft) Errors: Reports
recovered errors over SCSI.
On
On or Off
■
Restore Factory Defaults: Restores the default
configuration settings (see Table 12 on
page 91).
N/A
N/A
Prevent Media Access: Locks the library
drawers and prevents front panel access.
Off
On or Off
■
Chapter 3
Other
Configuration
Options (see
page 112)
Description
Factory default configuration settings are listed in Table 12.
Table 12
Default Configuration Settings
Description
Setting
Library controller SCSI ID (see page 106)
0
Drives 1-10 SCSI IDs (see page 106)
1-6, 8-11
Clean count (see page 87)
0
Report recovered errors (see page 118)
On
Cleaning cartridge location
Unknown
Mailslot configuration (see page 93)
1
All online drive repair states
Online pending
Prevent media access (see Table 11 on page 90)
Off
Hard error, soft error, drive media, library event, and recovery
logs (see page 118)
Cleared
All move stored heights and offsets
Returned to default positions
Chapter 3
Configuring the Library
91
Enabling and Changing the Password
Note
Administration procedures can be password protected. These
procedures include: diagnostic tests, configurations, online drive
repair, and setting the date and time. A password is also
required for administration through the remote management
card.
Main Menu -> Administration -> Change Configuration -> Password
When the library is first installed, the password is inactive. To protect the
system from unauthorized access, use the following procedure to set a
password.
1. Enter the Password menu. A status screen will indicate if a password is
enabled.
— If the password is turned off, select Set New Password to enable the
password.
— If the password is turned on, select Change Password to enter the new
password. It must be exactly eight digits.
— If the password is turned on, select Turn Password Off to clear the
password.
Note
If you enter more than eight digits, the ninth digit will become
the first digit of the new password.
2. Select [OK] to exit.
Caution
92
Configuring the Library
Be sure to document the password. If you forget the password,
contact your service representative.
Chapter 3
Configuring the Mailslot
The mailslot is used for moving tapes into and out of the library in a controlled
manner. Mailslot locations are different than storage locations. Consequently,
having a larger mailslot decreases the number of storage locations available
in the library. See Table 13 on page 94.
Figure 40
Mailslot Drawer
By default, the library is configured for a one-slot mailslot. This setting can also
be configured for 0 slots (no mailslot), 1 slot, 1 magazine, or 2 magazines
from the Administration or Service menus (see Table 13 on page 94).
Chapter 3
Configuring the Library
93
Chapter 3
The mailslot is comprised of magazine locations in the upper right-hand
drawer. When a tape is being changed, the drawer opens only to the number
of slots that have been configured.
Table 13
Mailslot Configuration
Number of
Mailslots
0 slots
1 slot
1 magazine
2 magazines
94
Configuring the Library
Advantages and Disadvantages
Magazine access must be used to exchange tapes (see
Magazine Access on page 81).
■
Advantage: Allows all slots to be used for data storage.
■
Disadvantage: Cannot easily remove or add tapes
without an inventory check.
A mailslot setting of 1 (one) allows one slot to be
designated as the mailslot.
■
Advantage: Opens only to the designated slot, which
simplifies the manual tape exchange procedure.
■
Disadvantages: Reduces the library’s storage capacity
by one tape. Also requires more time to import and
export multiple tapes.
A mailslot setting of 1 magazine designates an entire
magazine as the mailslot.
■
Advantage: Provides access to a magazine of tapes,
which simplifies the manual tape exchange procedure.
■
Disadvantage: Reduces the library’s storage capacity
by one magazine.
A mailslot setting of 2 magazines designates an entire
drawer as the mailslot.
■
Advantage: Provides access to two magazines of tapes,
which simplifies the manual tape exchange procedure.
Also, if you have more than one drive technology in
your library, each magazine could be for a different
tape type.
■
Disadvantage: Reduces the library’s storage capacity
by 2 magazines.
Chapter 3
Note
When you reconfigure the library, you may also need to
reconfigure your backup software. For more information, consult
the documentation provided with your software.
Note
Before changing the mailslot configuration, verify the slots that
will become the mailslot are empty and not the original location
of a tape in a drive.
Use the following steps to configure the mailslot option.
1. In the Configure Mailslot menu, a message will remind you to check the
storage slot and mailslot configurations in the backup software.
Select [OK].
2. The next screen will describe the prerequisites for configuring the mailslot.
Verify these prerequisites have been met, then select [OK].
3. The display will indicate the current mailslot setting. Select the number of
mailslots desired (0 slots, 1 slot, 1 magazine, or 2 magazines). See Table
13 on page 94 for information about each option.
A confirmation screen automatically displays the success or failure of the
change and reminds you to reconfigure the backup software.
4. Select [Done] to exit.
Caution
Chapter 3
Do not change the mailslot setting without reconfiguring your
backup software. The backup software must reflect the mailslot
setting to assist in tracking tape exchanges and the current
location of all tapes. Verify that your backup software supports
and reflects the mailslot configuration that you select.
Configuring the Library
95
Chapter 3
Main Menu -> Administration -> Change Configuration -> Mailslot
Using the Remote Management Card
Overview
The remote management card (RMC) includes a Web-Based Library
Administrator, which allows web management and monitoring of your library
through a network connection. This interface allows you to monitor your
library from anywhere on the network through comprehensive and userfriendly web pages. (See Figure 41.)
Online instructions are included on the web interface to describe how to use
the tool. Simply select the [?] key in the upper right-hand corner to access the
online help.
Figure 41
RMC Web Interface
The web-based remote management features allow you to obtain status reports
and diagnostic information, as well as manage library functions from a remote
location. All remote operations are password protected with the administrator
password to prevent unauthorized access.
96
Configuring the Library
Chapter 3
For remote management, you need a network connection and a browser to:
■
View the current status of the library, drives, and tapes
■
Manage multiple devices from any workstation within the intranet
■
Manage and configure the library on your network in a secure
environment to:
Chapter 3
— Clean the drives
— Load and unload tapes
— Run diagnostics
— Restart the library
— Dynamically assign the library’s IP address, gateway address, and
subnet mask using DHCP or BOOTP mode
■
View library, drive, and tape error messages
■
Generate error reports to fax or email to your support representative
■
Download and install firmware
■
Access web-based support, web registration, documentation, and partner
information
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
DHCP allows a DHCP server to dynamically assign IP addresses to any DHCP
client that requests one. The DHCP server usually has a limited set of IP
addresses, and assigns them on a first come first serve basis. When a DHCP
client boots up, it will broadcast a DHCP request over TCP/IP. If a DHCP server
is present, that server will respond to the DHCP client with an IP address,
subnet mask and gateway. This response also includes a lease (or expiration)
time for the IP address being assigned. If the DHCP client then wants to use this
address, the client must acknowledge the server’s response, and then
periodically renew the lease on that IP address. If the lease expires, the DHCP
server is free to re-issue that IP address to another DHCP client.
Note
Chapter 3
DHCP only manages dynamic allocation of IP addresses.
Assigning device names with DHCP is not recommended.
Configuring the Library
97
BOOTP
BOOTP is similar to DHCP, in that a BOOTP server dynamically assigns an IP
address to any BOOTP client that requests one. The difference is that your
system administrator must preconfigure the BOOTP server for the library. The
system administrator assigns a permanent IP address to the library’s MAC
address. When the library is booted, the BOOTP server responds and assigns
the permanent address to the library. The IP address never expires and the
BOOTP server will not reissue the IP address to any other BOOTP client.
Management Programs
In addition to using your browser directly to manage your library, you can also
use popular management programs, such as HP OpenView, HP Top Tools, and
CA Unicenter TNG. In order to best use HP OpenView and CA Unicenter
TNG, you must download a plug-in from the HP Customer Care website at
http://www.hp.com/go/support. This plug-in can be easily installed in your
environment. HP Top Tools has built-in native support for your library, and no
plug-in is required.
Table 14
Supported Configurations
Description
Browsers
98
Configuring the Library
Supported Configurations
■
Windows 95/98/2000/NT: Internet
Explorer™ 4.01 and higher, Netscape
Communicator™ 4.5 and higher, and
Netscape Navigator™ 4.08 and higher.
■
HP-UX: Netscape Communicator™ 4.5 and
higher and Netscape Navigator™ 4.08
and higher. Internet Explorer™ is not
supported.
■
Sun Solaris: Netscape Communicator™ 4.5
and higher and Netscape Navigator™
4.08 and higher. Internet Explorer™ and
HotJava™ are not supported.
Chapter 3
Configuring the Remote Management Card
The library only requires one remote management card, which will already be
installed when the library arrives.
Note
1. Connect to the network port of the card using a category 5 ethernet cable.
Ensure that the cable is also connected to an active network port.
2. On the library’s back panel, verify that the link LED on the remote
management card is green. If the LED is not green, a link has not been
established with the local network. Ensure the network port is active by
checking with your system administrator. (See Table 20 on page 133 for
a description of the LEDs.)
3. Enter the Network Access menu.
Main Menu -> Administration -> Change Configuration -> Network
Access
4. If you would like to use DHCP/BOOTP to configure your remote
management card, select [Yes]. (See Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) on page 97 or BOOTP on page 98.)
— A message will display to confirm your configuration through DHCP/
BOOTP, or alert you if DHCP/BOOTP failed.
— If successful, note the IP address, and skip to step 9.
— If DHCP/BOOTP was not successful, or if you do not want to use
DHCP/BOOTP, contact your system administrator to obtain an IP
address, subnet mask, and gateway address. Continue with
step 5.
Chapter 3
Configuring the Library
99
Chapter 3
The library administrator password is required for this process. If
the password is not set, you can view information but will not be
permitted to configure your remote management card from your
web browser. (See Enabling and Changing the Password on
page 92.)
Note
The MAC address is unique to each remote management card
and is used for identification. This address cannot be configured.
To successfully use BOOTP from the library, your system
administrator must first configure the BOOTP server using the
MAC address. (See BOOTP on page 98.)
5. Enter the IP Address.
Use the [+] key to change the number.
Use the [->] key to move to the next number.
Use the [Down] key to move to the next address.
6. Enter the subnet mask using the same procedure.
7.
Enter the gateway address.
8. Press [OK] when complete to save the changes, or press [Quit] to exit the
menu and not save the changes. A message will display to confirm the
changes you have entered or alert you if the changes have not been
saved.
9.
Enter the designated IP address into the web browser to launch the WebBased Library Administrator pages.
Example 1 - All modes (Manual, DHCP, or BOOTP):
IP address = 15.28.33.12
http://15.28.33.12
Example 2 - Manual and BOOTP only:
Device name = library1
http://library1
Note
To use a device name, your system administrator must add the
device name you select to the domain name server (DNS).
Note
Instructions and online help screens describing remote
management are available from the Web-Based Library
Administrator pages by selecting the [?] button in the top righthand corner of any page.
100 Configuring the Library
Chapter 3
Retrieving Information about the Remote Management Card
Enter the Information menu to view the following remote management card
settings:
Main Menu -> Information -> View Configuration -> Network Access
Network connection speed
■
IP address
■
Subnet mask
■
Gateway address
■
MAC address
Chapter 3
Chapter 3
■
Configuring the Library 101
Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel
Note
When you reconfigure the library, you may also need to
reconfigure your backup software. For more information, consult
the documentation provided with your software.
The optional Fibre Channel controllers in the library serve as a bridge between
SCSI and Fibre Channel.
Note
It is not necessary to connect the library to its Fibre Channel
topology (arbitrated loop or fabric) before configuration.
Note
When Fibre Channel controllers are installed in the library,
device SCSI IDs cannot be changed from their factory default.
Configuration
Though you do not need to set SCSI IDs for Fibre Channel, you will need to
configure Fibre Channel addressing.
Main Menu -> Administration -> Change Configuration -> Fibre Channel
1. Enter the Fibre Channel menu.
2. Select the level where the Fibre Channel controller you want to configure is
located.
Use the [-] key to select a lower level in the library.
Use the [+] key to select a higher level in the library.
Select [OK] if the level is correct.
3. A message displays the following information:
— Fibre Channel controller type (LVD or HVD SCSI)
— SCSI bus status
Select [MORE].
102 Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel
Chapter 3
4. A message displays information for the CURRENT STATUS, including:
— Link status
— Connection type (loop or fabric)
— AL_PA (Arbitrated Loop Physical Address) for loop connections, or a
hex address for fabric connections
5. A message displays information for the CURRENT SETTINGS, including the
addressing assignment method (hard or soft) and the AL_PA for loop
connections.
Select [MORE].
6. A message displays information for the FUTURE SETTINGS. This allows you
to input the addressing assignment method and AL_PA that you want to
use at a later time, without affecting your current connection. (Changes to
the FUTURE SETTINGS will take effect on the next power up or board reset.)
Note
For multi-level libraries, settings can be changed simultaneously
for each level of the library by changing the FUTURE SETTINGS
and then power-cycling the library.
— The default addressing is hard addressing with auto-select enabled.
Hard addressing allows you to set and maintain a fixed address, but
may result in address conflicts. Soft addressing looks for an unused
address on every power cycle, so the address might change.
Note
Since AL_PAs can change with soft addressing, some backup
software applications and operating systems may have difficulty
locating the library in this mode. Check the backup software
documentation to ensure soft addressing is supported before
selecting this mode.
— If you selected hard addressing for a loop connection, select the
AL_PA (fixed address) or choose auto-select. Auto-select is an option
under hard addressing that automatically selects an available address
and then uses it as a hard address from then on.
Chapter 3
Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel 103
Chapter 3
Select [MORE].
7.
Press [OK] when complete to save the changes, or select [QUIT] to return to
the beginning of the fibre configuration menu. If you select [QUIT], a
message will display indicating the old values will be retained.
If you select [OK], a message will display indicating that the settings are
being stored onto the Fibre Channel controller. If this is successful, a
message displays indicating that the new settings will be attempted at the
next restart.
8. To immediately apply the new settings, select [RESTART], or select [DONE] to
wait until the next power cycle.
When the Fibre Channel controller is restarted, or when the library is
power-cycled, FUTURE SETTINGS are copied into CURRENT SETTINGS. The
Fibre Channel controller always attempts to connect using CURRENT
SETTINGS.
If you select [RESTART], the Fibre Channel controller is restarted. This should
not be attempted if data transfers or library operations are in progress.
The [RESTART] operation normally completes within 90 seconds. The
display will report the status of the operation when it is complete.
Note
The actual connection achieved depends on the external
topology and network. Consequently, CURRENT STATUS may
differ from CURRENT SETTINGS.
Note
You can also change configuration from remote access. See
Using the Remote Management Card on page 96.
104 Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel
Chapter 3
Retrieving information about Fibre Channel
Enter the Information menu to view information such as:
Fibre Channel interface or SCSI interface type (LVD or HVD)
■
SCSI bus status
■
Current status (link status, connection type, address)
■
Current settings (addressing assignment method, AL_PA)
■
Future settings (addressing assignment method, AL_PA)
■
World wide node name
■
World wide port name
Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel 105
Chapter 3
Chapter 3
■
Setting SCSI IDs
Main Menu -> Administration -> Change Configuration -> SCSI IDs
Note
Table 15
This menu is unavailable for libraries using Fibre Channel
because the SCSI IDs are configured automatically.
Default SCSI IDs
Devicea
SCSI ID
Library controller
0
Drive position 1
1
Drive position 2
2
Drive position 3
3
Drive position 4
4
Drive position 5
5
Drive position 6
6
Drive position 7
8
Drive position 8
9
Drive position 9
10
Drive position 10
11
a.The number of drives depends on the library model.
Note
106 Setting SCSI IDs
Each device on the same SCSI bus must have its own unique
SCSI ID. SCSI ID 7 is not used as the default for drive position 7
because it is typically used by the host computer.
Chapter 3
Caution
Changing SCSI ID settings from factory defaults may affect the
backup software configuration. Consult your backup software
manual for SCSI ID requirements.
1. Enter the SCSI IDs menu. A message warns you that devices with the same
SCSI IDs must be connected to different SCSI buses.
Select [OK].
2. The Configure SCSI ID screen displays a message that indicates the drive
position selected.
Use the [-] or [+] key to select the drive or library controller, then select
[OK]. Refer to Library Back Panel on page 33 or the product information
labels on the back of the library for the library’s drive numbering
arrangement.
3. The next screen displays the drive number and the current SCSI ID.
Use the [-] or [+] key to select the desired SCSI ID, then select [OK].
4. A confirmation screen will indicate either a successful or failed operation.
If the SCSI ID assignment failed, the screen will indicate the reason and
then return to the Configure SCSI ID screen.
Chapter 3
Note
After changing SCSI IDs, you can save the new settings to flash
ROM by power cycling the library, which allows the settings to
be recovered if the library is powered off for more than eight
days. If this step is not completed and the library is powered off
for more than eight days, the new settings may be lost.
Note
You can also set SCSI IDs from remote access. See Using the
Remote Management Card on page 96.
Setting SCSI IDs 107
Chapter 3
The SCSI ID for a drive position can be configured, even when no drive is
present. When a drive is later added, it will use the ID already assigned to that
location.
Setting the Date and Time
Main Menu -> Administration -> Set Date and Time
When the library is initially set up, or if it has been disconnected for more than
eight days, you need to set the date and time. If the date and time are not set,
logs will not include date and time stamps. To set the date and time, enter the
Administration menu. If you want to only view the date and time, enter the
Information menu.
To set the date and time:
1. Enter the Set Date & Time menu.
2. Use the [-] or [+] keys to select the year, month, and day. Use the [->] to
scroll to the next entry when complete.
3. Set the hour and minutes (00:00:00) using the [+] or [-] keys. Use the [->]
key to scroll over to the next selection. The seconds are automatically set at
00.
4. Use the [-] or [+] keys to select the time zone. UTC stands for Coordinated
Universal Time. (See Table 16 on page 109.) This will keep your host
time and library time synchronized.
5. Press [OK] to save your changes. Press [Quit] to exit this menu and not save
your changes.
Note
108 Setting the Date and Time
The time does not automatically adjust for time changes such as
daylight savings time and is accurate to within one hour per
year. Occasional adjustment is normal.
Chapter 3
Table 16
World Time Zones
UTC -12
Eniwetok, Kwajalein
UTC -11
Midway Island, Samoa
UTC -10
Hawaii
Alaska
UTC -8
Pacific Time (US and Canada), Tijuana
UTC -7
Mountain Time (US and Canada), Arizona
UTC -6
Central Time (US and Canada), Saskatchewan, Mexico City, Tegucigalpa
UTC -5
Eastern Time (US and Canada), Bogota, Lima
UTC -4
Atlantic Time (Canada), Caracas, La Paz
UTC -3
Brasilia, Buenos Aires, Georgetown
UTC -2
Mid-Atlantic
Chapter 3
UTC -9
UTC -1
Atlantic Ocean
UTC
Great Britain, Lisbon, Monrovia, Casablanca
UTC +1
Berlin, Stockholm, Rome, Bern, Brussels, Vienna, Paris, Madrid, Amsterdam,
Prague, Warsaw, Budapest
UTC +2
Athens, Helsinki, Istanbul, Cairo, Eastern Europe, Harare, Pretoria, Israel
UTC +3
Baghdad, Kuwait, Nairobi, Riyadh, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Kazan, Volgograd
UTC +3:30
Tehran
UTC +4
Abu Dhabi, Muscat, Tbilisi
UTC +4:30
Kabul
UTC +5
Islamabad, Karachi, Ekaterinburg, Tashkent
UTC +5:30
Mumbai, Calcutta, Madras, New Delhi, Colombo
UTC +6
Almaty, Dhaka
UTC +7
Bangkok, Jakarta, Hanoi
UTC +8
Beijing, Chongqing, Urumqi, Hong Kong, Perth, Singapore, Taipei
UTC +9
Tokyo, Osaka, Sapporo, Seoul, Yakutsk
UTC +9:30
Adelaide, Darwin
UTC +10
Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney, Guam, Port Moresby, Vladivostock, Hobart
UTC +11
Magadan, Solomon Is., New Caledonia
UTC +12
Fiji, Kamchatka, Marshall Is., Auckland, Wellington
Chapter 3
Setting the Date and Time 109
Retrieving Library Information
The following information is available from the Information and Administration
menus:
■
Library information
■
Drive information
■
Configuration information
■
Date and Time
■
Firmware revisions
■
Power supplies
Note
This information is also available from remote access. See Using
the Remote Management Card on page 96.
Library Information
Main Menu -> Information -> Library Information
Use the following procedure to view information about the library. Table 17
on page 111 explains each option.
1. From the Library Information menu, select one of the following options:
— Library Status
— Hard Error Log
— Recovered (Soft) Error Log
— Odometer
— Identity
2. Select [Back] to return to the Library Information menu.
110 Retrieving Library Information
Chapter 3
Table 17
Library Information
Menu option
Information
Displays information about the overall status of the
library and any partial availability flags. (See
page 120.)
Hard Error Log
(see page 126)
Displays a history of unrecovered errors. Returns a
message indicating that there are no hard errors,
or provides an error entry. Use the [Older] or
[Newer] keys to select an entry.
Soft (Recovered) Error
Log (see page 118)
Displays a history of recovered errors (errors that
were resolved by one or more automatic retries).
Returns a message indicating that there are no
soft entries or supplies an error entry. Use the
[Older] or [Newer] keys to select an entry.
Odometer
Displays a count of cumulative power-on hours
and drive loads.
Note: This option is available for DLT tape
libraries only.
Identity
Chapter 3
Displays the library’s serial number.
Retrieving Library Information 111
Chapter 3
Library Status
Drive Information
Main Menu -> Information -> Drive Information
1. From the Drive Information menu, use the [-] or [+] keys to select the desired
drive module.
2. Select [OK] to display and select one of the following options:
— Event Log: Displays significant events for the selected drive position,
including drive errors, online/offline transitions, and drive cleaning.
Note
This log is still available while a drive is being removed.
— Odometer: Displays a count of cumulative power-on hours and drive
loads. (This option is available for DLT tape libraries only.)
— Identity: Displays the drive type, serial number, and firmware revision.
Configuration Information
Main Menu -> Information -> View Configuration
From the View Configuration menu, select the desired library function to view
current information about the following. (See page 91 for factory defaults.)
■
Password enabled status
■
Network access configuration
■
Mailslot configuration
■
SCSI ID assignments or Fibre Channel status
■
Save SCSI element reserve after a power cycle
■
Other configuration options (report recovered error logs and prevent
media access)
112 Retrieving Library Information
Chapter 3
Date and Time
Main Menu -> Information -> Date and Time
Firmware Revisions
Main Menu -> Information -> Firmware Revisions
From the Firmware Revisions menu, you can view information about the
following (see page 176 for upgrading firmware):
■
Library
■
Tape drives
■
Fibre Channel
Power Supplies
Main Menu -> Information -> Power Supplies
From the Power Supplies menu, you can view information about the status of
your power supply and whether or not your library contains a redundant
power supply.
Chapter 3
Retrieving Library Information 113
Chapter 3
Access this menu to view the library’s settings for the date, time, and time
zone. Use the [Powered] key to display the date and time of the last power on.
(See page 108 for setting the date and time.)
114 Retrieving Library Information
Chapter 3
Troubleshooting and
Diagnostics
4
Chapter Overview
This chapter includes information on the following:
■
Troubleshooting Overview on page 116
■
Understanding Error States on page 118
■
Interpreting Library LEDs on page 130
■
Troubleshooting Common Problems on page 140
■
Diagnostic Support Tools on page 154
Chapter Overview 115
Troubleshooting Overview
Below is an overview of the troubleshooting process. More detailed
information is provided on the following pages.
Troubleshooting Overview
Figure 42
Identify the type of error.
(See the Understanding Error
Types section of this chapter)
Is the front panel
LED green?
Record error
code and qualifier.
They may be
needed by your
service
representative.
YES
NO
YES
Follow the
recommendations
on the front panel
and in this
manual.
Is the front
panel LED
flashing amber?
NO
(solid amber)
See the Partial
Availability section
of this chapter
Was there a
timeout?
NO
Troubleshoot as
a host, software
or media issue.
YES
Check soft error
logs. If there is
no corresponding
entry, then
troubleshoot as
a host, software
or media issue.
(See the Host
Software and
Media Errors
section in this
chapter.)
(See the Host
Software and
Media Errors
section in this
chapter.)
If the error cannot
be resolved,
contact your
service
representative.
116 Troubleshooting Overview
Chapter 4
Understanding Error Types
There are several categories of errors that might occur when you are using
your library. Each error category has a different troubleshooting process,
which is described in more detail later in this chapter.
Error Types
Figure 43
Least serious
Most serious
Partial
Availability
Errors
Front Panel LED is
GREEN
Front Panel LED is
SOLID AMBER
Host, Software,
and Media
Errors
Hard
(Unrecovered)
Errors
Host Bus Adapter
Library had error,
but recovered. The
soft error log contains
history.
.
From the front panel
select:
INFORMATION ->
LIBRARY
INFORMATION ->
SOFT (RECOVERED)
ERROR LOG
Library has a
condition that needs
to be noted. The
library should still be
operational in this
state.
.
From the front
panel select:
Information ->
LIBRARY
INFORMATION ->
LIBRARY Status
Front Panel LED is
FLASHING AMBER
- Driver conflicts
- Incompatible HBA
- SCSI ID conflict
Network Problems
- Slow or busy
- Data not streaming
- Power unstable
- Not properly cabled
or configured
Tape Media
- Tape damaged
- Tape write-protected
- Clean cartridge
expired
- Incompatible cleaning
or data cartridge
Library had an error
and cannot recover
from it. You cannot
operate the library
until the error is
resolved. The hard
error log contains
more information.
.
From the front
panel select:
INFORMATION ->
LIBRARY
INFORMATION ->
HARD ERROR LOG
(See Table 18 for
recovery information.)
Server
- Hardware problems
- BIOS settings
- Incorrect or conflicting
drivers
- Insufficient memory
- Processor too slow
Backup Software
- Incorrect software
configuration
- Configuration
changes to host
- Library not ready
for software operation
(i.e. drive full)
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting Overview 117
Chapter 4
Soft (Recovered)
Errors
Understanding Error States
This section describes the difference between the following types of errors:
■
Soft (Recovered) Errors on page 118
■
Partial Availability State on page 120
■
Hard (Unrecovered) Errors on page 126
■
Host Software and Media Errors on page 128
Soft (Recovered) Errors
Soft errors are hardware errors that the library recovered from by retrying the
operation. Though they are often transparent to a user, the time required to
complete the operation may be noticeably longer.
Main Menu -> Information -> Library Information -> Soft (Recovered) Error
Log
Periodically review the soft error log to detect and track errors before they
become serious. If you see that a component has many soft errors, it might
indicate a library component that is wearing out or will fail in the future. If the
library has a hard error and you are unsure what caused it, you can review
the soft error log to help identify problem areas.
You can also use soft errors to identify the cause of software time-outs. The
backup software on the host computer only allows a designated time for each
operation. If the library takes longer than the backup software allows, it may
be due to the library retrying a failed operation, which will be logged as a
soft error.
Note
118 Understanding Error States
The date and time stamp will help you resolve errors by
establishing a timeline of when events occurred.
Chapter 4
Figure 44
Using the Soft Error Log
Monitor and track
components that might
fail.
See error history to
determine why other
errors have occurred.
Identify the reason for
backup software
and SCSI timeouts.
Chapter 4
Understanding Error States 119
Chapter 4
Review the soft error
log to:
Partial Availability State
Note
A partial availability state is most commonly an indication of a
configuration issue and does not necessarily indicate a
hardware failure.
When the library is in a partial availability state, it is still functional, but is not
in an optimum or supported configuration, as described in Table 18 on page
121. When this occurs, the front panel will display Partly Available, and the
illuminated bar beneath the front panel display will be solid amber until the
condition is resolved. See Figure 45 for an example of how the partial
availability state appears from the Home Screen. The front panel uses the term
“Partly Available” due to display size limitations.
Figure 45
Partial Availability State
The center icon button on the Home screen is a shortcut to the Library Status
menu and partial availability information. This icon, as well as the icon on the
status bar, shows a reverse video reminder (icon background reverses to
black) when the library’s partial availability status changes. You may clear
this reminder by viewing the Library Status screen.
120 Understanding Error States
Chapter 4
To view more information about the partial availability error, you can access
the log by following this menu path:
Main Menu -> Information -> Library Information -> Library Status
The partial availability state is caused by one of the conditions listed in Table
18 on page 121. The condition will be displayed on the library front panel or
the RMC Web-Based Library Administrator pages
.
Partial Availability Conditions
Library Status
Cause
Solution
Drives
Drive not present
The library could not detect all the
expected drive modules.
Note: This typically occurs because
a drive was physically removed
from the library. This may also
occur for a brief time during an
online drive repair. This condition
will persist over a power cycle.
Drive offline
Drive taken offline because of the
following:
■
Chapter 4
Taken offline from front panel,
host computer, or library
controller.
If a drive is present in the library:
■
Power off the library.
■
Reseat the drive module.
■
Power on the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
■
Verify that the drive is online. If
not, put drive back online from the
front panel.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Drive(s) failed power-on test.
Verify cabling and termination.
■
■
■
Drive module board failed
power-on test.
Verify that the drive is seated
properly.
■
■
Failed serial communication to
drive.
■
Failed to load/unload tape.
Check the error log from the front
panel or RMC Web-Based Library
Administrator pages for possible
causes.
■
Contact your service
representative.
Understanding Error States 121
Chapter 4
Table 18
Table 18
Partial Availability Conditions
Library Status
Cause
Solution
Drive online
pending
Drive(s) are present and powered
up, but have outdated firmware.
■
Update drive firmware. (See
Upgrading Firmware on
page 176.)
Drive firmware
mismatch
Drives are present and powered up,
but have different revisions of
firmware.
■
Update drive firmware. (See
Upgrading Firmware on
page 176.)
Drive needs
cleaning
One or more drives need cleaning.
■
Clean the drive(s). (See Cleaning a
Drive on page 87.)
Drive critical error
A critical error has occurred on a
drive.
■
Check the Drive Event Log from the
front panel or RMC Web-Based
Library Administrator pages for
possible causes.
■
Contact your service
representative.
■
Verify that Fibre Channel is your
intended configuration.
■
Verify that cabling is set up
correctly.
■
Verify that there are no broken or
bent pins on the SCSI cables (for
standard performance Fibre
Channel controller only).
■
Tighten all SCSI cables and power
cycle the library.
■
If problem persists, replace the
SCSI cables.
■
Contact your service
representative.
Drive not on Fibre
Channel
Drive(s) are detected by library
controller, but are not detected by
any of the Fibre Channel
controllers.
122 Understanding Error States
Chapter 4
Table 18
Library Status
Partial Availability Conditions
Cause
Solution
Magazine/Mailslot
Library could not detect all the
magazines.
■
Ensure that all magazines are
present and correctly installed.
(See Figure 37 on page 82.)
Incompatible
magazine(s)
The magazine is incompatible with
the drive type.
■
Ensure that you use the correct
magazine for your drive type.
Mailslot open
Mailslot drawer is open. The library
robotics will not move until the
mailslot is closed.
■
Ensure that the mailslot drawer is
closed.
Library could not detect the remote
management card.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
Library could not detect the library
slave controller cards.
■
Verify that there is a slave card
present in all but the lowest level of
the library.
■
Verify that the cards are properly
seated.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
Cards
RMC not present
Slave card not
present
Note: Slave controller cards are
required in all but the lowest level of
the library.
Remote
management card
failed
Chapter 4
Remote management card failed
power-up test.
Understanding Error States 123
Chapter 4
Magazine(s)
missing
Table 18
Partial Availability Conditions
Library Status
Slave card failed
Cause
Library slave controller card failed
power-up test.
Note: Slave controller cards are
required in all but the lowest level of
the library.
Fibre Channel
controller failed
Fibre Channel controller failed
power-up test. (Usually due to
problems on the SCSI bus, such as
an LVDS drive or terminator on an
HVDS bus, etc.)
Solution
■
Verify that a slave card is present
in all but the lowest level of the
library.
■
Verify that the cards are properly
seated.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
■
Verify that proper SCSI
terminators and/or tape drives
are attached to the Fibre Channel
controller.
■
Verify that there are no bent pins
on the controller.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
Front Panel
Front panel not
present
Library could not detect the front
panel display.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
Front panel failed
Front panel display failed power-up
test.
■
Power cycle the library
■
Contact your service
representative.
Date and time not
set
The date and time is not set on the
front panel
■
Set the date and time. (See Setting
the Date and Time on page 108.)
Door open
One or more tape doors are open.
The library robotics will not move
until the door is closed.
■
Ensure that doors are closed.
Miscellaneous
124 Understanding Error States
Chapter 4
Table 18
Library Status
Power supply fault
Upgrade library
firmware
Cause
Library detected one or more
redundant power supplies in a
failed condition.
A library card cage fan has failed.
A library component has firmware
that is different from the rest of the
library.
Solution
■
Determine which power supply
has failed. (See Table 26 on page
139 for LED status information.)
■
Contact your service
representative to replace the
power supply.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service
representative.
■
Update library firmware. (See
Upgrading Firmware on
page 176.)
Note: This is a common problem
when replacing parts.
Chapter 4
Understanding Error States 125
Chapter 4
Library fan failure
Partial Availability Conditions
Hard (Unrecovered) Errors
When a hard error occurs, the front panel will display an error message that
indicates the problem, and the LED bar will be flashing amber. You cannot
operate the library until this error is resolved.
Note
This information can also be found in the latest entry of the hard
error log. For a list of error codes, see Library Error Codes on
page 209.
View the hard error log after the initial error has been cleared. You can do
this by accessing the following menu path from the front panel or press the
center icon button.
Main Menu -> Information -> Library Information -> Hard Error Log
Note
The date and time stamp will help you resolve errors by
establishing a timeline for the failures. Failures can also be
associated with events that may have occurred outside of the
library. When you review the error log, select [Older] to view
error history and [Newer] to see more recent errors.
Error information includes:
■
Time stamp or error event
■
Error code number(s)
■
Library component that potentially caused the problem
■
Error code description
■
Error code qualifier that provides more information on the type of error
■
Recovery suggestions
■
Sequence numbers, which are used for factory diagnostics
126 Understanding Error States
Chapter 4
Use the following steps to resolve the problem:
1. From the screen with the initial error message or from the Hard Error Log,
select [More] to retrieve more information about the error.
2. Record all information from this screen for later reference.
3. Select [More]. Record the list of recommendations on this and any
subsequent screens. To retrieve this information after you exit, view the
latest entry in the hard error log.
— Power cycle the library.
— Remove a tape from the library.
— Check the library or host configuration.
— Check the cable connections (data or power).
— Run front panel diagnostic tests.
— Reposition a tape or magazine.
Caution
Before upgrading firmware, be sure to generate a support ticket
using HP Library & Tape Tools (see page 154). The resulting
information may be helpful to your service representative in
resolving potential issues that may have prompted the firmware
upgrade.
— Upgrade firmware.
5. If the problem persists after implementing all of the recommendations
presented on the front panel display, contact your service representative.
(See page 195.)
Chapter 4
Understanding Error States 127
Chapter 4
4. Perform the recommendations in the order presented. Continue with each
successive recommendation until the problem is isolated. Here are some
examples of the types of recommendations:
Host Software and Media Errors
The library depends on several other components to operate correctly. Errors
that seem to be caused by the library often are a result of issues on the host,
the network, or with the backup software. When troubleshooting the library,
begin ruling out these components.
Use the following troubleshooting procedures to help determine if an error is
caused by the library hardware, host, or backup software.
Verify the
software is
supported and
correctly
configured.
Verify the library
hardware is
correctly
operating.
.
.
Ensure the LED
on front panel is
not flashing amber.
Flashing amber
indicates a hardware
error. Check the hard
and soft error logs.
Run a Wellness test
from the library
front panel.
.
.
Check the software
configuration. Ensure
the settings are correct
on the backup
software application.
Use a different backup
software application
(if available) and see
if a similar error
occurs.
Look for
connection
errors with the
host and
network.
. Ensure
the host can
identify the library and
drive.
. Check
all cable
connections. Ensure
the SCSI bus is
properly terminated.
. Ensure
the SCSI or
Fibre Channel host
bus adapter card
and drivers are
compatible and
correctly installed.
. If
applicable, ensure
that the host bus
adapter firmware is
up-to-date.
128 Understanding Error States
Chapter 4
Backup Software Errors
While the library product itself is supported by Hewlett-Packard, all software
products are supported by individual software vendors. (See Backup Software
Support on page 201.)
Your software applications may need to be reconfigured or, in some cases,
reinstalled after you have installed additional drives or slots into the library. In
addition, some backup software applications may require the purchase of
additional add-on components and/or licenses when increasing the number
of storage slots or drives.
Chapter 4
Understanding Error States 129
Chapter 4
Contact your software application provider for more information or if newly
installed storage slots and drives are not recognized by your backup software
application.
Interpreting Library LEDs
LEDs communicate status and errors as they are occurring. Use the library
LEDs to get an indication of how the library is functioning.
All library cards and drive modules contain LEDs. In general, a yellow LED
comes on during power up and changes to green when power up is
successful. This may take a few minutes on some library cards.
The LED bar underneath the front panel display indicates library activity.
Figure 46
Library LED Bar
Green
Library is ready and idle.
Flashing Green
Library or drive is active.
Amber
Library is partially available and idle (Partial
Availability State on page 120).
Flashing Amber
Library failed (Hard (Unrecovered) Errors on
page 126).
Note
130 Interpreting Library LEDs
Figure 47 on page 131 shows where components that contain
LEDs are located. These LEDs are described later in this chapter.
Chapter 4
Library Back Panel
Figure 47
1
6
5
DRV
DRV
9
10
DRV
DRV
7
8
DRV
DRV
5
6
DRV
DRV
3
4
DRV
DRV
1
2
7
10/100
4
1
1
7
8/80
Chapter 4
5
4
1
1
5
7
6/60
4
1
1
5
7
4/40
4
1
2
3
7
2/20
4
1
Vacant slot
5
Slave controller card
2
Remote management card
6
Library expansion card
3
Library controller card
7
Power supply (standard or redundant)
4
Fibre Channel interface (optional)
Chapter 4
Interpreting Library LEDs 131
Table 19
Slave Controller LED
Ready LED
Yellow
Default boot mode on power-up. Will
remain in this state until board
completes initialization.
Green
Slave controller board is ready.
3
Slave Controller Card
Description
Ready
Color
132 Interpreting Library LEDs
Chapter 4
Table 20
Remote Management Card LEDs
1) Ready LED
Description
Yellow
Powering up, failed power-on
test, or fatal error was detected
during operation.
Green
2
Ready
Color
1
Indicates valid network
connection.
3) Activity LED
Color
Description
Flashing
Green
Indicates transmission activity
by the card’s ethernet port.
2
10/100
Base T
LNK
Green
ACT
Description
RS-232
Color
Remote Management Card
2) Link LED
Chapter 4
Card passed power-on test.
Card ready.
3
Chapter 4
Interpreting Library LEDs 133
Table 21
HVDS Library Controller Card LEDs
1) Controller LED
Flashing Green
Controller needs firmware.
Yellow
In the process of powering up.
Flashing Yellow
Controller failed power-on test.
Green
Controller passed power-on test.
3
1
Description
Green
No bus connected or high-voltage differential
SCSI bus connected.
Yellow
Error; single-ended SCSI device connected.
134 Interpreting Library LEDs
Differential SCSI
Color
HVDS
2) SCSI LED
Library Controller Card
Description
Ready
Color
2
Chapter 4
Table 22
LVDS Library Controller Card LEDs
1) Controller LED
Flashing Green
Controller needs firmware.
Yellow
In the process of powering up.
Flashing Yellow
Controller failed power-on test.
Green
Controller passed power-on test.
3
Ready
Description
1
Chapter 4
Color
Green
No bus connected or low-voltage
differential SCSI bus connected.
Flashing Green
Single-ended SCSI bus attached. SCSI
performance reduced.
Yellow
Chapter 4
Controller Card
Description
Differential SCSI
Color
LVDS
2) SCSI LED
2
Error; high-voltage differential SCSI bus
connected.
Interpreting Library LEDs 135
Table 23
Library Expansion Card LED (8/80 and 10/100 Series Libraries Only)
Ready LED
Yellow
Powering up, hardware
error, or card located
on an unsupported level
of the library.
Green
Card is ready.
Flashing
Green
Indicates internal library
communication bus
activity.
2
Library Expansion Card
Description
Ready
Color
136 Interpreting Library LEDs
Chapter 4
Table 24
High-Performance Fibre Channel Interface (HVDS or LVDS)
1) Activity LED
Color
Description
4
ACT LNK RDY
Indicates transmission activity by the Fibre Channel interface.
Green
Indicates valid Fibre Channel connection.
Yellow
Fibre Channel interface is being reset.
Off
Fibre Channel is not connected.
3
4
BUS 2
3) Ready LED
BUS 1
Description
Color
Description
Yellow
Fibre Channel interface is being reset, failed power-on test, or a
fatal error was detected during operation.
Green
Fibre Channel interface passed power-on test. Interface is
ready.
Flashing
Green
One SCSI port is faulty.
5
4 & 5) SCSI Bus LEDs
Color
Description
Green
SCSI bus is operational.
Yellow
SCSI bus is not operational, or is partially available.
Flashing
Green
Indicates transmission activity by the SCSI bus.
Chapter 4
Interpreting Library LEDs 137
Chapter 4
Color
2
Fibre Channel Card
2) Link LED
FIBRE
1
Differential SCSI
HVDS
Flashing
Green
Table 25
1) Yellow
Drive Module LEDs
2) Green
Description
Off
On
Drive is online and available.
Flashing
Off
Drive is offline and may be
replaced without powering off
the library.
On
Flashing
Drive is being brought online.
Flashing
On
Drive is offline. Internal
communication has been lost.
On
On
Drive module controller is in
reset.
On
Off
Power-on test in progress.
Flashing
Off
Drive module failed power-on
test.
1
2
Attention
Drive Power
Note
138 Interpreting Library LEDs
Depending on your library’s drive type(s), the back of the drive
module might look different from the illustration above.
Chapter 4
Table 26
Redundant Power Supply LEDs
1) DC Output LED
Description
Green
DC output is within the
specified limit.
Off
DC output is outside of
specified limit.
1
AC DC
OK OK
Color
2
Description
Green
AC input is within the
specified limit.
Off
AC input is outside of
specified limit.
Note
Chapter 4
1
AC DC
OK OK
Color
2
The redundant power supply comes standard with the 8/80
and 10/100 series libraries, but is an option for 2/20, 4/40,
and 6/60 series libraries. If you do not have this option, your
power supply will not have LEDs.
Interpreting Library LEDs 139
Chapter 4
2) AC Input LED
Troubleshooting Common Problems
This section includes information on troubleshooting common library
problems. For problems that may be related to the host or application
software, refer to the host system documentation, the application software
instructions, and Host Software and Media Errors on page 128. If these
procedures fail, contact your service representative for further assistance.
Consult the system administrator before cycling power. Never
cycle power when active devices are connected to the SCSI bus
or Fibre Channel bus. Cycling power when the SCSI bus or
Fibre Channel bus is active can cause data loss or hang the host
system.
Caution
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Solution
Power
Library will not power on.
Power-on test failed. An error
message appears in the front
panel display.
■
Check all power cord connections.
■
Make sure the power (standby) switch is on.
■
Make sure there is power to the outlet by trying another
working outlet.
■
Verify that the LEDs on the back of the library are on and that
the fans are turning to ensure the library is receiving power
(Table 26 on page 139).
■
If you have a multi-level library, swap power supplies with the
one on the lowest level.
■
Replace the power cord(s).
■
Contact your service representative.
■
Follow the recovery procedures from the library front panel.
■
Note the error code and error code qualifier.
■
Contact your service representative.
140 Troubleshooting Common Problems
Chapter 4
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Solution
■
Check the LEDs on the power supplies to identify the one that
may be at fault (Table 26 on page 139) and contact your
service representative.
The library’s power failed
while a tape was in the drive
and did not return to the
ready state after the power
came on.
■
Verify that the LEDs on the back of the library are on and the
fans are turning (Interpreting Library LEDs on page 130).
■
Power cycle the library
■
Contact your service representative.
No display messages appear.
■
Make sure the power cord is connected.
■
Make sure the power switch is on.
■
Check that the LEDs on the back of the library are on and the
fans are turning (Interpreting Library LEDs on page 130).
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Try to access the library from the web or through a host-based
diagnostic tool (Using the Remote Management Card on
page 96).
■
Download library firmware (Upgrading Firmware on
page 176).
■
Contact your service representative.
■
Verify that tapes are inserted correctly in the magazine.
(Accessing Tapes in the Library on page 81).
■
Verify that the correct tape type is used. (See Media
Compatibility on page 187.)
Tape Movement
An error message appears
after inserting the magazine
or loading tapes.
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting Common Problems 141
Chapter 4
One of the redundant power
supplies is not functioning
properly.
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Tape stuck in drive.
Solution
■
Power cycle the library and retry unloading the tape from the
library front panel, the remote management card Web-Based
Library Administrator pages, or the host backup software.
■
Ensure the backup host software is not reserving the slot. The
backup software needs to cancel the reservation. If necessary,
disconnect from the host, and power cycle.
■
For DLT tapes, see Removing a Stuck DLT Tape on page 152.
■
For Ultrium tapes, contact your service representative.
■
Run the Recalibrate Library test (See Running Library Diagnostic
Tests on page 156).
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Contact your service representative.
■
Using the front panel display, open the appropriate drawer.
Slide the drawer outward and remove the magazine.
■
Pull the tape out.
■
Reinsert the magazine.
■
If the magazine is damaged, contact your service
representative.
■
Run the Recalibrate Library test (See Running Library Diagnostic
Tests on page 156).
■
Ensure that you are using the correct tape type. (See Media
Compatibility on page 187.)
■
Contact your service representative.
Cleaning or data cartridge
incompatible with drive.
■
Ensure you are using cleaning and data cartridges that are
compatible with the drive(s). (See Media Compatibility on
page 187.)
Cannot load tape into drive.
■
Ensure your media and format type matches your drive type.
(See Media Compatibility on page 187.)
Tape stuck in transport.
Tape stuck in storage slot.
Transport is misaligned.
Transport won’t get a tape.
Tape/drive/transport is
misaligned.
Media
142 Troubleshooting Common Problems
Chapter 4
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Solution
DLT tape has circular wear
patterns around the hub.
■
The DLT drive hub may not be engaging the tape hub properly.
Discard the tape and contact your support representative.
Error message appears:
“Drive rejected load of tape”
(error code 101, qualifier 65
H).
■
Retry the operation. If you continue to get this error, replace the
tape cartridge. If data recovery is needed, contact your support
representative.
Chapter 4
LTO-Cartridge Memory (LTO-CM)
A new data cartridge that is
write-enabled is rejected by
the drive.
■
LTO-CM has failed or is damaged. Replace the data cartridge.
A new data cartridge that is
write-protected is rejected in
multiple known good drives.
■
LTO-CM has failed and the drive has found no data to recover.
Replace the data cartridge.
A cartridge that has data
written to it and is writeenabled is rejected by the
drive.
■
LTO-CM has failed or is damaged. The data can still be
recovered. Contact your support representative for more
information.
■
After data recovery, replace the cartridge.
A cartridge that has data
written to it and is writeprotected restores very slowly.
■
LTO-CM has failed and the drive cannot use the tape directory
information to recover the data. The data can still be
recovered, but may take longer than normal. Contact your
support representative for more information.
■
Specific revisions of firmware may be required for proper
operation. See Upgrading Firmware on page 176.
■
Contact your service representative.
Cleaning
The Universal Cleaning
Cartridge does not operate
properly.
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting Common Problems 143
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
A new data cartridge is used
and the clean drive icon is
displayed.
Recurring cleaning message.
Solution
■
Ensure you are using an approved cleaning cartridge for your
drive type. (See Media Compatibility on page 187.)
■
Clean the outside of the data cartridge using a damp cloth.
■
Clean the drive using the drive cleaning procedure. Cleaning a
Drive on page 87.
■
If the icon is displayed again within a short amount of time,
replace the data cartridge.
■
Ensure you are using an approved cleaning cartridge for your
drive type. (Media Compatibility on page 187.)
■
Replace the existing cleaning cartridge with a new one.
■
If the message reappears when a particular data cartridge is
used, verify that the data cartridge is readable by:
— Clearing the error message.
— Reading the tape again.
Cannot load the cleaning
cartridge.
■
If the data cartridge can be read, backup data from the
damaged cartridge to another cartridge, and discard the
damaged one.
■
Ensure you are using an approved cleaning cartridge for your
drive type. (See Media Compatibility on page 187.)
■
Check the drive media log using the RMC Web-Based Library
Administrator.
■
Contact your service representative.
■
Avoid by ensuring the drive is operated in a clean,
contamination-free environment. Cartridges should be stored
vertically in their plastic cases.
Cleaning lights
Cause: Contamination by
loose debris.
144 Troubleshooting Common Problems
Chapter 4
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Solution
■
One or two passes with a cleaning tape should resolve
cleaning lights caused by normal head staining. If a cleaning
tape is unsuccessful in resolving a cleaning light after 3 or
more attempts, the cleaning tape may be contaminated, and
should NOT be used in another drive.
Cause: Temperature and
humidity
■
Tapes should be stored and used in the middle of the
temperature and humidity specifications range of 64-79 F, and
40-60 RH.
Cause: Non-acclimated media
■
A tape should be acclimated for a minimum of 24 hours before
being used, particularly if it has been stored at a substantially
different temperature or level of humidity than the tape library.
Cause: Wrong cleaning
cartridge
■
Only use the cleaning cartridge specifically designated for
each drive type.
Cause: Wrong tape format
■
Attempting to load, read, or write tapes that were written in
other formats can cause cleaning lights.
Cause: Abnormal build up of
head debris (Frequent load/
unload operations with
minimal tape reading or
writing can cause this
condition.)
■
Do not perform frequent load/unloads without also doing tape
operations. The front panel load/unload test should NOT be
run for more than 100 cycles since it does not perform actual
tape operations.
Cause: Bad/defective/
contaminated media
■
If a cleaning light is cleared using a cleaning tape, and then
immediately reappears when a particular cartridge is
reloaded, that cartridge should be suspected as being
contaminated.
■
If this occurs, re-clean the drive, loading a known good tape.
In rare cases, a tape cartridge can be worn out, have bad
calibration tracks, or have a bad tape directory recorded by
another drive.
■
Any cartridge that is suspected of being defective or
contaminated should NOT be reused in any drive.
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting Common Problems 145
Chapter 4
Cause: Contamination by
head staining.
(Resulting from adhesion of
chemicals that are present in
the tape media to the head
surface)
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Solution
Cause: Expired cleaning
cartridge
■
A cleaning cartridge is good for 20 uses. After that, the drive
will still load the cartridge, but it will not perform any cleaning,
and the cleaning light will stay on. If cleaning is performed
from the front panel of the library, the library will provide a
front panel message if the cleaning cartridge has expired.
Cause: Cleaning requested/
required and overuse of
cleaning cartridges
■
Use of a cleaning cartridge should only be done when the
drive front panel states “cleaning required.”
Cause: Old firmware revisions
■
If a cleaning tape does not resolve a cleaning light issue, make
sure the latest drive firmware is being used.
■
Check that all SCSI devices on the same bus have different ID
numbers.
■
Reboot the host.
■
If the drive SCSI ID remains at 5, regardless of what is selected,
then the drive is not communicating with the library. Contact
your service representative.
Connections
Changed drive SCSI ID, but
the new ID is not recognized
by the host computer.
146 Troubleshooting Common Problems
Chapter 4
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Host does not detect the
library.
Solution
Ensure that the HBA type matches the library type (HVDS,
LVDS, or single-ended SCSI) and is properly installed and
configured.
■
Check that the library is terminated and properly cabled.
■
Ensure that the terminator is compatible with the library
(HVDS, LVDS, or single-ended SCSI).
■
Check that the library is recognized on the operating system.
■
Check that the backup software is compatible with the library.
■
Check that the device is properly installed and configured
using HP Library & Tape Tools available from http://
www.hp.com/support/TapeTools.
■
Power cycle the library and power down the host. Wait until
the library completes its power cycle before powering up the
host.
■
Check for SCSI ID conflicts (Setting SCSI IDs on page 106).
■
If using Fibre Channel, make sure you power on the devices in
the correct order (switch, hub, library, host).
■
Contact your service representative.
■
Do not use the [Back] or [Forward] buttons on the browser to
navigate. Instead, use the tabs and buttons on the actual
interface page.
Network Monitoring
Cannot navigate through the
RMC Web-Based Library
Administrator interface.
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting Common Problems 147
Chapter 4
■
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
The RMC Web-Based Library
Administrator interface is slow
in updating the web pages or
does not display clearly.
Solution
■
Check your computer’s display settings. For best results, make
sure the display resolution is set to 800 x 600 and the color
palette is set to 65535 colors or higher.
■
To speed up the display of pages, be sure to bypass proxies for
local access by listing the domains to exclude in the
Connections/Advanced page of the browser options.
■
Check your browser’s caching options to ensure the browser is
looking for newer versions of the stored pages. (Configuring
the Remote Management Card on page 99.)
■
Check the SCSI IDs of all devices on the host buses to ensure
there are no conflicts.
■
Check that the backup software does not require SCSI IDs to be
in a certain order.
■
Contact your service representative.
Library Performance
HP-UX host responds slowly or
crashes after connecting to the
library.
148 Troubleshooting Common Problems
Chapter 4
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
The library is not efficiently
backing up data.
Solution
Check the network bandwidth from the host computer.
■
Check that the library’s drive(s) are on their own SCSI bus and
not daisy-chained to another tape drive or the hard drive.
■
Check that the server and file system have the processing
power and memory needed to stream the tape drive.
■
Ensure that the drive is clean. (See Cleaning a Drive on
page 87.)
■
Try a new tape. A marginal tape can cause performance
problems due to bad spots on the tape requiring retries.
■
Ensure that the backup software is using fixed-length records
(or blocks) to maximize throughput and has not defaulted to a
smaller record size. (64K should be sufficient.)
■
Ensure that the data is being compressed, however do not turn
on both software and hardware compression.
■
Check the size of the files. Backing up several small files can
impact performance.
Cannot remember the
administration menu
password.
■
Contact your service representative.
Need to abort internal test
cycle.
■
Press [STOP]. The current test loop completes, then the test stops.
It may take a few minutes to stop the current test loop.
Operations
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting Common Problems 149
Chapter 4
■
Table 27
Troubleshooting Table
Problem
Cannot write to the tape.
Solution
■
Check the write-protect tab on the tape to assure write-enabled
status.
■
Ensure that the backup software does not have the write-protect
setting activated.
■
Check the host device file system access permissions.
■
Verify that you are using the correct tape type. (See Media
Compatibility on page 187.)
■
Check the Drive Event Log (See Drive Information on page 112).
■
Try a new tape.
Caution: During the troubleshooting process, do not put the tape in
question into another drive since damaged tapes can damage
drives.
Front Panel Display
Front panel display does not
work.
The soft keys on the front
panel display do not work.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Attempt to access the library through the remote management
card (See Using the Remote Management Card on page 96).
■
Attempt to access the library from the host computer (either
SCSI or Fibre Channel, depending on how the library is
configured).
■
Contact your service representative.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Attempt to access the library through the remote management
card (See Using the Remote Management Card on page 96).
■
Attempt to access the library from the host computer (either
SCSI or Fibre Channel, depending on how the library is
configured).
■
Contact your service representative.
150 Troubleshooting Common Problems
Chapter 4
Manually Rewinding a Stuck DLT Tape
Note
The following procedure is for DLT tape drives only. For tapes
stuck in an Ultrium tape drive, contact your support
representative.
Before manually rewinding a stuck DLT tape:
Attempt to eject the tape using the tape library front panel, remote
management card Web-Based Library Administrator pages, and your
host backup software.
■
You must first remove the DLT drive module from the tape library. Refer to
Removing a Drive Module on page 163.
After removing the DLT drive module, view the drive hub through the clear
plastic to determine if the tape has been rewound. If the tape has not been
rewound, follow the steps below and refer to Figure 48 on page 152:
Caution
The DLT drive does not automatically eject a cartridge if a
power failure occurs.
1. Place the DLT drive module on its top side so that the bottom of the drive
module is facing up.
2. Insert a Phillips #2 screwdriver in the rewind hole on the bottom of the
drive module and engage the screw.
Note
Gently move the ribbon cable to one side of the rewind hole if
necessary.
3. Turn the screwdriver counter-clockwise to rewind the tape. Continue
rewinding until the leader is seated in the tape cartridge.
Caution
Chapter 4
Do not use a power screwdriver as damage may result to the
tape.
Troubleshooting Common Problems 151
Chapter 4
■
Figure 48
Rewinding a Tape in the DLT Drive Module
Removing a Stuck DLT Tape
Use the following procedure and Figure 49 to remove a tape stuck in a DLT
drive module:
1. Ensure that the tape has been rewound. See Manually Rewinding a Stuck
DLT Tape on page 151.
2. Locate the spring-loaded latch near the opening on the drive module, and
push it outward (item 1 in Figure 49). Ensure that you move both parts of
the latch.
3. While holding the latch outward, rotate the thumb-wheel (drive gear) until
the tape ejects (item 2 in Figure 49).
Note
152 Troubleshooting Common Problems
If turning the thumb-wheel does not eject the tape, or if you
encounter high resistance in turning the thumb-wheel, check to
ensure that the spring-loaded latch has been rotated outward.
Chapter 4
4. Verify the tape is not damaged (see Inspecting DLT Cartridges on
page 74).
Figure 49
Spring-Loaded Latch and Thumb-Wheel
Chapter 4
1
Chapter 4
2
Troubleshooting Common Problems 153
Diagnostic Support Tools
The following tools are available for the library:
■
HP Library & Tape Tools on page 154
■
Support Tools Manager and Sysdiag on page 155
■
Running Library Diagnostic Tests on page 156
HP Library & Tape Tools
With HP Library & Tape Tools installed on your host computer, you can do the
following:
■
Identify all SCSI and Fibre Channel devices connected to your system
■
View detailed configuration, identification, inventory, and drive
information for the library
■
Easily update library and drive firmware (Upgrading Firmware on
page 176)
■
Run advanced diagnostic tests, including connectivity, read/write, media
validation, and testing library functionality
■
View library and drive error logs
■
Generate a detailed support file that can be emailed or faxed to your
support representative for analysis
The HP Library & Tape Tools diagnostic provides an intuitive graphical user
interface with integrated context-sensitive help (see Figure 50 on page 155). It
can be downloaded free of charge from http://www.hp.com/support/
TapeTools.
154 Diagnostic Support Tools
Chapter 4
Figure 50
HP Library & Tape Tools Interface (example)
Chapter 4
Support Tools Manager and Sysdiag
For more information on these diagnostic tools, see the online Configuration
and Diagnostic Guide at http://www.hp.com/go/support. Search for the
library model and then select [Manuals].
Note
Chapter 4
This tool is for use with HP-UX and MPE/iX operating systems.
Diagnostic Support Tools 155
Running Library Diagnostic Tests
Main Menu -> Administration -> Run Test
Use the following procedure to run internal tests of library functions. Table 28
on page 156 describes these tests.
1. From Administration, select [More] to display additional administrative
options. Select [Run Test].
2. From Run Test, use the [-] or [+] key to view available tests.
3. Select [OK] to select the test.
4. Select the number of times this test will run.
5. Select [Run] to start the test cycle. The test results will display at the
conclusion of the test cycle.
Select [Stop] to abort a test. The current test cycle completes
before the test stops. Stopping the test may take a few minutes.
Note
Table 28
Front Panel Diagnostic Tests
Test
Description
Check Inventory
Physically scans the entire library to determine
which slots and drives contain tapes and reads all
bar code labels.
Recalibrate Library
Performs the power-up self-tests. Each test runs one
time per test loop. This test recalibrates the
mechanics and clears hard errors, but not the hard
error log.
Test Lateral Motion
Moves the transport assembly to a random slot. No
tape is required.
Test Magazine
Moves
Moves a tape from a random slot to an empty,
random slot, and then returns it to the original
location.
156 Diagnostic Support Tools
Chapter 4
Table 28
Front Panel Diagnostic Tests
Test
Description
Wellness Test
Moves a tape from a random slot to an empty
drive, repeats the process until all drives are full,
and then returns all tapes to their original slots.
Rewind Media
Caution: Do not run this test if the drive contains a
tape that is receiving data from the host.
Rewinds the tape in the drive.
Locks the transport assembly in place to allow for
shipping the library. Power down the library after
running this test. Motion commands may fail if
issued after the transport assembly is locked.
Note: The transport assembly automatically
unlocks when library is powered on.
Unlock Transport
Unlocks the transport assembly without power
cycling the library. The transport must have already
been locked to use this test.
Note: The transport assembly automatically
unlocks when library is powered on.
Chapter 4
Test Transport
Comm
Exercises the infrared communications path
between the library controller and the transport
controller. Reports the health of this link. If the test
passes, the infrared communication link is good.
Show All Sensors
Dynamically displays the state of sensors. To toggle
drawer sensors, open and close the drawers. To
toggle the mailslot sensor, open the mailslot to
access the first two tapes.
Diagnostic Support Tools 157
Chapter 4
Lock Transport
Table 28
Front Panel Diagnostic Tests
Test
Demonstration
Description
Caution: Run an inventory check from the host
backup application after performing this test to
ensure that tapes are returned to their original
locations
Selects a random full storage slot, moves the tape
to the drive, and repeats the process until all drives
are full. The test locates a full slot, a full drive, an
empty slot, and then performs an exchange.
158 Diagnostic Support Tools
Chapter 4
5
Replacing Parts and
Upgrading Firmware
Chapter Overview
This chapter includes information on the following:
■
Removing and Replacing Cards on page 160
■
Removing and Replacing Drive Modules on page 162
■
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply on page 169
■
Removing the Library Cover and Feet (2/20 & 4/40 Series Only) on
page 172
■
Removing and Replacing a Cosmetic Door on page 174
■
Upgrading Firmware on page 176
Chapter Overview 159
Removing and Replacing Cards
Caution
This library contains very sensitive electrical components. It is
important to follow the proper procedures to prevent electrostatic
discharge (ESD). Use wrist-grounding straps and anti-static mats
when removing and replacing cards and major assemblies.
Failure to follow proper procedures could lead to intermittent
failures or premature hard failures.
Caution
The Fibre Channel printed circuit boards may contain a laser
system (GBIC or GLM module) that is classified as a “Class-I
Laser Product” under a U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services (DHHS) Radiation Performance standard according to
the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968 and
EN60825-1(+A11) safety of laser products. The compliance
statement is located on the module.
Before powering the library off to remove a card, review the LEDs on the back
of each card to ensure there is no activity (see Interpreting Library LEDs on
page 130).
Removing a Card
1. Note the library configuration settings (if you will be downloading new
firmware), and power off the library.
2. Note how the library is connected and the placement of the card, and
then remove all external cables attached to the card.
3. Loosen the two thumbscrews on the card by hand or with a screwdriver.
4. Remove the card by gently pulling it outward.
160 Removing and Replacing Cards
Chapter 5
Replacing a Card
1. Align the edges of the replacement card with the card slot.
2. Gently push on the lower third of the replacement card, inserting it into the
library until the card is flush with the library. This will help ensure that the
backplane pins are optimally aligned.
3. Tighten the thumbscrews with a flat-blade screwdriver.
4. Reconnect external cables.
5. Power on the library.
6. Download new firmware (see Upgrading Firmware on page 176).
7.
If installing Fibre Channel cards for the first time, configure the library
from the front panel. See Configuring the Library for Fibre Channel on
page 102.
Chapter 5
Chapter 5
Removing and Replacing Cards 161
Removing and Replacing Drive Modules
This section explains how to replace a drive module in the following situations:
■
The library is powered off.
■
The library is powered on. If the library needs to remain powered on
when you are placing the drive, you need to check that the backup
software supports this.
Unloading a Tape from a Drive
Before replacing a drive, unload any tape from the drive (if applicable).
1. From the Drive and Tape Operations menu, select Unload Tape from Drive.
2. Use the [-] or [+] keys to select the drive you want to unload.
3. Select [Unload] to move the tape from the drive module to the original slot
where the tape was located. The tape is automatically rewound before it is
unloaded.
Taking a Drive Offline (for on-line drive replacement only)
Although a drive module can be removed without powering off the library, you
must first take the drive module offline. This process may be accomplished by
using the library’s front panel and following these steps:
1. Check the drive icons on the front panel display to see if the drive has
already been taken offline. Verify the drive module’s status by checking
the LEDs on the back of the drive module (Table 25 on page 138).
2. If the drive module is not already offline, go to the Administration and then
Online Drive Repair menus.
3. Select the drive with the [-] or [+] keys, and press [OK].
4. Select [Put Drive Offline]. The front panel indicates the success or failure of
this operation. When the drive module has been successfully taken offline,
one of the LEDs on the back of the drive will be flashing yellow.
162 Removing and Replacing Drive Modules
Chapter 5
Removing a Drive Module
Note
To preserve SCSI communications, do not loosen or remove the
SCSI cable(s) connected to the outside of the drive module. The
connection to be removed is located inside the drive module.
Remove the drive module using the steps below:
1. Verify the external SCSI cable is tightened to the connector plate.
2. Loosen the thumbscrews on each side of the connector plate, located in the
middle of the drive module (Figure 51 on page 163). If this is your first
time loosening the thumbscrews, use a screwdriver.
3. Gently remove the connector plate, with SCSI cable(s) still connected.
Use standard precautions for electro-static discharge (ESD)
protection.
4. Grasp the ribbon cable that is plugged into the drive module. Remove the
cable by pulling the connector to the left. See Figure 51 on page 163 for
the location of the ribbon cable and connector.
Figure 51
Chapter 5
Ribbon Cable and Connector
Removing and Replacing Drive Modules 163
Chapter 5
Caution
5. Lay the connector assembly to the side, allowing the external cables to
hang from the connection(s). Do not disconnect external cables from the
connector plate.
6. Loosen the top and bottom thumbscrews on the drive module (Figure 52
on page 164).
7.
Figure 52
Using the handle that is mounted on the back of the drive module, pull the
drive module straight out with one hand while supporting the bottom of
the drive module with the other hand.
Caution
As the drive module is pulled out, support the bottom of the drive
module to avoid dropping or damaging it.
WARNING
To avoid injury, do not insert your hand or foreign objects
through the empty drive bay and into the vertical lift assembly
area.
Removing a Drive
164 Removing and Replacing Drive Modules
Chapter 5
Installing a Drive Module
WARNING
It is not necessary to power off the library when inserting a
replacement drive module. However, to avoid injury, do not
insert your hand or foreign objects through the empty drive bay
and into the vertical lift assembly area.
1. Hold the drive module with one hand on the drive module handle while
the other hand supports the bottom (Figure 53 on page 165).
2. Install the drive by inserting the rail at the top of the drive module into the
slot at the top of the drive module opening.
Figure 53
Chapter 5
Higher force will be required in the last half-inch of insertion to
engage the electrical connection.
Installing a Drive Module
Removing and Replacing Drive Modules 165
Chapter 5
Note
3. Tighten the top and bottom thumbscrews, securing the drive module into
the library.
4. Plug the ribbon connector into the back of the drive module (Figure 51 on
page 163).
5. Gently fold the ribbon cable (attached to the plate and SCSI cable), into
the back of the drive module.
6. Holding the connector plate in place, tighten the thumbscrews on each
side of the connector.
7.
Bring the new drive module online if necessary using the front panel
display.
a. Enter the Administration then the Online Drive Repair menus.
b. Select the drive module that has been replaced. Bring the drive back
online.
The library will automatically run a self-test when the drive has been
brought online. When the drive is successfully brought online, the new
drive will adopt the SCSI ID of the current drive position.
Note
If you have increased the number of drives since the last power
cycle, you must power cycle the library for the library to
recognize the additional drives.
Note
You may get a drive firmware mismatch error if you have
multiple drives with different firmware revisions. To correct this
error, update firmware as necessary until all drives of the same
type (such as LTO) have the same firmware revision. See
Upgrading Firmware on page 176.
8. Update the drive firmware if needed. (See Upgrading Firmware on
page 176.)
Note
You may need to use the host backup software to recognize the
new drive when bringing it online. If the software or operating
system does not have the capability to automatically detect the
new drive, you may need to reboot the host.
166 Removing and Replacing Drive Modules
Chapter 5
Removing and Replacing the Power Supply
A failing power supply on a 2/20 series library disables the library. A failing
power supply on upper library levels results in a partial availability state.
Note
Power cycling the library at this point will result in a hard error. If
you want to continue using the library in its partially available
state, do not power cycle.
When the library is in a partial availability state, it is still functional, but is not
in optimum configuration. When this occurs, the front panel will display Partly
Available, and the illuminated LED beneath the front panel display will be solid
amber until the condition is resolved (see Table 26 on page 139).
Chapter 5
Removing the Power Supply
1. Power off the library.
2. Disconnect the power cord from the back of the power supply.
3. Loosen the thumbscrews at the top and bottom of the power supply. If the
thumbscrews are too tight to loosen by hand, loosen them with a
screwdriver.
4. Remove the stop bracket (if applicable). See Figure 56 on page 171.
5. Remove the power supply with one hand by pulling outward (see Figure
56 on page 171). Support the bottom of the power supply to avoid
dropping the module.
Chapter 5
Removing and Replacing the Power Supply 167
Figure 54
Removing the Stop Bracket for 2/20 Series Library
Replacing the Power Supply
1. Grasp the power supply handle with one hand while supporting the
bottom with your other hand. Align the power supply with the guide notch
at the top of the power supply bay.
2. Fully insert the power supply into the library.
3. Replace the stop bracket (if applicable).
4. Tighten the two thumbscrews with a flat-blade screwdriver.
5. Connect the power cord to the power supply.
168 Removing and Replacing the Power Supply
Chapter 5
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply
To replace individual power supply units:
1. Push the tab on the power supply unit to the left.
2. Remove the supply using the handle on the back of the unit and pulling
outward. Support the bottom of the power supply to avoid dropping or
damaging it.
WARNING
Avoid touching the top surface of the power supply unit since it
may be hot.
Figure 55
Chapter 5
Replacing Individual Power Supply Units
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply 169
Chapter 5
3. Install the new power supply by sliding the replacement unit into the
vacant slot until it “clicks” into place.
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply Module
Caution
When replacing the entire power supply module, note that the
library does not have redundant power backup until the new
module is installed. See page 170 for the procedure for
replacing individual power supply units.
1. Disconnect the power cords from the library. Contact the system
administrator to ensure there is no activity on the SCSI bus.
2. Remove the power supply module by loosening the two 6-32 x .25 T-15
screws and pulling the module straight out.
3. Install the replacement power supply module by aligning the bottom of the
module with the bottom of the power supply bay.
4. Fully insert the power supply module into the back of the library.
5. Tighten the two screws.
6. The replacement supply comes with the entire redundant power supply
module and one individual unit. If you need to install an additional unit,
install one of the units from the original power supply.
7.
Reconnect the power cord to the power supply.
170 Replacing the Redundant Power Supply
Chapter 5
Figure 56
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply Module
Chapter 5
Power Supply Module
Power Supply Unit
Chapter 5
Caution
Do not move the covered power switch located at the bottom of
the module. By default, power is always kept on to ensure
redundant backup.
Note
The redundant power supply module FRU comes with the entire
module and one power supply unit. If you need an individual
unit and not the entire module, then use the one that comes with
the replacement module and discard the rest of the housing.
Replacing the Redundant Power Supply 171
Removing the Library Cover and Feet (2/20 & 4/40 Series
Only)
To install a stand-alone library in a rack, remove the cover and feet by
following these steps:
1. Remove the following six screws (Figure 57):
a. Four screws, one located at each of the four feet
b. Two screws near the bottom of the library and in the back
2. Lift the cover off the library.
Note
Figure 57
The cover may fit tightly. If you cannot remove it easily, ease the
sides out while lifting up on the cover.
Removing the Cover
172 Removing the Library Cover and Feet (2/20 & 4/40 Series Only)
Chapter 5
3. Remove the feet as follows:
a. Remove the 10-24 torx T20 machine screws from the side of each foot
assembly.
b. Slide the feet off the library.
Figure 58
Removing the Feet
Chapter 5
Chapter 5
Removing the Library Cover and Feet (2/20 & 4/40 Series Only) 173
Removing and Replacing a Cosmetic Door
Removing a Cosmetic Door Face
1. Pull the front door outward. Use the front panel display and/or key to
unlock the door.
2. Remove the front magazine by lifting the handle on the top of the
magazine and pulling upward.
3. Twist the release tab on the back of the cosmetic door and simultaneously
pull upward on the sheet-metal tab to release (see Figure 59 on page
175).
Caution
To avoid breaking the tab, do not use excessive force.
Replacing a Cosmetic Door
1. Insert the cosmetic door’s connecting hooks through the holes in the front
of the door.
2. Holding the cosmetic door in place, align the holes in the sheet-metal with
the holes in the door front.
3. Push the sheet-metal tab downward so that the sheet-metal plate clicks into
place beneath the plastic tab.
4. Replace the magazine, and close the door.
174 Removing and Replacing a Cosmetic Door
Chapter 5
Figure 59
Removing the Front Door Face
2
3
Chapter 5
1
Release tab
2
Sheet-metal tab
3
Cosmetic door connecting hooks
Removing and Replacing a Cosmetic Door 175
Chapter 5
1
Upgrading Firmware
Caution
Before upgrading firmware, be sure to generate a support ticket
using HP Library & Tape Tools (see page 154). The resulting
information may be helpful to your service representative in
resolving potential issues that may have prompted the firmware
upgrade.
This section details the processes for upgrading library and drive firmware.
Some of the processes used for upgrading library firmware are different from
those used to upgrade drive firmware.
Firmware can be downloaded by:
■
Using HP Library & Tape Tools (library and drive firmware)
■
Using the remote management card (library and LTO drive firmware)
■
Using a firmware upgrade tape (drive firmware only)
Note
After upgrading firmware, library configuration settings will
revert back to the factory defaults, which could affect remote
management. For a complete list of factory defaults, see Table
12 on page 91.
Checking the Firmware Revision
Before downloading new firmware, check your current firmware revisions, and
compare them to the latest available revisions at http://www.hp.com/go/
support.
Note
If the library is in a partial availability state due to a firmware
mismatch, new firmware must be downloaded to resolve the
condition. (See Partial Availability State on page 120.)
1. Use the following menu from the front panel:
Main Menu -> Information -> Firmware Revisions
176 Upgrading Firmware
Chapter 5
2. From the Firmware Revisions menu, use [More] to view the drive firmware
revisions.
You can also check your current firmware revisions from the remote
management card:
1. Enter the designated IP address into the web browser to launch the WebBased Library Administrator pages. (See Using the Remote Management
Card on page 96.)
2. Select the [Report] tab.
3. Scroll down to the Firmware Revisions section of the page to view your
library and drive firmware revisions.
Note
Ensure that your backup software does not “SCSI reserve” the
library, as this can prevent a firmware download.
You can download library and drive firmware using the HP Library & Tape
Tools diagnostic utility. This utility may already be installed on your host. If not,
you can download it from http://www.hp.com/support/TapeTools.
Online help and instructions are included with HP Library & Tape Tools. The
firmware download procedure involves these simple steps:
1. Run the HP Library & Tape Tools utility.
2. Generate a support ticket for the library.
3. If prompted to download new firmware from the website, select [Yes],
otherwise, select [Get Firmware from Web] under the File menu.
4. Click on the firmware revisions for the library and drive that you would like
to download firmware to, and then click the [Download] button. The
firmware file(s) will be copied into the firmware folder of the HP Library &
Tape Tools utility.
5. Close the firmware window.
6. Select the library in the [By Product] device list tab, and then select the
[Firmware] button. The latest revisions available for the library and drive
will automatically be selected.
7.
Chapter 5
Select Start Update to update the firmware for the library and/or drive.
Upgrading Firmware 177
Chapter 5
Using HP Library & Tape Tools (library and drive firmware)
Note
The firmware download may take several minutes to complete.
Using the Remote Management Card (library and LTO drive firmware)
All library components, except drives, can be easily downloaded from the
remote management card.
Note
The firmware file is available from HP Support at http://
www.hp.com/go/support. These files must be loaded onto the
local host computer before downloading firmware. First select
your product, and then make a selection from the Downloads &
Drivers pull-down menu.
1. Once the library is configured for network access, enter the IP address
within your web browser to launch the Web-Based Library Administrator
pages. (See Using the Remote Management Card on page 96.)
Note
The library administrator password is required for this process
and is not set by default. If the password is not set, you will not
be permitted to download firmware.
2. Select the [Configuration] tab from the main screen.
3. Select the [Firmware Download] button.
4. Enter the full pathname for the download file, or use the [Browse] button
to locate the file.
5. Select the [Start Firmware Download] button to begin the actual process
of downloading the library firmware.
Once the download process begins, the progress and status of the
download will display on the lower half of your screen.
Note
178 Upgrading Firmware
The firmware download may take several minutes to complete.
Chapter 5
Using a Firmware Upgrade Tape (drive firmware only)
1. Contact your service representative to get the drive upgrade tape.
2. Ensure that the drive is empty. The drive icon(s) on the Home screen
indicates the presence of a tape in the drive. If a tape is in the drive, use
the front panel to return the tape to a storage slot. See Unloading a Tape
from the Drive on page 87.
3. Place the firmware upgrade tape in an available storage slot in the library,
and note the slot number.
4. Use the following menu to perform the firmware upgrade:
Main Menu -> Administration -> Upgrade Drive Firmware
6. Use the [-] or [+] key to select the drive that you want to upgrade. Select
[OK].
7.
Watch the upgrade status on the library’s front panel. Only drives that are
online and empty (not reserved) can be upgraded.
Note
When the operation is complete, the tape will be returned to its
original slot.
8. Remove the firmware upgrade tape from the library.
Chapter 5
Upgrading Firmware 179
Chapter 5
5. From the Upgrade Drive Firmware menu, use the [-], [+] or [++] key to
select the slot containing the firmware upgrade tape. Select [OK].
180 Upgrading Firmware
Chapter 5
A
Technical Specifications
Appendix Overview
The appendix provides information on the following:
■
Environmental Specifications on page 182
■
Library Specifications on page 183
■
Physical Specifications on page 184
■
Cable Specifications on page 186
■
Drive Compatibility Specifications on page 187
■
HP Ultrium Drive and Media Specifications on page 189
■
DLT Drive and Media Specifications on page 192
Appendix Overview 181
Environmental Specifications
Table 29
Environmental Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Temperature/Humidity
Operating
10º to 35º C
Non-operating
-35º to 65º C
Operating wet-bulb
temperature (media)
25º C maximum
Non-operating wet-bulb
temperature (drive)
46º C maximum
Gradient
10º C per hour
Transportation
-30 to 60º C (<14 consecutive days)
Humidity
Operating
20% to 80% RH non-condensing
Non-operating
10% to 90% RH non-condensing
Shock
Operating
4.0g (half-sine)
Non-operating
10g/24ips
Vibration (5-500 Hz)
Operating
0.21g RMS (random)
Non-operating
2.1g RMS (random)
Operating
0.25g (0-peak, swept-sine)
Non-operating
0.5g (0-peak, swept-sine)
182 Environmental Specifications
Appendix
Library Specifications
Table 30
Library Specifications
Description
All models
General
15 seconds
Average tape exchange time
(mean time to eject tape from
drive, robotically exchange tape
from magazine and reload
drive)
46 seconds
Storage capacity
Dependent upon the model and
configuration
MTBF
100,000 Hours (robotics only)
50,000 Hours (including drives)
45,000 (library only)
Appendix
MSBF (robotics)
1,000,000 swaps (robotics)
Line voltage
100-127/200-240 VAC Auto-selecting
Line frequency
50-60 HZ
Library Specifications 183
Appendix A
Average tape access time
Physical Specifications
Table 31
Physical Specifications
Description
Specification
Height
2/20 Series
216 mm (9 in)
4/40 Series
489 mm (19 in)
6/60 Series
711 mm (28 in)
8/80 & 10/100 Series
1,969 mm(78 in)
2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series
442 mm (17 in)
8/80 & 10/100 Series
597 mm (24 in)
2/20, 4/40 & 6/60 Series
696 mm (27 in)
8/80 & 10/100 Series
940 mm (37 in)
Width
Depth
Weight (net)
2/20 Series
40 kg (87 lb)
4/40 Series
75 kg (165 lb)
6/60 Series
104 kg (249 lb)
8/80 & 10/100 Series
approximately 227 kg (500 lb)
Weight (packaged)
184 Physical Specifications
2/20 Series
41 kg (90 lb)
4/40 Series
82 kg (180 lb)
6/60 Series
111 kg (244 lb)
Appendix
Table 31
Physical Specifications
Description
8/80 & 10/100 Series
SCSI Interface
Fibre Channel Interface
approximately 318 kg (700 lb)
■
Two ports, Very High Density
Cable Interconnect (VHDCI),
small form factor
■
Auto-negotiation (fast,
narrow, wide, ultra2)
■
Supports SCSI-2 and SCSI-3
protocols
■
Available as HVD or LVD/
SE
■
One 1.0625 Gbps port
■
Embedded shortwave
optical connector, type SC
■
Supports FC-AL (arbitrated
loop) and FC-SW (switched
fabric) topologies
■
FCP-2 compliant
■
Private Loop Direct Attach
(PLDA) profile
■
Class 3 connection with
SCSI-FCP protocol
■
Tachyon™ TL protocol
controller
■ RJ45 standard network
connector
■ 10/100 Base-TX network
port
Appendix
Physical Specifications 185
Appendix A
RMC interface
Specification
Cable Specifications
Table 32
SCSI Cable Specifications
Interface
Maximum Supported Length
Single-Ended
Low-Voltage
Differential
High-Voltage
Differential
Fast SCSI
10 MB/second Narrow
20 MB/second Wide
3 meters
12 meters
25 meters
Normal/Slow SCSI
5MB/second Narrow
10MB/second Wide
6 meters
12 meters
25 meters
12 meters
25 meters
Ultra SCSI-3
20 MB/s (single-ended)
40 MB/s (LVD/HVD)
■
3 meters for 4 devices
■
1.5 meters for 8
devices
Ultra2 SCSI
40 MB/s (HVD)
80 MB/s (LVD)
N/A
12 meters
25 meters
Ultra3 SCSI
160 MB/s (LVD)
N/A
12 meters
N/A
Note
Table 33
Ensure that all cables conform to the ANSI SCSI specifications.
Fibre Channel Cable Specifications
Cable
186 Cable Specifications
Maximum supported length
50/125 fibre-optic cable
500 meters
62.5/125 fibre-optic cable
175 meters
Appendix
Drive Compatibility Specifications
Drive Compatibility
Table 34 on page 187 shows read and write compatibility between Quantum
DLT and LTO, Linear Tape-Open, Ultrium formats.
Table 34
Drive Read/Write Compatibility
Drive Type
DLT 8000
LTO Ultrium
Read-compatible
Write-compatible
DLT 4000
DLT 4000
DLT 7000
DLT 7000
DLT 8000
DLT 8000
LTO Ultrium
LTO Ultrium
Caution
It is critical to ensure that the media you use matches the format
of your tape drive. Cleaning cartridges and formatted data
cartridges are unique for each drive technology. Damage may
occur if inappropriate media is used in the tape drives.
Table 35 on page 187 shows drive technologies and compatible unformatted
data cartridges.
Table 35
Unformatted Cartridge Compatibility
Drive type
Data cartridge type
HP part number
Quantum DLT
DLT Type IV
C5141F (40/70/80
GB)
HP Ultrium
HP Ultrium 200 GB
C7970A (100 GB)
C7971A (200 GB)
Appendix
Drive Compatibility Specifications 187
Appendix A
Media Compatibility
Table 36 on page 188 shows drive technologies and compatible cleaning
cartridges.
Table 36
Cleaning Cartridge Compatibility
Drive type
Cleaning cartridge type
Quantum DLT
DLTtape cleaning cartridge
C5142A
HP Ultrium
HP Ultrium Universal
Cleaning Cartridge
C7978A
Note
188 Drive Compatibility Specifications
HP part number
Ensure you use the correct cleaning cartridge for your tape drive.
Appendix
HP Ultrium Drive and Media Specifications
Table 37
Ultrium Drive Specifications
Description
Read/write transfer rate:
(maximum sustained)
■
Non-compressed mode:
15 MB/second
■
Compressed (2:1 typical):
30 MB/second
Burst transfer rate
80 MB/second
Average access time
90 seconds
Loading time
25 seconds (maximum)
Unloading time
13 seconds (maximum)
MTBF
250,000 hours
Interface type
■
Low-Voltage Differential (LVD)
Ultra 2 SCSI
■
High-Voltage Differential (HVD)
Ultra SCSI
HP Ultrium Drive and Media Specifications 189
Appendix A
Appendix
HP Ultrium
Table 38
Ultrium Media Specifications
Characteristic
Formatted capacity
200 GB (2:1 typical compression)
Basic description
0.5 inch (metal particle)
Tape length
580 meters (1903 feet)
Cartridge dimensions
10.2 x 10.5 x 2.2 cm
(4.02 x 4.15 x 0.85 in)
Shelf life
30 years
Cartridge life
■
1,000,000 passes
■
20,000 loads/unloads
Cleaning cartridge life
Note
Figure 60
Ultrium Media
15 uses
Only use Ultrium cleaning cartridges with HP Ultrium tape
drives. For data cartridges, only use those specified as having
met Ultrium standards. Approved media will have the Ultrium
format trademark (Figure 60), which indicates that the media
has passed Ultrium format compliance testing. For best results,
always use HP-branded media.
Ultrium Format Trademark
190 HP Ultrium Drive and Media Specifications
Appendix
Table 39
Ultrium Cartridge Bar Code Specifications
Description
Specification
Data cartridge message
8-character: 6 alphanumeric (user
preference) followed by 2
alphanumeric (media ID)
Cleaning cartridge message
8-character: ‘CLN’, ‘H’, 2 numeric, and
2 alphanumeric (media ID)
Dimensions
7.8 cm x 1.7 cm (3.07 in x 0.67 in)
Symbology
code 39 without check digit
Start/stop characters
*/*
■
Short bar
■
6.0 mm (0.24 in)
■
Long bar
■
8.5 mm (0.33 in)
2.75:1
Print quality
ANSI Grade “A”
Note
For data cartridge messages, ‘n’ represents the volume serial
number (or volser), and ‘XY’ represents the media ID. The HP
Ultrium media ID is ‘Lg’ where ‘g’ (alphanumeric) designates a
generation of the cartridge. For example, the HP Ultrium media
ID for first generation data cartridges is ‘L1”.
For cleaning cartridge messages, ‘CLN’ denotes that it is a
cleaning cartridge, ‘H’ represents Hewlett-Packard as the drive
manufacturer, ‘n’ is the volume serial number, and ‘XY’
represents the media ID (as stated above). Bar codes will
resemble ‘CLNHnnL1’.
Appendix
HP Ultrium Drive and Media Specifications 191
Appendix A
Ratio
DLT Drive and Media Specifications
Table 40
DLT Drive Specifications
Description
Quantum DLT 8000
Read/write transfer rate:
maximum sustained (DLT Type IV
media)
■
Non-compressed mode:
6.0 MB/second
■
Compressed (2:1 typical):
12.0 MB/second
Burst transfer rate
20 MB/second
Average access time
60 seconds
Loading time to BOT
(for previously written tape)
37 seconds (average)
MTBF
250,000 hours
Interface type
■
Low-Voltage Differential (LVD) Fast
wide SCSI
■
High-Voltage Differential (HVD)
Fast wide SCSI
192 DLT Drive and Media Specifications
Appendix
Table 41
DLT Media Specifications
Characteristic
DLT 8000 Formatted capacity
■
40 GB (non-compressed)
■
80 GB (2:1 typical compression)
0.5 inch (metal particle)
Tape length
557 meters (1828 feet)
Cartridge dimensions
10.4 x 10.4 x 2.5 cm
(4.1 x 4.1 x 1.0 in)
Shelf life
30 years (minimum) @ 20° C
40% RH (non-condensing)
Cartridge life
■
1,000,000 passes (any point on the
tape passing the recording head in
either direction)
■
2,000 loads/unloads
Note
20 uses
You can also use DLT Type IIIXT media, though it has a
significantly reduced capacity and performance compared to
DLT Type IV media.
DLT Drive and Media Specifications 193
Appendix A
Basic description
Cleaning cartridge life
Appendix
DLT Type IV Media
Table 42
DLT Bar Code Specifications
Description
Specification
Data cartridge message
6-character: 2 alpha, 4 numeric,
(AAnnnn)
Cleaning cartridge message
6-character: ‘CLN’, 3 numeric
(CLNnnn)
Dimensions
5.6 cm x 2.1 cm (2.2 in x .82 in)
Symbology
code 39 without check digit
Start/stop characters
*/*
Narrow bar
0.036 cm (0.014 in)
Ratio
2.5:1
Print quality
ANSI Grade “A”
194 DLT Drive and Media Specifications
Appendix
Customer Support
B
Appendix Overview
This appendix provides information on the following:
■
Registering Your Product on page 196
■
Support Services on page 197
■
Contacting HP Customer Support on page 202
■
Warranty Information on page 207
Appendix Overview 195
Registering Your Product
Registering your product ensures fast and easy access to Hewlett-Packard
Customer Support.
■
HP registration web site:
http://www.register.hp.com
HP customers who register on our web site join a select group who register to
receive:
■
Technical support updates
■
Special Hewlett-Packard offers
■
Direct-to-you details on:
— Ideas and ways to use your new HP Surestore Tape Library
— Other exciting HP products
— News on emerging technologies
196 Registering Your Product
Appendix
Support Services
HP support services upgrade and/or extend the warranty on your tape library.
A wide range of service options are available to meet your business uptime
needs.
SupportPacks
SupportPacks are available within180 days of your purchase. If you choose to
purchase one, your warranty will be upgraded. Once your warranty has
expired, post-warranty SupportPacks are also available.
Table 43 on page 198 lists HP SupportPack service options.
Note
To order HP SupportPacks, visit http://www.hp.com/hps/
support/supportpack, or contact your support or sales
representative.
Appendix B
Appendix
Support Services 197
Table 43
SupportPacks
SupportPack Number
Description
2/20 series
H5520A/E
3 year, same day, onsite
H4434A/E
3 year, 24x7, onsite
U2063PA/PD (post-warranty)
1 year, next day, onsite
H2734PA/PE (post-warranty)
1 year, same day, onsite
4/40 series
H5533A/E
3 year, same day, onsite
H4435A/E
3 year, 24x7, onsite
U2064PA/PE (post-warranty)
1 year, next day, onsite
H2735PA/PE (post-warranty)
1 year, same day, onsite
6/60 series
H5534A/E
3 year, same day, onsite
H4436A/E
3 year, 24x7, onsite
U2065PA/PE (post-warranty)
1 year, next day, onsite
H2736PA/PE (post-warranty)
1 year, same day, onsite
80 and 100 series
198 Support Services
U2061A/E
3 year, same day, onsite
U2062A/E
3 year, 24x7, onsite
U2066PA/PE (post-warranty)
1 year, next day, onsite
U2067PA/PE (post-warranty)
1 year, same day, onsite
Appendix
Service Contracts
Service contracts are available after the first 180 days of your purchase. If you
choose to purchase one, your warranty will be upgraded. To purchase a
service contract, or for information on additional options, contact your HP
sales representative.
Table 44 on page 199 and Table 45 on page 200 lists post-warranty service
contracts and upgrade options.
Note
Table 44
Post-Warranty Service Contracts
Option
Description
01A
Standalone hardware call-to-repair, 6 hour response, 24x7
coverage
02A
Onsite, same day, 4 hour response
02C
Onsite, next working day response
02G
Onsite, 4 hour response, 24x7 coverage
02L
Onsite scheduled response
02V
6 hour hardware call-to-repair
02X
4 hour hardware call-to-restoration
Appendix B
Appendix
To purchase a service contract, or for more information, contact
your support or sales representative.
Support Services 199
Table 45
Warranty Upgrade Service Contracts
Option
200 Support Services
Description
01B
Standalone upgrade to hardware warranty to 6 hour
call-to-repair, 24x7 coverage
07A
Priority
07G
Upgrades hardware warranty response to 24x7
07V
Upgrades hardware warranty to 6 hour call-to-repair
07X
Upgrades hardware warranty to 4 hour call-torestoration
Appendix
Backup Software Support
While the library product itself is supported by Hewlett-Packard, all software
products are supported by individual software vendors. When contacting the
software vendor for support, you will need the following information:
■
Your name and telephone number
■
Product name, release number, operating system, build, and serial number
■
Detailed list of error messages reported
■
Configuration files and log files related to the problem
■
Screen dumps, if applicable
■
Explanation of how to reproduce the problem, if possible
■
Events that may have contributed to the problem, recent operator actions,
recent events in the software or the system, and recent changes to the
computer system, software, or network environment.
Appendix B
Appendix
Support Services 201
Contacting HP Customer Support
If your library fails during the warranty period and the suggestions in the
documentation do not solve the problem, you can receive support by doing the
following:
■
Access HP Support on the World Wide Web at: http://www.hp.com/go/
support
■
Contact your authorized HP dealer or Authorized Service Provider
■
Call the HP Customer Care Center in your region (See Telephone Support
on page 203.)
If you purchased a service contract through HP or an authorized reseller, make
sure that you register immediately. Failure to register may result in slower
response time. Registering allows the local repair office to prepare for the
proper response level needed. If your library fails while under the support
contract period, contact the appropriate support number included in your
contract information.
If your library fails after the warranty period, contact your authorized HP
dealer/distributor or the nearest HP sales and service office. Customers in the
US and Europe can use a credit card for phone assistance.
Information Needed for Support
Before calling, please have the following information ready:
■
Model number of your library
■
Serial number (see Library Information on page 110)
■
Drive type(s)
■
Error codes and error code qualifiers
■
Revision number for library and drive firmware
■
Brand and model of your host computer
■
Brand and model of your SCSI or fibre channel host adapter
■
Library drivers and backup application software that you are using and
the version number(s)
202 Contacting HP Customer Support
Appendix
Telephone Support
To obtain technical assistance, call the support representative nearest you.
North and South America
Note
■
Argentina
(541) 778 8380
■
Brazil
(011) 829 6612
■
Canada
905-206-4663
■
Chile
800 360 999
■
Mexico
800 427 6684
■
United States
(970) 635-1500; Monday - Friday,
7 am - 5pm Mountain Time
■
Venezuela
800 47 888 (Caracas 207 8488)
Appendix B
Appendix
For the latest list of phone numbers for HP Customer Support, see
http://www.hp.com/go/support. Phone charges may apply.
Contacting HP Customer Support 203
European Customer Support Centers
Monday - Friday, 8:30 - 18:00 (C.E.T)
Note
For the latest list of phone numbers for HP Customer Support, see
http://www.hp.com/go/support. Phone charges may apply.
■
Austria
+ 43 (0) 7114 201080
■
Belgium, Dutch
+ 32 (0) 2 626 8806
■
Belgium, French
+ 32 (0) 2 626 8807
■
Denmark
+ 45 39 29 4099
■
English
International + 44 (0) 171 512 52 02
■
Finland
+ 358 (0) 203 47 288
■
France
+ 33 (0) 1 43 62 34 34
■
Germany
+49 (0) 180 52 58 143
■
Ireland
+ 353 (0) 1 662 5525
■
Israel
+ 972 (0) 9 9524848
■
Italy
+ 39 02 264 10350
■
Netherlands
+ 31 (0) 20 606 8751
■
Norway
+ 47 22 11 6299
■
Portugal
+ 351 (0)1 318 00 65
204 Contacting HP Customer Support
Appendix
■
Spain
+ 34 902 321 123
■
Sweden
+ 46 (0) 8 619 2170
■
Switzerland
+ 41 (0) 848 80 11 11
■
Turkey
+ 90 212 224 59 25
■
United Kingdom
+ 44 (0) 171 512 52 02
Asia Pacific Customer Support Centers
Note
■
Australia
+ 61 3 8877 8000
■
China
+ 86 (0) 10 6564 5959
■
Hong Kong
800 96 7729
■
India
+ 91 11 682 6035
■
Indonesia
+ 62 21 350 3408
■
Japan
+ 81 3 3335 8333
■
Korea
+ 82 2 3270 0700
■
Outside Seoul
080 999 0700
■
Malaysia
+ 60 3 295 2566
Appendix B
Appendix
For the latest list of phone numbers for HP Customer Support, see
http://www.hp.com/go/support. Phone charges may apply.
Contacting HP Customer Support 205
■
New Zealand
+ 64 9 356 6640
■
Penang
1 300 88 00 28
■
Philippines
+ 63 2 867 3551
■
Singapore
+ 65 272 5300
■
Taiwan
+ 886 2 717 0055
■
Thailand
+ 66 2 661 4000
■
Vietnam
+ 84 (0) 8 823 4530
Elsewhere
Contact your authorized HP dealer/distributor or the nearest HP sales and
service office.
206 Contacting HP Customer Support
Appendix
Warranty Information
HP Product: HP Surestore Tape Library 20/20, 40/40, 60/60, 8/80 and 10/100
series
Duration of limited warranty: One Year
1. HP warrants HP hardware, accessories, and supplies against defects in
materials and workmanship for the period specified above. If HewlettPackard receives notice of such defects during the warranty period,
Hewlett-Packard will, at its option, either repair or replace products which
prove to be defective. Replacement products may be either new or likenew.
2. HP warrants that HP software will not fail to execute its programming instructions,
for the period specified above, due to defects in material and workmanship when
properly installed and used. If HP receives notice of such defects during the
warranty period, HP will replace software media that does not execute its
programming instructions due to such defects.
3. HP does not warrant that the operation of HP products will be uninterrupted or error
free. If HP is unable, within a reasonable time, to repair or replace any product to a
condition as warranted, customer will be entitled to a refund of the purchase price
upon prompt return of the product.
4. HP products may contain remanufactured parts equivalent to new in performance
or may have been subject to incidental use.
installed by HP. If customer schedules or delays HP installation more than 30 days
after delivery, warranty begins on the 31st day from delivery.
6. Warranty does not apply to defects resulting from (a) improper or inadequate
maintenance or calibration, (b) software, interfacing, parts or supplies not supplied
by HP, (c) unauthorized modification or misuse, (d) operation outside of the
published environmental specifications for the products, or (e) improper site
preparation or maintenance.
7. TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY LOCAL LAW, THE ABOVE WARRANTIES ARE
EXCLUSIVE AND NO OTHER WARRANTY OR CONDITION, WHETHER WRITTEN
OR ORAL, IS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AND HP SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, SATISFACTORY
QUALITY, AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
8. HP will be liable for damage to tangible property per incident up to the greater of
$300,000 or the actual amount paid for the product that is the subject of the claim,
and for damages for bodily injury or death, to the extent that all such damages are
determined by a court of competent jurisdiction to have been directly caused by a
defective HP product.
Appendix
Warranty Information 207
Appendix B
5. The warranty period begins on the date of delivery or on the date of installation if
TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY LOCAL LAW, THE REMEDIES IN THIS WARRANTY
STATEMENT ARE THE CUSTOMER’S SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES. EXCEPT
AS INDICATED ABOVE, IN NO EVENT WILL HP OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR
LOSS OF DATA OR FOR DIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL
(INCLUDING LOST PROFIT OR DATA), OR OTHER DAMAGE, WHETHER BASED
IN CONTRACT, TORT, OR OTHERWISE.
208 Warranty Information
Appendix
Error Code Reference
C
Library Error Codes
Table 46 on page 210 lists the hard error codes and suggestions for recovery.
Use the recovery instructions from the front panel display as the primary
approach to troubleshooting. Each hard error is accompanied by a qualifier
code and a list of sequence (micro-move) IDs (only used for factory
diagnostics).
Note
If you need to contact a service representative to resolve an issue,
be sure to note the error code and qualifier code beforehand.
For more information, see Information Needed for Support on
page 202.
Each hard error code and qualifier code is paired with a list of recovery
suggestions. The library suggests the appropriate recovery procedures, which
could include:
■
Power cycling the library.
■
Removing a tape from the drive.
■
Checking the library or host configuration.
■
Checking the cable connections (data or power).
■
Running diagnostic tests. Diagnostic tests are recommended to help isolate
the appropriate FRU for replacement, or to clear the error condition.
■
Repositioning a tape or magazine.
■
Upgrading firmware.
■
Replacing a FRU. Replace FRUs in the order listed. Test after each FRU
replacement to determine when the error condition is resolved.
Library Error Codes 209
Table 46
Decimal
Error
0
1-8
9
10
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
00H
01H 08H
09H
0AH
210 Library Error Codes
Description
Error code not set.
Failed library
controller self test.
Failed translate motor
test.
Failed vertical motor
test.
Recovery Method
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Observe the LEDs on the back of the library
controller card. See Interpreting Library LEDs
on page 130 to understand what the LEDs may
indicate.
01h through 08h are controller tests. These errors
are possible only on power-up.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Observe the LEDs on the back of the library
controller card. See Interpreting Library LEDs
on page 130 to understand what the LEDs may
indicate.
■
If failure persists, the library controller card
may be faulty.
Cannot translate the transport.
■
Check for a possible obstruction in the
transport pathway and remove it.
■
The umbilical cable may be faulty.
■
If the transport moves a little, but cannot fully
rotate around the assembly, a faulty motor is
indicated.
Occurs when trying to sense if the transport
assembly moves vertically. If the assembly does not
move:
■
Ensure that the motor leads are connected to
the vertical motor and the vertical lift board.
■
Check the umbilical cable under the translate
frame.
Appendix
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
11
0BH
Failed plunge motor
test.
■
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
12
0CH
Transport failed to
find the translate
home position.
■
Make sure that all tape cartridges are fully
seated in their slots.
13
0DH
Transport failed to
find the vertical home
position.
■
Check for a possible obstruction in the
transport pathway and remove it.
■
Verify that the vertical path is physically clear.
■
Make sure that all tape cartridges are fully
seated in their slots. (When manually loaded,
cartridges may not have been fully inserted into
slots.)
■
The plunge motor can be moved. Therefore, the
motor and umbilical cable are probably not
indicated.
■
Replace the transport assembly.
14
0EH
Transport failed to
find the plunge home
position.
0FH
Has wrong library
family firmware or the
controller is on the
wrong level.
Download new firmware (see Upgrading Firmware
on page 176).
18
12H
Failed because
magazine door) is
open.
Close magazine doors.
19
13H
Vertical motor cable is
missing or faulty.
Check that the vertical cable connections are
secure.
20
14H
Transport umbilical
cable is missing or
faulty.
Check the transport cable connections or the cable
that goes from the transport to the library.
Appendix
Library Error Codes 211
Appendix C
15
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
21
15H
A chassis fan is
disconnected or
faulty.
Check that the chassis fan cable connection is
secure.
22
16H
Chassis interconnect
cables are
disconnected or
faulty.
Check that the chassis interconnect cables are
secure.
23
17H
Front panel cable is
disconnected or
faulty.
Check that the front panel cable connections are
secure.
24
18H
Transport bar code
reader failed self test.
Power cycle the library.
25
19H
Library levels
measured does not
match the number of
levels detected.
■
Check for obstructions in the vertical path.
■
Check that the chassis interconnect cable
connection is secure.
26
1AH
Upper level fan cable
failed.
See Troubleshooting Common Problems on
page 140 for troubleshooting procedures.
27
1BH
Transport controller
unable to
communicate with
transport.
Replace the transport assembly.
28
1CH
Transport controller
needs new firmware.
Update the library’s firmware (see Upgrading
Firmware on page 176).
29
1DH
Failed transport
firmware download.
Update the transport’s firmware (see Upgrading
Firmware on page 176).
50
32H
Test not run, an
invalid test number
was specified.
If incorrect test number was designated when
initiating a test over the SCSI interface, select
desired number and then re-initiate the test.
212 Library Error Codes
Appendix
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
51
33H
Test not run, tapes not
in required locations.
The library needs at least one tape and an empty
slot to perform this test.
52
34H
Test not run, an
inventory check is
needed.
■
Run the Inventory Check test from the front panel
(see Running Library Diagnostic Tests on
page 156).
■
Update the backup software to show the
correct tape and slot configuration.
35H
Failed test, refer to
previous error.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
54
36H
Test not run, some
elements are reserved.
Check the backup software documentation to
disable the reserved condition.
56
38H
Cannot run test with
tapes in current
locations.
The library needs at least one tape and an empty
slot to perform this test. For a drive test, it cannot
rewind the media.
57
39H
Test not run, not
enough tapes in the
library.
Load one additional tape into the library.
58
3AH
Test not started, the
transport contains a
tape.
Run the Empty Transport test (see Running Library
Diagnostic Tests on page 156).
59
3BH
Failed to put tape into
magazine slot.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
60
3CH
Failed to get tape
from magazine slot.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
61
3DH
Failed inventory check
on a magazine slot.
■
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
■
Check magazine back slot for debris or marks.
Clean if necessary.
Appendix
Library Error Codes 213
Appendix C
53
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
62
3EH
Failed to load a tape
into a drive.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
63
3FH
Failed to unload a
tape from a drive.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
64
40H
Transport unable to
inventory drive.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
65
41H
Failed while checking
for a cartridge in the
transport.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
66
42H
Transport stuck at
home position.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
67
43H
Transport stuck at
vertical home
position.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
68
44H
Failed to move after
finding the plunge
home position.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
69
45H
Transport unable to
move to the end of the
track.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
70
46H
Failed inventory
check, transport
contains a tape.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
71
47H
Timeout moving
transport to the top of
the library.
■
Power cycle the library.
■
Check the vertical path for obstructions.
■
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
214 Library Error Codes
Appendix
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
72
48H
Unable to put tape
back into slot after
power cycle.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
74
4AH
Drive module
disconnected or has
failed.
■
Ensure that all drive modules are fully inserted
into the drive bays at the rear of the library.
■
Note the LEDs on the drive modules. See
Interpreting Library LEDs on page 130 to
understand what the LEDs may indicate.
■
If the LED indicates failure, replace the drive
module.
4BH
Drive(s) fan
disconnected or
faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
76
4CH
Failed to perform an
inventory check.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
77
4DH
Transport moved
above highest
detected level.
Run the Test Vertical Motion test (see Running
Library Diagnostic Tests on page 156).
78
4EH
Not all drives in the
library are the same
type.
Check to ensure that you have the correct type of
drive.
80
50H
Drive reports
hardware error.
■
Power cycle the library and re-try.
■
Replace the drive module if unsuccessful. See
Removing and Replacing Drive Modules on
page 162.
Library failed during
initialization.
Power cycle the library.
81
Appendix
51H
Library Error Codes 215
Appendix C
75
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
82
52H
Incorrect external
SCSI connection.
Library connected to
wrong type of SCSI
bus.
Check the cable configuration (see Connecting and
Powering on the Library on page 32).
89
59H
Cleaning cartridge
has expired.
Use a new cleaning cartridge.
90
5AH
Not a cleaning
cartridge.
Insert a cleaning cartridge.
100
64H
Library controller
unable to
communicate with
drive module.
Power cycle the library.
101
65H
Drive module unable
to communicate with
drive.
Power cycle the library.
102
66H
Drive command
timeout on drive
module controller.
Command timeout on 8051.
103
67H
A drive module
controller has failed.
Power cycle the library and re-try. Replace the drive
module if unsuccessful (see Removing and
Replacing Drive Modules on page 162).
104
68H
Failed drive module
initialization.
Power cycle the library.
105
69H
Drive module serial
timeout to drive.
Retry command.
110
6EH
Library controller
unable to
communicate with
slave card.
Power cycle the library.
216 Library Error Codes
Appendix
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
6fH
Slave controller card
missing or faulty.
Ensure the slave controller card is installed and fully
seated.
112
70H
Slave board
command timeout.
Retry command.
113
71H
Slave controller card
failed self test.
Power cycle the library.
114
72H
Slave controller card
failed initialization.
Power cycle the library.
118
76H
Slave controller is on
level 1.
Remove slave controller card from the bottom level
of the library.
120
78H
Library controller
unable to
communicate with
Fibre Channel card.
Ensure Fibre Channel card is installed and fully
seated.
121
79H
Failed to detect all of
the Fibre Channel
cards.
Power cycle the library.
122
7AH
Fibre Channel board
command timeout.
Power cycle the library.
123
7BH
A Fibre Channel card
has failed.
Power cycle library and retry. Replace card if
unsuccessful (Removing and Replacing Cards on
page 160).
126
7EH
More than one Fibre
Channel card is on a
library level.
Remove duplicate Fibre Channel card.
130
82H
Library controller
unable to
communicate with
remote management
card.
Power cycle the library.
Appendix
Library Error Codes 217
Appendix C
111
Table 46
Decimal
Error
131
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
83H
Description
Recovery Method
Remote management
card is missing or
faulty.
■
Ensure the remote management card is
installed.
■
Power cycle the library.
132
84H
Remote management
card board timeout.
Retry command.
133
85H
A remote
management card
has failed.
Power cycle the library.
134
86H
The remote
management card is
not on library level 1.
Move the remote management card to the correct
library level (on the bottom level). See Figure 47 on
page 131.
135
87H
Failed because more
than one remote
management card is
present.
Remove the extra remote management card. There
should be one card installed on the library and on
the bottom library level. See Figure 47 on page
131.
136
88H
Failed because the
library expansion
card is missing or
faulty.
Ensure the library expansion card is properly
installed, seated, and connected.
137
89H
Failed because the
library expansion
card is present, but on
the wrong library
level.
Move the library expansion card to the fifth library
level. See Figure 47 on page 131.
138
8AH
Failed because more
than one library
expansion card is
present.
Remove the extra library expansion card. There
should be one card installed on the library and on
the fifth library level.
140
8CH
Front panel Send
command did not
complete.
Retry the operation.
218 Library Error Codes
Appendix
Table 46
Decimal
Error
Error Codes and Recovery Procedures
Hex
Error
Description
Recovery Method
8DH
Front panel board
missing.
Power cycle library.
142
8EH
Front panel board
timeout.
Retry command.
143
8FH
Front panel board
failed.
Power cycle the library.
150-155
96H 9BH
Failed transport
controller self test.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
157
9DH
Transport plunge
motor cable is missing
or faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
158
9EH
Transport translate
motor cable is missing
or faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
159
9FH
Transport barcode
reader cable is
missing or faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
160
A0H
Transport illuminator
cable is missing or
faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
161
A1H
Two transport cables
are missing or faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
162
A2H
Three transport cables
are missing or faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
163
A3H
Four transport cables
are missing or faulty.
Note the error code qualifier to help determine
appropriate testing.
Appendix
Library Error Codes 219
Appendix C
141
220 Library Error Codes
Appendix
glossary
A
AL_PA
Arbitrated loop physical address
B
backup software
board
bulk load
bus
Software that runs on the host computer that is used to track data backups and
execute library functions.
A printed circuit assembly (PCA). Also called a card or adapter.
A way to load magazine slots with tapes. Usually refers to the initial loading of
the library.
A common data path over which data is transported.
C
calibration
cleaning tape
A routine that is run immediately after a tape cartridge is loaded, in order to
determine if the tape is blank or written, compatible with the drive, and
capable of being written and read.
A tape that is used only for cleaning a drive.
D
DLT
drawer
drive, tape drive
Digital Linear Tape; a family of tape device and media technologies developed
by Quantum Corporation.
The area of the library that contains the magazines. Each level of the library
has two drawers. Also referred to as tray.
The device that the library uses to record data onto tapes.
Glossary 221
drive cleaning
drive module
differential SCSI
A library feature that uses a cleaning tape to clean a tape drive.
The entire assembly that houses the drive, including the metal housing and
connectors.
A type of SCSI cable that can carry data a maximum of 25 meters.
E
event
A significant function of the library displayed in the event log that reports drive
errors, online/offline transitions, drive cleaning, and other information.
F
fabric
Switched interconnect methodology that supports high-speed data routing in
Fibre Channel networks.
Fibre Channel
A switched protocol that allows concurrent communication among
workstations, supercomputers, mainframes, data storage devices, and other
peripherals. Fibre Channel is capable of transmitting at rates exceeding one
gigabit per second in both directions simultaneously.
Fibre Channel
Arbitrated
Loop (FC-AL)
Topology that provides a low-cost solution for attaching multiple Fibre Channel
ports in a loop without switches.
front panel display
An LCD (liquid crystal display), equipped with five soft keys, mounted on the
front of the library (top level on multi-level libraries) that controls all library
functions.
G
GBIC
Gigabit Interface Converter
H
hard errors
HBA
222 Glossary
Electronic errors in library functions that cannot be recovered. These errors are
recorded in the hard error log. May also be referred to as host interface card.
Host Bus Adapter - A circuit board residing in the host system that handles
requests to and from the host system and the library. May also be referred to
as a host interface card.
home screen
The view on the front panel display that provides status information after the
library has been powered on. Also, the default view to which the display
returns after being left idle after approximately three minutes.
host
One or more computers that generate and communicate data to the library.
hub
A device that provides a multiple port loop interconnect system to implement a
Fibre Channel arbitrated loop using a physical “star” configuration.
HVDS
High Voltage Differential SCSI
I
identity
IP
A front panel display option that provides the library’s serial number.
Internet Protocol
J
jumper cables
Cables used to connect the library controller card to a drive. May also be
referred to as daisy-chain cables.
L
latch stop
A spring-loaded safety device that protrudes through the mounting rail. The
latch stop allows 2/20, 4/40, and 6/60 tape libraries to be pulled
approximately two-thirds out of a rack, while preventing them from being
pulled out completely.
Light-emitting diodes, also called lamps, found in various library assemblies,
including drive modules, power supplies, library cards, and internal
assemblies. An LED communicates status information about the assembly.
library
A data storage system that stores electronic data on tape media. Depending
on the model, the library can use up to six drive modules.
LTO
LVDS
Linear Tape-Open; a family of tape device and media technologies developed
by Hewlett-Packard, IBM, and Seagate.
Low Voltage Differential SCSI
Glossary 223
Glossary
LEDs
M
MAC Address
magazine
Media access control address - a unique hardware-based address that
identifies each node on a network.
A slotted container that resides in the tape drawers that provides individual
slots for five tape cartridges.
magazine access
A process of loading or unloading tapes that involves opening a tape drawer
and exchanging one or more magazines.
mailslot
A process of loading or unloading tapes that allows the user to access either 1
slot, 1 magazine, or 2 magazines.
move
A single library action, such as loading a tape into a drive, or unloading a
tape from a drive.
N
node
nesting
An addressable entity connected to an I/O bus or network, used to refer to
storage devices and subsystems.
The menu approach implemented in the library that uses increasing levels of
library control.
O
odometer
A front panel option that displays the odometer logs for power-on hours and
moves.
originator
A Fibre Channel term that refers to the initiating device.
P
port
power (stand-by)
switch
The hardware entity within a node that performs data communications.
A low holding voltage remains in the library even though library has been
powered off.
R
RMC, remote
management card
224 Glossary
A circuit card that provides the ability to gain access to the library from a
computer at a different location.
S
SCSI
SCSI ID
SCSI element
reservation
single-ended SCSI
Small Computer Systems Interface - A bus that transfers data between the host
system and the library.
The electronic identification number for each SCSI device in the library. The
library SCSI devices are the drives and the library interface controller card.
This allows the host to continue reserving drive or slots after a power cycle. This
is typically used to ensure that only one host can access a slot or drive.
A type of cable that is limited to short distances.
soft error
Electronic errors in library functions that can be recovered. These errors are
recorded in the soft error log.
soft keys
Five buttons located along the bottom edge of the front panel display that are
used to execute commands on the display.
swap
Two related library actions, or moves, such as moving a tape from a slot to a
drive, and then back to a slot.
switch
A device that provides a (n by n) interconnect to allow a port to have full
communication bandwidth with any other port while other communications
are occurring.
T
tape, tape cartridge
TCP/IP
The media that the library uses for recording data from the host computer(s).
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
An electronic device that connects to the end of the SCSI bus to stabilize bus
signals.
tray
The area of the library that contains the magazines, Each level of the library
has two trays. Also referred to a drawer.
U
Ultrium
A tape format specification for the high capacity implementation of LTO
technology.
Glossary 225
Glossary
terminator
UTC
Coordinated Universal Time
W
web-based library
administrator
Describes the interface that allows you to monitor and manage the library over
the network via the remote management card.
wide SCSI
A 68-pin connector that can be single-ended or differential in implementation.
226 Glossary
index
A
access
mailslot 85
tape magazine 81
AL_PA 103, 105, 221
anti-tip foot
in moving procedure 57
in rackmounting procedure
19
applications, backup software
31, 66, 221
bringing drives online 166
compatibility 12, 50, 147
configuring 90, 95, 102,
107
errors 128, 129, 142
inventory check 158
mailslot configuration 53
replacing a drive 162
SCSI reserve 177
soft addressing 103
support 201, 202
updating 213
write-protecting taptes 70
Asia-Pacific telephone support
205
B
back panel features, 2/20, 4/
40, 6/60, 8/80, 10/100 33
backup software 31, 66, 221
bringing drives online 166
compatibility 12, 50, 147
configuring 90, 95, 102,
107
errors 128, 129, 142
inventory check 158
mailslot configuration 53
replacing a drive 162
SCSI reserve 177
soft addressing 103
support 201, 202
updating 213
write-protecting tapes 70
bar code
DLT labels 79– 80
Ultrium labels 72– 73
bar code labels 12
BOOTP 97– 100
bulk erasing 69
bulk load 221
bus 221
C
cables
fibre channel 12, 13, 43,
56, 186
fibre channel, 2/20 45
fibre channel, 4/40 46
fibre channel, 6/60 47
fibre channel, 8/80 and 10/
100 49
SCSI 12, 13, 31, 34– 40,
56, 122, 186
SCSI, 2/20 36
SCSI, 4/40 37
SCSI, 6/60 38
SCSI, 8/80 and 10/100
39– 40
choosing a location 14
cleaning a drive 87
cleaning cartridge
compatibility 187
DLT 74
Ultrium 69
using DLT 74, 80
using Ultrium 72– 73
cleaning tape 87, 142, 144,
221
cleaning, drive 222
clearing a partial availability
state 120
clip nuts
installing 19
placement for 2/20 20
placement for 4/40 20
placement for 6/60 21
templates for 19
use EIA markers for
placement 19
compatibility
cleaning cartridges 187
drives 187
format 187
media 187
read-compatible 187
write-compatible 187
configuration options available
90
configuring the library 90
configuring the library for fibre
227
channel 102– 109
connectivity
troubleshooting
128
coordinated universal time
zones, for setting date and time
109
cosmetic drawer face
removing 174
replacing 174
cover, removing from standalone library 172
Customer Care website 202
customer support
Asia-Pacific 205
during warranty 202
Europe 204
North and South America
203
D
data cartridge
bulk erasing Ultrium media
69
degaussing Ultrium media
69
DLT 74
description 193
dimensions 193
length 193
removing a stuck tape
152– 153
rewinding a stuck tape
151– 152
write-protecting 77
DLT Type IIIXT 193
hub 74
inspecting DLT 74
inspecting Ultrium 69
leader 74
maintaining Ultrium 69
Ultrium 69
description 190
dimensions 190
length 190
write-protecting 70
228
date and time, setting 108
date and time, viewing 113
date, setting 108
default configuration settings
91
default SCSI IDs 106
degaussing 69
DHCP 97, 99
diagnostic tools 50, 154
differential SCSI 222
display conventions, front panel
60
DLT
4000 187
7000 187
8000 187
bar code labels 79– 80
cleaning cartridge 80
format 187
inspecting media 74
interface types 192
media cartridge life 193
removing a stuck tape 152–
153
rewinding a stuck tape 151–
152
drawer keys, shipping location
30
drive and tape operations 86–
88
drive cleaning 222
drive event log 112
drive firmware revision, viewing 113
drive identity, viewing 112
drive information
categories available 112
viewing
event log 112
drive information, viewing
identity 112
odometer 112
drive module 222
installing into library 165
removing from library 163
replacement overview 162
taking drive offline 162
unloading tape 162
drive odometer, viewing 112
drive types 83, 87, 123, 138
drive, cleaning 87
drive, tape 221
drives
compatibility 187
DLT
removing a stuck tape
152– 153
rewinding a stuck tape
151– 152
media format 187
E
EIA rack markers 19
electrostatic discharge during
service, prevention 160
error codes, table of 210
error recovery 209
error states 118– 129
errors
categories 117
differences 118– 129
hard 126
partial availability 120
soft 118
types 117
errors, hardware 140– 150
ESD, preventing during removal/replacement 160
European telephone support
204
event 222
event log
viewing 112
F
fabric 222
features
library back panel 33
feet, removing from standalone
library 173
fibre channel
addressing 103
configuration 102
current settings 103, 104
current status 103, 104
future settings 103, 104
installation 41– 47
supported topologies 41
viewing status 112
fibre channel arbitrated loop
222
fibre channel cable 186
2/20 45
4/40 46
6/60 47
fibre channel connections
2/20 45
fibre channel controller, location
4/40 33
format
compatibility 187
DLT 4000 187
DLT 7000 187
DLT 8000 187
media and drive 187
Ultrium 187
front panel
display conventions 60
LEDs 130
front panel display 222
front panel features, 2/20, 4/
40, 6/60, 8/80, 10/100 60
G
GBIC 222
GBIC module, fibre channel installation 12, 43, 160
H
hard error log, viewing 110
hard errors 126, 222
HBA 222
high voltage differential SCSI
interface and terminators 34
home screen 223
home screen, information displayed 60
host 223
host configuration, verifying
50
host interface card, installing
31
host troubleshooting 128
HP Library & Tape Tools 67
hub 74, 223
hub, in fibre channel installation
2/20 45
4/40 46
6/60 47
HVDS 223
I
icons, status bar 61
identifying errors 117
identity 223
drive, viewing 112
library, viewing 110
information menu 64
information, gathered before
contacting support 202
inspecting media
DLT 74
Ultrium 69
installation check 50, 154
installation, fibre channel 41–
47
installing a standalone library
into a rack 17– 30
installing clip nuts, general tips
19
installing host bus adapters 31
installing into a rack 17– 30
installing rails 21
installing stop bracket
2/20 25
4/40 26
6/60 26
installing trim brackets
2/20 27
4/40 28
6/60 29
interface
DLT 8000 192
Ultrium 189
IP 223
J
jumper cable
2/20 36
4/40 37
6/60 38
jumper cables 223
K
keys, tape drawer (shipping location) 30
L
latch stops 223
bypassing when moving 4/
40 and 6/60 57
when moving 2/20 57
LED indications
drive module 138
HVDS library controller card
134
library expansion card 136
LVDS library controller card
135
redundant power supply 139
remote management card
133
slave controller card 132
LEDs 130, 223
LEDs, activity 130
leveler feet 19
library 223
back panel features 33
configuring 90– 94
configuring for fibre channel
102
configuring for SCSI 34
moving and shipping 54–
58
229
password protected menus
63
rackmounting 19
registering 196
retrieving information about
110– 158
service contracts 199
support services 197
supportpacks 197
weight 17, 25, 54, 58
Library & Tape Tools 50, 154
library configuration
configuring the mailslot 93
enabling and changing the
password 92
library configurations, viewing
date and time 113
fibre channel status 112
firmware revision, drives
113
firmware revision, library
113
mailslot 112
network access 112
password enabled status
112
save element reserve 112
SCSI ID assignments 112
service information 112
library controller card, location
4/40 33
library diagnostic tests available 156– 158
library diagnostic tests, running
156
library expansion card, location 33
library firmware revision, viewing 113
library hardware, troubleshooting 140– 150
library identity, viewing 110
library information viewing
hard error log 110
library information, categories
available 111
230
library information, retrieving
110
library information, viewing
identity 110
library status 110
odometer 110
library specifications 183
library status, viewing 110
library, clearance 15
lift, mechanical (4/40 and 6/
60 installation) 24
lifting straps
using for 2/20 23
loading a tape into a drive
from front panel 86
location
requirements 14
location of securing screws 30
location, of library
choosing 14
log
drive event 112
low voltage differential SCSI interface and terminators 34
LVDS 223
M
MAC address 224
magazine 224
magazine access 224
magazines
removal 82
mailslot 224
mailslot configuration, viewing
112
mailslot configurations, advantages and disadvantages 94
mailslot configurations, listed
95
mailslot, accessing 85
maintaining media
Ultrium 69
mechanical lift, 4/40 and 6/60
installation 24
media
bulk erasing Ultrium tapes 69
compatibility 187
degaussing Ultrium tapes 69
DLT
cartridge life 193
inspecting 74
rewinding a stuck tape
151– 152, 152–
153
write-protecting 77
DLT Type IIIXT 193
drive format 187
hub 74
migration 67– 68
mixing 66
tape leader 74
Ultrium
cartridge life 190
inspecting 69
maintaining 69
write-protecting 70
using DLT cartridges 74
using Ultrium 70– 83
media types 83, 87, 123,
141, 142, 144, 150
menus 64
menus, nesting of 63
mixed media 66
move 224
moving libraries 54
moving tapes between slots 88
N
nesting 63, 224
network access configuration,
viewing 112
North and South American telephone support 203
O
odometer 224
odometer, viewing 110, 112
operations, drive 86
originator 224
P
packaging materials 58
partial availability conditions,
list of 121– 125
partial availability state, clearing 120
password enabled status, viewing 112
password,
enabling
and
changing 92
physical specifications 184–
185
placement of clip nuts
2/20 20
4/40 20
6/60 21
port 224
post-installation tasks
configuring the library for
web monitoring 53
enabling the password 53
setting mailslot configuration
53
setting the date and time 53
power (standby) switch 224
power supplies 113
power supply
removing 167
replacing 168
power supply, location 33
power supply, redundant 139
R
rackmounting the library 17–
30
rails, installing 21
recovery procedures, table of
210
reducing weight for installation
23
registering the library 196
remote management card 224
configuration 99– 100
features 97
installation 99
interface 96
retrieving information from
101
supported configurations 98
using 96– 101
remote management card, fibre
channel installation
10/100 49
2/20 45
4/40 46
6/60 47
8/80 49
remote management card, location
2/20 36
4/40 33, 37
6/60 38
8/80 and 10/100 40
removing and replacing cards
160– 161
removing cover, standalone library 172
removing feet, standalone library 173
removing magazines 82
removing/replacing drive modules 162– 171
retrieving library information
110– 158
from front panel 110
running library diagnostic tests
156
S
save element reserve, viewing
112
screws, securing 30
SCSI 225
cable connections, 2/20 36
cable connections, 4/40 37
cable connections, 6/60 38
cable connections, 8/80 and
10/100 39– 40
cable specifications 186
choosing terminator 34
jumper cable in fibre
installation 42
SCSI element reservation 90,
225
SCSI ID 225
SCSI ID assignments, viewing
112
SCSI ID, saving settings 107
SCSI ID, setting 106
SCSI IDs, default 106
SCSI terminators, fibre channel
installation
10/100 49
2/20 45
4/40 46
6/60 47
8/80 49
SCSI, differential 222
securing screws, location 30
securing the library into position 30
service contracts 199
service information, viewing
112
setting
date and time 108
SCSI IDs, from front panel
106
setting date and time, when to
set 108
shipping libraries 54
shock specifications 182
single-ended SCSI 225
slave controller card, location
33
soft error 225
soft errors 118
soft keys 225
software errors, information
needed before calling vendor
129
software support 201
software vendors, provide applications 129
specifications
231
DLT
formatted capacity 193
media cartridge life 193
media shelf life 193
fibre channel cables 186
library 183
physical 184– 185
SCSI cable 186
SCSI cables 186
shock 182
temperature and humidity
182
Ultrium
bar code labels 191
formatted capacity 190
media cartridge life 190
media shelf life 190
vibration 182
standby power switch 224
status bar icons 61
stop bracket, installing in
2/20 25
4/40 26
6/60 26
straps, lifting 23
support
service contracts 199
supportpacks 197
support packs, availability and
ordering 197
supportpacks 197
swap 225
switch 225
switch, in fibre channel installation
2/20 45
4/40 46
6/60 47
T
tape 225
tape and drive operations 86–
88
tape cartridge 225
bulk erasing Ultrium media
232
69
degaussing Ultrium media
69
DLT 74
description 193
dimensions 193
length 193
removing a stuck tape
152– 153
rewinding a stuck tape
151– 152
DLT Type IIIXT 193
hub 74
inspecting DLT 74
inspecting Ultrium 69
leader 74
Ultrium 69
description 190
dimensions 190
length 190
using Ultrium media 70– 83
write-protecting DLT 77
write-protecting Ultrium 70
tape drawer keys, shipping location 30
tape leader 74
tape magazine access 81
tape, loading into a drive 86
tape, loading into drive 86
tape, unloading from drive 87
TCP/IP 225
telephone support during warranty 203
temperature and humidity specifications 182
templates for clip nuts 19
terminator 225
terminators
2/20 36
4/40 37
6/60 38
8/80 and 10/100 40
terminators, HVDS and LVDS
34
time zones 109
time, setting 108
tools needed, rack installation
17
trim brackets, installing
2/20 27
4/40 28
6/60 29
troubleshooting
DLT
removing a stuck tape
152– 153
rewinding a stuck tape
151– 152
error states 118– 129
error types 117
library hardware 140– 150
network monitoring 147
overview 116
soft errors 118
troubleshooting the host 128
U
Ultrium
bar code labels 72– 73
bulk erasing
media 69
cleaning cartridge 69, 72–
73
degaussing
media 69
format 187
inspecting media 69
interface types 189
maintaining media 69
media formatted capacity
190
specifications 189
tape cartridge 69
using tape cartridges 70–
83
write-protecting media 70
unloading a tape from a drive
using the front panel 87
upgrading firmware 176– 179
UTC 109, 226
UTC. See coordinated universal
time zones, for setting date and time
V
verifying host configuration 50
vibration specifications 182
viewing library configurations 112
W
warranty 197, 199, 207
warranty, telephone support during 203
web-based library administrator 226
website, Customer Care 202
weight, library 17, 25, 54, 58
weight, reducing for installation 23
wide SCSI 226
world time zones 109
write-protecting
DLT media 77
Ultrium media 70
Z
zones, time 109
233
234
Copyright © 2002
Hewlett-Packard Company
Printed in U.S.A.
Edition 5 June 2002
www.hp.com/go/support
Printed on recycled paper
C9521-90002