HP HSC/PCI 1000Base-SX User's Manual

Using PCI 1000Base-T and HSC/PCI 1000Base-SX
(Gigabit Ethernet)
Manufacturing Part Number : J5683-90002
E0602
U.S.A.
© Copyright 2002, Hewlett-Packard Company.
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2
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3
4
Preface
The information in this manual is intended for network managers who administer
Gigabit Ethernet networks. It is assumed that the Gigabit Ethernet hardware and
software have been installed and configured. For instructions on how to install and
configure Gigabit Ethernet hardware and software, refer to the Quick Installation Guide,
available in the /opt/networkdocs directory on your system and on the web (see “Manuals
Available for Gigabit Ethernet” in Chapter 3).
This manual is organized as follows:
Chapter 1
Chapter 1, "Introduction," provides an overview of Gigabit Ethernet
and lists its features.
Chapter 2
Chapter 2, "Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters," describes how
to configure Gigabit Ethernet parameters using the lanadmin(1M)
command line interface.
Chapter 3
Chapter 3, "Gigabit Ethernet Resources," provides references to other
useful tools for installing, configuring, and maintaining Gigabit
Ethernet.
Chapter 4
Chapter 4, "Troubleshooting," provides flowcharts to help diagnose
Gigabit Ethernet hardware and software problems.
Appendix A
Appendix A, "Gigabit Ethernet lanadmin Display," defines the terms
listed in the lanadmin(1M) command display.
Appendix B
Appendix B, "Gigabit Ethernet Card Statistics," gives an explanation
of the card statistics.
Appendix C
Appendix C, "Hardware Reference Information," provides information
about the card LEDs, cabling requirements, and card specifications.
Appendix D
Appendix D, "Hardware Regulatory Statements," includes regulatory
statements for the United States, Canada, Australia/New Zealand,
Japan, and the European community.
Glossary
Provides definitions of terms used in the manual.
3
4
1
Introduction
This chapter gives an overview of the Gigabit Ethernet products and lists its features.
Chapter 1
5
Introduction
Product Overview
Product Overview
Gigabit Ethernet is a high-performance Ethernet networking solution for HP servers
and workstations.
The LAN adapters are data link adapters that support the IEEE 802.3z standard for
1000Base-SX operation over multimode fiber, and the IEEE 802.3ab standard for
1000Base-T operation over 4-pair Cat-5 or Cat-5E UTP copper wiring.
The Gigabit Ethernet intelligent adapters are designed to maximize host CPU efficiency
by performing functions such as TCP/IP checksum, interrupt coalescing, and byte
swapping. Bulk data transfers can be optimized with the use of Jumbo Frames; the large
9000 byte maximum transfer unit (MTU) improves system efficiency.
1000Base-T brings high bandwidth with 10, 100, and 1000 Mbps speeds, whch makes
more processing power available for applications. The tri-speed adapter supports
autonegotiation and autosensing. It operates in full-duplex mode at 10, 100, and 1000
Mbps or in half-duplex mode at 10 and 100 Mbps.
1000Base-SX supports full-duplex point-to-point or back-to-back (via switch to adapter
or adapter to adapter) operations only. The adapters do not support half-duplex and do
not speed negotiate (1000 Mbps operation only), but do perform autonegotiation for other
link parameters.
A6847A supports PCI only. Older 1000Base-SX adapters support HSC/PCI. 1000Base-T
supports PCI only.
The PCI adapters require a single slot in the host system and support all PCI bus
configurations: 32-bit, 33/66 MHz and 64-bit, 33/66 MHz. (Note: A6794A, A6847A, and
A6825A support 64-bit only.)
Features
Features of Gigabit Ethernet include:
•
1000Base-T features:
— Triple speed 10/100/1000 Mbps
— Full duplex operation at 10/100/1000 Mbps and half-duplex operation at 10/100
Mbps (no half-duplex support for 1000 Mbps)
— Autonegotiation and autosensing to the highest available link speed
•
1000Base-SX features:
— 1000 Mbps
— Full-duplex operation
•
Supports IEEE 802.1Q VLAN tagging and IEEE 802.1p Priority Queuing (HP-UX
11i)
•
Minimized host CPU utilization
— Protocol offloading through on-board TCP, UDP, and IP checksum calculations
— Adaptive interrupt coalescence based on traffic load
6
Chapter 1
Introduction
Product Overview
•
Jumbo Frame support
— Large 9000 byte maximum transfer unit (MTU) for improved efficiency and
performance with bulk data transfer
— Supported only at 1000Mbps interface (link partner must also support Jumbo
Frames)
•
SNMP (MIB-II) support
•
MC/ServiceGuard and Auto-Port Aggregation (APA) support for high availability
Note: MC/ServiceGuard is not supported on HP-UX 11iv1.5. APA is not supported on
HP-UX 11i v1.5 and 11i v1.6.
•
Configuration support through SAM
•
Promiscuous mode (link and SAP) inbound and outbound support
•
Supports TCP/IP, NFS, and DLPI applications. Ethernet and SNAP encapsulations
are supported.
•
Supports OLA/R (Online Addition and Replacement) (HP-UX 11i, PCI only)
Note that SX and T cards are not considered to be like cards for OLA/R, that is, you
cannot replace an SX card with a T card, and vice versa.
HP does not support OLA/R on A6794A although HP-UX tools will allow the device
to be suspended and resumed.
Performance on A6794A, A6847A, and A6825A
TCP performance is improved with better throughput on inbound and bidirectional
traffic and better request/response rate.
Differences Between gelan and igelan
The differences between gelan and igelan are:
Chapter 1
•
Supported platforms - see Table 1-1, “List of Gigabit Ethernet Products”.
•
LED behavior - see Table C-1, “LED Description and Status for 1000Base-SX” and
Table C-2, “LED Description and Status for 1000Base-T”.
7
Introduction
About this Manual
About this Manual
The information in this manual applies to the following Gigabit Ethernet products:
Table 1-1
Product
List of Gigabit Ethernet Products
Description
Driver
Name
Operating
System
Supported Systems
A4924A
HSC 1000Base-SX for
K-Class
gelan
K-Class server
10.20, 11.0, and 11i
A4925A
HSC 1000Base-SX for
D/R-Class
gelan
D350 and above, R380
and R390 servers
10.20, 11.0, and 11i
A4926A
PCI 1000Base-SX
gelan
10.20, 11.0, and 11i
A4929A
PCI 1000Base-T
B-Class except B180L
and below, C-Class except
C1xx, J2240 and above
workstations and rp2400
(A-Class) server
rp5400 series (L-Class),
rp7400 (N-Class), and
V-Class servers
11.0 and 11i
SD (Superdome), rp7410,
and rp8400 servers
11i
A6794A
1000Base-T/SCSI
A6847A
PCI 1000Base-SX
A6825A
PCI 1000Base-T
igelan
igelan
rx4610 and rx9610
servers
11i v1.5, 11i v1.6
rp7410 server core I/O
11i, 64-bit only
See Note
11i v1.6
B1000 and higher, C3000
and higher, and J5000
and higher workstations
11.0 and 11i, 64-bit
only
rp5400 series (L-Class),
rp7400 (N-Class), and
rp2400 series (A400 and
higher) servers
11.0 and 11i, 64-bit
only
SD (Superdome), rp7410,
and rp8400 servers
11i, 64-bit only
See Note
11i v1.6
Note: For information on IPF (ItaniumTM Processor Family) platforms supported on HP-UX 11i v1.6, see
the Gigabit Ethernet support web page. Log on to itrc.hp.com and click on “navigate knowledge trees and
response center FAQs” under “maintenance and support” to go to the Knowledge Tree area, then navigate
to Networks/hp-ux networking/lan/gigabit ethernet/technical support.
8
Chapter 1
Introduction
About this Manual
This manual does not include step-by-step instructions on how to install and configure
the Gigabit Ethernet hardware and software. Those instructions are provided in the
Quick Installation Guide, which is available in the /opt/networkdocs directory on your
system and on the web (see “Manuals Available for Gigabit Ethernet” on page 21).
Chapter 1
9
Introduction
About this Manual
10
Chapter 1
2
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet
Parameters
This chapter describes how to configure the Gigabit Ethernet parameters using the
lanadmin(1M) command line interface.
Chapter 2
11
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Understanding the Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Understanding the Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Several parameters can be configured using either the lanadmin(1M) command line
interface or the graphical user interface provided by the System Administration
Manager (SAM). Refer to the next section, “Using the lanadmin Tool with Gigabit
Ethernet” for details on the use of the lanadmin(1M) command. The following
parameters can be configured:
Generic Parameters
•
Ethernet Station Address
The Gigabit Ethernet cards come preprogrammed with an Ethernet Station Address
in the read-only memory. This cannot be modified. However, the station address
actually used by the card for sending and receiving network packets, also known as
the MAC Address, can be set via lanadmin or SAM.
•
Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU)
The MTU can be either the regular Ethernet MTU (1500 bytes) or the Jumbo Frame
MTU (9000 bytes). For 1000Base-T, jumbo frames can be configured only when the
link speed is 1000 Mbps.
Link Parameters
•
Speed, Duplexity, and Autonegotiation
While 1000Base-SX operates only at 1000 Mbps in full-duplex mode, 1000Base-T
operates at 10 or 100 Mbps in either half-duplex or full-duplex mode and also at 1000
Mbps in full-duplex mode.
The speed and duplexity of 1000Base-SX cannot be modified, but its ability to
autonegotiate can be turned on and off for other link parameters. Thus,
autonegotiation has no effect on the speed or duplexity of 1000Base-SX.
1000Base-T can be manually set to 10 or 100 Mbps but not 1000 Mbps. To achieve
gigabit speed, it must be allowed to autonegotiate with its link partner, and provided
the partner can autonegotiate, 1000Base-T will operate at the highest common speed
and duplexity. The following table summarizes the valid settings for 1000Base-T:
12
Chapter 2
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Understanding the Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Speed
Duplexity
Autonegotiation
10
Half
Off
10
Full
Off
100
Half
Off
100
Full
Off
1000*
N/A*
On
*When autonegotiation is on, 1000Base-T will autonegotiate with its link partner;
then, if its partner also autonegotiates and can attain a speed of 1000 Mbps,
1000Base-T will operate at 1000 Mpbs full-duplex (it is not designed to operate at
1000 Mbps half-duplex).
NOTE
Partners on a link must be configured to have the same setting, that is, either both
must autonegotiate or both must be set to the same manual setting. For example, if
the card is set to 100 Mbps full-duplex, the link partner must also be set to 100 Mbps
full-duplex. This will help ensure operation without degraded performance.
•
Receive flow control
Flow control allows use of flow control negotiation and sending and receiving of
pause frames. When the flow control parameter is on, the card receives and manages
pause frames sent by the link partner. When the flow control parameter is off, the
card will silently discard these pause frames. The card cannot be configured to send
pause frames.
Performance Tuning Parameters
CAUTION
•
Send Buffer Coalescing Threshold
•
Receive Buffer Coalescing Threshold
•
Send Interrupt Coalescing Ticks
•
Receive Interrupt Coalescing Ticks
These features are for advanced users. If you set these parameters and you do not
understand what they do, you may have unpredictable results. It is recommended to use
the default settings.
When the card transmits or receives a frame, the system must be notified of the event. If
the card interrupts the system for each transmitted and received frame, the result is a
high degree of processor overhead. To prevent that, Gigabit Ethernet provides a feature
called Interrupt Coalescence. Effective use of this feature can reduce system overhead
and improve performance.
Interrupt Coalescence essentially means that the card interrupts the system after
sending or receiving a few frames. The number of frames after which the card interrupts
the processor can be tuned independently for both send and receive. The tuning can be
specified via two parameters each for send and receive, so that there are four parameters
Chapter 2
13
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Understanding the Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
in all. One of the two parameters specifies the number of data buffers that the card must
transmit (or receive) before interrupting and the other specifies the number of system
clock ticks that must elapse before interrupting.
The four tuning parameters are summarized in the following table.
Table 2-1
Performance Tuning Parameters
Name
Range
Default
Units
send_max_bufs
1 – 128
16 (for gelan)
10 (for igelan)
# of buffers
recv_max_bufs
1 – 256
1
# of buffers
send_coal_ticks
0 – 10000000
1000 (for gelan)
150 (for igelan)
microseconds
recv_coal_ticks
0 – 10000000
0
microseconds
A send interrupt is generated by the card to the host when either:
•
the number of buffers sent by the card since the previous send interrupt equals
send_max_bufs
or
•
the time that has elapsed since the previous send interrupt equals send_coal_ticks (a
value of zero disables timer-based interrupt coalescing),
whichever occurs first.
A receive interrupt is generated by the card to the host when either:
•
the number of frames received by the card since the previous receive interrupt
equals recv_max_bufs
or
•
the time that has elapsed since the previous receive interrupt equals recv_coal_ticks
(a value of zero disables timer-based interrupt coalescing),
whichever occurs first.
14
Chapter 2
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Using the lanadmin Tool with Gigabit Ethernet
Using the lanadmin Tool with Gigabit Ethernet
This section explains the options available in lanadmin to support the Gigabit Ethernet
driver and how to use them. The lanadmin(1M) tool is used to display and set
parameters, as specified by the following commands:
NOTE
When your system is rebooted, settings that were made via the lanadmin(1M) command
will be lost. To retain configuration settings permanently in the configuration file
(/etc/rc.config.d/hpgelanconf or /etc/rc.config.d/hpigelanconf), use the SAM
utility or manually edit the configuration file.
To display the card’s station address, execute:
$ lanadmin -a nmid/ppa
To set the card’s station address, execute:
$ lanadmin -A station_addr nmid/ppa
where nmid is the Network Management Identifier (NMID) (for HP-UX 10.20) and ppa
is the Card Instance Number (also known as physical point of attachment or PPA) (for
HP-UX 11.0 and later). Both the NMID and PPA may be obtained from the lanscan(1M)
output.
To display the MTU, execute:
$ lanadmin -m nmid/ppa
To set the MTU, execute:
$ lanadmin -M mtu_size nmid/ppa
On HP-UX 10.20, the setting of the MTU should be followed by configuring the interface
with the appropriate IP address using ifconfig(1M). See the ifconfig man page for
details. The change in MTU should be verified, on all HP-UX operating systems, by
executing:
$ netstat -rn
To display link parameters, execute:
$ lanadmin -x option nmid/ppa
To set link parameters, execute:
$ lanadmin -X option nmid/ppa
where option specifies the operation to be carried out.
Chapter 2
15
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Using the lanadmin Tool with Gigabit Ethernet
Displaying Values
The command $ lanadmin -x (or -X) help nmid/ppa displays a list of valid options
used to display values.
Option
NOTE
Display
help
List of -x or -X options
speed
Speed and duplexity of the link
fctrl
Whether Receive Flow Control is enabled or not
send_max_bufs
Value of send buffer coalescing threshold
recv_max_bufs
Value of receive buffer coalescing threshold
send_coal_ticks
Value of send interrupt coalescing ticks
recv_coal_ticks
Value of receive interrupt coalescing ticks
stats drv
Driver and adapter statistics
card_info
Adapter and driver revision and settings
If option is not specified, then the speed, duplexity, and autonegotiation settings are
displayed.
Examples
Card Information To display the card information, execute:
$ lanadmin -x card_info nmid/ppa
*********** Version Information ***********
Driver version: B.10.20.11
Firmware version: 12.4.5
Chip version: 0x6
PCI Sub-System ID: 0x106f (1000Base-SX)
PCI Sub-Vendor ID: 0x103c
Board revision: C
Software Key: 6
Engineering Date Code: B-3845
*********** Card Setting ***********
Driver State: GELAN_ONLINE
Auto Negotiation: On
Flow Control: On
Send Max Buf Descriptors: 16
Recv Max Buf Descriptors: 1
Send Coalesced Ticks: 1000
Recv Coalesced Ticks: 0
16
Chapter 2
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Using the lanadmin Tool with Gigabit Ethernet
Card Statistics To display the card statistics, execute:
$ lanadmin -x stats drv nmid/ppa
NOTE
See Appendix B for a sample output and explanation of the card statistics.
Send Buffer Coalescing To display the send buffer coalescing threshold, execute:
$ lanadmin -x send_max_bufs nmid/ppa
Send buffer coalescing threshold = 16
Receive Interrupt Coalescing To display the receive interrupt coalescing ticks,
execute:
$ lanadmin -x recv_coal_ticks nmid/ppa
Receive interrupt coalescing ticks = 0
Flow Control To display the flow control setting, execute:
$ lanadmin -x fctrl nmid/ppa
Flow control is enabled
Setting Values
The command $ lanadmin -X (or -x) help nmid/ppa displays a list of valid options
used to set values.
Option
Chapter 2
Setting
help
Lists -X or -x options
auto_on
Turns on auto-negotiation mode
auto_off
Turns off autonegotiation mode for a 1000Base-SX
fctrl on
Turns on receive flow control
fctrl off
Turns off receive flow control
10hd
Sets speed of a 1000Base-T to 10 Mbps half-duplex
10fd
Sets speed of a 1000Base-T to 10 Mbps full-duplex
100hd
Sets speed of a 1000Base-T to 100 Mbps half-duplex
100fd
Sets speed of a 1000Base-T to 100 Mbps full-duplex
send_max_bufs*
Sets send buffer coalescing threshold [1 – 128]
recv_max_bufs*
Sets receive buffer coalescing threshold [1 – 256]
send_coal_ticks*
Sets send interrupt coalescing ticks [0 – 10000000]
17
Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Parameters
Using the lanadmin Tool with Gigabit Ethernet
Option
Setting
recv_coal_ticks*
Sets receive interrupt coalescing ticks [0 – 10000000]
stats clear
Clears all driver and adapter statistics
* These options require the desired value to be specified after the option name.
Examples
Speed To set the speed to 100 Mbps full-duplex on 1000Base-T, execute:
$ lanadmin -X 100fd nmid/ppa
NOTE
The lanadmin -S option to set the speed is not supported on Gigabit Ethernet.
Stats Clear To clear all driver and card statistics, execute:
$ lanadmin -X stats clear nmid/ppa
Buffer Coalescing Threshold To set the send buffer coalescing threshold, execute:
$ lanadmin -X send_max_bufs 32 nmid/ppa
Note that the tuning option send_max_bufs requires the additional option 32 (the
coalescing threshold).
Interrupt Coalescing Ticks To set the send interrupt coalescing ticks, execute:
$ lanadmin -X send_coal_ticks 2000 nmid/ppa
Note that the tuning option send_coal_ticks requires the additional option 2000 (the
number of coalescing ticks).
18
Chapter 2
3
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
This chapter provides references to other useful tools for installing, configuring, and
maintaining Gigabit Ethernet.
Chapter 3
19
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
HP-UX Manual Reference Pages
HP-UX Manual Reference Pages
While installing, configuring, or troubleshooting Gigabit Ethernet, you may need to refer
to any of the following online manual reference pages (man pages) for useful HP-UX
operating system or Gigabit Ethernet commands. To display a man page, type the
following at the system prompt: man command name. For example, man arp.
20
•
arp(1M) displays and modifies the Internet-to-station address mapping tables used
by the Address Resolution Protocol.
•
hosts(4) is a database that contains a single line entry for each host name entry.
•
ifconfig(1M) assigns an address to a network interface and configures and displays
network parameters.
•
ioscan(1M) scans system hardware, usable I/O system devices, or kernel I/O system
data structures as appropriate, and lists the results.
•
lanadmin(1M) resets or reports the status of the LAN card.
•
lanconfig(1M) in HP-UX 10.20 sets/resets the packet encapsulation method for a
network interface.
•
lanscan(1M) displays information about LAN cards that are successfully bound to
the system.
•
linkloop(1M) verifies network connectivity through the Data Link Layer (OSI
Layer 2).
•
netfmt(1M) formats common tracing and logging binary files.
•
netstat(1) provides network statistics and information about network connections.
•
nettl(1M) logs network events and traces packets as they enter and exit the Gigabit
Ethernet driver.
•
ping(1M) verifies network connectivity through the Network Layer (OSI Layer 3)
and reports the round-trip time of communications between the local and remote
hosts.
•
rad(1M) in HP-UX 11i performs OLA/R functions without any comprehensive
checks.
•
route(1M) adds and deletes entries to the network routing table.
•
sam(1M) configures networking software.
•
swinstall(1M)loads software filesets.
•
swverify(1M)verifies software installation.
Chapter 3
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
Manuals Available for Gigabit Ethernet
Manuals Available for Gigabit Ethernet
Refer to the following Quick Install Guide for step-by-step instructions on how to install
and configure Gigabit Ethernet hardware and software. This guide is available on the
web at http://docs.hp.com under “Networking and Communications ” and in the
/opt/networkdocs directory on your system.
•
For A4924A, A4925A, A4926A, and A4929A:
PCI 1000Base-T and HSC/PCI 1000Base-SX/9000 Quick Installation
•
For A6794A, A6847A and A6825A:
PCI 1000Base-T and 1000Base-SX Quick Installation and Configuration Guide
NOTE
For complete component installation instructions, refer to the Service Guide HP 9000
Server manual for your server or the appropriate Owner’s Guide for your
workstation.
Other Useful Manuals
The following manuals also provide useful information. They are available on the web at
http://docs.hp.com.
•
Installing and Administering LAN/9000 Software
Provides information on installing and administering the LAN product. It also
includes information on configuring other HP-UX link products.
•
Configuring HP-UX For Peripherals
Provides detailed information on using OLA/R (Online Addition and Replacement).
Chapter 3
21
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
Error Messages
Error Messages
Gigabit Ethernet comes with an online message catalog that is used to report
networking problems. You must use the nettl logging and tracing utility to display the
probable cause and action for a message.
Logging Messages
Gigabit Ethernet uses the nettl(1M) logging and tracing facility supplied with HP-UX.
You may access the logging and tracing utility using either the graphical user interface
(GUI) version or the command line interface.
Features of the GUI version, which are now a part of your HP 9000 system, include:
•
An interface which guides you through logging and tracing tasks.
•
An interface which allows you to create and format reports.
•
The capability to collect logging and tracing subsystem-specific information.
•
Report screens which are updated instantaneously with current logging and tracing
information by the subsystem.
•
Context-sensitive on-line help.
To access the GUI version of the logging and tracing utility, execute:
nettladm
See the nettladm(1M) man page for information on using the GUI version, or the
nettl(1M) man page for information on using the command line interface.
Listed below are some example commands using the command line interface.
•
To examine the log file with cause and action descriptions, execute:
netfmt -v -f /var/adm/nettl.LOG00 | more
netfmt -v -f /var/adm/nettl.LOG000 | more (for HP-UX 11i and later)
The -v option enables the reporting of available cause and action descriptions for
each log message. A sample log message using the -v option is shown below.
***********Gigabit Ethernet LAN/9000 Networking***********
Timestamp
: Mon Aug 3 PDT 1998 18:37:16.175754
Process ID
: [ICS]
Subsystem:GELAN
User ID ( UID )
: -1
Log Class:DISASTER
Device ID
: 3
Path ID: 0
Connection ID
: 0
Log Instance: 0
•
To examine just the log messages in the log file, execute:
netfmt -f /var/adm/nettl.LOG00
netfmt -f /var/adm/nettl.LOG000 (for HP-UX 11i and later)
•
22
To check network logging and tracing status, execute:
Chapter 3
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
Logging Messages
nettl -status
•
To start Gigabit Ethernet tracing to the file /tmp/tracefile.TRC0, execute:
nettl -traceon all -entity gelan -file /tmp/tracefile
or
nettl -traceon all -entity igelan -file /tmp/tracefile
Note: nettl(1m) adds the .TRC0 postfix for you.
•
To stop Gigabit Ethernet tracing, execute:
nettl -traceoff
-entity gelan
or
nettl -traceoff
•
-entity igelan
To format the Gigabit Ethernet trace file into the file /tmp/traceout, execute:
netfmt -f /tmp/tracefile.TRC0 > /tmp/traceout
Refer to the netfmt(1M)man page for further information on how to create a filter for
trace formatting.
Chapter 3
23
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
Contacting Your HP Representative
Contacting Your HP Representative
If you have no service contract with HP, you may follow the procedure described below,
but you will be billed accordingly for time and materials.
If you have a service contract with HP, document the problem as a Service Request (SR)
and forward it to your HP representative. Include the following information where
applicable:
•
A characterization of the problem. Describe the events leading up to and including
the problem. Attempt to describe the source and symptoms of the problem.
Your characterization should include: HP-UX commands; communication subsystem
commands; job streams; result codes and messages; and data that can reproduce the
problem. You should also provide a network map with the host name, IP/Internet
address, and station address of each system connected with the HP system.
Illustrate as clearly as possible the context of any message(s). Prepare copies of
information displayed at the system console and user terminal.
•
Obtain the version, update, and fix information for all software. For example, to
check the version number, execute:
what /stand/vmunix | grep gelan or the swlist command and look for
GigEther-00 (for gelan on HP-UX 11i and later)
or
what /stand/vmunix | grep igelan or the swlist command and look for
GigEther-01 (for igelan on HP-UX 11i and later).
To check the version of your kernel, execute uname -r.
This allows HP to determine if the problem is already known and if the correct
software is installed at your site.
•
Prepare copies of the /etc/hosts, /etc/rc.config.d/hpgelanconf (or
hpigelanconf), and /etc/rc.config.d/netconf files.
•
Execute the dmesg command and record messages about the status of the card.
•
Execute the lanscan -v command and record the output.
•
Execute the display command of the lanadmin diagnostic on the Gigabit Ethernet
interface and record the output.
•
Record the troubleshooting flowchart number where you are unable to resolve the
problem.
•
Record all error messages and numbers that appear at the user terminal and the
system console.
•
Save all network log files:
/var/adm/nettl.LOG00 and nettl. LOG01
/var/adm/nettl.LOG000 and nettl. LOG001 (for HP-UX 11i and later)
24
Chapter 3
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
Contacting Your HP Representative
Make sure that ERROR and DISASTER log classes are enabled when log files are
collected.
Prepare the formatted output and a copy of the log file for your HP representative to
further analyze.
•
Prepare a listing of the HP-UX I/O configuration you are using for your HP
representative to further analyze. Use the ioscan(1M) command to help collect this
information
•
Try to determine the general area within the software where you think the problem
exists. Refer to the appropriate reference manual and follow the guidelines on
gathering information for that product.
•
Document your interim, or “workaround,” solution. The cause of the problem can
sometimes be found by comparing the circumstances in which it occurs with the
circumstances in which it does not occur.
•
Create copies of any Internet or Gigabit Ethernet link trace files that were active
when the problem occurred for your HP representative to further analyze.
•
In the event of a system failure, a full memory dump must be taken. Use the
HP-UX utility savecore(1M) to save a core dump. Send the output to your HP
representative.
•
Run the lanadmin command to collect card configuration and statistics. Examples:
For HP-UX 10.20, execute:
lanadmin -x card_info nmid
lanadmin -x stats drv nmid
For HP-UX 11.0 and later, execute:
lanadmin -x card_info ppa
lanadmin -x stats drv ppa
Chapter 3
25
Gigabit Ethernet Resources
Contacting Your HP Representative
26
Chapter 3
4
Troubleshooting
This chapter provides flowcharts that will help diagnose Gigabit Ethernet hardware and
software problems.
Chapter 4
27
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Overview
Troubleshooting Overview
As with any troubleshooting, a systematic approach is helpful. The following table and
flowcharts provide a logical sequence of steps to follow when troubleshooting Gigabit
Ethernet. Using the diagnostic flowcharts, identify whether the problem is with Gigabit
Ethernet or any of the connections to the switch, or whether it is in some other part of
the network, verify your assumptions and, if it is limited to Gigabit Ethernet software or
hardware, correct the problem.
NOTE
To help ensure operation without degraded performance, make sure that both link
partners are set to autonegotiate, or, if using manual settings, that each side is set to the
same speed and duplexity.
If you cannot solve the problem on your own, call your HP representative. Use the
guidelines at the end of Chapter 3 to help you effectively communicate what is wrong.
The Gigabit Ethernet products use diagnostic tools compatible with the HP LAN Link
product.
28
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Diagnostic Flowcharts
The following table summarizes the types of network tests in the diagnostic flowcharts.
Table 4-1
Chart
Chapter 4
Type of Test
Purpose
1
Cable and LED
Test
Checks that hardware, cables, and connectors between your
system and card are operational.
2
Link Level Test
Checks communication between link levels on source and
target host using linkloop(1M).
3
Network Level
Tests
Validates arp(1M) entries and remote host availability.
Checks communication between network layers on source
and target host using ping(1M).
3a
ARP Test
Verifies that an entry exists for the remote host in your
system's ARP cache.
3b
ping Test
Checks communication between network layers on the source
and target host.
4
Transport Level
Test
Checks communication between transport layers on source
and target host using telnet and ftp sessions.
5
Bridge/Gateway
Loopback Test
Checks general network connections through a gateway.
6
Configuration
Tests
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host using
ioscan(1M), lanscan(1M), netfmt(1M), lanadmin(1M), and
ifconfig(1M).
6a
ioscan and lanscan
Test
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host.
6b
netfmt and
lanadmin Test
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host.
6c
ifconfig Test
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host.
29
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 1: Cable and LED Test
Checks that hardware, cables, and connectors between your system and card are
operational.
Figure 4-1
Flowchart 1
Cable
and LED
Test
Does
dmesg/syslog show
error message
for gelan/igelan?
YES
Check card
installation, reset
and/or reseat card
NO
1000Base-SX Link
LED = OFF
or
For gelan driver:
1000Base-T
All speed LEDS = ON
?
YES
NO
1000Base-T
All speed LEDS = OFF
or
For gelan driver:
1000Base-SX
Link LED = Flashing
?
NO
Link Level Test
YES
Check for incorrect/faulty network
cable or connector. Ensure settings for
switch and card are the same.
30
Configuration
Tests
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 1 Procedures
NOTE
•
Check dmesg/syslog output and look for error messages pertaining to gelan/igelan.
Also, check nettl log messages. If errors, check card installation and reset and/or
reseat card.
•
Verify LEDs. If 1000Base-SX link LED = OFF or for gelan, 1000Base-T all speed
LEDs = ON, check card installation and reset and/or reseat card. If LEDs are then
displayed correctly, continue to Link Level Test.
•
If 1000Base-T all speed LEDs = OFF or for gelan, 1000Base-SX Link LED =
Flashing, check for incorrect or faulty network cable or connector. Ensure that
switch is capable of 1000 Mbps operation. Ensure that the switch (or immediate link
partner) and card are set to same autonegotiation settings. Then go to Configuration
Tests. Otherwise, if 1000Base-SX link LED or one of 1000Base-T speed LEDs is on,
continue to Link Level Test.
Refer to Table C-1, “LED Description and Status for 1000Base-SX” and Table C-2, “LED
Description and Status for 1000Base-T” for LED status.
On a 1000Base-SX card, if both Link and Activity LEDs are on and there is no network
connectivity, it could mean that the I/O cage is not seated well. Remove and reseat the
entire PCI I/O cage and reboot.
Chapter 4
31
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 2: Link Level Test
Checks communications between link levels on source and target host using
linkloop(1M).
Figure 4-2
Flowchart 2
Link Level
Test
Execute
linkloop to
remote host
Linkloop
successful?
YES
Network Level
Tests
NO
Loopback FAILED:
Address has bad
format or
Not an individual
address
Loopback FAILED:
Remote host fails
to respond
Re-check remote
host address or
choose a different
remote host and
re-execute linkloop
Correct the link
address parameter
Linkloop
successful?
Repeat
Link Level
Test
NO
Configuration
Tests
YES
Network
Level
Tests
32
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 2 Procedures
Chapter 4
•
Execute linkloop(1M) to remote host. If linkloop is successful, continue to Network
Level Tests. Otherwise, note which error was returned.
•
If loopback failed error = “Address has bad format” or “Not an individual address,”
correct link level address with proper station address format/value and repeat Link
Level Test.
•
Otherwise, loopback failed because remote host did not respond. Double check
remote host address or choose another remote host and re-execute linkloop(1M). If
linkloop is successful, continue to Network Level Tests. You may also want to call the
node manager of the remote host that did not respond (if this was the case). If
linkloop fails, go to Configuration Tests.
33
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 3: Network Level Tests
Validates arp(1M) entries and remote host availability. Checks communication between
network layers on source and target host using ping(1M).
Figure 4-3
Flowchart 3
Network
Level
Tests
ARP Test
ping Test
Flowchart 3 Procedures
34
•
See Flowchart 3a to validate arp(1M) entries and remote host availability.
•
See Flowchart 3b to check communication between network layers on source and
target host using ping(1M).
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 3a: ARP Test
Validates arp(1M) entries and remote host availability.
Figure 4-4
Flowchart 3a
ARP Test
Execute
ping <remotehost> 2000 -n 1
Is remote host
entry in ARP
cache?
NO
Remote
host up?
YES
NO
YES
Is the ARP
entry correct
and complete
?
Bring up
remote host
NO
Use ARP to
correct and
complete the
entry
YES
ping Test
Flowchart 3a Procedures
Chapter 4
•
Execute ping(1M) to remote host so that ARP entry is added. Whether or not ping is
successful, proceed to the next step.
•
Use arp(1M) to verify that an entry exists for the remote host in your system's ARP
cache, executing arp hostname.
•
If there is no ARP entry for the remote host, check to see if the remote host is up. If
not, bring up remote host and continue to ping Test.
•
If the ARP entry is correct or complete, continue to ping Test. Otherwise, use
arp(1M) to enter the correct station address of the remote system and continue to
ping Test.
35
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 3b: ping Test
Checks communication between network layers on source and target host using
ping(1M).
Figure 4-5
Flowchart 3b
ping Test
Execute
ping <remotehost> 2000
NO
YES
Execute
netstat -in.
Are MTUs same on
local and remote
hosts?
NO
Successful?
Transport
Level
Test
NO
Ensure MTUs are same
on local and remote hosts
by executing
lanadmin -M <new mtu>
<nmid/ppa>
Repeat
ping Test
YES
Is speed
1000 Mbps?
(1000Base-T only)
YES
YES
Are you
using jumbo
frames?
NO
Validate network,
remote host, and
configuration
settings
Ensure speed is 1000 Mbps on
local and remote hosts
by executing
lanadmin -x speed <nmid./ppa>
continued
Repeat
ping Test
36
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 3b Procedures
Chapter 4
•
Execute ping(1M) to remote host. If ping is successful, continue to Transport Level
Test.
•
If ping is not successful, execute netstat -in to verify MTU size. Ensure MTU size
is the same on both local and remote hosts (9000 for jumbo frames and 1500 for
standard frames) by executing lanadmin -M new_mtu nmid/ppa, and repeat ping
Test.
•
If ping is still not successful and you are either (1) not using jumbo frames or (2)
using jumbo frames with the correct speed setting, continue to next flowchart to
validate network, remote host, and configuration settings.
•
If link speed is not 1000 Mbps, set it with lanadmin -x speed nmid/ppa,and
repeat ping Test.
37
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 3b (continued)
Figure 4-6
Flowchart 3b (continued)
ping not
successful
YES
Network
unreachable?
error?
Configuration
Tests
NO
YES
No response
from ping?
YES
NO
Unknown host
error?
Are you using
jumbo frames?
NO
YES
YES
NO
Reconfigure
network
Repeat
ping
Test
Cable and
LED Test
Correct BIND, YP,
or /etc/hosts
configuration
NO
No route to
host error?
Do switches in
the path support
jumbo frames?
Repeat
ping
Test
YES
Add route
table entry
NO
Call HP
38
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 3b (continued) Procedures
Chapter 4
•
If network unreachable error, go to Configuration Tests.
•
If there is no response from ping, and using jumbo frames, validate that switches in
the path support jumbo frames, making sure path MTU is 9000 from source host to
destination host. Otherwise, reconfigure network path and repeat ping Test. If not
using jumbo frames, or switches and path MTU are set for jumbo frames (9000
bytes), go to Cable and LED Test.
•
If you receive an unknown host error, add missing host name and repeat ping Test.
•
If you receive “error=SendTo: No route to host,” use route(1M) to add route table
entry for missing host and repeat ping Test. Otherwise, call your HP representative.
39
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 4: Transport Level Test
Checks communications between transport layers on source and target host using telnet
and ftp sessions.
Figure 4-7
Flowchart 4
Transport
Level
Test
Execute telnet to
remote host
telnet
successful?
YES
Stop
NO
Execute ftp to
remote host
ftp
successful?
YES
Call HP
NO
Is
TCP configured
on local or
remote host
?
NO
Configure TCP
Repeat
Transport
Level Test
YES
Network
congested
?
NO
Call HP
YES
Call HP
40
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 4 Procedures
Chapter 4
•
Execute telnet(1M) to a remote host. If successful, stop.
•
If not successful, try to establish an ftp to a remote host. Unlike telnet, ftp does not
use a pseudoterminal (pty) driver on your system. This will determine if pty is why
telnet failed. If ftp is successful, call your HP representative to determine why you
have a problem with pty.
•
If ftp fails, check to see if TCP is configured on both hosts by verifying the
/etc/protocols file. Telnet and ftp work at transport layer and require TCP. If TCP
is not configured, configure now and repeat Transport Level Test.
•
If TCP is installed on both hosts, telnet to another host and/or use netstat(1M)to
check for lost packets. If network is congested, you may need to reconfigure network.
If network congestion is not the cause, more detailed network diagnostics are
required. In either case, call your HP representative.
41
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 5: Bridge/Gateway Loopback Test
Checks general network connections through a gateway.
Figure 4-8
Flowchart 5
Bridge/
Gateway
Test
Execute ping from a
known good host through
a gateway to another
known good host
Successful?
YES
NO
YEStable
Check route
on problem host
and all hosts in
path and correct
if necessary
Examine gateway
YES
Refer to non-HP
documentation or if HP,
execute ifconfig on gateway
Network
interface
up?
YES
Network
Level
Tests
Configuration
Tests
NO
Configure interface up
Repeat/
Bridge/
Gateway
Test
42
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 5 Procedures
Chapter 4
•
Execute ping(1M) from a known good host through a gateway to another known
good host. This will test connectivity through bridge/gateway level. If successful,
execute netstat -r and examine route table on problem host and all hosts in path.
If necessary, correct routing table and go to Network Level Tests.
•
If ping fails, examine gateway to see if HP 9000 or non-HP. If non-HP, refer to
networking documentation for that product. If HP 9000, execute ifconfig(1M) for
all interfaces on gateway or host (see Configuration Tests for more details on
ifconfig).
•
If ifconfig does not show parameter as UP in output for gateway, execute netstat -i
to check status of network interfaces. An asterisk (*) indicates interface is down. If
network interface is down, configure interface up and repeat Bridge/Gateway Test. If
all interfaces are up, continue to Configuration Tests and test all interfaces on
gateway.
43
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6: Configuration Tests
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host using ioscan(1M), lanscan(1M),
netfmt(1M), lanadmin(1M), and ifconfig(1M).
Figure 4-9
Flowchart 6
Configuration
Tests
ioscan and lanscan
Test
netfmt and lanadmin
Test
ifconfig Test
44
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6 Procedures
•
Chapter 4
Verify configuration of network interface on a host using ioscan(1M), lanscan(1M),
netfmt(1M), lanadmin(1M), and ifconfig(1M).
45
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6a: ioscan and lanscan Test
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host using ioscan(1M) and
lanscan(1M).
Figure 4-10
Flowchart 6a
ioscan
and
lanscan
Test
Is the card
claimed by the
system as shown
by executing
ioscan?
Does
lanscan show
ExecuteUP
Hardware
for your
interface?
YES
Does
what /stand/vmunix
display the
gelan/igelan
driver?
Install driver using
swinstall(1M) and verify
or edit /stand/system
to add driver keyword
gelan/igelan. Regenerate
kernel and reboot
system.
Repeat
ioscan and
lanscan
Test
46
Cable
and LED
Test
NO
NO
NO
YES
netfmt
and
lanadmin
Test
YES
Does
dmesg/syslog
show error message
for gelan/igelan
YES
Check card
installation, reset
and/or reseat card
?
NO
Call HP
Repeat
ioscan
lanscan
Test
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6a Procedures
•
Execute ioscan(1M) as follows:
ioscan -kfd drivername, where drivername is either gelan or igelan (refer to
Table 1-1, “List of Gigabit Ethernet Products”).
Verify output from ioscan shows card “CLAIMED” by the system.
Chapter 4
•
If card is claimed, execute lanscan(1M) and check if the hardware state display
shows “UP.” If so, go to Cable and LED Test. If not, continue to netfmt and lanadmin
Test.
•
If card is not claimed, execute what /stand/vmunix | grep drivername, where
drivername is as mentioned above. Verify if the output is similar to the output
documented in the Release Notes for your Gigabit Ethernet product. Use the name of
the running kernel image file in place of “/stand/vmunix” as appropriate.
•
If driver is displayed, check if dmesg/syslog output shows error messages pertaining
to gelan/igelan. Also, check nettl log messages. If errors, check card installation and
reset and/or reseat card, then repeat ioscan and lanscan Test. Otherwise, call your
HP representative.
•
If driver is not displayed, install driver using swinstall(1M) and verify or edit
/stand/system to contain gelan or igelan keyword. (See Chapter 3 of Installing and
Administering LAN/9000 Software for instructions on how to edit /stand/system
and create a new kernel.) Reboot system and repeat ioscan and lanscan Test.
47
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6b: netfmt and lanadmin Test
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host using netfmt(1M) and
lanadmin(1M).
Figure 4-11
Flowchart 6b
netfmt
and
lanadmin
Test
Execute netfmt.
Check causes and
actions in the log
output
Problem
solved?
YES
ifconfig Test
NO
Reset card
ResetYES
successful?
YES
Link Level Test
NO
Reset
card once
more; if still
not successful,
call HP.
48
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6b Procedures
•
Execute netfmt(1M) and view error and disaster log messages.
Example: netfmt -vf /var/adm/nettl.LOG00
It will help to use the time stamp to find proper logs. Ensure you are looking at
1000Base-SX/T information.
Chapter 4
•
If problem is solved, continue to ifconfig Test.
•
If problem persists, run lanadmin(1M) to reset card.
•
If reset is successful, go to Link Level Test. Otherwise, reset the card once more; if
still not successful, call your HP representative.
49
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6c: ifconfig Test
Verifies configuration of network interface on a host using ifconfig(1M).
Figure 4-12
Flowchart 6c
ifconfig
Test
Execute
ifconfig <interface>
<IP address>
netmask <netmask> up.
Execute
ifconfig <interface>
ifconfig
successful
?
NO
YES
Are flags
correct?
NO
Correct ifconfig
flag settings
YES
Call HP
ifconfig entry in
YES
/etc/rc.config.d/netconf
?
NO
Add network config
for card to
/etc/rc.config.d/netconf
Any error
messages
returned?
NO
YES
Correct problem
according to
message received
Repeat
ifconfig
Test
Network
Level
Tests
50
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
Flowchart 6c Procedures
•
Execute ifconfig(1M) on the interface you want to configure to ensure that
interface is enabled. Example:
ifconfig lan1 192.6.1.17 netmask 255.255.255.0 up
Next, execute ifconfig interface to test and verify flag setting is UP and correct
IP address is displayed. Example:
ifconfig lan1
<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST,CKO>
Chapter 4
•
If IP and flags are correct, verify there is an entry for card interface in
/etc/rc.config.d/netconf. If so, go to Network Level Tests. Otherwise, add
correct interface parameters to /etc/rc.config.d/netconf file and reboot. If
flags are incorrect, correct them with ifconfig and repeat ifconfig Test. Otherwise,
if ifconfig is not successful and error messages appear, correct them accordingly
and repeat ifconfig Test.
•
If you cannot correct errors, call your HP representative.
51
Troubleshooting
Diagnostic Flowcharts
52
Chapter 4
A
Gigabit Ethernet lanadmin Display
This appendix defines the terms listed in the lanadmin(1M) command display.
Appendix A
53
Gigabit Ethernet lanadmin Display
LAN Interface Status Display
LAN Interface Status Display
The following is a sample of a lanadmin(1M) command display. The fields are defined in
the section that follows.
HP-UX 10.20 lanadmin output:
LAN INTERFACE STATUS DISPLAY
Sun, Jun 21,1998 14:39:36
Network Management ID
Description
Type (value)
MTU Size
Speed
Station Address
Administration Status (value)
Operation Status (value)
Last Change
Inbound Octets
Inbound Unicast Packets
Inbound Non-Unicast Packets
Inbound Discards
Inbound Errors
Inbound Unknown Protocols
Outbound Octets
Outbound Unicast Packets
Outbound Non-Unicast Packets
Outbound Discards
Outbound Errors
Outbound Queue Length
Specific
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
5
lan3 HP 1000Base-SX Adapter HW Rev A-3814
ethernet-csmacd(6)
1500
1000000000
0x60b0c41121
up(1)
up(1)
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
655367
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ethernet-like Statistics Group
Index
Alignment Errors
FCS Errors
Single Collision Frames
Multiple Collision Frames
Deferred Transmissions
Late Collisions
Excessive Collisions
Internal MAC Transmit Errors
Carrier Sense Errors
Frames Too Long
Internal MAC Receive Errors
54
Appendix A
Gigabit Ethernet lanadmin Display
LAN Interface Status Display
HP-UX 11.0 lanadmin output:
LAN INTERFACE STATUS DISPLAY
Sun, Jun 21,1998 14:49:43
PPA Number
Description
A-3814
Type (value)
MTU Size
Speed
Station Address
Administration Status (value)
Operation Status (value)
Last Change
Inbound Octets
Inbound Unicast Packets
Inbound Non-Unicast Packets
Inbound Discards
Inbound Errors
Inbound Unknown Protocols
Outbound Octets
Outbound Unicast Packets
Outbound Non-Unicast Packets
Outbound Discards
Outbound Errors
Outbound Queue Length
Specific
= 3
= lan3 HP 1000Base-SX Adapter HW Rev
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
ethernet-csmacd(6)
1500
1000000000
0x60b0c401d4
up(1)
up(1)
14
2220359858
87658661
577
0
0
0
2729643634
107383997
285158
0
0
0
655367
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
9
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ethernet-like Statistics Group
Index
Alignment Errors
FCS Errors
Single Collision Frames
Multiple Collision Frames
Deferred Transmissions
Late Collisions
Excessive Collisions
Internal MAC Transmit Errors
Carrier Sense Errors
Frames Too Long
Internal MAC Receive Errors
Appendix A
55
Gigabit Ethernet lanadmin Display
RFC 1213 MIB II
RFC 1213 MIB II
Following are descriptions of the statistics fields in the lanadmin(1M) command display.
For more detailed information about the fields, refer to RFC 1213.
Field
Description
Network Management ID
A unique ID assigned by the system for the network
management of each network interface.
PPA Number
A unique number assigned to each network interface,
distinct from NMID.
Description
A textual string containing information about the
interface.
Type (value)
The type of interface, distinguished according to the
physical/link protocols, immediately below the
network layer in the protocol stack.
Gigabit Ethernet can have one of the following
values: ethernet or IEEE 802.3.
56
MTU Size
The size of the largest datagram which can be
sent/received on the interface specified in octets. This
value can be 1500 or 9000.
Speed in bits per second
The speed of the card — 1000 Mbps for 1000Base-SX
and 10, 100, or 1000 Mbps for 1000Base-T.
Station Address
The interface address at the protocol layer
immediately below the network layer in the protocol
stack. For interfaces which do not have such an
address, such as serial line, this object contains an
octet string of zero length.
Administration Status
The status of the card. This parameter is set to up(1)
and is not configurable. It will have one of the
following values:
up(1)
Ready to pass packets
down(2)
Not operative
testing(3)
In test mode
Operation Status
The status of the link. This value is the same as the
administration status. If the value is up, the link is
operational.
Last Change
The value of SysUpTime at the time the interface
entered its current operational state. If the current
state was entered prior to the last reinitialization of
the local network management subsystem, then this
object contains a zero value.
Appendix A
Gigabit Ethernet lanadmin Display
RFC 1213 MIB II
Appendix A
Inbound Octets
The total number of octets received on the interface,
including framing characters.
Inbound Unicast Packets
The number of subnetwork-unicast packets delivered
to a high-layer protocol.
Inbound Non-Unicast Packets
The number of non-unicast (subnetwork-broadcast or
subnetwork-multicast) packets delivered to a
higher-layer protocol.
Inbound Discards
The number of inbound packets that were discarded
even though no errors had been detected, preventing
them from being delivered to a higher-layer protocol.
One possible reason for discarding such a packet
could be out of receive buffers.
Inbound Errors
The number of inbound packets that contained
errors, preventing them from being deliverable to a
higher-layer protocol.
Inbound Unknown Protocols
The number of packets received via the interface that
were discarded because of an unknown or
unsupported protocol.
Outbound Octets
The total number of octets transmitted out of the
interface, including framing characters.
Outbound Unicast Packets
The total number of packets that higher-level
protocols requested be transmitted to a
subnetwork-unicast address, including those that
were discarded or not sent.
Outbound Non-Unicast Packets
The total number of packets that higher-level
protocols requested be transmitted to a non-unicast
(a subnetwork-broadcast or subnetwork-multicast)
address, including those that were discarded or not
sent.
Outbound Discards
The number of outbound packets that were discarded
even though no errors had been detected to prevent
them from being transmitted. One possible reason for
discarding such a packet could be out of transmit
buffers.
Outbound Errors
The number of outbound packets that could not be
transmitted because of errors.
Outbound Queue Length
The length of the output packet queue (in packets).
57
Gigabit Ethernet lanadmin Display
RFC 1284 Ethernet-Like Interface Statistics
RFC 1284 Ethernet-Like Interface Statistics
Following are descriptions of the Ethernet-like statistics fields in the lanadmin(1M)
command display.
58
Field
Description
Index
A value that uniquely identifies an interface to an
802.3 medium.
Alignment Errors
A count of frames received on a particular interface
that are not an integral number of octets in length
and do not pass the FCS check.
FCS Errors
A count of frames received on a particular interface
that are not an integral number of octets in length
and do not pass the FCS check.
Single Collision Frames
A count of successfully transmitted frames on a
particular interface for which transmission is
inhibited by exactly one collision.
Multiple Collision Frames
A count of successfully transmitted frames on a
particular interface for which transmission is
inhibited by more than one collision.
Deferred Transmissions
A count of frames for which the first transmission
attempt on a particular interface is delayed because
the medium is busy. The count represented by an
instance of this object does not include frames
involved in collisions.
Late Collisions
The number of times that a collision is detected on a
particular interface later than 512 bit-times into the
transmission of a packet.
Excessive Collisions
A couple of frames for which transmission on a
particular interface fails due to excessive collisions or
packets dropped.
Internal MAC Transmit Errors
A count of frames for which transmission on a
particular interface fails due to an internal MAC
sublayer transmit error.
Carrier Sense Errors
The number of times that the carrier sense condition
was lost or never asserted when attempting to
transmit a frame on a particular interface.
Frames Too Long
A count of frames received on a particular interface
that exceed the maximum permitted frame size.
Internal MAC Receive Errors
A count of frames for which reception on a particular
interface fails due to an internal MAC sublayer
receive error.
Appendix A
B
Gigabit Ethernet Card Statistics
This appendix defines the card statistics that are output from the lanadmin(1M)
command.
Appendix B
59
Gigabit Ethernet Card Statistics
Card Statistics Output
Card Statistics Output
The following is a sample card statistics output. An explanation of the statistics is in the
section that follows.
****** Driver Statistics ******
In Packet Error
Out Packet Error
Loopback packets
Link down events
0
0
0
0
****** Host Command Statistics ******
nicCmdsDelMCastAddr
nicCmdsSetMACAddr
nicCmdsSetMulticastMode
micCmdsClearStats
0
0
0
0
****** NIC Events Statistics ******
nicEventsFirmwareOperational
nicEventsStatsUpdated
nicEventsLinkStateChanged
nicEventsMCastListUpdated
1
362765
1
1
****** Interface Statistics ******
ifIndex
4
ifType
6
ifMtu
1514
ifSpeed
1000000000
ifAdminStatus
1
ifOperStatus
1
ifLastChange
12
ifInDiscards
0
ifInErrors
0
ifInUnknownProtos
0
ifOutDiscards
0
ifOutErrors
0
ifOutQLen
0
ifInOctets_low
26719576
ifInOctets_high
0
ifInUcastPkts_low
0
ifInUcastPkts_high
0
ifInMulticastPkts_low
0
ifInMulticastPkts_high
0
ifInBroadcastPkts_low
382146
ifInBroadcastPkts_high
0
ifOutOctets_low
0
ifOutOctets_high
0
ifOutUcastPkts_low
0
ifOutUcastPkts_high
0
ifOutMulticastPkts_low
0
ifOutMulticastPkts_high
0
ifOutBroadcastPkts_low
0
ifOutBroadcastPkts_high
0
60
Appendix B
Gigabit Ethernet Card Statistics
Explanation of Card Statistics
Explanation of Card Statistics
Following are descriptions of the card statistics that are output from the lanadmin(1M)
command.
Field
Description
Driver Statistics
In Packet Error
Number of inbound packets discarded because they
were received when the driver was not operational or
the packet length was incorrect.
Out Packet Error
Number of outbound packets discarded because the
driver was not operational or the driver had
insufficient resources (Memory) to transmit the
packet.
Loopback packets
Number of packets looped back to the upper layers by
the driver.
Link Down events
Number of link down events, i.e., cable disconnects
processed by the driver.
Host Command Statistics
nicCmdsDelMCastAddr
Number of times the driver has issued a command to
the NIC to delete a multicast MAC address.
nicCmdsSetPromiscMode
Number of times the NIC received a command to
enable or disable promiscuous mode.
nicCmdsSetMACAddr
Number of times the NIC received a command to set
the current MAC address.
nicCmdsClearStats
Number of times the NIC received a command to
clear the card statistics maintained by the card.
NIC Events Statistics
nicEventsFirmwareOperational
The number of events the driver has received from
the NIC indicating that the firmware on the NIC is in
the operational state.
nicEventsStatsUpdated
The number of times the NIC has updated the MIB
interface statistics.
nicEventsLinkStateChanged
The number of events the driver has processed
indicating that the status of the link has changed.
nicEventsMCastListUpdated
The number of times the NIC generated an event to
report the addition or deletion of a multicast MAC
address.
Interface Statistics
These are the MIB statistics collected by the card as documented in RFC1066.
Appendix B
61
Gigabit Ethernet Card Statistics
Explanation of Card Statistics
62
Appendix B
C
Hardware Reference Information
This appendix contains information about the card LEDs, cabling requirements, and
card specifications.
Appendix C
63
Hardware Reference Information
The Meaning of the LEDs
The Meaning of the LEDs
The Link LED indicates the card’s status and must be on for the card to function
properly. Note that there is no Link LED on the 1000Base-T card. In its place are three
LEDs which indicate what speed (10, 100, or 1000 Mbps) the link has been established.
The following tables show the LED description and status.
Table C-1
LED Description and Status for 1000Base-SX
LED Description
and Color
Link - Green
On (Steady)
Good connection between
card and network at 1000
Mbps.
Flashing
Port disabled by software, connection failed,
or card trying to
establish connection.
Off
No connection
between card and
network
Note: A6847A is not
programmed to flash
the Link LED.
ACT (Activity) - Amber
Table C-2
Data detected
No data detected
LED Description and Status for 1000Base-T
LED Description
and Color
1000 - Green
100 - Green
10 - Green
On (Steady)
Good connection between
card and network at either
10, 100, or 1000 Mbps as
indicated by LED.
Note: Only one speed
LED should be on at
any given time.
Note: For A4929A, if all
Link speed LEDs are on
steady, the driver is disabled
or not installed.
ACT (Activity) - Amber
(Green on A6794A)
Data detected
64
Data detected
Flashing
Off
N/A
No connection between
card and network.
Data detected
No data detected
Appendix C
Hardware Reference Information
Cabling Requirements
Cabling Requirements
Connectors on LAN cards adhere to appropriate standards agreed upon by various
standards bodies and are widely available. The 1000Base-SX port is compatible with the
IEEE 802.3z standard and uses a single duplex SC connector. The 1000Base-T port is
compatible with the IEEE 802.3ab standard and uses an RJ-45 connector.
Incorrectly wired or installed cabling is the most common cause of communications
problems for local area networks. HP recommends that you work with a qualified cable
installer for assistance in your cabling requirements. The following tables summarize
cabling requirements:
Table C-3
Cabling Requirements for 1000Base-SX
Description
(850nm short-wave laser)
Modal Bandwidth
Operating Distance
62.5 micron MMF
(multimode fibre)
160 (MHz * km)
2 to 220 meters
200 (MHz * km)
2 to 275 meters
50 micron MMF
(multimode fibre)
400 (MHz * km)
2 to 500 meters
500 (MHz * km)
2 to 550 meters
Table C-4
Cabling Requirements for 1000Base-T
Description
Cat 5 or Cat 5E UTP
Bandwidth
100 MHz
Operating Distance
Up to 100 meters
Back-to-Back Connection
When running 1000Base-T back-to-back at either 10 or 100 Mbps, you must use a
crossover cable configuration. At 1000 Mbps, you can use either a crossover or
straight-through cable.
Appendix C
65
Hardware Reference Information
Card Specifications
Card Specifications
For compliance to European directives and related specifications, see the Declaration of
Conformity statement in Appendix D.
A4924A/A4925A/A4926A
Physical
Dimensions (HSC for K):
5.625 in by 3.25 in
Dimensions (HSC for D/R):
13.375 in by 4.875 in
Dimensions (PCI):
6.73 in by 4.75 in
Electrical
Power requirement (HSC):
+15 watts max
Power requirement (PCI):
+14 watts max
Environmental
Temperature
Degrees F = (1.8 x Degrees C) + 32
Operating Temperature:
0o C to 55o C
Storage Temperature:
-40o C to 70o C
Humidity
Operating Relative Humidity
Range
5 to 85% non-condensing
Non-operating/Storage
Humidity:
5 to 95% non-condensing
40o C: 16 hour dwells at extremes
10o C/hour
Altitude
Operating:
10,000 ft (3.1km)
Non-operating:
35,000 ft
Electromagnetic Compatibility
66
FCC Class A
USA
CISPR-22/EN55022 Class A
International and Europe
EN55082-1
Europe
Appendix C
Hardware Reference Information
Card Specifications
VCCI Class A (PCI card only)
Japan
A4929A
Physical
Dimensions:
6.73 in by 4.75 in
Electrical
Power requirement:
+14 watts max
Environmental
Temperature
Degrees F = (1.8 x Degrees C) + 32
Operating Temperature:
0o C to 45o C
Storage Temperature:
-40o C to 70o C
Humidity
Operating Relative Humidity
Range
15 to 80% non-condensing
Non-operating/Storage
Humidity:
5 to 95% non-condensing
40o C: 16 hour dwells at extremes
10o C/hour
Altitude
Operating:
10,000 ft (3.1km)
Non-operating:
35,000 ft
Electromagnetic Compatibility
Appendix C
FCC Class A
USA
CISPR-22/EN55022 Class A
International and Europe
EN55082-1
Europe
VCCI Class A
Japan
67
Hardware Reference Information
Card Specifications
A6825A/A6847A
Physical
Dimensions:
6.6 in by 2.5 in
Electrical
Power requirement:
+8 watts max
Environmental
Temperature
Degrees F = (1.8 x Degrees C) + 32
Operating Temperature:
0o C to 50o C
Storage Temperature:
-40o C to 60o C
Humidity
Operating Relative humidity
range
5 to 95% non-condensing
(40o C: 16 hour dwells at extremes)
Non-operating/storage
humidity:
5 to 95% non-condensing
20o C/hour
Altitude
Operating:
10,000 ft (3.1km)
Non-operating:
35,000 ft
Electromagnetic Compatibility
68
FCC Class A
USA
CISPR-22/EN55022 Class A
International and Europe
CISPR-24
Europe
VCCI Class A
Japan
Appendix C
D
Hardware Regulatory Statements
This appendix contains regulatory statements for the United States, Canada,
Australia/New Zealand, Japan, and the European community.
Appendix D
71
Hardware Regulatory Statements
FCC Statement (For U.S.A.)
FCC Statement (For U.S.A.)
Federal Communications Commission Radio Frequency Interference
Statement
WARNING
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions:
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference and
(2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference
that might cause undesired operation.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class
A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when
the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment
generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy, and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause
interference, in which case the user at his own expense will be required to
take whatever measures may be required to correct the interference.
Hewlett-Packard’s system certification tests were conducted with
HP-supported peripheral devices and cables, such as those received with your
system. Changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved by
Hewlett-Packard could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
Canada
Warning: This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian
Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du règlement sur le
matériel brouilleur du Canada.
72
Appendix D
Hardware Regulatory Statements
EMI (Australia and New Zealand)
EMI (Australia and New Zealand)
This product meets the applicable requirements of the Australia and New Zealand EMC
Framework.
VCCI (Japan) (PCI Card Only)
This equipment complies with the Class A category for information technology
equipment based on the rules of Voluntary Control Council for Interference by
Information Technology Equipment. When used in a residential area, radio interference
may be caused. In this case, the user may be required to take appropriate corrective
actions.
Figure D-1
VCCI Regulatory Statement
EMI Statement (European Community)
NOTE
Appendix D
This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio
interference, in which case you may be required to take adequate measures.
73
Hardware Regulatory Statements
Laser Safety Statements
Laser Safety Statements
Laser Safety Statements - U.S. FDA/CDRH - Optical (laser) Transceiver
CAUTION
The optical transceiver provided on the network interface card contains a laser system
and is classified as a “Class-I Laser Product” under a U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services (DHHS) Radiation Performance standard according to the Radiation
Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968. The Class I label and compliance statement
are located on the optical transceiver.
To ensure proper use of this product, please read this instruction manual carefully and
retain for future reference. Should the unit ever require maintenance, contact an
authorized service location.
CAUTION
Use of controls, adjustments or the performance procedures other than those specified
herein may result in hazardous radiation exposure. To prevent direct exposure to laser
beam, do not try to open the enclosure.
Laser Safety - European Union - Optical Transceiver Only
CAUTION
The optical transceiver provided on the network interface card contains a laser system
and is classified as a “Class 1 Laser Product” per EN 60825-1, Safety of Laser products.
Class 1 laser products are considered safe and do not pose a biological hazard if used
within the data sheet limits and instructions.
To ensure proper use of this product, please read this instruction manual carefully and
retain for future reference. Should the unit ever require maintenance, contact an
authorized service location.
CAUTION
Use of controls, adjustments or the performance procedures other than those specified
herein may result in hazardous radiation exposure. To prevent direct exposure to laser
beam, do not try to open the enclosure.
There are no user serviceable parts nor any maintenance required for the optical
transceiver. All adjustments are made at the factory before shipment to customers.
Tampering with or any attempt to modify the optical transceiver will result in voided
product warranty. It may also result in improper operation of the network card circuitry
and possible overstress of the laser source. Device degradation or product failure may
result.
74
Appendix D
Hardware Regulatory Statements
Laser Safety Statements
Appendix D
75
Hardware Regulatory Statements
Laser Safety Statements
76
Appendix D
Hardware Regulatory Statements
Laser Safety Statements
Appendix D
77
Hardware Regulatory Statements
Laser Safety Statements
78
Appendix D
Glossary
Numerics
F
1000Base-SX: A specific implementation of
1000Mbps operating over two multimode fiber
cables, as specified in Standard IEEE
802.3z/D.50-1998.
Fast Ethernet: A commonly used name applied to
100Base-T.
1000Base-T: A specific implementation of 1000
Mbps operating over four-pair Cat-5 or Cat-5e UTP
cables, as specified in IEEE 802.3ab standards.
A
Alias: Name of the interface that corresponds to a
given Internet address on a system.
Full-Duplex Mode: A mode of media utilization
whereby data can flow in both directions
simultaneously across the multiple wire pairs of a
physical link. While full-duplex operation is not
defined per se in the IEEE 802.3u-1995 specification,
the specification does define a mechanism for this
mode to be autonegotiated between devices on each
end of a link. Full-duplex mode is typically found on
switches.
H
Autonegotiation: A mechanism defined in IEEE
802.3u-1995 whereby devices sharing a link segment
can exchange data and automatically configure
themselves to operate at the highest capability mode
shared between them. This is also used for link
configuration per IEEE 802.3z and IEEE 802.3ab
standards of duplex and flow control configuration
between two 1000Base-SX/T links.
C
Card Instance Number: A number that uniquely
identifies a device within a class. A class of devices is
a logical grouping of similar devices.
HSC: High-speed connect bus.
Half-Duplex Mode: The media utilization mode of
IEEE 802.3u-1995 networks whereby data can flow
in only one direction at a time across the multiple
wire pairs of a physical link.
Hardware Path: An identifier assigned by the
system according to the physical location (slot) of the
card in the hardware backplane. On HP servers, the
I/O subsystem identifies each LAN card by its
hardware path.
Hostname: Name of system on the network.
D
Destination Address: A field in the message
packet format identifying the end node(s) to which
the packet is being sent.
Hub: A network interconnection device that allows
multiple devices to share a single logical link
segment.
I
DHCP: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
DLPI: Data Link Provider Interface. An
industry-standard definition for message
communications to STREAMS-based network
interface drivers.
E
Ethernet: A 10 Mbps LAN, developed by Digital
Equipment Corporation, Intel, and Xerox
Corporation, upon which the IEEE 802.3 network is
based.
Glossary
IEEE: The Institute of Electrical and Electronics
Engineers. A national association, whose activities
include publishing standards applicable to various
electronic technologies. The IEEE technical
committees are numbered and grouped by area. The
802.3 committee produced the standard for LAN
networks.
IEEE 802.3u-1995 network: A 10 or 100 Mbps
LAN, specified in the IEEE 802.3u-1995 Standard
for Local Area Networks. It uses the Carrier Sense
Multiple Access/Collision Detection (CSMA/CD)
network access method to give every node equal
access to the network.
79
Glossary
Internet Address: The network address of a
computer node. This address identifies both which
network the host is on and which host it is. Refer to
the Installing and Administering LAN/9000
Software manual for detailed information about
network addressing.
IP Address: See Internet Address.
L
LAN: See Local Area Network.
Local Area Network (LAN): A data
communications system that allows a number of
independent devices to communicate with each
other.
Local Network: The network to which a node is
directly attached.
Node: Any point in a network where services are
provided or communications channels are
interconnected. A node could be a workstation or a
server processor.
O
Online Addition/Replacement (OLA/R): The
ability of a PCI I/O card to be added or replaced
without the need to shut down or reboot the system.
For instructions on how to perform OLA/R, refer to
Configuring HP-UX For Peripherals.
P
PCI: Peripheral Component Interconnect.
Packet: A sequence of binary digits that is
transmitted as a unit in a computer network. A
packet usually contains control information plus
data.
M
Major Number: Unique value that identifies an
individual hardware device.
Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU): Largest
amount of data that can be transmitted through that
interface. This value does not include the LLC or
MAC headers.
Physical Point of Attachment: A unique number
assigned to each network interface, distinct from
NMID.
PMTU: Path MTU
PPA: See Physical Point of Attachment
Mbps: Megabits per second
Protocol: A specification for coding messages
exchanged between two communications processes.
MBps: Megabytes per second
R
MTU: See Maximum Transmission Unit
RJ-45: The name for the connector type used with
UTP cabling.
N
S
Network Interface: A communication path
through which messages can be sent and received. A
hardware network interface has a hardware device
associated with it, such as a LAN or FDDI card. A
software network interface does not include a
hardware device, for example, the loopback
interface. For every IP address instance, there must
be one network interface configured.
Network Management Identifier (NMID): A
unique ID assigned by the system for the network
management of each network interface.
NMID: See Network Management Identifier
80
Subnetwork: Small discrete physical networks
connected via gateways which share the same
network address space. Refer to Installing and
Administering LAN/9000 Software for detailed
information about subnetworks and subnet
addressing.
Subnet mask: A 32-bit mask which, when AND'd
with an internet address, determines a subnetwork
address. When the internet address is AND'd with
the subnet mask, the ones in the host portion of the
subnet mask will “overwrite” the corresponding bits
of the host portion of the internet address, resulting
Glossary
Glossary
in the subnet address. Refer to Installing and
Administering LAN/9000 Software for detailed
information about subnet masks.
Switch: A network interconnection device that
allows multiple connected senders and receivers to
communicate simultaneously in contrast to a hub
(repeater) where only one device can send at a time.
Some switches have fixed port speeds (10 or 100
Mbps) while others allow port speeds to be
configured or autonegotiated.
T
Topology: The physical and logical geometry
governing placement of nodes in a computer
network. Also, the layout of the transmission
medium for a network.
U
Unshielded Twisted Pair: A data cable type
consisting of pairs of wires twisted together without
an electrically shielding jacket.
UTP: See Unshielded Twisted Pair
Glossary
81