4Holocaust2013CourseSyllabus2

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Literature 80L and History 80W
Winter 2013
Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry
Murray Baumgarten, Professor of English & Comparative
Literature dickens@ucsc.edu
Office Hours: M, W, F 11 – 12: 335 Humanities 1
Peter Kenez, Professor emeritus of Russian History,
kenez@ucsc.edu
Office Hours: M, W, F 11 – 12: 279 Stevenson
Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry, -Literature 80L and History 80W -- is taught jointly by
Professors Murray Baumgarten (Literature) and Peter
Kenez (History). The lectures, selected readings, films, and
classroom discussions of the course present the events of the
Shoah. Bringing historical and literary representations into
dialogue, they ask how and why and where and when the
murder of European Jewry by the Nazis and their various
helpers took place. Students are expected to think critically
about perspectives that have been put forward to account
for the Holocaust, as they develop their own views.
The class meets Monday, Wednesday, Friday at 9:30-10:40
a.m. in Humanities Lecture 206. Films will be shown on
Wednesday evenings from 7:00-10:00 p.m. in Humanities
Lecture 206.
There will be a midterm, a 4-6 page paper, and a final exam,
covering the reading, section discussions, films, and your
critical thinking about the Holocaust. You are required to
attend a discussion section every week, and view a film, which
will be shown on Wednesday evening. There will be
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presentations by survivors and visiting lecturers.
Books are available at the BayTree Bookstore, and on reserve
in McHenry Library.
REQUIRED READING
Appelfeld, Aaron, Badenheim 1939, B. G. Rudolph Lectures
in Judaic Studies, Syracuse U Press
Arieti, Silvano, The Parnas
Bauer, Yehuda, A History of the Holocaust
Borowski, Tadeusz, This Way for the Gas, Ladies &
Gentlemen
Fink, Ida, A Scrap of Time
Kenneally, Thomas, Schindler’s List
Keret, Edgar, Four Stories, B. G. Rudolph Lectures in
Judaic Studies, Syracuse U Press
Levi, Primo, Survival in Auschwitz
Kertesz, Imre, Fateless ness
Schwartz-Bart, Andres, The Last of the Just
Tec, Nehama, Dry Tears
Wiesel, Elie, Night
You will also be responsible for other materials, including
texts of poems and essays, that will be posted on eCommons.
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RECOMMENDED READING
Eigner, Ruth, The Mousetrap, Amazon: kindle edition
Grossman, David, See Under: LOVE
Isaacson, Sarah, Seed of Sarah
Lagerwey, Mary D. Reading Auschwitz, AltaMira 1998
Michaels, Anne, Fugitive Pieces
Orkeny, Istvan, One Minute Stories, Corvina/Budapest 1995
Pecsi, Katalin, Salty Coffee: untold stories by Jewish
Women, Budapest Novella 2007
Ozick, Cynthia, The Shawl
Sebald, W.G., The Emigrants
Thomas, D.M., The White Hotel
WEEKLY READING ASSIGNMENTS
Week 1. January 7 - 11
Monday, January 7: Introduction to Holocaust Studies
Reading: Dan Pagis, “Written in Pencil in the Sealed Railway-Car” – see poe
end of syllabus; Nehama Tec, Dry Tears; begin Yehuda Bauer, A History of t
28,
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Wednesday, January 9. First Lecture: Peter Kenez
Friday, January 11. First Lecture: Murray Baumgarten
Week 2. January 14 – 18 – Begin Section Meetings
Reading: Appelfeld, “Badenheim, 1939” -- Continue reading Bauer; Wiesel, N
Begin Primo Levi, “Survival in Auschwitz”
Monday, January 14. Second Lecture: Peter Kenez
Wednesday, January 16. Second Lecture: Murray Baumgarten -FILM SERIES BEGINS
Friday, January 18. Third Lecture: Peter Kenez
Week 3. January 21 - 25
Monday, January 21. NO CLASS – Martin Luther King Day
Reading: Finish Primo Levi, Survival In Auschwitz; begin Silvano Arieti, Th
January 23. Nathaniel Deutsch – Religious Responses to the Holocausgt
January 25 : Third Lecture: Murray Baumgarten
Week 4. January 28 – February 1
Monday January 28: Fourth Lecture: Peter Kenez
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Reading: Complete at least first half of Bauer, complete The Parnas
Wed, January 30: Fourth Lecture: Murray Baumgarten
Friday, February 1: Fifth Lecture: Peter Kenez
Reading: Poems of Dan Pagis, Paul Celan . . . – handout –
Begin Schwartz-Bart, The Last Of the Just – first two sections
Week 5. February 4 - 8
MIDTERM DUE IN SECTION
Monday, February 4:: Mark Cioc: The Totalitarian State and Modern Terro
Wednesday February 6. Bruce Thompson
Reading: Complete Andres Schwartz-Bart, The Last of the Just
Friday, February 8: Fifth Lecture: Murray Baumgarten
Reading: Begin Thomas Kenneally, Schindler’s List
Week 6. February 11 - 15
Monday, February 11. Michael Thaler, The Nazi State and Modern Medicine
Wednesday, February 13: Sixth Lecture: Peter Kenez
Complete Schindler’s List
Friday, February 15. Sixth Lecture: Murray Baumgarten
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Week 7. February 18 -22
Monday, February 18: NO CLASS – PRESIDENT’S DAY
Wednesday, February 20: Peter Kenez, Murray Baumgarten: Bystanders, Re
(Recommended: David Grossman, See Under: Love, part 1)
Friday, February 22: Peter Kenez, Seventh Lecture
Week 8. February 25 – March 1
Monday February 25: Murray Baumgarten: Seventh Lecture
Reading: Tadeusz Borowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen
Wednesday February 27: Dora Sorell, “Surviving Auschwitz: Tell It To The
Reading, Imre Kertesz, Fatelessness
Friday March 1 Eighth Lecture: Peter Kenez
PAPER DUE IN SECTIONS
Week 9. March 4 - 8
Monday, March 4: Eighth Lecture: Murray Baumgarten
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(Recommended: W. G. Sebald, The Emigrants)
Wednesday March 6: Ninth Lecture: Peter Kenez
Reading, Etgar Keret, Four Stories
Friday March 8: James Young, “Memorials – Holocaust, Vietnam, 9//11”
Week 10: March 11 - 15
Monday March 7. Ninth Lecture: Peter Kenez
Wednesday, March 9. Ninth Lecture: Murray Baumgarten
Friday March 11: Tenth Lecture: Peter Kenez
Reading, Ida Fink, A Scrap of Time
(Recommended D. M. Thomas, The White Hotel.)
Monday, March 18: Concluding Discussions – Peter Kenez and Murray Baum
FINAL EXAM: Take home, due in Sections
Lectures by Peter Kenez
Historical Background – Tradition and Modernity
1. The Jews of Western Europe
2. The Jews of Eastern Europe
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3. The Jews of Russia
Nazi Germany
4. Nazism and Antisemitism
5. Nazi anti-Jewish laws, 1933 – 1939
6. 1941: Extermination – Poland and Russia
7. Extermination of the Jews of the West
8. Extermination: the Balkans and Hungary
How It was Done
9.Jewish Leadership and the Concentration Camps
10. The Victims
11. Consequences of Mass Murder
Lectures by Murray Baumgarten
1. How do we read Holocaust Writing – Dan Pagis, Nehama
Tec
2. Sholom Aleichem & the Yiddish World
2. Emancipation: the Promise of Western Culture – the
responses of
Aaron Appelfeld, Elie Wiesel, and Primo Levi
3. Literature and the Incredible World: The Parnas
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4. What words for this? Postmemory: Dan Pagis, Paul Celan . .
.
5. “Life on the Other Planet”: The Last Of The Just
6. Literary Form: Diary, Memoir, Fiction, Film – and
Schindler’s List
7. Messenger & Witness: Imre Kertesz and Tadeusz Borowski
8. “Not knowing what to think:” Ida Fink – and Anne Michaels
9. Primo Levi: Living After –
10. 7. Holocaust Writing and the Postmodern Situation: Etgar
Keret, David
Grossman, W. G. Sebald
11. Anne Frank in America: the Holocaust Museum Question
General Topics for Discussion
1. Science and Politics: Antisemitism, Racism, and European
Culture
2. Modern Jewish History, the Hurbn, and the Construction of
Meaning
3. The Holocaust as a problem for World-history
4. Victims and Victimizers; Bystanders and Righteous Gentiles
5. Identity Narratives: whose story are we constructing?
Monday Evening Films—roughly in the order we will show
them:
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Image Before My Eyes; Night & Fog; Excerpts from Shoah;
The Partisans of Vilna; The Pianist; Europa, Europa; My
Quarrel with Hersh Rasseyner; Wannsee; Divided We Fall;
The Shop on Main Street
Some Holocaust Poems
Dan Pagis
Translated by Stephen Mitchel
Kaddish
Upon Israel and upon the rabbis
and upon the disciples and upon all the
disciples of their disciples,
and upon all who study the Torah in this
place and in every place,
Peace.
Upon Israel and upon all who meet with
unfriendly glances,
sticks and stones and names . . .
on posters, in newspapers, or in books to last,
chalked on asphalt or in acid on glass,
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shouted from a thousand thousand windows by radio;
who are pushed out of classrooms and rushing trains
whom the hundred hands of a mob strike,
and whom jailers strike with bunches of keys, with
revolver butts; to them and to you,
in this place and in every place . . .
Safety.
Upon Israel and upon all who live as the
sparrows of the streets,
under the cornices of the houses of others,
and as rabbits in the field of strangers
on the grace of the seasons
and what the gleaners leave in the corners;
you children of the wind . . .
birds that feed on the tree of knowledge
in this place and in every place,
to them and to you . . .
A living.
Upon Israel and upon their children and upon all
the children of their children,
In this place and in every place,
to them and to you . . .
Life.
(Kaddish by Charles Reznikoff, November 1942
DEATHFUGUE
Black milk of daybreak we drink it at evening
we drink it at midday and morning we drink it at night
we drink and we drink
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we shovel a grave in the sky there we won't feel crammed in
A man lives in the house he plays with his vipers he writes
he writes when it grows dark to Deutschland your golden hair
Marguerite
he writes it and steps out of doors and the stars are all
twinkling
he whistles his hounds to come close
he whistles his Jews into rows has them shovel a grave in the
ground
he orders us strike up and play for the dance
Black milk of daybreak we drink you at night
we drink you at morning and midday we drink you at evening
we drink and we drink
A man lives in the house he plays with his vipers he writes
he writes when it grows dark to Deutschland your golden hair
Marguerite
your ashen hair Shulamith we shovel a grave in the sky
there we won't feel crammed in
He shouts jab the earth deeper you there you others sing up
and play
he grabs for the rod in his belt he swings it his eyes are blue
jab your spades deeper you there you others play on for the
dance
Black milk of daybreak we drink you at night
we drink you at midday and morning we drink you at evening
we drink and we drink
a man lives in the house with your goldenes Haar Marguerite
your aschenes Haar Shulamith he plays with his vipers
He shouts play death more sweetly Death is a master from
Deutschland
he shouts scrape your strings darker you'll rise then in smoke
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to the sky
you'll have a grave then in the clouds there we won't feel
crammed in
Black milk of daybreak we drink you at night
we drink you at midday Death is a master aus Deutschland
we drink you at evening and morning we drink and we drink
Death is ein Meister aus Deutschland his eye is blue
he shoots you with shot made of lead shoots you level and true
a man lives in the house your goldenes Haar Margarete
he looses his hounds on us grants us a grave in the air
he plays with his vipers and daydreams der Tod ist ein Meister
aus Deutschland
dein goldenes Haar Margarete
dein aschenes Haar Sulamith
Paul Celan, 1944-45
tr. John Felstiner
TODESFUGE
Schwarze Milch der Fruhe wir trinken sie abends
wir trinken sie mittags und morgens wir trinken sie nachts
wir trinken und trinken
wir schaufeln ein Grab in den Luften da liegt man nicht eng
Ein Mann wohnt im Haus der spielt mit den Schlangen der
schreibt
der schreibt wenn es dunkelt nach Deutschland dein goldenes
Haar Margarete
er schreibt es und tritt vor das Haus und es blitzen die Sterne
er pfeift seine Ruden herbei
er pfeift seine Juden hervor la t schaufeln ein Grab in der
Erde
er befiehlt uns spielt auf nun zum Tanz
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Schwarze Milch der Fruhe wir trinken dich nachts
wir trinken dich morgens und mittags wir trinken dich abends
wir trinken und trinken
Ein Mann wohnt im Haus der spielt mit den Schlangen der
schreibt
der schreibt wenn es dunkelt nach Deutschland dein goldenes
Haar Margarete
Dein aschenes Haar Sulamith wir schaufeln ein Grab in den
Luften da liegt man nicht eng
Er ruft stecht trefer ins Erdreich ihr einen ihr andern singet
und spielt
er greift nach dem Eisen im Gurt er schwingts seine Augen
sind blau
stecht tiefer die Spaten ihr einen ihr andern spielt weiter zum
Tanz auf
.
Schwarze Milch der Fruhe wir trinken dich nachts
wir trinken dich mittags und morgens wir trinken dich abends
wir trinken und trinken
ein Mann wohnt im Haus dein goldenes Haar Margarete
dein aschenes Haar Sulamith er spielt mit den Schlangen
Er ruft spielt su er den Tod der Tod ist ein Meister aus
Deutschland
er ruft streicht dunkler die Geigen dann steigt ihr als Rauch
in die Luft
dann habt ihr ein Grab in den Wolken da liegt man nicht eng
Schwarze Milch der Fruhe wir trinken dich nachts
wir trinken dich mittags der Tod ist ein Meister aus
Deutschland
wir trinken dich abends und morgens wir trinken und trinken
der Tod ist ein Meister aus Deutschland sein Auge ist blau
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er trifft dich mit bleierner Kugel er trifft dich genau
ein Mann wohnt im Haus dein goldenes Haar Margarete
er hetzt seine Ruden auf uns er schenkt uns ein Grab in der
Luft
er spielt mit den Schlangen und traumet der Tod ist ein
Meister
aus Deutschland
dein goldenes Haar Margarete
dein aschenes Haar Sulamith
 Paul Celan
MEMORIAL POEM
Strangers' eyes don't see
how in my small room I open a door
and begin my nightly stroll among the graves.
(How much earth--if you can call it earth-does it take to bury smoke?)
There are valleys and hills
and hidden twisted paths,
enough to last a whole night's journey.
In the dark I see shining towards me
faces of epitaphs
wailing their song.
Graves of the whole
vanished Jewish world
blossom in my one-man tent.
And I pray:
Be a father, a mother to me,
a sister, a brother,
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my own children, body-kin,
real as pain,
from my own blood and skin,
be my own dead,
let me grasp and take in
these destroyed millions.
At dawn I shut the door
to my people's house of death.
I sit at the table and doze off,
humming a tune.
The enemy had no dominion over them.
Fathers, mothers, children from their cradles
ringed around death and overcame him.
All the children, astonished,
ran to meet the fear of death
without tears, like little Jewish bedtime stories.
And soon they flickered into flames
like small namesakes of God.
Who else, like me, has a
dead garden?
Who is destined for this, as I am?
Who has so much dead earth waiting for him, as for me?
And when I die
who will inherit my small house of death
and that shining gift,
an eternal deathday light
forever flickering?
MEMENTO MORI
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And if Moyshe Leyb the poet should tell
that he saw death in the waves,
as one sees oneself in the mirror,
in the morning, of all times, around ten o'clock,
would they believe Moyshe Leyb?
And if Moyshe Leyb greeted death from a distance
with his hand, and asked, How's it going?
precisely at the moment when thousands of people
were having the time of their life in the water,
would they believe Moyshe Leyb?
And if Moyshe Leyb, weeping, should swear
that he was drawn to death as much
as a fellow moooning around in the evening
at the window of a lady he's made holy,
would they believe Moyshe Leyb?
And if Moyshe Leyb should picture death for them,
not gray and dark, but gorgeously colorful,
just as it showed itself around ten o'clock,
there, far away, between sky and wave, alone,
would they believe Moyshe Leyb?
 Moyshe Leib Halpern
Translated from the Yiddish by Ruth Whitman
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Teaching Assistants for Holocaust Course
Thomas Mathew <tmathew1@soe.ucsc.edu>
Elizabeth Bejarano <ebejaran@ucsc.edu>,
Dennis Brand <drbrand@ucsc.edu>,
Jeffery Marino <jrmarino@ucsc.edu>,
Jeb Purucker <jpurucke@ucsc.edu>
Jessica Barbata - jbarbata@ucsc.edu
Huseyin Aytug - haytug@ucsc.edu