Motorola Netopia 3397GP User's Manual

Administrator’s
Handbook
®
Motorola Netopia Embedded Software
Version 7.8.2
Motorola Netopia 2200, 3300
and 7000 Series Routers
Residential models
January 2009
®
Administrator’s Handbook
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Motorola, Inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means or used to
make any derivative work (such as translation, transformation or adaptation) without written permission
from Motorola, Inc.
Motorola reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes in content from time to time
without obligation on the part of Motorola to provide notification of such revision or change. Motorola
provides this guide without warranty of any kind, either implied or expressed, including, but not limited to,
the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Motorola may make
improvements or changes in the product(s) described in this manual at any time. MOTOROLA and the
Stylized M Logo are registered in the US Patent & Trademark Office. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Me,
and Windows NT are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S and/or
other countries. Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. Firefox is a registered trademark of the
Mozilla Foundation. All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners.
Motorola, Inc.
1303 East Algonquin Road
Schaumburg, Illinois 60196
USA
Part Number
556447-001-00
V7.8.2-sku29/34
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
CHAPTER 1
Setting up Your Motorola Netopia® Gateway
.......... 7
What’s New in 7.8.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Important Safety Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
POWER SUPPLY INSTALLATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
TELECOMMUNICATION INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
PRODUCT VENTILATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
NETZTEIL INSTALLIEREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
INSTALLATION DER TELEKOMMUNIKATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Set up your Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Configure Your PC for Dynamic Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Motorola Netopia® Gateway Quickstart
CHAPTER 2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Basic Mode Features
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
The Home Page
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Home Page Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Links Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Firewall
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Firewall Background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Wireless Protected Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Enable Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Wireless ID (SSID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Enable Wireless Scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Advanced Configuration Options (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
WiFi Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Wireless MAC Authorization (optional). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Gaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Expert Mode
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Troubleshoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Diagnostics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
DSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
ATM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Help
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Administrator’s Handbook
CHAPTER 3
Expert Mode
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Home Page - Expert Mode
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Home Page Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Links Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Configure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
LAN/WAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
DHCP Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
IP Passthrough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
NAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Router Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Time Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Ethernet Switching/Policy Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
VoIP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Enable Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Wireless ID (SSID) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
Enable Wireless Scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
Advanced Configuration Options (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91
WiFi Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Wireless MAC Authorization (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Statistics
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
DSL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
ATM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Ethernet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Wireless . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Remote Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Update Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
• From a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
• From your PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Reset Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Restart Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Basic Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
CHAPTER 4
Basic Troubleshooting
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Status Indicator Lights
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
LED Function Summary Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Factory Reset Switch
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Table of Contents
CHAPTER 5
Command Line Interface
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Starting and Ending a CLI Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Logging In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Ending a CLI Session. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Saving Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Using the CLI Help Facility
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
About SHELL Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
SHELL Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
SHELL Command Shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
SHELL Commands
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Common Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
WAN Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
About CONFIG Commands
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
CONFIG Mode Prompt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Navigating the CONFIG Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Entering Commands in CONFIG Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Guidelines: CONFIG Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Displaying Current Gateway Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Step Mode: A CLI Configuration Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Validating Your Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
CONFIG Commands
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Remote ATA Configuration Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
DSL Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Bridging Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
DHCP Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
DMT Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Domain Name System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
IGMP Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
IP Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Queue Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
IPMaps Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Network Address Translation (NAT) Default Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Network Address Translation (NAT) Pinhole Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
PPPoE /PPPoA Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
PPPoE with IPoE Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Ethernet Port Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
802.3ah Ethernet OAM Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Command Line Interface Preference Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Port Renumbering Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
SNMP Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Syslog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Wireless Settings (supported models) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
VLAN Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
VoIP settings (supported models) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
UPnP settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
DSL Forum settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Remote Management settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Backup IP Gateway Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
VDSL Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Administrator’s Handbook
CHAPTER 6
Technical Specifications and Safety Information
Description
. . . .245
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Power requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Software and protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245
Agency approvals
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
Regulatory notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .246
Manufacturer’s Declaration of Conformance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Important Safety Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
47 CFR Part 68 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
FCC Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
FCC Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249
Electrical Safety Advisory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Warranty Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250
Software License, Limited Warranty and Limitation of Remedies . . . .250
Software License. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
Limited Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
General Provisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
Copyright Acknowledgments
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Caring for the Environment by Recycling
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Beskyttelse af miljøet med genbrug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Umweltschutz durch Recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Cuidar el medio ambiente mediante el reciclaje . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Recyclage pour le respect de l'environnement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Milieubewust recycleren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Dba∏oÊç o Êrodowisko - recykling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Cuidando do meio ambiente através da reciclagem . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Var rädd om miljön genom återvinning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
CHAPTER 1
Setting up Your Motorola Netopia®
Gateway
This Administrator’s Handbook covers the advanced features of the Motorola Netopia® 2200- 3300and 7000-Series Gateway family.
Your Motorola Netopia® equipment offers advanced configuration features accessed through the Webbased interface screens and the Command Line Interface (CLI). This Administrator’s Handbook documents the advanced features, including advanced testing, security, monitoring, and configuration. This
Administrator’s Handbook should be used as a companion to the User Manual. You should read the
User Manual before reading this Administrator’s Handbook.
This guide is targeted primarily to residential service subscribers.
Expert Mode sections and the Command Line Interface may also be of use to the support staffs of
broadband service providers and advanced residential service subscribers. (See “Expert Mode” on
page 59” and “Command Line Interface” on page 127.”)
Most users will find that the basic Quickstart configuration is all that they ever need to use. This section may be all that you ever need to configure and use your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. The following
instructions cover installation in Router Mode.
❑ “Important Safety Instructions” on page 9
“Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise” on page 10
❑ “Set up your Gateway” on page 11
❑ “Configure Your PC for Dynamic Addressing” on page 12
❑ “Motorola Netopia® Gateway Quickstart” on page 15
7
Administrator’s Handbook
What’s New in 7.8.2
❑ WFA WMM Automatic Unscheduled Power Save support. No user configuration required.
❑ Wireless MAC Filter for each SSID. See “Enable Multiple Wireless IDs” on page 39 and “Wireless
MAC Address Authorization Settings” on page 222.
❑ Wireless Scheduler. See “Enable Wireless Scheduler” on page 32 and “Wireless Settings (supported models)” on page 216.
❑ ADSL and VDSL WIAD Voice-over-IP (VoIP) support. See “VoIP” on page 85 and “VoIP settings (supported models)” on page 229.
❑ The system admin password can now be set via scripting with an FTP file. See “SHELL Commands”
on page 133 and “System Settings” on page 210.
❑ The current configuration can now be saved as factory defaults, surviving a reset of the device. See
“Saving Settings” on page 131.
8
Important Safety Instructions
POWER SUPPLY INSTALLATION
Connect the power supply cord to the power jack on the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. Plug the power
supply into an appropriate electrical outlet.
☛
CAUTION:
Depending on the power supply provided with the product, either the direct plug-in power
supply blades, power supply cord plug or the appliance coupler serves as the mains power
disconnect. It is important that the direct plug-in power supply, socket-outlet or appliance
coupler be located so it is readily accessible.
(Sweden) Apparaten skall anslutas till jordat uttag när den ansluts till ett nätverk
(Norway) Apparatet må kun tilkoples jordet stikkontakt.
USB-powered models: For Use with Listed I.T.E. Only
TELECOMMUNICATION INSTALLATION
When using your telephone equipment, basic safety precautions should always be followed to reduce
the risk of fire, electric shock and injury to persons, including the following:
❑ Do not use this product near water, for example, near a bathtub, wash bowl, kitchen sink or laundry
tub, in a wet basement or near a swimming pool.
❑ Avoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type) during an electrical storm. There may be a
remote risk of electrical shock from lightning.
❑ Do not use the telephone to report a gas leak in the vicinity of the leak.
❑ CAUTION: The external phone should be UL Listed and the connections should be made in accordance with Article 800 of the NEC.
PRODUCT VENTILATION
The Motorola Netopia® Gateway is intended for use in a consumer's home. Ambient temperatures
around this product should not exceed 104°F (40°C). It should not be used in locations exposed to outside heat radiation or trapping of its own heat. The product should have at least one inch of clearance
on all sides except the bottom when properly installed and should not be placed inside tightly enclosed
spaces unless proper ventilation is provided.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
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Administrator’s Handbook
Wichtige Sicherheitshinweise
NETZTEIL INSTALLIEREN
Verbinden Sie das Kabel vom Netzteil mit dem Power-Anschluss an dem Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
Stecken Sie dann das Netzteil in eine Netzsteckdose.
☛
Achtung:
Abhängig von dem mit dem Produkt gelieferten Netzteil, entweder die direkten Steckernetzgeräte, Stecker vom Netzkabel oder der Gerätekoppler dienen als Hauptspannungsunterbrechung. Es ist wichtig, dass das Steckernetzgerät, Steckdose oder Gerätekoppler
frei zugänglich sind.
(Sweden) Apparaten skall anslutas till jordat uttag när den ansluts till ett nätverk
(Norway) Apparatet må kun tilkoples jordet stikkontakt.
USB-powered models: For Use with Listed I.T.E. Only
INSTALLATION DER TELEKOMMUNIKATION
Wenn Ihre Telefonausrüstung verwendet wird, sollten grundlegende Sicherheitsanweisungen immer
befolgt werden, um die Gefahr eines Feuers, eines elektrischen Schlages und die Verletzung von Personen, zu verringern. Beachten Sie diese weiteren Hinweise:
❑ Benutzen Sie dieses Produkt nicht in Wassernähe wie z.B. nahe einer Badewanne, Waschschüssel,
Küchenspüle, in einem nassen Keller oder an einem Swimmingpool.
❑ Vermeiden Sie das Telefonieren (gilt nicht für schnurlose Telefone) während eines Gewitters. Es
besteht die Gefahr eines elektrischen Schlages durch einen Blitz.
❑ Nicht das Telefon benutzen um eine Gasleckstelle zu Melden, wenn Sie sich in der Nähe der Leckstelle befinden.
Bewahren Sie diese Anweisungen auf
10
Set up your Gateway
Refer to your User Manual for instructions on how to connect your Motorola Netopia® Gateway to your
power source, PC or local area network, and your Internet access point, whether it is a dedicated DSL
outlet or a DSL or cable modem. Different Motorola Netopia® Gateway models are supplied for any of
these connections. Be sure to enable Dynamic Addressing on your PC. See “Configure Your PC for
Dynamic Addressing”.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Configure Your PC for Dynamic Addressing
The following instructions assume that you want to use the automatic configuration and address sharing features of the Gateway to provide IP information to devices on your Local Area Network. To connect
additional computers that will use the Gateway’s address sharing feature repeat these steps for each
computer.
Microsoft Windows:
1.
Navigate to the TCP/IP Properties Control Panel.
a. Some Windows versions
follow a path
like this:
Start menu -> Settings -> Control
Panel -> Network (or Network and
Dial-up Connections -> Local Area
Connection -> Properties) -> TCP/IP
[your_network_card] or Internet Protocol [TCP/IP] -> Properties
b. Some Windows versions
follow a path
like this:
Start menu -> Control Panel ->
Network and Internet Connections -> Network Connections ->
Local Area Connection -> Properties -> Internet Protocol [TCP/IP]
-> Properties
Then go to Step 2.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Select Obtain an IP address automatically.
Select Obtain DNS server address automatically, if available.
Remove any previously configured gateways, if available.
OK the settings. Restart if prompted.
Proceed to the next section “Motorola Netopia® Gateway Quickstart” on page 15.
12
c. Windows Vista is set to obtain an IP address automatically by default. You may not need to configure
it at all.
To check, open the Networking Control Panel and select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4).
Click the Properties button.
The Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4) Properties window should appear as shown.
If not, select the radio buttons shown above, and click the OK button.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Macintosh MacOS 9.2 and higher or Mac OS X 10.1.5 or higher:
1.
Access the TCP/IP or Network control panel.
a. MacOS follows a path
like this:
Apple Menu -> Control Panels -> TCP/IP Control Panel
b. Mac OS X
follows a path
like this:
Apple Menu ->
System Preferences ->
Network
Then go to Step 2.
2.
3.
4.
Select Built-in Ethernet
Select Configure Using DHCP
Close and Save, if prompted.
Proceed to the next section “Motorola Netopia® Gateway Quickstart” on page 15.
14
Motorola Netopia® Gateway Quickstart
1.
Run a Web browser, such as Mozilla Firefox or Microsoft Internet Explorer.
Enter http://192.168.1.254 in the URL Address text box.
Press Return.
(If your ISP’s Configuration Worksheet tells you to use an IP address other than 192.168.1.254 to
log in, enter http://< ip-address>.)
2.
The Motorola Netopia® Router displays the Language Preference page.
ChoIces in the Americas are:
Choices in Europe are:
English
English
Español Latinoamericano
Français
Portugués do Brasil
Deutsch
Italiano
3.
Select your language from the pull-down menu and click Next.
The browser displays the Welcome page.
For security, you must create and enter an Administrative password for accessing the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
• The administrative User name is admin.
• The initial Password can be whatever you choose, from one to 32 characters long.
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Administrator’s Handbook
This user name and password are separate from the user name and password you will use to
access the Internet. You may change them later. You will be challenged for this Admin username and
password any time that you attempt to access the Motorola Netopia® Gateway’s configuration
pages.
When you connect to your Gateway as an Administrator, you enter “admin” as the UserName and
the Password you just created.
4.
Click OK.
☛
NOTE:
For 3397GP and 7000 Series models, skip the rest of this section.
Congratulations! Your configuration is complete.
You can go directly to “Basic Mode Features” on page 19.
PPPoE Quickstart
The browser displays the Internet Login page.
16
5.
Enter the User Name and Password supplied by your Internet Service Provider.
Click the Connect button.
You will be redirected to an Internet web page to register your new Modem.
Congratulations! Your installation is complete. You can now surf to your favorite Web sites by typing an
URL in your browser’s location box or by selecting one of your favorite Internet bookmarks.
Optional services that you may have contracted with your provider are also available.
If you have any questions or encounter problems with your Motorola Netopia® Gateway, refer to “Basic
Troubleshooting” on page 115, the context-sensitive help in your Gateway’s web pages, or contact your
service provider’s technical support helpdesk.
Answers to many frequently asked product-related questions are also available on-line at:
http://www.netopia.com/support
If you click the Back button on your web browser, the browser displays the Basic Home Page.
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Administrator’s Handbook
18
CHAPTER 2
Basic Mode Features
Using the Web-based user interface for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway you can configure, troubleshoot, and monitor the status of your Gateway.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
“The Home Page” on page 20
“Links Bar” on page 22
“Firewall” on page 23
“Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26
“Wireless” on page 28
“Gaming” on page 46
“Expert Mode” on page 51
“Troubleshoot” on page 52
“Help” on page 57
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Administrator’s Handbook
The Home Page
Home Page for a PPPoE Connection
Home Page Information
The Home page displays information about the following categories:
❑
❑
❑
❑
Connection Information
(supported VoIP models only) Telephone Information
Router Information
Local Network
Language Selection Buttons
Language Selection Buttons are located at the top of every page. If you prefer the web UI to be displayed in a different language, you can click one of these buttons, and the pages will display in that language, until you choose a different button.
Supported languages in Europe are German, French, Italian, and English.
Supported languages in the Americas are Latin American Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, and English.
20
More Buttons
❑ Restart Connection – For a PPPoE connection, clicking this button will resend your current PPPoE
login credentials and reestablish your Internet connection.
For a DHCP connection, clicking this button will release and renew the DHCP lease from your service
provider’s DHCP server, which assigns your local IP address.
❑ Connect – Only displays if you are not connected. For a PPPoE connection, clicking this button will
allow you to attempt to login using a different User ID and Password.
❑ Disconnect – Only for a PPPoE connection, clicking this button will disconnect you from the Internet
until you choose to reestablish your connection manually.
Click the Help link in the left-hand column of links to display a page of explanatory information. Help is
available for every page in the Web interface. See “Help” on page 57.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Links Bar
The links in the left-hand column of the Home page access a series of pages to allow you to monitor,
diagnose, and update your Gateway. The following sections give brief descriptions of these pages.
❑“The Home Page” on page 20
❑“Firewall” on page 23
❑“Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26
❑“Wireless” on page 28
❑“Gaming” on page 46
❑“Expert Mode” on page 51
❑“Troubleshoot” on page 52
❑“Help” on page 57
22
Firewall
When you click the Firewall link, the Firewall selection page appears.
In addition to the recommended Medium setting, for special circumstances, High and Low levels of
firewall protection are available. You can also turn all firewall protection Off.
Consider your security needs carefully before making any changes here.
If you select a different level of firewall protection, click the Save Changes button.
Firewall Background
The following table gives some tips for Firewall settings:
Application
Typical Internet usage
(browsing, e-mail)
Multi-player online
gaming
Going on vacation
Finished online use for the
day
Chatting online or using
instant messaging
Select this
Level
Medium
Low
High
High
Off
Other Considerations
Set up “Gaming” on page 46; once defined,
services will be active whenever Off is set.
Restore Medium when finished.
Protects your connection while you’re away.
This protects you instead of disconnecting
your Gateway connection.
Set up “Gaming” on page 46; once defined,
services will be active whenever Off is set.
Restore Medium when finished.
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Administrator’s Handbook
As a device on the Internet, a Motorola Netopia® Gateway requires an IP address in order to send or
receive traffic.
The IP traffic sent or received have an associated application port which is dependent on the nature of
the connection request. In the IP protocol standard the following session types are common applications:
❑ ICMP
❑ SNMP
❑ HTTP
❑ telnet
❑ FTP
❑ DHCP
By receiving a response to a scan from a port or series of ports (which is the expected behavior according to the IP standard), hackers can identify an existing device and gain a potential opening for access
to an internet-connected device.
To protect LAN users and their network from these types of attacks, the Motorola Netopia® Firewall
offers three levels of increasing protection.
The following tables indicate the state of ports associated with session types, both on the WAN side
and the LAN side of the Gateway.
This table shows how inbound traffic is treated. Inbound means the traffic is coming from the WAN into
the WAN side of the Gateway.
Gateway: WAN Side
Firewall Setting >>
Port
20
21
23
23
80
80
67
68
161
24
Session Type
ftp data
ftp control
telnet external
telnet Netopia server
http external
http Netopia server
DHCP client
DHCP server
snmp
ping (ICMP)
Off
Low/Medium*
High
--------------Port State----------------------Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Not Applicable
Enabled
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Enabled
Not Applicable
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Not Applicable
Disabled
Disabled
This table shows how outbound traffic is treated. Outbound means the traffic is coming from the LANside computers into the LAN side of the Gateway.
Gateway: LAN Side
Firewall Setting >>
Port
20
21
23
23
80
80
67
68
161
☛
Session Type
ftp data
ftp control
telnet external
telnet Netopia server
http external
http Netopia server
DHCP client
DHCP server
snmp
ping (ICMP)
Off
Low/Medium*
High
--------------Port State----------------------Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Not Applicable
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Not Applicable
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled
Not Applicable
Enabled
Enabled
WAN - Disabled
LAN Local Address
Only
* NOTES:
• The Low setting allows traffic from IPMaps, pinholes, NAT Default cases; the Medium
setting does not allow such traffic.
• The Gateway’s WAN DHCP client port in Medium mode is enabled. This feature allows
end users to continue using DHCP-served IP addresses from their Service Providers, while
having no identifiable presence on the Internet.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Wireless Protected Setup
When you click the Wireless Protected Setup link in the left-hand links bar, the Wireless Protected
Setup configuration page appears.
Wireless Protected Setup (WPS) is a not a new security protocol. It is simply an easier way to use
existing protocols to provide greater security for your wireless network connections.
By default, Privacy is set to Wireless Protected Access (WPA-PSK). WPS allows you to automatically generate a new strong WPA key for your Gateway and any client devices on your wireless network.
☛
Note:
Not all client wireless devices support WPS. Refer to their documentation.
This page offers two ways to enable WPS from the Setup Type pull-down menu:
❑ by PIN Entry:
Here you create a Personal Identification Number (PIN), just as you would for a bank’s ATM card.
Select the MAC address of the client device you want to enable, enter a PIN number, and click the
Submit button.
The Gateway generates a strong WPA key, and displays a completion message.
You must then follow the instructions that came with your WPS-enabled client device to complete the
configuration.
26
❑ or by using the Gateway’s WPS Push-button.
Make sure your wireless clients are running. Click the Start button to begin the exchange, which
may last up to two minutes.
Do not power off your Router during the exchange.
The Router will display a success message when the exchange has completed.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Wireless
(supported models)
When you click Wireless, the 3-D Reach Wireless configuration page appears.
Enable Wireless
The wireless function is automatically enabled by default. If you uncheck the Enable Wireless checkbox, the Wireless Options are disabled, and the Gateway will not provide or broadcast its wireless LAN
services.
Wireless ID (SSID)
The Wireless ID is preset to a number unique to your unit. You can either leave it as is, or change it by
entering a freeform name of up to 32 characters, for example “Hercule’s Wireless LAN”. On client PCs’
software, this might also be called the Network Name. The Wireless ID is used to identify this particular
wireless LAN. Depending on their operating system or client wireless card, users must either:
❑ select from a list of available wireless LANs that appear in a scanned list on their client
❑ or enter this name on their clients in order to join this wireless LAN.
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS)
See “Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26.
28
Enable Wireless Scheduler
If you check the Enable Wireless Scheduler checkbox, the screen expands to allow you to set times
of day when the wireless radio will turn off and on. This makes it possible to control your wireless LAN’s
hours of operation automatically.
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS)
See “Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26.
Privacy
By default, Privacy is set to WPA-PSK with a Wireless Protected Access Pre-Shared key.
Other privacy options, as well as other advanced wireless options are available. To access them, click
the Advanced Configuration Options button.
See “Privacy” on page 33 for more information.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Advanced Configuration Options (optional)
When you click the Advanced Configuration Options button, the Advanced 802.11 Wireless
screen appears. This screen varies its options depending on which form of wireless Privacy you have
selected.
Operating Mode
The pull-down menu allows you to select and lock the Gateway into the wireless transmission mode you
want. For compatibility with clients using 802.11b (up to 11 Mbps transmission) and 802.11g (up to
20+ Mbps), select Normal (802.11b + g). To limit your wireless LAN to one mode or the other, select
802.11b Only, or 802.11g Only.
☛
NOTE:
If you choose to limit the operating mode to 802.11b or 802.11g only, clients using the
mode you excluded will not be able to connect.
Default Channel
(1 through 11, for North America) on which the network will broadcast. This is a frequency range within
the 2.4Ghz band. Channel selection depends on government regulated radio frequencies that vary from
region to region. The widest range available is from 1 to 14. Europe, France, Spain and Japan differ.
Channel selection can have a significant impact on performance, depending on other wireless activity
30
close to this Router. Channel selection is not necessary at the client computers; the clients will scan
the available channels seeking access points using the same SSID as the client.
AutoChannel Setting
For 802.11G models, AutoChannel is a feature that allows the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to determine the best channel to broadcast automatically.
Three settings are available from the pull-down menu: Off-Use default, At Startup, and Continuous.
❑ Off-Use default: the Motorola Netopia® Gateway will use the configured default channel selected
from the previous pull-down menu.
❑ At Startup – the default setting – causes the Motorola Netopia® Gateway at startup to briefly initialize on the default channel, then perform a full two- to three-second scan, and switch to the best
channel it can find, remaining on that channel until the next reboot.
❑ Continuous performs the at-startup scan, and will continuously monitor the current channel for any
other Access Point beacons. If an Access Point beacon is detected on the same channel, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway will initiate a three- to four-minute scan of the channels, locate a better one,
and switch. Once it has switched, it will remain on this channel for at least 30 minutes before
switching again if another Access Point is detected.
Enable Closed System Mode
If enabled, Closed System Mode hides the wireless network from the scanning features of wireless client computers. Unless both the wireless clients and the Router share the same Wireless ID in Closed
System mode, the Router’s wireless LAN will not appear as an available network when scanned for by
wireless-enabled computers. Members of the Closed System WLAN must log onto the Router’s wireless
network with the identical SSID as that configured in the router.
Closed System mode is an ideal way to increase wireless security and to prevent casual detection by
unwanted neighbors, office users, or malicious users such as hackers.
If you do not enable Closed System Mode, it is more convenient, but potentially less secure, for clients
to access your WLAN by scanning available access points. You must decide based on your own network
requirements.
About Closed System Mode and Wireless Encryption
Enabling Closed System Mode on your wireless Router provides another level of security, since your
wireless LAN will no longer appear as an available access point to client PCs that are casually scanning
for one.
Your own wireless network clients, however, must log into the wireless LAN by using the exact SSID of
the Motorola Netopia® Router.
In addition, if you have enabled WEP or WPA encryption on the Motorola Netopia® Router, your network
clients must also have WEP or WPA encryption enabled, and must have the same WEP or WPA encryption key as the Motorola Netopia® Router.
Once the Motorola Netopia® Gateway is located by a client computer, by setting the client to a matching
SSID, the client can connect immediately if WEP or WPA is not enabled. If WEP or WPA is enabled then
the client must also have WEP or WPA enabled and a matching WEP or WPA key.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Wireless client cards from different manufacturers and different operating systems accomplish connecting to a wireless LAN and enabling WEP or WPA in a variety of ways. Consult the documentation for
your particular wireless card and/or operating system.
Block Wireless Bridging
Check the checkbox to block wireless clients from communicating with other wireless clients on the
LAN side of the Gateway.
Enable Wireless Scheduler
See “Enable Wireless Scheduler” on page 29.
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS)
See “Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26.
32
Privacy
❑ WEP - Automatic: provides an easy way to generate WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) keys for
encryption of your wireless network traffic. See “WEP-Automatic” on page 38.
❑ WEP - Manual: WEP Security is a Privacy option that is based on encryption between the Router
and any PCs (“clients”) you have with wireless cards. If you are not using WPA-PSK Privacy, you can
use WEP encryption instead. For this encryption to work, both your Router and each client must
share the same Wireless ID, and both must be using the same encryption keys. See “WEP-Manual”
on page 36.
❑ WPA-802.1x provides RADIUS server authentication support. See “RADIUS Server authentication”
on page 34 below.
❑ WPA-PSK provides Wireless Protected Access, the most secure option for your wireless network.
See “WPA-PSK” on page 35. This mechanism provides the best data protection and access control.
Be sure that your Wi-Fi client adapter supports this option. Not all Wi-Fi clients support WPA-PSK.
❑ OFF - No Privacy: This mode disables privacy on your network, allowing any wireless users to connect to your wireless LAN. Use this option if you are using alternative security measures such as
VPN tunnels, or if your network is for public use.
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Administrator’s Handbook
RADIUS Server authentication
RADIUS servers allow external authentication of users by means of a remote authentication database.
The remote authentication database is maintained by a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service
(RADIUS) server. In conjunction with Wireless User Authentication, you can use a RADIUS server database to authenticate users seeking access to the wireless services, as well as the authorized user list
maintained locally within the Gateway.
If you select WPA-802.1x, the screen expands.
Click the Configure RADIUS Server button.
The Configure RADIUS Server screen appears.
Enter your RADIUS Server information in the
appropriate fields:
❑RADIUS Server Addr/Name: The default
RADIUS server name or IP address that you
want to use.
❑RADIUS Server Secret: The RADIUS secret
key used by this server. The shared secret
should have the same characteristics as a normal password.
❑Alt RADIUS Server Addr/Name: An alternate RADIUS server name or IP address, if available.
❑ Alt RADIUS Server Secret: The RADIUS secret key used by this alternate server. The shared
secret should have the same characteristics as a normal password.
❑ RADIUS Server Port: The port on which the RADIUS server is listening, typically, the default 1812.
Click the Save Changes button.
34
WPA-PSK
One of the easiest ways to enable Privacy on your Wireless network is by selecting
WPA-PSK (Wi-Fi Protected Access) from the pull-down menu.
The screen expands to allow you to enter a Pre Shared Key. The key can be between 8 and 63 characters, but for best security it should be at least 20 characters. When you have entered your key, click the
Save Changes button.
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Administrator’s Handbook
WEP-Manual
Alternatively, you can enable WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) encryption by selecting
WEP-Manual from the Privacy pull-down menu.
You can provide a level of data security by enabling WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) for encryption of network data. You can enable 40-, 128-, or 256-bit WEP Encryption (depending on the capability of your client wireless card) for IP traffic on your LAN.
WEP - Manual allows you to enter your own encryption keys manually. This is a difficult process, but
only needs to be done once. Avoid the temptation to enter all the same characters.
Encryption Key Size #1 – #4: Selects the length of each encryption key. The longer the key, the stronger the encryption and the more difficult it is to break the encryption.
Encryption Key #1 – #4: The encryption keys. You enter keys using hexadecimal digits. For 40/64bit
encryption, you need ten digits; 26 digits for 128bit, and 58 digits for 256bit WEP. Hexadecimal characters are 0 – 9, and a – f.
36
Examples:
❑ 40bit: 02468ACE02
❑ 128bit: 0123456789ABCDEF0123456789
❑ 256bit: 592CA140F0A238B0C61AE162F592CA140F0A238B0C61AE162F21A09C
Use WEP encryption key (1 – 4) #: Specifies which key the Gateway will use to encrypt transmitted
traffic. The default is key #1.
Click the click Save Changes button.
Any WEP-enabled client must have an identical key of the same length as the Router, in order to successfully receive and decrypt the traffic. Similarly, the client also has a ‘default’ key that it uses to
encrypt its transmissions. In order for the Router to receive the client’s data, it must likewise have the
identical key of the same length.
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Administrator’s Handbook
WEP-Automatic
Alternatively, you can enable WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) encryption by selecting
WEP-Automatic from the Privacy pull-down menu.
You can provide a level of data security by enabling WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) for encryption of network data. You can enable 40-, 128-, or 256-bit WEP Encryption (depending on the capability of your client wireless card) for IP traffic on your LAN.
Enter a Passphrase. The number of characters to use is shown in the pull-down menu. Click the Save
Changes button. This will generate an encryption key automatically.
Any WEP-enabled client must have an identical key of the same length as the Router, in order to successfully receive and decrypt the traffic. Similarly, the client also has a ‘default’ key that it uses to
encrypt its transmissions. In order for the Router to receive the client’s data, it must likewise have the
identical key of the same length.
38
Enable Multiple Wireless IDs
This feature allows you to add additional network identifiers (SSIDs or Network Names) for your wireless
network. To enable Multiple Wireless IDs, click the button.
The Enable Multiple Wireless IDs screen appears to allow you to add up to three additional Wireless
IDs.
When the Multiple Wireless SSIDs screen appears, check the Enable SSID checkbox for each SSID
you want to enable.
The screen expands to allow you to name each additional Wireless ID, and specify a Privacy mode for
each one.
❑ You can enable or disable Closed System Mode for each SSID by checking or unchecking the
checkbox. See “Enable Closed System Mode” on page 31 for more information.
❑ Privacy modes available from the pull-down menu for the multiple SSIDs are: WPA-PSK, WPA802.1x, or Off-No Privacy. WEP-Automatic or WEP-Manual are also available if not already configured on the primary SSID or a previous multiple SSID.
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Administrator’s Handbook
❑ You also have the choice of applying WPA Version 1 and 2, WPA Version 1 Only, or WPA Version
2 Only from the pull-down menu. These can be applied to each SSID individually.
❑ If you choose WPA-802.1x privacy, the Configure RADIUS Server option appears, to allow you to
specify your RADIUS server information. See “RADIUS Server authentication” on page 34.
❑ You can now choose to Limit Wireless Access by MAC Address. This allows you to restrict individual
clients’ access to each SSID separately. Click the Limit Wireless Access by MAC Address button.
The MAC Authorization for that SSID screen appears.
Select Enabled from the pull-down menu. The screen expands to allow you to add authorized clients’ MAC addresses.
40
You do this in the same manner as you do to authorize MAC addresses for the primary SSID. See
“Wireless MAC Authorization (optional)” on page 44.
Click the Save Changes button. The Gateway will prompt you to restart it.
Click the Yes button, and the Gateway will restart with your new settings.
☛
NOTES:
The Gateway supports up to 4 different SSIDs:
• One SSID is broadcast by default and has wireless bridging enabled by
default.
• These network IDs can now be configured separately in terms of MAC
Address filtering.
• You can configure privacy on one SSID and disable it on another SSID.
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Administrator’s Handbook
WiFi Multimedia
WiFi Multimedia is an advanced feature that allows you to prioritize various types of data travelling over
the wireless network. Certain types of data that are sensitive to delays, such as voice or video, must be
prioritized ahead of other, less delay-sensitive types, such as email.
WiFi Multimedia currently implements wireless Quality of Service (QoS) by transmitting data depending
on Diffserv priority settings. These priorities are mapped into four Access Categories (AC), in increasing
order of priority:
❑
❑
❑
❑
Background (BK),
Best Effort (BE),
Video (VI), and
Voice (VO).
It requires WiFi Multimedia (WMM)-capable clients, usually a separate feature enabled at the client network settings, and client PC software that makes use of Differentiated Services (Diffserv). Refer to
your operating system instructions for enabling Diffserv QoS.
When you click the WiFi Multimedia button the WiFi Multimedia page appears.
To enable the WiFi Multimedia custom settings, select Diffserv from the pull-down menu.
42
The screen expands.
Router EDCA Parameters (Enhanced Distributed Channel Access) govern wireless data from your
Gateway to the client; Client EDCA Parameters govern wireless data from the client to your Gateway.
☛
NOTE:
It is not recommended that you modify these settings without direct knowledge or instructions to do so. Modifying these settings inappropriately could seriously degrade network
performance.
❑ AIFs: (Arbitration Interframe Spacing) the wait time in milliseconds for data frames.
❑ cwMin: (Minimum Contention Window) upper limit in milliseconds of the range for determining initial
random backoff. The value you choose must be lower than cwMax.
❑ cwMax: (Maximum Contention Window) upper limit in milliseconds of the range of determining final
random backoff. The value you choose must be higher than cwMin.
❑ TXOP Limit: Time interval in microseconds that clients may initiate transmissions.
(When Operating Mode is B-only, default values are used and this field is not configurable.)
Click the Save Changes button.
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Wireless MAC Authorization (optional)
MAC Authorization allows you to specify which client PCs are allowed to join the wireless LAN by unique
hardware (MAC) address. To enable this feature, click the Limit Wireless Access by MAC
Address button. The MAC Authorization screen appears.
Select Enabled from the pull-down menu.
The screen expands to permit you to add MAC addresses.
Click the Add button.
Once it is enabled, only entered MAC addresses that have been set to Allow will be accepted onto the
wireless LAN. All unlisted addresses will be blocked, in addition to the listed addresses with Allow disabled.
44
Click the Submit button.
When you are finished adding MAC addresses click the Save Changes button. You will be returned to
the 802.11 Wireless page. You can Add, Edit, or Delete any of your entries later by returning to this
page.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Gaming
When you click Gaming, the NAT (Games and Other Services) page appears.
NAT (Games and Other Services) allows you to host internet applications when NAT is enabled. You
can host different games and software on different PCs.
From the Service Name pull-down menu, you can select any of a large number of predefined games
and software. (See “List of Supported Games and Software” on page 47.)
1.
Once you choose a software service or game, click Enable.
The Enable Service screen appears.
Host Device specifies the machine on which the selected software is hosted.
2.
Select a PC to host the software from the Select Host Device pull-down menu and
click Enable.
Each time you enable a software service or game your entry will be added to the list of Service
Names displayed on the NAT Configuration page.
To remove a game or software from the hosted list, choose the game or software you want to remove
and click the Disable button.
46
List of Supported Games and Software
Act of War - Direct Action
Age of Empires II
Age of Empires, v.1.0
Age of Empires: The Rise of
Rome, v.1.0
Age of Mythology
Age of Wonders
AIM Talk
America's Army
Apache
Asheron's Call
Azureus
Baldur's Gate I and II
Battlefield 1942
Battlefield Communicator
Battlefield Vietnam
BitTornado
BitTorrent
Black and White
Blazing Angels Online
Brothers in Arms - Earned in
Blood
Brothers in Arms Online
Buddy Phone
Calista IP Phone
Call of Duty
CART Precision Racing, v 1.0
Citrix Metaframe/ICA Client
Close Combat for Windows 1.0
Close Combat III: The Russian
Front, v 1.0
Close Combat: A Bridge Too
Far, v 2.0
Combat Flight Sim 2: WWII
Pacific Thr, v 1.0
Combat Flight Sim: WWII
Europe Series, v 1.0
Counter Strike
Dark Reign
Delta Force (Client and Server)
Delta Force 2
Delta Force Black Hawk Down
Diablo II Server
Dialpad
DNS Server
Doom 3
Dues Ex
Dune 2000
eDonkey
Empire Earth
Empire Earth 2
eMule
eMule Plus
F-16, Mig 29
F-22, Lightning 3
Far Cry
Fighter Ace II
FTP
GNUtella
Grand Theft Auto 2 Multiplayer
H.323 compliant (Netmeeting,
CUSeeME)
Half Life
Half Life 2 Steam
Half Life 2 Steam Server
Half Life Steam
Half Life Steam Server
Halo
Hellbender for Windows, v 1.0
Heretic II
Hexen II
Hotline Server
HTTP
HTTPS
ICQ 2001b
ICQ Old
IMAP Client
IMAP Client v.3
Internet Phone
IPSec IKE
iTunes
Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast
Kali
KazaA
Lime Wire
Links LS 2000
Lord of the Rings Online
Mech Warrior 3
MechWarrior 4: Vengeance
Medal of Honor Allied Assault
Microsoft Flight Simulator
2000
Microsoft Flight Simulator 98
Microsoft Golf 1998 Edition, v
1.0
Microsoft Golf 1999 Edition
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48
Microsoft Golf 2001 Edition
Midtown Madness, v 1.0
mIRC Auth-IdentD
mIRC Chat
mIRC DCC - IRC DCC
Monster Truck Madness 2, v
2.0
Monster Truck Madness, v 1.0
Motocross Madness 2, v 2.0
Motocross Madness, v 1.0
MSN Game Zone
MSN Game Zone DX
MSN Messenger
Need for Speed 3, Hot Pursuit
Need for Speed, Porsche
Net2Phone
NNTP
Operation FlashPoint
Outlaws
pcAnywhere (incoming)
PlayStation Network
POP-3
PPTP
Quake 2
Quake 3
Quake 4
Rainbow Six
RealAudio
Return to Castle Wolfenstein
Roger Wilco
Rogue Spear
ShoutCast Server
SMTP
SNMP
Soldier of Fortune
SSH server
StarCraft
Starfleet Command
StarLancer, v 1.0
TeamSpeak
Telnet
TFTP
Tiberian Sun: Command and
Conquer
Timbuktu
Total Annihilation
Ultima Online
Unreal Tournament Server
Urban Assault, v 1.0
VNC, Virtual Network Computing
Warlords Battlecry
Warrock
Westwood Online, Command
and Conquer
Win2000 Terminal Server
Wolfenstein Enemy Territory
World of Warcraft
X-Lite
XBox 360 Media Center
XBox Live 360
Yahoo Messenger Chat
Yahoo Messenger Phone
ZNES
Define Custom Service
To configure a Custom Service, choose whether to use Port Forwarding or Trigger Ports.
❑ Port Forwarding forwards a range of WAN ports to an IP address on the LAN.
❑ Trigger Ports forwards a range of ports to an IP address on the LAN only after specific outbound
traffic “triggers” the feature.
Click the Next button.
If you chose Port Forwarding, the Port Range entry screen appears.
Port Forwarding forwards a range of WAN ports to an IP address on the LAN. Enter the following information:
❑ Service Name: A unique identifier for the Custom Service.
❑ Global Port Range: Range of ports on which incoming traffic will be received.
❑ Base Host Port: The port number at the start of the port range your Gateway should use when forwarding traffic of the specified type(s) to the internal IP address.
❑ Protocol: Protocol type of Internet traffic, TCP or UDP.
Click the Next button.
If you chose Trigger Ports, the Trigger Ports entry screen appears.
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Trigger Ports forwards a range of ports to an IP address on the LAN only after specific outbound traffic
“triggers” the feature. Enter the following information:
❑ Service Name: A unique identifier for the Custom Service.
❑ Global Port Range: Range of ports on which incoming traffic will be received.
❑ Local Trigger Port: Port number of the type of outbound traffic that needs to happen (will be the
trigger) to then allow the configured ports for inbound traffic.
Example: Set the trigger port to 21 and configure a range of 25 – 110. You would need to do an outbound ftp before you were able to do an inbound smtp.
Click the Next button.
Static NAT
This feature allows you to:
❑ Direct your Gateway to forward all externally initiated IP traffic (TCP and UDP protocols only) to a
default host on the LAN.
❑ Enable it for certain situations:
– Where you cannot anticipate what port number or packet protocol an in-bound application might
use. For example, some network games select arbitrary port numbers when a connection is opened.
– When you want all unsolicited traffic to go to a specific LAN host.
This feature allows you to direct unsolicited or non-specific traffic to a designated LAN station. With NAT
“On” in the Gateway, these packets normally would be discarded.
For instance, this could be application traffic where you don’t know (in advance) the port or protocol
that will be used. Some game applications fit this profile.
From the pull-down menu, select the address of the PC that you want to be your default NAT destination.
Click the Next button, and your choice will be so designated.
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Expert Mode
Expert Mode allows you to configure a wide variety of specific Gateway and networking settings. Expert
Mode is for advanced users and system administrators, and most users will not need to modify these
settings. If you need to enter Expert Mode, and click the Expert Mode link, you will be challenged to
confirm your choice.
Consult with your Internet Service Provider or your system administrator before attempting to modify
any settings in the Expert Mode.
When you click Yes, enter expert mode, the Expert Mode Home page appears.
For information go to “Expert Mode” on page 59.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Troubleshoot
When you click the Troubleshoot link, the Links Bar expands to
offer two troubleshooting sub-headings:
❑“Diagnostics” on page 53
❑“Statistics” on page 54
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Diagnostics
This automated multi-layer test examines the functionality of the Gateway from the physical connections to the data traffic being sent by users through the Gateway.
You enter a web address URL or an IP address in the Web Address field and click the Test button.
Results will be displayed in the Progress Window as they are generated.
This sequence of tests takes approximately one minute to generate results. Please wait for the test to
run to completion.
Each test generates one of the following result codes:
Result
Meaning
* PASS:
The test was successful.
* FAIL:
The test was unsuccessful.
* SKIPPED:
The test was skipped because a test on which it depended failed.
* PENDING:
The test timed out without producing a result. Try running Diagnostics again.
* WARNING:
The test was unsuccessful. The Service Provider equipment your Gateway
connects to may not support this test.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Statistics
When you click Statistics in the left hand column of links, the links bar expands to display six statistical sub-headings:
❑“DSL” on page 54
❑“ATM” on page 55
❑“Ethernet” on page 55
❑“IP” on page 55
❑“LAN” on page 55
❑“Wireless” on page 56
❑“Logs” on page 56
These screens will vary depending on your Gateway’s model and traffic activity.
☛
Note:
Available Statistics links vary by platform.
DSL
When you click DSL, the DSL Statistics page appears.
The DSL Statistics page displays information about the Gateway's WAN connection to the Internet.
❑ Line State: May be Up (connected) or Down (disconnected).
❑ Modulation: Method of regulating the DSL signal. DMT (Discrete MultiTone) allows connections to
work better when certain radio transmitters are present.
❑ Data Path: Type of path used by the device's processor.
Downstream and Upstream statistics
❑ Max Allowed Speed (kbps): Your maximum speeds for downloading (receiving) and uploading
(sending) data on the DSL line, in kilobits per second.
❑ SN Margin (db): Signal to noise margin, in decibels. Reflects the amount of unwanted “noise” on
the DSL line.
❑ Line Attenuation: Amount of reduction in signal strength on the DSL line, in decibels.
❑ CRC Errors: Number of times data packets have had to be resent due to errors in transmission or
reception.
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ATM
When you click ATM, the ATM Statistics page appears.
The ATM Statistics page:
❑ displays your Gateway's unique hardware (MAC) address.
❑ displays detailed statistics about your WAN data traffic, upstream and downstream.
This information is useful for troubleshooting and when seeking technical support.
Ethernet
When you click Ethernet, the Ethernet Statistics page appears.
The Ethernet Statistics page:
❑ displays your Gateway's unique hardware (MAC) address.
❑ displays detailed statistics about your LAN data traffic, upstream and downstream.
IP
When you click IP, the IP Statistics page appears. The IP Statistics page displays the IP interfaces and
routing table information about your network.
General
❑ IP WAN Address: The public IP address of your Gateway, whether dynamically or statically
assigned.
❑ IP Gateway: Your ISP's gateway Gateway IP address
❑ Primary DNS: The IP address of the Primary Domain Name Server
❑ Primary DNS name: The name of the Primary Domain Name Server
❑ Secondary DNS: The IP address of the backup Domain Name Server (if any)
❑ Secondary DNS name: The name of the backup Domain Name Server
IP interfaces
❑ Address: Your Gateway's IP address as seen from your internal network (LAN), and from the public
Internet (WAN)
❑ Netmask: The subnet mask for the respective IP interfaces (LAN and WAN)
❑ Name: The name of each IP interface (example:Eth0, WAN2)
Network Routing Table and Host Routing Table
The Routing tables display all of the IP routes currently known to your Gateway
LAN
When you click LAN, the LAN Statistics page appears.
The LAN Statistics page displays detailed information about your LAN IP configuration and names and
IP addresses of devices on your LAN.
❑ Gateway IP Address: The IP address of your Gateway as seen from the LAN
❑ DHCP Netmask: Subnet mask of your LAN
❑ DHCP Start Address: First IP address in the range being served to your LAN by the Gateway's
DHCP server
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❑ DHCP End Address: Last IP address in the range being served to your LAN by the Gateway's DHCP
server
❑ DHCP Server Status: May be On or Off
❑ DNS Server: The IP address of the default DNS server
Devices on LAN
Displays the IP Address, MAC (hardware) Address, and network Name for each device on your LAN connected to the Gateway.
Wireless
When you click Wireless, the Wireless Statistics page appears.
The Wireless Statistics page:
❑ displays your Router's unique hardware Wireless (MAC) address.
❑ displays detailed statistics about your Wireless LAN data traffic, upstream and downstream.
Logs
When you click Logs, the Logs page appears.
Select a log from the pull-down menu:
❑ All: Displays the entire system log.
❑ Connection: Displays events logged for the WAN connection.
❑ System: Displays events logged for the Gateway system configuration.
The current status of the Gateway is displayed for all logs.
❑ You can clear all log entries by clicking the Clear All Logs button.
❑ You can save logs to a text (.TXT) file by clicking the Save to File button. This will create a text file
that you can save to your hard drive. The file can be opened with your favorite text editor.
☛
Note:
Some browsers, such as Internet Explorer for Windows XP, require that you specify the
Motorola Netopia® Gateway’s URL as a “Trusted site” in “Internet Options: Security”. This
is necessary to allow the “download” of the log text file to the PC.
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Help
Click the Help link in the left-hand column of links to display a page of explanatory information. Help is
available for every page in the Web interface.
Here is an example:
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CHAPTER 3
Expert Mode
Using the Expert Mode Web-based user interface for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway you can configure,
troubleshoot, and monitor the status of your Gateway.
This section covers the following topics:
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
“Home Page - Expert Mode” on page 60
“Help” on page 62
“Links Bar” on page 63
“Configure” on page 64
“Statistics” on page 106
“Diagnostics” on page 109
“Remote Access” on page 110
“Update Router” on page 111
“Reset Router” on page 112
“Restart Router” on page 113
“Basic Mode” on page 114
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Administrator’s Handbook
Home Page - Expert Mode
The Home Page is the summary page for your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. The toolbar on the left side
provides links to controlling, configuring, and monitoring pages. Critical configuration and operational
status is displayed in the center section.
When you click Yes, enter expert mode, the Expert Mode Home page appears.
Home Page for a PPPoE Connection
Home Page Information
The Home page displays information about the following categories:
❑
❑
❑
❑
Connection Information
(supported VoIP models only) Telephone Information
Gateway Information
Local Network
Language Selection Buttons
Language Selection Buttons are located at the top of every page. If you prefer the web UI to be displayed in a different language, you can click one of these buttons, and the pages will display in that language, until you choose a different button.
Supported languages in Europe are German, French, Italian, and English.
60
Supported languages in the Americas are Latin American Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, and English.
More Buttons
❑ Restart Connection – For a PPPoE connection, clicking this button will resend your current PPPoE
login credentials and reestablish your Internet connection.
For a DHCP connection, clicking this button will release and renew the DHCP lease from your service
provider’s DHCP server, which assigns your local IP address.
❑ Connect – Only displays if you are not connected. For a PPPoE connection, clicking this button will
allow you to attempt to login using a different User ID and Password.
❑ Disconnect – Only for a PPPoE connection, clicking this button will disconnect you from the Internet
until you choose to reestablish your connection manually.
Click the Help link in the left-hand column of links to display a page of explanatory information.
Detailed on-line Help is available by clicking the Help link on the left hand frame of the Gateway’s web
page.
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Help
Click the Help link in the left-hand column of links to display a page of explanatory
information. Help is available for every page in the Web interface.
Here is an example:
62
Links Bar
The Links Bar is the frame at the left-hand side of the page containing the major
navigation links. These links are available from almost every page, allowing you
to move freely about the site. The headings in the following table are hyperlinks.
You can click on any heading to read about that feature.
Home
Configure
Statistics
Connection
Router Password
DSL
Wireless
LAN/WAN
Time Zone
ATM
Logs
DHCP Server
VLAN
Ethernet
IP Passthrough
VoIP
IP
NAT
Wireless
LAN
Diagnostics
Remote Access
Update Router
Reset Router
Restart Router
Basic Mode
Help
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Configure
When you click Configure in the left hand column of links, the links bar
expands.
64
Connection
When you click Connection, the Connection Configuration page appears. This screen’s appearance will
vary depending on your type of connection to the Internet.
Here is an example.
Here you can set up or change the way you connect to your ISP. You should only change these settings
at your ISP's direction, or by agreement with your ISP.
❑ VPI/VCI: These values depend on the way your ISP's equipment is configured. 8/35 and 0/35 are
the most common virtual circuit pairs, but others are also used.
❑ Protocol: The authentication and encapsulation protocol is determined by your ISP by the type of
account that you have signed up for. Choose from the pull-down menu:
PPPOE LLC, PPPOE VCMUX, ETHER LLC, IP LLC, PPPOA LLC, or PPPOA VCMUX
❑ Bridging: Your Gateway can be turned into a simple bridge, if desired. However, it will no longer provide routing or security features in this mode.
❑ If you want the Gateway to do both bridging and routing, select Enabled from the Concurrent
Bridging/Routing pull-down menu. When this mode is enabled, the Gateway will appear to be a
router, but also bridge traffic from the LAN if it has a valid LAN-side address.
❑ PPPoE/PPPoA/DHCP Autosensing: The pull-down menu allows you to select an autosensing feature, or to disable it. Selecting between PPPoE/DHCP or PPPoE/PPPoA enables automatic sensing
of your WAN connection type. If you select PPPoE/DHCP, the gateway attempts to connect using
PPPoE first. If the Gateway fails to connect after 60 seconds, it switches to DHCP. As soon as it can
connect via DHCP, the Gateway chooses and sets DHCP as its default. Otherwise, after attempting
to connect via DHCP for 60 seconds, the Gateway switches back to PPPoE. The Gateway will continue to switch back and forth in this manner until it successfully connects. Similarly, selecting
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Administrator’s Handbook
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
PPPoE/PPPoA causes the Gateway to attempt to connect by trying these protocols in parallel, and
using the first one that is successful. If you choose to disable the feature, select Off.
User Name and Password: Provided by your ISP for PPP-based Protocols. Does not appear for RFC1483-based Protocols.
Confirm Password: Repeat your Password entry for confirmation
Static IP Address: Your service provider may tell you that the WAN IP Address for your Gateway is
static. In this case, enter the IP Address from your Service Provider in the appropriate field.
IP Gateway: The IP Address of the default gateway, or peer address if using PPP. This is normally
set to 0.0.0.0 for PPP connections.
Primary DNS Server: The IP Address of the Primary Domain Name Server
Secondary DNS Server: The IP Address of the backup Domain Name Server
Connection Type: If using PPPoE, this is a choice to have either an uninterrupted connection or an
as-needed connection. The type of service you have signed up for with your ISP. Options are OnDemand, Always ON, and Manual.
Always ON: This setting provides convenience, but it leaves your network permanently connected
to the Internet.
On-Demand: Furnishes almost all the benefits of an Always On connection, but has additional security benefits:
Your network cannot be attacked when it is not connected.
Your network may change address with each connection, making it more difficult to attack.
Manual: This setting disables automatic connection attempts. You must bring the connection up
and down via the Connect/Disconnect buttons.
User Inactivity Timeout: (in seconds) If you chose either Manual or On Demand as your Connection
Type, the User Inactivity Timeout setting can be used to control how long your connection will remain
active before it disconnects automatically. You can set it for up to one hour (3600 seconds). After
that period of time expires with no user activity, the connection must be reestablished.
UPnP: Universal Plug and Play (UPnP™) is a set of protocols that allows a PC to automatically discover other UPnP devices (anything from an internet gateway device to a light switch), retrieve an
XML description of the device and its services, control the device, and subscribe to real-time event
notification. By default, UPnP is enabled on the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
For Windows XP users, the automatic discovery feature places an icon representing the Motorola
Netopia® Gateway automatically in the “My Network Places” folder. Double-clicking this icon opens
the Gateway’s web UI.
PCs using UPnP can retrieve the Gateway’s WAN IP address, and automatically create NAT port
maps. This means that applications that support UPnP, and are used with a UPnP-enabled Motorola
Netopia® Gateway, will not need application layer gateway support on the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to work through NAT.
You can disable UPnP, if you are not using any UPnP devices or applications.
When all of your entries are made, click the Save Changes button.
66
LAN/WAN
(supported models)
The LAN/WAN Turnaround feature allows Ethernet port 4 to be used as the WAN interface.
❑ When you click the Enable button, the DSL interface is disabled.
❑ When you click the Disable button, the Ethernet port 4 and the DSL interface function normally.
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DHCP Server
When you click DHCP Server, the DHCP Server Configuration page appears.
m
The Server configuration determines the functionality of your DHCP Settings. This functionality enables
the Gateway to assign your LAN computer(s) a “private” IP address and other parameters that allow
network communication. This feature simplifies network administration because the Gateway maintains
a list of IP address assignments. Additional computers can be added to your LAN without the hassle of
configuring an IP address. This is the default mode for your Gateway.
❑ Router IP Address: Specifies the IP address of the Gateway itself.
❑ Subnet Mask: Specifies the common Class C subnet.
❑ DHCP Start Address: Specifies the first address in the DHCP address range. You can reserve a
sequence of up to 253 IP addresses within a subnet, beginning with the specified address, for
dynamic assignment.
❑ DHCP End Address: Specifies the last address in the DHCP address range.
❑ DHCP Lease: Specifies the default length for DHCP leases issued by the Gateway. Enter lease time
in dd:hh:mm:ss (days/hours/minutes/seconds) format.
❑ DHCP Server Enable: Uncheck this setting if you already have a DHCP server on your LAN. This
enables the DHCP server in this Gateway.
❑ Additional IP Subnets: When you click the Additional IP Subnets button, the IP Subnets screen
appears.
One subnet is preconfigured by default.
68
The IP Subnets screen allows you to configure up to seven secondary subnets and their DHCP
ranges, by entering IP address/subnet mask pairs:
☛
Note:
You need not use this screen if you have only a single Ethernet IP subnet.
This screen displays seven rows of editable columns. All seven row labels are always visible, regardless of the number of subnets configured.
❑ To add an IP subnet, select one of the rows, and click the Edit button.
Check the Enabled checkbox and click the Submit button.
The screen expands to allow you to enter subnet information.
If DHCP Server (see “DHCP Server” on page 68) is
not enabled, the DHCP Start Address and DHCP End
Address fields do not appear.
❑Enter the Router’s IP address on the subnet in the IP
Address field and the subnet mask for the subnet in
the Netmask field.
❑Enter the DHCP Start Address and End Address of
the subnet range in their respective fields.
Ranges cannot overlap and there may be only one range per subnet.
❑ Click the Submit button.
To delete a configured subnet, set both the IP address and subnet mask values to 0.0.0.0, either
explicitly or by clearing each field and clicking the Submit button to commit the change.
☛
NOTE:
All additional DHCP ranges use the global lease period value. See page 68.
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Administrator’s Handbook
IP Passthrough
When you click IP Passthrough, the IP Passthrough Configuration page appears.
The IP passthrough feature allows a single PC on the LAN to have the Gateway’s public address
assigned to it. It also provides PAT (NAPT) via the same public IP address for all other hosts on the private LAN subnet. Using IP passthrough:
❑ The public WAN IP is used to provide IP address translation for private LAN computers.
❑ The public WAN IP is assigned and reused on a LAN computer.
❑ DHCP address serving can automatically serve the WAN IP address to a LAN computer.
When DHCP is used for addressing the designated passthrough PC, the acquired or configured WAN
address is passed to DHCP, which will dynamically configure a single-servable-address subnet, and
reserve the address for the configured PC’s MAC address. This dynamic subnet configuration is
based on the local and remote WAN address and subnet mask. If the WAN interface does not have
a suitable subnet mask that is usable, for example when using PPP or PPPoE, the DHCP subnet configuration will default to a class C subnet mask.
1.
Select either User Configured PC or an IP address displayed in the selection window (these are the IP addresses currently being served to computers on your LAN.)
If you select “User Configured PC”, you must then configure a local PC to have the public WAN IP
address.
2.
Click Enable.
Once configured, the passthrough host's DHCP leases will be shortened to two minutes. This allows for
timely updates of the host's IP address, which will be a private IP address before the WAN connection
is established. After the WAN connection is established and has an address, the passthrough host can
renew its DHCP address binding to acquire the WAN IP address.
A restriction
Since both the Gateway and the passthrough host will use the same IP address, new sessions that conflict with existing sessions will be rejected by the Gateway. For example, suppose you are a teleworker
using an IPSec tunnel from the Gateway and from the passthrough host. Both tunnels go to the same
remote endpoint, such as the VPN access concentrator at your employer’s office. In this case, the first
one to start the IPSec traffic will be allowed; the second one – since, from the WAN, it's indistinguishable – will fail.
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NAT
When you click NAT, the NAT (Games and Other Services) page appears.
NAT Configuration allows you to host internet applications when NAT is enabled. You can host different
games and software on different PCs.
From the Service Name pull-down menu, you can select any of a large number of predefined games
and software. (See “List of Supported Games and Software” on page 72.)
1.
Once you choose a software service or game, click Enable.
The Enable Service screen appears.
Host Device specifies the machine on which the selected software is hosted.
2.
Select a PC to host the software from the Select Host Device pull-down menu and
click Enable.
Each time you enable a software service or game your entry will be added to the list of Service
Names displayed on the NAT Configuration page.
To remove a game or software from the hosted list, choose the game or software you want to remove
and click the Disable button.
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List of Supported Games and Software
72
Act of War - Direct Action
Age of Empires II
Age of Empires, v.1.0
Age of Empires: The Rise of
Rome, v.1.0
Age of Mythology
Age of Wonders
AIM Talk
America's Army
Apache
Asheron's Call
Azureus
Baldur's Gate I and II
Battlefield 1942
Battlefield Communicator
Battlefield Vietnam
BitTornado
BitTorrent
Black and White
Blazing Angels Online
Brothers in Arms - Earned in
Blood
Brothers in Arms Online
Buddy Phone
Calista IP Phone
Call of Duty
CART Precision Racing, v 1.0
Citrix Metaframe/ICA Client
Close Combat for Windows 1.0
Close Combat III: The Russian
Front, v 1.0
Close Combat: A Bridge Too
Far, v 2.0
Combat Flight Sim 2: WWII
Pacific Thr, v 1.0
Combat Flight Sim: WWII
Europe Series, v 1.0
Counter Strike
Dark Reign
Delta Force (Client and Server)
Delta Force 2
Delta Force Black Hawk Down
Diablo II Server
Dialpad
DNS Server
Doom 3
Dues Ex
Dune 2000
eDonkey
Empire Earth
Empire Earth 2
eMule
eMule Plus
F-16, Mig 29
F-22, Lightning 3
Far Cry
Fighter Ace II
FTP
GNUtella
Grand Theft Auto 2 Multiplayer
H.323 compliant (Netmeeting,
CUSeeME)
Half Life
Half Life 2 Steam
Half Life 2 Steam Server
Half Life Steam
Half Life Steam Server
Halo
Hellbender for Windows, v 1.0
Heretic II
Hexen II
Hotline Server
HTTP
HTTPS
ICQ 2001b
ICQ Old
IMAP Client
IMAP Client v.3
Internet Phone
IPSec IKE
iTunes
Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast
Kali
KazaA
Lime Wire
Links LS 2000
Lord of the Rings Online
Mech Warrior 3
MechWarrior 4: Vengeance
Medal of Honor Allied Assault
Microsoft Flight Simulator
2000
Microsoft Flight Simulator 98
Microsoft Golf 1998 Edition, v
1.0
Microsoft Golf 1999 Edition
Microsoft Golf 2001 Edition
Midtown Madness, v 1.0
mIRC Auth-IdentD
mIRC Chat
mIRC DCC - IRC DCC
Monster Truck Madness 2, v
2.0
Monster Truck Madness, v 1.0
Motocross Madness 2, v 2.0
Motocross Madness, v 1.0
MSN Game Zone
MSN Game Zone DX
MSN Messenger
Need for Speed 3, Hot Pursuit
Need for Speed, Porsche
Net2Phone
NNTP
Operation FlashPoint
Outlaws
pcAnywhere (incoming)
PlayStation Network
POP-3
PPTP
Quake 2
Quake 3
Quake 4
Rainbow Six
RealAudio
Return to Castle Wolfenstein
Roger Wilco
Rogue Spear
ShoutCast Server
SMTP
SNMP
Soldier of Fortune
SSH server
StarCraft
Starfleet Command
StarLancer, v 1.0
TeamSpeak
Telnet
TFTP
Tiberian Sun: Command and
Conquer
Timbuktu
Total Annihilation
Ultima Online
Unreal Tournament Server
Urban Assault, v 1.0
VNC, Virtual Network Computing
Warlords Battlecry
Warrock
Westwood Online, Command
and Conquer
Win2000 Terminal Server
Wolfenstein Enemy Territory
World of Warcraft
X-Lite
XBox 360 Media Center
XBox Live 360
Yahoo Messenger Chat
Yahoo Messenger Phone
ZNES
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Administrator’s Handbook
Define Custom Service
To configure a Custom Service, choose whether to use Port Forwarding or Trigger Ports.
❑ Port Forwarding forwards a range of WAN ports to an IP address on the LAN.
❑ Trigger Ports forwards a range of ports to an IP address on the LAN only after specific outbound
traffic “triggers” the feature.
Click the Next button.
If you chose Port Forwarding, the Port Range entry screen appears.
Port Forwarding forwards a range of WAN ports to an IP address on the LAN. Enter the following information:
❑ Service Name: A unique identifier for the Custom Service.
❑ Global Port Range: Range of ports on which incoming traffic will be received.
❑ Base Host Port: The port number at the start of the port range your Gateway should use when forwarding traffic of the specified type(s) to the internal IP address.
❑ Protocol: Protocol type of Internet traffic, TCP or UDP.
Click the Next button.
If you chose Trigger Ports, the Trigger Ports entry screen appears.
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Trigger Ports forwards a range of ports to an IP address on the LAN only after specific outbound traffic
“triggers” the feature. Enter the following information:
❑ Service Name: A unique identifier for the Custom Service.
❑ Global Port Range: Range of ports on which incoming traffic will be received.
❑ Local Trigger Port: Port number of the type of outbound traffic that needs to happen (will be the
trigger) to then allow the configured ports for inbound traffic.
Example: Set the trigger port to 21 and configure a range of 25 – 110. You would need to do an outbound ftp before you were able to do an inbound smtp.
Click the Next button.
Static NAT
This feature allows you to:
❑ Direct your Gateway to forward all externally initiated IP traffic (TCP and UDP protocols only) to a
default host on the LAN.
❑ Enable it for certain situations:
– Where you cannot anticipate what port number or packet protocol an in-bound application might
use. For example, some network games select arbitrary port numbers when a connection is opened.
– When you want all unsolicited traffic to go to a specific LAN host.
This feature allows you to direct unsolicited or non-specific traffic to a designated LAN station. With NAT
“On” in the Gateway, these packets normally would be discarded.
For instance, this could be application traffic where you don’t know (in advance) the port or protocol
that will be used. Some game applications fit this profile.
From the pull-down menu, select the address of the PC that you want to be your default NAT destination.
Click the Next button, and your choice will be so designated.
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Router Password
When you click Router Password, the Gateway Password page appears.
Here you can change the administrative password that you use when logging onto the Gateway as
admin. Passwords are case sensitive fields, and must be 1 to 32 characters long. Store your password
in a safe place. Enter your new password, and confirm it.
Click the Save Changes button.
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Time Zone
When you click the Time Zone link, the Time Zone page appears.
You can set your local time zone by selecting the number of hours your time zone is distant from Greenwich Mean Time (GMT +12 – -12) from the pull-down menu. This allows you to set the time zone for general time stamp purposes.
If you are in a time zone that honors Daylight Saving Time, you will also have the option to automatically
enable or disable it. If your time zone does not use Daylight Saving Time, this checkbox option does not
appear.
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VLAN
When you click VLAN, the VLANs page appears.
Overview
A Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) is a network of computers or other devices that behave as if they
are connected to the same wire even though they may be physically located on different segments of a
LAN. You set up VLANs by configuring the Gateway software rather than hardware. This makes VLANs
very flexible. VLANs behave like separate and independent networks.
VLANs are strictly layer 2 entities. They can be thought of as virtual Ethernet switches, into which can
be added: Ethernet ports, router IP interfaces, ATM PVC/VCC interfaces, SSIDs, and any other physical
port such as USB, HPNA, or MOCA. This allows great flexibility on how the components of a system are
connected to each other.
VLANs are part of Motorola’s VGx Virtual Gateway technology which allows individual port-based VLANs
to be treated as separate and distinct “channels.” When data is passed to a Motorola Netopia® VGxenabled broadband gateway, specific policies, routing, and prioritization parameters can be applied to
each individual service, delivering that service to the appropriate networked device with the required
level of quality of service (QoS). In effect, a single Motorola gateway acts as separate virtual gateways
for each distinct service being delivered.
Motorola’s VGx technology provides service segmentation and QoS controls, and supports delivery of
triple play applications: voice for IP Telephony, video for IPTV, and data.
Your Gateway supports the following:
❑ VLAN management access restriction.
❑ Global VLANs - these are used when trunking/tagging is required on any port member of the VLAN.
Trunks are used to interconnect switches to form networks. The VLANs can communicate with each
other via a trunking connection between the two switches using the router.
❑ - Supports 802.1q and 802.1p; both are configurable
❑ Port-based VLANs - these can be used when no trunking is required
❑ Routed VLANs
- WAN-side VLAN with Multiple WAN IPoE/PPPoE interface support and IP interface-to-VLAN binding
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- LAN-side VLAN with IP interface-to-VLAN binding
- Inter-VLAN routing groups to extend VLAN segmentation up through the IP routing layer.
❑ Bridged VLANs - these VLANs are used to bridge traffic from LAN to WAN
❑ Prioritization per VLAN and per port
Ethernet Switching/Policy Setup
Before you configure any VLANs, the unconfigured Gateway is set up as a router composed of a LAN
switch, a WAN switch, and a router in the middle, with LAN and WAN IP interfaces connected to their
respective switches. These bindings between Ethernet switch ports, IP LAN interface, IP WAN interface
and WAN physical ports are automatically created.
When you configure any VLANs, the default bindings are no longer valid, and the system requires
explicit binding between IP interfaces and layer 2 interfaces. Each VLAN can be thought of as a layer 2
switch, and enabling each port or interface in a VLAN is analogous to plugging it in to the layer 2
switch.
Thereafter, in order for devices to communicate on layer 2, they must be associated in the same VLAN.
For devices to communicate at layer 3, the devices must be either on the same VLAN, or on VLANs that
have an Inter-VLAN routing group enabled in common.
When configuring VLANs you must define how traffic needs to be forwarded:
❑ If traffic needs to be bridged between LAN and WAN you can create a single VLAN that encompasses
the WAN port and LAN ports.
❑ If traffic needs to be routed then you must define four elements:
• LAN-side VLANs
• WAN-side VLANs
• Associate IP Interfaces to VLANs
• Inter-VLAN Routing Groups: configuration of routing between VLANs is done by association of a
VLAN to a Routing Group. Traffic will be routed between VLANs within a routing group. The LAN IP
Ethernet Interface can be bound to multiple LAN VLANs, but forwarding can be limited between an
Ethernet LAN port and a WAN VLAN if you properly configure Inter-VLAN groups.
Inter-VLAN groups are also used to block routing between WAN interfaces. If each WAN IP interface
is bound to its own VLAN and if you configure a different Inter-VLAN group for each WAN VLAN then
no routing between WAN IP interfaces is possible.
❑ Example: to route between a VCC and all the LAN ports, which effectively is similar to the default
configuration without any VLANs:
Create a VLAN named “VccWan” consisting of vcc1, ip-vcc1, routing-group 1
Create a VLAN named “Lan” consisting of eth0.1, eth0.2, eth0.3, eth0.4, ssid1, ssid2, ssid3, ssid4
(etc.), ip-eth-a, routing-group 1
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An example of multiple VLANs, using a Netopia Router with VGx managed switch technology, is shown
below:
To configure VLANs check the Enable checkbox.
To create a VLAN select a list item from the main VLAN page and click the Edit button.
The VLAN Entry page appears.
Check the Enable checkbox, and enter a descriptive name for the VLAN.
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You can create up to 8 VLANs, and you can also restrict any VLAN, and the computers on it, from administering the Gateway.
❑ VLAN Name – A descriptive name for the VLAN.
❑ Type – LAN or WAN Port(s) can be enabled on the VLAN. You can choose a type designation as follows:
By-Port: indicating that the VLAN is port-based. When this setting is enabled on a Gateway with a
LAN Ethernet Managed Switch, the switch will be segmented into the number of physical ports. Each
port can then independently join VLANs, otherwise the LAN ethernet port can join VLANs as a single
port. The ports set up on VLANs for this switch will insert a default VLAN identifier (VID) into any non802.1q-tagged Ethernet packet received, and they will strip out any 802.1q header within a packet
transmitted through the port with a VID matching the VLAN's VID. The default VID for the VLAN is
selected by the Gateway.
Global: indicating that the ports joining this VLAN are part of a global 802.1q Ethernet VLAN. This
VLAN includes ports on this Gateway and may include ports within other devices throughout the network. The VID in this case may define the behavior of traffic between all devices on the network having ports that are members of this VLAN segment.
❑ VLAN ID – If you select Global as the VLAN Type, the VLAN ID field appears for you to enter a VID.
This must be a unique identifying number between 1 and 4094.
❑ Admin Restricted – If you want to prevent administrative access to the Gateway from this VLAN,
check the checkbox.
❑ 802.1p Priority Bit: If you set this from the pull-down menu to a value greater than 0, all packets of
this VLAN with unmarked priority bits (pbits) will be re-marked to this priority.
Click the Submit button.
The VLAN Port Configuration screen appears.
❑ Port interfaces available for this VLAN are listed in the left hand column.
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Displayed port interfaces vary depending on the kinds of physical ports on your Gateway, for example, Ethernet.
For Motorola Netopia® VGx technology models, separate Ethernet switch ports are displayed and
may be configured.
To enable any of them on this VLAN, check the associated Enable checkbox(es).
Typically you will choose a physical port, such as an Ethernet port (example: eth0.1).
❑ When you enable an interface, the Tag, Priority, and Promote checkboxes, and the 802.1p Priority
Bit menu appear for that interface.
Tag – Packets transmitted from this port through this VLAN must be tagged with the VLAN VID. Packets received through this port destined for this VLAN must be tagged with the VLAN VID by the
source. The Tag option is only available on global type ports.
Priority – Use any 802.1p priority bits in the VLAN header to prioritize packets within the Gateway’s
internal queues, according to DiffServ priority mapping rules.
Promote – When checked, this port writes any specified 802.1p priority bits (page 81) into the IPTOS header bit field for IP packets received on this port, destined for this particular VLAN. It writes
any specified IP-TOS priority bits into the 802.1p priority bit field for tagged IP packets transmitted
from this port for this VLAN.
All mappings between Ethernet 802.1p and IP-TOS are made according to a pre-defined QoS mapping policy. The pre-defined mapping can now be set in the CLI. See “Queue Configuration” on
page 177.
802.1p Priority Bit – If you select a value greater than 0, all packets received on this port with
unmarked priority bits will be re-marked to this priority. If the port 802.1p PBit is greater than 0, the
VLAN 802.1p PBit setting is ignored.
❑ Select an IP Interface for this VLAN if it is to be routed; otherwise leave the default. These selections will vary depending on your IP interfaces. For example, if you have set up multiple VCCs, these
will appear in the list as ip-vcc1, ip-vcc2, and so forth.
❑ When you select an IP interface, the screen expands to allow you to configure Inter-Vlan-Groups.
Inter-VLAN groups allow VLANs in the group to route traffic to the others; ungrouped VLANs cannot
route traffic to each other.
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❑ Click the Submit button.
❑ If you want to create more VLANs, click the Configure link (in the left-hand toolbar) and then the
VLAN link, and repeat the process.
You can Edit, Clear, Enable, or Disable your VLAN entries by returning to the VLANs page, and selecting the appropriate entry from the displayed list.
❑ When you are finished, click the Save Changes button.
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To view the settings for each VLAN, select the desired VLAN from the list and click the Details button.
The screen expands to display the VLAN settings.
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VoIP
(supported models)
Voice-over-IP (VoIP) refers to the ability to make voice telephone calls over the Internet. This differs from
traditional phone calls that use the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN). VoIP calls use an Internet protocol, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), to transmit sound over a network or the Internet in the
form of data packets. Certain Motorola Netopia® Gateway models have two separate voice ports for
connecting telephone handsets. These models support VoIP. If your Gateway is a VoIP model, you can
configure the VoIP features.
When you click the VoIP link, the VoIP SIP Lines page appears.
To enable a VoIP line, select one of the lines from the SIP Line Entry menu that corresponds to the port
on the Gateway to which your phone is connected.
Click the Edit button. In the resulting screen, check the Enable SIP checkbox.
The screen expands to display the features that you can enable for that line.
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SIP Line Entry
86
Registration Interval
(in secs)
Length of time the VoIP registration will be valid before it will be
renewed. Default is 1 hour.
Registrar Server
Registration Server name or IP address.
Registrar Port
Registration Server port. Default is 5060.
Proxy Server
Proxy server name or IP address.
Proxy Port
Proxy server port, if required. Default is 5060.
Outbound Proxy Server
Outbound Proxy server name or IP address, if required.
Outbound Proxy Port
Outbound Proxy server port, if required. Default is 5060.
User Display Name
Name of this phone’s user to be displayed on the Home page. Example: “Jacob Q. Smith”
SIP User Name
Registration user ID. Example: “jqsmith”
SIP User Password
Registration user password.
Auth User ID
The authorization ID that authenticates the user to SIP for the
specified phone. Most SIP Servers expect this to be the User
Name itself but some may use Auth User ID.
SIP Line Entry
Digit Map
A set of rules used to recognize a number dialed by the user and to
ensure this number matches the dial plan defined by the ITSP.
Call Features Settings
DTMF Mode
Choose the Dual Tone Multi-Frequency Mode:
• Inband: Sends the DTMF digits as a normal inband tone.
• RFC2833: Sends the DTMF digits as an event as part of the RTP
packet header information.
• Info: Sends the DTMF digits in the SIP INFO message.
Enable Call Forwarding
Unconditionally
If you check this checkbox, all calls will be forwarded to a specified
number.
The Unconditional Call Forwarding Number field will appear for you
to enter the number, if enabled.
Enable Call Forwarding On
Busy
If you check this checkbox, calls will be forwarded to a specified number if the line is busy.
The On Busy Call Forwarding Number field will appear for you to
enter the number, if enabled.
Enable Call Forwarding On
No Answer
If you check this checkbox, calls will be forwarded to a specified number if there is no answer.
The On No Answer Call Forwarding Number field will appear for
you to enter the number, if enabled.
Enable Call Waiting
If you check this checkbox, call waiting is enabled.
Enable Conferencing
If you check this checkbox, 3-party teleconferencing is enabled.
Enable Do Not Disturb
If you check this checkbox, the Gateway will reject VoIP calls without
ringing the phone.
Subscribe for MWI
If you check this checkbox, Message Waiting Indicator is enabled
when new voice mail is received.
Enable Call Transfer
If you check this checkbox, Call Transferring is enabled when an
incoming call is received.
When you are finished entering the required information, click the Submit button.
To configure the second voice port, return to the VoIP SIP Lines screen.
When you are finished, you will be prompted to restart your router.
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The Home page for a VoIP-enabled Gateway with both phone lines registered is shown below.
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Wireless
(supported models)
When you click Wireless, the 3-D Reach Wireless configuration page appears.
Enable Wireless
The wireless function is automatically enabled by default. If you uncheck the Enable Wireless checkbox, the Wireless Options are disabled, and the Gateway will not provide or broadcast its wireless LAN
services.
Wireless ID (SSID)
The Wireless ID is preset to a number unique to your unit. You can either leave it as is, or change it by
entering a freeform name of up to 32 characters, for example “Hercule’s Wireless LAN”. On client PCs’
software, this might also be called the Network Name. The Wireless ID is used to identify this particular
wireless LAN. Depending on their operating system or client wireless card, users must either:
❑ select from a list of available wireless LANs that appear in a scanned list on their client
❑ or enter this name on their clients in order to join this wireless LAN.
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Enable Wireless Scheduler
If you check the Enable Wireless Scheduler checkbox, the screen expands to allow you to set times
of day when the wireless radio will turn off and on. This makes it possible to control your wireless LAN’s
hours of operation automatically.
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS)
See “Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26.
Privacy
By default, Privacy is set to WPA-PSK with a Wireless Protected Access Pre-Shared key.
Other privacy options, as well as other advanced wireless options are available. To access them, click
the Advanced Configuration Options button.
See “Privacy” on page 93 for more information.
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Advanced Configuration Options (optional)
When you click the Advanced Configuration Options button, the Advanced 802.11 Wireless
screen appears. This screen varies its options depending on which form of wireless Privacy you have
selected.
Operating Mode
The pull-down menu allows you to select and lock the Gateway into the wireless transmission mode you
want. For compatibility with clients using 802.11b (up to 11 Mbps transmission) and 802.11g (up to
20+ Mbps), select Normal (802.11b + g). To limit your wireless LAN to one mode or the other, select
802.11b Only, or 802.11g Only.
☛
NOTE:
If you choose to limit the operating mode to 802.11b or 802.11g only, clients using the
mode you excluded will not be able to connect.
Default Channel
(1 through 11, for North America) on which the network will broadcast. This is a frequency range within
the 2.4Ghz band. Channel selection depends on government regulated radio frequencies that vary from
region to region. The widest range available is from 1 to 14. Europe, France, Spain and Japan differ.
Channel selection can have a significant impact on performance, depending on other wireless activity
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close to this Router. Channel selection is not necessary at the client computers; the clients will scan
the available channels seeking access points using the same SSID as the client.
AutoChannel Setting
For 802.11G models, AutoChannel is a feature that allows the Netopia Router to determine the best
channel to broadcast automatically.
Three settings are available from the pull-down menu: Off-Use default, At Startup, and Continuous.
❑ Off-Use default: the Netopia Router will use the configured default channel selected from the previous pull-down menu.
❑ At Startup – the default setting – causes the Netopia Router at startup to briefly initialize on the
default channel, then perform a full two- to three-second scan, and switch to the best channel it can
find, remaining on that channel until the next reboot.
❑ Continuous performs the at-startup scan, and will continuously monitor the current channel for any
other Access Point beacons. If an Access Point beacon is detected on the same channel, the Netopia Router will initiate a three- to four-minute scan of the channels, locate a better one, and switch.
Once it has switched, it will remain on this channel for at least 30 minutes before switching again if
another Access Point is detected.
Enable Closed System Mode
If enabled, Closed System Mode hides the wireless network from the scanning features of wireless client computers. Unless both the wireless clients and the Router share the same Wireless ID in Closed
System mode, the Router’s wireless LAN will not appear as an available network when scanned for by
wireless-enabled computers. Members of the Closed System WLAN must log onto the Router’s wireless
network with the identical SSID as that configured in the router.
Closed System mode is an ideal way to increase wireless security and to prevent casual detection by
unwanted neighbors, office users, or malicious users such as hackers.
If you do not enable Closed System Mode, it is more convenient, but potentially less secure, for clients
to access your WLAN by scanning available access points. You must decide based on your own network
requirements.
About Closed System Mode and Wireless Encryption
Enabling Closed System Mode on your wireless Router provides another level of security, since your
wireless LAN will no longer appear as an available access point to client PCs that are casually scanning
for one.
Your own wireless network clients, however, must log into the wireless LAN by using the exact SSID of
the Motorola Netopia® Router.
In addition, if you have enabled WEP or WPA encryption on the Motorola Netopia® Router, your network
clients must also have WEP or WPA encryption enabled, and must have the same WEP or WPA encryption key as the Motorola Netopia® Router.
Once the Motorola Netopia® Gateway is located by a client computer, by setting the client to a matching
SSID, the client can connect immediately if WEP or WPA is not enabled. If WEP or WPA is enabled then
the client must also have WEP or WPA enabled and a matching WEP or WPA key.
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Wireless client cards from different manufacturers and different operating systems accomplish connecting to a wireless LAN and enabling WEP or WPA in a variety of ways. Consult the documentation for
your particular wireless card and/or operating system.
Block Wireless Bridging
Check the checkbox to block wireless clients from communicating with other wireless clients on the
LAN side of the Gateway.
Enable Wireless Scheduler
See “Enable Wireless Scheduler” on page 90.
Enable Wireless Protected Setup (WPS)
See “Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26.
Privacy
❑ WEP - Automatic: provides an easy way to generate WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) keys for
encryption of your wireless network traffic. See “WEP-Automatic” on page 98.
❑ WEP - Manual: WEP Security is a Privacy option that is based on encryption between the Router
and any PCs (“clients”) you have with wireless cards. If you are not using WPA-PSK Privacy, you can
use WEP encryption instead. For this encryption to work, both your Router and each client must
share the same Wireless ID, and both must be using the same encryption keys. See “WEP-Manual”
on page 96.
❑ WPA-802.1x provides RADIUS server authentication support. See “RADIUS Server authentication”
on page 94 below.
❑ WPA-PSK provides Wireless Protected Access, the most secure option for your wireless network.
See “WPA-PSK” on page 95. This mechanism provides the best data protection and access control.
Be sure that your Wi-Fi client adapter supports this option. Not all Wi-Fi clients support WPA-PSK.
❑ OFF - No Privacy: This mode disables privacy on your network, allowing any wireless users to connect to your wireless LAN. Use this option if you are using alternative security measures such as
VPN tunnels, or if your network is for public use.
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RADIUS Server authentication
RADIUS servers allow external authentication of users by means of a remote authentication database.
The remote authentication database is maintained by a Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service
(RADIUS) server. In conjunction with Wireless User Authentication, you can use a RADIUS server database to authenticate users seeking access to the wireless services, as well as the authorized user list
maintained locally within the Gateway.
If you select WPA-802.1x, the screen expands.
Click the Configure RADIUS Server button.
The Configure RADIUS Server screen appears.
Enter your RADIUS Server information in the
appropriate fields:
❑RADIUS Server Addr/Name: The default
RADIUS server name or IP address that you
want to use.
❑RADIUS Server Secret: The RADIUS secret
key used by this server. The shared secret
should have the same characteristics as a normal password.
❑Alt RADIUS Server Addr/Name: An alternate RADIUS server name or IP address, if available.
❑ Alt RADIUS Server Secret: The RADIUS secret key used by this alternate server. The shared
secret should have the same characteristics as a normal password.
❑ RADIUS Server Port: The port on which the RADIUS server is listening, typically, the default 1812.
Click the Save Changes button.
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WPA-PSK
One of the easiest ways to enable Privacy on your Wireless network is by selecting
WPA-PSK (Wi-Fi Protected Access) from the pull-down menu.
The screen expands to allow you to enter a Pre Shared Key. The key can be between 8 and 63 characters, but for best security it should be at least 20 characters. When you have entered your key, click the
Save Changes button.
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WEP-Manual
Alternatively, you can enable WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) encryption by selecting
WEP-Manual from the Privacy pull-down menu.
You can provide a level of data security by enabling WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) for encryption of network data. You can enable 40-, 128-, or 256-bit WEP Encryption (depending on the capability of your client wireless card) for IP traffic on your LAN.
WEP - Manual allows you to enter your own encryption keys manually. This is a difficult process, but
only needs to be done once. Avoid the temptation to enter all the same characters.
Encryption Key Size #1 – #4: Selects the length of each encryption key. The longer the key, the stronger the encryption and the more difficult it is to break the encryption.
Encryption Key #1 – #4: The encryption keys. You enter keys using hexadecimal digits. For 40/64bit
encryption, you need ten digits; 26 digits for 128bit, and 58 digits for 256bit WEP. Hexadecimal characters are 0 – 9, and a – f.
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Examples:
❑ 40bit: 02468ACE02
❑ 128bit: 0123456789ABCDEF0123456789
❑ 256bit: 592CA140F0A238B0C61AE162F592CA140F0A238B0C61AE162F21A09C
Use WEP encryption key (1 – 4) #: Specifies which key the Gateway will use to encrypt transmitted
traffic. The default is key #1.
Click the click Save Changes button.
Any WEP-enabled client must have an identical key of the same length as the Router, in order to successfully receive and decrypt the traffic. Similarly, the client also has a ‘default’ key that it uses to
encrypt its transmissions. In order for the Router to receive the client’s data, it must likewise have the
identical key of the same length.
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WEP-Automatic
Alternatively, you can enable WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) encryption by selecting
WEP-Automatic from the Privacy pull-down menu.
You can provide a level of data security by enabling WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) for encryption of network data. You can enable 40-, 128-, or 256-bit WEP Encryption (depending on the capability of your client wireless card) for IP traffic on your LAN.
Enter a Passphrase. The number of characters to use is shown in the pull-down menu. Click the Save
Changes button. This will generate an encryption key automatically.
Any WEP-enabled client must have an identical key of the same length as the Router, in order to successfully receive and decrypt the traffic. Similarly, the client also has a ‘default’ key that it uses to
encrypt its transmissions. In order for the Router to receive the client’s data, it must likewise have the
identical key of the same length.
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Enable Multiple Wireless IDs
This feature allows you to add additional network identifiers (SSIDs or Network Names) for your wireless
network. To enable Multiple Wireless IDs, click the button.
The Enable Multiple Wireless IDs screen appears to allow you to add up to three additional Wireless
IDs.
When the Multiple Wireless SSIDs screen appears, check the Enable SSID checkbox for each SSID
you want to enable.
The screen expands to allow you to name each additional Wireless ID, and specify a Privacy mode for
each one.
❑ You can enable or disable Closed System Mode for each SSID by checking or unchecking the
checkbox. See “Enable Closed System Mode” on page 92 for more information.
❑ Privacy modes available from the pull-down menu for the multiple SSIDs are: WPA-PSK, WPA802.1x, or Off-No Privacy. WEP-Automatic or WEP-Manual are also available if not already configured on the primary SSID or a previous multiple SSID.
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❑ You also have the choice of applying WPA Version 1 and 2, WPA Version 1 Only, or WPA Version
2 Only from the pull-down menu. These can be applied to each SSID individually.
❑ If you choose WPA-802.1x privacy, the Configure RADIUS Server option appears, to allow you to
specify your RADIUS server information. See “RADIUS Server authentication” on page 94.
❑ You can now choose to Limit Wireless Access by MAC Address. This allows you to restrict individual
clients’ access to each SSID separately. Click the Limit Wireless Access by MAC Address button.
The MAC Authorization for that SSID screen appears.
Select Enabled from the pull-down menu. The screen expands to allow you to add authorized clients’ MAC addresses.
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You do this in the same manner as you do to authorize MAC addresses for the primary SSID. See
“Wireless MAC Authorization (optional)” on page 104.
Click the Save Changes button. The Gateway will prompt you to restart it.
Click the Yes button, and the Gateway will restart with your new settings.
☛
NOTES:
The Gateway supports up to 4 different SSIDs:
• One SSID is broadcast by default and has wireless bridging enabled by
default.
• These network IDs can now be configured separately in terms of MAC
Address filtering.
• You can configure privacy on one SSID and disable it on another SSID.
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WiFi Multimedia
WiFi Multimedia is an advanced feature that allows you to prioritize various types of data travelling over
the wireless network. Certain types of data that are sensitive to delays, such as voice or video, must be
prioritized ahead of other, less delay-sensitive types, such as email.
WiFi Multimedia currently implements wireless Quality of Service (QoS) by transmitting data depending
on Diffserv priority settings. These priorities are mapped into four Access Categories (AC), in increasing
order of priority:
❑
❑
❑
❑
Background (BK),
Best Effort (BE),
Video (VI), and
Voice (VO).
It requires WiFi Multimedia (WMM)-capable clients, usually a separate feature enabled at the client network settings, and client PC software that makes use of Differentiated Services (Diffserv). Refer to
your operating system instructions for enabling Diffserv QoS.
When you click the WiFi Multimedia button the WiFi Multimedia page appears.
To enable the WiFi Multimedia custom settings, select Diffserv from the pull-down menu.
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The screen expands.
Router EDCA Parameters (Enhanced Distributed Channel Access) govern wireless data from your
Gateway to the client; Client EDCA Parameters govern wireless data from the client to your Gateway.
☛
NOTE:
It is not recommended that you modify these settings without direct knowledge or instructions to do so. Modifying these settings inappropriately could seriously degrade network
performance.
❑ AIFs: (Arbitration Interframe Spacing) the wait time in milliseconds for data frames.
❑ cwMin: (Minimum Contention Window) upper limit in milliseconds of the range for determining initial
random backoff. The value you choose must be lower than cwMax.
❑ cwMax: (Maximum Contention Window) upper limit in milliseconds of the range of determining final
random backoff. The value you choose must be higher than cwMin.
❑ TXOP Limit: Time interval in microseconds that clients may initiate transmissions.
(When Operating Mode is B-only, default values are used and this field is not configurable.)
Click the Save Changes button.
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Wireless MAC Authorization (optional)
MAC Authorization allows you to specify which client PCs are allowed to join the wireless LAN by unique
hardware (MAC) address. To enable this feature, click the Limit Wireless Access by MAC
Address button. The MAC Authorization screen appears.
Select Enabled from the pull-down menu.
The screen expands to permit you to add MAC addresses.
Click the Add button.
Once it is enabled, only entered MAC addresses that have been set to Allow will be accepted onto the
wireless LAN. All unlisted addresses will be blocked, in addition to the listed addresses with Allow disabled.
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Click the Submit button.
When you are finished adding MAC addresses click the Save Changes button. You will be returned to
the 802.11 Wireless page. You can Add, Edit, or Delete any of your entries later by returning to this
page.
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Statistics
When you click Statistics in the left hand column of links, the links bar
expands.
☛
Note:
Available Statistics links vary by platform.
DSL
When you click DSL, the DSL Statistics page appears.
The DSL Statistics page displays information about the Gateway's WAN connection to the Internet.
❑ Line State: May be Up (connected) or Down (disconnected).
❑ Modulation: Method of regulating the DSL signal. DMT (Discrete MultiTone) allows connections to
work better when certain radio transmitters are present.
❑ Data Path: Type of path used by the device's processor.
Downstream and Upstream statistics
❑ Max Allowed Speed (kbps): Your maximum speeds for downloading (receiving) and uploading
(sending) data on the DSL line, in kilobits per second.
❑ SN Margin (db): Signal to noise margin, in decibels. Reflects the amount of unwanted “noise” on
the DSL line.
❑ Line Attenuation: Amount of reduction in signal strength on the DSL line, in decibels.
❑ CRC Errors: Number of times data packets have had to be resent due to errors in transmission or
reception.
ATM
When you click ATM, the ATM Statistics page appears.
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The ATM Statistics page:
❑ displays your Gateway's unique hardware (MAC) address.
❑ displays detailed statistics about your WAN data traffic, upstream and downstream.
This information is useful for troubleshooting and when seeking technical support.
Ethernet
When you click Ethernet, the Ethernet Statistics page appears.
The Ethernet Statistics page:
❑ displays your Gateway's unique hardware (MAC) address.
❑ displays detailed statistics about your LAN data traffic, upstream and downstream.
IP
When you click IP, the IP Statistics page appears. The IP Statistics page displays the IP interfaces and
routing table information about your network.
General
❑ IP WAN Address: The public IP address of your Gateway, whether dynamically or statically
assigned.
❑ IP Gateway: Your ISP's gateway Gateway IP address
❑ Primary DNS: The IP address of the Primary Domain Name Server
❑ Primary DNS name: The name of the Primary Domain Name Server
❑ Secondary DNS: The IP address of the backup Domain Name Server (if any)
❑ Secondary DNS name: The name of the backup Domain Name Server
IP interfaces
❑ Address: Your Gateway's IP address as seen from your internal network (LAN), and from the public
Internet (WAN)
❑ Netmask: The subnet mask for the respective IP interfaces (LAN and WAN)
❑ Name: The name of each IP interface (example:Eth0, WAN2)
Network Routing Table and Host Routing Table
The Routing tables display all of the IP routes currently known to your Gateway
LAN
When you click LAN, the LAN Statistics page appears.
The LAN Statistics page displays detailed information about your LAN IP configuration and names and
IP addresses of devices on your LAN.
❑ Gateway IP Address: The IP address of your Gateway as seen from the LAN
❑ DHCP Netmask: Subnet mask of your LAN
❑ DHCP Start Address: First IP address in the range being served to your LAN by the Gateway's
DHCP server
❑ DHCP End Address: Last IP address in the range being served to your LAN by the Gateway's DHCP
server
❑ DHCP Server Status: May be On or Off
❑ DNS Server: The IP address of the default DNS server
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Devices on LAN
Displays the IP Address, MAC (hardware) Address, and network Name for each device on your LAN connected to the Gateway.
Wireless
When you click Wireless, the Wireless Statistics page appears.
The Wireless Statistics page:
❑ displays your Router's unique hardware Wireless (MAC) address.
❑ displays detailed statistics about your Wireless LAN data traffic, upstream and downstream.
Logs
When you click Logs, the Logs page appears.
Select a log from the pull-down menu:
❑ All: Displays the entire system log.
❑ Connection: Displays events logged for the WAN connection.
❑ System: Displays events logged for the Gateway system configuration.
The current status of the Gateway is displayed for all logs.
❑ You can clear all log entries by clicking the Clear All Logs button.
❑ You can save logs to a text (.CTXT) file by clicking the Save to File button. This will download the file
to your browser’s default download location on your hard drive. The file can be opened with your
favorite text editor.
☛
Note:
Some browsers, such as Internet Explorer for Windows XP, require that you specify the
Motorola Netopia® Gateway’s URL as a “Trusted site” in “Internet Options: Security”. This
is necessary to allow the “download” of the log text file to the PC.
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Diagnostics
When you click Diagnostics, the Diagnostics page appears.
This automated multi-layer test examines the functionality of the Gateway from the physical connections to the data traffic being sent by users through the Gateway.
You enter a web address URL in the Web Address field and click the Test button. Results will be displayed in the Progress Window as they are generated.
This sequence of tests takes approximately one minute to generate results. Please wait for the test to
run to completion.
Each test generates one of the following result codes:
Result
Meaning
* PASS:
The test was successful.
* FAIL:
The test was unsuccessful.
* SKIPPED:
The test was skipped because a test on which it depended failed.
* PENDING:
The test timed out without producing a result. Try running Diagnostics again.
* WARNING:
The test was unsuccessful. The Service Provider equipment your Gateway
connects to may not support this test.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Remote Access
When you click Remote Access, the Enable Remote Access page appears.
This link allows you to authorize a remotely-located person, such as a support technician, to directly
access your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. This is useful for fixing configuration problems when you need
expert help. You can limit the amount of time such a person will have access to your Gateway. This will
prevent unauthorized individuals from gaining access after the time limit has expired.
❑ Since you’ve already entered an Admin password, you can use that Admin password or enter a new
password. If you enter a new password, it becomes the temporary Admin password. After the timeout period has expired, the Admin password reverts to the original Admin password you entered.
Enter a temporary password for the person you want to authorize.
❑ Select a Timeout period for this password, from the pull-down menu (5 – 30 minutes, or Unlimited).
Remote Access authorization lasts for a selected period of inactivity, after which it is automatically
disabled again, to protect against unauthorized access attempts to your Gateway. Selecting Unlimited will enable remote access until the Gateway is rebooted. Be sure to tell the authorized person
what the password is, and for how long the time-out is set.
❑ “Permanent” remote access to the Gateway (i.e. access which is not disabled after the Gateway is
rebooted) may be configured in the CLI. See the command “set ip dsl vccn restrictions { admin-disabled | none }” on page 165. This is not a recommended practice, but may be needed for some
applications.
Click the Enable button. You can manually disable it, before the timeout period ends, by clicking the
Disable button, or by restarting the Gateway.
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Update Router
When you click Update Router, the Software Upgrade page appears.
Operating System Software is what makes your Gateway run and occasionally it needs to be updated.
Your Current Software Version is displayed at the top of the page.
If you want to check for an updated version without installing it, click the Check Software from Server
link. You can update your software in either of two ways:
• From a Server
❑ If an updated version exists, click the Update Software from Server button, and a new version will
automatically be downloaded to your Gateway.
❑ When the download and installation is complete, you will be prompted to restart the Gateway.
• From your PC
To update your software from a file on your PC, you must first download the software from:
http://www.netopia.com/equipment/residential/firmwareN.html
1.
2.
3.
4.
Browse your computer for the operating system file you downloaded.
Click the Update Software from PC button.
The install may take a few minutes; wait for it to complete.
Restart your Gateway and your new operating system will be running.
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Reset Router
You might need to reset your Gateway to its factory default state, and clear all of your previous settings.
The Reset Router link allows you to do that. When you click the link, you will be challenged to confirm
that this is what you want to do.
If you want to clear your settings, click the Yes, reset to factory settings button. The Gateway configuration will be reset to the factory default. Any configuration information you have entered will be lost
and will have to be re-entered. The Gateway will automatically restart.
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Restart Router
When the Gateway is restarted, it will disconnect all users, initialize all its interfaces, and copy the
Operating System Software and feature keys from its internal storage.
When you make configuration changes, you must restart for the changes to take effect.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Basic Mode
When you click Basic Mode, you are returned immediately to the Basic Mode Home page
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CHAPTER 4
Basic Troubleshooting
This section gives some simple suggestions for troubleshooting problems with your Gateway’s initial
configuration.
Before troubleshooting, make sure you have
❑ read the User Manual;
❑ plugged in all the necessary cables; and
❑ set your PC’s TCP/IP controls to obtain an IP address automatically.
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Status Indicator Lights
The first step in troubleshooting is to check the status indicator lights (LEDs) in the order outlined in the
following section.
The first step in troubleshooting is to check the status indicator lights (LEDs) in the order outlined
below.
Motorola Netopia® Router 2210 status indicator lights
Power
DSL
Internet
LED
Action
Power
Solid Green = Power on; Off = Power off; Flashing Red =
Power On/Self Test; Solid Red = PO/ST Failure
Ethernet
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Ethernet
Solid green = Device connected; Off = No device connected or modem power is off
DSL
Solid green = DSL synch; Off = Modem power off; Flashing green = DSL attempting synch; Flashing green/red
= DSL fails to synch 3 times; Flashing red = No DSL signal
Internet
Solid green = Connected to Internet; Off = Bridge mode
or modem power is off; Flashing green = Attempting
PPP connection; Red = Connection failed
Motorola Netopia® Router 2240N/2241N status indicator lights
Power
LED
Power
Ethernet
USB
DSL
Internet
Action
Green when power is on. Red if device malfunctions. Flashes Red
when new embedded software is being installed.
Ethernet
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is activity on the
LAN.
USB
(Model 2241N only)
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is activity on the
LAN.
DSL
Solid green when trained. Blinking green when no line is attached or
when training.
Internet
Solid green when Broadband device is connected. Flashes green for
activity on the WAN port. If the physical link comes up, but PPP or
DHCP fail, the LED turns red.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Motorola Netopia® Router 2246N status indicator lights
Power
LED
Power
118
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
DSL
Internet
Action
Green when power is on. Red if device malfunctions. Flashes Red
when new embedded software is being installed.
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is activity on the
LAN.
DSL
Solid green when trained. Blinking green when no line is attached or
when training.
Internet
Solid green when Broadband device is connected. Flashes green for
activity on the WAN port. If the physical link comes up, but PPP or
DHCP fail, the LED turns red.
Motorola Netopia® Router 2247NWG status indicator lights
Power
LED
Power
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4 Wireless DSL Internet
Action
Green when power is on. Red if device malfunctions. Flashes Red
when new embedded software is being installed.
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is activity on the
LAN.
Wireless
Flashes green when there is activity on the wireless LAN. Off if driver
fails to initialize, or if wireless is disabled.
DSL
Solid green when trained. Blinking green when no line is attached or
when training.
Internet
Solid green when Broadband device is connected. Flashes green for
activity on the WAN port. If the physical link comes up, but PPP or
DHCP fail, the LED turns red.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Motorola Netopia® Router 2247-42 VoIP model status indicator lights
Power
Internet
DSL
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
Wireless
Line
Phone 1, Phone 2
LED
Power
120
Action
Green when power is on. Red if device malfunctions. Flashes Red
when new embedded software is being installed.
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is activity on the
LAN.
Wireless
Flashes green when there is activity on the wireless LAN. Off if driver
fails to initialize, or if wireless is disabled.
DSL
Solid green when trained. Blinking green when no line is attached or
when training.
Internet
Solid green when Broadband device is connected. Flashes green for
activity on the WAN port.
Phone 1, Phone 2
Off when respective line is not registered and on hook.
Solid green when respective SIP account is registered and on hook.
Flash green when the respective line is off hook and registered, or
FXO feature is enabled.
Line
Off when FXO feature is enabled and no FXO call is in progress, or
when FXO feature is not enabled. Flashes green when FXO feature is
enabled and FXO call is in progress.
Motorola Netopia® Router 3347-02 status indicator lights
Power
Wireless
DSL
Internet
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
LED
Action
Power
Green when power is on. Red when updating embedded
software, or for system failure.
DSL
Solid green when Internet connection is established.
Internet
Solid green when Gateway is connected. Flashes green
when transmitting or receiving data on the WAN port.
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is
activity on the LAN.
Wireless
Flashes green when there is activity on the wireless
LAN.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Motorola Netopia® Router 7000-series status indicator lights
Wireless Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4 DSL Power
LED
Power
DSL
(DSL 1 & 2: ADSL2+
models only)
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Action
Green when power is on. Red if device malfunctions. Flashes Red
when new embedded software is being installed.
Solid green when trained. Blinking green when no line is attached or
when training. Flashes green for DSL traffic.
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is activity on the
LAN.
Wireless
Flashes green when there is activity on the wireless LAN. Off if driver
fails to initialize, or if wireless is disabled.
Motorola Netopia® Router 7346/56-series status indicator lights
Power
LED
Power
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4 DSL
Action
Green when power is on. Red if device malfunctions. Flashes Red
when new embedded software is being installed.
Ethernet 1, 2, 3, 4
Solid green when connected. Flash green when there is activity on the
LAN.
DSL
Solid green when trained. Blinking green when no line is attached or
when training. Flashes green for DSL traffic.
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Administrator’s Handbook
LED Function Summary Matrix
Unlit
Power
USB Active
DSL Sync
DSL Traffic
Ethernet
Traffic
Ethernet Link
Flashing
Green
Solid Red
Flashing Red
No power
Power on
N/A
System failure
Installing new
embedded software
No signal
USB port connected to PC
Activity on the
USB cable
N/A
N/A
No signal
DSL line synched
with the DSLAM
Attempting to
train with DSLAM
N/A
N/A
No signal
N/A
Activity on the
DSL cable
N/A
N/A
No signal
N/A
Activity on the
Ethernet port
N/A
N/A
No signal
Synched with Ethernet card
N/A
N/A
N/A
No signal
Broadband device
is connected.
Activity on the
WAN port.
Physical link
established, but
PPP or DHCP
fails.
N/A
Wireless is
disabled.
Wireless is
enabled.
Activity on the
WLAN.
N/A
N/A
Internet
Wireless
Solid Green
If a status indicator light does not look correct, look for these possible problems:
LED
State
Possible problems
1. Make sure the power switch is in the ON position.
2. Make sure the power adapter is plugged into the 2200-, 3300- or 7000-series DSL Gate-
Power
Unlit
way properly.
3. Try a known good wall outlet.
4. Replace the power supply and/or unit.
1. Make sure the you are using the correct cable. The DSL cable is the thinner standard tele-
phone cable.
DSL
Sync
Unlit
2. Make sure the DSL cable is plugged into the correct wall jack.
3. Make sure the DSL cable is plugged into the DSL port on the 2200-, 3300- or 7000-series
DSL Gateway.
4. Make sure the DSL line has been activated at the central office DSLAM.
5. Make sure the 2200-, 3300- or 7000-series DSL Gateway is not plugged into a micro filter.
EN Link
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Unlit
Note: EN Link light is inactive if only using USB.
1. Make sure the you are using the Ethernet cable, not the DSL cable. The Ethernet cable is
thicker than the standard telephone cable.
2. Make sure the Ethernet cable is securely plugged into the Ethernet jack on the PC.
3. If plugging a 2200-, 3300- or 7000-series DSL Gateway into a hub the you may need to
plug into an uplink port on the hub, or use an Ethernet cross over cable.
4. Make sure the Ethernet cable is securely plugged into the Ethernet port on the 2200-,
3300- or 7000-series DSL Gateway.
5. Try another Ethernet cable if you have one available.
1. Make sure you have Ethernet drivers installed on the PC.
2. Make sure the PC’s TCP/IP Properties for the Ethernet Network Control Panel is set to
obtain an IP address via DHCP.
EN Traffic
Unlit
3. Make sure the PC has obtained an address in the 192.168.1.x range. (You may have
changed the subnet addressing.)
4. Make sure the PC is configured to access the Internet over a LAN.
5. Disable any installed network devices (Ethernet, HomePNA, wireless) that are not being
USB
Active
Unlit
DSL
Traffic
Unlit
used to connect to the 2200-, 3300- or 7000-series DSL Gateway.
Note: USB Active light is inactive if only using Ethernet.
1. Make sure you have USB drivers installed on the PC.
2. Make sure the PC’s TCP/IP Properties for the USB Network Control Panel is set to obtain
an IP address via DHCP.
3. Make sure the PC has obtained an address in the 192.168.1.x range. (You may have
changed the subnet addressing.)
4. Make sure the PC is configured to access the Internet over a LAN.
5. Disable any installed network devices (Ethernet, HomePNA, wireless) that are not being
used to connect to the 2200-, 3300- or 7000-series DSL Gateway.
Launch a browser and try to browse the Internet. If the DSL Active light still does not flash,
then proceed to Advanced Troubleshooting below.
Unlit
❑ Make sure your client PC(s) have their wireless cards correctly installed and configured.
❑ Check your client PC(s) TCP/IP settings to make sure they are receiving an IP address from
Wireless
Link
the wireless Router.
❑ Check the Gateway’s log for wireless driver failure messages.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Factory Reset Switch
Lose your password? This section shows how to reset the Motorola Netopia® Router so that you can
access the configuration screens once again.
☛
NOTE: Keep in mind that all of your settings will need to be reconfigured.
If you don't have a password, the only way to access the Motorola Netopia® Router is the following:
1.
Referring to the following diagram, find the round Reset Switch opening.
7000-series
DSL
2240N
LAN
4
2
3
1
Power
Off/On
Factory Reset Switch:
Push to clear all settings
Factory Reset Switch:
Push to clear all settings
2241N
3347-02
DSL
4
3
LAN
2
1
Power
Off / On
Factory Reset Switch:
Push to clear all settings
Factory Reset Switch:
Push to clear all settings
2246N
2247-series
ON
OFF
DSL
4
3 ETHERNET 2
1
RESET
POWER
Factory Reset Switch:
Push to clear all settings
Factory Reset Switch:
Push to clear all settings
2.
Carefully insert the point of a pen or an unwound paperclip into the opening.
❑ If you press the factory default button for less than 1/2 a second, the unit will continue to run as
normal.
❑ If you press the factory default button for 1 second, when you release it, the Gateway will perform a
factory reset, clear all settings and configurations, and reboot. Do not hold the button down too long
(5 – 10 seconds). This will destroy any saved default settings as well.
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CHAPTER 5
Command Line Interface
The Motorola Netopia® Gateway operating software includes a command line interface (CLI) that lets
you access your Motorola Netopia® Gateway over a telnet connection. You can use the command line
interface to enter and update the unit’s configuration settings, monitor its performance, and restart it.
This chapter covers the following topics:
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
“CONFIG Commands” on page 128
“Overview” on page 129
“Starting and Ending a CLI Session” on page 131
“Using the CLI Help Facility” on page 131
“About SHELL Commands” on page 132
“SHELL Commands” on page 133
“About CONFIG Commands” on page 145
“CONFIG Commands” on page 148
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CONFIG Commands
128
“Remote ATA Configuration Commands” on
page 148
“PPPoE with IPoE Settings” on page 190
“DSL Commands” on page 150
“Ethernet Port Settings” on page 191
“Bridging Settings” on page 151
“802.3ah Ethernet OAM Settings” on
page 192
“DHCP Settings” on page 153
“Command Line Interface Preference Settings” on page 193
“DMT Settings” on page 159
“Port Renumbering Settings” on page 194
“Domain Name System Settings” on page 160
“Security Settings” on page 195
“IGMP Settings” on page 162
“System Settings” on page 210
“IP Settings” on page 164
“Syslog” on page 214
“Queue Configuration” on page 177
“Wireless Settings (supported models)” on
page 216
“IPMaps Settings” on page 184
“VLAN Settings” on page 224
“Network Address Translation (NAT) Default Settings” on page 185
“VoIP settings (supported models)” on
page 229
“Network Address Translation (NAT) Pinhole Settings” on page 186
“UPnP settings” on page 235
“PPPoE /PPPoA Settings” on page 187
“DSL Forum settings” on page 235
“SNMP Settings” on page 209
“Backup IP Gateway Settings” on page 238
Overview
The CLI has two major command modes: SHELL and CONFIG. Summary tables that list the commands are provided below. Details of the entire command set follow in this section.
SHELL Commands
Command
arp
atmping
clear
clear_certificate
clear_log
configure
diagnose
download
etheroam
exit
help
install
license
log
loglevel
netstat
nslookup
ping
quit
reset
restart
show
start
status
telnet
traceroute
upload
view
voip
who
Status and/or Description
to send ARP request
to send ATM OAM loopback
to erase all stored configuration information
to remove an SSL certificate that has been installed
to erase all stored log info in flash memory
to configure unit's options
to run self-test
to download config file
to show Ethernet OAM info
to quit this shell
to get more: “help all” or “help help”
to download and program an image into flash
to enter an upgrade key to add a feature
to add a message to the diagnostic log
to report or change diagnostic log level
to show IP information
to send DNS query for host
to send ICMP Echo request
to quit this shell
to reset subsystems
to restart unit
to show system information
to start subsystem
to show basic status of unit
to telnet to a remote host
to send traceroute probes
to upload config file
to show configuration information
to show VoIP info
to show who is using the shell
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CONFIG Commands
Command Verbs
delete
help
save
script
set
validate
view
Status and/or Description
Delete configuration list data
Help command option
Save configuration data
Print configuration data
Set configuration data
Validate configuration settings
View configuration data
Keywords
ata
atm
backup
bridge
dhcp
dmt
diffserv
dns
dslf-cpewan
dslf-lanmgnt
dynamic-dns
ethernet
ethernet-MAC-override
igmp
ip
ip-maps
nat-default
pinhole
ppp
wan-over-ether
preferences
queue
radius
security
servers
snmp
system
upnp
vdsl
vlan
ATA remote config options
ATM options (DSL only)
Backup gateway options
Bridge options
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol options
DMT ADSL options
Differentiated Services options
Domain Name System options
TR-069 CPE WAN management
TR-064 LAN management
Dynamic DNS client options
Ethernet options
Ethernet options
IGMP configuration options
TCP/IP protocol options
IPmaps options
Network Address Translation default options
Pinhole options
Peer-to-Peer Protocol options
PPP over Ethernet options
Shell environment settings
bandwidth queueing options
RADIUS Server options
Security options
Internal Server options
SNMP management options
Gateway’s system options
UPnP options
VDSL tuning options
VLAN options
Command Utilities
top
quit
exit
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Go to top level of configuration mode
Exit from configuration mode; return to shell mode
Exit from configuration mode; return to shell mode
Starting and Ending a CLI Session
Open a telnet connection from a workstation on your network.
You initiate a telnet connection by issuing the following command from an IP host that supports telnet,
for example, a personal computer running a telnet application such as NCSA Telnet.
telnet <ip_address>
You must know the IP address of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway before you can make a telnet connection to it. By default, your Motorola Netopia® Gateway uses 192.168.1.254 as the IP address for its
LAN interface. You can use a Web browser to configure the Motorola Netopia® Gateway IP address.
Logging In
The command line interface log-in process emulates the log-in process for a UNIX host. To logon, enter
the username (either admin or user), and your password.
❑ Entering the administrator password lets you display and update all Motorola Netopia® Gateway settings.
❑ Entering a user password lets you display (but not update) Motorola Netopia® Gateway settings.
When you have logged in successfully, the command line interface lists the username and the security
level associated with the password you entered in the diagnostic log.
Ending a CLI Session
You end a command line interface session by typing quit from the SHELL node of the command line
interface hierarchy.
Saving Settings
In CONFIG mode, the save command saves the working copy of the settings to the Gateway. The Gateway automatically validates its settings when you save and displays a warning message if the configuration is not correct.
save defaults string
This will save the current config options as the new factory defaults. You must supply a comment string
to save defaults.
Using the CLI Help Facility
The help command lets you display on-line help for SHELL and CONFIG commands. To display a list of
the commands available to you from your current location within the command line interface hierarchy,
enter help.
To obtain help for a specific CLI command, type help <command>. You can truncate the help command to h or a question mark when you request help for a CLI command.
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About SHELL Commands
You begin in SHELL mode when you start a CLI session. SHELL mode lets you perform the following
tasks with your Motorola Netopia® Gateway:
❑ Monitor its performance
❑ Display and reset Gateway statistics
❑ Issue administrative commands to restart Motorola Netopia® Gateway functions
SHELL Prompt
When you are in SHELL mode, the CLI prompt is the name of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway followed
by a right angle bracket (>). For example, if you open a CLI connection to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway named “Netopia-3000/9437188,” you would see Netopia-3000/9437188> as your CLI prompt.
SHELL Command Shortcuts
You can truncate most commands in the CLI to their shortest unique string. For example, you can use
the truncated command q in place of the full quit command to exit the CLI. However, you would need
to enter rese for the reset command, since the first characters of reset are common to the restart
command.
The only commands you cannot truncate are restart and clear. To prevent accidental interruption of
communications, you must enter the restart and clear commands in their entirety.
You can use the Up and Down arrow keys to scroll backward and forward through recent commands you
have entered. Alternatively, you can use the !! command to repeat the last command you entered.
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SHELL Commands
Common Commands
arp nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
Sends an Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) request to match the nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn IP address to
an Ethernet hardware address.
clear [yes]
Clears the configuration settings in a Motorola Netopia® Gateway. If you do not use the optional yes
qualifier, you are prompted to confirm the clear command.
clear_certificate
Removes an SSL certificate that has been installed.
clear_log
Erases the log information stored in flash if persistent logging is enabled.
configure
Puts the command line interface into Configure mode, which lets you configure your Motorola Netopia®
Gateway with Config commands. Config commands are described starting on page 130.
diagnose
Runs a diagnostic utility to conduct a series of internal checks and loopback tests to verify network connectivity over each interface on your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. The console displays the results of
each test as the diagnostic utility runs. If one test is dependent on another, the diagnostic utility
indents its entry in the console window. For example, the diagnostic utility indents the Check IP connect
to Ethernet (LAN) entry, since that test will not run if the Check Ethernet LAN Connect test fails.
Each test generates one of the following result codes:
CODE
PASS
FAIL
SKIPPED
PENDING
Description
The test was successful.
The test was unsuccessful.
The test was skipped because a test on which it depended failed, or
because the test did not apply to your particular setup or model.
The test timed out without producing a result. Try running the test again.
download [server_address ] [filename] [confirm]
This command installs a file of configuration parameters into the Motorola Netopia® Gateway from a
TFTP (Trivial File Transfer Protocol) server. The TFTP server must be accessible on your Ethernet network.
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You can include one or more of the following arguments with the download command. If you omit arguments, the console prompts you for this information.
❑ The server_address argument identifies the IP address of the TFTP server from which you want
to copy the Motorola Netopia® Gateway configuration file.
❑ The filename argument identifies the path and name of the configuration file on the TFTP server.
❑ If you include the optional confirm keyword, the download begins as soon as all information is
entered.
You can also download an SSL certificate file from a trusted Certification Authority (CA), on platforms
that support SSL, as follows:
download [-cert] [server_address ] [filename] [confirm]
install [server_address] [filename] [confirm]
Downloads a new version of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway operating software from a TFTP (Trivial File
Transfer Protocol) server, validates the software image, and programs the image into the Motorola
Netopia® Gateway memory. After you install new operating software, you must restart the Motorola
Netopia® Gateway.
The server_address argument identifies the IP address of the TFTP server on which your Motorola
Netopia® Gateway operating software is stored. The filename argument identifies the path and name
of the operating software file on the TFTP server.
If you include the optional keyword confirm, you will not be prompted to confirm whether or not you
want to perform the operation.
license [key]
This command installs a software upgrade key. An upgrade key is a purchased item, based on the
serial number of the gateway.
log message_string
Adds the message in the message_string argument to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway diagnostic
log.
loglevel [level]
Displays or modifies the types of log messages you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to record. If
you enter the loglevel command without the optional level argument, the command line interface
displays the current log level setting.
You can enter the loglevel command with the level argument to specify the types of diagnostic
messages you want to record. All messages with a level number equal to or greater than the level you
specify are recorded. For example, if you specify loglevel 3, the diagnostic log will retain high-level informational messages (level 3), warnings (level 4), and failure messages (level 5).
Use the following values for the level argument:
❑ 1 or low – Low-level informational messages or greater; includes trivial status messages.
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❑ 2 or medium – Medium-level informational messages or greater; includes status messages that
can help monitor network traffic.
❑ 3 or high – High-level informational messages or greater; includes status messages that may be
significant but do not constitute errors.
❑ 4 or warning – Warnings or greater; includes recoverable error conditions and useful operator
information.
❑ 5 or failure – Failures; includes messages describing error conditions that may not be recoverable.
netstat -i
Displays the IP interfaces for your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
netstat -r
Displays the IP routes stored in your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
nslookup [ hostname | ip_address ]
Performs a domain name system lookup for a specified host.
❑ The hostname argument is the name of the host for which you want DNS information; for example,
nslookup klaatu.
❑ The ip_address argument is the IP address, in dotted decimal notation, of the device for which
you want DNS information.
ping [-s size] [-c count] [ hostname | ip_address ]
Causes the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to issue a series of ICMP Echo requests for the device with the
specified name or IP address.
❑ The hostname argument is the name of the device you want to ping; for example, ping ftp.netopia.com.
❑ The ip_address argument is the IP address, in dotted decimal notation, of the device you want to
locate. If a host using the specified name or IP address is active, it returns one or more ICMP Echo
replies, confirming that it is accessible from your network.
❑ The -s size argument lets you specify the size of the ICMP packet.
❑ The -c count argument lets you specify the number of ICMP packets generated for the ping
request. Values greater than 250 are truncated to 250.
You can use the ping command to determine whether a hostname or IP address is already in use on
your network. You cannot use the ping command to ping the Motorola Netopia® Gateway’s own IP
address.
quit
Exits the Motorola Netopia® Gateway command line interface.
reset arp
Clears the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache on your unit.
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reset atm
Resets the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) statistics.
reset cdmode
This command will set up one boot flag so that the next time a 3342N/3352N restarts or reboots
(power cycle), the Gateway will boot into CD-ROM mode instead of Gateway mode.
This command is only for the 3342N/3352N. If the Gateway is not a 3342N/3352N this command
does nothing but returns the message: “CD mode is not supported on this platform.”
reset crash
Clears crash-dump information, which identifies the contents of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway registers at the point of system malfunction.
reset dhcp server
Clears the DHCP lease table in the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
reset diffserv
Resets the Differentiated Services (diffserv) statistics.
reset enet [ all ]
Resets Ethernet statistics to zero. Resets individual LAN switch port statistics as well as wireless and
WAN Ethernet statistics (where applicable).
reset heartbeat
Restarts the heartbeat sequence.
reset ipmap
Clears the IPMap table (NAT).
reset log
Rewinds the diagnostic log display to the top of the existing Motorola Netopia® Gateway diagnostic log.
The reset log command does not clear the diagnostic log. The next show log command will display
information from the beginning of the log file.
reset security-log
Clears the security monitoring log to make room to capture new entries.
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reset wan-users [all | ip-address]
This function disconnects the specified WAN User to allow for other users to access the WAN. This function is only available if the number of WAN Users is restricted and NAT is on. Use the all parameter to
disconnect all users. If you logon as Admin you can disconnect any or all users. If you logon as User,
you can only disconnect yourself.
reset wan
This function resets WAN interface statistics.
reset wepkeys
This function allows you to force your wireless WEP key settings back to the default values, if there are
default values. For example, on some models, the WEP keys are based on the serial number. This
allows you to get back those default settings if you have changed them without the need to reset the
entire configuration of the unit.
restart [seconds]
Restarts your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. If you include the optional seconds argument, your Motorola Netopia® Gateway will restart when the specified number of seconds have elapsed. You must enter
the complete restart command to initiate a restart.
show all-info
Displays all settings currently configured in the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show backup
Displays the status of the Backup port, Up or Down, and reports the current port in use.
show bridge interfaces
Displays bridge interfaces maintained by the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show bridge table
Displays the bridging table maintained by the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show config
Dumps the Motorola Netopia® Gateway’s configuration script just as the script command does in
config mode.
show crash
Displays the most recent crash information, if any, for your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
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show daylight-savings
Displays the auto-daylight savings time settings information.
show dhcp agent
Displays DHCP relay-agent leases.
show dhcp server leases
Displays the DHCP leases stored in RAM by your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show diffserv
Displays the Differentiated Services and QoS values configured in the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show dslf device-association
Displays LAN devices that conform with the TR111 Gateway requirement. It displays - IP Address, Manufacture OUI and Serial number.
show enet [ all ]
Displays Ethernet interface statistics maintained by the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. Beginning with
Firmware Version 7.7, supports display of individual LAN switch port statistics as well as WAN Ethernet
statistics (where applicable).
Example:
show enet status all
10/100 Ethernet 1
Port Status: Link down
Transmit OK
:
Transmit unicastpkts :
Receive OK
:
Receive unicastpkts
:
Tx Octets
:
Rx Octets
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
10/100 Ethernet 2
Port Status: Link down
Transmit OK
:
Transmit unicastpkts :
Receive OK
:
Receive unicastpkts
:
Tx Octets
:
Rx Octets
:
10/100 Ethernet 3
Port Status: Link up
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0
0
0
0
0
0
Duplex: Full-duplex not
Speed: 100BASE-X
Transmit OK
:
Transmit unicastpkts :
Receive OK
:
Receive unicastpkts
:
Tx Octets
:
Rx Octets
:
active
3309
31
5588
1976
31
1976
10/100 Ethernet 4
Port Status: Link down
Transmit OK
:
Transmit unicastpkts :
Receive OK
:
Receive unicastpkts
:
Tx Octets
:
Rx Octets
:
0
0
0
0
0
0
show etheroam ah
Displays OAM internal information, such as OAM mode, state, configurations, events and OAM statistics.
show features
Displays standard and keyed features installed in the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show group-mgmt
Displays the IGMP Snooping Table. See “IGMP Settings” on page 162 for detailed explanation.
show ip arp
Displays the Ethernet address resolution table stored in your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show ip igmp
Displays the contents of the IGMP Group Address table and the IGMP Report table maintained by your
Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show ip interfaces
Displays the IP interfaces for your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show ip ipsec
Displays IPSec Tunnel statistics.
show ip firewall
Displays firewall statistics.
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show ip lan-discovery
Displays the LAN Host Discovery Table of hosts on the wired or wireless LAN, and whether or not they
are currently online.
show ip routes
Displays the IP routes stored in your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
show ip state-insp
Displays whether stateful inspection is enabled on an interface or not, exposed addresses and blocked
packet statistics because of stateful inspection.
show ipmap
Displays IPMap table (NAT).
show log
Displays blocks of information from the Motorola Netopia® Gateway diagnostic log. To see the entire
log, you can repeat the show log command or you can enter show log all.
show memory [all]
Displays memory usage information for your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. If you include the optional all
argument, your Motorola Netopia® Gateway will display a more detailed set of memory statistics.
show pppoe
Displays status information for each PPPoE socket, such as the socket state, service names, and host
ID values.
show rootcert
Dumps the Subject line for the list of all the trusted root certificates for the supplicant, which is currently a superset of the OpenSSL trusted root certificates.
show rtsp
Displays RTSP ALG session activity data.
show security-log
Displays blocks of information from the Motorola Netopia® Gateway security log.
show status
Displays the current status of a Motorola Netopia® Gateway, the device's hardware and software revision levels, a summary of errors encountered, and the length of time the Motorola Netopia® Gateway
has been running since it was last restarted. Identical to the status command.
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show summary
Displays a summary of WAN, LAN, and Gateway information.
show vlan
Displays detail of VLAN status and statistics.
Example:
show vlan
Displaying vlan segment interfaces
==== vlan mode ====
==== segment 0 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== segment 1 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00001006-00000001
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00001006-00000001
==== segment 2 port masks ====
PortPort
: 0000003c-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 0000003c-00000000
==== segment 3 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== segment 4 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== segment 5 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== segment 6 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== segment 7 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== segment 8 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== segment 9 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
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==== segment 10 port masks ====
PortPort
: 00000000-00000000
GlobalPort : 00000000-00000000
SumPort
: 00000000-00000000
==== vlan active segment ====
Type : 1
Index : 1
Vid : 1
PortMask
: 00001006-00000001
SwitchMask
: 00000004
WirelessMask : 00001000
==== vlan active link ====
namePtr
: eth-lan-uplink
portType : 1
portIndex : 1
ifId
: 45
==== vlan active link ====
namePtr
: ethernet0/0
portType : 3
portIndex : 2
ifId
: 46
==== vlan active link ====
namePtr
: ssid1
portType : 5
portIndex : 12
ifId
: 56
==== vlan active link ====
namePtr
: eth-ip0
portType : 7
portIndex : 32
ifId
: 76
==== vlan active segment ====
Type : 1
Index : 2
Vid : 3
PortMask
: 0000003c-00000000
SwitchMask
: 0000003c
WirelessMask : 00000000
==== vlan active link ====
namePtr
: ethernet0/0
portType : 3
portIndex : 2
ifId
: 90
==== vlan active link ====
namePtr
: ethernet0/1
portType : 3
portIndex : 3
ifId
: 91
==== vlan active link ====
namePtr
: ethernet0/2
portType : 3
portIndex : 4
ifId
: 92
==== vlan active link ====
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namePtr
portType
portIndex
ifId
:
:
:
:
ethernet0/3
3
5
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show voip
Shows voice over IP information.
show wireless [ all ]
Shows wireless status and statistics.
show wireless clients [ MAC_address ]
Displays details on connected clients, or more details on a particular client if the MAC address is
added as an argument.
voip rtpstats
Allows printing RTP Send and Receive statistics.
telnet [ hostname | ip_address ] [ port ]
Lets you open a telnet connection to the specified host through your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
❑ The hostname argument is the name of the device to which you want to connect; for example, telnet ftp.netopia.com.
❑ The ip_address argument is the IP address, in dotted decimal notation, of the device to which you
want to connect.
❑ The port argument is the number of t he port over which you want to open a telnet session.
traceroute ( ip_address | hostname )
Traces the routing path to an IP destination.
upload [server_address] [filename] [confirm]
Copies the current configuration settings of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to a TFTP (Trivial File Transfer Protocol) server. The TFTP server must be accessible on your Ethernet network. The
server_address argument identifies the IP address of the TFTP server on which you want to store
the Motorola Netopia® Gateway settings. The filename argument identifies the path and name of
the configuration file on the TFTP server. If you include the optional confirm keyword, you will not be
prompted to confirm whether or not you want to perform the operation.
view config
Dumps the Motorola Netopia® Gateway’s configuration just as the view command does in config
mode.
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who
Displays the names of the current shell and PPP users.
WAN Commands
atmping vccn [ segment | end-to-end ]
Lets you check the ATM connection reachability and network connectivity. This command sends five
Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) loopback calls to the specified vpi/vci destination.
There is a five second total timeout interval.
Use the segment argument to ping a neighbor switch.
Use the end-to-end argument to ping a remote end node.
reset dhcp client release [ vcc-id ]
Releases the DHCP lease the Motorola Netopia® Gateway is currently using to acquire the IP settings
for the specified DSL port. The vcc-id identifier is an “index” letter in the range B-I, and does not
directly map to the VCC in use. Enter the reset dhcp client release command without the
variable to see the letter assigned to each virtual circuit.
reset dhcp client renew [ vcc-id ]
Releases the DHCP lease the Motorola Netopia® Gateway is currently using to acquire the IP settings
for the specified DSL port. The vcc-id identifier is an “index” letter in the range B-I, and does not
directly map to the VCC in use. Enter the reset dhcp client release without the variable to
see the letter assigned to each virtual circuit.
reset dsl
Resets any open DSL connection.
reset ppp vccn
Resets the point-to-point connection over the specified virtual circuit. This command only applies to virtual circuits that use PPP framing.
show atm [all]
Displays ATM statistics for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. The optional all argument displays a more
detailed set of ATM statistics.
show dsl [ all ]
Displays DSL port statistics, such as upstream and downstream connection rates and noise levels.
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show ppp [{ stats | lcp | ipcp }]
Displays information about open PPP links. You can display a subset of the PPP statistics by including
an optional stats, lcp, or ipcp argument for the show ppp command.
start ppp vccn
Opens a PPP link on the specified virtual circuit.
About CONFIG Commands
You reach the configuration mode of the command line interface by typing configure (or any truncation of configure, such as con or config) at the CLI SHELL prompt.
CONFIG Mode Prompt
When you are in CONFIG mode, the CLI prompt consists of the name of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway
followed by your current node in the hierarchy and two right angle brackets (>>). For example, when you
enter CONFIG mode (by typing config at the SHELL prompt), the Netopia-3000/9437188
(top)>> prompt reminds you that you are at the top of the CONFIG hierarchy. If you move to the ip
node in the CONFIG hierarchy (by typing ip at the CONFIG prompt), the prompt changes to Netopia3000/9437188 (ip)>> to identify your current location.
Some CLI commands are not available until certain conditions are met. For example, you must enable
IP for an interface before you can enter IP settings for that interface.
Navigating the CONFIG Hierarchy
❑ Moving from CONFIG to SHELL — You can navigate from anywhere in the CONFIG hierarchy back
to the SHELL level by entering quit at the CONFIG prompt and pressing RETURN.
Netopia-3000/9437188 (top)>> quit
Netopia-3000/9437188 >
❑ Moving from top to a subnode — You can navigate from the top node to a subnode by entering
the node name (or the significant letters of the node name) at the CONFIG prompt and pressing
RETURN. For example, you move to the IP subnode by entering ip and pressing RETURN.
Netopia-3000/9437188 (top)>> ip
Netopia-3000/9437188 (ip)>>
As a shortcut, you can enter the significant letters of the node name in place of the full node name at
the CONFIG prompt. The significant characters of a node name are the letters that uniquely identify the
node. For example, since no other CONFIG node starts with b, you could enter one letter (“b”) to move
to the bridge node.
❑ Jumping down several nodes at once — You can jump down several levels in the CONFIG hierarchy by entering the complete path to a node.
❑ Moving up one node — You can move up through the CONFIG hierarchy one node at a time by
entering the up command.
❑ Jumping to the top node — You can jump to the top level from anywhere in the CONFIG hierarchy
by entering the top command.
❑ Moving from one subnode to another — You can move from one subnode to another by entering
a partial path that identifies how far back to climb.
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❑ Moving from any subnode to any other subnode — You can move from any subnode to any other
subnode by entering a partial path that starts with a top-level CONFIG command.
❑ Scrolling backward and forward through recent commands — You can use the Up and Down
arrow keys to scroll backward and forward through recent commands you have entered. When the
command you want appears, press Enter to execute it.
Entering Commands in CONFIG Mode
CONFIG commands consist of keywords and arguments. Keywords in a CONFIG command specify the
action you want to take or the entity on which you want to act. Arguments in a CONFIG command specify
the values appropriate to your site. For example, the CONFIG command
set ip ethernet A ip_address
consists of two keywords (ip, and ethernet A) and one argument (ip_address). When you use
the command to configure your Gateway, you would replace the argument with a value appropriate to
your site.
For example:
set ip ethernet A 192.31.222.57
Guidelines: CONFIG Commands
The following table provides guidelines for entering and formatting CONFIG commands.
Command
component
Command verbs
Keywords
Argument Text
Numbers
IP addresses
Rules for entering CONFIG commands
CONFIG commands must start with a command verb (set, view, delete).
You can truncate CONFIG verbs to three characters (set, vie, del).
CONFIG verbs are case-insensitive. You can enter “SET,” “Set,” or “set.”
Keywords are case-insensitive. You can enter “Ethernet,” “ETHERNET,” or “ethernet” as a
keyword without changing its meaning.
Keywords can be abbreviated to the length that they are differentiated from other keywords.
Text strings can be as many as 64 characters long, unless otherwise specified. In some
cases they may be as long as 255 bytes.
Special characters are represented using backslash notation.
Text strings may be enclosed in double (“) or single (‘) quote marks. If the text string
includes an embedded space, it must be enclosed in quotes.
Special characters are represented using backslash notation.
Enter numbers as integers, or in hexadecimal, where so noted.
Enter IP addresses in dotted decimal notation (0 to 255).
If a command is ambiguous or miskeyed, the CLI prompts you to enter additional information. For example, you must specify which virtual circuit you are configuring when you are setting up a Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
Displaying Current Gateway Settings
You can use the view command to display the current CONFIG settings for your Motorola Netopia®
Gateway. If you enter the view command at the top level of the CONFIG hierarchy, the CLI displays the
settings for all enabled functions. If you enter the view command at an intermediate node, you see
settings for that node and its subnodes.
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Step Mode: A CLI Configuration Technique
The Motorola Netopia® Gateway command line interface includes a step mode to automate the process of entering configuration settings. When you use the CONFIG step mode, the command line interface prompts you for all required and optional information. You can then enter the configuration values
appropriate for your site without having to enter complete CLI commands.
When you are in step mode, the command line interface prompts you to enter required and optional
settings. If a setting has a default value or a current setting, the command line interface displays the
default value for the command in parentheses. If a command has a limited number of acceptable values, those values are presented in brackets, with each value separated by a vertical line. For example,
the following CLI step command indicates that the default value is off and that valid entries are limited to on and off.
option (off) [on | off]:
on
You can accept the default value for a field by pressing the Return key. To use a different value, enter it
and press Return.
You can enter the CONFIG step mode by entering set from the top node of the CONFIG hierarchy. You
can enter step mode for a particular service by entering set service_name. In stepping set mode
(press Control-X <Return/Enter> to exit. For example:
Netopia-3000/9437188 (top)>> set system
...
system
name (“Netopia-3000/9437188”): Mycroft
Diagnostic Level (High): medium
Stepping mode ended.
Validating Your Configuration
You can use the validate CONFIG command to make sure that your configuration settings have
been entered correctly. If you use the validate command, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway verifies
that all required settings for all services are present and that settings are consistent.
Netopia-3000/9437188 (top)>> validate
Error: Subnet mask is incorrect
Global Validation did not pass inspection!
You can use the validate command to verify your configuration settings at any time. Your Motorola
Netopia® Gateway automatically validates your configuration any time you save a modified configuration.
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CONFIG Commands
This section describes the keywords and arguments for the various CONFIG commands.
Remote ATA Configuration Commands
Motorola Netopia® firmware supports configuration of a maximum of four Motorola Netopia® ATA profiles, which are stored in the Gateway’s configuration database. When a Motorola Netopia® ATA is discovered, the Gateway compares the MAC address of the ATA with one of the existing profiles stored in
the database. If there is a match, the configuration is downloaded to the Motorola Netopia® ATA, and
the ATA is restarted. Once the Motorola Netopia® ATA is restarted, it comes up with the newly downloaded configuration.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-option [ on | off ]
Enables or disables the remote ATA configuration option for the specified ATA configuration profile to be
stored in the Gateway.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-mac-addr MAC_addr
Specifies the MAC address of the ATA for the specified configuration profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-qos-enable [ on | off ]
Enables or disables QoS for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-dhcpc-enable [ on | off ]
Enables or disables DHCP client service for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-dhcpc-hostname string
Specifies a DHCP client hostname for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-dhcpc-vid-enable [ off | on ]
Enables or disables a DHCP client vendor ID for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-dhcpc-vid string
Specifies a vendor ID for the specified profile when ata-dhcpc-vid-enable is on.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-static-wan-ip ip_addr
Specifies a static WAN IP address for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-static-wan-subnet-mask subnet_mask
Specifies a static WAN IP subnet mask for the specified profile.
148
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-static-wan-gateway ip_addr
Specifies a static gateway WAN IP address for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-proxy-server ip_addr
Specifies a SIP proxy server hostname or IP address for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-proxy-port port
Specifies a SIP proxy server port, typically 5060, for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-registrar-server ip_addr
Specifies a registrar server hostname or IP address for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-registrar-port port
Specifies a registrar server port, typically 5060, for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-outproxy-server ip_addr
Specifies an outbound proxy server hostname or IP address for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-outproxy-port port
Specifies an outbound proxy server port, typically 5060, for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-auth-id value
Specifies an authorization ID for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-user-name string
Specifies the ISP-supplied user name for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-user-display-name string
Specifies the a user “display” or “screen” name for the specified profile.
set ata profile [ 0... 3 ] ata-user-password string
Specifies the user password for the specified profile.
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DSL Commands
ATM Settings. You can use the CLI to set up each ATM virtual circuit.
set atm option {on | off }
Enables the WAN interface of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to be configured using the Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM) protocol.
set atm [vcc n] option {on | off }
Selects the virtual circuit for which further parameters are set. Up to eight VCCs are supported; the
maximum number is dependent on your Motorola Netopia® Operating System tier and the capabilities
that your Service Provider offers.
set atm [vcc n] qos service-class { cbr | ubr | vbr }
Sets the Quality of Service class for the specified virtual circuit – Constant (cbr), Unspecified (ubr), or
Variable (vbr) Bit Rate.
❑ ubr: No configuration is needed for UBR VCs. Leave the default value 0 (maximum line rate).
❑ cbr: One parameter is required for CBR VCs. Enter the Peak Cell Rate that applies to the VC. This
value should be between 1 and the line rate. You set this value according to specifications defined
by your service provider.
❑ vbr: Three parameters are required for VBR VCs. Enter the Peak Cell Rate, the Sustained Cell
Rate, and the Maximum Burst Size that apply to the VC. You set these values according to specifications defined by your service provider.
set atm [vcc n] qos peak-cell-rate { 1 ...n }
If QoS class is set to cbr or vbr then specify the peak-cell-rate that should apply to the specified virtual circuit. This value should be between 1 and the line rate.
The Peak Cell Rate (PCR) should be set to the maximum rate a PVC can oversubscribe its Sustained
Cell Rate (SCR). The Peak Cell Rate (see below) must be less than, or equal to the raw WAN (DSL) bit
rate. The Maximum Burst Size (MBS) is the number of cells that can be sent at the PCR rate, after
which the PVC must fall back to the SCR rate.
set atm [vcc n] qos sustained-cell-rate { 1 ...n }
If QoS class is set to vbr, then specify the sustained-cell-rate that should apply to the specified virtual circuit. This value should be less than, or equal to the Peak Cell Rate, which should be less than,
or equal to the line rate.
set atm [vcc n] qos max-burst-size { 1 ...n }
If QoS class is set to vbr then specify the max-burst-size that should apply to the specified virtual circuit. This value is the maximum number of cells that can be transmitted at the Peak Cell Rate after
which the ATM VC transmission rate must drop to the Sustained Cell Rate.
set atm [vcc n] vpi { 0 ... 255 }
Select the virtual path identifier (vpi) for VCC n.
150
Your Service Provider will indicate the required vpi number.
set atm [vcc n] vci { 0 ... 65535 }
Select the virtual channel identifier (vci) for VCC n. Your Service Provider will indicate the required vci
number.
set atm [vccn] encap { ppp-vcmux | ppp-llc | ether-llc |
ip-llc | ppoe-vcmux | pppoe-llc }
Select the encapsulation mode for VCC n. The options are:
ppp-vcmux
PPP over ATM, VC-muxed
ppp-llc
PPP over ATM, LLC-SNAP
ether-llc
RFC-1483, bridged Ethernet, LLC-SNAP
ip-llc
RFC-1483, routed IP, LLC-SNAP
pppoe-vcmux
PPP over Ethernet, VC-muxed
pppoe-llc
PPP over Ethernet, LLC-SNAP
Your Service Provider will indicate the required encapsulation mode.
set atm [vccn] pppoe-sessions { 1 ... 8 }
Select the number of PPPoE sessions to be configured for VCC 1, up to a total of eight. The total number of pppoe-sessions and PPPoE VCCs configured must be less than or equal to eight.
Bridging Settings
Bridging lets the Motorola Netopia® Gateway use MAC (Ethernet hardware) addresses to forward nonTCP/IP traffic from one network to another. When bridging is enabled, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway
maintains a table of up to 512 MAC addresses. Entries that are not used within 30 seconds are
dropped. If the bridging table fills up, the oldest table entries are dropped to make room for new
entries.
Virtual circuits that use IP framing cannot be bridged.
☛
NOTE:
For bridging in the 3341 (or any model with a USB port), you cannot set the bridge option
off, or bridge ethernet option off; these are on by default because of the USB port.
Common Commands
set bridge sys-bridge {on | off }
Enables or disables bridging services in the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. You must enable bridging services within the Motorola Netopia® Gateway before you can enable bridging for a specific interface.
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set bridge concurrent-bridging-routing {on | off }
Enables or disables Concurrent Bridging/Routing.
set bridge dhcp-filterset "string"
Assigns a filterset named string to the bridge configuration.
☛
NOTE:
A filterset can only be configured for the bridge if the system bridge or concurrent bridging/
routing is enabled.
set bridge ethernet option { on | off }
Enables or disables bridging services for the specified virtual circuit using Ethernet framing.
set bridge dsl vccn option { on | off }
Enables or disables bridging services for the specified interface. Specified interface must be part of a
VLAN if bridge is turned on. Only RFC-1483 Bridged encapsulation is supported currently.
❑ show log command will show that WAN Bridge is enabled when at least one WAN interface is
bridged.
❑ show ip interfaces and show bridge interfaces commands will show the interfaces that are not in
bridged mode and that are in bridged modes, respectively.
set bridge table-timeout [ 30 ... 6000 ]
Sets the timeout value for bridging table timeout. Default = 30 secs; range = 30 secs – 6000 secs (.5–
100 mins).
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DHCP Settings
As a Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) server, your Motorola Netopia® Gateway can assign IP
addresses and provide configuration information to other devices on your network dynamically. A device
that acquires its IP address and other TCP/IP configuration settings from the Motorola Netopia® Gateway can use the information for a fixed period of time (called the DHCP lease).
Common Commands
set dhcp option { off | server | relay-agent }
Enables or disables DHCP services in the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. You must enable DHCP services
before you can enter other DHCP settings for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
If you turn off DHCP services and save the new configuration, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway clears its
DHCP settings.
set dhcp start-address ip_address
If you selected server, specifies the first address in the DHCP address range. The Motorola Netopia® Gateway can reserve a sequence of up to 253 IP addresses within a subnet, beginning with the
specified address for dynamic assignment.
set dhcp end-address ip_address
If you selected server, specifies the last address in the DHCP address range.
set dhcp lease-time lease-time
If you selected server, specifies the default length for DHCP leases issued by the Motorola Netopia®
Gateway. Enter lease time in dd:hh:mm:ss (day/hour/minute/second) format.
set dhcp option-group name
Specifies a name for one of up to eight DHCP Option Groups. Each Option Group can have a name of
between 1 and 15 characters. The name is used in the DHCP filterset syntax to choose what group of
gen-options is to be served to a particular DHCP Client. See “DHCP Generic Options” on page 154 and
“DHCP Option Filtering” on page 157.
Option Groups refer to gen-options; they do not contain them. Deleting a gen-option from an option
group does not delete the option. Adding a gen-option to an option-group does not preclude it from
being added to another option-group.
set dhcp default-option-group name
Sets the option group specified by name as the default.
set dhcp server-address ip_address
If you selected relay-agent, specifies the IP address of the relay agent server.
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set dhcp range [ 2... 8 ] start-address ip_address
Specifies the starting IP address of DHCP range n when subnet n option is on. See “Additional subnets” on page 168.
set dhcp range [ 2... 8 ] end-address ip_address
Specifies the ending IP address of DHCP range n when subnet n option is on. See “Additional subnets” on page 168.
set dhcp reserved ip-address x.x.x.x mac-address y-y-y-y-y-y
If you selected server, reserves the specified IP address from the DHCP pool to the specified MAC
address. These are list items; a total of 16 reserved addresses are supported. Secondary ranges will
all make use of the dhcp lease-time value.
DHCP Generic Options
Beginning with Firmware Version 7.7.2, you can specify DHCP Generic Options which allow you to configure the content to be served for particular option numbers.
set dhcp gen-option name name
Specifies a DHCP generic option set named name of one to 15 characters. You can specify up to 20
gen-options. Each can contain up to 100 bytes of data, up to a maximum of 912 bytes of options data
total. An option will be served only if the client requests it.
set dhcp gen-option option [ 1 – 255 ]
Specifies the DHCP option by number, 1 – 255. The following table shows the formats and sizes for
known options, and whether or not you can configure a gen-option of that type.
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Option
Data Format
Data Size
(bytes)
Can
Configure
0
Empty
0
No
1
IP mask
4
Yes
2
Unsigned 4 byte integer
4
Yes
3 - 11
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
12
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
13
Unsigned 2 byte integer
2
Yes
14 - 15
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
16
Unsigned 4 byte integer
4
Yes
17
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
18
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
19 - 20
Flag
1
Yes
21
IP address & mask list
Multiples of 8
Yes
22
Unsigned 2 byte integer
2
Yes
23
Unsigned 1 byte integer
1
Yes
Option
Data Format
Data Size
(bytes)
Can
Configure
24
Unsigned 4 byte integer
4
Yes
25
Unsigned 2 byte integer list
Multiples of 2
Yes
26
Unsigned 2 byte integer
2
Yes
27
Flag
1
Yes
28
IP address
4
Yes
29 - 31
Flag
1
Yes
32
IP address
4
Yes
33
IP address and mask list
Multiples of 8
Yes
34
Flag
1
Yes
35
Unsigned 4 byte integer
4
Yes
36
Flag
1
Yes
37
Unsigned 1 byte integer
1
Yes
38
Unsigned 4 byte integer
4
Yes
39
Flag
1
Yes
40
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
41 - 42
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
43
Vendor-specific
String
Yes
44 - 45
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
46
Unsigned 1 byte integer
1
Yes
47
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
48 - 49
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
50
IP address
4
No
51
Unsigned 4 byte integer
4
No
52
Unsigned 1 byte integer
1
No
53
Unsigned 1 byte integer
1
Yes
54
IP address
4
Yes
55
String (up to 100 characters)
N
No
56
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
57
Unsigned 2 byte integer
2
Yes
58 - 59
Unsigned 4 byte integer
4
No
60
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
61
String (up to 100 characters)
N
No
62
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
63
Complex
N
No
64
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
65
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
66 - 67
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
68 - 76
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
77
Pascal string list (length byte + data)
N
Yes
78 - 79
Complex
N
No
80
Empty
0
No
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Option
Data Format
Data Size
(bytes)
Can
Configure
81
Complex
N
No
82
Sub-option list
N
Yes
83
Complex
N
No
84
Undefined
??
Yes
85
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
86 - 87
Unicode String
Multiples of 2
Yes
88
Encoded DN list
N
Yes
89
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
90
Complex
N
No
91 - 97
Undefined/Weakly defined
??
Yes
98
String (up to 100 characters)
N
Yes
99 - 115
Undefined/Weakly defined
??
Yes
116
Flag
1
Yes
117
Unsigned 2 byte integer list
Multiples of 2
Yes
118
IP address
4
Yes
119
Encoded DN list 2
N
Yes
120
Encoded DN list or IP Address list
N
Yes
121 - 125
Complex
N
No
126 - 127
Undefined
N
Yes
128
IP address list
Multiples of 4
Yes
129 - 223
Undefined/Weakly defined
??
Yes
224 - 254
Private Use
N
Yes
249 (note)
Microsoft uses this instead of 121
N
Yes
255
Empty
0
No
set dhcp gen-option data-type [ ascii | hex | dotted-decimal ]
Specifies the DHCP gen-option data type: ascii, hex or dotted-decimal.
set dhcp gen-option data data
Specifies the gen-option data.
❑ If the data-type is ascii, then any printable character + octal representations (e.g.”\0007”) and hex
representations (e.g. “\xA4”).
❑ If the data-type is hex, then an even number of hex characters (e.g. “0123456789AbcdEf”
❑ If the data-type is dotted-decimal, then a series of numbers between 0 and 255, separated by a
period (.). IP addresses are generally represented in this form.
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DHCP Option Filtering
Beginning with Firmware Version 7.7, support for DHCP option filtering is provided via the filterset settings.
set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n
type [ dhcp-option | hw-address | requested-option ]
Specifies a DHCP filterset named string as one of three possible types:
The rule can either specify an option and option contents, dhcp-option; a client hardware address
range, hw-address; or an option the client is requesting, requested-option. For hw-address, you will
need to enter start-address and end-address values; for the others a dhcp-option parameter must
be set.
By default a rule is of type dhcp-option, for backwards compatibility.
set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n dhcp-option [ 0... 255 ]
Creates a DHCP filterset named string, for example “settopbox,” with rule number n.
Up to two filtersets can be added. Your Gateway supports a single LAN DHCP server instance, but an
additional filterset is available for use when bridging, to block undesired DHCP traffic. Up to 8 rules can
be created in the filterset, which are evaluated in order.
dhcp-option determines which DHCP option should be compared. A typical value would be to use
option 60 data for comparison, but allowing this value to be configured permits more flexibility.
set dhcp filterset name “settopbox” rule 1 type dhcp-option
set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n match-action
[ pass | discard | continue ]
Assigns a match action to the filterset. If set to pass the match-pool address is shown.
set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n absent-action
[ pass | discard | continue ]
Assigns an absent action to the filterset. If set to pass the absent-pool address is shown.
set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n match-option-group "option_group*"
Assigns the option group named option_group to match.
set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n match-str "match_string*"
Assigns a match string to the filterset. The match-str string will be compared against the DHCP DISCOVER option data. This string can contain multiple “*” and “?” wildcard substitutions.
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set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n match-pool ip_address
Specifies the start IP address of the range within a DHCP pool where that range will be used to allocate
an address if the wildcard matches.
The value 0.0.0.0 means regular processing; 255.255.255.255 means discard.
set dhcp filterset name "string" rule n absent-pool ip_address
Specifies the start IP address of the range within a DHCP pool where that range will be used to allocate
an address if the option in the DHCP packet is not present.
The value 0.0.0.0 means regular processing; 255.255.255.255 means discard.
Example
Netopia-3000/9450000 (dhcp)>> sc
set dhcp option server
set dhcp start-address 192.168.1.33
set dhcp end-address 192.168.1.63
set dhcp lease-time 00:01:00:00
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
dhcp
dhcp
dhcp
dhcp
dhcp
dhcp
dhcp
dhcp
dhcp
filterset
filterset
filterset
filterset
filterset
filterset
filterset
filterset
filterset
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
"settopbox"
"settopbox"
"settopbox"
"settopbox"
"settopbox"
“settopbox”
"settopbox"
"settopbox"
“settopbox”
rule
rule
rule
rule
rule
rule
rule
rule
rule
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
type dhcp-option
dhcp-option 60
match-str "STB*"
match-action pass
match-pool 192.168.6.100
match-option-group “og1”
absent-action pass
absent-pool 0.0.0.0
absent-option-group “og2”
Netopia-3000/9450000 (dhcp)>>
set dhcp assigned-filterset "string"
Assigns the filterset named string created above to the DHCP configuration.
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DMT Settings
DSL Commands
set dmt dsl-annex-support [ off | on ]
This controls whether other annex support (just as Annex M) is enabled. Default is off.
set dmt type [ lite | dmt | ansi | multi | adsl2 | adsl2+ | readsl2 |
adsl2anxm | adsl2+anxm ]
Selects the type of Discrete Multitone (DMT) asynchronous digital subscriber line (ADSL) protocol to
use for the WAN interface.
The type value also supports the following settings on certain model units: adsl2, adsl2+, readsl2,
adsl2anxm, adsl2+anxm.
☛
NOTE:
Some dmt type settings are now supported for many Annex B (335xN) platforms. 2200
Series and 33xxN Series models are supported. Currently, adsl2anxm and adsl2+anxm
are not supported in Annex B.
set dmt autoConfig [ off | on ]
Enables support for automatic VPI/VCI detection and configuration. When set to on (the default), a predefined list of VPI/VCI pairs are searched to find a valid configuration for your ADSL line. Entering a
value for the VPI or VCI setting will disable this feature.
set dmt dmt dying-gasp [ default | off | on ]
Enables or disables Gateway “dying gasp” behavior in cases of power failure. Default is off.
set dmt wiringMode [ auto | tip_ring | A_A1 ]
(not supported on all models) This command configures the wiring mode setting for your ADSL line.
Selecting auto (the default) causes the Gateway to detect which pair of wires (inner or outer pair) are in
use on your phone line. Specifying tip_ring forces the inner pair to be used; and A_A1 the outer pair.
set dmt metallic-termination [ auto | disabled | always_on ]
(not supported on all models) This command allows you to apply a sealing current to “dry” DSL lines so
that the wiring doesn’t corrode.
❑ auto - The device will scan for standard telephone service (POTS). If it finds POTS, it disables metallic termination. If it does not find POTS during the search period, then metallic termination is
enabled.
❑ disabled - There is no POTS detection, and metallic termination is disabled.
❑ always_on - The device will scan for POTS for information only. Metallic termination is always
enabled.
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Domain Name System Settings
Domain Name System (DNS) is an information service for TCP/IP networks that uses a hierarchical
naming system to identify network domains and the hosts associated with them. You can identify a primary DNS server and one secondary server.
Common Commands
set dns domain-name domain-name
Specifies the default domain name for your network. When an application needs to resolve a host
name, it appends the default domain name to the host name and asks the DNS server if it has an
address for the “fully qualified host name.”
set dns primary-address ip_address
Specifies the IP address of the primary DNS name server.
set dns proxy-enable
This allows you to disable the default behavior of acting as a DNS proxy. The default is on.
set dns secondary-address ip_address
Specifies the IP address of the secondary DNS name server. Enter 0.0.0.0 if your network does not
have a secondary DNS name server.
set dns configured-dns-priority [ 0 - 255 ]
Sets the configured DNS priority relative to acquired DNS. These server addresses may be acquired via
DHCP (client), PPP, or statically configured. A “DNS learned-server-priority” is assigned to each configured interface. By default, configured DNSes have the highest priority (lowest number), then PPPacquired DNSes, and DHCP-acquired DNSes have lowest priority (highest number).
The default priorities for each type are:
❑ Configured DNSes: 10
❑ PPP-acquired: 20
❑ DHCP-acquired: 30
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Dynamic DNS support allows you to use the free services of www.dyndns.org. Dynamic DNS automatically directs any public Internet request for your computer's name to your current dynamically-assigned
IP address. This allows you to get to the IP address assigned to your Gateway, even though your actual
IP address may change as a result of a PPPoE connection to the Internet.
set dynamic-dns option [ off | dyndns.org ]
set dynamic-dns ddns-host-name myhostname.dyndns.org
set dynamic-dns ddns-user-name myusername
set dynamic-dns ddns-user-password myuserpassword
Enables or disables dynamic DNS services. The default is off. If you specify dyndns.org, you must
supply your hostname, username for the service, and password.
Because different dynamic DNS vendors use different proprietary protocols, currently only
www.dyndns.org is supported.
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IGMP Settings
Multicasting is a method for transmitting large amounts of information to many, but not all, computers
over an internet. One common use is to distribute real time voice, video, and data services to the set of
computers which have joined a distributed conference. Other uses include updating the address books
of mobile computer users in the field, or sending out company newsletters to a distribution list.
Since a router should not be used as a passive forwarding device, Motorola Netopia® Gateways use a
protocol for forwarding multicasting: Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP).
Motorola Netopia® Gateways support IGMP Version 1, Version 2, or, beginning with Motorola Netopia®
Firmware Version 7.7, Version 3.
IGMP “Snooping” is a feature of Ethernet layer 2 switches that “listens in” on the IGMP conversation
between computers and multicast routers. Through this process, it builds a database of where the multicast routers reside by noting IGMP general queries used in the querier selection process and by listening to other router protocols.
From the host point of view, the snooping function listens at a port level for an IGMP report. The switch
then processes the IGMP report and starts forwarding the relevant multicast stream onto the host's
port. When the switch receives an IGMP leave message, it processes the leave message, and if appropriate stops the multicast stream to that particular port. Basically, customer IGMP messages although
processed by the switch are also sent to the multicast routers.
In order for IGMP snooping to function with IGMP Version 3, it must always track the full source filter
state of each host on each group, as was previously done with Version 2 only when Fast Leave support
was enabled.
IGMP Version 3 supports:
IGMP Source Filtering: the ability for group memberships to incorporate source address filtering. This
allows “Source-Specific Multicast” (SSM). By adding source filtering, a Gateway that proxies IGMP can
more selectively join the specific multicast group for which there are interested LAN multicast receivers.
These features require no user configuration on the Gateway.
You can set the following options:
❑ IGMP Snooping – enables the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to “listen in” to IGMP traffic. The Gateway discovers multicast group membership for the purpose of restricting multicast transmissions to
only those ports which have requested them. This helps to reduce overall network traffic from
streaming media and other bandwidth-intensive IP multicast applications.
❑ Robustness – a way of indicating how sensitive to lost packets the network is. IGMP can recover
from robustness minus 1 lost IGMP packet. The default value is 2.
❑ Query Interval– the amount of time in seconds between IGMP General Query messages sent by the
querier gateway. The default query interval is 125 seconds.
❑ Query Response Interval – the maximum amount of time in tenths of a second that the IGMP
Gateway waits to receive a response to a General Query message. The default query response interval is 10 seconds and must be less than the query interval.
❑ Unsolicited Report Interval – the amount of time in seconds between repetitions of a particular
computer’s initial report of membership in a group. The default unsolicited report interval is 10 seconds.
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❑ Querier Version – select a version of the IGMP Querier: version 1, version 2, or version 3. If you
know you will be communicating with other hosts that are limited to v1 or v2, for backward compatibility, select accordingly; otherwise, allow the default v3.
☛
NOTE:
IGMP Querier version is relevant only if the Gateway is configured for IGMP forwarding. If
any IGMP v1 routers are present on the subnet, the querier must use IGMP v1. The use of
IGMP v1 must be administratively configured, since there is no reliable way of dynamically
determining whether IGMP v1 routers are present on a network. IGMP forwarding is
enabled per IP Profile and WAN Connection Profile.
❑ Last Member Query Interval – the amount of time in tenths of a second that the IGMP gateway
waits to receive a response to a Group-Specific Query message. The last member query interval is
also the amount of time in seconds between successive Group-Specific Query messages. The
default last member query interval is 1 second (10 deci-seconds).
❑ Last Member Query Count – the number of Group-Specific Query messages sent before the gateway assumes that there are no members of the host group being queried on this interface. The
default last member query count is 2.
❑ Fast Leave – set to off by default, fast leave enables a non-standard expedited leave mechanism.
The querier keeps track of which client is requesting which channel by IP address. When a leave
message is received, the querier can check its internal table to see if there are any more clients on
this group. If there are none, it immediately sends an IGMP leave message to the upstream querier.
❑ Log Enable – If set to on, all IGMP messages on both the LAN and the WAN will be logged.
❑ Wireless Multicast to Unicast conversion – Only available if IGMP Snooping is enabled. If set to
on, the Gateway replaces the multicast MAC-address with the physical MAC-address of the wireless
client. If there is more than one wireless client interested in the same multicast group, the Gateway
will revert to multicasting the stream immediately. When one or more wireless clients leave a group,
and the Gateway determines that only a single wireless client is interested in the stream, it will once
again unicast the stream.
set igmp snooping [ off | on ]
Enables IGMP Snooping.
set igmp robustness value
Sets IGMP robustness range: from 2 – 255. The default is 2.
set igmp query-intvl value
Sets the query-interval range: from 10 seconds – 600 seconds, The default is 125 seconds.
set igmp query-response-intvl value
Sets the query-response interval range: from 5 deci-seconds (tenths of a second) – 255 deci-seconds.
The default is 100 deci-seconds.
set igmp unsol-report-intvl value
Sets the unsolicited report interval: the amount of time in seconds between repetitions of a particular
computer’s initial report of membership in a group. The default is 10 seconds.
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set igmp version [ 1 | 2 | 3 ]
Sets the IGMP querier version: version 1, version 2, or version 3. If you know you will be communicating
with other hosts that are limited to v1, for backward compatibility, select 1; otherwise, allow the default
3.
set igmp last-member-query-intvl value
Sets the last member query interval: the amount of time in tenths of a second that the IGMP gateway
waits to receive a response to a Group-Specific Query message. The last member query interval is also
the amount of time in seconds between successive Group-Specific Query messages. The default is 1
second (10 deci-seconds).
set igmp last-member-query-count value
Sets the last member query count: the number of Group-Specific Query messages sent before the gateway assumes that there are no members of the host group being queried on this interface. The default
is 2.
set igmp fast-leave [ off | on ]
Sets fast leave on or off. Set to off by default, fast leave enables a non-standard expedited leave mechanism. The querier keeps track of which client is requesting which channel by IP address. When a leave
message is received, the querier can check its internal table to see if there are any more clients on this
group. If there are none, it immediately sends an IGMP leave message to the upstream querier.
set igmp wireless-m2u [ on | off ]
This command allows you enable or disable wireless multicast-to-unicast if igmp snooping is set to on.
set igmp log-enable [ on | off ]
If set to on, all IGMP messages on both the LAN and the WAN will be logged. Default is off.
IP Settings
You can use the command line interface to specify whether TCP/IP is enabled, identify a default Gateway, and to enter TCP/IP settings for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway LAN and WAN ports.
☛
NOTE:
For the DSL platform you must identify the virtual PPP interface [vccn], a number from 1 to
8.
Common Settings
set ip option { on | off }
Enables or disables TCP/IP services in the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. You must enable TCP/IP services before you can enter other TCP/IP settings for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. If you turn off
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TCP/IP services and save the new configuration, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway clears its TCP/IP settings.
ARP Timeout Settings
set ip arp-timeout [ 60 ... 6000 ]
Sets the timeout value for ARP timeout. Default = 600 secs (10 mins); range = 60 secs - 6000 secs
(1–100 mins).
DSL Settings
set ip dsl vccn address ip_address
Assigns an IP address to the virtual circuit. Enter 0.0.0.0 if you want the virtual circuit to obtain its IP
address from a remote DHCP server.
set ip dsl vccn broadcast broadcast_address
Specifies the broadcast address for the TCP/IP network connected to the virtual circuit. IP hosts use
the broadcast address to send messages to every host on your network simultaneously.
The broadcast address for most networks is the network number followed by 255. For example, the
broadcast address for the 192.168.1.0 network would be 192.168.1.255.
set ip dsl vccn netmask netmask
Specifies the subnet mask for the TCP/IP network connected to the virtual circuit. The subnet mask
specifies which bits of the 32-bit binary IP address represents network information. The default subnet
mask for most networks is 255.255.255.0 (Class C subnet mask).
set ip dsl vccn restrictions { admin-disabled | none }
Specifies restrictions on the types of traffic the Motorola Netopia® Gateway accepts over the DSL virtual circuit. The admin-disabled argument means that access to the device via telnet, web, and
SNMP is disabled. RIP and ICMP traffic is still accepted. The none argument means that all traffic is
accepted.
set ip dsl vccn addr-mapping { on | off }
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to use network address translation (NAT)
when communicating with remote Gateways. Address mapping lets you conceal details of your network
from remote Gateways. It also permits all LAN devices to share a single IP address. By default, address
mapping is turned “On”.
set ip dsl vccn auto-sensing [ off | dhcp/pppoe | pppoe/pppoa ]
Enables or disables DHCP/PPPoE or PPPoE/PPPoA autosensing on the specified interface. Setting this
to DHCP/PPPoE enables automatic sensing of your WAN connection type: PPPoE or DHCP. The gateway attempts to connect using PPPoE first. If the Gateway fails to connect after 60 seconds, it switches
to DHCP. As soon as it can connect via DHCP, the Gateway chooses and sets DHCP as its default. Otherwise, after attempting to connect via DHCP for 60 seconds, the Gateway switches back to PPPoE.
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The Gateway will continue to switch back and forth in this manner until it successfully connects. Similarly, selecting PPPoE/PPPoA causes the Gateway to attempt to connect by trying these protocols in
parallel, and using the first one that is successful.
set ip dsl vccn mcast-fwd [ on | off }
Enables or disables multi-cast forwarding on the specified interface. If set to on, this interface acts as
an IGMP proxy host, and IGMP packets are transmitted and received on this interface on behalf of
IGMP hosts on the LAN interface.
set ip dsl vccn igmp-null-source-addr { on | off }
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to identify the source IP address of every
IGMP packet transmitted from this interface as 0.0.0.0 when mcast-fwd is set to on. This complies
with the requirements of TR-101, and removes the need for a publicly advertised IP address on the
WAN interface.
set ip dsl vccn unnumbered [ on | off }
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to have its WAN interface unnumbered, i.e.
set to 0. unnumbered option is only available if the address is set to 0 for the interface. Enables or
disables unnumbered IP addressing (where an address of 0 is allowed AND the DHCP client is disabled)
on the specified interface. This setting applies to native IP as well as PPP interfaces to support running
an IPoE interface without an address.
set ip dsl vccn dns acquired-dns-priority [ 0 - 255 ]
Sets the priority for DNS acquired via PPP. See “Domain Name System Settings” on page 160 for more
information.
set ip dsl vccn rip-send { off | v1 | v2 | v1-compat | v2-MD5 }
Specifies whether the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should use Routing Information Protocol (RIP) broadcasts to advertise its routing tables to other Gateways. RIP Version 2 (RIP-2) is an extension of the original Routing Information Protocol (RIP-1) that expands the amount of useful information in the RIP
packets. While RIP-1 and RIP-2 share the same basic algorithms, RIP-2 supports several additional features, including inclusion of subnet masks in RIP packets and implementation of multicasting instead
of broadcasting (which reduces the load on hosts which do not support routing protocols. RIP-2 with
MD5 authentication is an extension of RIP-2 that increases security by requiring an authentication key
when routes are advertised.
Depending on your network needs, you can configure your Motorola Netopia® Gateway to support RIP1, RIP-2, or RIP-2MD5.
If you specify v2-MD5, you must also specify a rip-send-key. Keys are ASCII strings with a maximum of
31 characters, and must match the other Gateway(s) keys for proper operation of MD5 support.
set ip dsl vccn rip-receive { off | v1 | v2 | v1-compat | v2-MD5 }
Specifies whether the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should use Routing Information Protocol (RIP) broadcasts to update its routing tables with information received from other Gateways.
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If you specify v2-MD5, you must also specify a rip-receive-key. Keys are ASCII strings with a maximum
of 31 characters, and must match the other Gateway(s) keys for proper operation of MD5 support.
Ethernet LAN Settings
set ip ethernet A option { on | off }
Enables or disables communications through the designated Ethernet port in the Gateway. You must
enable TCP/IP functions for an Ethernet port before you can configure its network settings.
set ip ethernet A address ip_address
Assigns an IP address to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway on the local area network. The IP address you
assign to the local Ethernet interface must be unique on your network. By default, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway uses 192.168.1.254 as its LAN IP address.
set ip ethernet A broadcast broadcast_address
Specifies the broadcast address for the local Ethernet interface. IP hosts use the broadcast address to
send messages to every host on your network simultaneously.
The broadcast address for most networks is the network number followed by 255. For example, the
broadcast address for the 192.168.1.0 network would be 192.168.1.255.
set ip ethernet A netmask netmask
Specifies the subnet mask for the local Ethernet interface. The subnet mask specifies which bits of the
32-bit binary IP address represent network information. The default subnet mask for most networks is
255.255.255.0 (Class C subnet mask).
set ip ethernet A restrictions { none | admin-disabled }
Specifies whether an administrator can open a telnet connection to a Motorola Netopia® Gateway over
an Ethernet interface (A = the LAN) to monitor and configure the unit.
The admin-disabled argument prevents access to the device via telnet, web, and SNMP.
By default, administrative restrictions are none on the LAN, but admin-disabled is set on the WAN.
This means that, by default, an administrator can open, for example, a telnet connection from the LAN,
but not the WAN.
set ip ethernet A rip-send { off | v1 | v2 | v1-compat | v2-MD5 }
Specifies whether the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should use Routing Information Protocol (RIP) broadcasts to advertise its routing tables to other Gateways on your network. RIP Version 2 (RIP-2) is an
extension of the original Routing Information Protocol (RIP-1) that expands the amount of useful information in the RIP packets. While RIP-1 and RIP-2 share the same basic algorithms, RIP-2 supports several additional features, including inclusion of subnet masks in RIP packets and implementation of
multicasting instead of broadcasting (which reduces the load on hosts which do not support routing
protocols. RIP-2 with MD5 authentication is an extension of RIP-2 that increases security by requiring
an authentication key when routes are advertised.
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If you specify v2-MD5, you must also specify a rip-send-key. Keys are ASCII strings with a maximum of
31 characters, and must match the other Gateway(s) keys for proper operation of MD5 support.
Depending on your network needs, you can configure your Motorola Netopia® Gateway to support RIP1, RIP-2, or RIP-2MD5.
set ip ethernet A rip-receive { off | v1 | v2 | v1-compat | v2-MD5 }
Specifies whether the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should use Routing Information Protocol (RIP) broadcasts to update its routing tables with information received from other Gateways on your network.
If you specify v2-MD5, you must also specify a rip-receive-key. Keys are ASCII strings with a maximum
of 31 characters, and must match the other Gateway(s) keys for proper operation of MD5 support.
Additional subnets
See “DHCP Settings” on page 153 for subnet range configuration commands.
set ip ethernet A subnet [ 2 ... 8 ] option [ on | off ]
Enables or disables additional LAN subnets. Up to seven additional subnets may be configured.
set ip ethernet A subnet n address ip_address
Specifies an IP address for the subnet n, when subnet n option is on.
set ip ethernet A subnet n netmask netmask
Specifies the subnet mask for the subnet n, when subnet n option is on.
Default IP Gateway Settings
set ip gateway option { on | off }
Specifies whether the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should send packets to a default Gateway if it does
not know how to reach the destination host.
set ip gateway interface { ip-address | ppp-vccn }
Specifies how the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should route information to the default Gateway. If you
select ip-address, you must enter the IP address of a host on a local or remote network. If you specify ppp, the Motorola Netopia® unit uses the default gateway being used by the remote PPP peer.
IP-over-PPP Settings. Use the following commands to configure settings for routing IP over a virtual
PPP interface.
☛
NOTE:
For a DSL platform you must identify the virtual PPP interface [vccn], a number from 1 to
8.
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set ip ip-ppp [vccn] option { on | off }
Enables or disables IP routing through the virtual PPP interface. By default, IP routing is turned on. If
you turn off IP routing and save the new configuration, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway clears IP routing
settings
set ip ip-ppp [vccn] address ip_address
Assigns an IP address to the virtual PPP interface. If you specify an IP address other than 0.0.0.0, your
Motorola Netopia® Gateway will not negotiate its IP address with the remote peer. If the remote peer
does not accept the IP address specified in the ip_address argument as valid, the link will not come
up.
The default value for the ip_address argument is 0.0.0.0, which indicates that the virtual PPP interface will use the IP address assigned to it by the remote peer. Note that the remote peer must be configured to supply an IP address to your Motorola Netopia® Gateway if you enter 0.0.0.0 for the
ip_address argument.
set ip ip-ppp [vccn] peer-address ip_address
Specifies the IP address of the peer on the other end of the PPP link. If you specify an IP address other
than 0.0.0.0, your Motorola Netopia® Gateway will not negotiate the remote peer's IP address. If the
remote peer does not accept the address in the ip_address argument as its IP address (typically
because it has been configured with another IP address), the link will not come up.
The default value for the ip_address argument is 0.0.0.0, which indicates that the virtual PPP interface will accept the IP address returned by the remote peer. If you enter 0.0.0.0, the peer system must
be configured to supply this address.
set ip ip-ppp [vccn] restrictions { admin-disabled | none }
Specifies restrictions on the types of traffic the Motorola Netopia® Gateway accepts over the PPP virtual circuit. The admin-disabled argument means that access to the device via telnet, web, and
SNMP is disabled. RIP and ICMP traffic is still accepted. The none argument means that all traffic is
accepted.
set ip ip-ppp [vccn] addr-mapping [ on | off ]
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to use network address translation (NAT)
when communicating with remote Gateways. Address mapping lets you conceal details of your network
from remote Gateways. It also permits all LAN devices to share a single IP address. By default, address
mapping is turned “On”.
set ip ip-ppp [vccn] auto-sensing [ off | dhcp/pppoe | pppoe/pppoa ]
Enables or disables DHCP/PPPoE or PPPoE/PPPoA autosensing on the specified interface. Setting this
to DHCP/PPPoE enables automatic sensing of your WAN connection type: PPPoE or DHCP. The gateway attempts to connect using PPPoE first. If the Gateway fails to connect after 60 seconds, it switches
to DHCP. As soon as it can connect via DHCP, the Gateway chooses and sets DHCP as its default. Otherwise, after attempting to connect via DHCP for 60 seconds, the Gateway switches back to PPPoE.
The Gateway will continue to switch back and forth in this manner until it successfully connects. Simi-
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larly, selecting PPPoE/PPPoA causes the Gateway to attempt to connect by trying these protocols in
parallel, and using the first one that is successful.
set ip ip-ppp [vccn] rip-send { off | v1 | v2 | v1-compat | v2-MD5 }
Specifies whether the Motorola Netopia® Gateway unit should use Routing Information Protocol (RIP)
broadcasts to advertise its routing tables to Gateways on the other side of the PPP link. An extension of
the original Routing Information Protocol (RIP-1), RIP Version 2 (RIP-2) expands the amount of useful
information in the packets. While RIP-1 and RIP-2 share the same basic algorithms, RIP-2 supports several new features. For example, inclusion of subnet masks in RIP packets and implementation of multicasting instead of broadcasting. This last feature reduces the load on hosts which do not support
routing protocols. RIP-2 with MD5 authentication is an extension of RIP-2 that increases security by
requiring an authentication key when routes are advertised.
This command is only available when address mapping for the specified virtual circuit is turned “off”.
If you specify v2-MD5, you must also specify a rip-send-key. Keys are ASCII strings with a maximum of
31 characters, and must match the other Gateway(s) keys for proper operation of MD5 support.
set ip ip-ppp [vccn] rip-receive { off | v1 | v2 | v1-compat | v2-MD5 }
Specifies whether the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should use Routing Information Protocol (RIP) broadcasts to update its routing tables with information received from other Gateways on the other side of
the PPP link.
If you specify v2-MD5, you must also specify a rip-receive-key. Keys are ASCII strings with a maximum
of 31 characters, and must match the other Gateway(s) keys for proper operation of MD5 support.
set ip ip-ppp vccn igmp-null-source-addr [ on | off ]
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to identify the source IP address of every
IGMP packet transmitted from this interface as 0.0.0.0 when mcast-fwd is set to on. This complies
with the requirements of TR-101, and removes the need for a publicly advertised IP address on the
WAN interface.
set ip ip-ppp vccn mcast-fwd [ on | off ]
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway interface to act as an IGMP proxy host.
set ip ip-ppp vccn unnumbered [ on | off ]
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to have its WAN interface unnumbered, i.e.
set to 0.
set ip ip-ppp vccn dns acquired-dns-priority [ 0 - 255 ]
Sets the priority for DNS acquired via PPP. See “Domain Name System Settings” on page 160 for more
information.
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Static ARP Settings
Your Motorola Netopia® Gateway maintains a dynamic Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) table to map
IP addresses to Ethernet (MAC) addresses. Your Motorola Netopia® Gateway populates this ARP table
dynamically, by retrieving IP address/MAC address pairs only when it needs them. Optionally, you can
define static ARP entries to map IP addresses to their corresponding Ethernet MAC addresses. Unlike
dynamic ARP table entries, static ARP table entries do not time out.
You can configure as many as 16 static ARP table entries for a Motorola Netopia® Gateway. Use the following commands to add static ARP entries to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway static ARP table:
set ip static-arp ip-address ip_address
Specifies the IP address for the static ARP entry. Enter an IP address in the ip_address argument in
dotted decimal format. The ip_address argument cannot be 0.0.0.0.
set ip static-arp ip-address ip_address hardware-address MAC_address
Specifies the Ethernet hardware address for the static ARP entry. Enter an Ethernet hardware address
in the MAC_address argument in nn.nn.nn.nn.nn.nn (hexadecimal) format.
IGMP Forwarding
set ip igmp-forwarding [ off | on ]
Turns IP IGMP forwarding off or on. The default is off.
IPsec Passthrough
set ip ipsec-passthrough [ off | on ]
Turns IPsec client passthrough off or on. The default is on.
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SIP Passthrough
set ip sip-passthrough [ on | off ]
Turns Session Initiation Protocol application layer gateway client passthrough on or off. The default is
on.
Session Initiation Protocol, is a signaling protocol for Internet conferencing, telephony, presence,
events notification and instant messaging.
RTSP Passthrough
set ip rtsp-passthrough [ off | on ]
Turns Real Time Streaming Protocol application layer gateway client passthrough on or off. RTSP is a
protocol used for streaming media. It allows a client remotely to control a streaming media server. A
typical application is Video-on-Demand (VoD). The default is on.
IP Prioritization
set ip prioritize [ off | on ]
Allows you to support traffic that has the TOS bit set. This defaults to off.
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Differentiated Services (DiffServ)
set diffserv option [ off | on ]
Turns the DiffServ option off (default) or on. on enables the service and IP TOS bits are used, even if
no flows are defined. Consequently, if the end-point nodes provide TOS settings from an application that
can be interpreted as one of the supported states, the Gateway will handle it as if it actively marked the
TOS field itself.
☛
NOTE:
The Gateway itself will not override TOS bit settings made by the endpoints. Support for
source-provided IP TOS priorities within the Gateway is achieved simply by turning the DiffServe option “on” and by setting the lohi-asymmetry to adjust the behavior of the Gateway’s internal queues.
set diffserv lohi-ratio [ 60 - 100 percent ]
Sets a percentage between 60 and 100 used to regulate the level of packets allowed to be pending in
the low priority queue. The default is 92. It can be used in some degree to adjust the relative throughput bandwidth for low- versus high-priority traffic.
☛
NOTE:
diffserv lohi-ratio has been removed for VDSL, ADSL bonded units.
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set diffserv custom-flows name name
protocol [ TCP | UDP | ICMP | other ]
direction [ outbound | inbound | both ]
start-port [ 0 - 65535 ]
end-port [ 0 - 65535 ]
inside-ip inside-ip-addr
inside-ip-mask inside-ip-netmask
outside-ip outside-ip-addr
outside-ip-mask outside-ip-netmask
qos [ off | assure | expedite | network-control ]
Defines or edits a custom flow. Select a name for the custom-flow from the set command. The CLI will
step into the newly-named or previously-defined flow for editing.
❑ protocol – Allows you to choose the IP protocol for the stream: TCP, UDP, ICMP, or other.
other is appropriate for setting up flows on protocols with non-standard port definitions, for example, IPSEC or PPTP. If you select other, an additional field, numbered-protocol will appear with a
range of 0–255. Choose the protocol number from this field.
❑ direction – Allows you to choose whether to apply the marking and gateway queue behavior for
inbound packets, outbound packets, or to both. If the Gateway is used as an “edge” gateway, its
more important function is to mark the packets for high-priority streams in the outbound direction.
❑ start-port/end-port – Allows you to specify a range of ports to check for a particular flow, if the protocol selection is TCP or UDP.
❑ inside-ip/mask – If you want packets originating from a certain LAN IP address to be marked, enter
the IP address and subnet mask here. If you leave the address equal to zero, this check is ignored
for outbound packets. The check is always ignored for inbound packets. The DiffServe queuing function must be applied ahead of NAT; and, before NAT re-maps the inbound packets, all inbound packets are destined for the Gateway's WAN IP address.
❑ outside-ip/mask – If you want packets destined for and originating from a certain WAN IP address
to be marked, enter this address and subnet mask here. If you leave the address equal to zero, the
outside address check is ignored. For outbound flows, the outside address is the destination IP
address for the packets. For inbound packets, the outside address is the source IP address for the
packets.
Note:
When setting the Inside/Outside IP Address/Netmask settings, note that a netmask value can be
used to configure for a network rather than a single IP address.
❑ qos – Allows you to specify the Quality of Service for the flow: off, assure, expedite or networkcontrol. These are used both to mark the IP TOS byte and to distribute packets into the queues as
if they were marked by the source.
QoS Setting
174
TOS Bit Value
Behavior
Off
TOS=000
This custom flow is disabled. You can activate it by selecting one
of the two settings below. This setting allows you to pre-define
flows without actually activating them.
Assure
TOS=001
Use normal queuing and throughput rules, but do not drop packets if possible. Appropriate for applications with no guaranteed
delivery mechanism.
Expedite
TOS=101
Use minimum delay. Appropriate for VoIP and video applications.
Network Control
TOS=111
Use highest possible priority.
Packet Mapping Configuration
set diffserv qos [ network-control-queue | expedite-queue |
assured-queue | best-effort-queue ] queue_name
Specifies the Diffserv QoS queue mapping associations.
❑ queue_name - the basic queue name to which classified packets are directed.
By default the following mappings are created:
set
set
set
set
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
qos
qos
qos
qos
network-control-queue basic_q0
expedite-queue basic_q1
assured-queue basic_q2
best-effort-queue basic_q3
set diffserv qos dscp-map [ default | custom ]
❑ default – the default DSCP-queue mappings are used
❑ custom – allows you to set up customized mappings between DSCP code points and queue types.
If custom is selected, the following can be configured:
set diffserv qos dscp-map-0
[ best-effort | assured | expedite | network-control ]
set diffserv qos dscp-map-1
[ best-effort | assured | expedite | network-control ]
...
set diffserv qos dscp-map-31
[ best-effort | assured | expedite | network-control ]
By default, the following settings are used in custom mode:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
dscp-map-0 best-effort
dscp-map-1 best-effort
dscp-map-2 best-effort
dscp-map-3 best-effort
dscp-map-4 best-effort
dscp-map-5 assured
dscp-map-6 best-effort
dscp-map-7 best-effort
dscp-map-8 best-effort
dscp-map-9 assured
dscp-map-10 best-effort
dscp-map-11 best-effort
dscp-map-12 best-effort
dscp-map-13 assured
dscp-map-14 best-effort
dscp-map-15 best-effort
dscp-map-16 best-effort
dscp-map-17 assured
dscp-map-18 best-effort
dscp-map-19 best-effort
dscp-map-20 best-effort
dscp-map-21 best-effort
dscp-map-22 best-effort
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Administrator’s Handbook
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
176
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
diffserv
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
qos
dscp-map-23
dscp-map-24
dscp-map-25
dscp-map-26
dscp-map-27
dscp-map-28
dscp-map-29
dscp-map-30
dscp-map-31
expedite
network-control
network-control
network-control
network-control
network-control
network-control
network-control
network-control
Queue Configuration
The Gateway’s WAN interface can now be configured for:
❑ strict priority queuing (as currently)
❑ weighted fair queuing
❑ rate-limiting funnel
☛
Note:
The configuration mechanism is designed to be flexible enough to accommodate complex
queuing requirements. Configurations not supported by the Gateway will be flagged during
configuration verification.
You configure the WAN outbound queue as follows:
❑ create and configure one or more queues, which can be a basic queue or a priority queue comprising
a group of basic queues, a weighted fair queue comprising a group of basic queues, or a funnel comprising a group of basic queues;
❑ assign a queue instance to the Ethernet WAN interface;
❑ map packet attributes to a queue.
The same queue name can be assigned to multiple interfaces which require identical queue configuration, however currently the only interface available for queueing configuration is ethernet 1.
To help you configure queues, and to maintain compatibility with previous firmware releases, several
queues are set up automatically on upgrade to Version 7.7, or upon a factory reset.
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Administrator’s Handbook
set queue name queue_name option [ on | off ]
type [ basic | wfq | priority | funnel ]
Creates a queue named queue_name and assigns a type:
❑
❑
❑
❑
basic – Basic Queue
wfq – Weighted Fair Queue
priority – Priority Queue
funnel – Funnel Queue
Basic Queue
set queue name basic_queue_name option [ on | off ]
set queue name basic_queue_name type basic
Specifies the Basic Queue named basic_queue_name attributes. Basic queues have one input and
one output. The basic queue is assigned an ID, with the following attribute: when the queue is full, discard.
By default, the following Basic Queues are created:
❑
❑
❑
❑
178
basic_q0
basic_q1
basic_q2
basic_q3
Weighted Fair Queue
set queue name wfq option [ on | off ]
set queue name wf_queue_name type wfq
set queue name wf_queue_name weight-type [ relative | bps ]
set queue name wf_queue_name default-input queue_name
Specifies the attributes of the Weighted Fair Queue named wf_queue_name.
❑ wf_queue_name – name of weighted fair queue
❑ weight-type – the weighted fair queue configuration allows you to set the rate in bits per second
(bps) or percentage of the line rate (relative). bps is the default.
❑ default-input – specifies the default input queue name.
set queue name wf_queue_name entry n input input_queue_name
set queue name wf_queue_name entry n weight weight
set queue name wf_queue_name entry n share-bw [ on | off ]
set queue name wf_queue_name entry n limit-bw [ on | off ]
A weighted fair queue can contain up to 8 input queues. For each input queue, the following is configured:
❑ n – entry number for this input queue
❑ input_queue_name – name of input queue
❑ weight_value – numeric relative weight of queue; the number assigned to the weight for WFQs indicates the bandwidth used for each queue.
❑ share-bw – if enabled, the bandwidth for this queue can be shared between other queues when
idle.
❑ limit-bw – if enabled, then the transmit bandwidth for that queue is limited to the weight ratio (if the
WFQ type is relative) or the specified bps (if the WFQ type is bps). Therefore if queue X has limitbw enabled, and any other queues have share-bw enabled, then queue X will not use additional
available bandwidth from the shared queues.
The default special queuing configuration shapes the rate of a custom flow toward the Remote Management Server.
By default, the following WFQ is created:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
option on
type wfq
weight-type bps
entry 1 input "basic_q0"
entry 1 weight 10000
entry 1 share-bw off
entry 1 limit-bw off
entry 2 input "basic_q1"
entry 2 weight 20000
entry 2 share-bw off
entry 2 limit-bw off
entry 3 input "basic_q2"
entry 3 weight 30000
entry 3 share-bw off
entry 3 limit-bw off
entry 4 input "basic_q3"
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Administrator’s Handbook
set
set
set
set
180
queue
queue
queue
queue
name
name
name
name
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
"wfq"
entry 4 weight 40000
entry 4 share-bw off
entry 4 limit-bw off
default-input "basic_q0"
Priority Queue
set queue name priority_queue_name option [ off | on ]
set queue name priority_queue_name type priority
set queue name priority_queue_name default-input queue_name
A priority queue can contain up to 8 input queues. For each input queue, the following is configured:
set queue name priority_queue_name entry n
input input_queue_name
set queue name priority_queue_name entry n priority priority_value
Specifies the Priority Queue named priority_queue_name attributes.
❑ priority_queue_name – name of priority queue
❑ input_queue_name – name of input queue
❑ priority_value – numeric relative priority of queue.
☛
The lower the number, the higher the priority of the queue.
❑ default-input – specifies the default input queue name.
By default, the following priority queue is created:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
queue
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
"pq"
option on
type priority
entry 1 input "basic_q0"
entry 1 priority 10
entry 2 input "basic_q1"
entry 2 priority 20
entry 3 input "basic_q2"
entry 3 priority 30
entry 4 input "basic_q3"
entry 4 priority 40
default-input "basic_q0"
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Administrator’s Handbook
Funnel Queue
A funnel queue is used to limit the rate of the transmission below the actual line rate:
set queue name funnel_queue_name option [ on | off ]
set queue name funnel_queue_name type funnel
set queue name funnel_queue_name input input_queue_name
set queue name funnel_queue_name bps bps
Specifies the Funnel Queue named funnel_queue_name attributes.
❑ funnel_queue_name – name of funnel queue
❑ input_queue_name – name of input queue
❑ bps – max bits per second permitted through funnel queue
By default, the following funnel queues are created:
Rate-limiting priority queue to 100Kbps:
set
set
set
set
queue
queue
queue
queue
name
name
name
name
pq-100kbps
pq-100kbps
pq-100kbps
pq-100kbps
option on
type funnel
input pq
bps 100000
Rate-limiting weighted fair queue to 100Kbps:
set
set
set
set
queue
queue
queue
queue
name
name
name
name
wfq-100kbps
wfq-100kbps
wfq-100kbps
wfq-100kbps
option on
type funnel
input wfq
bps 100000
Interface Queue Assignment
The WAN ethernet queue is assigned as follows:
set [ ethernet ethernet | ip ethernet B | ip-ppp vccn ] tx-queue queue_name
By default, the WAN ethernet interface is assigned the default priority queue:
set ethernet ethernet B tx-queue pq
Other interfaces may likewise be assigned tx-queue values.
Static Route Settings
A static route identifies a manually configured pathway to a remote network. Unlike dynamic routes,
which are acquired and confirmed periodically from other Gateways, static routes do not time out. Consequently, static routes are useful when working with PPP, since an intermittent PPP link may make
maintenance of dynamic routes problematic.
You can configure as many as 32 static IP routes for a Motorola Netopia® Gateway. Use the following
commands to maintain static routes to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway routing table:
182
set ip static-routes destination-network net_address
Specifies the network address for the static route. Enter a network address in the net_address
argument in dotted decimal format. The net_address argument cannot be 0.0.0.0.
set ip static-routes destination-network net_address netmask netmask
Specifies the subnet mask for the IP network at the other end of the static route. Enter the netmask
argument in dotted decimal format. The subnet mask associated with the destination network must
represent the same network class (A, B, or C) or a lower class (such as a class C subnet mask for class
B network number) to be valid.
set ip static-routes destination-network net_address
interface { ip-address | ppp-vccn }
Specifies the interface through which the static route is accessible.
set ip static-routes destination-network net_address
gateway-address gate_address
Specifies the IP address of the Gateway for the static route. The default Gateway must be located on a
network connected to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway configured interface.
set ip static-routes destination-network net_address metric integer
Specifies the metric (hop count) for the static route. The default metric is 1. Enter a number from 1 to
15 for the integer argument to indicate the number of Gateways (actual or best guess) a packet must
traverse to reach the remote network.
You can enter a metric of 1 to indicate either:
❑ The remote network is one Gateway away and the static route is the best way to reach it;
❑ The remote network is more than one Gateway away but the static route should not be replaced by a
dynamic route, even if the dynamic route is more efficient.
set ip static-routes destination-network net_address
rip-advertise [ splitHorizon | always | never ]
Specifies whether the gateway should use Routing Information Protocol (RIP) broadcasts to advertise to
other Gateways on your network and which mode to use. The default is splitHorizon.
delete ip static-routes destination-network net_address
Deletes a static route. Deleting a static route removes all information associated with that route.
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Administrator’s Handbook
IPMaps Settings
set ip-maps name name internal-ip ip_address
Specifies the name and static ip address of the LAN device to be mapped.
set ip-maps name name external-ip ip_address
Specifies the name and static ip address of the WAN device to be mapped.
Up to 8 mapped static IP addresses are supported.
184
Network Address Translation (NAT) Default Settings
NAT default settings let you specify whether you want your Motorola Netopia® Gateway to forward NAT
traffic to a default server when it doesn’t know what else to do with it. The NAT default host function is
useful in situations where you cannot create a specific NAT pinhole for a traffic stream because you
cannot anticipate what port number an application might use. For example, some network games
select arbitrary port numbers when a connection is being opened. By identifying your computer (or
another host on your network) as a NAT default server, you can specify that NAT traffic that would otherwise be discarded by the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should be directed to a specific hosts.
set nat-default mode [ off | default-server | ip-passthrough ]
Specifies whether you want your Motorola Netopia® Gateway to forward unsolicited traffic from the
WAN to a default server or an IP passthrough host when it doesn’t know what else to do with it.
set nat-default dhcp-enable [ on | off ]
Allows the IP passthrough host to acquire its IP address via DHCP, if ip-passthrough is enabled.
set nat-default address ip_address
Specifies the IP address of the NAT default server.
set nat-default host-hardware-address MAC_address }
Specifies the hardware (MAC) address of the IP passthrough host. If the MAC address is specified as
all-zeroes, the first DHCP client that requests an IP address gets the passthrough address.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Network Address Translation (NAT) Pinhole Settings
NAT pinholes let you pass specific types of network traffic through the NAT interfaces on the Motorola
Netopia® Gateway. NAT pinholes allow you to route selected types of network traffic, such as FTP
requests or HTTP (Web) connections, to a specific host behind the Motorola Netopia® Gateway transparently.
To set up NAT pinholes, you identify the type(s) of traffic you want to redirect by port number, and you
specify the internal host to which each specified type of traffic should be directed.
The following list identifies protocol type and port number for common TCP/IP protocols:
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
FTP (TCP 21)
telnet (TCP 23)
SMTP (TCP 25),
TFTP (UDP 69)
SNMP (TCP 161, UDP 161)
set pinhole name name
Specifies the identifier for the entry in the Gateway's pinhole table. You can name pinhole table entries
sequentially (1, 2, 3), by port number (21, 80, 23), by protocol, or by some other naming scheme.
set pinhole name name protocol-select { tcp | udp }
Specifies the type of protocol being redirected.
set pinhole name name external-port-start [ 0 - 49151 ]
Specifies the first port number in the range being translated.
set pinhole name name external-port-end [ 0 - 49151 ]
Specifies the last port number in the range being translated.
set pinhole name name internal-ip internal-ip
Specifies the IP address of the internal host to which traffic of the specified type should be transferred.
set pinhole name name internal-port [ 0 - 65535 ]
Specifies the port number your Motorola Netopia® Gateway should use when forwarding traffic of the
specified type. Under most circumstances, you would use the same number for the external and internal port.
186
PPPoE /PPPoA Settings
You can use the following commands to configure basic settings, port authentication settings, and peer
authentication settings for PPP interfaces on your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
Configuring Basic PPP Settings.
☛
NOTE:
For the DSL platform you must identify the virtual PPP interface [vccn], a number from 1 to
8.
set ppp module [vccn] option { on | off }
Enables or disables PPP on the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
set ppp module [vccn] auto-connect { on | off }
Supports manual mode required for some vendors. The default on is not normally changed. If auto-connect is disabled (off), you must manually start/stop a ppp connection.
set ppp module [vccn] mru integer
Specifies the Maximum Receive Unit (MRU) for the PPP interface. The integer argument can be any
number between 128 and 1492 for PPPoE; 1500 otherwise.
set ppp module [vccn] magic-number { on | off }
Enables or disables LCP magic number negotiation.
set ppp module [vccn] protocol-compression { on | off }
Specifies whether you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to compress the PPP Protocol field when it
transmits datagrams over the PPP link.
set ppp module [vccn] lcp-echo-requests { on | off }
Specifies whether you want your Motorola Netopia® Gateway to send LCP echo requests. You should
turn off LCP echoing if you do not want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to drop a PPP link to a nonresponsive peer.
set ppp module [vccn] echo-period integer
Specifies the number of seconds the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should wait before sending another
echo from an LCP echo request. The integer argument can be any number from between 5 and 300
(seconds).
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Administrator’s Handbook
set ppp module [vccn] lost-echoes-max integer
Specifies the maximum number of lost echoes the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should tolerate before
bringing down the PPP connection. The integer argument can be any number from between 1 and 20.
set ppp module [vccn] failures-max integer
Specifies the maximum number of Configure-NAK messages the PPP module can send without having
sent a Configure-ACK message. The integer argument can be any number between 1 and 20.
set ppp module [vccn] configure-max integer
Specifies the maximum number of unacknowledged configuration requests that your Motorola Netopia®
Gateway will send. The integer argument can be any number between 1 and 20.
set ppp module [vccn] terminate-max integer
Specifies the maximum number of unacknowledged termination requests that your Motorola Netopia®
Gateway will send before terminating the PPP link. The integer argument can be any number between 1
and 10.
set ppp module [vccn] restart-timer integer
Specifies the number of seconds the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should wait before retransmitting a
configuration or termination request. The integer argument can be any number between 1 and 30.
set ppp module [vccn] connection-type { instant-on | always-on }
Specifies whether a PPP connection is maintained by the Motorola Netopia® Gateway when it is unused
for extended periods. If you specify always-on, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway never shuts down the
PPP link. If you specify instant-on, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway shuts down the PPP link after
the number of seconds specified in the time-out setting (below) if no traffic is moving over the circuit.
set ppp module [vccn] time-out integer
If you specified a connection type of instant-on, specifies the number of seconds, in the range 30 3600, with a default value of 300, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway should wait for communication
activity before terminating the PPP link.
Configuring Port Authentication. You can use the following command to specify how your Motorola
Netopia® Gateway should respond when it receives an authentication request from a remote peer.
The settings for port authentication on the local Motorola Netopia® Gateway must match the authentication that is expected by the remote peer. For example, if the remote peer requires CHAP authentication and has a name and CHAP secret for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway, you must enable CHAP and
specify the same name and secret on the Motorola Netopia® Gateway before the link can be established.
set ppp module [vccn] port-authentication
188
option [ off | on | pap-only | chap-only ]
Specifying on turns both PAP and CHAP on, or you can select PAP or CHAP. Specify the username and
password when port authentication is turned on (both CHAP and PAP, CHAP or PAP.) Authentication
must be enabled before you can enter other information.
set ppp module [vccn] port-authentication username username
The username argument is 1 – 255 alphanumeric characters. The information you enter must match
the username configured in the PPP peer's authentication database.
set ppp module [vccn] port-authentication password password
The password argument is 1 – 128 alphanumeric characters. The information you enter must match
the password used by the PPP peer.
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Administrator’s Handbook
PPPoE with IPoE Settings
Ethernet WAN platforms
set wan-over-ether pppoe [ on | off ]
Enables or disables PPPoE on the Ethernet WAN interface.
set wan-over-ether pppoe-with-ipoe [ on | off ]
Enables or disables the PPPoE with IPoE support on Ethernet WAN, including VDSL, platforms when
pppoe option is set to on.
When pppoe-with-ipoe is set to on, an additional interface, “ethernet C,” becomes available.
set wan-over-ether ipoe-sessions [ 1 - 4 ]
Sets the number of IPoE sessions, up to four, on Ethernet WAN, including VDSL, platforms.
☛
NOTE:
Enabling pppoe-with-ipoe disables support for multiple PPPoE sessions.
Example:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
190
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ip
ethernet C option on
ethernet C address 0.0.0.0
ethernet C broadcast 0.0.0.255
ethernet C netmask 255.255.255.0
ethernet C restrictions admin-disabled
ethernet C addr-mapping on
ethernet C dns acquired-dns-priority 20
ethernet C mcast-fwd on
ethernet C igmp-null-source-addr off
ethernet C tx-queue "none"
ethernet C unnumbered off
ethernet C rip-receive off
ethernet C proxy-arp off
ip-ppp enet-B option on
ip-ppp enet-B address 0.0.0.0
ip-ppp enet-B peer-address 0.0.0.0
ip-ppp enet-B restrictions admin-disabled
ip-ppp enet-B addr-mapping on
ip-ppp enet-B dns acquired-dns-priority 20
ip-ppp enet-B igmp-null-source-addr off
ip-ppp enet-B tx-queue "none"
ip-ppp enet-B mcast-fwd on
ip-ppp enet-B unnumbered off
ip-ppp enet-B rip-receive off
ADSL platforms
You must configure two VCCs with the same VPI/VCI to enable concurrent PPPoE and IPoE support, and
you will need to configure the individual settings for each interface for proper operation.
set atm vcc n encap pppoe-llc
Specifies that the VCC will allow a second VCC with the same VPI/VCI values as the first. pppoe-llc
denotes this special case.
Example:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
atm
atm
atm
atm
atm
atm
atm
atm
atm
option on
vcc 1 option on
vcc 1 vpi 0
vcc 1 vci 35
vcc 1 encap pppoe-llc
vcc 2 option on
vcc 2 vpi 0
vcc 2 vci 35
vcc 2 encap ether-llc
This will allow you to configure the second WAN interface.
set atm vcc 2 vpi 0
set atm vcc 2 vci 35
set atm vcc 2 encap ether-llc
...
set ip ip-ppp vcc1 mcast-fwd [ on | off }
Enables or disables multi-cast forwarding on the specified interface. If set to on, this interface acts as
an IGMP proxy host, and IGMP packets are transmitted and received on this interface on behalf of
IGMP hosts on the LAN interface. See “IGMP Settings” on page 162 for more information.
set ip ip-ppp vcc1 igmp-null-source-addr [ off | on ]
Enables or disables IGMP null source address, if mcast-fwd is set to on. If enabled, the source IP
address of every IGMP packet transmitted from this interface is set to 0.0.0.0. This complies with the
requirements of TR-101, and removes the need for a publicly advertised IP address on the WAN interface.
Ethernet Port Settings
set ethernet ethernet A mode { auto | 100M-full | 100M-full-fixed |
100M-half-fixed | 10M-full-fixed | 10M-half-fixed |
100M-half | 10M-full | 10M-half }
Allows mode setting for the ethernet port. Only supported on units without a LAN switch, or dual ethernet products (338x). In the dual ethernet case, “ethernet B” would be specified for the WAN port. The
default is auto.
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Administrator’s Handbook
802.3ah Ethernet OAM Settings
802.3ah Ethernet in the First Mile (EFM) Operations Administration and Maintenance (OAM) is a group
of network management functions that provide network fault indication, performance information, and
diagnosis using special-purpose Ethernet OAM frames. These are exchanged between your Gateway
and service provider Access Node (AN) devices for network fault management, performance analysis
and fault isolation.
All VDSL and Ethernet WAN Motorola Netopia® Gateways support Ethernet OAM options.
More Ethernet Packet-Transfer-Mode (PTM) enabled xDSL Motorola Netopia® Gateways will support
802.3ah Ethernet OAM options in future releases.
802.3ah Ethernet OAM exchanges periodic Ethernet OAM heartbeat frames between the endpoints of
the physical link being monitored, and thus discovers and keeps-alive the Link connectivity and reports
faults if the link goes down. Supported OAM request and response types are: remote loopback enable,
remote loopback disable, variable request, variable response.
set ethernet oam ah option [ off | on ]
Enables or disables Ethernet OAM. Default is off.
set ethernet oam ah pass-through [ off | on ]
Enable or disable Ethernet OAM pass-through mode. Default is off.
Warning: This is a DEBUG feature. Leave it off unless you know exactly what you are doing.
set ethernet oam ah mode [ active | passive ]
Specifies the Ethernet OAM mode. Default is active.
set ethernet oam ah pdu-size-max [ 64 - 1518 ]
Specifies the Maximum Protocol Data Unit (PDU) size. Default is 1518.
set ethernet oam ah discovery-timer [ 1 - 300 ]
Specifies the discovery timer value for continuity check in seconds. Range is 1 – 300 seconds. Default
is 1.
set ethernet oam ah keepalive-timer [ 5 - 305 ]
Specifies the keep-alive timer value in seconds. Range is 5 – 305 seconds. Default is 5.
etheroam ah ping
Sends OAM remote loopback request in active mode.
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Command Line Interface Preference Settings
You can set command line interface preferences to customize your environment.
set preference verbose { on | off }
Specifies whether you want command help and prompting information displayed. By default, the command line interface verbose preference is turned off. If you turn it on, the command line interface displays help for a node when you navigate to that node.
set preference more lines
Specifies how many lines of information you want the command line interface to display at one time.
The lines argument specifies the number of lines you want to see at one time. The range is 1-65535.
By default, the command line interface shows you 22 lines of text before displaying the prompt: More
…[y|n] ?.
If you enter 1000 for the lines argument, the command line interface displays information as an uninterrupted stream (which is useful for capturing information to a text file).
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Port Renumbering Settings
If you use NAT pinholes to forward HTTP or telnet traffic through your Motorola Netopia® Gateway to an
internal host, you must change the port numbers the Motorola Netopia® Gateway uses for its own configuration traffic. For example, if you set up a NAT pinhole to forward network traffic on Port 80 (HTTP)
to another host, you would have to tell the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to listen for configuration connection requests on a port number other than 80, such as 6080.
After you have changed the port numbers the Motorola Netopia® Gateway uses for its configuration
traffic, you must use those port numbers instead of the standard numbers when configuring the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. For example, if you move the Gateway's Web service to port “6080” on a box
with a system (DNS) name of “superbox”, you would enter the URL http://superbox:6080 in a Web
browser to open the Motorola Netopia® Gateway graphical user interface. Similarly, you would have to
configure your telnet application to use the appropriate port when opening a configuration connection to
your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
set servers web-http [ 1 - 65534 ]
Specifies the port number for HTTP (web) communication with the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
Because port numbers in the range 0-1024 are used by other protocols, you should use numbers in the
range 1025-65534 when assigning new port numbers to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway web configuration interface. A setting of 0 (zero) will turn the server off.
set servers telnet-tcp [ 1 - 65534 ]
Specifies the port number for telnet (CLI) communication with the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
Because port numbers in the range 0-1024 are used by other protocols, you should use numbers in the
range 1025-65534 when assigning new port numbers to the Motorola Netopia® Gateway telnet configuration interface. A setting of 0 (zero) will turn the server off.
☛
NOTE:
You cannot specify a port setting of 0 (zero) for both the web and telnet ports at the same
time. This would prevent you from accessing the Gateway.
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Security Settings
Security settings include the Firewall, Packet Filtering, Stateful Inspection, and IPSec parameters.
Some of the security functionality is keyed.
Firewall Settings
set security firewall option [ high | medium | low | off ]
The firewall settings are discussed on page page 23.
SafeHarbour IPSec Settings
SafeHarbour VPN is a tunnel between the local network and another geographically dispersed network
that is interconnected over the Internet. This VPN tunnel provides a secure, cost-effective alternative to
dedicated leased lines. Internet Protocol Security (IPsec) is a series of services including encryption,
authentication, integrity, and replay protection. Internet Key Exchange (IKE) is the key management protocol of IPsec that establishes keys for encryption and decryption. Because this VPN software implementation is built to these standards, the other side of the tunnel can be either another Motorola
Netopia® unit or another IPsec/IKE based security product. For VPN you can choose to have traffic
authenticated, encrypted, or both.
When connecting the Motorola Netopia® unit in a telecommuting scenario, the corporate VPN settings
will dictate the settings to be used in the Motorola Netopia® unit. If a parameter has not been specified
from the other end of the tunnel, choose the default unless you fully understand the ramifications of
your parameter choice.
set security ipsec option (off) {on | off}
Turns on the SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability. Default is off.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123"
The name of the tunnel can be quoted to allow special characters and embedded spaces.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" tun-enable {on | off}
This enables this particular tunnel. Currently, one tunnel is supported.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" dest-ext-address ip-address
Specifies the IP address of the destination gateway.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" dest-int-network ip-address
Specifies the IP address of the destination computer or internal network.
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set security ipsec tunnels name "123" dest-int-netmask netmask
Specifies the subnet mask of the destination computer or internal network. The subnet mask specifies
which bits of the 32-bit IP address represents network information. The default subnet mask for most
networks is 255.255.255.0 (class C subnet mask).
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" encrypt-protocol { ESP | none }
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" auth-protocol {AH | ESP | none}
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode pre-shared-key-type
[ ascii | hex ]
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode pre-shared-key hex_string
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
Example: 0x1234
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode
neg-method { main | aggressive }
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
Note: Aggressive Mode is a little faster, but it does not provide identity protection for negotiations
nodes.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode DH-group { 1 | 2 | 5 }
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
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set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode
isakmp-SA-encrypt { DES | 3DES }
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode ipsec-mtu mtu_value
The Maximum Transmission Unit is a link layer restriction on the maximum number of bytes of data in a
single transmission. The maximum allowable value (also the default) is 1500, and the minimum is 100.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode isakmp-SA-hash
{ MD5 | SHA1 }
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode PFS-enable { off | on }
See page 201 for details about SafeHarbour IPsec tunnel capability.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode invalid-spi-recovery
{ off | on }
Enables the Gateway to re-establish the tunnel if either the Motorola Netopia® Gateway or the peer
gateway is rebooted.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" xauth enable {off | on }
Enables or disables Xauth extensions to IPsec, when IKE-mode neg-method is set to aggressive.
Default is off.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" xauth username username
Sets the Xauth username, if Xauth is enabled.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" xauth password password
Sets the Xauth password, if Xauth is enabled.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" nat-enable { on | off }
Enables or disables NAT on the specified IPsec tunnel. The default is off.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" nat-pat-address ip-address
Specifies the NAT port address translation IP address for the specified IPsec tunnel.
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set security ipsec tunnels name "123" local-id-type
{ IP-address | Subnet | Hostname | ASCII }
Specifies the NAT local ID type for the specified IPsec tunnel, when Aggressive Mode is set.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" local-id id_value
Specifies the NAT local ID value as specified in the local-id-type for the specified IPsec tunnel, when
Aggressive Mode is set.
☛
Note: If subnet is selected, the following two values are used instead:
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" local-id-addr ip-address
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" local-id-mask ip-mask
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" remote-id-type
{ IP-address | Subnet | Hostname | ASCII }
Specifies the NAT remote ID type for the specified IPsec tunnel, when Aggressive Mode is set.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" remote-id id_value
Specifies the NAT remote ID value as specified in the remote-id-type for the specified IPsec tunnel,
when Aggressive Mode is set.
☛
Note: If subnet is selected, the following two values are used instead:
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" remote-id-addr ip-address
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" remote-id-mask ip-mask
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Internet Key Exchange (IKE) Settings
The following four IPsec parameters configure the rekeying event.
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode
ipsec-soft-mbytes (1000) {1-1000000}
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode
ipsec-soft-seconds (82800) {60-1000000}
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode
ipsec-hard-mbytes (1200) {1-1000000}
set security ipsec tunnels name "123" IKE-mode
ipsec-hard-seconds (86400) {60-1000000}
❑ The soft parameters designate when the system begins to negotiate a new key. For example, after
82800 seconds (23 hours) or 1 Gbyte has been transferred (whichever comes first) the key will
begin to be renegotiated.
❑ The hard parameters indicate that the renegotiation must be complete or the tunnel will be disabled. For example, 86400 seconds (24 hours) means that the renegotiation must be complete
within one day.
Both ends of the tunnel set parameters, and typically they will be the same. If they are not the same,
the rekey event will happen when the longest time period expires or when the largest amount of data
has been sent.
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Table 1: IPSec Tunnel Details Parameter Setup Worksheet
Parameter
Name
Peer Internal Network
Peer Internal Netmask
NAT Enable
PAT Address
Negotiation Method
Local ID Type
Local ID Address/Value
Local ID Mask
Remote ID Type
Remote ID Address/Value
Remote ID Mask
Pre-Shared Key Type
Pre-Shared Key
DH Group
PFS Enable
SA Encrypt Type
SA Hash Type
Invalid SPI Recovery
Soft MBytes
Soft Seconds
Hard MBytes
Hard Seconds
IPSec MTU
Xauth Enable
Xauth Username
Xauth Password
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Motorola Netopia®
Gateway
On/Off
Main/Aggressive
IP Address
Subnet
Hostname
ASCII
IP Address
Subnet
Hostname
ASCII
HEX
ASCII
1/2/5
Off/On
DES
3DES
MD5
SHA1
Off/On
1 - 1000000
60 - 1000000
1 - 1000000
60 - 1000000
100 - 1500 (default)
Off/On
Peer Gateway
Parameter Descriptions
The following tables describe SafeHarbour’s parameters that are used for an IPSec VPN tunnel configuration:
Table 2: IPSec Configuration page parameters
Field
Description
Name
The Name parameter refers to the name of the configured tunnel. This is mainly used as
an identifier for the administrator. The Name parameter is an ASCII value and is limited
to 31 characters. The tunnel name does not need to match the peer gateway.
Peer External IP
Address
The Peer External IP Address is the public, or routable IP address of the remote gateway
or VPN server you are establishing the tunnel with.
Encryption
Protocol
Encryption protocol for the tunnel session.
Parameter values supported include NONE or ESP.
Authentication
Protocol
Authentication Protocol for IP packet header. The three parameter values are None,
Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) and Authentication Header (AH)
Key Management
The Key Management algorithm manages the exchange of security keys in the IPSec protocol architecture. SafeHarbour supports the standard Internet Key Exchange (IKE)
Table 3: IPSec Tunnel Details page parameters
Field
Description
Name
The Name parameter refers to the name of the configured tunnel. This is mainly used as
an identifier for the administrator. The Name parameter is an ASCII value and is limited
to 31 characters. The tunnel name does not need to match the peer gateway.
Peer Internal
Network
The Peer Internal IP Network is the private, or Local Area Network (LAN) address of the
remote gateway or VPN Server you are communicating with.
Peer Internal
Netmask
The Peer Internal IP Netmask is the subnet mask of the Peer Internal IP Network.
NAT enable
Turns NAT on or off for this tunnel.
PAT Address
If NAT is enabled, this field appears. You can specify a Port Address Translation (PAT)
address or leave the default all-zeroes (if Xauth is enabled). If you leave the default. the
address will be requested from the remote router and dynamically applied to the Gateway.
Negotiation
Method
This parameter refers to the method used during the Phase I key exchange, or IKE process. SafeHarbour supports Main or Aggressive Mode. Main mode requires 3 two-way
message exchanges while Aggressive mode only requires 3 total message exchanges.
Local ID type
If Aggressive mode is selected as the Negotiation Method, this option appears. Selection options are: IP Address, Subnet, Hostname, ASCII
Local ID Address/
Value
If Aggressive mode is selected as the Negotiation Method, this field appears. This is the
local (Gateway-side) IP address (or Name Value, if Subnet or Hostname are selected as
the Local ID Type).
Local ID Mask
If Aggressive mode is selected as the Negotiation Method, and Subnet as the Local ID
Type, this field appears. This is the local (Gateway-side) subnet mask.
Remote ID Type
If Aggressive mode is selected as the Negotiation Method, this option appears. Selection options are: IP Address, Subnet, Hostname, ASCII.
Remote ID
Address/Value
If Aggressive mode is selected as the Negotiation Method, this field appears. This is the
remote (central-office-side) IP address (or Name Value, if Subnet or Hostname are
selected as the Local ID Type).
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Table 3: IPSec Tunnel Details page parameters
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Remote ID Mask
If Aggressive mode is selected as the Negotiation Method, and Subnet as the Remote ID
Type, this field appears. This is the remote (central-office-side) subnet mask.
Pre-Shared Key
Type
The Pre-Shared Key Type classifies the Pre-Shared Key. SafeHarbour supports ASCII or
HEX types
Pre-Shared Key
The Pre-Shared Key is a parameter used for authenticating each side. The value can be
ASCII or Hex and a maximum of 64 characters. ASCII is case-sensitive.
DH Group
Diffie-Hellman is a public key algorithm used between two systems to determine and
deliver secret keys used for encryption. Groups 1, 2 and 5 are supported.
PFS Enable
Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) is used during SA renegotiation. When PFS is selected, a
Diffie-Hellman key exchange is required. If enabled, the PFS DH group follows the IKE
phase 1 DH group.
SA Encrypt Type
SA Encryption Type refers to the symmetric encryption type. This encryption algorithm
will be used to encrypt each data packet. SA Encryption Type values supported include
DES and 3DES.
SA Hash Type
SA Hash Type refers to the Authentication Hash algorithm used during SA negotiation.
Values supported include MD5 and SHA1. N/A will display if NONE is chosen for Auth
Protocol.
Invalid SPI
Recovery
Enabling this allows the Gateway to re-establish the tunnel if either the Motorola Netopia® Gateway or the peer gateway is rebooted.
Soft MBytes
Setting the Soft MBytes parameter forces the renegotiation of the IPSec Security Associations (SAs) at the configured Soft MByte value. The value can be configured between 1
and 1,000,000 MB and refers to data traffic passed. If this value is not achieved, the
Hard MBytes parameter is enforced. This parameter does not need to match the peer
gateway.
Soft Seconds
Setting the Soft Seconds parameter forces the renegotiation of the IPSec Security Associations (SAs) at the configured Soft Seconds value. The value can be configured
between 60 and 1,000,000 seconds. This parameter does not need to match the peer
gateway.
Hard MBytes
Setting the Hard MBytes parameter forces the renegotiation of the IPSec Security Associations (SAs) at the configured Hard MByte value.
The value can be configured between 1 and 1,000,000 MB and refers to data traffic
passed. This parameter does not need to match the peer gateway.
Hard Seconds
Setting the Hard Seconds parameter forces the renegotiation of the IPSec Security Associations (SAs) at the configured Hard Seconds value. The value can be configured
between 60 and 1,000,000 seconds This parameter does not need to match the peer
gateway.
IPSec MTU
Some ISPs require a setting of e.g. 1492 (or other value). The default 1500 is the most
common and you usually don’t need to change this unless otherwise instructed.
Accepted values are from 100 – 1500.
This is the starting value that is used for the MTU when the IPSec tunnel is installed. It
specifies the maximum IP packet length for the encapsulated AH or ESP packets sent by
the router. The MTU used on the IPSec connection will be automatically adjusted based
on the MTU value in any received ICMP can't fragment error messages that correspond
to IPSec traffic initiated from the router. Normally the MTU only requires manual configuration if the ICMP error messages are blocked or otherwise not received by the router.
Table 3: IPSec Tunnel Details page parameters
Xauth Enable
Extended Authentication (XAuth), an extension to the Internet Key Exchange (IKE) protocol. The Xauth extension provides dual authentication for a remote user’s Motorola Netopia® Gateway to establish a VPN, authorizing network access to the user’s central office.
IKE establishes the tunnel, and Xauth authenticates the specific remote user's Gateway.
Since NAT is supported over the tunnel, the remote user network can have multiple PCs
behind the client Gateway accessing the VPN. By using XAuth, network VPN managers
can centrally control remote user authentication.
Xauth Username/
Password
Xauth authentication credentials.
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Stateful Inspection
Stateful inspection options are accessed by the security state-insp tag.
set security state-insp [ ip-ppp | dsl ] vccn option [ off | on ]
set security state-insp ethernet [ A | B ] option [ off | on ]
Sets the stateful inspection option off or on on the specified interface. This option is disabled by
default. Stateful inspection prevents unsolicited inbound access when NAT is disabled.
set security state-insp [ ip-ppp | dsl ] vccn default-mapping [ off | on ]
set security state-insp ethernet [ A | B ] default-mapping [ off | on ]
Sets stateful inspection default mapping to Gateway option off or on on the specified interface.
set security state-insp [ ip-ppp | dsl ] vccn tcp-seq-diff [ 0 - 65535 ]
set security state-insp ethernet [ A | B ] tcp-seq-diff [ 0 - 65535 ]
Sets the acceptable TCP sequence difference on the specified interface. The TCP sequence number difference maximum allowed value is 65535. If the value of tcp-seq-diff is 0, it means that this check is
disabled.
set security state-insp [ ip-ppp | dsl ] vccn deny-fragments [ off | on ]
set security state-insp ethernet [ A | B ] deny-fragments [ off | on ]
Sets whether fragmented packets are allowed to be received or not on the specified interface.
set security state-insp tcp-timeout [ 30 - 65535 ]
Sets the stateful inspection TCP timeout interval, in seconds.
set security state-insp udp-timeout [ 30 - 65535 ]
Sets the stateful inspection UDP timeout interval, in seconds.
set security state-insp dos-detect [ off | on ]
Enables or disables the stateful inspection Denial of Service detection feature. If set to on, the device
will monitor packets for Denial of Service (DoS) attack. Offending packets may be discarded if it is
determined to be a DoS attack.
set security state-insp xposed-addr exposed-address# "n"
Allows you to add an entry to the specified list, or, if the list does not exist, creates the list for the
stateful inspection feature. xposed-addr settings only apply if NAT is off.
Example:
set security state-insp xposed-addr exposed-address# (?): 32
32 has been added to the xposed-addr list.
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Sets the exposed list address number.
set security state-insp xposed-addr exposed-address# "n" start-ip ip_address
Sets the exposed list range starting IP address, in dotted quad format.
set security state-insp xposed-addr exposed-address# "n" end-ip ip_address
Sets the exposed list range ending IP address, in dotted quad format.
32 exposed addresses can be created. The range for exposed address numbers are from 1 through 32.
set security state-insp xposed-addr exposed-address# "n"
protocol [ tcp | udp | both | any ]
Sets the protocol for the stateful inspection feature for the exposed address list. Accepted values for
protocol are tcp, udp, both, or any.
If protocol is not any, you can set port ranges:
set security state-insp xposed-addr exposed-address# "n"
start-port [ 1 - 65535 ]
set security state-insp xposed-addr exposed-address# "n"
end-port [ 1 - 65535 ]
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Packet Filtering Settings
Packet Filtering has two parts:
❑ Create/Edit/Delete Filter Sets, create/edit/delete rules to a Filter Set.
❑ Associate a created Filter Set with a WAN or LAN interface
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
forward [ on | off ]
Creates or edits a filter rule, specifying whether packets will be forwarded or not.
☛
NOTE:
If this is the first rule, it will create the filter-set called filterset-name, otherwise it will edit
the filterset.
If the index is not consecutive, the system will select the next consecutive index. If the
index does not exist, a rule will be created. If a rule exists, the rule will be edited.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
idle-reset [ on | off ]
Turns idle reset on or off for the specified filter rule. A match on this rule resets idle-timeout status and
keeps the WAN connection alive. The default is off. For idle-reset to be displayed, forward must be
enabled on a filter rule.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
frc-rte [ on | off ]
Turns forced routing on or off for the specified filter rule. A match on this rule will force a route for packets. The default is off. For frc-rte to be displayed, forward must be enabled on a filter rule.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
gateway ip_addr
Specifies the gateway IP address for forced routed packets, if forced routing is enabled.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
src-ip ip_addr
Specifies the source IP address to match packets (where the packet was sent from).
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
src-mask mask
Specifies the source IP mask to match packets (where the packet was sent from).
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set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
dest-ip ip_addr
Specifies the destination IP address to match packets (where the packet is going).
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
dest-mask mask
Specifies the destination IP mask to match packets (where the packet is going).
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
tos value
Specifies the TOS (Type Of Service) value to match packets. The value for tos can be from 0 – 255.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
tos-mask value
Specifies the TOS (Type Of Service) mask to match packets. The value for tos-mask can be from 0 –
255.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
protocol value
Specifies the protocol value to match packets, the type of higher-layer Internet protocol the packet is
carrying, such as TCP or UDP. The value for protocol can be from 0 – 255.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
src-compare [ nc | ne | lt | le | eq | gt | ge ]
Sets the source compare operator action for the specified filter rule. src-compare only displays when
the protocol is TCP or UDP.
Operator
Action
nc
No compare
ne
Not equal to
lt
Less than
le
Less than or equal to
eq
Equal to
ge
Greater than or equal to
gt
Greater than
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set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
dst-compare [ nc | ne | lt | le | eq | gt | ge ]
Sets the destination compare operator action for the specified filter rule. dst-compare only displays
when the protocol is TCP or UDP.
Operator
Action
nc
No compare
ne
Not equal to
lt
Less than
le
Less than or equal to
eq
Equal to
ge
Greater than or equal to
gt
Greater than
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
src-port value
Specifies the source IP port to match packets (the port on the sending host that originated the packet,
if the underlying protocol is TCP or UDP). src-port does not display if nc is set for src-compare or dstcompare.
set security pkt-filter filterset filterset-name [ input_filter | output_filter ] index
dst-port value
Specifies the destination IP port to match packets (the port on the receiving host that the packet is
destined for, if the underlying protocol is TCP or UDP). dst-port does not display if nc is set for srccompare or dst-compare.
set security pkt-filter interface
assigned-filterset filterset-name
Associates a filterset with a LAN or WAN interface.
Example:
set security pkt-filter ethernet A assigned-filterset set1
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SNMP Settings
The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) lets a network administrator monitor problems on a
network by retrieving settings on remote network devices. The network administrator typically runs an
SNMP management station program on a local host to obtain information from an SNMP agent such as
the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
set snmp community read name
Adds the specified name to the list of communities associated with the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. By
default, the Motorola Netopia® Gateway is associated with the public community.
set snmp community write name
Adds the specified name to the list of communities associated with the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
set snmp community trap name
Adds the specified name to the list of communities associated with the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
set snmp trap ip-traps ip-address
Identifies the destination for SNMP trap messages. The ip-address argument is the IP address of
the host acting as an SNMP console.
set snmp sysgroup contact contact_info
Identifies the system contact, such as the name, phone number, beeper number, or email address of
the person responsible for the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. You can enter up to 255 characters for the
contact_info argument. You must put the contact_info argument in double-quotes if it contains
embedded spaces.
set snmp sysgroup location location_info
Identifies the location, such as the building, floor, or room number, of the Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
You can enter up to 255 characters for the location_info argument. You must put the
location_info argument in double-quotes if it contains embedded spaces.
SNMP Notify Type Settings
set snmp notify type [ v1-trap | v2-trap | inform ]
Sets the type of SNMP notifications that the system will generate:
❑ v1-trap – This selection will generate notifications containing an SNMPv1 Trap Protocol Data Unit
(PDU)
❑ v2-trap – This selection will generate notifications containing an SNMPv2 Trap PDU
❑ inform – This selection will generate notifications containing an SNMPv2 InformRequest PDU.
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System Settings
You can configure system settings to assign a name to your Motorola Netopia® Gateway and to specify
what types of messages you want the diagnostic log to record.
set system name name
Specifies the name of your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. Each Motorola Netopia® Gateway is assigned
a name as part of its factory initialization. The default name for a Motorola Netopia® Gateway consists
of the word “Netopia-3000/XXX” where “XXX” is the serial number of the device; for example, Netopia3000/9437188. A system name can be 1 – 255 characters long. Once you have assigned a name to
your Motorola Netopia® Gateway, you can enter that name in the Address text field of your browser to
open a connection to your Motorola Netopia® Gateway.
☛
NOTE:
Some broadband cable-oriented Service Providers use the System Name as an important
identification and support parameter. If your Gateway is part of this type of network, do
NOT alter the System Name unless specifically instructed by your Service Provider.
set system diagnostic-level { off | low | medium | high | alerts | failures }
Specifies the types of log messages you want the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to record. All messages
with a level equal to or greater than the level you specify are recorded. For example, if you specify set
system diagnostic-level medium, the diagnostic log will retain medium-level informational messages,
alerts, and failure messages. Specifying off turns off logging.
Use the following guidelines:
❑ low - Low-level informational messages or greater; includes trivial status messages.
❑ medium - Medium-level informational messages or greater; includes status messages that can
help monitor network traffic.
❑ high - High-level informational messages or greater; includes status messages that may be significant but do not constitute errors. The default.
❑ alerts - Warnings or greater; includes recoverable error conditions and useful operator information.
❑ failures - Failures; includes messages describing error conditions that may not be recoverable.
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set system ftp-server option [ off | on ]
Enables or disables a simple FTP server in the Gateway. If enabled, the Gateway will accept binary
embedded software images (‘.bin’) files or command line configuration files.
Supported FTP commands
MODE
(data transfer mode (only Streaming supported)
NOOP
(send back ok)
PORT
(specify client address:port for data)
QUIT
(quit)
STOR
(send file to FTP server)
SYST
(get system info about FTP server)
TYPE
(set data representation type, ASCII and IMAGE (BIN) only supported)
USER
(send username for authentication)
set system log-size [ 10240... 65536 ]
Specifies a size for the system log. The most recent entries are posted to the beginning of the log.
When the log becomes full, the oldest entries are dropped. The default is 30000.
set system persistent-log [ off | on ]
When set to on, causes the log information to be kept in flash memory.
set system idle-timeout { telnet [ 1...120 ] | http [ 1... 120 ] }
Specifies a timeout period of inactivity for telnet or HTTP access to the Gateway, after which a user
must re-login to the Gateway. Defaults are 5 minutes for HTTP and 15 minutes for telnet.
set system username { administrator name | user name }
Specifies the usernames for the administrative user – the default is admin; and a non-administrative
user – the default is user.
set system password { admin | user }
Specifies the administrator or user password for a Motorola Netopia® Gateway. When you enter the
set system password command, you are prompted to enter the old password (if any) and new
password. You are prompted to repeat the new password to verify that you entered it correctly the first
time. To prevent anyone from observing the password you enter, characters in the old and new passwords are not displayed as you type them. For security, you cannot use the “step” method to set the
system password.
A password can be as many as 32 characters. Passwords are case-sensitive.
Passwords go into effect immediately. You do not have to restart the Motorola Netopia® Gateway for
the password to take effect. Assigning an administrator or user password to a Motorola Netopia® Gateway does not affect communications through the device.
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set system heartbeat option { on | off }
protocol [ udp | tcp ]
port-client [ 1 - 65535 ]
ip-server [ ip_address | dns_name ]
port-server [ 1 - 65535 ]
url-server ("server_name")
number [ 1 – 1073741823 ]
interval (00:00:00:20)
sleep (00:00:30:00)
contact-email ("string@domain_name")
location ("string"):
The heartbeat setting is used in conjunction with the configuration server to broadcast contact and
location information about your Gateway. You can specify the protocol, port, IP-, port-, and URLserver.
❑ The interval setting specifies the broadcast update frequency. Part of sequence control. The interval is the spacing between heartbeats, in d:h:m:s.
❑ The contact-email setting is a quote-enclosed text string giving an email address for the Gateway’s
administrator.
❑ The location setting is a text string allowing you to specify your geographical or other location, such
as “Secaucus, NJ.”
❑ The number setting is part of the sequence control. This is the number of heartbeats to send, at
each “interval”, before sleeping. For example, if this is 20, in the above layout, each heartbeat
sequence will send out a total 20 heartbeats, spaced at 30 second intervals, and then sleep for 30
minutes. So to have the Gateway send out packets “forever”, this number can be set very high. If it
is 1440 and the interval is 1 minute, say, the heartbeat will go out every minute for 1440 minutes,
or one day, before sleeping.
❑ The sleep setting is part of sequence control. This is the time to sleep before starting another
heartbeat sequence, in d:h:m:s.
set system ntp
option [ off | on ]:
server-address (north-america.pool.ntp.org)
alt-server-address (pool.ntp.org):
time-zone [ -12 - 12 ]
update-period (60) [ 1 - 65535 ]:
auto-daylight-savings option [ off | on ]
auto-daylight-savings override option [ off | on ]
start-year [ 0 - 99 ]
start-month [ 1 - 12 ]
start-day [ 1- 31 ]
start-hour [ 0 - 23 ]
end-year [ 0 - 99 ]
end-month [ 1 - 12 ]
end-day [ 1 - 31 ]
end-hour [ 0 - 23 ]
Specifies the NTP server address, time zone, and how often the Gateway should check the time from
the NTP server. The NTP server-address and alt-server-address can be entered as DNS names as
well as IP addresses. NTP time-zone of 0 is GMT time; options are -12 through 12 (+/- 1 hour increments from GMT time). update-period specifies how often, in minutes, the Gateway should update the
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clock. auto-daylight-savings specifies whether daylight savings time is in effect; it defaults to on if
the time-zone is one that honors Daylight Savings Time; otherwise, it defaults to off. To manually override auto-daylight-savings options, the auto-daylight-savings override option may be set to on, and
the corresponding parameters set for start and end year, month, day, and hour. Otherwise, this
defaults to off.
set system zerotouch option [ on | off ]
Enables or disables the Zero Touch option.
Zero Touch refers to automatic configuration of your Motorola Netopia® Gateway. The Motorola Netopia® Gateway has default settings such that initial connection to the Internet will succeed. If the zerotouch option is set to on, HTTP requests to any destination IP address except the IP address(es) of the
configured redirection URL(s) will access a redirection server. DNS traffic will not be blocked. Other traffic from the LAN to all destinations will be dropped.
set system zerotouch redirect-url redirection-URL
Specifies the URL(s) of the desired redirection server(s) when the zerotouch option is set to on. URLs
may be a maximum of 192 characters long, and may be in any of the following forms:
http://<domain-name OR IP address>/optionalPath:port
http://<domain-name OR IP address>/optionalPath
https://<domain-name OR IP address>/optionalPath:port
https://<domain-name OR IP address>/optionalPath
<domain-name OR IP address>/optionalPath:port
<domain-name OR IP address>/optionalPath
If the port number is omitted, port 80 will be assumed.
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Syslog
set system syslog option [ off | on ]
Enables or disables system syslog feature. If syslog option is on, the following commands are available:
set system syslog host-nameip [ ip_address | hostname ]
Specifies the syslog server’s address either in dotted decimal format or as a DNS name up to 64 characters.
set system syslog log-facility [ local0 ... local7 ]
Sets the UNIX syslog Facility. Acceptable values are local0 through local7.
set system syslog log-violations [ off | on ]
Specifies whether violations are logged or ignored.
set system syslog log-accepted [ off | on ]
Specifies whether acceptances are logged or ignored.
set system syslog log-attempts [ off | on ]
Specifies whether connection attempts are logged or ignored.
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Default syslog installation procedure
1. Access the Gateway via telnet from the private LAN.
DHCP server is enabled on the LAN by default.
2.
The product’s stateful inspection feature must be enabled in order to examine TCP,
UDP and ICMP packets destined for the Gateway or the private hosts.
This can be done by entering the CONFIG interface.
• Type config
• Type the command to enable stateful inspection
set security state-insp ip-ppp vcc1 option on
• Type the command to enable the Gateway to drop fragmented packets
3.
set security state-insp ip-ppp vcc1 deny-fragments on
Enabling syslog:
• Type config
• Type the command to enable syslog
set system syslog option on
• Set the IP Address of the syslog host
set system syslog host-nameip <ip-addr>
(example: set system syslog host-nameip 10.3.1.1)
• Enable/change the options you require
4.
set system syslog
set system syslog
set system syslog
set system syslog
Set NTP parameters
• Type config
log-facility local1
log-violations on
log-accepted on
log-attempts on
• Set the time-zone – Default is 0 or GMT
set system ntp time-zone <zone>
(example: set system ntp time-zone –8)
• Set NTP server-address if necessary (default is 204.152.184.72)
set system ntp server-address <ip-addr>
(example:
set system ntp server-address 204.152.184.73)
• Set alternate server address
5.
set system ntp alt-server-address <ip-addr>
Type the command to save the configuration
• Type save
• Exit the configuration interface by typing
exit
• Restart the Gateway by typing
restart
The Gateway will reboot with the new configuration in effect.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Wireless Settings (supported models)
set wireless option ( on | off )
Administratively enables or disables the wireless interface.
set wireless network-id ssid { network_name }
Specifies the wireless network id for the Gateway. A unique ssid is generated for each Gateway. You
must set your wireless clients to connect to this exact id, which can be changed to any 32-character
string.
set wireless auto-channel mode { off | at-startup | continuous }
Specifies the wireless AutoChannel Setting for 802.11G models. AutoChannel is a feature that allows
the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to determine the best channel to broadcast automatically. For details,
see “Advanced” on page 56.
set wireless default-channel { 1...14 }
Specifies the wireless 2.4GHz sub channel on which the wireless Gateway will operate. For US operation, this is limited to channels 1–11. Other countries vary; for example, Japan is channel 14 only. The
default channel in the US is 6. Channel selection can have a significant impact on performance,
depending on other wireless activity in proximity to this AP. Channel selection is not necessary at the
clients; clients will scan the available channels and look for APs using the same ssid as the client.
set wireless network-id closed-system { on | off }
When this setting is enabled, a client must know the ssid in order to connect or even see the wireless
access point. When disabled, a client may scan for available wireless access points and will see this
one. Enable this setting for greater security. The default is on.
set wireless mode { both-b-and-g | b-only | g-only }
Specifies the wireless operating mode for connecting wireless clients: both-b-and-g, b-only, or gonly, and locks the Gateway in that mode.
☛
NOTE:
If you choose to limit the operating mode to B or G only, clients using the mode you
excluded will not be able to connect.
set wireless scheduler option { on | off }
Enables or disables the scheduler for turning the wireless radio off and on during specified times.
Default is off.
set wireless scheduler begin-time hh:min
Specifies the time to turn the wireless radio on, when wireless scheduler option is set to on.
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set wireless scheduler end-time hh:min
Specifies the time to turn the wireless radio off, when wireless scheduler option is set to on.
set wireless multi-ssid option { on | off }
Enables or disables the multi-ssid feature which allows you to add additional network identifiers
(SSIDs or Network Names) for your wireless network. When enabled, you can specify up to three additional SSIDs with separate privacy settings for each. See below.
set wireless multi-ssid {second-ssid | third-ssid | fourth-ssid } name
Specifies a descriptive name for each SSID. when multi-ssid option is set to on.
set wireless multi-ssid {second-ssid-hidden | third-ssid-hidden |
fourth-ssid-hidden } [ off | on ]
Specifies a whether or not each SSID is “hidden,” i.e closed system mode, when multi-ssid option is
set to on.
set wireless multi-ssid second-ssid-privacy { off | WEP | WPA-PSK |
WPA-802.1x }
set wireless multi-ssid third-ssid-privacy { off | WEP | WPA-PSK |
WPA-802.1x }
set wireless multi-ssid fourth-ssid-privacy { off | WEP | WPA-PSK |
WPA-802.1x }
Specifies the type of privacy enabled on multiple SSIDs when multi-ssid option is set to on. off = no
privacy; WEP = WEP encryption; WPA-PSK = Wireless Protected Access/Pre-Shared Key; WPA-802.1x =
Wireless Protected Access/802.1x authentication. See “Wireless Privacy Settings” on page 221 for
more information.
☛
NOTE:
WEP is supported on only one SSID at a time, and will not be available if another SSID
already has it configured.
set wireless multi-ssid second-ssid-wpa-ver { all | WPA1-only |
WPA2-only }
set wireless multi-ssid third-ssid-wpa-ver { all | WPA1-only |
WPA2-only }
set wireless multi-ssid fourth-ssid-wpa-ver { all | WPA1-only |
WPA2-only }
Specifies the type of WPA version enabled on multiple SSIDs when multi-ssid option is set to on and
privacy is set to WPA-PSK. See “Wireless Privacy Settings” on page 221 for more information.
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Administrator’s Handbook
set wireless multi-ssid second-ssid-psk { string }
set wireless multi-ssid third-ssid-psk { string }
set wireless multi-ssid fourth-ssid-psk { string }
Specifies a WPA passphrase for the multiple SSIDs, when second-, third-, or fourth-ssid-privacy is
set to WPA-PSK. The Pre Shared Key is a passphrase shared between the Gateway and the clients
and is used to generate dynamically changing keys. The passphrase can be 8 – 63 characters. It is recommended to use at least 20 characters for best security.
set wireless multi-ssid second-ssid-weplen [ 40/64bit | 128bit | 256bit ]
set wireless multi-ssid third-ssid-weplen [ 40/64bit | 128bit | 256bit ]
set wireless multi-ssid fourth-ssid-weplen [ 40/64bit | 128bit | 256bit ]
Specifies the WEP key length for the multiple SSIDs, when second-, third-, or fourth-ssid-privacy is
set to WEP. 40bit encryption is equivalent to 64bit encryption. The longer the key, the stronger the
encryption and the more difficult it is to break the encryption.
set wireless multi-ssid second-ssid-wepkey { hexadecimal digits }
set wireless multi-ssid third-ssid-wepkey { hexadecimal digits }
set wireless multi-ssid fourth-ssid-wepkey { hexadecimal digits }
Specifies a WEP key for the multiple SSIDs, when second-, third-, or fourth-ssid-privacy is set to
WEP. For 40/64bit encryption, you need 10 digits; 26 digits for 128bit, and 58 digits for 256bit WEP.
Valid hexadecimal characters are 0 – 9, a – f.
set wireless no-bridging [ off | on ]
When set to on, this will block wireless clients from communicating with other wireless clients on the
LAN side of the Gateway.
set wireless tx-power [ full | medium | fair | low | minimal ]
Sets the wireless transmit power, scaling down the router's wireless transmit coverage by lowering its
radio power output. Default is full power. Transmit power settings are useful in large venues with multiple wireless routers where you want to reuse channels. Since there are only three non-overlapping
channels in the 802.11 spectrum, it helps to size the Gateway’s cell to match the location. This allows
you to install a router to cover a small “hole” without conflicting with other routers nearby.
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Wireless Multi-media (WMM) Settings
Router EDCA Parameters (Enhanced Distributed Channel Access) govern wireless data from your
Gateway to the client; Client EDCA Parameters govern wireless data from the client to your Gateway.
set wireless wmm option [ off | on ]
Enables or disables wireless multi-media settings option, which allows you to fine tune WiFi Multimedia
Quality of Service (QoS) by transmitting data depending on Diffserv priority settings. These priorities
are mapped into four Access Categories (AC), in increasing order of priority: Background (BK), Best
Effort (BE), Video (VI), and Voice (VO). It requires WiFi Multimedia-capable clients, usually a separate
feature enabled at the client.
❑ aifs: (Arbitration Interframe Spacing) the wait time in milliseconds for data frames.
Valid values are: 1 – 255
❑ cwmin: (Minimum Contention Window) upper limit in milliseconds of the range for determining initial
random backoff. The value you choose must be lower than cwmax.
Valid values are: 1, 3, 7, 15, 31, 63, 127, 255, or 511.
❑ cwmax: (Maximum Contention Window) upper limit in milliseconds of the range of determining final
random backoff. The value you choose must be higher than cwmin.
Valid values are: 3, 7, 15, 31, 63, 127, 255, 511, or 1023.
❑ txoplimit: Time interval in microseconds that clients may initiate transmissions.
Valid values are: 0 – 9999.
☛
NOTE:
It is not recommended that you modify these settings without direct knowledge or instructions to do so. Modifying these settings inappropriately could seriously degrade network
performance.
set wireless wmm router-edca voice { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm router-edca voice { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm router-edca voice { cwmax value }
Sets values for Gateway WMM voice parameters.
set wireless wmm router-edca video { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm router-edca video { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm router-edca video { cwmax value }
Sets values for Gateway WMM video parameters.
set wireless wmm router-edca best-effort { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm router-edca best-effort { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm router-edca best-effort { cwmax value }
Sets values for Gateway WMM best effort parameters.
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set wireless wmm router-edca background { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm router-edca background { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm router-edca background { cwmax value }
Sets values for Gateway WMM background parameters.
set wireless wmm client-edca voice { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm client-edca voice { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm client-edca voice { cwmax value }
set wireless wmm client-edca voice { txoplimit 0... 9999 }
Sets values for client WMM voice parameters.
set wireless wmm client-edca video { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm client-edca video { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm client-edca video { cwmax value }
set wireless wmm client-edca video { txoplimit 0... 9999 }
Sets values for client WMM video parameters.
set wireless wmm client-edca best-effort { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm client-edca best-effort { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm client-edca best-effort { cwmax value }
set wireless wmm client-edca best-effort { txoplimit 0... 9999 }
Sets values for client WMM best effort parameters.
set wireless wmm client-edca background { aifs 1... 255 }
set wireless wmm client-edca background { cwmin value }
set wireless wmm client-edca background { cwmax value }
set wireless wmm client-edca background { txoplimit 0... 9999 }
Sets values for client WMM background parameters.
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Wireless Privacy Settings
set wireless network-id wps [ off | on ]
Enables or disables Wireless Protected Setup. See “Wireless Protected Setup” on page 26.
set wireless network-id privacy option { off | WEP | WPA-PSK | WPA-802.1x }
Specifies the type of privacy enabled on the wireless LAN. off = no privacy; WEP = WEP encryption;
WPA-PSK = Wireless Protected Access/Pre-Shared Key; WPA-802.1x = Wireless Protected Access/
802.1x authentication. See “Wireless” on page 53 for a discussion of these options.
WPA provides Wireless Protected Access, the most secure option for your wireless network. This mechanism provides the best data protection and access control. PSK requires a Pre-Shared Key; 802.1x
requires a RADIUS server for authentication.
WEP is Wired Equivalent Privacy, a method of encrypting data between the wireless Gateway and its clients. It is strongly recommended to turn this on as it is the primary way to protect your network and
data from intruders. Note that 40bit is the same as 64bit and will work with either type of wireless client. The default is off.
A single key is selected (see default-key) for encryption of outbound/transmitted packets. The WEPenabled client must have the identical key, of the same length, in the identical slot (1...4) as the wireless Gateway, in order to successfully receive and decrypt the packet. Similarly, the client also has a
‘default’ key that it uses to encrypt its transmissions. In order for the wireless Gateway to receive the
client’s data, it must likewise have the identical key, of the same length, in the same slot. For simplicity, a wireless Gateway and its clients need only enter, share, and use the first key.
set wireless network-id privacy pre-shared-key string
The Pre Shared Key is a passphrase shared between the Router and the clients and is used to generate dynamically changing keys, when WPA-PSK is selected or enabled. The passphrase can be 8 – 63
characters. It is recommended to use at least 20 characters for best security.
set wireless network-id privacy default-keyid { 1...4 }
Specifies which WEP encryption key (of 4) the wireless Gateway will use to transmit data. The client
must have an identical matching key, in the same numeric slot, in order to successfully decode. Note
that a client allows you to choose which of its keys it will use to transmit. Therefore, you must have an
identical key in the same numeric slot on the Gateway.
For simplicity, it is easiest to have both the Gateway and the client transmit with the same key. The
default is 1.
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set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key1-length
{40/64bit, 128bit, 256bit}
set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key2-length
{40/64bit, 128bit, 256bit}
set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key3-length
{40/64bit, 128bit, 256bit}
set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key4-length
{40/64bit, 128bit, 256bit}
Selects the length of each encryption key. 40bit encryption is equivalent to 64bit encryption. The
longer the key, the stronger the encryption and the more difficult it is to break the encryption.
set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key1 { hexadecimal digits }
set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key2 { hexadecimal digits }
set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key3 { hexadecimal digits }
set wireless network-id privacy encryption-key4 { hexadecimal digits }
The encryption keys. Enter keys using hexadecimal digits. For 40/64bit encryption, you need 10 digits;
26 digits for 128bit, and 58 digits for 256bit WEP. Valid hexadecimal characters are 0 – 9, a – f.
Example 40bit key: 02468ACE02.
Example 128bit key: 0123456789ABCDEF0123456789.
Example 256bit key: 592CA140F0A238B0C61AE162F592CA140F0A238B0C61AE162F21A09C.
You must set at least one of these keys, indicated by the default-keyid.
Wireless MAC Address Authorization Settings
set wireless mac-auth option { on | off }
Enabling this feature limits the MAC addresses that are allowed to access the LAN as well as the WAN
to specified MAC (hardware) addresses.
set wireless mac-auth wrlss-MAC-list mac-address MAC-address_string
Enters a new MAC address into the MAC address authorization table. The format for an Ethernet MAC
address is six hexadecimal values between 00 and FF inclusive separated by colons or dashes [e.g.,
00:00:C5:70:00:04).
set wireless mac-auth wrlss-MAC-list mac-address
“MAC-address_string” allow-access { on | off }
Designates whether the MAC address is enabled or not for wireless network access. Disabled MAC
addresses cannot be used for access until enabled.
set wireless multi-ssid second-ssid-macauth { off | on }
set wireless multi-ssid third-ssid-macauth { off | on }
set wireless multi-ssid fourth-ssid-macauth { off | on }
Enables or disables MAC authorization for the specified SSID.
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set wireless mac-auth wrlss-MAC-list mac-address
“MAC-address_string” allow-access-ssid2 { on | off }
set wireless mac-auth wrlss-MAC-list mac-address
“MAC-address_string” allow-access-ssid3 { on | off }
set wireless mac-auth wrlss-MAC-list mac-address
“MAC-address_string” allow-access-ssid4 { on | off }
Designates whether the MAC address is enabled or not for the specified multiple SSID access. Disabled MAC addresses cannot be used for access until enabled.
RADIUS Server Settings
set radius radius-name "server_name_string"
Specifies the default RADIUS server name or IP address.
set radius radius-secret "shared_secret"
Specifies the RADIUS secret key used by this server. The shared secret should have the same characteristics as a normal password.
set radius alt-radius-name "server_name_string"
Specifies an alternate RADIUS server name or IP address to be used if the primary server is unreachable.
set radius alt-radius-secret "shared_secret"
Specifies the secret key used by the alternate RADIUS server.
set radius radius-port port_number
Specifies the port on which the RADIUS server is listening. The default value is 1812.
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VLAN Settings
You can create up to 8 VLANs, and you can also restrict any VLAN, and the computers on it, from administering the Gateway. See “VLAN” on page 78 for more information.
set vlan name name
Sets the descriptive name for the VLAN. If no name is specified, displays a selection list of node names
to select for editing. Once a new VLAN name is specified, presents the list of VLAN characteristics to
define.
set vlan name name type [ by-port | global ]
Specifies VLAN type: by-port or global. Default is by-port.
set vlan name name id VID
Specifies VLAN id (VID), when type is set to global. The numerical range of possible VIDs is 1 - 4094.
(A VID of zero (0) is permitted on the Ethernet WAN port only.)
set vlan name name admin-restricted [ off | on ]
Turns admin-restricted off or on. Default is off. If you select on, administrative access to the Gateway is blocked from the specified VLAN.
set vlan name name seg-pbits [ 0 - 7 ]
Specifies the 802.1p priority bit. If you set this to a value greater than 0, all packets of this VLAN with
unmarked priority bits (pbits) will be re-marked to this priority.
set vlan name name ports port option [ off | on ]
Enables or disables the Gateway’s physical Ethernet, USB or VCC port or wireless SSID for the specified VLAN.
set vlan name name ports port tag [ off | on ]
If set to on, packets transmitted from this port through this VLAN must be tagged with the VLAN VID.
Packets received through this port destined for this VLAN must be tagged with the VLAN VID by the
source. The tag option is only available on global type ports.
set vlan name name ports port priority [ off | on ]
Enables or disables the priority for the port assigned to the specified VLAN allowing packet prioritization based on any 802.1p priority bits in the VLAN header to prioritize packets within the Gateway’s
internal queues, according to DiffServ priority mapping rules.
set vlan name name ports port promote [ off | on ]
Enables or disables the promote setting allowing writing any 802.1p priority bits into the IP-TOS header
bit field for received IP packets on this port destined for this VLAN. Write any IP-TOS priority bits into the
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802.1p priority bit field for tagged IP packets transmitted from this port for this VLAN. All mappings
between Ethernet 802.1p and IP-TOS are made via diffserv dscp-map settings.
set vlan name name ports port port-pbits [ 0 - 7 ]
Specifies the 802.1p priority bit for this port associated with the specified VLAN. If you set this to a
value greater than 0, all packets of this port with unmarked priority bits (pbits) will be re-marked to this
priority.
set vlan name name ip-interface ip_interface
Associates this VLAN with the specified IP interface. By default the ip-vcc1 and ip-eth-a interfaces are
available, but others may be defined.
set vlan name name inter-vlan-routing [ group-1... group-8 ] [ off | on ]
When set to on, inter-vlan-routing allows VLANs in the specified group to route traffic to the others;
ungrouped VLANs cannot route traffic to each other.
You must save the changes, exit out of configuration mode, and restart the Gateway for the changes to
take effect.
Example 1:
❑ A simple example using the “Step” method – Navigate to the VLAN item:
Netopia-3000/9437188 (top)>> vlan
Netopia-3000/9437188 (vlan)>> set
vlan
(vlan) node list ...
Select (name) node to modify from list,
or enter new (name) to create.
vlan name (?): vlan1
(vlan1) has been added to the (vlan) list
name "vlan1"
type (by-port) [ by-port | global ]: by-port
admin-restricted (off) [ off | on ]: off
seg-pbits (0) [ 0 - 7 ]: 0
ports
❑ At this point you have created a VLAN. It is called vlan1, without any admin restrictions.
❑ Next, add the port eth0.1 port to this VLAN:
ports
eth0.1
option (off) [ off | on ]: on
priority (off) [ off | on ]: on
promote (off) [ off | on ]: on
port-pbits (0) [ 0 - 7 ]: 1
eth0.2
option (off) [ off | on ]:
eth0.3
option (off) [ off | on ]:
eth0.4
option (off) [ off | on ]:
ssid1
option (off) [ off | on ]:
vcc1
option (off) [ off | on ]:
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Administrator’s Handbook
❑ Assign an IP interface:
ip-vcc1
option (off) [ off | on ]:
ip-eth-a
option (off) [ off | on ]: on
ipsec-mgmt1
option (off) [ off | on ]:
Netopia-3000/9437188 (vlan)>>
Example 2:
❑ An example of a “Triple-Play” setup:
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
226
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"LanPorts"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"Voip_217"
"PPPoE_11"
type by-port
admin-restricted off
seg-pbits 0
ports eth0.1 option off
ports eth0.2 option on
ports eth0.2 priority off
ports eth0.2 promote off
ports eth0.2 port-pbits 0
ports eth0.3 option on
ports eth0.3 priority off
ports eth0.3 promote off
ports eth0.3 port-pbits 0
ports eth0.4 option on
ports eth0.4 priority off
ports eth0.4 promote off
ports eth0.4 port-pbits 0
ports ssid1 option on
ports ssid1 priority off
ports ssid1 promote off
ports ssid1 port-pbits 0
ports eth1 option off
ip-interfaces ip-ppp-a option off
ip-interfaces ip-eth-b option off
ip-interfaces ip-eth-c option off
ip-interfaces ip-eth-a option on
inter-vlan-routing group-1 on
inter-vlan-routing group-2 off
inter-vlan-routing group-3 off
inter-vlan-routing group-4 off
type global
id 217
admin-restricted off
seg-pbits 7
ports eth0.1 option off
ports eth0.2 option off
ports eth0.3 option off
ports eth0.4 option off
ports ssid1 option off
ports eth1 option on
ports eth1 tag on
ports eth1 priority off
ports eth1 promote off
ports eth1 port-pbits 0
ip-interfaces ip-ppp-a option off
ip-interfaces ip-eth-b option on
ip-interfaces ip-eth-c option off
ip-interfaces ip-eth-a option off
inter-vlan-routing group-1 on
inter-vlan-routing group-2 off
inter-vlan-routing group-3 off
inter-vlan-routing group-4 off
type global
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
name
"PPPoE_11" id 11
"PPPoE_11" admin-restricted off
"PPPoE_11" seg-pbits 0
"PPPoE_11" ports eth0.1 option off
"PPPoE_11" ports eth0.2 option off
"PPPoE_11" ports eth0.3 option off
"PPPoE_11" ports eth0.4 option off
"PPPoE_11" ports ssid1 option off
"PPPoE_11" ports eth1 option on
"PPPoE_11" ports eth1 tag on
"PPPoE_11" ports eth1 priority off
"PPPoE_11" ports eth1 promote off
"PPPoE_11" ports eth1 port-pbits 0
"PPPoE_11" ip-interfaces ip-ppp-a option on
"PPPoE_11" ip-interfaces ip-eth-b option off
"PPPoE_11" ip-interfaces ip-eth-c option off
"PPPoE_11" ip-interfaces ip-eth-a option off
"PPPoE_11" inter-vlan-routing group-1 on
"PPPoE_11" inter-vlan-routing group-2 off
"PPPoE_11" inter-vlan-routing group-3 off
"PPPoE_11" inter-vlan-routing group-4 off
"Mgmt_2017" type global
"Mgmt_2017" id 2017
"Mgmt_2017" admin-restricted off
"Mgmt_2017" seg-pbits 3
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth0.1 option off
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth0.2 option off
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth0.3 option off
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth0.4 option off
"Mgmt_2017" ports ssid1 option off
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth1 option on
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth1 tag on
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth1 priority off
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth1 promote off
"Mgmt_2017" ports eth1 port-pbits 0
"Mgmt_2017" ip-interfaces ip-ppp-a option off
"Mgmt_2017" ip-interfaces ip-eth-b option off
"Mgmt_2017" ip-interfaces ip-eth-c option on
"Mgmt_2017" ip-interfaces ip-eth-a option off
"Mgmt_2017" inter-vlan-routing group-1 off
"Mgmt_2017" inter-vlan-routing group-2 off
"Mgmt_2017" inter-vlan-routing group-3 off
"Mgmt_2017" inter-vlan-routing group-4 off
"Video_31" type global
"Video_31" id 31
"Video_31" admin-restricted off
"Video_31" seg-pbits 5
"Video_31" ports eth0.1 option on
"Video_31" ports eth0.1 tag off
"Video_31" ports eth0.1 priority off
"Video_31" ports eth0.1 promote off
"Video_31" ports eth0.1 port-pbits 0
"Video_31" ports eth0.2 option off
"Video_31" ports eth0.3 option off
"Video_31" ports eth0.4 option off
"Video_31" ports ssid1 option off
"Video_31" ports eth1 option on
"Video_31" ports eth1 tag on
"Video_31" ports eth1 priority off
"Video_31" ports eth1 promote off
"Video_31" ports eth1 port-pbits 0
"Video_31" ip-interfaces ip-ppp-a option off
"Video_31" ip-interfaces ip-eth-b option off
"Video_31" ip-interfaces ip-eth-c option off
"Video_31" ip-interfaces ip-eth-a option off
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Administrator’s Handbook
set
set
set
set
vlan
vlan
vlan
vlan
name
name
name
name
"Video_31"
"Video_31"
"Video_31"
"Video_31"
inter-vlan-routing
inter-vlan-routing
inter-vlan-routing
inter-vlan-routing
group-1
group-2
group-3
group-4
off
off
off
off
You must save the changes, exit from configuration mode, and restart the Gateway for the changes to
take effect.
228
VoIP settings (supported models)
Voice-over-IP (VoIP) refers to the ability to make voice telephone calls over the Internet. This differs from
traditional phone calls that use the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN). VoIP calls use an Internet protocol, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), to transmit sound over a network or the Internet in the
form of data packets. Certain Motorola Netopia® Gateway models have two separate voice ports for
connecting telephone handsets. These models support VoIP. If your Gateway is a VoIP model, you can
configure the VoIP features.
set ip client voip ip-interface
[ no-restrict | ip-dsl-vcc1... | ppp-vcc2... | ppp-enet-x... | ip-enet-x... ]
This command allows you to specify which WAN IP interface to use for VoIP traffic. The option list will
display the WAN IP interface name if the interface is enabled.
❑
❑
❑
❑
❑
no-restrict: default behavior — use the default (first WAN IP) interface.
ip-dsl-vcc1, 2, 3: will show IP WAN interface.
ppp-vcc1, 2, 3: will show IP PPP WAN interface.
ip-enet-x: will show IP over Ethernet over VDSL/Ethernet WAN.
ppp-enet-x: will show PPP over Ethernet over VDSL/Ethernet WAN.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-option [ off | on ]
Turns SIP on or off for the specified phone. Default is off.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-proxy-server [ server_name | ip_address ]
Specifies the SIP proxy server for the specified phone by fully qualified server name or IP address.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-proxy-server-transport [ UDP | TCP | TLS ]
Specifies the SIP proxy server transport protocol for the specified phone. Default is UDP.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-registrar-setting sip-registrar-server
[ server_name | ip_address ]
Specifies the SIP registration server for the specified phone by fully qualified server name or IP
address.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-registrar-setting
sip-registrar-server-transport [ UDP | TCP | TLS ]
Specifies the SIP registration server transport protocol for the specified phone. Default is UDP.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-registrar-setting sip-expires-time [ 0 - 65535 ]
Specifies the SIP registration server time-out duration from 0 – 65535 seconds for the specified phone.
Default is 3600 (1 hour).
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Administrator’s Handbook
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-out-proxy-server [ server_name | ip_address ]
Specifies the SIP outbound proxy server for the specified phone by fully qualified server name or IP
address.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-user-display-name name
Specifies the user name that is displayed on the web UI Home page, or other caller-id displays for the
specified phone.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-user-name username
Specifies the user name that authenticates the user to SIP for the specified phone.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-user-password password
Specifies the password that authenticates the user to SIP for the specified phone.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] auth-id string
Specifies the authorization ID that authenticates the user to SIP for the specified phone. Most SIP Servers expect this to be the username itself but some may use auth-id.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] codec G711A priority
[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | none ]
Assigns a priority to the alaw codec, the common analog voice encoding method used outside North
America.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] codec G711U priority
[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | none ]
Assigns a priority to the ulaw codec, the common analog voice encoding method used in North America.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] codec G729A priority
[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | none ]
Assigns a priority to the G729 annex A codec, the common analog voice compression implementation
used in North America.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] codec G726_16 priority
[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | none ]
Assigns a priority to the G726-16 codec, a common audio media type implementation at 16 kbit/s.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] codec G726_24 priority
[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | none ]
Assigns a priority to the G726-24 codec, a common audio media type implementation at 24 kbit/s.
230
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] codec G726_32 priority
[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | none ]
Assigns a priority to the G726-32 codec, a common audio media type implementation at 32 kbit/s.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] codec G726_40 priority
[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | none ]
Assigns a priority to the G726-40 codec, a common audio media type implementation at 40 kbit/s.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting sip-dtmf-mode
[ inband | rfc2833 | info ]
sip-dtmf-mode – sets the Dual Tone Multi-Frequency Mode:
❑ inband: sends the DTMF digits as a normal inband tone.
❑ rfc2833: sends the DTMF digits as an event as part of the RTP packet header
information.
❑ info: sends the DTMF digits in the SIP INFO message.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting sip-digit-map string
Specifies rules used to recognize a number dialed by the user and to ensure this number matches the
dial plan defined by the ITSP.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting sip-compact-header [ off | on ]
Forces all headers in the message to use compact format when set to on. Sends the SIP messages
with Compact Headers, reducing the size of the SIP messages.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting sip-q-value [ 0 - 10 ]
This is used to prioritize the sip Account based on the value.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting sip-qos-tos-value [ 0 - 255 ]
Specifies the SIP Diff-Serv Type of Service (ToS) values for Quality of Service (QoS) assignment. Default
is 136.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting rtp-qos-tos-value [ 0 - 255 ]
Specifies the RTP Diff-Serv Type of Service (ToS) values for Quality of Service (QoS) assignment.
Default is 184.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-forwarding-all-option [ off | on ]
call-forwarding-all-option – turns unconditional call forwarding on or off.
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Administrator’s Handbook
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-forwarding-all-number phone_number
call-forwarding-all-number – specifies the number to which calls are to be forwarded when call-forwarding-all-option is on.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-forwarding-on-busy-option [ off | on ]
call-forwarding-on-busy-option – turns call forwarding when the line is busy on or off.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-forwarding-on-busy-number-option [ off | on ]
call-forwarding-on-busy-number-option – turns call forwarding when the phone is busy on another
call on or off.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-forwarding-on-no-answer-option [ off | on ]
call-forwarding-on-no-answer-option – turns call forwarding when there is no answer on or off.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-forwarding-on-no-answer-number phone_number
call-forwarding-on-no-answer-number – specifies the number to which calls are to be forwarded
when call-forwarding-on-no-answer-option is on.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-waiting-option [ off | on ]
call-waiting-option – enables or disables call waiting.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-conferencing-option [ off | on ]
call-conferencing-option – enables or disables 3-way call conferencing.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
subscribe-do-not-disturb-option [ off | on ]
subscribe-do-not-disturb-option – enables or disables option to prevent the phone from ringing.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
subscribe-mwi-option [ off | on ]
subscribe-mwi-option – if set to on, the Message Waiting Indicator is enabled when new voice mail is
received.
232
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
anonymous-call-block-option [ off | on ]
anonymous-call-block-option – if set to on, blocks calls from unidentified sources, such as those
with caller-ID blocking.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting call-feature
call-transfer-option [ off | on ]
call-transfer-option – if set to on, permits call transfer to another phone.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting dsp-settings echo-option
[ echo-off | echo-on | echo-on-nlp | echo-on-cng-nlp ]
echo-option – specifies under what conditions the system invokes or disables echo cancellation.
Default is echo-on-cng-nlp (Comfort Noise Generation with non-linear processor).
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting dsp-settings
echo-start-attenuation [ 0 - 65535 ]
echo-start-attenuation – specifies the minimum attenuation level at which to invoke echo cancellation. Default is 8192.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting dsp-settings
echo-max-attenuation [ 0 - 65535 ]
echo-max-attenuation – specifies the maximum attenuation level at which to invoke echo cancellation. Default is 16384.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting dsp-settings
echo-tail-length [ 0 - 65535 ]
echo-tail-length – specifies the duration of an echo tail required to invoke cancellation. Default is 0.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting dsp-settings vad-option [ off | on ]
vad-option – turns Voice Activity Detection on or off. Default is off.
set voip phone [ 1 | 2 ] sip-advanced-setting dsp-settings
vad-setting [ vad-cn | vad-std-sid | vad-suppress-sid ]
When vad-option is set to on:
❑ vad-cn – enables Voice Activity Detection/Comfort Noise Generation. When speech is not present,
the CNG algorithm generates a noise signal at the level sent from the transmit side.
❑ vad-std-sid – enables Voice Activity Detection with standard Silence Insertion Descriptor support.
❑ vad-suppress-sid – enables Voice Activity Detection but suppresses standard Silence Insertion
Descriptor support.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Example
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
"1234"
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
set voip
234
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
sip-option on
sip-proxy-server "joe"
sip-proxy-server-transport UDP
sip-registrar-setting sip-registrar-server "joe"
sip-registrar-setting sip-registrar-server-transport UDP
sip-registrar-setting sip-expires-time 3600
sip-out-proxy-server "joe"
sip-user-display-name "joe"
sip-user-name "joe"
sip-user-password "***"
auth-id "joe"
codec G711U priority 1
codec G711A priority 2
codec G729A priority 3
codec G726_16 priority 4
codec G726_24 priority 5
codec G726_32 priority 6
codec G726_40 priority 7
sip-advanced-setting sip-dtmf-mode rfc2833
sip-advanced-setting sip-digit-map "O=16,I=6()"
sip-advanced-setting sip-compact-header off
sip-advanced-setting sip-q-value 10
sip-advanced-setting sip-qos-tos-value 40
sip-advanced-setting rtp-qos-tos-value 184
sip-advanced-setting call-feature call-forwarding-all-option on
sip-advanced-setting call-feature call-forwarding-all-number "1234"
sip-advanced-setting call-feature call-forwarding-on-busy-option on
sip-advanced-setting call-feature call-forwarding-on-busy-number "1234"
sip-advanced-setting call-feature call-forwarding-on-no-answer-option on
sip-advanced-setting call-feature call-forwarding-on-no-answer-number
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
phone
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
sip-advanced-setting
call-feature
call-feature
call-feature
call-feature
call-feature
call-feature
dsp-settings
dsp-settings
dsp-settings
dsp-settings
dsp-settings
dsp-settings
call-waiting-option on
call-conferencing-option on
do-not-disturb-option on
subscribe-mwi-option on
anonymous-call-block-option on
call-transfer-option on
echo-option echo-on-cng-nlp
echo-start-attenuation 8192
echo-max-attenuation 16384
echo-tail-length 0
vad-option on
vad-setting vad-std-sid
UPnP settings
set upnp option [ on | off ]
PCs using UPnP can retrieve the Gateway’s WAN IP address, and automatically create NAT port maps.
This means that applications that support UPnP, and are used with a UPnP-enabled Motorola Netopia®
Gateway, will not need application layer gateway support on the Motorola Netopia® Gateway to work
through NAT. The default is on.
You can disable UPnP, if you are not using any UPnP devices or applications.
set upnp log [ off | on ]
Enables or disables UPnP logging.
set upnp read-only [ off | on ]
Enables or disables
DSL Forum settings
TR-064 is a LAN-side DSL CPE configuration specification and TR-069 is a WAN-side DSL CPE Management specification.
TR-064
DSL Forum LAN Side CPE Configuration (TR-064) is an extension of UPnP. It defines more services to
locally manage the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. While UPnP allows open access to configure the Gateway's features, TR-064 requires a password to execute any command that changes the Gateway's configuration.
set dslf-lanmgmt option [ off | on ]
Turns TR-064 LAN side management services on or off. The default is on.
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TR-069
DSL Forum CPE WAN Management Protocol (TR-069) provides services similar to UPnP and TR-064.
The communication between the Motorola Netopia® Gateway and management agent in UPnP and TR064 is strictly over the LAN, whereas the communication in TR-069 is over the WAN link for some features and over the LAN for others. TR-069 allows a remote Auto-Config Server (ACS) to provision and
manage the Motorola Netopia® Gateway. TR-069 protects sensitive data on the Gateway by not advertising its presence, and by password protection.
set dslf-cpewan option [ off | on ]
set dslf-cpewan acs-url "acs_url:port_number"
set dslf-cpewan acs-user-name “acs_username”
set dslf-cpewan acs-user-password “acs_password”
Turns TR-069 WAN side management services on or off. For 3300-Series Gateways, the default is off;
for 2200-Series Gateways, the default is on. If TR-069 WAN side management services are enabled,
specifies the auto-config server URL and port number. A username and password must also be supplied, if TR-069 is enabled.
The auto-config server is specified by URL and port number. The format for the ACS URL is as follows:
http://some_url.com:port_number
or
http://123.45.678.910:port_number
On units that support SSL, the format for the ACS URL can also be:
https://some_url.com:port_number
or
https://123.45.678.910:port_number
236
Remote Management settings
set remote-mgmt telnet-enable [ on | off ]
Enables or disables remote management via telnet of the network specified by
network-n/netmask-n. Up to 10 networks may be specified.
set remote-mgmt web-enable [ on | off ]
Enables or disables remote management via web UI of the network specified by
network-n/netmask-n.
set remote-mgmt snmp-enable [ on | off ]
Enables or disables remote management via SNMP of the network specified by
network-n/netmask-n.
set remote-mgmt [ network-1... network-10 ] ip_addr
Specifies the IP address for the network, 1 – 10, to be remotely managed.
set remote-mgmt [ netmask-1... netmask-10 ] netmask
Specifies the subnet mask for the network, 1 – 10, to be remotely managed.
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Backup IP Gateway Settings
The purpose of Backup is to provide a recovery mechanism in the event that the primary connection
fails. A failure can be either line loss, for example by central site switch failure or physical cable breakage, or loss of end-to-end connectivity. Detection of one of these failures causes the Gateway to switch
from using the primary DSL WAN connection to an alternate gateway on the Ethernet LAN. In the event
of a loss of primary connectivity you have the option of switching back to the primary circuit automatically once it has recovered its connection.
A typical application would be to have a LAN connection from your Gateway to another Gateway that
has, for example, another DSL modem or Gateway connection to the Internet, and designating the
second gateway as the backup gateway. Should the primary WAN connection fail, traffic would be
automatically redirected through your alternate gateway device to maintain Internet connectivity.
set backup option [ disabled | manual | automatic ]
Specifies whether backup to an IP gateway is disabled or enabled as manual or automatic. Default is
disabled.
set backup failure-timeout [ 1 - 10 ]
Specifies the number of minutes you want the system to wait before the backup port becomes enabled
in the event of primary line failure, when backup option is set to automatic. Sets the Default is 1.
set backup ping-host-1 option [ name | address ]
set backup ping-host-1 [ hostname | ip-address ]
set backup ping-host-1 ip-address ip_address
set backup ping-host-1 hostname hostname
set backup ping-host-2 option [ name | address ]
set backup ping-host-2 [ hostname | ip-address ]
set backup ping-host-2 ip-address ip_address
set backup ping-host-2 hostname hostname
Specifies whether the Gateway will ping an IP address or resolvable DNS name, when backup option is
set to automatic. These are optional items that are particularly useful for testing if the remote end of a
VPN connection has gone down.
Specifies an IP address or resolvable DNS name for the Gateway to ping. The Gateway will ping both
addresses simultaneously at five-second intervals, recording the ping responses from each host. The
Gateway will proceed into backup mode only if neither of the configured remote hosts responds.
set backup auto-recovery [ off | on ]
Turns automatic recovery off or on. Default is off.
set backup recovery-timeout [ 1 - 10 ]
If auto-recovery is set to on, specifies the number of minutes for the system to wait before attempting
to switch back to the WAN connection. This allows you to be sure that the WAN connection is well reestablished before the gateway switches back to it from the backup mode. Default is 1.
238
set ip backup-gateway option [ on | off ]
Turns the backup gateway option on or off. Default is off.
set ip backup-gateway interface [ ip-address | ppp-vccn ]
Specifies the backup gateway interface ip address to which you want to direct the backup connection.
set ip backup-gateway default ip_address
Specifies the ip address of the default gateway.
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VDSL Settings
☛
CAUTION!
These settings are for very advanced users and lab technicians. Exercise extreme caution
when modifying any of these settings.
set vdsl sys-option [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
sys-bandplan [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
psd-mask-level [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
pbo-k1_1 [ 0x00000000 - 0xffffffff ]
pbo-k1_2 [ 0x00000000 - 0xffffffff ]
pbo-k1_3 [ 0x00000000 - 0xffffffff ]
pbo-k2_1 [ 0x00000000 - 0xffffffff ]
pbo-k2_2 [ 0x00000000 - 0xffffffff ]
pbo-k2_3 [ 0x00000000 - 0xffffffff ]
line-type [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
us-max-inter-delay [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
ds-max-inter-delay [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
us-target-noise-margin [ 0x0000 - 0xffff ]
ds-target-noise-margin [ 0x0000 - 0xffff ]
min-noise-margin [ 0x0000 - 0xffff ]
port-bandplan [ 0x00 - xff ]
framing-mode [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
band-mod [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
port-option [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
power-mode [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
tx-filter [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
rx-filter [ 0x00 - 0xff ]
dying-gasp [ off | on ]
VDSL Parameter Defaults
Parameter
240
Default
Meaning
sys-option
0x00
VDSL system option(bit0=ntr, 1=margin, 2=ini,
3=pbo, 4=tlan, 5=pbo)
sys-bandplan
0x02
VDSL system bandplan(bp_3_998_4=2,
bp4_997_3=3, bp5_997_3=4…)
psd-mask-level
0x00
VDSL system psd mask(def=0, 1=ansim1cab,
2=ansim2cab, 3=etsim1cab, 4=etsim2cab)
pbo-k1_1
0x00
VDSL system power back-off k1_1
pbo-k1_2
0x00
VDSL system power back-off k1_2
pbo-k1_3
0x00
VDSL system power back-off k1_3
pbo-k2_1
0x00
VDSL system power back-off k2_1
pbo-k2_2
0x00
VDSL system power back-off k2_2
pbo-k2_3
0x00
VDSL system power back-off k2_3
VDSL Parameter Defaults
Parameter
Default
Meaning
line-type
0x81
VDSL port line type(auto=0x80, vdsl=0x81,
vdsl_etsi=0x82)
us-max-inter-delay
0x04
VDSL port upstream max inter delay
ds-max-inter-delay
0x04
VDSL port downstream max inter delay
us-target-noise-margin
0x0C
VDSL port upstream target noise margin
ds-target-noise-margin
0x0C
VDSL port downstream target noise margin
min-noise-margin
0x0A
VDSL port minimum noise margin
port-bandplan
0x02
VDSL port bandplan
framing-mode
0x90
DSL port frame mode(0-ATM; 0x80-PTM;
0x90-Auto(EFM/PTM)
band-mod
0x11
VDSL port band mod
port-option
0x0A - Annex B
0x06 - Annex A
VDSL port portoption(bit0=I43, bit1=v43,
bit2=a43, bit3=b43)
power-mode
0x01
VDSL port power mode
tx-filter
0x02
VDSL port txPathFilterMode
rx-filter
0x02
VDSL port rxPathFilterMode
dying-gasp
off
Dying Gasp On/Off
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VDSL Parameters Accepted Values
Parameter
242
Accepted Values
sys-option
Bit[0]: NTR_DISABLE
Bit[1]: ALW_MARGIN_ADJUST.
1: the SNR margin for the optional band is reduced by up to 2.5
dB, but never below a minimum of 4 dB.
Bit[2]: SUPPORT_INI
Bit[4]: TLAN Enable
Bit[5]: PBO Weak mode Enable (Applicable only when PBO
Bit[3]=0.
Bit[6]: ADSL_SAFE_MODE Enable
Bit[7]: TLAN_SAFE_MODE Enable (Applicable only when TLAN
Enable Bit[4] is set. If TLAN_SAFE_MODE not set, line will
attempt to retrain at higher rates, but less stable line)
sys-bandplan
BP1_998_3
(0x00)
BP2_998_3
(0x01)
BP998_3B_8_5M (0x01)
BP3_998_4
(0x02)
BP998_4B_12M (0x02)
BP4_997_3
(0x03)
BP997_3B_7_1M (0x03)
BP5_997_3
(0x04)
BP6_997_4
(0x05)
BP997_4B_7_1M (0x05)
BP7_MXU_3
(0x06)
FLEX_3B_8_5M (0x06)
BP8_MXU_2
(0x07)
BP9_998_2
(0x08)
BP10_998_2
(0x09)
BP998_2B_3_8M (0x09)
BP11_998_2
(0x0A)
BP12_998_2
(0x0B)
BP13_MXU_3
(0x0C)
BP14_MXU_3
(0x0D)
BP15_MXU_3
(0x0E)
BP16_997_4B_4P (0x0F)
BP17_998_138_4400 (0x10)
BP18_997_138_4400(0x11)
BP19_997_32_4400(0x12)
BP20_998_138_4400_opBand (0x15)
BP21_997_138_4400_opBand (0x16)
BP22_998_138_4400_opBand(0x16)
BP23_998_138_16000 (0x17)
BP24_998_3B_8KHZ (0x18)
BP25_998_138_17600 (0x19)
BP26_CH1_3 (0x1A)
BP27_CH1_4 (0x1B)
VDSL Parameters Accepted Values
Parameter
Accepted Values
psd-mask-level
0x00 -- default mask (old gains from before)
0x01 -- ANSI M1 CAB
0x02 -- ANSI M2 CAB
0x03 -- ETSI M1 CAB
0x04 -- ETSI M2 CAB
0x05 -- ITU-T Annex F (Japan)
0x06 - ANSI M1 Ex
0x07 - ANSI M2 Ex
0x08 -- ETSI M1 Ex
0x09 - ETSI M2 Ex
0x0A - RESERVED
0x0B - PSD_K (Korean M1 FTTCab -59dBm/Hz)
pbo-k1_1
K1 and K2 parameters allow the user more flexibility in using
Upstream Power Back-Off (UPBO) on CPE modem. Changing
K1 and K2 values will affect the CPE TX PSD. Refer to VDSL
standards for exact relation between K1, K2 parameters and TX
PSD. There is an individual set of K1/K2 parameters associated
with each upstream band in the PSD: Upstream Band 0 or
Optional band, Upstream band 1, Upstream band 2 and
Upstream Band 3. Setting all K2 parameters to 0 and all K1 to a
high power level(ie low number) will essentially disable UPBO.
pbo-k1_2
pbo-k1_3
pbo-k2_1
pbo-k2_2
pbo-k2_3
line-type
VDSL_AUTO_DETECT – (0x80)
VDSL – (0x81)
VDSL_ETSI – (0x82)
us-max-inter-delay
Maximum upstream interleave delay.
Provisioned in steps of 0.5 ms. User defined.
ds-max-inter-delay
Maximum downstream interleave delay.
Provisioned in steps of 0.5 ms. User defined.
us-target-noise-margin
Range 0-31.0dB, increments of 0.5dB (e.g., 0 =
0dB, 1 = 0.5dB, ...)
ds-target-noise-margin
Range 0-31.0dB, increments of 0.5dB (e.g., 0 =
0dB, 1 = 0.5dB, ...)
min-noise-margin
Range 0-31.0dB, increments of 0.5dB (e.g., 0 =
0dB, 1 = 0.5dB, ...)
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VDSL Parameters Accepted Values
Parameter
244
Accepted Values
port-bandplan
BP1_998_3
(0x00)
BP2_998_3
(0x01)
BP998_3B_8_5M (0x01)
BP3_998_4
(0x02)
BP998_4B_12M (0x02)
BP4_997_3
(0x03)
BP997_3B_7_1M (0x03)
BP5_997_3
(0x04)
BP6_997_4
(0x05)
BP997_4B_7_1M (0x05)
BP7_MXU_3
(0x06)
FLEX_3B_8_5M (0x06)
BP8_MXU_2
(0x07)
BP9_998_2
(0x08)
BP10_998_2
(0x09)
BP998_2B_3_8M (0x09)
BP11_998_2
(0x0A)
BP12_998_2
(0x0B)
BP13_MXU_3
(0x0C)
BP14_MXU_3
(0x0D)
BP15_MXU_3
(0x0E)
BP16_997_4B_4P (0x0F)
BP17_998_138_4400 (0x10)
BP18_997_138_4400(0x11)
BP19_997_32_4400(0x12)
BP20_998_138_4400_opBand (0x15)
BP21_997_138_4400_opBand (0x16)
BP22_998_138_4400_opBand(0x16)
BP23_998_138_16000 (0x17)
BP24_998_3B_8KHZ (0x18)
BP25_998_138_17600 (0x19)
BP26_CH1_3 (0x1A)
BP27_CH1_4 (0x1B)
framing-mode
HDLC – 0x80
AUTO – 0x90
ATM – 0x00
VDSL Parameters Accepted Values
Parameter
Accepted Values
band-mod
Bit 0, 1: Tx Cfg band
1- All tones on
2- All tones below 640 Khz are turned off
3- All tones below 1.1 Mhz are turned off
Bit 2,3: Not used
Bit 4,5: Rx Cfg band
1- All tones on
2- All tones below 640 Khz are turned off
3- All tones below 1.1 Mhz are turned off
Bit 6, 7:Optional band
0- No Optional band
1- ANNEX_A_6_32 ( ie. 25KHz to 138 KHz)
2- ANNEX_B_32_64 (ie. 138 KHz to 276 KHz)
3- ANNEX_B_6_64 (ie. 25KHz to 276 KHz)
port-option
Bit [0]: I 43 G.hs carrier set.
Bit [1]: V 43 G.hs carrier set.
Bit [2]. A 43 G.hs carrier set.
Bit [3]: B 43 G.hs carrier set.
Bit[4:7]: shall be set to 0.
power-mode
0: 8.5dBm power output
1: 11.5 dBm power output
tx-filter
0: using internal filter in Tx path
1: using K1 external filter in Tx path
(for Korea VLR Application)
2: using U1 external filter in Tx path
(for US / Korea VLR Application)
3: using H1 external filter in Tx path
(for 100/100 Application)
rx-filter
0: using internal filter in Rx path
1: using K1 external filter in Rx path
(for Korea VLR Application)
2: using U1 external filter in Rx path
(for US / Korea VLR Application)
3: using H1 external filter in Rx path
(for 100/100 Application)
dying-gasp
Dying Gasp is a message sent from CPE to CO using the indicator bit. It indicates that the CPE is experiencing an impending
loss of power.
Off: Dying Gasp off (don't send a message to CO).
On: Dying Gasp on.
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246
CHAPTER 6
Technical Specifications and Safety
Information
Description
Communications interfaces: The Motorola Netopia® Gateways have an RJ-11 jack for DSL line connections
or an RJ-45 jack for cable/DSL modem connections and 1 or 4–port 10/100Base-T Ethernet switch for your LAN
connections. Some models have a USB port that can be used to connect to your PC; in some cases, the USB port
also serves as the power source. Some models contain an 802.11b or 802.11g wireless LAN transmitter.
Power requirements
●
12 VDC input
Environment
Operating temperature: 0° to +40° C
Storage temperature: 0° to +70° C
Relative storage humidity: 20 to 80% noncondensing
Software and protocols
Software media: Software preloaded on internal flash memory; field upgrades done via download to internal
flash memory via TFTP or web upload.
Routing: TCP/IP Internet Protocol Suite, RIP
WAN support: PPPoE, DHCP, static IP address
Security: PAP, CHAP, UI password security, IPsec, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate (supported models)
Management/configuration methods: HTTP (Web server), Telnet, SNMP, TR-069 DSL Forum CPE WAN
Management Protocol
Diagnostics: Ping, event logging, routing table displays, statistics counters, web-based management,
traceroute, nslookup, and diagnostic commands.
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Agency approvals
North America
Safety Approvals:
●
United States – UL 60950, Third Edition
●
Canada – CSA: CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 60950-00
EMC:
●
United States – FCC Part 15 Class B
●
Canada – ICES-003
Telecom:
●
United States – 47 CFR Part 68
●
Canada – CS-03
International
Safety Approvals:
●
Low Voltage (European directive) 73/23
●
EN60950 (Europe)
EMI Compatibility:
●
89/336/EEC (European directive)
●
EN55022:1994
●
EN300 386 V1.2.1 (non-wireless products)
●
EN 301-489 (wireless products)
CISPR22 Class B
Regulatory notices
European Community. This Motorola product conforms to the European Community CE Mark standard for the
design and manufacturing of information technology equipment. This standard covers a broad area of product
design, including RF emissions and immunity from electrical disturbances.
The Motorola Netopia® Embedded Software Version 7.8 complies with the following EU directives:
●
Low Voltage, 73/23/EEC
●
EMC Compatibility, 89/336/EEC, conforming to EN 55 022
This Motorola product is in conformity with the essential requirements and other relevant requirements
of the Radio Equipment and Telecommunications Terminal Equipment Directive (R&TTE) 1999/5/EC, following the
provision of the Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive (EMC) No. 89/336/EEC and Low Voltage Directive (LVD)
No. 73/23/EEC.
The product is compliant with the following standards and other normative documents:
LEMC – Emissions and Immunity: EN 301 489-1 V1.2.1 (2002-08), EN 301 489-17 (2002-08), EN 55022 Class B
(1998)
EMC – Radio Data Transmission: EN 300 328 V1.4.1 (2003-04)
EMC - Resistibility: ITU-T K.21 (1996)
LVD - Safety: EN 60950 (2000) + A1 + A2 + A3 + A4 + A11
246
Manufacturer’s Declaration of Conformance
☛
Warnings:
This is a Class B product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference, in
which case the user may be required to take adequate measures. Adequate measures include
increasing the physical distance between this product and other electrical devices.
Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance
could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
United States. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy
and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this
equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning
the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following
measures:
●
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
●
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
●
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
●
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio TV technician for help.
Service requirements. In the event of equipment malfunction, all repairs should be performed by our Company
or an authorized agent. Under FCC rules, no customer is authorized to repair this equipment. This restriction
applies regardless of whether the equipment is in or our of warranty. It is the responsibility of users requiring
service to report the need for service to our Company or to one of our authorized agents. Service can be obtained
at Motorola, Inc., 6001 Shellmound Street, Emeryville, California, 94608. Telephone: 510-597-5400.
☛
Important
This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of shielded
cables and connectors between system components. Changes or modifications to this product not
authorized by the manufacturer could void your authority to operate the equipment.
Canada. This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference -Causing Equipment
Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Réglement sur le matériel brouilleur du
Canada.
Declaration for Canadian users
NOTICE: The Canadian Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This certification means
that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective, operation, and safety
requirements. The Department does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s
satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected to the
facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an
acceptable method of connection. In some cases, the company’s inside wiring associated with a
single line individual service may be extended by means of a certified connector assembly
(telephone extension cord). The customer should be aware that compliance with the above
conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some situations.
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Administrator’s Handbook
Repairs to the certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian maintenance facility
designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or
equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to
disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the power
utility, telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together.
This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
Caution
Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric
inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) assigned to each terminal device provides an indication of the maximum
number of terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface. The termination on an interface may
consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the sum of the Ringer Equivalence
Numbers of all the devices does not exceed 5.
Important Safety Instructions
Australian Safety Information
The following safety information is provided in conformance with Australian safety requirements:
Caution
DO NOT USE BEFORE READING THE INSTRUCTIONS: Do not connect the Ethernet ports to a carrier or carriage
service provider’s telecommunications network or facility unless: a) you have the written consent of the network or
facility manager, or b) the connection is in accordance with a connection permit or connection rules.
Connection of the Ethernet ports may cause a hazard or damage to the telecommunication network or facility, or
persons, with consequential liability for substantial compensation.
Caution
●
The direct plug-in power supply serves as the main power disconnect; locate the direct plug-in power supply
near the product for easy access.
■
For use only with CSA Certified Class 2 power supply, rated 12VDC.
Telecommunication installation cautions
248
●
Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.
■
Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.
■
Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the
network interface.
●
Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.
●
Avoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type) during an electrical storm. There may be a remote risk of
electric shock from lightning.
●
Do not use the telephone to report a gas leak in the vicinity of the leak.
47 CFR Part 68 Information
FCC Requirements
1.
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has established Rules which permit this device to be directly
connected to the telephone network. Standardized jacks are used for these connections. This equipment
should not be used on party lines or coin phones.
2.
If this device is malfunctioning, it may also be causing harm to the telephone network; this device should be
disconnected until the source of the problem can be determined and until repair has been made. If this is not
done, the telephone company may temporarily disconnect service.
3.
The telephone company may make changes in its technical operations and procedures; if such changes affect
the compatibility or use of this device, the telephone company is required to give adequate notice of the
changes. You will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC.
4.
If the telephone company requests information on what equipment is connected to their lines, inform them of:
a. The telephone number to which this unit is connected.
b. The ringer equivalence number. [0.XB]
c. The USOC jack required. [RJ11C]
d. The FCC Registration Number. [XXXUSA-XXXXX-XX-E]
Items (b) and (d) are indicated on the label. The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) is used to determine how
many devices can be connected to your telephone line. In most areas, the sum of the REN's of all devices on
any one line should not exceed five (5.0). If too many devices are attached, they may not ring properly.
FCC Statements
a) This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules and the requirements adopted by the ACTA. On the
bottom of this equipment is a label that contains, among other information, a product identifier in the format
US:AAAEQ##TXXXX. If requested, this number must be provided to the telephone company.
b) List all applicable certification jack Universal Service Order Codes (“USOC”) for the equipment: RJ11.
c) A plug and jack used to connect this equipment to the premises wiring and telephone network must comply with
the applicable FCC Part 68 rules and requirements adopted by the ACTA. A compliant telephone cord and modular
plug is provided with this product. It is designed to be connected to a compatible modular jack that is also
compliant. See installation instructions for details.
d) The REN is used to determine the number of devices that may be connected to a telephone line. Excessive RENs
on a telephone line may result in the devices not ringing in response to an incoming call. In most but not all areas,
the sum of RENs should not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices that may be connected to a
line, as determined by the total RENs, contact the local telephone company. For products approved after July 23,
2002, the REN for this product is part of the product identifier that has the format US:AAAEQ##TXXXX. The digits
represented by ## are the REN without a decimal point (e.g., 03 is a REN of 0.3). For earlier products, the REN is
separately shown on the label.
e) If this equipment, the Motorola Netopia® 2200, 3300 or 7000 Series Gateway, causes harm to the telephone
network, the telephone company will notify you in advance that temporary discontinuance of service may be
required. But if advance notice isn’t practical, the telephone company will notify the customer as soon as possible.
Also, you will be advised of your right to file a complaint with the FCC if you believe it is necessary.
f) The telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations or procedures that could
affect the operation of the equipment. If this happens the telephone company will provide advance notice in order
for you to make necessary modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
g) If trouble is experienced with this equipment, the Motorola Netopia® 2200, 3300 Series Gateway, for repair or
warranty information, please contact:
Motorola Technical Support
510-597-5400
www.netopia.com.
If the equipment is causing harm to the telephone network, the telephone company may request that you
disconnect the equipment until the problem is resolved.
h) This equipment not intended to be repaired by the end user. In case of any problems, please refer to the troubleshooting section of the Product User Manual before calling Motorola Technical Support.
249
Administrator’s Handbook
i) Connection to party line service is subject to state tariffs. Contact the state public utility commission, public
service commission or corporation commission for information.
j) If your home has specially wired alarm equipment connected to the telephone line, ensure the installation of this
Motorola Netopia® 2200, 3300 Series Gateway does not disable your alarm equipment. If you have questions
about what will disable alarm equipment, consult your telephone company or qualified installer.
RF Exposure Statement:
NOTE: Installation of the wireless models must maintain at least 20 cm between the wireless Gateway and any
body part of the user to be in compliance with FCC RF exposure guidelines.
PRODUCT VENTILATION
The Motorola Netopia® Gateway is intended for use in a consumer's home. Ambient temperatures around this
product should not exceed 104°F (40°C). It should not be used in locations exposed to outside heat radiation or
trapping of its own heat. The product should have at least one inch of clearance on all sides except the bottom
when properly installed and should not be placed inside tightly enclosed spaces unless proper ventilation is
provided.
Electrical Safety Advisory
Telephone companies report that electrical surges, typically lightning transients, are very destructive to customer
terminal equipment connected to AC power sources. This has been identified as a major nationwide problem.
Therefore it is advised that this equipment be connected to AC power through the use of a surge arrestor or similar
protection device.
Warranty Information
Software License, Limited Warranty and Limitation of Remedies
INSTALLATION OF THE Motorola Netopia® GATEWAY (the “PRODUCT”) AND SOFTWARE PROVIDED BY Motorola, INC.
(“Motorola”) CONSTITUTES ACCEPTANCE BY YOU OF THE TERMS OF THE FOLLOWING SOFTWARE LICENSE AND
LIMITED WARRANTY. IF YOU DO NOT ACCEPT THESE TERMS, PLEASE IMMEDIATELY RETURN THE GATEWAY IN ITS
ORIGINAL PACKAGING TO THE VENDOR FROM WHICH YOU PURCHASED IT FOR A FULL REFUND OF THE PURCHASE
PRICE.
The following describes your license to use the software (the “Software”) that has been provided with the Product
and the limited warranty that Motorola provides on the Software and Product.
Software License
The Software is protected by copyright laws and international copyright treaties. The Software is licensed and not
sold to you. This means that although you own the media (CD-ROM or the Product) on which the Software is
provided or in which the Software is embedded, Motorola or its licensors retains all ownership of the Software.
250
●
Grant of License. You may install and use only one copy of the Software. If the Product is installed on a
network, you may install the Software on the network server or other server-side device on which the Product
is installed and onto the client-side devices connected to the network as necessary.
●
Restrictions on Use. The license is a limited license. This means that you may not (a) sublicense, assign, or
make available copies of the Software to others; (b) modify, adapt, reverse engineer, translate or create
derivative works based upon the Software in whole or in part; or (c) rent, lease or loan the Software or
otherwise make it available on a fee basis.
●
Transfer. If you transfer the Product, you also must transfer the Software. In this circumstance, you must
remove all copies of the Software from any other device onto which you have installed it.
●
Updates, Upgrades and New Releases. This license covers the Software as originally provided to you with
the Product and any additional Software that you receive from Motorola, including any updates, upgrades and
new releases, regardless of whether delivered electronically or otherwise.
●
Export Laws. You understand that the Software may be subject to the export control laws and regulations of
the United States. As a result, you must not export or re-export the Software in violation of such laws and
regulations.
●
Termination. Without limiting Motorola's other rights, Motorola may terminate this license upon notice if you
fail to comply with the terms of the license. Upon termination, you agree to destroy all full and partial copies
of the Software in your possession or control.
Limited Warranty
Motorola warrants to you, the end user, that the Product will be free from defects in materials and workmanship
under normal use for a period of one (1) year from date of purchase, or two (2) years from date of purchase if you
reside in a European Union country. Motorola warrants to you, the end user, that the Software will perform
substantially in conformance with the related documentation for a period of ninety (90) days from date of
purchase. Motorola makes no warranty with respect to hardware and software not supplied by Motorola.
Motorola's entire liability and your sole and exclusive remedy under this warranty during the warranty period is that
Motorola, at its sole option, either shall repair or replace the Product or Software, as applicable. Any replacement
Product will be warranted for the remainder of the original warranty period or thirty (30) days, whichever is longer.
In order to make a claim under this warranty you must comply with the following procedure:
1. Contact Motorola Customer Service within the warranty period to obtain a Return Materials Authorization
(“RMA”) number.
2. Return the defective Product and proof of purchase, shipping prepaid, to Motorola with the RMA number
prominently displayed on the outside of the package.
If you are located outside of the United States, a different warranty claim procedure may apply. Please contact your
vendor in order to arrange for warranty service.
THE ABOVE WARRANTIES ARE MADE BY Motorola ALONE, AND THEY ARE THE ONLY WARRANTIES MADE BY
ANYONE REGARDING THE PRODUCT AND THE SOFTWARE. TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY LAW, Motorola AND ITS
LICENSOR(S) EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ALL OTHER WARRANTIES AND MAKE NO OTHER WARRANTIES, WHETHER
EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MER¬CHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, REGARDING THE PRODUCT AND THE SOFTWARE. EXCEPT AS
OTHERWISE EXPRESSLY PROVIDED ABOVE, Motorola AND ITS LICENSOR(S) DO NOT WARRANT, GUARANTEE OR
MAKE ANY REPRESENTATION REGARDING THE USE OR THE RESULTS OF THE USE OF THE PRODUCT AND THE
SOFTWARE IN TERMS OF ITS CORRECTNESS, ACCURACY, RELIABILITY, CURRENTNESS, OR OTHERWISE. THE
ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE RESULTS AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PRODUCT AND THE SOFTWARE IS ASSUMED BY
YOU. THE EXCLUSION OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES IS NOT PERMITTED BY SOME STATES OR JURISDICTIONS, SO THE
ABOVE EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. IN THAT CASE, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES ARE LIMITED IN DURATION
TO NINETY (90) DAYS FROM THE DATE OF DELIVERY OF THE PRODUCT. THERE MAY BE OTHER RIGHTS THAT YOU
MAY HAVE WHICH VARY FROM JURISDICTION TO JURISDICTION.
TO THE FULL EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT ANY REMEDY SET FORTH HEREIN
FAILS OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE, IN NO EVENT WILL Motorola, ITS LICENSOR(S) AND THE DIRECTORS,
OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES OR AGENTS OF ANY OF THEM BE LIABLE TO YOU, WHETHER UNDER CONTRACT,
WARRANTY, TORT OR ANY OTHER THEORY OF LAW, FOR ANY SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, EXEMPLARY, PUNITIVE, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY SIMILAR DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO
DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF PROFITS, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, PERSONAL INJURY, LOSS OR IMPAIRMENT OF DATA
OR BUSINESS INFORMATION, EVEN IF Motorola HAS BEEN NOTIFIED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
Motorola'S OR ITS LICENSOR(S)' LIABILITY TO YOU (IF ANY) FOR ACTUAL DIRECT DAMAGES FOR ANY CAUSE
WHATSOEVER, AND REGARDLESS OF THE FORM OF THE ACTION (WHETHER IN CONTRACT, TORT [INCLUDING
NEGLIGENCE], PRODUCT LIABILITY OR OTHERWISE), WILL BE LIMITED TO, AND SHALL NOT EXCEED, THE AMOUNT
PAID FOR THE PRODUCT. BECAUSE SOME STATES OR JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY NOT
APPLY TO YOU.
General Provisions
This Software License, Limited Warranty and Limitation of Remedies is governed by and construed in accordance
with the laws of the State of California, excluding its conflicts of laws rules. The United Nations Convention on
Contracts for the International Sale of Goods expressly does not apply. If any provision of this Software License,
Limited Warranty and Limitation of Remedies is held by a court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid or
unenforceable, such provision will be enforced to the maximum extent permissible, and the remaining provisions
shall remain in full force and effect.
251
Administrator’s Handbook
Copyright Acknowledgments
Because Motorola has included certain software source code in this product, Motorola includes the
following text required by the respective copyright holders:
Portions of this software are based in part on the work of the following:
Copyright (c) 1998-2005 The OpenSSL Project. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the
following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following
disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display the following
acknowledgment:
“This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit.
(http://www.openssl.org/)”
4. The names “OpenSSL Toolkit” and “OpenSSL Project” must not be used to endorse or promote products
derived from this software without prior written permission. For written permission, please contact opensslcore@openssl.org.
5. Products derived from this software may not be called “OpenSSL” nor may “OpenSSL” appear in their names
without prior written permission of the OpenSSL Project.
6. Redistributions of any form whatsoever must retain the following acknowledgment:
“This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project
for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit (http://www.openssl.org/)”
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE OpenSSL PROJECT ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE OpenSSL
PROJECT OR ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL,
EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF
SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS
INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT,
STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF
THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
This product includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
Original SSLeay License
/Copyright (C) 1995-1998 Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com)
All rights reserved.
This package is an SSL implementation written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
The implementation was written so as to conform with Netscape’s SSL.
This library is free for commercial and non-commercial use as long as the following conditions are adhered to.
The following conditions apply to all code found in this distribution, be it the RC4, RSA, lhash, DES, etc., code;
not just the SSL code. The SSL documentation included with this distribution is covered by the same copyright
terms except that the holder is Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
Copyright remains Eric Young's, and as such any Copyright notices in the code are not to be removed. If this
package is used in a product, Eric Young should be given attribution as the author of the parts of the library
used. This can be in the form of a textual message at program startup or in documentation (online or textual)
provided with the package.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the
following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following
disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display the following
acknowledgement:
“This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com)”
The word 'cryptographic' can be left out if the routines from the library being used are not cryptographic
related :-).
4. If you include any Windows specific code (or a derivative thereof) from the apps directory (application code)
you must include an acknowledgement:
“This product includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com)”
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY ERIC YOUNG ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR OR
CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE
GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
(INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS
SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
The licence and distribution terms for any publicly available version or derivative of this code cannot be
changed. i.e. this code cannot simply be copied and put under another distribution licence [including the GNU
Public Licence.]
Portions of this software are based in part on the work of the following:
Copyright (C) 1995, 1996, 1997, and 1998 WIDE Project. All rights reserved.
252
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the
following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following
disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
3. Neither the name of the project nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote
products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE PROJECT AND CONTRIBUTORS ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS
OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT
SHALL THE PROJECT OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN
CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY
WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH
DAMAGE.
Portions of this software are based in part on the work of the following:
Copyright (C) 1990, RSA Data Security, Inc. All rights reserved.
<<RSA Data Security, Inc. MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm>>
License to copy and use this software is granted provided that it is identified as the “RSA Data Security, Inc.
MD5 Message Digest Algorithm” in all material mentioning or referencing this software or this function.
License is also granted to make and use derivative works provided that such works are identified as “derived
from the RSA Data Security, Inc. MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm” in all material mentioning or referencing the
derived work.
<<RSA Data Security, Inc. MD4 Message-Digest Algorithm>>
License to copy and use this software is granted provided that it is identified as the “RSA Data Security, Inc.
MD4 Message Digest Algorithm” in all material mentioning or referencing this software or this function.
License is also granted to make and use derivative works provided that such works are identified as “derived
from the RSA Data Security, Inc. MD4 Message-Digest Algorithm” in all material mentioning or referencing the
derived work.
RSA Data Security, Inc. makes no representations concerning either the merchantability of this software or the
suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided “as is” without express or implied warranty of
any kind.
These notices must be retained in any copies of any part of this documentation and/or software.
Portions of this software are based in part on the work of the following:
Copyright (c) 1989 Carnegie Mellon University. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted provided that the above copyright notice and
this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other
materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that the software was developed by Carnegie
Mellon University. The name of the University may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from
this software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED ``AS IS'' AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES,
INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTIBILITY AND FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Portions of this software are based in part on the work of the following:
Copyright 2000, 2001 Shane Kerr. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the
following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR(S) ``AS IS'' AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE REGENTS
OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE
GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
(INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS
SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
253
Administrator’s Handbook
Caring for the Environment by Recycling
When you see this symbol on
a Motorola product, do not
dispose of the product with
residential or commercial
waste.
Recycling your Motorola Equipment
Please do not dispose of this product with
your residential or commercial waste. Some
countries or regions, such as the European
Union, have set up systems to collect and
recycle electrical and electronic waste items.
Contact your local authorities for information
about practices established for your region.
If collection systems are not available, call
Motorola Customer Service for assistance.
Please visit www.motorola.com/recycle
<http://www.motorola.com/recycle> for instructions on recycling.
254
Beskyttelse af miljøet med
genbrug
Når du ser dette symbol på et
Motorola-produkt, må produktet ikke bortskaffes sammen
med husholdningsaffald eller
erhvervsaffald.
Genbrug af dit Motorola-udstyr
Dette produkt må ikke bortskaffes sammen med husholdningsaffald
eller erhvervsaffald. Nogle lande eller områder, f.eks. EU, har oprettet
systemer til indsamling og genbrug af elektriske og elektroniske affaldsprodukter. Kontakt de lokale myndigheder for oplysninger om gældende fremgangsmåder i dit område. Hvis der ikke findes tilgængelige
indsamlingssystemer, kan du kontakte Motorola Kundeservice.
Umweltschutz durch
Recycling
Wenn Sie dieses Zeichen auf
einem Produkt von Motorola
sehen, entsorgen Sie das
Produkt bitte nicht als
gewöhnlichen Hausoder
Büromüll.
Recycling bei Geräten von Motorola
Bitte entsorgen Sie dieses Produkt nicht als gewöhnlichen Haus- oder
Büromüll. In einigen Ländern und Gebieten, z. B. in der Europäischen
Union, wurden Systeme für die Rücknahme und Wiederverwertung von
Elektroschrott eingeführt. Erkundigen Sie sich bitte bei Ihrer Stadtoder
Kreisverwaltung nach der geltenden Entsorgungspraxis. Falls bei Ihnen
noch kein Abfuhroder Rücknahmesystem besteht, wenden Sie sich
bitte an den Kundendienst von Motorola.
Cuidar el medio ambiente
mediante el reciclaje
Cuando vea este símbolo en
un producto Motorola, no lo
deseche junto con residuos
residenciales o comerciales.
Reciclaje de su equipo Motorola
No deseche este producto junto con sus residuos residenciales o comerciales. Algunos países o regiones, tales como la Unión Europea, han
organizado sistemas para recoger y reciclar desechos eléctricos y electrónicos. Comuníquese con las autoridades locales para obtener información acerca de las prácticas vigentes en su región. Si no existen
sistemas de recolección disponibles, solicite asistencia llamando el
Servicio al Cliente de Motorola.
Recyclage pour le respect
de l'environnement
Lorsque vous voyez ce symbole sur un produit Motorola,
ne le jetez pas avec vos
ordures ménagères ou vos
rebuts d'entreprise.
Recyclage de votre équipement Motorola
Veuillez ne pas jeter ce produit avec vos ordures ménagères ou vos
rebuts d'entreprise. Certains pays ou certaines régions comme
l'Union Européenne ont mis en place des systèmes de collecte et de
recyclage des produits électriques et électroniques mis au rebut.
Veuillez contacter vos autorités locales pour vous informer des pratiques instaurées dans votre region. Si aucun système de collecte
n'est disponible, veuillez appeler le Service clientèle de Motorola qui
vous apportera son assistance.
Milieubewust recycleren
Als u dit symbool op een
Motorola-product ziet, gooi
het dan niet bij het
huishoudelijk afval of het bedrijfsafval.
Uw Motorola-materiaal recycleren.
Gooi dit product niet bij het huishoudelijk afval het of bedrijfsafval. In
sommige landen of regio's zoals de Europese Unie, zijn er bepaalde
systemen om elektrische of elektronische afvalproducten in te
zamelen en te recycleren. Neem contact op met de plaatselijke overheid voor informatie over de geldende regels in uw regio. Indien er
geen systemen bestaan, neemt u contact op met de klantendienst van
Motorola.
Dbałość o środowisko recykling
Produktów Motorola oznaczonych tym symbolem nie
należy wyrzucać do komunalnych pojemników na śmieci.
Recykling posiadanego sprzętu Motorola
Produktu nie należy wyrzucać do komunalnych pojemników na śmieci. W
niektórych krajach i regionach, np. w Unii Europejskiej, istnieją systemy
zbierania i recyklingu sprzętu elektrycznego i elektronicznego. Informacje
o utylizacji tego rodzaju odpadów należy uzyskać od władz lokalnych.
Jeśli w danym regionie nie istnieją systemy zbierania odpadów elektrycznych i elektronicznych, informacje o utylizacji należy uzyskać od biura
obsługi klienta firmy Motorola (Motorola Customer Service).
Cuidando do meio
ambiente através da
reciclagem
Quando você ver este símbolo
em um produto Motorola, não
descarte o produto junto com
lixo residencial ou comercial.
Reciclagem do seu equipamento Motorola
Não descarte este produto junto com o lixo residencial ou comercial.
Alguns países ou regiões, tais como a União Européia, criaram sistemas para colecionar e reciclar produtos eletroeletrônicos. Para obter
informações sobre as práticas estabelecidas para sua região, entre
em contato com as autoridades locais. Se não houver sistemas de
coleta disponíveis, entre em contato com o Serviço ao Cliente da
Motorola para obter assistência.
Var rädd om miljön genom
återvinning
När du ser den här symbolen
på en av Motorolas produkter
ska du inte kasta produkten
tillsammans med det vanliga
avfallet.
Återvinning av din Motorola-utrustning
Kasta inte denna produkt tillsammans med det vanliga avfallet. Vissa
länder eller regioner, som t.ex. EU, har satt upp ett system för insamling och återvinning av el- och elektronikavfall. Kontakta dina lokala
myndigheter för information om vilka regler som gäller i din region. Om
det inte finns något insamlingssystem ska du kontakta Motorolas
kundtjänst för hjälp.
255
Administrator’s Handbook
Please visit www.motorola.com/recycle <http://www.motorola.com/recycle> for instructions on recycling.
256
Index
Symbols
!! command 132
Numerics
3-D Reach Wireless Configuration 28, 89
A
Address resolution table 139
Administrative restrictions 170
Administrator password 131
Arguments, CLI 146
ARP
Command 133, 144
ATA configuration 149
ATM 55, 106
Authentication 187
Authentication trap 207
auto-channel mode 214
AutoChannel Setting 31, 92, 214
B
Backup 236
Bridging 152
Broadcast address 166, 168
C
CLI 127
!! command 132
Arguments 146
Command shortcuts 132
Command truncation 146
Configuration mode 145
Keywords 146
Navigating 146
Prompt 132, 145
Restart command 132
SHELL mode 132
View command 147
Closed System Mode 31, 92
Command
ARP 133, 144
Ping 135
Telnet 144
Command line interface (see CLI)
Community 207
Compression, protocol 186
Concurrent Bridging/Routing 65, 153
CONFIG
Command List 130
Configuration mode 145
Configure 64
Connection 65
Custom Service 49, 74
D
Default Channel 30, 91
DHCP 12, 154
DHCP filtering 158
DHCP lease table 136
DHCP option filtering 158
DHCP Server 68
Diagnostic log 136, 140
Level 208
DNS 161
Domain Name System (DNS) 161
DSL 54, 106
DSL Forum settings 233
Dynamic Addressing 12
E
Echo request 186
echo-period 186
Ethernet 55, 107
Ethernet address 152
Ethernet statistics 136
Expert Mode 51
F
factory default 112
firewall 139
FTP 184
G
Gaming 46
257
Administrator’s Handbook
H
N
Hardware address 152
Home Page 20
Home Page - Expert Mode 60
Hop count 183
HTTP traffic 192
Nameserver 161
NAT 46, 71, 170, 184
Netmask 168
O
set upnp option 233
Operating Mode
Wireless 30, 91, 214
I
ICMP Echo 135
IGMP 163
IGMP Snooping 163
IP 55, 107
IP address 166, 168
IP interfaces 139
IP Passthrough 70
IP routes 140
IPMap table 140
IPSec Tunnel 139
P
Password
Administrator 131
User 131
persistent-log 209
Ping command 135
Pinholes 184
Port authentication 187
Port Forwarding 49, 74
Port renumbering 192
PPP 145
Primary nameserver 161
Prompt, CLI 132, 145
Protocol compression 186
K
Keywords, CLI 146
L
LAN 55, 107
LAN Host Discovery Table 140
LCP echo request 186
LEDs 116
Limit
Wireless
Access
by
Address 44, 104
Links Bar 63
Location, SNMP 207
Log 140
Logging in 131
Logs 56, 108
lost echoes 186
M
Magic number 185
Memory 140
Metric 183
multi-cast forwarding 167, 189
multiple subnets 69
Multiple Wireless IDs 39, 99
Multiple Wireless SSIDs
Wireless 215
258
Q
MAC
qos max-burst-size 151
qos peak-cell-rate 151
qos service-class 151
qos sustained-cell-rate 151
quickstart 15
R
Remote Access 110
Restart 137
Restart command 132
Restart timer 186
Restrictions 170
RIP 167, 168
Router Password 76
Routing Information Protocol (RIP) 167,
168
rtsp-passthrough 182
S
safety instructions 9
Secondary nameserver 161
Session Initiation Protocol 85, 227
Set bncp command 151, 152
Set bridge commands 152
Set DMT commands 160
Set dns commands 161
Set ip static-routes commands 182
Set ppp module port authentication
command 187
Set preference more command 191
Set preference verbose command 191
set security state-insp 202
Set servers command 192
Set servers telnet-tcp command 192
Set
snmp
sysgroup
location
command 207
Set snmp traps authentification-traps ipaddress command 207
Set
system
diagnostic-level
command 208
Set system heartbeat command 210
Set system name command 208
Set system NTP command 210
Set system password command 209
set system syslog 212
Set wireless option command 214
Set
wireless
user-auth
option
command 220
SHELL
Command Shortcuts 132
Commands 132
Prompt 132
SHELL level 146
SHELL mode 132
show config 137
Show ppp 145
Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) 207
SIP 85, 227
sip-passthrough 182
SMTP 184
SNMP 184, 207
SNMP Notify Type settings 207
stateful inspection 140
Static NAT 50, 75
Static route 182
Statistics 54, 106
status indicator lights 116
Step mode 147
Subnet mask 168
subnets
multiple 69
Supported Games and Software 47, 72
System contact, SNMP 207
System diagnostics 208
system idle-timeout 209
T
Telnet 131, 184
Telnet command 144
Telnet traffic 192
TFTP 184
TFTP server 134
Toolbar 63
Trap 207
Trigger Ports 49, 74
Trivial File Transfer Protocol 134
Troubleshooting 115
Truncation 146
U
User name 131
User password 131
V
set atm 151
View command 147
view config 144
VLAN 78
VLAN ID 81
VLAN Settings 222
VLANs 78
Voice-over-IP 85, 227
VoIP 85, 227
W
Weighted Fair Queue 179
weighted fair queuing 177
Wi-Fi Protected Access 35, 95
259
Administrator’s Handbook
Wired Equivalent Privacy 36, 96
Wireless Configuration 28, 89
Wireless ID (SSID) 28, 89
Z
Zero Touch 211
260