Polaris 600 IQ Touring User's Manual

Pantone 426C
For your nearest Polaris dealer,
call 1-800-POLARIS
or visit www.polarisindustries.com
Polaris Sales Inc.,
2100 Hwy. 55, Medina, MN 55340
Phone 1-888-704-5290
Part No. 9922288 Rev 01
Printed in USA
WARNING
Read, understand, and follow all of the instructions and safety precautions in
this manual and on all product labels.
Failure to follow the safety precautions could result in serious injury or death.
WARNING
The engine exhaust from this product contains chemicals known to the State
of California to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm.
WELCOME
Thank you for purchasing a Polaris vehicle, and welcome to our worldwide family of Polaris owners. We proudly produce an exciting line of
utility and recreational products.
• Snowmobiles
• All-terrain vehicles (ATVs)
• RANGER utility vehicles
• Victory motorcycles
We believe Polaris sets a standard of excellence for all utility and recreational vehicles manufactured in the world today. Many years of experience have gone into the engineering, design, and development of your
Polaris vehicle, making it the finest machine we’ve ever produced.
For safe and enjoyable operation of your vehicle, be sure to follow the
instructions and recommendations in this owner’s manual. Your manual
contains instructions for minor maintenance, but information about
major repairs is outlined in the Polaris Service Manual and should be
performed only by a Factory Certified Master Service Dealer (MSD)
Technician.
Your Polaris dealer knows your vehicle best and is interested in your
total satisfaction. Be sure to return to your dealership for all of your service needs during, and after, the warranty period.
We also take great pride in our complete line of apparel, parts and accessories, available through our online store at www.purepolaris.com. Have
your accessories and clothing delivered right to your door!
1
POLARIS and POLARIS THE WAY OUT are registered trademarks of Polaris Industries Inc.
RIDER SELECT is a trademark of Polaris Industries Inc.
Copyright 2009 Polaris Sales Inc. All information contained within this publication is
based on the latest product information at the time of publication. Due to constant
improvements in the design and quality of production components, some minor discrepancies may result between the actual vehicle and the information presented in this publication. Depictions and/or procedures in this publication are intended for reference use
only. No liability can be accepted for omissions or inaccuracies. Any reprinting or reuse
of the depictions and/or procedures contained within, whether whole or in part, is
expressly prohibited.
Printed in U.S.A.
2010 600 IQ Touring Owner’s Manual
P/N 9922288
2
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
This section contains helpful information for owners and drivers and
illustrates the location of important identification numbers that should
be recorded in the owner’s manual.
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
This section describes safe vehicle operation and identifies warning
decals and their locations.
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
This section identifies the locations of your snowmobile’s controls and
features.
The Perfect Fit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
This section explains how to tailor the suspension and other features for
an optimum riding experience.
Pre-Ride Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
This section explains procedures that must be performed before riding.
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
This section explains proper engine break-in, operation of features and
general operating procedures.
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
This section defines your role, and your dealer’s role, in your snowmobile’s regular maintenance.
Polaris Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
118
119
124
133
136
3
4
INTRODUCTION
Important Notes for Owners and Drivers
After reading this manual, store it in the snowmobile for convenient reference. It should remain with the snowmobile when the snowmobile is
sold.
Some of the illustrations and photos used in this manual are general representations. Your model may differ.
Follow the maintenance program outlined in this manual. Preventive
maintenance ensures that critical components of the snowmobile are
inspected by your dealer at specific mileage intervals.
You and your dealer must complete the registration form included with
your snowmobile and forward it to us. This completed form is necessary
to ensure warranty coverage.
Protect and preserve your right to ride by joining your local trail riding
clubs.
When teaching inexperienced operators to ride, set up a predetermined
course for practice. Make sure they know how to drive and control the
snowmobile before allowing them to make longer trips. Teach them
proper snowmobile courtesy, and enroll them in driver’s training and
safety courses sponsored by local or state organizations.
5
INTRODUCTION
Preservation of the Environment
Polaris is committed to supporting an environmental education campaign. We encourage state and provincial governments across the snowbelt to adopt rigorous safety training programs that encourage protection
of our environment, including wildlife and vegetation.
Snowmobile clubs and other organizations are working together to protect our environment. Please support their efforts and operate your
snowmobile with consideration for the protection and preservation of
our environment.
Noise Level
One of the most publicized issues about snowmobiles is noise. The
Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the standard-setting body for
snowmobile development, recommends that snowmobiles conform to
prescribed sound levels.
Polaris snowmobiles are engineered to conform to these SAE standards.
Our muffler systems are designed to reduce noise levels and must not be
altered or removed. The sound of your snowmobile may not be welcome
to non-snowmobilers, so you have a responsibility to operate your
snowmobile with concern for others. We do our part by manufacturing
quieter machines; we ask your help to further reduce the impact of noise
by operating your snowmobile safely and responsibly.
6
INTRODUCTION
Vehicle Identification Numbers
Record your snowmobile’s identification numbers and key number in
the spaces provided. Remove the spare key and store it in a safe place.
Your key can be duplicated only by mating a Polaris key blank with one
of your existing keys, so if both keys are lost, the ignition switch must
be replaced.
+
Vehicle Model Number: ___________________________________________________
Tunnel VIN (+): _________________________________________________________
(lower right side of the tunnel)
Engine Serial Number (on recoil housing): _____________________________________
Key Number: ___________________________________________________________
7
SAFETY
Operator Safety
The following signal words and symbols appear throughout this manual
and on your vehicle. Your safety is involved when these words and symbols are used. Become familiar with their meanings before reading the
manual.
The safety alert symbol, on your vehicle or in this manual, indicates the potential
for serious injury.
WARNING
A WARNING indicates a potential hazard that may result in serious injury or
death.
CAUTION
A CAUTION indicates a potential hazard that may result in minor injury.
NOTICE
A NOTICE indicates a situation that may result in damage to the vehicle.
8
Operator Safety
SAFETY
Follow the recommended maintenance program outlined beginning on
page 84 of this manual to ensure that all critical components on the
snowmobile are thoroughly inspected by your dealer at specific mileage
intervals.
WARNING
Driving a snowmobile requires your full attention. DO NOT drink alcohol or use
drugs or medications before or while driving or riding as a passenger. They will
reduce your alertness and slow your reaction time.
Snowmobiles are capable of traveling at high speeds. Use extra caution to
ensure operator safety. Make sure your snowmobile is in excellent operating
condition at all times. Always check major and vital safety components before
every ride.
All Polaris snowmobiles are designed and tested to provide safe operation when
used as directed. Failure of critical machine components may result from operation with any modifications, especially those that increase speed or power. DO
NOT MODIFY YOUR MACHINE. The snowmobile may become aerodynamically unstable at speeds higher than those for which it is designed. Loss of control may occur at higher speeds. Modifications may also create a safety hazard
and lead to bodily injury.
The warranty on your entire machine is terminated if any equipment has
been added, or any modifications have been made, to increase the speed or
power of the snowmobile.
9
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Stay Clear of Track
Your snowmobile is propelled by a revolving track that must be partially
exposed for proper operation.
WARNING! Serious injuries may result if
hands, feet, or clothing become entangled
in the track. Be alert when riding, and
remain properly seated to stay clear of the
track. Never hold the snowmobile up or
stand behind it while warming up the track.
A loose track or flying debris could cause
serious injury or death. We recommend
having your dealer perform all track service
and alignment procedures.
Stay Clear of Engine
Never attempt adjustments with the engine running. Turn off the ignition, raise the hood, make the adjustment, secure shields and guards,
secure the hood, and then restart the engine to check its operation.
WARNING! Serious injury can occur if fingers or clothing contact the moving
parts of an engine. Always stop the engine before attempting adjustments.
10
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Riding Position
Operating a snowmobile requires skill and balance for proper control.
Rider positions may vary with experience; but under many conditions,
the proper position is to be seated with both feet on the running boards
and both hands on the handlebar grips for proper throttle, brake and
steering control.
WARNING! Improper riding position may reduce control and could result in
serious injury or death. Always ride in a position that allows for control of your
vehicle.
Survival Preparation
For your safety, always ride in a group of other snowmobilers. Always
tell someone where you’re going and how long you expect to be gone. If
it isn’t possible to ride with others, and you must travel into remote
areas, always carry survival equipment that’s appropriate to the conditions you may encounter. Such equipment may include, but is not limited to: extra clothing, a sleeping bag, a flashlight, food and water, a
signaling mirror, a means of building a fire, and a two-way radio or cellular telephone.
Always carry the owner’s manual on your snowmobile. For added protection, purchase and carry the following items on your snowmobile as
well:
•
•
•
•
•
Spare Drive Belt
Extra Set of Spark Plugs
Tow Rope
Extra Oil
Fuel Deicer
•
•
•
•
Winter Survival Kit
Trail Map
First Aid Kit
Tool Kit
11
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Riding Apparel
Helmet
Wearing a helmet can prevent a severe head injury. Whenever riding a
Polaris vehicle, always wear a helmet that meets or exceeds established
safety standards.
Approved helmets in the USA and Canada bear a U.S. Department of
Transportation (DOT) label.
Approved helmets in Europe, Asia and Oceania
bear the ECE 22.05 label. The ECE mark consists
E4
of a circle surrounding the letter E, followed by the
051039
distinguishing number of the country which has
0006.31
granted approval. The approval number and serial
number will also be displayed on the label.
Eye Protection
Do not depend on eyeglasses or sunglasses for eye protection. Whenever riding a Polaris vehicle, always wear shatterproof goggles or use a
shatterproof helmet face shield. Polaris recommends wearing approved
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) bearing markings such as VESC
8, V-8, Z87.1, or CE. Make sure protective eye wear is kept clean.
Clothing
Be prepared, be warm and be comfortable when riding. Be aware of
the weather forecast, especially the
windchill, and dress accordingly.
See the chart on page 23.
WARNING! Avoid wearing loose
clothing or long scarves, which can
become entangled in moving parts and
cause serious injury. Always wear an
approved helmet and eye protection.
12
Operator Safety
SAFETY
Rider Capacity
Driving 1-Up - Some Polaris snowmobiles are designed for a single
rider only. A decal on the console of these models indicates single rider
operation.
Driving 2-Up - Some Polaris snowmobiles are designed for up to two
riders. A decal on the hood of these models indicates that the vehicle is
designed for one operator and one passenger only.
WARNING! Control becomes more difficult with two people on board. More
space is required to make turns, and longer distances are needed for stopping.
Make sure the passenger remains seated behind the driver, facing forward, with
both feet placed firmly on the running boards. Slow down and avoid “jumping”
your snowmobile.
Snowmobiles designed for two riders should never be operated with
more than two people on board. When traveling with a passenger, it’s
the driver’s responsibility to operate the snowmobile safely.
Slow down! Control becomes more difficult with two people on board.
More space is required to make turns, and longer distances are necessary
for stopping.
13
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Disabled Operators
Safe operation of this rider-active vehicle requires good judgement and
physical skills.
WARNING! Operators with cognitive or physical disabilities have an increased
risk of loss of control, which could result in serious injury or death. Do not allow
disabled persons to operate this vehicle.
Cargo Overload
Too much weight on the rear of the machine may reduce your ability to
steer. Do not exceed carrier and rack weight limits, and do not allow a
passenger to sit on the seat back or the cargo carrier.
14
Operator Safety
SAFETY
Excessive Speed
WARNING! High speed driving, especially at night, could result in serious injury
or death. Always reduce speed when driving at night or in inclement weather.
Always observe all state and local laws governing snowmobile operation and speed limits. Always be alert and pay attention to the trail
ahead. If your speed is 40 MPH (64 km/h), your snowmobile is traveling
about 60 feet (18 m) per second. If you look back for only two seconds,
your snowmobile will travel about 120 feet (36 m). If your speed is 60
MPH (96 km/h), your snowmobile will travel about 180 feet (55 m) in
two seconds.
Traveling at night requires extra caution. Check headlight and taillight
to ensure proper operation, and don’t over-drive your headlight beam.
Always be able to bring your snowmobile to a stop in the distance illuminated by the headlight.
15
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Driver Awareness
Slow down when traveling near poles,
posts, or other obstacles. Be especially
alert if you’re snowmobiling after dark.
Always be on the alert for wire fences.
Single strands are especially dangerous,
since there may be a great distance
between posts. Guy wires on utility poles
are also difficult to distinguish.
Make sure the way is clear before crossing
railroads and other roads and highways.
The noise of your snowmobile will drown
out the sound of approaching vehicles.
Look ahead, behind, and to both sides
before turning or crossing railroad tracks
or highways. Steep embankments may
also hide your view. Always leave yourself
a way out.
R
R
Variances in snow depth and/or water currents may result in uneven ice
thickness. You may drown if you break through the ice. Avoid travelling
on frozen bodies of water.
16
Operator Safety
SAFETY
Avalanches
Snowmobilers should always be properly trained and equipped before
traveling in mountainous terrain:
•
•
•
•
Take an avalanche class
Travel with experienced people
Travel on designated trails
Make sure each person is equipped
with a shovel, probe and avalanche
beacon.
You don’t have to be snowmobiling on a
slope for an avalanche to occur. Be aware
that all of the snow is connected. You may be riding on a flat slope or
snow covered road, but if the snowpack above is unstable enough you
can trigger an avalanche on a steeper slope above you. Always be aware
of snow conditions above you as you travel in mountainous terrain.
Before riding in mountainous terrain, call or log on to your local avalanche advisory to get current weather and snow stability information.
For more information about avalanche training and avalanche conditions, contact local law enforcement in your area, or visit the American
and Canadian online avalanche centers at www.avalanche.org.
17
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Ice and Snow Build-up
WARNING! Ice and snow build-up may interfere with the steering of your
snowmobile, resulting in serious injury or death. Keep the underhood area free
of snow and ice.
Before driving, manually turn the skis to the left and right to be sure ice
and snow are not interfering with full left and right steering. If difficulty
is encountered, remove ice and snow build-up that may be obstructing
the steering linkage.
If your snowmobile is equipped with RIDER SELECT, perform this
check in both the full up and full down steering positions.
Driving Downhill
When riding downhill, shift your weight to the rear of the snowmobile
and reduce your speed to a minimum. Apply just enough throttle to keep
the clutch engaged, allowing the engine’s compression to help slow the
snowmobile and keep it from rolling freely downhill.
WARNING! When driving on long downhill stretches, pump the brakes. Riding
the brakes may cause the brake system to overheat, which may result in brake
failure. Excessive or repetitive use of the brakes for high speed stops will also
cause an overheated brake system. This condition may lead to a sudden loss of
brakes and/or fire and may result in serious injury or death.
18
Operator Safety
SAFETY
Driving on Slippery Surfaces
WARNING! Never attempt an abrupt change of direction when operating on
slippery surfaces. Proceed slowly and use extra caution. Driving on ice or hardpacked snow reduces steering and braking control, which may result in loss of
control and serious injury or death. Slow down and use extra caution when
operating on slippery surfaces.
Driving in Hilly Terrain
WARNING! Climbing a hill or crossing the face of a slope may result in loss of
balance and snowmobile rollover, causing serious injury or death. Use caution
and good judgement when driving in hilly terrain.
Use extra caution when operating in hilly terrain. If climbing a hill is
unavoidable, keep your weight low and forward. If you must cross the
face of a slope, keep your weight on the uphill side of the snowmobile to
maintain proper balance and avoid possible rollover.
Slow down when reaching the crest of a hill. Be prepared to react to
obstacles, sharp drops or other people or vehicles that may be on the
other side of the hill.
If you’re unable to continue up a hill, turn the snowmobile downhill
before it loses momentum. If this isn’t possible, spin the track just
enough to dig in to prevent it from rolling back down the hill. Stop the
engine and set the parking brake (if equipped). Keeping away from the
downhill side of the snowmobile, pull the rear of the snowmobile
around and point the front end and skis downhill. Remount the snowmobile, restart the engine, release the parking brake, and descend the hill
carefully.
19
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Drive Belt
Do not operate the engine with the drive belt removed.
Any servicing that requires operation without a belt must be performed
by your dealer.
NOTICE: Operation of the engine with the belt removed may result in damage
to the engine.
Intake Silencer
Do not operate the engine with the intake silencer or filter removed.
NOTICE: Damage to the engine may occur if the intake silencer or filter are
removed.
Clutches
Do not attempt to service the clutches.
All clutch service must be performed by your dealer. The clutch is a
complex mechanism that rotates at high speeds. Each clutch is dynamically balanced before installation. Any tampering may disrupt this precision balancing and create an unstable condition.
Cold Weather Drive-Away
Whenever your snowmobile has been parked for a length of time, especially overnight, always make sure the skis and track are loosened from
ice and snow before attempting to drive. Apply the throttle with enough
authority to put the snowmobile into motion, but always operate within
safety limits and, on 2-up machines, with respect for a passenger.
Maneuverability
While much control and maneuverability is achieved through the steering system and skis, maximum control is achieved by the shifting of
your body weight. Maneuverability will change for lighter operators or
snowmobiles designed to carry a load or a passenger.
20
Operator Safety
SAFETY
Inadequate Snow Conditions
Since snow provides the only lubrication for the power slide suspension
and, on liquid cooled models, cooling for the engine, adequate snow
cover is a requirement for operation of your snowmobile.
NOTICE: Driving in too little snow will result in excessive wear and damage to
the slide rail, track and/or engine.
WARNING! Inadequate cooling and lubrication will lead to overheating of the
slide rail and track, causing premature wear, damage and failure, which can
result in serious injury. Reduce speeds and frequently drive into fresh snow to
allow adequate cooling and polishing of the slide rail and track surfaces. Avoid
operating for prolonged periods on ice, hard-packed surfaces or roads.
Operating in Deep Snow
If the snowmobile becomes stuck in snow, clear the running board area
of snow, then step down the snow in front of the snowmobile so that
when the throttle is opened, the snowmobile will be able to climb up and
over the snow.
21
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Driving Responsibly
Every snowmobile handles differently, and even the most docile conditions may become dangerous if operators drive improperly. If you’re
new to snowmobiling, acquaint yourself with the machine and with
what it will and won’t do under various conditions. Even seasoned drivers should spend some time getting the feel for a machine before
attempting ambitious maneuvers.
• A snowmobile depends on the rider’s body position for proper balance in executing turns, traversing hills, etc. Always start on a
smooth, level area to begin building your operating experience.
• Before allowing someone else to use your snowmobile, know the
extent of their operating skills. Check to see if they’ve taken a snowmobile safety course and have an operator’s certificate. For their protection, as well as yours, make sure they take a snowmobile safety
course. Everyone can benefit from the course.
• Don't "jump" your snowmobile over large drifts or similar terrain.
Jumping may injure your back because of spinal compression that
could occur when the snowmobile impacts the ground. The seat and
suspension of your snowmobile have been designed to provide protection under normal riding conditions. Your snowmobile is not
intended for this kind of use.
• Be courteous to oncoming traffic by dimming your headlights and
reducing your speed.
• When traveling in a group of snowmobiles, don’t tailgate (follow too
closely). Leave enough distance between snowmobiles to provide
ample stopping room and to provide protection from flying snow and
debris. Allow even more distance when driving on slippery surfaces
or when driving in darkness or other low visibility conditions. Be
aware of any snowmobile traffic around your vehicle. Drive defensively to avoid accidents.
• Remove the key from the ignition when you leave the snowmobile
unattended.
22
SAFETY
Operator Safety
Windchill/Temperature Charts
The following information is provided to help you determine when temperatures become dangerous for riding.
WIND CHILL CHART (°F)
Wind
Speed
40
in
MPH
Actual Thermometer Reading (_F)
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
-5
-10 -15 -20 -25 -30 -35 -40 -45
Equivalent Temperature (_F)
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
5
36
31
25
19
13
7
1
-5
10
34
27
21
15
9
3
-4
-10 -16 -22 -28 -35 -41 -47 -53 -59 -66 -72
15
32
25
19
13
6
0
-7
-13 -19 -26 -32 -39 -45 -51 -58 -64 -71 -77
20
30
24
17
11
4
-2
-9
-15 -22 -29 -35 -42 -48 -55 -61 -68 -74 -81
25
29
23
16
9
3
-4
-11 -17 -24 -31 -37 -44 -51 -58 -64 -71 -78 -84
30
28
22
15
8
1
-5
-12 -19 -26 -33 -39 -46 -53 -60 -67 -73 -80 -87
35
28
21
14
7
0
-7
-14 -21 -27 -34 -41 -48 -55 -62 -69 -76 -82 -89
40
27
20
13
6
-1
-8
-15 -22 -29 -36 -43 -50 -57 -64 -71 -78 -84 -91
45
26
19
12
5
-2
-9
-16 -23 -30 -37 -44 -51 -58 -65 -72 -79 -86 -93
50
26
19
12
4
-3
-10 -17 -24 -31 -38 -45 -52 -60 -67 -74 -81 -88 -95
55
25
18
11
4
-3
-11 -18 -25 -32 -39 -46 -54 -61 -68 -75 -82 -89 -97
60
25
17
10
3
-4
-11 -19 -26 -33 -40 -48 -55 -62 -69 -76 -84 -91 -98
Frostbite in >> 30 min.
0
-5
-10 -15 -20 -25 -30 -35 -40 -45
Calm
-11 -16 -22 -28 -34 -40 -46 -52 -57 -63
10 min.
5 min.
WIND CHILL CHART (°C)
Wind
Speed
in
KPH
5
2
-1
-4
-7
-10 -13 -16 -19 -22 -25 -28 -31 -34 -37 -40 -43 -46
Actual Thermometer Reading (_C)
Calm
5
2
-1
-4
-7
-10 -13 -16 -19 -22 -25 -28 -31 -34 -37 -40 -43 -46
-11 -14 -18 -22 -25 -29 -32 -36 -39 -43 -46 -50 -53 -57
Equivalent Temperature (_C)
8
3
0
-4
-7
16
2
-2
-6
-10 -13 -17 -21 -24 -28 -32 -36 -39 -43 -47 -50 -54 -58 -62
24
1
-3
-7
-11 -15 -19 -22 -26 -30 -34 -38 -42 -45 -49 -53 -57 -61 -65
32
0
-4
-8
-12 -16 -20 -24 -28 -32 -36 -39 -43 -47 -51 -55 -59 -63 -67
40
-1
-5
-9
-13 -17 -21 -25 -29 -33 -37 -41 -45 -49 -53 -57 -61 -65 -69
48
-1
-5
-9
-13 -18 -22 -26 -30 -34 -38 -42 -46 -50 -54 -58 -62 -66 -70
56
-2
-6
-10 -14 -18 -22 -26 -31 -35 -39 -43 -47 -51 -55 -59 -64 -68 -72
64
-2
-6
-10 -15 -19 -23 -27 -31 -35 -40 -44 -48 -52 -56 -61 -65 -69 -73
72
-2
-7
-11 -15 -19 -23 -28 -32 -36 -40 -45 -49 -53 -57 -61 -66 -70 -74
80
-3
-7
-11 -15 -20 -24 -28 -33 -37 -41 -45 -50 -54 -58 -62 -67 -71 -75
88
-3
-7
-12 -16 -20 -24 -29 -33 -37 -42 -46 -50 -55 -59 -63 -67 -72 -76
96
-3
-8
-12 -16 -21 -25 -29 -34 -38 -42 -47 -51 -55 -60 -64 -68 -73 -77
Frostbite in >> 30 min.
10 min.
5 min.
23
SAFETY
Safety Decals and Locations
Warning decals have been placed on the snowmobile for your protection. Read and follow the instructions of the decals and other warnings
on the snowmobile carefully. If any of the decals depicted in this manual
differ from the decals on your snowmobile, always read and follow the
instructions of the decals on the snowmobile.
If any decal becomes illegible or comes off, contact your Polaris dealer
to purchase a replacement. Replacement safety decals are provided by
Polaris at no charge. The part number is printed on the decal.
Clutch Cover Warning
This warning decal is found under the hood on the clutch cover:
WARNING
Do not operate with hood open.
Do not attempt adjustment with engine running.
Do not operate engine with plenum/belt guard removed.
Never run engine with drive belt removed.
Never service clutches yourself. See your dealer.
Pressure Cap Warning
This warning decal is found under the hood on the pressure cap of applicable liquid cooled models:
WARNING
Do not open hot. Test or replace when changing coolant. Press
down and turn to release cap. 13 PSI
24
Safety Decals and Locations
SAFETY
Passenger Warning
Snowmobiles designed for an
operator and one passenger have a
warning decal on the left console.
For more information on operating
with a passenger, see page 13.
“One Passenger”
Warning
WARNING
This vehicle is designed for
operator and “ONE” passenger
only.
Track Warning
WARNING
Stay clear of track. Do not sit on
seat back. Entanglement with
the track or a fall from seat back
may result in severe injury or
death.
Track Warning
25
SAFETY
Safety Decals and Locations
Reverse Warning
Operation
Warning
Reverse Warning
Polaris snowmobiles equipped with electric reverse and will have this
decal on the console:
WARNING
Reverse operation, even at low speeds, can cause loss of control
resulting in serious injury or death. To avoid loss of control,
always:
• Look behind before and while backing up.
• Avoid sharp turns.
• Shift to or from reverse only when stopped.
• Apply throttle slowly.
NOTE: For more information, see Owner's Manual.
If electric reverse:
• Machine stopped and engine at idle, push yellow button on LH control to reverse. Flashing light on dash indicates reverse operation.
• Push button again to return to forward.
26
Safety Decals and Locations
SAFETY
Operation Warning
An operation warning decal is present on the console of all Polaris
snowmobiles:
WARNING
• To avoid serious injury or death, read and understand all warnings and the
Owner’s Manual before operation. If manual is missing, contact a Polaris
dealer for a replacement.
• This vehicle is capable of high speeds. Buried objects or uneven terrain can
cause loss of control. Reduce speed and use extreme caution when operating in unfamiliar terrain.
• Excessive speed, especially at night or with limited visibility, can result in
insufficient time for you to react to terrain changes, to avoid unexpected
obstacles, or to stop safely.
• Never consume alcohol or drugs before or while operating this vehicle.
• In an emergency, push down the Auxiliary Shut-Off Switch, located on the top
of the throttle control assembly, to stop the engine. Then pull the brake lever
to stop.
• Always wear an approved helmet, eye protection, and adequate clothing
while operating this vehicle.
• This vehicle is designed for adult use only. Check local laws for age requirements.
• When operating with a passenger (on approved models only), reduce speed
and allow extra space for steering and stopping. A passenger reduces your
ability to control the vehicle.
• When operating on hard-packed snow, ice, or when crossing roads, steering
and braking ability are greatly reduced. Reduce speed and allow extra space
to turn or stop.
• To maintain vehicle control on ice or hard-packed surfaces, you should have
a proper balance of ski carbides to track studs. See Owner’s Manual for
proper use of traction products.
• Repeated stops from high speed may cause fading or sudden loss of braking
ability.
• Parking brake may relax when used for long periods. Do not leave brake
engaged for more than five minutes.
• Before starting the engine, check throttle, brake, and steering for proper operation. Make sure hood is latched. Be seated and in position to control the
vehicle.
Oil injection system: Use unmixed fuel only. Check oil level when refueling.
27
FEATURES
11 10
9
6
8
7
12
5
13
4
14
3
2
15
16
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
28
1
17
Nosepan
Skis
Front Bumper (do not use for pulling or dragging the snowmobile)
Hood
Headlight
Windshield
Operator Seat
Passenger Seat
Backrest
Passenger Grab Handle
Cargo Bag
Grab Handle Heater Switch
Taillights
Rear Bumper
Snow Flap
Track
Suspension
FEATURES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
MFD Display
Mirrors
Rider Selectt
Fuel Filler Cap
Handlebar
Hood Hold Down
Straps
Handlebar Grip Warmer
Switch
Thumbwarmer Switch
Electronic Reverse
Button
MFD Control
Headlight Dimmer
Switch
Parking Brake Lock
Brake Lever
Engine Stop Switch
Throttle Control
Ignition Switch
1
6
1
5
4
3
7
8
9
13
14
12
11
10
15
16
29
FEATURES
Backrest
The backrest is adjustable for either
operator or passenger use.
1. Loosen the upper adjustment
knobs to raise or lower the
backrest.
2. Loosen the lower adjustment
knobs to move the backrest forward for operator use or rearward for passenger use.
3. Always tighten the knobs
securely after adjusting.
Raise/Lower
Operator/Passenger
Adjustable Headlights
Move the adjuster to the left to lower the
headlight beam.
Move the adjuster to the right to raise the
headlight beam.
Radiator Compartment
Access Panel
The access panel is provided for cleaning
debris from the radiator.
+
30
Cargo Bag
The cargo bag is secured to the rear of
the tunnel with straps. The cargo bag
and the passenger seat are removable to
provide open storage for transporting
larger items. The maximum weight
capacity for the cargo area is 30 lbs.
(14 kg). Always secure cargo before
operating. Do not exceed the weight
limit. Do not allow a passenger to sit on
the seat back or the cargo area.
1. Remove the cargo bag.
2. Push down on the seat latch lever,
which is located at the lower rear
of the passenger seat.
3. Lift up the seat and remove it from
the chassis.
4. Reverse the procedure to reinstall
the seat. Press down firmly on both
sides of the seat to engage the
latch. Verify that the latch is
engaged by firmly pulling the seat
upward.
FEATURES
Cargo Bag
Seat Latch
31
FEATURES
Passenger Grab Handle
On some models the position of the
passenger grab handles can be
adjusted for rider preference.
1. Unscrew and remove the knob
assemblies that secure the grab
handles.
2. Reposition the grab handles to
one of the three available positions on the grab handle tube
between the operator seat and the
passenger seat.
3. Reinstall the knob assemblies and
tighten securely.
32
Knob
Assembly
FEATURES
RIDER SELECT Adjustable Steering System
The RIDER SELECT adjustable steering system (if equipped) allows
you to adjust the handlebar position to fit your style of riding. Some
models have five (5) adjustment positions. Other models have seven (7)
positions.
WARNING! If your snowmobile has five adjustment positions, do not remove
the RIDER SELECT lockout. Your Polaris snowmobile has been engineered for
this range of adjustability. Removing this lockout and using RIDER SELECT
position 6 or 7 will result in the handlebars and brake lever contacting other
components and interfering with steering and braking. This could lead to loss of
control resulting in serious injury or death. Always be sure that the handlebars
and brake lever do not contact any other snowmobile components at any
steering position AND at any RIDER SELECT position.
Do not use RIDER SELECT positions 6 or 7 unless riding conditions require it.
Operation in position 6 or 7 can reduce vehicle handling for other types of riding
and result in serious injury or death.
Choosing the Best RIDER SELECT Position
Position
Riding Style
1
2
3
Relaxed Trail Riding
Rider weight is slightly behind the center
of the snowmobile for comfortable and
relaxed riding.
4 General Trail Riding, Boondocking,
5 Deep Snow Riding
Rider weight is centered on the snowmobile, providing balance, comfort and control for both novice and experienced
riders. This is the recommended position
for most riding situations.
6 Snowcross/Steep Hill Climbing Only
7 Rider weight is ahead of the center of the
snowmobile, adding weight to the skis and
making the snowmobile heavier in the
front. These positions are ONLY for
snowcross and severe hill climbing.
33
FEATURES
RIDER SELECT Adjustable Steering System
WARNING! Attempting to adjust the handlebar position while the snowmobile is
moving could result in loss of control and serious injury or death. Always stop
the snowmobile before attempting to adjust the steering system.
1. Stop the snowmobile.
2. Press the release button
and move the handlebar
forward or rearward to
the desired position.
WARNING! Do not lubricate the RIDER SELECT mechanism. Doing so could
cause loss of control and result in serious injury or death. The RIDER SELECT
mechanism is lubricated for life at the factory.
WARNING! Some aftermarket accessories (including windshields and cargo
bags) may interfere with the handlebar. Such accessories could limit your ability
to steer the vehicle and/or may contact the brake lever. This could lead to loss of
control resulting in serious injury or death. Always be sure that accessories do
not contact the handlebar or brake lever at any steering position and at any
RIDER SELECT position.
34
FEATURES
Detonation Elimination Technology (DET)
The DET system prevents damage to the engine from detonation by
automatically reducing the engine timing and adding fuel whenever the
sensors detect detonation.
You may notice decreased engine RPM and performance when DET is
activated, but in most cases DET activation is temporary, and the timing
will return to normal automatically. In extreme conditions the DET system retards timing and holds it in a retarded state. If this occurs, replace
the fuel with recommended fuel or see your Polaris dealer for service.
Cause of DET Activation
Poor quality fuel
Improper engine modifications
Solution
Replace with higher quality fuel
Do not modify the engine
Sensor Fail-Safe
The DET includes a sensor fail-safe system to prevent the engine from
damage if the sensor fails, becomes disconnected or is unable to detect
detonation. The rider will experience a loss of power. The sensor must
be reconnected or repaired to regain full power. See your Polaris dealer
for service if this occurs.
Tip: The check engine light will flash six times if the sensor fails or becomes disconnected.
35
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Component Identification
Item
1 Analog (if equipped)
2
1
2 Digital Gauge
3 CHECK ENGINE
Indicator (carb models)
4 Low Oil Indicator
5 High Temp Indicator
6 Brake Indicator
7 Reverse Indicator
3
4
5
6
7
8
8 High Beam Indicator
Digital Display Identification
Item
1 RPM or Speed
Altitude (if equipped)
Service Interval
1
2
2 Electrical System Voltage
Level
3 MAX - Maximum MPH/
KPH or RPM
MPH -Miles per hour
KPH - Kilometers per hour
RPM -Engine crankshaft
revolutions per
minute
4 Air Temp (if equipped)
Engine Temp
Degrees Celsius
Degrees Fahrenheit
5 Miles
Kilometers
6 Hours
Trip 1/Trip 2/Trip F
Service Label
Altitude Label
7 Fuel Level (if equipped)
36
3
4
5
6
7
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Settings
The MFD control switch allows you
to set the MFD display to your preferences. The rocker switch has a
MODE button (top) and a SET button (bottom). Specific instructions
are outlined on the following pages.
MODE
SET
Standard vs. Metric
The MFD will display either standard or metric units of measurement.
MFD Control Switch
While viewing a screen that displays
measurements (MPH, km/h or temperatures), press and hold the MODE switch until the unit of measurement changes (about 10 seconds).
37
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Settings
Speedometer/Tachometer
The speedometer and tachometer can be viewed in either the analog or
the digital display. If the analog display is set to show speedometer readings, the digital screen will automatically display the tachometer (option
1). If the analog is set to show the tachometer, the digital screen will
show the speedometer (option 2).
To change viewing preferences, press and hold the MODE button for
three seconds. When the button is released, the new setting becomes
active and screen colors change. See table below.
Option
Analog
Display
Digital
Display
Analog
Screen
Digital
Screen
1
Speed
RPM
Blue “MPH”
Blue
Backlight
2
RPM
Speed
Red
“X100RPM”
Red
Backlight
38
Instrumentation
FEATURES
MFD Digital Display Programs
Press and release the MODE button to cycle through the three MFD programs: Performance, Engine and History. Each program remains active
until you cycle to the next program. While any program is active, press
and release the SET button to cycle through the program’s screens.
Performance Program
The Performance Program automatically displays either speed or
tachometer, whichever is opposite the analog display. See page 38. It
also displays electrical system voltage and fuel level (if equipped).
While in the Performance mode, press the SET button to cycle through
the odometer, Trip 1, Trip 2, Trip F (if equipped with electronic fuel
gauge) and Clock (if equipped). Use the following procedures to make
changes to these screens.
Odometer Setting
The odometer records the vehicle's total
distance traveled since manufacture. The
odometer cannot be reset.
39
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Digital Display Programs
Trip Settings
Trip 1 and Trip 2 are odometers used
to check fuel mileage or to keep
track of distance traveled. Both
odometers can be reset to zero.
1. Enter the Performance Program.
2. Press and release the SET button
until the desired trip screen is
active.
3. Press and hold the SET button for two seconds to reset the trip
odometer to zero.
4. Press and release the SET button to cycle through additional
screens.
40
Instrumentation
FEATURES
MFD Digital Display Programs
Performance Program
Trip Settings
If the snowmobile is equipped with an
electronic fuel gauge, Trip F automatically displays when the fuel level is low.
The fuel symbol and the last fuel bar on
the MFD gauge will blink when the fuel
level reaches 1/8th tank.
The Trip F odometer records distance
traveled until enough fuel is added to
raise the level above 1/4 tank. The fuel
symbol and the fuel bar will continue to
blink until the fuel level is above 1/4
tank. The Trip F odometer will automatically reset to zero after refueling.
41
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Digital Display Programs
Performance Program
Clock Setting (if equipped)
1. Enter the Performance Program.
2. Press and release the SET button
until the clock screen is active.
3. Press and hold the SET button for
five seconds.
4. When the hour starts flashing,
press the SET switch once to advance one hour. (Press and hold the
SET button to advance the hours quickly.)
5. Press and release the MODE button to save the hour. The minutes
will begin flashing.
6. Set the minutes in the same manner.
7. When finished, press and release the MODE button to save the new
setting. If the MODE button is not pressed within ten seconds, the
gauge will automatically save the new entry.
42
Instrumentation
FEATURES
MFD Digital Display Programs
Engine Program
The Engine Program automatically displays the engine coolant temperature, engine hours, electrical system voltage level and fuel level (if
equipped). On machines equipped with altimeter sensor and ambient air
temperature sensors, altitude and ambient air temperature will display as
additional screens in the engine program. Press the SET button to display the ambient air temperature and altitude screens. Use the following
procedures to make changes to these screens.
Hour Meter
The hour meter records the total hours of
engine operation since manufacture. This
meter cannot be reset.
Engine Temperature
A thermometer measures water temperature,
giving an indication of engine temperature.
Air Temperature (if equipped)
The MFD displays actual air temperature in
either standard or metric units.
1. Enter the Engine Program.
2. Press and hold the MODE switch for ten
seconds to switch between standard and
metric units of measurement.
43
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Digital Display Programs
Engine Program
Altitude (if equipped)
The rider can calibrate the altimeter for current
atmospheric conditions. Altimeter accuracy
will be +/-300 ft. (91 m) after adjustment.
1. Enter the Engine Program.
Tip: Press and hold the MODE switch for ten seconds to switch between standard and metric
units of measurement. When "ALt" displays, the
program is in the metric mode.
2. Press and release the SET button until the altimeter screen is active.
3. Press and hold the SET button for five seconds. When the digits
begin to flash, release the button.
4. Press and release the SET button once to advance 50 feet (15 m).
Tip: Press and hold the SET button to advance quickly by 100-foot (30 m) increments.
5. Adjust the altitude display to within 50 ft. (15 m) of current altitude.
Tip: The gauge reads barometric pressure and allows the rider to compensate
for daily fluctuations in air pressure. The gauge can adjust the displayed
altitude to +/- 1300 ft. (396 m) from the preset value. It will adjust up to
+1300 ft. (396 m) above the calibrated altitude. Once the +1300 ft. (396 m)
offset has been reached, the next adjustment is -1300 ft. (396 m) from the
calibrated altitude, and 50 ft. (15 m) will be added to the altitude each time
the SET button is pressed.
6. Press and release the MODE button to set the reading at the adjusted
value. If the MODE button is not pressed within ten seconds, the
gauge will automatically save the new entry.
44
Instrumentation
FEATURES
MFD Digital Display Programs
History Program
The History Program automatically displays electrical system voltage
level and fuel level (if equipped).
While in the History mode, press the SET button to view maximum
vehicle speed, maximum engine rpm or the current service interval setting. The gauge automatically logs the maximum speed and engine rpm
even if the History Program is not currently displayed.
The History Program will display the history of the Maximum Speed,
Maximum RPM and Service Interval settings.
Maximum Speed/Maximum RPM
1. Enter the History Program.
2. Press and release the SET button until
one of the two screens is active.
Tip: The MPH and RPM values are both reset at
the same time. Reset the values before each
run to obtain accurate readings.
3. Press and hold the SET button for three
seconds to reset the recorded maximum
values for both MPH and RPM.
Tip: Due to electrical noise, the MFD may occasionally display MAX MPH/RPM values that
are not representative of actual values.
45
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Digital Display Programs
History Program
Service Interval Reminder
The gauge logs the number of engine
hours accumulated between service
reminders. When the logged hours
reaches the designated service interval
(set by the user), the gauge provides a
reminder that service is due. "SErVCE"
will flash in the odometer area and
"ENG" will flash in the icon area for five
seconds each time the engine is started
(until the service reminder is reset.) Use
the following procedures to reset the
reminder.
To reset the reminder at the existing interval:
1. Enter the History Program.
2. Press and release the SET button until the service interval screen is
active.
3. Press and hold the SET button for ten seconds, continuing to hold
even after the display begins to flash.
4. When the display stops flashing, release the button. The service
interval has been reset.
46
Instrumentation
FEATURES
MFD Digital Display Programs
History Program
Service Interval Reminder
To reset the reminder at a new interval:
1. Enter the History Program.
2. Press and release the SET button until the service interval screen is
active.
3. Press and hold the SET button for five seconds, until the hours begin
to flash. Immediately release the button.
4. Press the button again, up to five times, to advance the reminder in
50-hour increments.
Tip: The maximum interval is 250 hours.
5. Press and release the MODE button to save the new settings.
To disable the service interval reminder:
1. Press the SET button once after reaching 250 hours on the display.
The gauge will display "OFF".
47
FEATURES
Instrumentation
MFD Battery Replacement
Models equipped with the clock feature
have a battery to power the clock. If the
clock function of the MFD isn't working
properly, replace the battery. Replacement batteries are available from your
dealer.
1. Remove the plenum from the underside of the hood.
2. Locate the black battery compartment. It has a red wire and a brown
wire with a white stripe. It's located
about three inches down the main
harness from the point where the
harness connects to the MFD.
3. Cut the plastic cable tie from the
outside of the compartment.
4. Carefully cut the bottom of the compartment (opposite the wires) to
separate the heat-sealed seams. Squeeze the corners of the compartment inward so the battery is visible.
Tip: Note the orientation of the battery before removing it. An incorrectly
installed battery will not maintain the clock.
48
Instrumentation
FEATURES
MFD Battery Replacement
5. Using needle-nose pliers, grasp the battery and rotate it so the leading edge of the battery is raised away from the battery holder. Pull
the battery out gently.
Tip: The battery will not come out of the holder unless the leading edge of the
battery is raised. Hold the battery compartment, not the wires, while removing the battery. Pulling on the wires will separate them from the battery
holder.
6. Install a new battery with fingers only.
7. Seal the end of the battery compartment using high strength doublesided tape between the two compartment halves or high strength
single-sided tape around the outside of the compartment.
8. Make sure the taped seam of the compartment faces the downward
side of the wire harness.
9. Install a cable tie to secure the compartment to the wire harness in
the same location where the previous cable tie was located. Make
sure the battery wires are not stretched tight.
Gauge Cleaning
1. Wipe the gauge face as needed using a clean cloth and a mild soap
and water solution. Wipe dry with clean, soft cloth.
2. Clean the back side of the gauge using a clean cloth and a mild soap
and water solution. Do not remove the electrical connectors or protective rubber boot. Do not spray the back side of the gauge or the
wire harness with a pressure washer or other water source.
NOTICE: To prevent damage to the lens, do not use alcohol for cleaning. Do not
allow chemicals or sprays to come into contact with the lens.
Immediately clean off any gasoline that splashes on the gauge during
refueling.
49
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Front Suspension Adjustments
Independent Front Suspension (IFS)
Break in the suspension for approximately 150 miles (240 km) before
making any fine-tuning adjustments.
Settings will vary from rider to rider, depending on rider weight, vehicle
speed, riding style, and trail conditions. We recommend starting with
factory settings and then customizing each adjustment individually to
suit rider preference. The snowmobile should be methodically tested,
one change at a time, under the same conditions (trail and snow conditions, vehicle speed, riding position, etc.) after each adjustment until the
best ride is achieved.
IFS Components
1.
2.
3.
4.
Skis
Front shocks and springs
Rod ends
A-arms
2
1
3
IFS Adjustment Options
• Front shock spring preload
• Optional springs
• Optional shock valving
50
4
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Front Suspension Adjustments
Front Shock Spring Preload
Increasing spring preload will increase
ski-to-ground pressure. Decreasing spring
preload will decrease ski-to-ground pressure. When adjusting, be sure the springs
on both the left and right sides of the
machine are at the same adjustment.
To change front shock spring preload,
grasp the spring and rotate it.
Increasing the spring preload too much
may adversely affect the handling of the
snowmobile and the performance of the
suspension. Never exceed one inch of preload beyond the factory settings, and
ensure that both sides are adjusted the
same. When decreasing preload, make
High
Low
sure at least two turns of preload are holdPreload
Preload
ing the spring between the retainer on the
top of the shock and the threaded spring
preload adjuster nut on the shock body.
Failure to do so could cause the retainer to fall off when the suspension
is fully extended.
Tip: Not all models have shocks with thread-adjustable spring preload. See your
dealer for more information.
NOTICE: On some models equipped with a plastic adjuster nut, the nut will
break if it is unscrewed from the threaded body. Do not force the nut if
resistance suddenly increases while you’re turning it.
51
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Front Suspension Adjustments
Shock Valving
The shocks can be revalved if spring preload alone isn't sufficient and
further adjustment is desired to control suspension stiffness.
WARNING! Changing shock valving requires special tools and a sound
knowledge of mechanical theory, tool use, and shop procedures to perform the
work safely and correctly. Shocks contain high-pressure nitrogen gas. Use
extreme caution when handling high-pressure service equipment. We
recommend that this work be performed by a Polaris dealer.
52
THE PERFECT FIT
Rear Suspension Adjustments
Rider weight, riding style, trail conditions, and vehicle speed all affect
suspension action.
Each rear suspension can be adjusted to suit rider preference and deliver
excellent performance for a given set of conditions. However, all suspension designs and adjustments involve a compromise, or trade-off.
For example, a suspension set up for snow-cross racing would provide a
very stiff ride on the trail. A suspension set up for trail riding would bottom out harshly on a snow-cross course.
Refer to the suspension setup label on your snowmobile, or see your
Polaris dealer for initial suspension setup information. Additional
adjustments can be made after initial setup. Make adjustments to one
area at a time so you can evaluate the change. For further assistance, see
your dealer.
Suspension Performance Tips
• Rider weight usually determines the position at which the spring preload should be set. However, this may vary with riding style. With a
little experimentation, each rider can find a preferred set-up. These
adjustments are easy to make, involve very little time or effort, and
greatly affect the ride.
• In deep snow, a new rail slide will offer improved performance over a
worn slide. It can also improve top speed.
• When riding on ice or hard-packed snow, adding a set of bogie wheels
to the rail may enhance the machine's performance. Bogie wheel kits
are available from your dealer.
• Polaris offers track kits for improved flotation in deep snow. See your
dealer for assistance.
Tip: Keep the suspension pivot points lubricated. This will reduce moisture and
rust build-up and ensure proper function of the suspension components.
Grease rear suspension pivots before adjusting the rear suspension. Refer
to the suspension lubrication information beginning on page 89.
53
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Rear Suspension Adjustments
Initial Spring Preload Setting (Sag Method)
To set up the rear suspension torsion
spring preload, measure the distance
between the ground and rear bumper.
This is measurement X.
Take the first measurement with no
rider and with the rear suspension at
full extension.
X
Tip: The rear bumper may need to be
lifted upward slightly to fully extend
the rear suspension.
Next, have the rider drop down hard
on the seat and bounce up and down
several times, collapsing the rear
suspension. With the rider seated,
measure the distance between the
ground and the rear bumper at the
exact location used for measurement X. This is measurement Y.
Y
To determine sag, commonly
referred to as ride-in, subtract measurement Y from X (sag=X-Y). If the
measured sag is incorrect, adjust the FRA position and/or rear torsion
spring preload.
Suspension Recommended Sag
IQ Comfort
(136)
4-5 inches (10-13 cm)
Adjustment
Torsion Spring
Preload
See
Page
55
Tip: This is only an initial setup, and final spring preload may vary based on rider
preference and riding conditions. Accessory springs with a higher load rating are available for some models. Please see your dealer for availability.
54
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Rear Suspension Adjustments
Torsion Spring Preload
To adjust rear torsion spring preload, rotate the three-position cam using
the engine spark plug tool. Adjustment is easiest when the cam is
rotated from low to medium, and then to high. Rotating directly from
low to high will require significantly more effort.
Different rate torsion springs are available if a firmer ride is desired. See
your dealer for more information.
Soft
Medium
Firm
55
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Rear Suspension Adjustments
Limiter Strap Position (Ski Pressure)
Ski pressure is set at the factory to
deliver the optimum balance
between ride and handling. If a
rider prefers more ski pressure for
improved steering performance,
adjustments can be made to the
front limiter straps. Tighten the
straps to increase ski pressure.
Loosen the straps to reduce ski
pressure.
Upper
Nuts
1. Remove the nuts and flat
washers from the upper limiter
straps.
2. Relocate the straps to the desired position.
3. Reinstall the nuts and washers. Tighten securely.
56
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Rear Suspension Adjustments
Suspension Coupling
On all Polaris snowmobile rear suspensions, there are two torque arms
that control the movement of the rail beam. Prior to the advent of suspension coupling, these torque arms could move independently of each
other. Rear suspension coupling links the movement of the front and
rear torque arms to each other. There are two types of rear suspension
coupling.
Front To Rear Coupling and the Front Rear Scissor Stop
(FRSS)
The front rear scissor stop (FRSS) couples the movement of the front
torque arm with the rear torque arm and limits the amount of independence between the movement of the front torque arm and the rear torque
arm.
When hitting a bump, the front torque arm starts to compress. The FRSS
links that movement to the rear torque arm, causing it to compress and
raise the rear suspension up as one, allowing the suspension to hit the
bump only once and reducing kickback.
The factory setting is usually adequate for all riders and conditions.
57
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Rear Suspension Adjustments
Rear To Front Coupling and the Rear Rear Scissor Stop
(RRSS)
The rear rear scissor stop (RRSS) couples the movement of the rear
torque arm with the front torque arm and limits the amount of independent movement between the rear torque and the front torque arm.
Adjusting the RRSS either allows more weight to transfer to the rear for
more traction, or allows less weight to transfer to the rear, resulting in
improved cornering performance. An adjustment dot is located on the
RRSS. This dot is on the longest end of the scissor stop.
Rear Rear Scissor Stop (RRSS) - Attributes
Moving the RRSS to a higher position will have the following effects on
the suspension:
•
•
•
•
58
Reduced weight transfer.
Improved chatter bump ride.
Improved cornering performance.
Increased load carrying capacity (2-up)
THE PERFECT FIT
IQ Rear Suspension Adjustments
Weight Transfer During Acceleration
The preferred method for controlling
weight transfer during acceleration is
by adjusting the rear rear scissor stop
(RRSS). The factory setting is the
best for most trail riding conditions.
To decrease weight transfer under
acceleration (for improved cornering), rotate the RRSS to a higher
position.
HIGH
LOW
LOW
MEDIUM
To increase weight transfer or ski lift
during acceleration, rotate the RRSS
to a lower position.
Tip: Your dealer can help you with initial
setup and additional setup instructions to help you achieve your optimum ride. A scissor stop tool is also
available from your dealer.
Track Tension
Track adjustment is critical for proper handling. Always maintain correct tension and alignment. Refer to the track tension maintenance section beginning on page 110.
59
THE PERFECT FIT
Handlebar Adjustments
Use the RIDER SELECT feature to adjust handlebar position. See page
33. Use the following steps to adjust handlebar angle at the handlebar
block.
1. Remove the handlebar cover
to expose the handlebar and
the four adjuster block bolts.
2. Using a 7/16" wrench, loosen
the four nuts on the bottom of
the adjuster block (turn handlebar to left or right for
access to back nuts).
Tip: If necessary, pry the blocks apart
with a screwdriver.
Handlebar
Cover
Adjuster
Block
Bolts
3. Adjust the handlebar to the
desired height. Be sure handlebars, brake lever and
throttle lever operate
smoothly and do not hit the
Nuts
gas tank, windshield or any
other part of the machine
when turned fully to the left
or right.
4. Torque the front bolts first, then torque the rear bolts. Torque the
bolts to 15-17 ft. lbs. (20-23 Nm).
5. Reinstall the handlebar cover.
60
Accessories
THE PERFECT FIT
Polaris offers a wide range of accessories for your snowmobile to help
make each ride more enjoyable.
Use only Polaris parts and accessories on your Polaris snowmobile. Use
of unapproved parts and accessories may result in:
• Non-compliance with government/industry requirements
• Voiding of warranty
• Injury to self or others
This applies, but is not limited to the following areas: brakes, clutches,
fuel systems, and exhaust systems. Exhaust systems are critical safety
areas that must use approved Polaris parts. Please see your Polaris
dealer for service.
61
THE PERFECT FIT
Traction Products
Studs
Before equipping your snowmobile with traction products, be aware of
the laws in your area pertaining to the use of traction products.
Use only Polaris traction products on your snowmobile. Track warranties are void if track damage or failure results from improper or excessive stud installation or the use of non-Polaris traction products.
See your dealer about installing studs and/or carbides.
NOTICE: Always install wear strips before installing studs. Failure to install wear
strips may result in cooler or tunnel damage. See page 63.
Never add shims to the wear strip. Track damage will result because
of lack of clearance between upper carrier wheels and track.
Use of studs longer than the recommended length on machines
equipped with center coolers will result in center cooler damage or
damage to the tunnel.
Track studding will enhance braking control on hard-packed snow or
ice, but extreme caution is still required on such surfaces. Steering ability may be reduced on hard-packed snow or ice.
When studded tracks are used, increased wear to the brake pads will
result from increased braking. Extended-wear brake pad kits are available. See your dealer.
NOTICE: Aggressive studding patterns may require grinding protruding stud
bolts flush to prevent idler wheel damage. Maintain track tension on
studded tracks on the tight side of the spec to prevent heat exchanger
damage. Center of stud must be at least 1 1/8" (2.86 cm) from the
outside edge of the track.
62
Traction Products
THE PERFECT FIT
n Carbide Skags
A skag is a replaceable bar attached to the underside of the ski to assist
in turning the snowmobile and to prevent ski wear caused by contact
with roads and other bare terrain. Use carbide skags with studded tracks
to help maintain proper vehicle steering and control. See page 115.
If your snowmobile has carbide skags, it may be necessary to add track
studs to maintain proper vehicle control. Maintain a proper balance
between the number of studs and the length of carbide on the skags (the
more studs you use, the longer the carbide on the skags should be). See
your dealer's track studding chart.
Wear Strips
To avoid excessive tunnel wear, tunnel wear strips must be installed
whenever track studding is used.
Install the appropriate wear strip kit. See your dealer.
Wear strips are designed for a specific stud length. See your dealer's
studding chart for recommended traction accessories.
NOTICE: Whenever wear strips are relocated, be sure there's adequate stud
clearance to the heat exchangers. Lack of clearance may result in
damage to heat exchangers.
63
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Pre-Ride Checklist
Inspect all items on the checklist for proper operation or condition
before each use of the snowmobile. Procedures are outlined on the referenced pages. Look for a checkmark (n) on the referenced pages to
locate the pre-ride inspection items.
Item
Drive Belt Condition
See Page
105
Steering System
66
Recoil Rope
65
Parking Brake Lock/Brake Lever/Brake System
Throttle Lever
Throttle Safety Switch
67, 68, 100
65
65
Auxiliary Shut-Off Switch (Engine Stop Switch)
71, 81
Ignition Switch
71, 81
Taillight/Brakelight/Headlight
71
Coolant Level
96
Chaincase Oil Level
90
Injection Oil Level
77
Suspension Mounting Bolts
70
Skags (Wear Bars)
63, 115
Ski Saddle and Spindle Bolts
70
Hood Straps/Latches
66
Seat Latches
65
Rear Wheel Idler Bolts
70, 111
Track Alignment/Condition
69, 112
Rail Slide Condition
64
112
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Before Starting the Engine
Before starting the engine, always refer to all safety warnings pertaining
to snowmobile operation. Never start the engine without checking all
vehicle components to be sure of proper operation.
WARNING! Operating the vehicle with worn, damaged, or malfunctioning
components could result in serious injury or death. Never start the engine
without checking all vehicle components to be sure of proper operation.
Read and Understand Your Owner's Manual
Read the Owner's Manual completely and refer to it often. The manual
is your guide to safe and enjoyable snowmobiling experience.
n Throttle Lever
The throttle and brake are the primary controls of your snowmobile.
Always make sure both are functioning properly.
Squeeze the throttle lever to make sure it compresses evenly and
smoothly. When released, the lever should immediately return to the
idle position without binding or hesitation. If the throttle does not function smoothly, or if you discover excessive lever freeplay, DO NOT start
the engine. Have the throttle serviced immediately.
n Throttle Safety Switch
Test the throttle safety switch system before the snowmobile is operated.
See page 78 for procedure.
n Seat Latches
Ensure that the seat latches are securely in place before every use of the
snowmobile.
n Recoil Rope
Inspect the recoil rope and handle for excessive wear, and make sure the
knot securing the rope inside the handle is secure. If excessive wear is
found, see your Polaris dealer for replacement.
65
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Before Starting the Engine
n Hood Latches
The hood of the snowmobile protects the operator from moving parts as
well as aiding in sound emission control and other functions. Under no
circumstances should your snowmobile be operated with the hood open
or removed. Always ensure that the hood straps are in good condition
and that the latches are securely in place before operating the snowmobile.
n Steering System
WARNING! Ice and snow build-up may interfere with the steering of your
snowmobile, resulting in serious injury or death. Keep the underhood area free
of snow and ice.
Before driving, manually turn the skis to the left and right to be sure ice
and snow are not interfering with full left and right steering. If difficulty
is encountered, remove ice and snow build-up that may be obstructing
the steering linkage.
If your snowmobile is equipped with RIDER SELECT, perform this
check in both the full up and full down steering positions.
66
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Before Starting the Engine
n Brakes
Always check the following items for proper operation before starting
the engine.
Brake Lever Travel
Squeeze the brake lever. It
should move no closer to the
handgrip than 1/2" (1.3 cm).
A smaller distance indicates
low brake fluid level or air in
the hydraulic system. Refer
to the brake bleeding information on page 102.
1/2" (1.3 cm)
Brake Lever Feel
If the brake lever feels “spongy” when squeezed, check the brake fluid
level and condition. Add fluid as needed. See page 101.
Check for the presence of air in the fluid system. See page 102 for more
information, or see your dealer for service.
WARNING! Continued use of “spongy” brakes may cause a complete loss of
brakes, which could result in serious injury or death. Always have the brakes
serviced at the first sign of sponginess.
67
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Before Starting the Engine
n Parking Brake Lever Lock
Use the parking brake lever lock only
when you want the snowmobile to
remain stationary; for example, when
parked on an incline for a period of
five minutes or less.
1.
2.
3.
4.
1
2
3
4
Brake Lever
Parking Brake Lever Lock
Master Cylinder Reservoir/Cover
Fluid Level Indicator
Lock Engagement
To engage the lock, squeeze the brake lever tightly and push forward on
the lock. Hold the lock forward while releasing the brake lever.
Tip: If the brake lever is squeezed tightly enough, the lock will move freely into
place. Do not force the lock or it may break.
The parking brake light on the gauge will light up if the parking brake
lever lock is set while the engine is running. It will also be lit when the
service brake is in use. If the parking brake light does not come on when
the parking brake or service brake is in use, have it serviced by your
dealer.
Lock Release
To release the lock, squeeze the brake lever tightly. The lock will return
to the unlocked position.
WARNING! If the parking brake lever lock is partially or entirely engaged while
riding, the brakes may overheat, resulting in brake damage. In extreme cases it
could cause a fire, which could result in serious injury or death. Always ensure
that the lever lock is completely disengaged before operating the snowmobile.
68
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Before Starting the Engine
n Track Inspection
WARNING! Operating the snowmobile with a damaged track increases the
possibility of track failure, which could cause loss of control resulting in serious
injury or death. Always inspect the track for damage before using the vehicle.
WARNING! Use of traction products such as studs increases the possibility of
track damage and/or failure. Driving at high speeds for extended periods of time
in marginal lubrication could severely damage track rods, break track edges,
and cause other track damage. Examples of marginal lubrication would include
frozen bodies of water without snow cover, icy trails, and no-snow conditions.
Track damage or failure caused by operation on ice or poor lubrication
conditions voids the track warranty.
69
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Before Starting the Engine
n Suspension Inspection
Loose nuts and bolts can reduce your snowmobile's reliability and cause
needless repairs and down time. Before beginning any snowmobile trip,
a visual inspection will uncover potential problems. Check the following items on a weekly basis or before any long trip.
Item
Check
Page
Suspension mounting bolts
Tightness
--
Rear idler wheel bolts
Tightness
111
Rear idler adjusting bolt locknuts
Tightness
--
Torque arm bolts
Tightness
--
Carrier and bogie wheel bolts
Tightness
--
Front torque arm limiter strap
Condition
--
Rail slide
Condition
112
Track
Tension
110
Lubrication
88
Ski runner/skag
Condition
--
Ski spindle bolts
Tightness
--
Tie rod end nuts
Tightness
--
All rear suspension components
70
PRE-RIDE INSPECTIONS
Start the Engine and Check
n Engine Stop Switch
Check the auxiliary shut-off switch for proper operation. Push the
switch down to stop the engine. Pull it up to allow restarting.
n Ignition Switch
Make sure the engine stops when the ignition switch is turned to OFF.
n Lighting
Check the headlight (high and low beam), taillight, and brake light.
Replace burned out lamps before operating.
n Mirror Adjustment
If equipped, adjust your mirrors so they can be used to their full advantage.
n Tether Switch (if equipped)
If your machine has a tether switch, remove the tether from the switch to
make sure the engine stops immediately.
n Operating Area
Before driving away, check your surroundings. Be aware of obstacles
and make sure bystanders are a safe distance from the snowmobile.
71
OPERATION
Engine Break-In
No single action on your part is as important to long, trouble-free
machine life as proper break-in of a new or rebuilt engine. Premix the
first tank of fuel with one pint of Polaris injection oil for each five gallons of fuel. This, in addition to the lubrication supplied by the injection
system, will assure proper engine break-in.
NOTICE: Excessive heat build-up during the first three hours of operation will
damage close-fitted engine parts. Do not operate at full throttle or high
speeds for extended periods during the first three hours of use. Vary
the throttle openings and machine speeds to reduce friction on all
close-fitting machined parts, allowing them to break in slowly without
damage.
Use of any lubricants other than those recommended by Polaris may
cause serious engine damage. We recommend the use of Polaris
lubricants for your vehicle.
Drive with extra caution during the break-in period. Perform regular
checks on fluid levels, lines, and all other important areas of the
machine.
72
Engine Break-In
OPERATION
Oil Injection System
Always check and fill the oil tank when refueling. See page 77.
NOTICE: Serious engine damage can occur without the proper lubrication.
Check the oil tank level often during the first tank of fuel. If the oil level
doesn't go down, contact your dealer immediately.
Oil Recommendations
This snowmobile is equipped with a variable exhaust system (VES).
Engine lubrication comes from oil added to the fuel and oil injection
systems. Polaris recommends the use of VES II 2 Cycle Oil for this
engine. See page 118 for the part numbers of Polaris products.
Never mix brands of oil. Serious chemical reactions can cause injection
system blockage, resulting in serious engine damage. Oils may also be
incompatible and the result could be sludge formation, filter blockage,
and reduced cold weather flow rates. All Polaris oils are compatible
with each other.
Slide Rail and Track Cooling
NOTICE: Inadequate cooling and lubrication will lead to overheating of the slide
rail and track, resulting in premature wear and failure. Reduce speeds
and frequently drive into fresh snow to allow adequate cooling and
polishing of the slide rail and track surfaces. Avoid operating on ice,
hard-packed surfaces or roads.
73
OPERATION
Track Warm-Up
WARNING
A loose track or flying debris could cause serious injury or death. Stand clear of
the front of the machine and the moving track. Never hold the snowmobile up or
stand behind it while warming up the track. Do not use excessive throttle during
warm-up or when the track is free-hanging. Be sure the rear support is stable.
WARNING
Use of traction products such as studs, ice growsers, etc. will increase the possibility of track damage and/or failure. This could cause loss of control, resulting in
serious injury or death. Always inspect for track damage before operating the
snowmobile.
Follow these steps to ensure proper warm-up of the engine, drive train
and track.
1. Use an appropriate stand to securely support the rear of the snowmobile at the rear bumper. The track should be approximately 4" (10
cm) off the ground.
2. Start the engine and allow it to warm up two to three minutes.
3. Depress the throttle abruptly and allow the track to rotate several
revolutions.
Tip: It will take longer to warm up the track sufficiently during colder outdoor
temperatures.
4. Release the throttle, apply the brakes, shut off the engine and lower
the snowmobile to the ground.
5. Grasp the skis by their front loops and move them from side to side
to loosen snow and ice.
74
Fuel Safety
OPERATION
WARNING
Gasoline is highly flammable and explosive under certain conditions.
•
•
•
•
•
Always exercise extreme caution whenever handling gasoline.
Always refuel outdoors or in a well-ventilated area.
Always turn off the engine before refueling.
Do not overfill the tank. Do not fill the tank neck.
Do not smoke or allow open flames or sparks in or near the area where refueling is performed or where gasoline is stored.
• If gasoline spills on your skin or clothing, immediately wash it off with soap
and water and change clothing.
• Never start the engine or let it run in an enclosed area. Engine exhaust fumes
are poisonous and can cause loss of consciousness or death in a short time.
WARNING
The engine exhaust from this product contains chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm. Operate this vehicle only outdoors
or in well-ventilated areas.
75
OPERATION
Fuel
For peak performance, Polaris recommends the use of 91 octane or
higher fuel. Although 87 octane fuel is usable, some engine performance will be lost and fuel economy will decrease. Do not use lower
than 87 octane fuel. Do not use fuel containing more than 10% ethanol
(including E85).
NOTICE: Operating with obstructed fuel systems will result in serious engine
damage. Perform maintenance as recommended.
Prolonged exposure to petroleum based products may damage paint.
Always protect painted surfaces when handling fuel.
Fuel System Deicers
If you use non-oxygenated fuel, Polaris recommends the regular use of
isopropyl-based fuel system deicer. Add one to two ounces per gallon
(8-16 ml per liter) of gasoline to prevent engine damage resulting from
fuel system icing and lean fuel mixtures. Never use deicers or additives
containing methanol. Polaris also recommends the use of Carbon Clean
Plus. See page 118 for the part numbers of Polaris products.
If you use oxygenated fuel containing ethanol, additional alcohol deicers or water absorbing additives should not be used.
76
n Oil
Low Oil Indicator Light
OPERATION
The low oil indicator light will alert the operator if the oil level is low.
Visually check for oil in the bottle. Add oil before further operation of
the snowmobile. See page 73 for oil recommendations.
Low Oil Level
Maintaining the proper oil level will prevent system aeration and possible loss of pumping action, which could result in engine damage. This is
especially important when the machine is operated in mountainous terrain.
NOTICE: Operating the snowmobile without adequate engine lubrication can
result in serious engine damage. Always check the oil level when
refueling. Add oil as needed.
Always maintain a visible level of oil in the tank. If oil is not visible,
continued operation may cause serious engine damage. See page 73 for
oil recommendations.
The Polaris oil cap on the oil bottle is vented to allow proper oil flow.
See your Polaris dealer for recommended replacement parts.
77
OPERATION
n Engine Stop Switch
Stop Switch
Push down on the engine stop
switch to ground out the ignition
and stop the engine quickly. Pull the
switch up to the RUN position to
allow restarting.
n Throttle Safety Switch
The throttle safety switch is designed to stop the engine whenever all
pressure is removed from the throttle lever and the throttle cable or
valves do not return to the normal closed position.
WARNING! Operating the snowmobile with a faulty throttle safety switch can
result in serious injury or death in the event of an accident. If the throttle safety
switch does not shut off the engine during a carburetor/throttle system
malfunction, immediately push down the engine stop switch. Do not start the
engine again until the malfunction has been corrected by your dealer.
78
n Throttle Lever
OPERATION
WARNING! An improperly functioning throttle lever may cause erratic machine
behavior and loss of control, which could result in serious injury or death. If the
throttle lever does not work properly, DO NOT start the engine.
If the engine stops abruptly when the throttle lever is released:
1. Turn the ignition switch to OFF.
2. Visually inspect the throttle cable and throttle body to determine
what caused the safety switch to activate.
3. Test the throttle lever by compressing and releasing it several times.
The lever and cable must return to the idle position quickly and
completely.
4. If the throttle lever operates properly, turn the ignition switch on and
go through normal starting procedures.
5. If the engine doesn't start, take the snowmobile to an authorized
Polaris dealer for service.
Tip: Excessive freeplay in the throttle cable may cause the safety switch to activate, preventing the engine from starting. If this occurs, return the snowmobile to an authorized Polaris dealer for service.
Tip: If an emergency exists and it's necessary to start the engine, the throttle
safety switch and engine stop switch may be disconnected from the wire
harness. When these switches are disconnected, the ignition key switch
must be used to shut off the engine. DO NOT continue to operate the
machine with the throttle safety switch disconnected. Return the machine to
an authorized Polaris dealer for service as soon as possible.
79
OPERATION
Electronic Reverse (PERCt)
Electronic reverse will activate only if the engine RPM is below 4000.
WARNING! Improper reverse operation, even at low speeds, may cause loss of
control, resulting in serious injury or death. Damage will occur to the gearcase or
transmission if shifting is attempted when the engine is operating above idle
speed.
• Shift to or from reverse only when the snowmobile is stopped and when
engine speed is at idle.
• Look behind the snowmobile before and while backing.
• Avoid sharp turns.
• Apply throttle slowly.
NOTICE: Engaging the starter when the engine is running WILL result in serious
engine damage, especially if the transmission is in reverse. Never
engage the starter when the engine is running.
Engaging Reverse
1. Stop the snowmobile and
leave the engine idling.
2. Make sure the area behind
your snowmobile is clear.
3. Push the yellow reverse button on the left-hand control
for one second, then release.
Reverse Button
Tip: A reverse light on the instrument panel will indicate that the transmission is
in reverse.
4. Apply the throttle slowly to make sure the transmission is in
reverse.
Tip: If the engine stops running, the transmission will be in forward gear when
it's restarted.
80
OPERATION
Electronic Reverse (PERCt)
Disengaging Reverse
1. Stop the snowmobile and leave the engine idling.
2. Push the yellow reverse button for one second and release. The light
on the instrument panel will shut off.
3. Apply the throttle slowly to make sure the transmission is in forward.
n Emergency Stopping
The following chart lists methods for stopping the snowmobile in the
event of an emergency. See page 78 for more information about the
engine stop switch.
SYSTEM
WHAT IT DOES
Ignition Switch
Interrupts ignition circuit
Brake
Slows jackshaft
Engine Stop Switch
Interrupts ignition circuit
Throttle Safety Switch
Interrupts ignition circuit
Tether Switch (Option)
Interrupts ignition circuit
81
OPERATION
Daily Storage
At the end of each ride, park the snowmobile on a level surface and support it at the rear with an appropriate track stand. The track should be
suspended approximately 4" (10 cm) off the ground.
Remove the key and cover the snowmobile.
Towing
Do not use the front bumper to pull or drag the snowmobile. The front
bumper is not designed for this type of use and may detach from the
vehicle if force is applied.
For your safety, do not attempt to use a tow hitch until you've read the
following warnings and understand the proper hitch functions.
WARNING! Objects towed with a rope have no braking power and can easily
collide with the rear of the snowmobile or other objects, resulting in serious
injury or death. DO NOT tow toboggans, sleds, saucers, or any type of vehicle
with a rope. Only a stiff metal pole connecting the towed object and the tow hitch
on the snowmobile should be used. If passengers are to be towed on a
toboggan or sled, make sure the pole is at least four feet (1.2 meters) long to
prevent any possibility of contact between the snowmobile's track and a person
riding in the towed object. Braking distances increase when towing loads. Slow
down to maintain control of the snowmobile.
If the snowmobile becomes inoperable and must be towed, and if it isn't
possible to use a rigid tow bar, attach the tow rope to the ski spindles
(not to the ski loops) to prevent damage to the steering components.
Remove the drive belt before towing, and have someone ride on the
towed snowmobile to operate the brake and steering when necessary.
NOTICE: Towing a disabled snowmobile with the drive belt in place can result in
serious damage to the engine and drive system. Always remove the
drive belt from a disabled snowmobile before towing.
82
Emission Control Information
MAINTENANCE
Any qualified repair shop or qualified person may maintain, replace, or
repair the emission control devices or systems on your snowmobile.
Emission Control Label
Your snowmobile is equipped at the time of sale with an emission control information (ECI) label and a factory-installed emissions information hangtag. These items are required by U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency regulations. The ECI label is permanently affixed to
either the right side of the tunnel or the engine recoil cover. The ECI
label should not be removed, even after you purchase the snowmobile.
You may remove the factory-installed emissions information hangtag,
which is intended solely for your use in making a purchasing decision.
Emission Control Maintenance Requirements
Your snowmobile is certified to operate on gasoline with a minimum
octane level of 87 (R+M)/2. If your snowmobile is equipped with a
check engine light and it comes on, you must take your snowmobile to a
qualified dealer for diagnostic service. Specifications and adjustments
for engine tune-ups are located in the Service Manual, which is available to your qualified service technician. Reverse (if equipped) must not
be engaged during engine tune-ups.
Owner's Responsibilities
Please read the Snowmobile Engine Emissions Limited Warranty, and
read the maintenance section of your owner's manual. You are responsible for ensuring that the specified maintenance is performed. Polaris
recommends that you contact an authorized Polaris dealer to perform
any service that may be necessary.
83
MAINTENANCE
Polaris Recommended Maintenance Program
To ensure many trouble-free miles of snowmobiling enjoyment, follow
recommended regular maintenance and perform service checks as outlined in this manual. Record maintenance and service in the Maintenance Log beginning on page 133.
The recommended maintenance schedule on your snowmobile calls for
service and maintenance inspections at 150 miles (240 km), 500 miles
(800 km) and 1000 miles (1600 km). These inspections should be performed by a qualified service technician. For continued optimum performance and component life, continue maintenance checks at 1000 mile
(1600 km) intervals.
All necessary replacement parts and labor incurred, with the exception
of authorized warranty repairs, become the responsibility of the registered owner. If, during the course of the warranty period, part failures
occur as a result of owner neglect in performing recommended regular
maintenance, the cost of repairs are the responsibility of the owner.
Personal safety is critical when attempting to service or make adjustments to your snowmobile. If you're not familiar with safe service or
adjustment procedures and the use of tools, or if you don't feel comfortable performing these tasks yourself, contact an authorized Polaris
dealer for service.
NOTICE: Hot components can cause damage to plastic. Always make sure the
exhaust system and engine have cooled before tipping the
snowmobile on its side for service or inspection.
84
MAINTENANCE
Periodic Maintenance Interval Table
The following chart is a guide based on average riding conditions. You
may need to increase frequency based on riding conditions. When
inspection reveals the need for replacement parts, always use genuine
Polaris parts, available from your Polaris dealer.
Item
See
Page
Frequency
150 mi.
(240 km)
500 mi.
(800 km)
1000 mi.
(1600 km)
2000 mi.
(3200 km)
I
I
PreSeason
CLUTCH
Clutch Alignment Offset
(without belt)
104
I
Drive Belt Condition
105
I
I
I
Clutches
104
C
C
C
--
I
I
I
I
104
I
I
I
I
Belt Tension
Clutch Sheaves
I
ENGINE/COOLING
Engine Mounts
--
I
I
I
I
Recoil Rope
--
I
I
I
I
Engine Torque Stop
107
I
I
I
I
Cylinder Head Bolts
--
I
I
I
Cylinder Base Nuts
--
I
I
I
Ignition Timing BTDC
--
I
I
I
VES System
--
C
C
C
I
Coolant
96
I
I
R
I
Coolant Hose
--
I
I
I
I
Heat Exchangers
98
I
I
I
I
Coolant Circulation
--
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
R
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Coolant Leaks
--
Spark Plug Condition
92
Exhaust Pipe
95
Exhaust Retaining
Springs
95
I
I
I
I - Inspect (clean, adjust, tighten, lubricate, replace if necessary)
C - Clean
R - Replace
L - Lubricate
85
MAINTENANCE
Periodic Maintenance Interval Table
Item
See
Page
Frequency
150 mi.
(240 km)
500 mi.
(800 km)
1000 mi.
(1600 km)
2000 mi.
(3200 km)
PreSeason
BRAKES
Hose Routing
--
I
I
I
I
Hose Condition
--
I
I
I
I
Fluid Leaks
--
I
I
I
I
Brake Pads
100
I
I
I
I
Brake Disc
--
I
I
I
I
Parking Brakes
68
I
I
I
Brake System
67,
100
Brake Fluid
101
I
I
R
FUEL MANAGEMENT
Idle RPM
Throttle Lever
-65, 79
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Oil Pump Lever
(synchronize)
--
I
I
I
Throttle Cable
89
L
L
L
Throttle Position
Sensor
--
I
I
I
I
Fuel Lines
94
I
I
Fuel Filter
94
R
R
Oil Filter
95
R
R
Oil Lines
95
I
I
I
Air Box
--
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
ELECTRICAL
Auxiliary Shut-Off
Switch
71, 78
I
I
I
I
I
Throttle Safety Switch
78
I
I
I
I
I
Ignition Switch
--
I
I
I
I
I
Taillight
71
I
I
I
I
I
Brakelight
71
I
I
I
I
I
Headlight
71
I
I
I
I
I
86
MAINTENANCE
Periodic Maintenance Interval Table
Item
See
Page
Frequency
150 mi.
(240 km)
500 mi.
(800 km)
1000 mi.
(1600 km)
2000 mi.
(3200 km)
PreSeason
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
CHASSIS
Ski Toe Alignment
--
Suspension Mounting
Bolts
--
Steering Fasteners
--
I
I
I
I
C
Rear Suspension Fasteners
--
I
I
I
I
I
Suspension Shock Oil
--
I
I
I
I
Cooling Fins and
Shroud
--
I
I
I
I
Drive Shaft Bearing
89
L
L
L
I
Jackshaft Bearings
116
L
L
L
I
Skags (Wear Bars)
115
I
I
I
I
I
Ski Saddle/Spindle
Bolts
--
I
I
I
I
I
Drive Chain Tension
99
I
I
I
I
I
Hood Latches
66
I
I
I
I
I
Rear Wheel Idler Bolts
111
I
I
I
I
I
Idler Bolt Jam Nut
111
I
I
I
I
Rear Suspension Pivot
Shafts
88
L
L
Steering Post U-Joint
--
L
L
Camber Alignment
--
I
I
I
I
I
L
L
Handlebar Centering
--
Tether Switch and Strap
71
I
I
I
I
I
I
Track Alignment
112
I
I
I
I
I
Track Tension
110
I
I
I
I
I
Front Limiter Strap
--
I
I
I
I
Rail Slide Condition
112
Chaincase Oil
90
I
I
I
I
I
R
I
I - Inspect (clean, adjust, tighten, lubricate, replace if necessary)
C - Clean
R - Replace
L - Lubricate
87
MAINTENANCE
Lubrication
Rear Suspension
Lubricate the suspension pivot shafts with Polaris Premium All Season
Grease at the intervals outlined in the Periodic Maintenance Table
beginning on page 85 and before seasonal storage. When operating in
heavy, wet snow conditions, lubricate every 500 miles (800 km).
Lack of lubrication will adversely affect your ride and the life of the suspension. For more information about suspension lubrication and adjustments, see your Polaris dealer.
IQ Comfort Rear Suspension
+
+
+
+
88
Lubrication
Driveshaft Bearing
MAINTENANCE
Fitting
Inject grease into the fitting on the
speedometer sensor housing until
grease purges from the seal on the
inside of the tunnel. This should take
approximately two pumps. Do not
use more than four pumps.
Throttle Cable
Lubricate the throttle cable lightly
with grease or oil. With the
engine off, turn the handlebars to
the left and lubricate liberally as
shown.
Front Suspension
The front suspension and steering components do not require lubrication.
89
MAINTENANCE
n Chaincase Oil
Check the chaincase oil level at the
intervals outlined in the Periodic Maintenance Table beginning on page 85.
The sight glass (1) is located on the
lower rear of the chaincase. Maintain the
oil level at or slightly below the center
of the sight glass (2). Change the chaincase oil after the first 500 miles (800
km), then every 1000 miles (1600 km)
or seasonally.
Polaris recommends the use of Polaris
Synthetic Chaincase Lube. See page 118
for the part numbers of Polaris products.
3
1
Oil Check
1. Position the vehicle on a level surface.
2. View the oil level at the sight glass.
3. Remove the fill plug (3) and add the
recommended oil as needed. Do not
overfill.
4. Reinstall the fill plug, making sure it
is seated properly.
90
2
Chaincase Oil
MAINTENANCE
Oil Change
1. Position the vehicle on a level surface.
2. Remove the drain plug (4) and drain
the oil into a drain pan. Allow the oil
to drain completely.
4
3. Clean off all metal shavings from the
plug.
4. Install a new sealing washer on the
drain plug. The sealing surfaces on the drain plug and the oil tank
should be clean and free of burrs, nicks or scratches.
5. Reinstall the drain plug. Torque to 6-10 ft. lbs. (8-13 Nm).
6. Remove the fill plug. Clean off all metal shavings from the plug.
7. Add 11 oz. (325 ml) of the recommended oil. Do not overfill.
8. Reinstall the fill plug, making sure it is seated properly.
91
MAINTENANCE
Spark Plugs
A new engine can cause temporary spark plug fouling due to the preservative added during the assembly process. Avoid prolonged idle speeds,
which cause plug fouling and carbonization.
NOTICE: Using non-recommended spark plugs can result in serious engine
damage. A spark plug with a heat range too high will always cause
engine damage if the engine is operated in conditions more severe
than intended for that plug. Always use the spark plugs recommended
for your snowmobile.
• Use recommended spark plugs with the proper gap. Refer to your
Owner's Manual Supplement for the specific spark plug to be used in
your machine.
• Use only resistor-type spark plugs.
• Torque spark plugs to 18-22 ft. lbs. (24-30 Nm).
Check the spark plug firing end condition after the engine has been
warmed up and the vehicle has been driven at higher speeds. If a plug is
fouled, replace the plug with a new plug.
CAUTION! A hot exhaust system and engine can cause burns. Wear
protective gloves when removing a spark plug for inspection.
92
Spark Plugs
MAINTENANCE
Normal Spark Plug
The normal insulator tip is gray, tan or light brown. There will be few
combustion deposits. The electrodes are not burned or eroded. This indicates the proper type and heat range for the engine and the service.
Tip: The tip should not be white. A white insulator tip indicates overheating,
caused by use of an improper spark plug or incorrect carburetor/throttle
body adjustments.
Wet Fouled Spark Plug
The wet fouled insulator tip is black. A damp oil film covers the firing
end. There may be a carbon layer over the entire nose. Generally, the
electrodes are not worn. General causes of fouling are excessive oil or
use of non-recommended injection oil.
Spark Plug Removal and Replacement
1. Remove the spark plug cap.
2. Using the special wrench provided in the tool pouch, rotate the
spark plug counterclockwise to remove.
3. Reverse the procedure for spark plug installation.
4. Torque to 18-22 ft. lbs. (24-30 Nm).
5. Reinstall the spark plug cap.
93
MAINTENANCE
Intake Filters
The intake foam filter limits snow
ingestion into the intake system.
When operating in loose powder
snow, check the top of the foam
filter periodically to remove any
accumulation of snow.
+
Fuel Injectors
All fuel injector service must be performed by an authorized Polaris
dealer. Do not attempt to clean or service the fuel injectors.
Fuel Pump
All fuel pump service must be performed by an authorized Polaris
dealer. Do not attempt to service the fuel pump.
Fuel Filter
See your Polaris dealer for replacement of the fuel filter at the intervals
outlined in the Periodic Maintenance Table beginning on page 85.
Fuel Lines
Inspect the fuel lines regularly for signs of deterioration or damage.
Always check fuel line condition after periods of storage. Normal deterioration from weather and fuel compounds may occur. Replace worn or
damaged fuel lines promptly.
NOTICE: Kinking the fuel lines or using a pliers or similar tools to remove fuel
lines may cause damage to the lines. If a fuel line has been damaged
or kinked, replace it promptly.
94
MAINTENANCE
Oil Lines
Inspect oil line condition every 1000 miles (1600 km).
Oil Filter
The oil filter is located at the side of
the oil tank. Have your dealer change
the oil filter and bleed the system
annually or every 1000 miles (1600
km).
Tip: The direction of the arrows indicates
the direction of flow through the filter.
Exhaust System
Check the exhaust system for wear or damage at the intervals outlined in
the Periodic Maintenance Table beginning on page 85.
CAUTION! Hot exhaust system parts can cause burns. Allow adequate time for
the exhaust system to cool. Never perform this procedure with the engine
running.
1. Allow the engine and exhaust system to cool completely.
2. Open the hood.
3. Inspect the muffler and pipes for cracks or damage. Check for weak
or missing retaining springs or damper/support grommets.
4. Replace any damaged or missing components.
5. Close the hood.
95
MAINTENANCE
Cooling System
Coolant
The coolant supplied in the system at the factory is a 50/50 mixture of
ethylene-glycol and distilled water, which will provide adequate freeze
protection under most conditions. If the vehicle will be stored or operated at extremely low temperatures, greater protection may be required.
Please see your Polaris dealer.
When adding or changing coolant, Polaris recommends using Premium
60/40 anti-freeze coolant, which is already premixed and ready to use.
Do not dilute with water. Never exceed a 60% antifreeze/40% water
mixture. See page 118 for the part numbers of Polaris products.
Tip: Never add tap water to the cooling system. Minerals cause deposits and
may react adversely with the metals in the engine and cooling system.
n Coolant Level
The engine coolant level is controlled by the recovery system. The
recovery system components are:
• Coolant reservoir bottle
• Filler neck
• Pressure cap
• Connecting hoses
Always maintain the coolant level at the “COLD FILL” mark on the
coolant overflow tank (when the engine is cold).
NOTICE: Operating the snowmobile with insufficient coolant will result in
overheating and serious engine damage. Always maintain the coolant
level as recommended.
96
Cooling System
MAINTENANCE
Coolant High Temperature Indicator Light
The high temperature indicator light will illuminate when engine coolant temperature becomes too hot for safe continued operation of the
engine. If you must drive your machine after the high temperature indicator light has come on, drive slowly and stop frequently to allow the
engine to cool down. Driving in deep snow will also help cool the
engine. See your dealer for service.
Add coolant if the level is low. Engine performance will be reduced if
you continue operating when the high temperature light is on.
Flushing the Cooling System
To ensure that the coolant maintains its ability to protect the engine,
drain the system completely every two years and add a fresh mixture of
antifreeze and distilled water. This service must be performed when the
engine is cold. Ask your Polaris dealer to check the coolant when he
performs the fall tune-up on your snowmobile.
97
MAINTENANCE
Cooling System
Bleeding the Cooling System
CAUTION! Steam and hot liquids will cause burns to your skin. Never bleed the
cooling system or remove the pressure cap when the engine is warm or hot.
Use of a non-standard pressure cap will not allow the recovery system to
function properly. If the pressure cap needs replacement, contact your
dealer for the correct part.
NOTICE: If coolant flow becomes restricted or plugged, coolant loss, air lock or
engine damage may result. Most cooling systems are equipped with a
filter that should be periodically inspected or replaced.
Perform the bleeding procedure when the engine is cold.
1. Position the vehicle so that the top of the tunnel is level. Elevate the
front of the vehicle slightly if necessary.
2. Remove the pressure cap and fill the coolant bottle with properly
mixed coolant to the maximum mark.
3. Remove the bleed screw from the water outlet manifold and/or the
thermostat housing. Allow the coolant to bleed through the system
until it runs out the bleed holes. Reinstall the bleed screw into the
manifold.
4. Add coolant to the coolant bottle to the maximum mark.
5. Start the engine and run at a fast idle for two to three minutes.
Loosen the bleed screw occasionally to purge any trapped air.
6. Stop the engine and check the coolant bottle level. Fill as required.
7. Feel the heat exchangers under the running boards. If the system is
bled properly, they'll be warm to the touch. If they're not, repeat step
5. Lift the front of the machine slightly to assist in the bleeding.
8. Replace the pressure cap and carefully lower the front end of the
machine.
98
Drive Chain Tension
MAINTENANCE
Check drive chain tension weekly and
before each long trip. To obtain correct
chain tension:
1. Rotate the driven clutch counterclockwise to move all chain slack to
the tensioner side. Lock the brake
lever lock, or have an assistant hold
the brake lever firmly.
2. Loosen the adjuster bolt jam nut (1).
3. Finger tighten the adjuster bolt (2)
until it can no longer be adjusted by
hand, then back off 1/4 turn.
4. Tighten the jam nut while holding
the adjuster bolt. Torque to 21 ft.
lbs. (28 Nm).
5. Release the brake lever lock.
2
1
99
MAINTENANCE
Brakes
n Hydraulic Brake Inspection
Inspect the brake lever reserve before each use of the snowmobile. See
page 67.
Brake pads must be replaced when the brake pad material becomes thinner than the backing plate, approximately 1/16" (1.5 mm). A kit is available for replacing brake pads. See your dealer.
WARNING! Brake failure during operation can result in serious injury or death.
Properly functioning brakes are vital to your safety. Be sure the brake pads do
not drag on the disc and that brake lever travel is not excessive. Always replace
brake pads when the brake pad material becomes thinner than the backing
plate, approximately 1/16" (1.5mm).
Brake Components
1. Brake Caliper
2. Brake Disc
3. Brake Pad Material
(Replace when thickness is
less than 1/16I/1.5 mm).
Excessive Lever Travel
Hydraulic brakes are selfadjusting, but if excessive
brake pad clearance develops
bring the snowmobile to an
authorized Polaris dealer for
inspection and adjustment.
100
3
2
1
Brakes
MAINTENANCE
n Brake Fluid
WARNING
After opening a bottle of brake fluid, always discard any unused portion. Never
store or use a partial bottle. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, meaning it rapidly
absorbs moisture from the air. The moisture causes the boiling temperature of
the brake fluid to drop, which can lead to early brake fade and the possibility of
accident or serious injury.
Keep the master cylinder cover free of dirt and debris. The vent slits allow for
diaphragm movement, and if they become plugged, movement of brake fluid
below the diaphragm may be restricted, altering brake function.
NOTICE: Brake fluid will damage decals, paint and some plastics. Always wipe
up spills immediately.
Replace brake fluid at least every two
years with Polaris DOT 4 high temperature brake fluid. See page 118 for
the part numbers of Polaris products.
Sight Glass
The brake fluid level can be seen
through the fluid level indicator (a
plastic sight glass) in the master cylinder reservoir. If the fluid is sufficient, the sight glass will be black. If
the sight glass is any color other than
black, add brake fluid.
101
MAINTENANCE
Brakes
Bleeding the Hydraulic Brake System
Air in the hydraulic brake system will cause spongy brake lever action.
Bleed the system before operating the snowmobile.
WARNING! Operating the vehicle with a spongy brake lever can result in loss of
brakes, which could cause an accident and lead to serious injury or death.
Never operate the vehicle with a spongy-feeling brake lever.
During the bleeding procedure, keep the brake handle as level as possible. The reservoir must be in this position to minimize the possibility of
air entering the system through the reservoir vent.
1. Remove brake master cylinder reservoir cover and gasket.
2. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to between the MIN and MAX
marks or 1/4"-5/16" (.6-.8 cm) below the lip of the reservoir opening. Reinstall the gasket and cover.
3. Slip a rubber tube over the ball of the bleeder valve and direct the
flow of fluid into an approved container.
4. Squeeze the brake lever a full stroke. Then unscrew the bleeder
valve 3/4 of a turn to release air.
5. Close the bleeder valve and release the brake lever.
6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until fluid flows from the bleeder valve in a
solid stream free of air bubbles.
WARNING! Overfilling the master cylinder leaves no room for fluid expansion
and may cause the brakes to lock, resulting in serious injury or death. Always
add brake fluid to the fill line as recommended.
7. After bleeding is complete, refill the reservoir to the proper level.
See page 101.
8. Reinstall the gasket and cover.
102
Lights
MAINTENANCE
Removing Halogen Bulbs
Tip: Do not touch a halogen bulb with bare fingers. Oil from skin leaves a residue, causing a hot spot that will shorten the life of the lamp. If fingers do
touch the bulb, clean it with an alcohol-moistened towel.
1. Remove the plenum coverBulb
ing from the headlight
assembly.
Spring
2. Lift the rubber boot to
expose the bulb.
Harness
3. Push down on the spring to
release it from the housing.
4. With the wire harness
attached to the bulb, withdraw the bulb from the
housing.
5. Grasp the bulb by its metal base and carefully separate the bulb
from the harness.
Installing Halogen Bulbs
1.
2.
3.
4.
Hold the bulb by its metal base and install it into the wire harness.
Insert the bulb into the housing.
Connect the spring to the housing.
Carefully flip the spring back into the housing, placing it around the
wire harness.
5. Reinstall the plenum covering on the headlight assembly.
6. Adjust headlight aim. See page 30.
Replacing Taillight Bulbs
1. Remove the screws securing the taillight lens. Remove the lens.
2. Push the bulb inward and turn it counterclockwise to remove it.
3. Install a new bulb. Push the bulb inward and turn it clockwise to
secure it.
4. Reinstall the taillight lens.
103
MAINTENANCE
Clutch System
Periodically inspect clutch sheaves for damage, wear or belt residue. To
maintain optimum performance, clean with non-oil based cleaners such
as isopropyl alcohol.
WARNING! If you become aware of higher than normal clutch engagement or
an unusual vibration or shift pattern, see your dealer immediately. Do not
operate the snowmobile until repairs have been made.
WARNING! All clutch maintenance and repairs must be performed by an
authorized Polaris dealer. Any unauthorized modifications to clutches, such as
adding or removing weights, will void the warranty.
NOTICE: The bushings in the weights and rollers of Polaris clutches are made
of a material that may be damaged if lubricated. Do not lubricate
clutch bushings.
Clutch Alignment Offset
Clutch alignment offset is important for maintaining optimum performance. See your dealer for service and adjustments. A special tool is
required to check for proper alignment.
Clutch Center Distance
See your Owner's Manual Supplement for recommended center distance
for your machine. If adjustment is necessary, see your dealer.
104
Clutch System
MAINTENANCE
n Drive Belt Condition
Periodically check the condition and tension of the drive belt, and
always carry a spare. Inspect the belt for signs of excessive wear: frayed
edges, missing cogs, cracks and excessive looseness. Replace the belt if
any of these conditions exist. See Drive Belt Troubleshooting on page
123.
For improved drive-away during extremely cold temperatures, remove
the belt and warm it to room temperature. Reinstall it before starting the
snowmobile.
n Drive Belt Deflection
Measure belt deflection with both
clutches at rest and in their full
neutral position.
Measure
A
Straight
Edge
Place a straight edge on the belt
and apply downward pressure
while measuring at point A. This
measurement should be 1 1/4"
(3.2 cm).
Drive Belt Adjustment
1. Install the L-wrench into the open threaded hole in the outer sheave
of the clutch (see page 106). Turn the wrench clockwise slightly to
remove pressure from the sheaves.
2. Loosen the 7/16" jam nut on the belt width adjuster.
3. Using a 1/8" Allen wrench, adjust the threaded set screw as needed.
Tip: Turn the set screw in (clockwise) to increase the distance between the
sheaves and out (counterclockwise) to decrease the distance.
4. Tighten the jam nut.
105
MAINTENANCE
Clutch System
Drive Belt Removal
NOTICE: Do not attempt to remove the drive belt after operating in reverse. The
snowmobile must be stopped after forward motion to prevent damage
to components during belt removal.
1. Stop the engine after operating in a forward motion.
2. Turn the ignition key off.
+
Wait for the engine to come
to a complete stop.
3. Lock the parking brake.
4. Open the hood.
5. Remove the left side panel.
6. Rotate the driven clutch
counterclockwise 1/4 turn
by hand to ensure forward
engagement before attempting to remove the belt.
7. Locate the L-wrench in the tool kit. Install the wrench into the open
threaded hole in the outer sheave of the clutch (+).
8. Turn the wrench clockwise until the sheaves open far enough to
remove the belt. If the wrench does not turn readily, rotate the
driven clutch counterclockwise an additional 1/4 turn by hand and
try again.
9. Grasp the belt at the lower edge and remove it.
106
Clutch System
MAINTENANCE
Drive Belt Installation
1. Drop the drive belt over the drive
clutch and pull back the slack.
Tip: To ensure satisfactory belt life, install
belts so they operate in the same
direction of rotation by positioning the
identification numbers so that you
can read them. If required, separate
the sheaves as outlined in the belt
removal procedures.
2. Rotate the L-wrench counterclockwise to tighten the sheaves while working the belt to the outer
edge of the sheaves.
3. Remove the wrench.
4. Reinstall the side panel.
5. Close and secure the hood.
Torque Stop
Periodically check torque stop clearance.
With clutches in proper alignment, the
torque stop clearance should be .010I.030I (.25-.75 mm) from the engine case.
Adjust if necessary. Lock the jam nut.
.010I-.030I
(.25-.75 mm)
107
MAINTENANCE
Track Replacement
When replacing the track, always install a track having the lug size recommended for your model. See your Polaris dealer.
NOTICE: Installing tracks with larger lugs on machines equipped with coolers
will result in damage to the cooler or tunnel. Always install a track
having the lug size recommended for your model.
Track Inspection
WARNING! Broken track rods can cause a rotating track to come off the
machine, which could cause serious injury or death. Never operate with a
damaged track. Never rotate a damaged track under power.
1. Using a hoist, safely lift and support the rear of the snowmobile
off the ground.
2. Rotate the track by hand to check
for damage.
3. Carefully examine the track along
the entire length of each rod.
Bend the track to check for breakage.
4. Replace the track if any rod damage is found.
108
Rods
Track Lubrication
MAINTENANCE
WARNING! Operating with insufficient lubrication between the rail slide and
track guide clips can cause track failure, loss of vehicle control and loss of
braking ability, which can result in serious injury or death. Avoid operating for
extended periods on ice and other surfaces that have little or no snow for
lubrication.
The slide rail requires adequate snow cover for sufficient lubrication.
Excessive wear indicates insufficient lubrication. A new rail slide can
cause faster heat build-up in limited lubrication, resulting in excessive
wear.
Track damage or failure caused by operation on ice or under other poor
lubrication conditions will void the track warranty.
NOTICE: High speed use on hard-packed surfaces is not recommended for
models equipped with a deep lug track. Track lug damage may occur.
Keep high speed use to a minimum, including frequent slow-speed
intervals for track cooling.
109
MAINTENANCE
Track Tension
WARNING! Moving parts can cut and crush body parts. When performing the
checks and adjustments recommended on the following pages, stay clear of all
moving parts. Never perform track measurement or adjustments with the engine
running.
Track adjustment is critical for proper handling. Always maintain correct tension and alignment.
TRACK TENSION DATA CHART
Suspension
Slack Measurement
Weight
Measurement
Location
IQ Comfort
7/8"-1 1/8" (2.2-2.9 cm)
10 lbs.
(4.54 kg)
16" (40 cm)
ahead of rear
idler shaft
Tip: Tension adjustments should be made only after the track is warmed up and
limber.
1. Turn the engine off.
2. Lift the rear of the snowmobile and safely support it off the ground.
3. Place the recommended weight or downward pressure on the track
at the specified distance (see chart) ahead of the center of the rear
idler wheel.
Tip: Measure at the point where the weight is hanging.
110
MAINTENANCE
Track Tension
4. Check for specified slack between the wear surface of the track clip
and the plastic rail slide.
If the track needs adjustment:
5. Loosen the rear idler shaft bolt.
6. Loosen the lock nuts.
Adjusting Screw
Lock Nut
Shaft
Bolt
Slack Measurement
S
16I(40 cm)
10 lbs. (4.54 kg)
7. Tighten or loosen the track adjusting screws as necessary to provide
equal adjustment on both sides of the track.
8. Repeat the measurement on the other side of the track.
Tip: Check more frequently when the snowmobile is new.
9. Start the engine and slowly rotate the track at least five revolutions.
Let the track come to a stop (do not apply brakes).
10. Check track alignment (see page 112) and adjust as necessary.
11. Tighten the lock nuts.
12. Tighten the idler shaft bolts. Torque to 35 ft. lbs. (47.5 Nm).
111
MAINTENANCE
n Track Alignment
Periodically check that the track is
centered and running evenly on the
slide rails. Misalignment will cause
excessive wear to the track and slide
rail.
1. Safely support the rear of the
snowmobile with the track off the
ground.
2. Start the engine and apply a small
amount of throttle until the track
turns slowly at least five comRails
plete revolutions. Stop the engine
and let the track come to a stop
(do not apply brakes).
3. Inspect track alignment by looking through the track window to
make sure the rails are evenly spaced on each side. If the track runs
to the left, loosen left locknut and tighten the left adjusting bolt. If
the track runs to the right, loosen right locknut and tighten the right
adjusting bolt.
4. After adjustments are complete, tighten locknuts and torque idler
shaft bolts to 35 ft. lbs. (47.5 Nm).
5. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to verify proper alignment.
n Rail Slide Wear
For ease of inspection, all
Polaris rail slides have a
wear limit indicator groove
to indicate the minimum permissible slide thickness.
Replace the rail slides if they
are worn to the top of the
groove at any point along
their length. Failure to do so
may result in permanent
damage to the track or rails.
112
Minimum
Thickness
Replace when
worn to top of
groove
MAINTENANCE
Steering System
Steering Inspection and Adjustment
Check all steering system fasteners weekly and before a long ride.
Tighten any loose fasteners.
+ +
+
+
+
113
MAINTENANCE
Steering System
Ski Alignment
WARNING! Improper ski alignment or adjustment may cause loss of steering
control, resulting in serious injury or death. Do not attempt to change the ski
alignment or camber adjustment. See your Polaris dealer.
With the handlebars in a straight ahead position, and with vehicle
weight compressing the suspension, measure from the straight edge of
the skis at the center of the ski mounting bolt. The measurement
between the skis at point X should be 1/8" to 1/4" (3-6 mm) greater than
the measurement at point Y.
Tip: If the skis are misaligned, we recommend that your dealer correct the alignment, since camber adjustment may also be affected.
X
10 in.
(25.4 cm)
10 in.
(25.4 cm)
Y
114
Steering System
MAINTENANCE
n Ski Skags
WARNING! Worn skis and/or skags will adversely affect handling. Loss of
vehicle control may result, causing serious injury or death. See your dealer's
studding chart for recommended skags. If you install longer or more aggressive
carbide skags than the original equipment, it may also be necessary to add track
studs to maintain proper vehicle control while turning on hard-packed snow or
ice.
Check skags before each use of the snowmobile to ensure positive steering characteristics. Skags must be replaced when worn to half their original diameter.
Tip: Carbide skags must be replaced if any abnormal wear or chipping is found.
Skag Replacement
Some models are equipped with single skags. Some models are
equipped with dual skags.
1. Raise and support the front of
the snowmobile so the skis are
approximately 6" (15 cm) from
the ground.
2. Remove the attaching nuts and
pry the skag downward.
3. Remove the front end of the
skag.
4. Remove the rear end of the
skag.
5. Reverse the steps to install a
skag.
Skag
115
MAINTENANCE
Extended Storage
Off-season or extended storage of your snowmobile requires preventive
measures to aid against deterioration and to prolong the useful life of
many components. See page 118 for the part numbers of Polaris products.
Cleaning and Preservation
Proper storage starts with cleaning, washing, and waxing the hood,
chassis, and plastic parts. Wipe down remaining surfaces with a damp
cloth. Clean and touch up with paint any rusted or previously painted
surfaces. Be sure that corrosive salt and acids are removed from surfaces
before beginning preservation with waxes and rust inhibitors (grease, oil
or paint).
The snowmobile should be stored in a dry garage or shed, out of direct
sunlight, and covered with a fabric snowmobile cover. Plastic tarp may
cause condensation to form and damage snowmobile components.
Controls and Linkage
Lubricate all bushings and cables at the intervals outlined in the Periodic
Maintenance Table beginning on page 85.
Bearings
Grease the jackshaft and drive shaft clutch side bearings with Polaris
Premium All-Season Grease or a similar high quality grease to prevent
corrosion.
Clutch and Drive System
Remove the drive belt and store in a cool dry location. Do not lubricate
clutch components, except the driven clutch shaft bushing as outlined in
the service manual. See your dealer.
116
Extended Storage
MAINTENANCE
Engine Protection
Proper preparation of the engine and fuel system is vital to the prevention of rust and corrosion on precision engine parts during storage.
Whenever the machine is stored for a period of more than 60 days, the
engine must be fogged with fogging oil. Follow the engine fogging
instructions provided on the container.
Always add Premium Carbon Clean or a fuel conditioner/stabilizer to
the fuel tank. Follow the instructions on the container, running the
engine for five minutes to get additives through the entire fuel system.
Top off with fresh fuel. Do not allow the snowmobile to run out of fuel.
Electrical Connections
Replace worn or frayed electrical wire and connectors. Be sure wiring
harness is properly secured away from sharp edges, steering linkage,
moving parts, and hot exhaust parts.
Track and Suspension
Moderate track tension should be maintained during summer storage.
The snowmobile should be supported off the ground to allow the track
to hang freely. See illustration.
Transporting the Snowmobile
Whenever the snowmobile is transported:
1. Be sure the fuel cap and oil cap are installed correctly.
2. Always tie the snowmobile to the transporting unit securely using
suitable straps.
3. Remove the ignition key to prevent loss.
117
POLARIS PRODUCTS
Description
Part No.
Engine Lubricants
2870791
Fogging Oil (12 oz. Aerosol)
2871098
Premium 2-Cycle Engine Oil (qt.)
2871097
Premium 2-Cycle Engine Oil (gal.)
2871240
Premium 2-Cycle Engine Oil (2.5 gal.)
2871721
Premium Gold Synthetic 2-Cycle Engine Oil (qt.)
2871722
Premium Gold Synthetic 2-Cycle Engine Oil (gal.)
2872347
Premium Gold Synthetic 2-Cycle Engine Oil (2.5 gal.)
2874438
VES II Synthetic 2-Cycle Engine Oil (qt.)
2874439
VES II Synthetic 2-Cycle Engine Oil (gal.)
2874443
VES II Synthetic 2-Cycle Engine Oil (2.5 gal.)
Chaincase Lubricants
2873105
Synthetic Chaincase Lubricant (qt.)
2872951
Synthetic Chaincase Lubricant (12 oz.)
Grease/Specialized Lubricants
2871312
Grease Gun Kit, Premium All Season (3 oz.)
2871322
Premium All Season Grease (3 oz. cartridge)
2871423
Premium All Season Grease (14 oz. cartridge)
2871329
Dielectric Grease (Nyogelt)
2871323
Anitfreeze, 60/40 Premix (gal.)
2871534
Anitfreeze, 60/40 Premix (qt.)
Coolant
Additives/Miscellaneous
2871326
Carbon Clean Plus (12 oz.)
2870652
Fuel Stabilizer (16 oz.)
2872189
DOT 4 Brake Fluid (12 oz.)
2872893
Engine Degreaser (12 oz.)
2870505
Isopropyl
2872889
Brake and Clutch Cleaner
2872890
Carb and Throttle Body Cleaner
118
Engine Troubleshooting
TROUBLESHOOTING
Unless you have experience and training in two-cycle engine repair,
see your dealer if technical problems arise.
Problem
Probable Cause Solution
Erratic engine operating RPM during
acceleration or load
variations
Drive clutch binding
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Driven clutch malfunction
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Harsh drive clutch
engagement
Drive belt worn or
too narrow
• Replace the drive belt.
Excessive belt/
sheave clearance
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Drive belt turns over
Machine fails to
move
Wrong belt for appli- • Replace the drive belt.
cation
Clutch alignment out
of spec
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Engine mount broken or loose
• Inspect and replace. SEE YOUR
DEALER.
Clutch jammed
• Check for twisted belt or broken
spring. SEE YOUR DEALER.
Track jammed
• Foreign object may be caught or the
rail slide melted to the track clips
due to lack of lubrication.
• Track may be iced up or frozen to
the ground.
Chaincase sprocket
or chain jammed or
broken
• Chain is loose or broken or chain
tightener is loose. SEE YOUR
DEALER.
119
TROUBLESHOOTING
Engine Troubleshooting
Problem
Probable Cause Solution
Noise in drive system
Broken drive clutch
components
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Bearing failure/
chaincase, jackshaft,
or front drive shaft
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Drive belt surface
flat spots
• Inspect and replace as needed.
Poor low RPM performance
Engine doesn't turn
120
Drive chain loose
• Inspect and adjust (or replace).
Drive chain worn,
sprocket teeth broken
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Worn drive belt
• Inspect and replace as needed.
Excessive belt/
sheave clearance
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Loose torque stop
• Inspect and adjust.
Sticky clutch
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Poor fuel quality
• Use 87-91 octane fuel (or higher).
Seized engine
• SEE YOUR DEALER. Seizure is a
result of poor lubrication, inadequate fuel supply, broken parts or
improper cooling.
Hydrostatic lock
• Fuel may have entered the crankcase
while the vehicle was standing or
being transported. SEE YOUR
DEALER to correct the cause. Drain
plug(s) are located on the lower
crankcase for emergency draining.
Engine Troubleshooting
TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem
Probable Cause Solution
Engine turns but fails
to start
Faulty ignition
• Install new spark plug(s). If engine
still fails to start, check for spark. If
there's no spark, SEE YOUR
DEALER.
No fuel to engine
• Make sure the fuel valve is on.
• Make sure the fuel tank contains
fuel.
• Ice may be in the fuel line, filter or
pump. Add isopropyl alcohol to the
fuel system.
Poor engine compression
• Mixture is too lean. A main jet that
is too small will cause seizure resulting in loss of power. This indicates a
major engine problem that must be
repaired before operating. SEE
YOUR DEALER.
Fouled or defective
spark plug(s)
• Replace the plug(s).
Fuel filter (loss of
high RPM power)
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Incorrect clutching
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Engine lacks power
Engine continually
backfires
Faulty plug(s)
• Change plug(s).
Fuel System
• Dirt or ice may be in the fuel system
(deicer should be added to non-ethanol fuel at all times for assurance
against fuel line icing).
Incorrect throttle
freeplay or faulty
switch
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Engine requires
more than normal
pulls to start
Poor fuel
• Replace with fresh winter fuel.
Not enough fuel getting to engine
• SEE YOUR DEALER.
Engine backfires but
fails to start
Spark plug wires
may be on wrong
cylinder
• Reinstall spark plug wires to the corresponding cylinder.
121
TROUBLESHOOTING
IQ Comfort Suspension Troubleshooting
Problem
Solution
Rear suspension bottoms too easily
• Adjust torsion spring preload to achieve proper static sag
(see page 54).
• Change torsion spring to stiffer optional spring (see your
dealer).
• Rotate RRSS to higher position (see page 59).
Rides too stiff in rear
• Check for binding suspension shafts and grease all pivot
points.
• Adjust torsion spring preload to achieve proper static sag
(see page 54).
• Change torsion spring to softer optional spring (see your
dealer).
• Check track tension (see page 110).
• Rotate RRSS to lower position (see page 59).
Machine darts from
side to side
• Check ski alignment (see page 114).
• Make sure spindles and all steering components turn freely.
• Check for excessive play in steering assembly (see your
dealer).
• Ensure skags are straight on skis.
• Set static sag (see page 54).
• Check rail slide/replace if worn (see page 112).
• Install Accu-Trak dual skags (see your dealer).
Front end pushes
• Check for worn skags.
• Check for binding front suspension shafts and steering
components, grease all pivot points (elevate front of
machine).
• Set static sag (see page 54).
• Install single skag (see your dealer).
• Increase IFS preload (if equipped) (see page 51).
• Rotate RRSS to higher position (see page 59).
Steering is heavy
•
•
•
•
122
Make sure spindles and all steering components turn freely.
Check ski alignment (see page 114).
Check skags and skis for damage.
Set static sag (see page 54).
Drive Belt Wear/Burn
Cause
TROUBLESHOOTING
Solution
Driving at low RPM
Drive at higher RPM. Gear the machine down. Check belt
deflection.
Insufficient warm-up
Warm the engine at least five minutes. Take the drive belt
off the machine in extremely cold weather and warm it
up. Break machine loose from the snow.
Towing at low RPM
Do not tow in deep snow. Use fast, aggressive throttle to
engage clutch.
Riding with high RPM
and slow speed (8000
RPM/10 MPH)
Lower the gear ratio. Reduce RPM. Avoid riding in high
ambient temperatures. Check for snow ingestion.
Ice and snow build-up
between track and tunnel
Warm the engine at least five minutes. Take the drive belt
off the machine in extremely cold weather and warm it
up. Break machine loose from the snow.
Poor engine performance
Check for fouled plugs or water, ice, or dirt in the gas tank
or fuel line.
Loading machines onto
trailers
Skis may gouge into trailers and prevent the drivetrain
from spinning properly. Use enough speed to drive the
machine completely onto the trailer. Push and pull it to
finish loading if necessary.
Clutch malfunction
Inspect clutch components. See your dealer.
Slow, easy clutch engage- Use fast, aggressive throttle to engage clutch.
ment
Wrong or missing belt
Always use the recommended belt.
Improper break-in
Always break in a new belt and/or clutch by avoiding
aggressive or high speed operation during the break-in
period.
123
WARRANTY
Service And Warranty Information
Obtaining Service and Warranty Assistance
Read and understand the service data and the Polaris warranty information contained in this manual. Contact your Polaris dealer for replacement parts, service or warranty. Your dealer receives frequent updates
on changes, modifications and tips on snowmobile maintenance, which
may supersede information contained in this manual. Your dealer is also
familiar with Polaris policies and procedures and will be happy to assist
you.
When contacting us about parts, service, or warranty, always provide the
following information:
1. Serial number
2. Model number
3. Dealer name
4. Date of purchase
5. Details of trouble experienced
6. Length of time and conditions of operation
7. Previous correspondence
Use the page provided near the front of your Owner’s Manual to record
the identification numbers of your snowmobile and its engine.
Polaris Customer Service
United States: 1-888-704-5290
Canada: 1-204-925-7100
124
Service And Warranty Information
WARRANTY
Polaris Anti-Theft System
The Polaris anti-theft system (PATS) monitoring program is designed to
aid owners of registered snowmobiles in recovery of stolen machines.
Administration
1. Polaris snowmobile owner reports theft.
A. In addition to notifying the proper law enforcement officials, the
owner must call Polaris Customer Service.
B. Owners must provide their name, address, telephone number and
the model and serial number of stolen machines.
2. Polaris warranty will provide all dealerships with a monthly updated
list of all stolen units to further monitor thefts.
3. Polaris warranty will aid in notifying the proper owner when a unit
is recovered
125
WARRANTY
Limited Warranty
Polaris Sales Inc., 2100 Highway 55, Medina, MN 55340, provides a ONE YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY on all components of the Polaris snowmobile against defects in
material or workmanship. This warranty covers the parts and labor charges for repair or
replacement of defective parts that are covered by this warranty. The warranty begins on
the date of purchase. This warranty is transferable to another consumer, during the warranty period, through a Polaris dealer.
Registration
At the time of sale, the Warranty Registration Form must be completed by your dealer
and submitted to Polaris within ten days. Upon receipt of this registration, Polaris will
record the registration for warranty. No verification of registration will be sent to the
purchaser as the copy of the Warranty Registration Form will be the warranty entitlement. If you have not signed the original registration and received the customer copy,
please contact your dealer immediately. NO WARRANTY COVERAGE WILL BE
ALLOWED UNLESS THE SNOWMOBILE IS REGISTERED WITH POLARIS.
Initial dealer preparation and set-up of your snowmobile is very important in ensuring
trouble-free operation. Purchasing a snowmobile in the crate or without proper dealer
set-up will void your warranty coverage.
Warranty Coverage and Exclusions
Limitations of warranties and remedies
This warranty excludes any failures not caused by a defect in material or workmanship.
The warranty does not cover accidental damage, normal wear and tear, abuse or
improper handling. The warranty also does not cover any snowmobile that has been
structurally altered, neglected, improperly maintained, used for racing or used for purposes other than for which it was manufactured. The warranty does not cover any damages that occur during trailer transit or as a result of unauthorized service or parts. In
addition, this warranty does not cover physical damage to paint or finish, stress cracks,
tearing or puncturing of upholstery material, corrosion or defects in parts, components
or the snowmobile due to fire, explosions or any other cause beyond Polaris’ control.
This warranty does not cover the use of unauthorized lubricants, chemicals, or fuels that
are not compatible with the snowmobile.
The exclusive remedy for breach of this warranty shall be, at Polaris’ exclusive option,
repair or replacement of any defective materials, or components or products. THE REMEDIES SET FORTH IN THIS WARRANTY ARE THE ONLY REMEDIES AVAILABLE TO ANY PERSON FOR BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY. POLARIS SHALL
HAVE NO LIABILITY TO ANY PERSON FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL
OR SPECIAL DAMAGES OF ANY DESCRIPTION, WHETHER ARISING OUT OF
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OR ANY OTHER CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE, OR OTHER TORT OR OTHERWISE. Some states do not permit the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages or implied warranties, so the
above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you if inconsistent with controlling
state law.
126
Limitations of warranties and remedies
WARRANTY
ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE) ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE ABOVE ONE YEAR
WARRANTY PERIOD. POLARIS FURTHER DISCLAIMS ALL EXPRESS WARRANTIES NOT STATED IN THIS WARRANTY. Some states do not allow limitations
on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation may not apply to you if
inconsistent with controlling state law.
How to Obtain Warranty Service
If your snowmobile requires warranty service, you must take it to a Polaris dealer authorized to repair Polaris snowmobiles. When requesting warranty service you must present
your copy of the Warranty Registration form to the dealer. (The cost of transportation to
and from the dealer is YOUR responsibility). Polaris recommends that you use your
original selling dealer; however, you may use any Polaris Servicing Dealer to perform
warranty service.
Please work with your dealer to resolve any warranty issues. Your dealer will contact the
appropriate personnel at Polaris if additional assistance is needed.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which
vary from state to state.
If any of the above terms are void because of state or federal law, all other warranty
terms will remain in effect.
Engine Oil
1. Mixing oil brands or using non-recommended oil may cause engine damage. We recommend the use of Polaris engine oil.
2. Damage resulting from the use of non-recommended lubricants may not be covered
by warranty.
127
WARRANTY
Conditions and Exclusions
In order to qualify for warranty, the product must have been properly set up and tested
by a Polaris Dealer (if applicable). Failure of any dealer to perform the required vehicle
Pre-Delivery Inspection, perform all applicable service bulletins and have the consumer
sign the PDI form prior to delivery may void the warranty. Failure to provide proof of
required periodic maintenance upon request may result in denial of warranty coverage.
Use of the recommended Polaris products for lubrication and maintenance as directed by
the Owner’s manual is highly recommended. Should a failure occur during the warranty
period resulting from the use of non-recommended products, warranty coverage may be
denied.
Warranty does not apply to parts exposed to friction surfaces, stresses, environmental
conditions and/or contamination. The following items are excluded from warranty consideration if the failure was due to wear or not the direct result of a defect:
Skis
Tracks
Suspension components
Brake components
Seat components
Clutches and components
Steering components
Batteries
Light bulbs/Sealed beam lamps
Idler wheels
Ski wear rods
Slide rails
Finished and unfinished surfaces
Carburetor/Throttle body components
Engine components
Drive belts
Hydraulic components
Circuit breakers/Fuses
Electronic components
Warranty applies to the product only and does not allow for coverage of personal loss.
Some items are considered “consumable,” meaning they are considered part of normal
maintenance or part of completing an effective repair. The following items are excluded
from warranty coverage in the event of a warranty claim:
Spark Plugs
Filters
Fuel
Sealants
Hotel fees
Towing charges
Mileage
Rentals/Loss of product use
Lubricants such as oil, grease, etc.
Batteries (unless defective)
Cosmetic damage/repair
Coolants
Meals
Shipping/ handling fees
Product pick-up/delivery
Loss of vacation/personal time
This warranty also excludes failures resulting from improper lubrication; improper
engine timing; improper fuel; surface imperfections caused by external stress, heat, cold
or contamination; operator error or abuse; improper component alignment, tension,
adjustment or altitude compensation; failure due to snow, water, dirt or other foreign
substance ingestion/contamination; improper maintenance; modified components; use
of aftermarket components resulting in failure; unauthorized repairs; repairs made after
the warranty period expires or by an unauthorized repair center; use of the product in
competition or for commercial purposes. Warranty will not apply to any product which
has been damaged by abuse, accident, fire or any other casualty not determined a defect
of materials or workmanship.
128
WARRANTY
Polaris Second Year Engine Service Contract
Second Year Engine Service Contract is standard on all eligible new and unused snowmobiles that were Snow Checked through an authorized Polaris dealer during the
March/April Snow Check promotion. The free Second Year Engine Service Contract is
honored by all authorized Polaris snowmobile dealers in North America and is transferable 120 days after the original purchase date, free of charge, through any Polaris snowmobile dealer. Coverage on Snow Check units is automatic. Although you do not
receive a warranty card, your dealership should have printed a copy of the warranty registration form. This form is your proof of warranty.
Consumer Exclusions
• Each repair visit after the first twelve months of standard warranty coverage is subject
to a $50 deductible.
• The free Second Year Engine Service Contract applies to the first 5,000 miles or two
(2) calendar years from date of purchase, whichever comes first. Tampering with the
odometer shall void all warranties/service contracts. No extensions to coverage under
this engine service contract can be given. Used snowmobiles are not eligible under this
program.
• Snowmobiles used for commercial purposes or for racing are excluded from coverage.
Coverage
Coverage for second year engine failures due to defects in materials and workmanship
will be determined by Polaris in its sole discretion. Coverage is automatic with no additional paperwork required. The free Second Year Engine Service Contract is subject to a
$50 deductible per visit. Regular, documented service maintenance visits are required to
validate this warranty.
A partial list of items excluded from coverage includes:
• Damage due to accident, fire, explosion, theft, or other causes beyond Polaris’ control.
• Damage caused by the failure of other components of the snowmobile.
• Failures caused by improper fuel or oil.
• Piston seizures, unless caused by a defective engine component.
• Failures caused due to improper adjustments.
• Failure due to unauthorized service.
• Failures due to lack of service as required in the owner’s manual or Polaris updates.
This includes off-season storage as listed in the owner’s manual.
• Failure due to use of unauthorized parts or modifications.
• Normal wear parts, including but not limited to spark plugs, hoses, batteries, controls,
and recoil ropes are excluded from coverage. Gaskets are covered, as are intake and
exhaust manifolds excluding paint coverage.
• Electrical coverage is limited to the ECU box, coils, stator plate, and sensors. Wiring
and other electrical components are excluded from coverage.
• Cooling system coverage is limited to the water pump assembly and components, fan,
fan bearings, temperature sensor, gasket and seals.
• Non wear related throttle body parts are covered. The fuel pump is covered.
• Clutches and related clutch parts, including but not limited to, the drive belt, are
excluded from coverage.
• Electrical components are excluded from coverage.
• Gearcases and transmissions are excluded from coverage.
129
WARRANTY
Exported Vehicles
EXCEPT WHERE SPECIFICALLY REQUIRED BY LAW, THERE IS NO WARRANTY OR SERVICE BULLETIN COVERAGE ON THIS VEHICLE IF IT IS SOLD
OUTSIDE THE COUNTRY OF THE SELLING DEALER’S AUTHORIZED LOCATION.
This policy does not apply to vehicles that have received authorization for export from
Polaris Industries. Dealers may not give authorization for export. You should consult an
authorized dealer to determine this vehicle’s warranty or service bulletin coverage if you
have any questions.
This policy does not apply to vehicles registered to government officials or military personnel on assignment outside the country of the selling dealer’s authorized location.
This policy does not apply to Safety Recalls.
How to Get Service
In the Country where your vehicle was purchased:
Warranty or Service Bulletin repairs must be done by an authorized Polaris dealer. If you
move or are traveling within the country where your vehicle was purchased, Warranty or
Service Bulletin repairs may be requested from any authorized Polaris dealer who sells
the same line as your vehicle.
Outside the Country where your vehicle was purchased:
If you are traveling temporarily outside the country where your vehicle was purchased,
you should take your vehicle to an authorized Polaris dealer. You must show the dealer
photo identification from the country of the selling dealer’s authorized location as proof
of residence. Upon residence verification, the servicing dealer will be authorized to perform the warranty repair.
If You Move:
If you move to another country, be sure to contact Polaris Customer Assistance and the
customs department of the destination country before you move. Vehicles importation
rules vary considerably from country to country. You may be required to present documentation of your move to Polaris Industries in order to continue your warranty coverage. You may also be required to obtain documentation from Polaris Industries in order
to register your vehicle in your new country.
If Purchased From A Private Party:
If you purchase a Polaris product from a private citizen outside of the country in which
the vehicle was originally purchased, all warranty coverage will be denied.
Notice
If your vehicle is registered outside of the country where it was purchased, and you have
not followed the procedure set out above, your vehicle will no longer be eligible for warranty or service bulletin coverage of any kind. (Vehicles registered to Government officials or military personnel on assignment outside of the country where the vehicle was
purchased will continue to be covered by the basic warranty.)
For questions call Polaris Customer Assistance (see page 124).
130
WARRANTY
U.S.A. EPA Emissions Limited Warranty
This emissions limited warranty is in addition to the Polaris standard limited warranty
for your vehicle. Polaris Industries Inc. warrants that at the time it is first purchased, this
emissions-certified vehicle is designed, built and equipped so it conforms with applicable U.S. Environmental Protection Agency emission regulations. Polaris warrants that
the vehicle is free from defects in materials and workmanship that would cause it to fail
to meet these regulations.
The warranty period for this emissions-certified vehicle starts on the date the vehicle is
first purchased and continues for a period of 200 hours of engine operation, 4000 kilometers (2485 miles) of vehicle travel, or 30 calendar months from the date of purchase,
whichever comes first.
This emissions limited warranty covers components whose failure increases the vehicle’s regulated emissions, and it covers components of systems whose only purpose is to
control emissions. Repairing or replacing other components not covered by this warranty is the responsibility of the vehicle owner. This emissions limited warranty does not
cover components whose failure does not increase the vehicle’s regulated emissions.
For exhaust emissions, emission-related components include any engine parts related to
the following systems:
• Air-induction system
• Fuel system
• Ignition system
• Exhaust gas recirculation systems
The following parts are also considered emission-related components for exhaust emissions:
• Aftertreatment devices
• Crankcase ventilation valves
• Sensors
• Electronic control units
The following parts are considered emission-related components for evaporative emissions:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fuel Tank
Fuel Cap
Fuel Line
Fuel Line Fittings
Clamps*
Pressure Relief Valves*
Control Valves*
Control Solenoids*
Electronic Controls*
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Vacuum Control Diaphragms*
Control Cables*
Control Linkages*
Purge Valves
Vapor Hoses
Liquid/Vapor Separator
Carbon Canister
Canister Mounting Brackets
Carburetor Purge Port Connector
*As related to the evaporative emission control system.
131
WARRANTY
U.S.A. EPA Emissions Limited Warranty
The exclusive remedy for breach of this limited warranty shall be, at the exclusive
option of Polaris, repair or replacement of any defective materials, components or products. THE REMEDIES SET FORTH IN THIS LIMITED WARRANTY ARE THE
ONLY REMEDIES AVAILABLE TO ANY PERSON FOR BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY. POLARIS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY TO ANY PERSON FOR INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR SPECIAL DAMAGES OF ANY
DESCRIPTION,WHETHER ARISING OUT OF EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OR ANY OTHER CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORT OR
OTHERWISE.
ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE) ARE LIMITED IN DURATION TO THE WARRANTY
PERIOD DESCRIBED HEREIN. POLARIS DISCLAIMS ALL EXPRESS WARRANTIES NOT STATED IN THIS WARRANTY. Some states do not allow limitations on
how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation may not apply if it is inconsistent with the controlling state law.
This limited warranty excludes failures not caused by a defect in material or workmanship.This limited warranty does not cover damage due to accidents, abuse or improper
handling, maintenance or use. This limited warranty also does not cover any engine that
has been structurally altered, or when the vehicle has been used in racing competition.
This limited warranty also does not cover physical damage, corrosion or defects caused
by fire, explosions or other similar causes beyond the control of Polaris.
Owners are responsible for performing the scheduled maintenance identified in the
owner's manual. Polaris may deny warranty claims for failures that have been caused by
the owner’s or operator’s improper maintenance or use, by accidents for which Polaris
has no responsibility, or by acts of God.
Any qualified repair shop or person may maintain, replace, or repair the emission control devices or systems on your vehicle. Polaris recommends that you contact an authorized Polaris dealer to perform any service that may be necessary for your vehicle.
Polaris also recommends that you use only Pure Polaris parts. It is a potential violation
of the Clean Air Act if a part supplied by an aftermarket parts manufacturer reduces the
effectiveness of the vehicle's emission controls. Tampering with emission controls is
prohibited by federal law.
If you have any questions regarding your warranty rights and responsibilities, please
contact the Polaris Warranty Department at 1-888-704-5290.
132
MAINTENANCE LOG
Present this section of your manual to your dealer each time your snowmobile is serviced. This will provide you and future owners with an
accurate log of maintenance and services performed on the snowmobile.
DATE
MILES
(KM)
TECHNICIAN
SERVICE PERFORMED / COMMENTS
150 mi.
(240 km)
500 mi.
(800 km)
1000 mi.
(1600 km)
1500 mi.
(2400 km)
133
MAINTENANCE LOG
DATE
134
MILES
(KM)
TECHNICIAN
SERVICE PERFORMED / COMMENTS
MAINTENANCE LOG
DATE
MILES
(KM)
TECHNICIAN
SERVICE PERFORMED / COMMENTS
135
INDEX
A
D
Access Panel, Radiator Compartment 30
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Adjustable Steering System. . . . . 33-34
Apparel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Avalanches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Drive Belt Installation . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Drive Belt Removal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Drive Chain Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Driver Awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Driveshaft Bearing Lubrication. . . . . 89
Driving Downhill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Driving in Hilly Terrain . . . . . . . . . . 19
Driving on Slippery Surfaces . . . . . . 19
Driving Responsibly . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
B
Backrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Battery Replacement, MFD . . . . . . . 48
Brake Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Brake Fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Brake Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Brake Lever Feel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Brake Lever Travel . . . . . . . . . 67, 100
Brake System Bleeding . . . . . . . . . 102
Brakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 100-102
Bulbs, Replacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
C
Cargo Bag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Cargo Overload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Chaincase Oil. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90-91
Clutch Alignment Offset . . . . . . . . 104
Clutch Center Distance . . . . . . . . . 104
Clutch Cover Warning. . . . . . . . . . . 24
Clutch System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104-107
Clutches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Coolant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Coolant High Temperature Light. . . 97
Coolant Level. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Cooling System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96-98
Cooling System Bleeding . . . . . . . . 98
Cooling System Flushing. . . . . . . . . 97
D
DET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Detonation Elimination Technology 35
Digital Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Disabled Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Drive Belt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Drive Belt Adjustment. . . . . . . . . . 105
Drive Belt Condition . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Drive Belt Deflection. . . . . . . . . . . 105
136
E
Emission Control Information. . . . . . 83
Emission Control Label. . . . . . . . . . . 83
Emission Control Maintenance . . . . . 83
Emissions Limited Warranty. . 131-132
Engine Break-In . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-73
Engine Stop Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Environment, Preservation . . . . . . . . . 6
Exhaust System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Eye Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
F
Front Rear Scissor Stop. . . . . . . . . . .
Front To Rear Coupling . . . . . . . . . .
FRSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Injectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fuel System Deicers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
57
57
76
94
94
94
94
75
76
G
Gauge Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Grab Handle Adjustment. . . . . . . . . . 32
H
Handlebar Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . .
Headlight Adjusting . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Helmet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High Temperature Indicator Light . .
Hood Latches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
60
30
12
97
66
INDEX
I
R
Ice and Snow Build-up . . . . . . . . . . . 18
IFS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-49
Intake Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Intake Silencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Rail Slide Wear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Rear Rear Scissor Stop . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Rear To Front Coupling . . . . . . . . . . 58
Recoil Rope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Reverse Operation . . . . . . . . . . . 80-81
Reverse Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Rider Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
RIDER SELECT . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-34
RRSS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
L
Lamps, Replacing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Light, High Temperature Indicator . . 97
Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Limiter Strap Position, SwitchBack . 56
Low Oil Indicator Light . . . . . . . . . . 77
Lubrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88-89
M
Maintenance Interval Table . . . . 85-87
Maintenance Program . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Maneuverability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
MFD Battery Replacement . . . . . 48-49
MFD Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
MFD Digital Display Programs . 39-47
MFD Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37-38
N
Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
O
Oil Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oil Indicator Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oil Injection System . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oil Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oil Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Oil Recommendations. . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating in Deep Snow. . . . . . . . . .
Operation Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
95
77
73
77
95
73
21
27
P
Parking Brake Lever Lock . . . . . . . . 68
Passenger Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Polaris Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Pre-Ride Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Pressure Cap Warning . . . . . . . . . . . 24
S
Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-23
Safety Decals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-27
Safety Symbols. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Seat Latches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Shock Valving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Signal Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Skags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 115
Ski Alignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Ski Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Slide Rail and Track Cooling . . . . . . 73
Snow Build-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Snow Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Spark Plugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92-93
Speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Spring Preload, Front Suspension . . 51
Spring Preload, IQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Steering Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Steering System . . . . . . . . 66, 113-115
Stop Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Stopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Storage, Daily. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Storage, Extended. . . . . . . . . . 116-117
Studs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Survival Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Suspension Adjustments, Front . 50-52
Suspension Adjustments, IQ . . . 54-59
Suspension Adjustments, Rear . . 53-59
Suspension Coupling, IQ . . . . . . . . . 57
Suspension Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Suspension Lubrication, Front . . . . . 89
Suspension Lubrication, Rear. . . . . . 88
137
INDEX
S
T
Suspension Performance Tips . . . . . 53
Suspension, Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Switch, Stop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Switch, Throttle Safety . . . . . . . 65, 78
Track Tension . . . . . . . . . . 59, 110-111
Track Warm-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Track Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Traction Products . . . . . . . . . . . . 62-63
Transporting the Snowmobile . . . . . 117
Troubleshooting
Drive Belt Wear/Burn . . . . . . . 123
IQ Suspension . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Troubleshooting, Engine . . . . . 119-121
T
Throttle Cable Lubrication . . . . . . . 89
Throttle Lever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 79
Throttle Safety Switch . . . . . . . . 65, 78
Torque Stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Torsion Spring Preload, IQ . . . . . . . 55
Towing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Track Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Track Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 108
Track Lubrication . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Track Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
138
V
Vehicle Identification Numbers . . . . . 7
W
Warning Labels/Decals . . . . . . . . 24-27
Wear Strips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Weight Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Windchill/Temperature Charts . . . . . 23