DTS VOYAGERPRO Specifications

Dell Unified Communication Solution with
Microsoft Lync Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation
A Dell Reference Architecture for Lync Server 2013 Solution for a single site with up
to 1,000 users
Dell Global Solutions Engineering
October 2013
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
Revisions
Date
Description
October 2013
Initial release
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© 2013 Dell Inc. All Rights Reserved. Dell , the Dell logo, PowerEdge and other Dell names and marks are
trademarks of Dell Inc. in the US and worldwide. Intel and Xeon are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the
®
U.S and other countries. Microsoft , Windows, Lync, Hyper-V and Windows Server are either trademarks or registered
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Sonus is a registered trademark and
SBC 1000 and SBC 2000 are trademarks of Sonus Networks, Inc. All other trademarks mentioned herein are the
property of their respective owners.
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
Contents
1
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................................................ 5
1.1
2
Microsoft Lync Server 2013 ..................................................................................................................................................... 8
2.1
3
Audience ........................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Lync 2013 Standard Edition with Backup Registrar Pool ....................................................................................... 10
Dell Unified Communication Solution Reference Architecture ....................................................................................... 11
3.1
Design Considerations ................................................................................................................................................. 12
3.1.1 High Availability ............................................................................................................................................................. 12
3.1.2 Application Performance ............................................................................................................................................. 13
3.1.3 Resource Consolidation .............................................................................................................................................. 13
3.2
Lync Server 2013 Core Architecture .......................................................................................................................... 14
3.2.1 Network Architecture ................................................................................................................................................... 16
3.2.2 Storage for Lync, SQL, and Hypervisor ..................................................................................................................... 17
3.2.3 Storage for Hyper-V Hosts .......................................................................................................................................... 17
3.2.4 Best Practices................................................................................................................................................................. 18
3.3
Lync Server 2013 Edge Architecture.......................................................................................................................... 20
3.3.1 Edge Network Architecture ......................................................................................................................................... 21
3.3.2 Reverse Proxy ................................................................................................................................................................ 22
3.3.3 Best Practices for Edge and Reverse Proxy Host .................................................................................................... 23
3.4
Enterprise Voice Connectivity .................................................................................................................................... 23
3.4.1 Sonus SBC 1000/2000 ................................................................................................................................................. 25
3.4.2 SBC 1000 Gateway Configuration ............................................................................................................................. 25
3.5
End-User Client Connectivity ..................................................................................................................................... 28
3.5.1 Wired Connectivity with Dell Networking 7000 Series Switches ......................................................................... 28
3.5.2 Wireless Networking with W-Series 3200 Controller and W-AP135 ................................................................... 28
4
Technical Specifications ......................................................................................................................................................... 29
4.1
Virtual Machine Specifications .................................................................................................................................... 29
4.2
Hardware Specifications .............................................................................................................................................. 31
4.2.1 Dell PowerEdge Servers ............................................................................................................................................... 33
4.2.2 Dell Networking............................................................................................................................................................. 34
4.2.3 Wireless Networking ..................................................................................................................................................... 35
4.2.4 Sonus SBC 1000 Gateway ........................................................................................................................................... 36
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
4.2.5 Client Devices ................................................................................................................................................................ 36
4
5
Verification ................................................................................................................................................................................ 38
6
Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................................................... 40
A
Additional Resources............................................................................................................................................................... 41
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
Acknowledgements
This Reference Architecture was produced by the following members of the Dell Global Solutions
Engineering team:
Engineering: Akshai Parthasarathy, Ajay Kakkar, Archana Rao and Ravikanth Chaganti
Additional contributors: Jane Wong, Debra Slapak, Paul Robichaux, Curtis Johnstone, Michael Przytula,
Pratik Mehta, Jaiwant Virk, Stephen McMaster, Frank Steiner and Sonus Networks
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
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Introduction
Unified Communication is becoming increasingly critical for organizations to have an efficient, flexible and
effective work experience. It not only enables and provides the benefits of having real-time
communication between peers, whether local, remote or geographically disbursed, but also enables
instant communication with partners, suppliers and directly with customers. Further, all of these
capabilities are provided while reducing the telephony, travel and IT cost.
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This Dell Unified Communications Solution provides a complete solution not only with essential instant
messaging, presence and audio-video conferencing but also with web conferencing and telephony
integration (Enterprise Voice). The fully featured solution integrates Dell products, and Microsoft® Lync®
Server 2013 software with Dell Services available for assistance if requested. The products consists of
Dell™ PowerEdge™ servers, Dell™ Networking switches and wireless, third-party voice gateways, client
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devices such as Dell™ Latitude laptops and Dell™ XPS tablets and Ultrabooks™. The solution is
designed to leverage server virtualization offered by Microsoft® Windows Server® 2012 with Microsoft®
Hyper-V® to allow better consolidation and utilization of resources. Further, the architecture is designed
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for availability and functions upon the failure of a server , network or voice gateway. Such a design
enables IT administrators to perform maintenance tasks without incurring any Lync application downtime.
Microsoft Lync Server 2013 enables instant messaging, presence, audio-video conferencing, web
conferencing and telephony solutions that support enterprise-level collaboration requirements. It can also
integrate with existing PBX systems or replace aging PBX systems to offer a complete unifiedcommunications experience, including telephony integration through the use of Lync clients.
Designing a complete Unified Communication Solution can be complex. To help with the process, the
following reference architecture details the design and implementation for a 1,000-user Microsoft Lync
Server 2013 implementation on a single site. The architecture provides resilient voice and conference
services for the users that enable Lync features, including Enterprise Voice. Sizing of the architecture
followed the Microsoft Best Practices and used the Microsoft Lync Stress and Performance Tool to
generate real-time workloads on Lync servers. The voice gateways were also validated through a thorough
lab study.
This reference architecture is structured in multiple sections. Section 2 goes over a quick introduction of
the Lync Server 2013 and its key features and roles. It also briefly touches upon some of the major
changes in the Lync Server architecture. Section 3 details the end-to-end design and implementation of
the Dell Unified Communication Solution. It discusses the design principles that dictated the architecture.
For simplicity, it breaks down the solution into five portions and goes in depth into each of them.
Following this, Section 4 provides the technical specification, including detailing all the virtual and physical
components that make up the complete solution. Toward the end of this guide, Section 5 provides an
overview of the verification that was performed to ensure that the solution met the design principles.
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Failure of the Front End Server requires the IT administrator to bring up another backup Front End registrar manually.
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
1.1
Audience
This reference architecture is intended for IT professionals and administrators interested in designing and
deploying an end-to-end, real-time collaboration solution using Microsoft Lync Server 2013 on Dell
servers and networking, third-party gateways/session border controllers, and associated client devices.
While the reference architecture provides an overview of the important solution components, the reader is
expected to have an understanding of Lync Server 2013 and voice gateways. Familiarity with Windows
Server 2012 and Hyper-V virtualization will also aid the reader’s comprehension of the content in this
document.
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
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Microsoft Lync Server 2013
Microsoft Lync Server 2013 enables instant messaging and presence, audio and video conferencing, web
conferencing, and voice-interoperability. Its functionality can be extended by the use of Session Initiation
Protocol (SIP) trunks or PBXs/voice gateways to communicate with users on the telephony network
(PSTN). There are a number of different modalities that Lync Server provides to users, including:
•
IM and Presence: The ability to view the status of other Lync users and update current status
(Available, Busy, Away, etc.). Conferencing with multiple users via IM is also supported.
•
Audio Conferencing: Communicate with other Lync users using SIP and Real-time Transport Protocol
(RTP). Audio conferencing using Lync is especially cost-effective for enterprises with employees
spread across geographical locations because users can communicate using the enterprise data
network instead of expensive long-distance telephony.
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Video and Web Conferencing: Video and Web Conferencing allow users to run meetings using 1:1
and group video conferences, including optional recording, combined with desktop and application
sharing. These workloads are available with Lync Server and can be leveraged for day-to-day tasks in
the enterprise.
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Voice Interop with PSTN: Lync Server’s Mediation Server role, which can be collocated on Front End
or Standard Edition servers, works with a SIP trunk or telephony device (IP-PBX/gateway) to
communicate with telephone users within and outside the enterprise. In order to have Lync and phone
systems integrated, the Mediation Server role must be installed and configured.
Listed below are the new and existing server roles of Lync Server 2013:
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Front End Server—The Front End Server role handles Lync client authentication, instant messaging,
web conferencing, audio-video conferencing and user presence updates. It is the central component
of a Lync Server topology. The Front End Server has a local database that stores user data and
topology information. This role can be deployed in an Enterprise Edition pool. In Lync Server 2013, the
Archiving and Monitoring role is combined with the Front End role. The Archiving and Monitoring
component of the Front End role can be used to monitor user statistics and quality of experience
(QoE) within the Lync environment, for archiving conference content and instant messages for future
audits. This component also allows IT administrators to access call detail records and quality of
experience (QoE) statistics for Lync communication. Organizations can also deploy separate Archiving
and Monitoring roles, or use the new unified archiving features in Exchange Server 2013, as per their
requirements.
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Back End Server— Microsoft® SQL Server® serves as the backend for Enterprise Edition servers, and is
also responsible for Archiving and Monitoring roles and Persistent Chat roles. SQL Server maintains a
copy of the topology information, user contact lists, archiving/monitoring databases and logs, and
other data. Lync Server 2013 supports SQL mirroring with primary and secondary copies. High
availability for SQL databases can be provided via two SQL Servers servicing SQL mirrors.
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Mediation Server—This Lync role provides Enterprise Voice capabilities and handles the
communication between Lync front ends and media gateways or session border controllers (SBCs).
This role can be collocated with the front end. The Mediation Server facilitates traffic
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
encryption/decryption and transcoding. Traffic encryption and decryption is made possible by the use
of TLS (Transport Layer Security) instead of traditional TCP. This is more secure than transmitting clear
traffic over the wire. Transcoding refers to the process of converting media streams between different
audio codecs. Transcoding becomes necessary if the telephony codec used is not G.711, i.e. the codec
used by Lync.
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Director Server—This is an optional role in Lync Server 2013. The Director role provides resiliency and
redirection to user requests to their home pool, which can be either a Standard Edition server or an
Enterprise Edition Front End pool. A Director protects Front End servers from denial-of-service attacks
and cannot be collocated with any other server role.
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Persistent Chat Server— This is a new and separate role in Lync Server 2013 that provides features
similar to group chat in earlier versions of Lync. Persistent chat allows users to participate in multiparty
and topic-based chat. Chats can be categorized by topic in a chat room and are not transient like unarchived instant message conversations or audio/video/web conferences.
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Edge Server—This role in Lync 2013 is responsible for handling all communications that are made
available to external and federated users except anything related to HTTP/HTTPS. All other traffic, such
as SIP or RTP, is routed to the external users using the Edge Server.
•
Standard Edition Server—The Standard Edition server delivers the features of Lync Server 2013 using
integrated databases on a single server. This configuration enables an organization to have Lync Server
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2013 infrastructure at a low cost and in a form that can be deployed with a backup registrar to
provide limited high availability features. This handles all Lync workloads, including client
authentication, instant messaging, user presence updates, web conferencing, audio/video
conferencing and Enterprise Voice, all running on one server.
This reference architecture represents a single site Lync Server 2013 deployment with up to 1,000 users.
Microsoft Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition is suited for small implementations that reduce customer
total cost of ownership (TCO) and increase return on investment (ROI).
Listed below are the other roles that can be a part of a Lync Server 2013 deployment:
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Office Web Apps Server—Lync Server 2013 uses Office Web Apps Server to provide enhanced web
conferencing with PowerPoint® presentations. This role enables the use of presentations with custom
fonts, animated slides and higher-resolution content sharing.
•
Reverse Proxy Servers—This role is an external component that complements the Edge Server role by
handling web services traffic. With the Reverse Proxy, external users can access web services available
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http://blogs.technet.com/b/nexthop/archive/2013/09/04/understanding-hadr-in-lync-server-2013.aspx
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
through simple URLs. Some of these features include meeting content downloads, address book
downloads, location information and Lync Web App. HTTP and HTTPS traffic is routed to the Reverse
Proxy, which then forwards the requests to the Front End Server.
2.1
Lync 2013 Standard Edition with Backup Registrar Pool
Microsoft Lync Server 2013 provides the option of using paired Standard Edition pools, one as the primary
registrar and the second as the backup registrar. In cases with relatively small user counts, a Standard
Edition server with backup registrar provides sufficient availability at lower cost. In the event of a primary
registrar failure, ongoing calls still continue, but Lync clients display a “limited functionality” message.
In Lync Server 2013, when a Standard Edition Server is specified as a backup registrar in a paired Standard
Edition pool, a new service called the Lync Server Backup Service is installed. This service provides realtime data replication to keep the pool synchronized. Replicated data includes user information, contacts,
conferencing data and other information stored within the SQL Express database. When the Front End
service is non-functional on the primary server, users fail over to the backup registrar with limited features.
The most notable feature limitation is the lack of presence status (Available, Busy, In a meeting, etc.) on
the Lync clients. When the IT administrator becomes aware of the Front End failure, he/she can fail over
the pool to the backup pool by issuing commands in the management shell.
Even though administrator intervention is needed, the disruption that users experience can be mitigated,
which enables reasonable service continuity for users.
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
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Dell Unified Communication Solution Reference
Architecture
A high-level diagram of the reference architecture is depicted in Figure 1. It shows a customer scenario
that consists of a single site only. For voice connectivity, the site may have either ISDN (T1/E1) or SIP trunk
connections provided by Internet Telephony Service Provide/Public Switched Telephone Network
ITSP/PSTN providers. Although the customer may not have both ISDN (T1/E1) and SIP trunk, the design
takes into consideration the different possibilities of voice connectivity.
Figure 1
Dell Unified Communication Solution Logical Architecture
There are four major portions of the reference architecture:
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Lync Server 2013 Core Architecture: This area hosts the server roles that provide the main
features of Microsoft Lync Server 2013, which include IM, presence, conferencing (web
conferencing, audio-video conferencing, dial-in conferencing and IM conferencing) and others.
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
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As expected, to support these crucial Lync Server componets, sufficient computing and storage
resouce should be allocated to fulfill the demand from the targeted number of users. The design
should incorporate high availability to ensure minimal service downtime. Therefore, multiple
instances of those important server roles are utilized to avoid a single point of failure.
Lync Server Edge Architecture: Edge Servers and the Reverse Proxy Servers are located at the
perimeter network. They support the communications across the organization’s firewall between
internal users and various types of external users, such as customers, partners and offsite
employees. For example, internal users can use IM and presence to commuciate with external
users, and they can participate in audio-video and web conferencing with remote employees.
Enterprise Voice Connectivity: Besides the Voice over IP (VoIP) components at the Standard
Edition servers and signaling and media translation by the Mediation Servers, there are other PSTN
connectivity components required to implement the Enterprise Voice features. This portion covers
those components, such as PSTN gateways, PBX and SBC, and how they connect to the Lync
Server core architecture.
End User Connectivity: End users connect with Lync services via different types of end-point
devices. This reference architecture describes their connectivity options and highlights how Dell™
Networking W-series switches enhances the user experience of wireless-connected Lync clients.
The physical configuration and design criteria of each major portion will be addressed in the subsequent
sections of this reference architecture guide. The guide will first discuss the design considerations of the
overall reference architecture in Section 3.1 .
Note that Active Directory architecture, firewall and security configuration and data center networking
are outside the scope of this reference architecture. Dell Services can help design a solution for each
individual customer-specific environment.
3.1
Design Considerations
The key design considerations that guided the reference architecture presented in the preceding sections
include:
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•
•
3.1.1
High availability
Application performance
Resource consolidation
High Availability
The first design consideration is high availability (HA). High availability is a feature that must be considered
at every layer to ensure minimal application downtime. Lync is a critical communication workload at any
enterprise and should it be the only communication end-point for end users, high availability should be
treated as being mandatory. There are two layers of high availability that were considered in the reference
architecture:
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
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Application-level high availability entails utilizing multiple instances of server roles to provide
services in the event of a failure. By ensuring that there is no single point of failure at the application
level, service downtime to the end user is minimized.
Infrastructure high availability is provided when a hardware resource fails; there is another
preconfigured resource that takes over.
It should also be noted that during scheduled downtime, infrastructure availability ensures that there are
additional hardware resource, and the application-level availability will keep the application services up for
the end users. This is particularly important to IT administrators who wish to apply patches or upgrades to
their data center equipment.
3.1.2
Application Performance
While maintaining high availability is critical, applications must still perform well to ensure a reliable enduser experience. The Dell Global Solutions Engineering group performed detailed verification to ensure that
the reference architecture presented is appropriately sized to meet the needs of a 1,000-user Lync
deployment. Some of the workloads sized in this reference architecture included audio conferencing, video
conferencing using multi-view, application sharing, distribution list expansion, address book downloads and
instant messaging. In order to size these workloads, the Microsoft Lync 2013 Stress and Performance Tool
was used.
It should also be noted that following application best practices help prevent performance bottlenecks.
These best practices are detailed in the next sections. Some of the major ones include:
•
•
•
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3.1.3
Static memory allocation, instead of dynamic memory allocation for virtual machines (VM)
Virtual CPU to physical core ratio maintained at 1:1
No co-existence of like roles on the same host
Dedicated hard drive spindles for hypervisor, virtual machine (VM) and SQL data stores
Resource Consolidation
The final design consideration, in addition to availability and application performance, is resource
consolidation. In such a solution that touches Lync, voice gateways/session border controllers, and PSTN or
PBX systems, it is important to consolidate multiple components to the best extent possible and reduce data
center footprint and cost.
In the context of this reference architecture, server virtualization is primarily used to consolidate the
different Lync Server roles and not leveraged to provide application high availability. High availability is
provided natively by Lync as opposed to using virtualization clustering and HA.
Another important consideration is the overall network architecture. While this reference architecture
provides guidance on networking and details on the host server networking configuration, the detailed
sizing and configuration of the end to end networking components are outside the scope of this reference
architecture.
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
3.2
Lync Server 2013 Core Architecture
When deploying a Lync solution, the first step is to articulate a design that will address the communication
requirements across the enterprise. The following section provides the design framework adequate for
1,000 Lync users with instant messaging, audio/video, web conferencing and Enterprise Voice
communication modalities.
The primary component of this architecture is a paired Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition server pool that
serves these different modalities. The Standard Edition pool consists of two Standard Edition servers that are
identical and provide communication services for a group of users. This pool of identically configured
servers provides scalability as well as availability in the event of a server failure. The Standard Edition server is
also the primary store for the user and conference data, where each user’s data is replicated to another
Standard Edition server. The Lync Standard Edition server that acts as the primary registrar hosts an SQL
Express instance to store the databases, and these databases are synchronized with the databases on
another Standard Edition server for Lync, which acts as the backup registrar. The databases are important to
show the presence information and to continue other user activities.
In addition, an SQL Server virtual machine is deployed to host the Archiving+Monitoring and Persistent Chat
server databases.
Figure 2 provides a high-level schematic of a Lync Server 2013 core architecture that has been sized for
1,000 users. The architecture has been built on the design principles discussed in Section 3.1.
High Availability
•
•
Application-level high availability. The Microsoft Lync Server 2013 core architecture uses paired
Standard Edition servers and two Office Web Apps servers (OWS). By ensuring that there are two
instances of the server roles, there is no single point of failure at the application level and thus
service downtime to the end user is minimized.
Infrastructure high availability. This is provided by having the VMs hosted on multiple physical
Hyper-V hosts and by having the hosts connected to redundant network switches. Further, the
placement of these VMs is arranged to ensure that no VMs with identical server roles are on the
same physical Hyper-V host. Note that the Hyper-V hosts are not part of a virtualized cluster and
the VMs do not fail over or live migrate across Hyper-V hosts. Lync service availability is provided
by having paired the pool of Lync applications, which is a native high availability feature.
Resource Consolidation
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Leveraging virtualization. By virtualizing the Lync Server roles on top of Windows Server® 2012
Hyper-V hosts, dedicated hardware for each role is no longer necessary. For example, in the
reference architecture, one of the Dell™ PowerEdge™ R620 hosts consolidates Lync Standard
Edition, Office Web Apps (OWS) and a Lync Persistent Chat role on a single server.
Service consolidation. By deploying the Mediation Server, Archiving and Monitoring roles
collocated with the Standard Edition server, management complexities are reduced without any
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
•
performance compromise. In addition, consolidating these roles saves administration costs and
eases management.
Using internal server storage. With a different RAID set within the server chassis for the guest VM,
host OS and SQL database, costs are reduced while application best practices and performance
requirements are met. The use of internal storage instead of external direct-attached arrays or
SANs is more cost effective and simplifies deployment.
As shown by the highlighted block in Figure 2, the overall design for the Lync Server 2013 core architecture
consists of two Dell PowerEdge R620 1U servers. Each of these servers is running Windows Server 2012 with
Hyper-V. The detailed hardware specification for these servers is provided in Section 4.
Figure 2
Lync Server 2013 Core Architecture
For providing high availability at the application level, two Lync Standard Edition VMs each collocated with
Mediation and Archiving+Monitoring roles are configured in a paired Standard Edition pool. These VMs are
placed on separate physical Hyper-V hosts to ensure that a single physical server failure does not impact
more than one Lync Standard Edition VM. Lync 2013 requires Office Web Apps Servers (OWS) to provide an
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
enhanced web conferencing experience. In this reference architecture, two OWS servers are deployed to
enable high availability. Table 1 presents a VM resource summary for the Lync Server core architecture.
Table 1
Purpose
3.2.1
Core Architecture VM Resource Summary
VMs Total Virtual CPU (vCPUs) Total Memory (GB)
Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition (with
Mediation and Archiving + Monitoring
roles)
Lync Server 2013 Back End for Archiving
+ Monitoring and Persistent Chat (SQL
Server 2012 Standard Edition)
Lync Server 2013 Persistent Chat Server
2
12
(6 per VM)
64
(32 GB per VM)
1
4
(4 per VM)
16
(16 GB per VM)
1
Office Web Apps Server (OWS)
2
4
(4 per VM)
8
(4 per VM)
8
(8 GB per VM)
16
(8 GB per VM)
Network Architecture
A summary of the networking configuration required on the Standard Edition hosts is provided in Figure 3.
Each PowerEdge R620 server provides four 1GbE network connections that are used for redundancy and
to avail the collective bandwidth the host can provide. On the Microsoft Hyper-V host, a converged
network design using Microsoft NIC teaming is used to provide networking connectivity to the virtual
machines. This reference architecture describes only host networking and not the configuration of
individual networking elements used in the reference architecture.
Figure 3 shows, the connectivity of the Lync Front End VMs to the Converged Virtual switch, which
connects to the Converged Network team. The teamed NICs from the hosts connect over 1GbE to the
Dell Networking switches, which are in turn fed into a pair of redundant layer 3 switches for Lync clients
and the media gateways/SBCs for VOIP connectivity.
Figure 3
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Network Architecture of Lync Core Server Hosts
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
3.2.2
Storage for Lync, SQL, and Hypervisor
All physical servers hosting the entire Lync core infrastructure leverage internal server storage. Using local
storage instead of iSCSI or Fibre Channel SANs or direct-attached external arrays is a cost-effective
solution for this small Lync deployment. The internal server storage in this design has been logically
partitioned into three separate storage blocks with multiple RAID sets, which comprise separate disks. One
storage block each is allocated to the host operating system, VM storage and Lync SQL database storage.
Use of different storage blocks with isolated disks guarantees that there is no contention for disk access
among the three different stores.
3.2.3
Storage for Hyper-V Hosts
The functional separation of disk drives allows for simplified storage management. This storage design for
the physical hosts abides by the Hyper-V best practice that recommends against the placing of system
files, application data and logs on shared physical storage drives. Table 2 details the storage design for the
physical hosts.
Table 2
Storage Building Blocks
Hyper-V® Server hypervisor
Virtual machines
3
SQL databases
Lync Core Architecture Storage Requirements
Disks Allocated
RAID Configuration
2 x 900-GB 10K RPM SAS
2 x 900-GB 10K RPM SAS
6 x 900-GB 10K RPM SAS
RAID 1
RAID 1
RAID 10
As shown in Table 2, 10,000 RPM SAS drives were leveraged for their throughput rather than higher
capacity NL-SAS or SATA drives. By using standardized 900-GB drives, sufficient capacity is provided for
the VM store and for the SQL databases. Note that these volumes are mirrored and therefore the effective
capacity is only half the total. For the VM store, a single VHDX volume was created for all VMs. The Lync
Standard Edition VMs need to be allocated some extra local hard disk space to account for the Lync
database.
Since Microsoft recommends VHDX format from Hyper-V 2012 onward, this solution leverages VHDX
volumes to ensure performance from all virtual machines. VHDX format has multiple benefits, including
several-fold improved performance over VHD format and its capability to store custom metadata about
operating system version, patches applied and more. Only fixed VHDX volumes are used for this solution.
3
Not required for PowerEdge R420 hosts running Edge and Reverse Proxy services. Only required for PowerEdge R620 hosts
running SQL server database.
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Dynamic and differencing disks are not recommended since guaranteeing optimum performance and
consistent user experience even under peak load is the primary design objective.
3.2.4
Best Practices
In addition to design considerations, certain best practices must also be considered while deploying Lync
Server 2013 on Hyper-V. These best practices are detailed below.
3.2.4.1
Infrastructure Best Practices
In order to have a successful Lync 2013 implementation on Hyper-V, certain recommendations are
provided for the infrastructure, which includes server, CPU, networking, disks and operating system. These
recommendations include:
• Use 64-bit Intel® Xeon® processors for the hosts, with a minimum of two sockets per server. Using
multiple populated sockets allows more cores per server, increasing density and allowing virtualization
to be leveraged.
• Use at least a dual-port network adapter with teaming on 1Gbps. In this deployment, the PowerEdge
R620 hosts for the Lync Standard Edition were deployed with four teamed 1GbE network adapters.
Further details are available in Figure 3.
• Use separate disks for the hypervisor, guest virtual machines and SQL databases. Doing so ensures that
there is no contention for disk access among the three different stores. In addition, it is a Hyper-V best
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practice to not store system files on other storage drives. If there is a period of high I/O activity in SQL
store, the hypervisor and VM stores will not experience any bottlenecks that will cause sluggishness in
the entire topology, should this best practice be followed. This separation of disks by different LUNs
also allows for easier management.
• Use Windows Server 2012 Datacenter or Standard edition. Although Windows Server 2008 R2 is
supported, the recommendation is to consider Windows Server 2012 in order to take advantage of the
latest features from the operating system and hypervisor.
• Use SQL Server 2012 or SQL Server 2008 R2 for the databases. SQL 2012 was used for lab validation.
• Provision physical hosts with identical hardware configuration in a virtualized environment. In this
reference implementation, PowerEdge R620 hosts with identical hardware and configuration are used
to avoid any degradation in user experience due to performance variations among the VMs on
different hosts. This recommendation is more critical in environments that use Hyper-V failover
clustering, but should be considered in deployments such as the one presented.
4
For details, see the article “6 Best Practices for Physical Servers Hosting Hyper-V Roles” in TechNet magazine:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd744830.aspx
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3.2.4.2
Lync-Specific Best Practices
Shown below are some of the best practices specific to Lync:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use two Lync Standard Edition Server in a paired pool or three Lync Front Ends in an Enterprise pool.
5
Doing so abides by the Microsoft Best Practice. This ensures best use of the “brick architecture” in
Lync Server 2013 Enterprise Edition and that there is a copy of user data on each of the three Front
Ends.
Place similar VMs on separate hosts. There are a few different Lync Server 2013 roles in the
deployment. By placing like roles on different hosts, IT administrators can ensure there is no loss of
availability if one host fails.
Use a minimum of six disks for the SQL data store. The official Microsoft recommendation is to also
6
use six disks for SQL Server databases. This recommendation ensures that there is sufficient disk
performance during periods of high I/O, such as durations with high user login rates. There are a
number of different DB-Log pairs within the SQL architecture for Lync:
o Xds—for information about the topology used by the Central Management Store
o
Rtcdyn— for transient user data, such as presence
o
Rtc— for persistent data, such as contact lists and contacts
o
Lcslog, LcsCdr and QoEMetrics—for archiving and monitoring database and log requirements
o
Rtcab—to store Lync address books
o
Rgsdyn, Rgsconfig—to store database and log information for response groups
o
And many others
7
For SQL Server, it is preferable to place the tempdb within the SQL store and not in the default system
volume location. The tempdb database is the working “scratch pad” that SQL uses to perform
operational tasks. Placing it on the system volume can cause unwanted disk contention.
There should be adequate network provisioning to accommodate audio and video traffic that Lync
8
enables. Allocate 65Kbps per audio stream and 500Kbps per video stream.
Sufficient memory must be allocated for each of the Lync Server roles.
Use statically assigned memory instead of dynamic memory. The use of fixed amounts of memory for
each VM provides resources that may be required at all times instead of allocation on demand by the
hypervisor to each VM. Considering that Lync 2013 is a real-time workload, using dynamic memory
may cause unwanted latencies in delay-sensitive audio/video traffic. For example, during peak hours
5
For details, see “Lync Server 2013: Keep in touch” in TechNet magazine: http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/magazine/jj839700.aspx
6
For details, see “Server Hardware Platforms” on TechNet: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg398835(OCS.15).aspx
7
For more examples, see “SQL Server Data and Log File Placement” on TechNet: http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/gg398479.aspx
8
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg425841.aspx
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•
•
•
3.3
for conferencing, the Front End VM may need to periodically request increased memory from the
hypervisor instead of being guaranteed resources.
Use fixed disks instead of dynamic disks. The use of fixed disks (or pass-through disks) guarantees best
performance and is recommended for production environments.
Microsoft recommends that physical CPUs not be oversubscribed by the VMs residing on the host. For
example, if the number of cores available is 16 and the number of vCPUs allocated is 24, this indicates
over-subscription since the Virtual CPUs (vCPU) : Processor Cores ratio is more than 1:1. Oversubscribing the CPUs will cause contention for resources. Since Lync works with delay-sensitive voice
and video traffic, there could be adverse effects due to over-subscription, and it is not recommended
at this time.
The use of “Synthetic network adapter” is preferred over “legacy network adapter” in Hyper-V and
offers better performance.
Lync Server 2013 Edge Architecture
The highlighted section of Figure 4 shows the Lync components that need to reside in the perimeter
network with internal and external firewalls. This reference architecture assumes that an existing perimeter
network already exists and does not explicitly provide details for firewalls. Dell SonicWall has a wide range
of products to fulfill any needs for security or firewall devices.
In order to follow the high availability design principle, the proposed Edge architecture consists of an Edge
pool with two Edge Server VMs and uses DNS load balancing on both the internal and external Edge
interfaces. An HTTPS Reverse Proxy can also be configured and is required to support the sharing of web
content and web services to federated and external users and for enabling certain features as detailed on
the Microsoft Setting Up Reverse Proxy Servers site. Since Reverse Proxy cannot be collocated with the
Edge Server, two additional VMs would be needed if a Reverse Proxy Server is required. To see a list of
Reverse Proxies qualified with Microsoft Lync Server 2013, visit the Infrastructure qualified for Microsoft
Lync site.
Both the Edge and Reverse Proxy Servers are consolidated as VMs on two Dell™ PowerEdge™ R420 1U
servers, each with dual-socket Intel® Xeon® E5-2400 series processors, 32 GB of DDR3 RAM and support
for up to 8 x 2.5-inch internal HDDs. Each of these servers is running Windows Server 2012 with Hyper-V.
The detailed hardware specifications for these servers are provided in Section 4.
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Figure 4
Lync Server Edge Architecture
The recommended configuration details of the VMs are provided in Table 3.
Table 3
Purpose
VMs
Lync Server 2013 Edge Pool 2
Reverse Proxy
2
3.3.1
Lync Edge Architecture VM Resources
Total Virtual CPU (vCPUs)
Total Memory (GB)
4
16
4
8
Edge Network Architecture
Figure 5 details the network connectivity for each of the PowerEdge R420 servers hosting the Edge and
Reverse Proxy server VMs. The PowerEdge R420 server uses the Broadcom® 5720 dual-port 1Gb LAN on
Motherboard (LOM) and has an optional Broadcom 5719 quad port 1Gb add-on Network Interface Card
(NIC) configured. Two of the ports from the LOM are teamed together and provide the connectivity to the
internal networking and two of the ports from the add-on NIC are teamed to provide external network
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connectivity. Separate virtual switches are created on each of the teams and each of the VMs has a
separate virtual NIC connecting to the internal and external networks, as depicted in Figure 5.
Figure 5
Network Architecture for Edge/Reverse Proxy Hosts
The internal network connects to the Lync core architecture and Lync clients on the LAN. The external
network allows access for authenticated Lync clients from the Internet.
3.3.2
Reverse Proxy
The Reverse Proxy Server is an external component that is not part of the Lync topology. Even though
external users can still log in and use critical Lync features, such as calls, desktop sharing and federated
communications, without the deployment of this role. With a Reverse Proxy, external users are able to take
advantage of functionalities that are available through web services, including:
•
•
22
Downloading meeting content for meetings
Expanding distribution groups
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
•
•
•
Downloading files from the address book service
Accessing the Lync Web App client
Enabling the Lync 2013 client, Lync Windows Store app and Lync 2013 mobile client to locate the Lync
Discover (autodiscover) URLs and use Unified Communications Web API (UCWA), etc.
Per Microsoft recommendation, these web services are made available to external users by publishing
them through external simple URLs. HTTP and HTTPS requests from external users are handled by the
Reverse Proxy Server, which forwards them internally to the Lync Front End pool. If Reverse Proxy is not
present, these external users will not have access to the functionalities. Furthermore, the Lync mobile
client for phones and tablets will not be functional for external users as they are web-based and require
the Reverse Proxy to communicate with the Lync Front End pool’s IIS mobility website.
3.3.3
Best Practices for Edge and Reverse Proxy Host
In order to deploy the Edge and Reverse Proxy Servers, the following best practices should be considered:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
3.4
Two separate network interfaces should be used for internal and external networks at minimum. These
should use separate subnets that are not routable across each other. Only the external interface should
include the default gateway and not the internal interface.
Static routes must be defined on the Edge Server for connectivity to internal subnets.
A standard SSL certificate, with common name field set to the Edge Server’s FQDN, should be used for
the internal Edge certificate; this certificate cannot contain a subject alternative name (SAN) field.
Whenever possible, internally facing certificates should be obtained from an internal Windows®
Enterprise CA.
The external edge certificate should be a UCC or SAN certificate issued by public trusted certificate
authority. It should include a common name field set to the access edge FQDN and subject alternative
name field that contains both the access edge FQDN and the web conferencing FQDN.
Additionally, externally facing certificates not include any of the internal hostnames. Broadcasting the
internal namespace on an external certificate is considered a poor practice.
Although it is not recommended to use the same external certificate for both the external Edge Server
interface and the Reverse Proxy Server interface, should this be done for cost-saving purposes, the
access edge FQDN must be specified in the common name field and the Reverse Proxy FQDN in the
SAN (subject alternative name) field.
Enterprise Voice Connectivity
In Lync Server 2013, the functionality of the Mediation Server can be part of the Front End Server by
default and thus a separate Mediation Server is no longer required. This means that the Front End pool can
now directly connect to a PSTN gateway, an IP-PBX or to a SIP trunk via a session border controller (SBC).
This reference architecture assumes connectivity to an ITSP via an intermediary on-premise SBC or to a
PSTN via a media gateway, as shown in Figure 6.
While the reference architecture collocates the mediation server with the frontend server, it is
recommended that you contact Dell services to scope out the optimal solution to fit your needs.
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The enterprise connectivity options, as shown in Figure 6, are:
•
•
•
T1/E1 connectivity from PSTN to a media gateway, which in turn connects to the Lync
infrastructure via SIP
SIP trunk from an ITSP to an SBC, which then connects to Lync infrastructure via SIP
PBX connecting to a media gateway via a T1/E1, which in turn connects to the Lync infrastructure
via SIP
If connecting to a SIP trunk via an on-premise SBC, consider placing the SBC in the perimeter network to
provide the appropriate level of security. If connecting directly to a SIP trunk provider without an
intermediary SBC, a separate Mediation Server may be required. The preferred third-party gateway, as
validated in this reference architecture, is the Sonus SBC 1000 or SBC 2000.
Figure 6
24
Enterprise Voice Connectivity
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
3.4.1
Sonus SBC 1000/2000
The Sonus SBC 1000/2000 is a Microsoft-qualified enhanced media gateway that has a session border
controller (SBC) for SIP trunking and gateway operation for T1/E1 telecom connectivity.
The SBC 1000 offers two 1GbE ports for SIP trunking and two T1/E1 interfaces while SBC 2000 offers four
1GbE ports for SIP trunking and sixteen T1/E1 interfaces. When used as a gateway, the SBC 1000/2000 can
function between the legacy PBX infrastructure within the data center and the Lync Mediation Server. In
this particular case, the Mediation Servers are collocated on the Front End and hence the Front End pool is
the next hop for the SBC 1000/2000 gateway. If used as an SBC, this device needs to be equipped with SIP
trunks from an Internet telecom service provider (ITSP) and connects through the provider’s switching
network into the PSTN. Both cases enable calls to external phone users.
Figure 7 shows the connectivity options for SBC 1000/2000, whereby the device can act as both an
enhanced media gateway connecting to a PSTN via T1/E1 interfaces or as an SBC connecting to an ITSP
via a SIP trunk. The Lync environment is in turn connected via SIP TCP or TLS. This provides an option to
fallback to a PSTN in the event the connectivity to the ITSP goes down. Further, the SBC 1000/2000 can
be configured in a highly available active-active mode, which provides resiliency and scalability by load
balancing the traffic.
Figure 7
Sonus SBC connectivity options
Sonus SBC 1000/2000
ITSP
SIP-TRUNK
A
d
m
i
n
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
SB
C
20
00
SIP TCP/TLS
LAN
SIP
PSTN
T1/E1 to PSTN
A
d
m
i
n
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
SB
C
20
00
Lync
Environment
SIP TCP/TLS
Sonus SBC 1000/2000
The SBC 2000 is similar to the SBC 1000 with more expandability options and the ability to scale to a
higher number of simultaneous sessions. Thus, depending on an organization’s voice needs, the
appropriate voice gateway should be considered. This reference architecture leverages Sonus SBC 1000.
The Sonus SBC series also supports the Lync Survivable Branch Appliance (SBA). Using the SBA, the branch
office communications are always available, even when the WAN link to the central site is down.
3.4.2
SBC 1000 Gateway Configuration
In order to configure the SBC 1000 as a gateway or SBC, the following configurations must be made:
•
25
Signaling Groups: A signaling group defines a virtual trunk that receives inbound calls and sends
outbound calls. For example, a signaling group can comprise a trunk to Lync endpoints. This signaling
group would be set to point to the Mediation Server as its next hop. The Figure 8 screenshot shows an
example of such a signaling group.
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
Figure 8
Signaling Group Example
As shown in the Figure 8 screenshot, the signaling group is set as a trunk to calls being sent outbound
on the “from Lync” routing table. Inbound calls will be directed to the SIP server table specified as the
“Lync Central Mediation Server Pool.”
•
26
Call Routing Tables: These rules define how a call should be routed. For example, a routing table
associated with the Lync signaling group will most likely be set to forward calls to specific outbound
interfaces. In this example, if operating as an SBC, the routing tables for calls from Lync will specify
Ethernet interfaces connected to the ITSP in the tables. On the other hand, if operating as a gateway,
the routing tables for the Lync signaling group will specify the T1/E1 interfaces as the outbound route.
Figure 9 shows the default route from the previous example of a Lync signaling group.
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
Implementation | Version 1.0
Figure 9
Call Routing Tables Example
As shown in Figure 9, the default route for the Lync signaling group specifies two entries. The first entry is a
T1/E1 interface and the second entry is a SIP trunk. In this particular example, the SBC is being used as both
a gateway and a session border controller.
•
Phone Number Transformations: In order to route calls between virtual trunks/signaling groups,
number transformations may become necessary. Internal extensions may take only seven digits
but external calls may require a prefix, such as an area code. Such transformations are handled in
these tables using regular expressions. These transformations are applied prior to a call being sent
to the outbound route.
In order to successfully implement the SBC 1000 within the SMB, these are the some signaling groups that
may be required:
•
•
•
27
Signaling group for Lync: routed outbound to the SIP trunk and the T1/E1, depending on whether
the SIP trunk or T1/E1 functionality is being leveraged
Signaling group for SIP trunk: routed outbound to the Lync signaling group
AND/OR
Signaling group for T1/E1: routed outbound to the Lync signaling group
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
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For detailed information on Sonus SBC 1000 configuration, please refer to the Sonus Online Support
Portal.
3.5
End-User Client Connectivity
End-user client connectivity is achieved via the Lync 2013 desktop or mobile clients, Lync Web App, Lync
Windows Store App, Lync Phone Edition or through specialized Lync devices. The Lync 2013 desktop
clients can be installed on Windows-based desktops, laptops or hybrids, such as the Dell™ XPS 12
Ultrabook™. The Lync 2013 mobile clients are available for Windows Phone devices, Apple iOS devices
(including the iPhone and iPad) and many popular devices running Google Android. Specialized Lync
devices, such as the PolyComm CX series, are designed to integrate with Microsoft Lync, and some of
these devices run the Lync Phone Edition natively on them. These devices can be connected through a
wired connection or wirelessly.
3.5.1
Wired Connectivity with Dell Networking Switches
The Dell™ Networking 7000 series switches are managed layer 3 GbE switches that provide wire-speed
throughput. Select Dell Networking 7000 series models offer 24 or 48 ports of Power over Ethernet (PoE)
support to connect to devices with power requirements of up to 30 watts without the need for a separate
power cable. This enables powering Dell Dell W-Series Access Points as well as specialized Lync 2013 VoIP
clients, such as the PolyComm CX600, to be powered on by directly connecting to the Dell Networking
7000 switches.
3.5.2
Wireless Networking with Dell Networking W-Series
The Dell™ Networking W-Series provides full-featured mobility controllers and access points that are
secure, reliable and flexible. The Dell™ W-Series W-3200 controller and W-AP135 access point provide a
mobility solution for Lync 2013 over wireless. Both controller and access point should be connected to a
Dell PoE (Power-over-Ethernet) switch. This switch can also be connected to other internal Lync client
devices or be connected to a separate set of client access switches. Internal clients are those devices that
are logged into the corporate domain and external clients are those that belong to visitors and are placed
on a “guest” wireless network.
Configuration of the controller and access point can be done through a browser-based interface once the
management interface of the controller is configured on the network via a serial connection and the
controller’s CLI. The management interface allows IT administrators to perform a number of different
tasks, including viewing and editing controllers and access points used in the topology.
To enable Lync wireless clients to authenticate, it is recommended to set up a RADIUS server through the
Microsoft Windows Network Policy Server role and to configure the controller as a RADIUS client.
Additionally, in order to ensure quality of service (QoS) for Lync, specific system configurations are
required. These settings are described in the Dell Networking W-Series Wireless LAN Mobility Controller
Optimizations for Microsoft Lync white paper.
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4
Technical Specifications
This section details the technical specifications for all of the physical and virtual components that make up
this reference architecture for the Dell Unified Communication Solution. Figure 10 shows the complete
logical view of the Dell Unified Communication Solution for a 1,000-user single-site deployment.
Figure 10 Dell Unified Communication Solution
4.1
Virtual Machine Specifications
Many Lync® Server 2013 server roles are deployed in separate virtual machines, as detailed in Section 3.
Each virtual machine has specific resource requirements in terms of compute and memory. This allocation
of vCPU, memory and networking seems sufficient based on validation using the Microsoft Lync Stress
and Performance Tool and per Microsoft best practices.
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Table 4
Virtual Machine Configuration Details
2 x Lync Front End VMs (includes Archiving-Monitoring and Audio-Video Conferencing Roles)
Operating System
Windows Server 2012
Virtual Machine Configuration
Networks
Software
6 x vCPU
32 GB RAM
1 x Virtual Network Adapter
Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition
1 x SQL Server VM (for Archiving+Monitoring and Persistent Chat)
Operating System
Windows Server® 2012
Virtual Machine Configuration
Networks
Software
Operating System
Virtual Machine Configuration
Networks
Software
Operating System
Virtual Machine Configuration
Networks
Software
Operating System
Virtual Machine Configuration
Networks
Software
Operating System
Virtual Machine Configuration
Networks
Software
7
30
4 x vCPU
16 GB RAM
1 x Virtual Network Adapter
SQL Server 2012 Standard Edition
2 x Office Web Apps Server (OWS) VMs
Windows Server 2012
4 x vCPU
8 GB RAM
1 x Virtual Network Adapter
Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition
1 x Persistent Chat Server VM
Windows Server 2012
4 x vCPU
8 GB RAM
1 x Virtual Network Adapter
Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition
2 x Edge Server VMs
Windows Server 2012
4 x vCPU
16 GB RAM
2 x Virtual Network Adapter (1 internal, 1 external)
Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition
2 x Reverse Proxy VMs
Windows Server 2012
4 x vCPU
8 GB RAM
2 x Virtual Network Adapter (1 internal, 1 external)
9
IIS ARR 2012 or MS Forefront® TMG 2010
Internet Information Services Application Request Routing and Microsoft® Forefront Threat Management Gateway
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
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Table 4 has the details about the recommended configuration for the virtual machines that make up this
solution. Based on the role performed by each virtual machine, optimum amounts of compute, memory,
network and storage resources have been allocated. CPU resources are allocated to ensure that the
core:vCPU ratio is not oversubscribed for delay-sensitive real-time traffic. Memory is allocated statically to
each VM, ensuring that resources are guaranteed during peak usage hours.
For service availability in the event of failure at the application level, more than one virtual machine has been
provisioned for all critical Lync server roles. Since persistent chat is not critical for the continued availability
of this solution, only one virtual machine has been incorporated in this solution. The same logic holds true
for the back-end SQL Server for the Archiving+Monitoring and Persistent Chat databases.
Since the Lync Server external website listens on port 4443, instead of on the standard port 443, a Reverse
Proxy is necessary for port translation between the two. The Reverse Proxy can use Microsoft IIS Application
Request Routing (ARR) 2012 to provide access to non-HTTP/HTTPS content for the Lync user requests
originating from outside of the “external firewall.” The IIS ARR component enables IIS to handle Reverse
Proxy requests, URL rewrites and load balancing. It also enables increased web application scalability and
reliability through rule-based routing, client and host name affinity, load balancing of HTTP server requests,
distributed disk caching and optimized resource utilization for application/web servers, among other
benefits.
In addition, the Microsoft Forefront Threat Management Gateway (TMG) 2010 or Unified Access Gateway
(UAG) 2010, another solution from Microsoft, can perform the role of Reverse Proxy Server as well. These
are comprehensive secure web gateway solutions that help to protect Lync users from web-based threats.
Forefront TMG/UAG also delivers simple, unified perimeter security, with integrated firewall, VPN, intrusion
prevention, malware inspection and URL filtering. Even though TMG is discontinued, Microsoft continues to
support it, and enterprises that are already using ForeFront TMG can still leverage it.
4.2
Hardware Specifications
The physical hardware components of the reference architecture are detailed in the following tables.
Table 5
Hardware
CPU
RAM
Networks
Storage
Host Operating System
31
Server Host Configuration Details
Host1 for Lync Core Server
Dell PowerEdge R620 rack server with 2.5-inch drive chassis
2 x Intel® Xeon® processor E5-2660 CPUs with 8 cores per
CPU
64 GB
Quad-port Broadcom® network adapter (within a network
team)
PERC H710P
4 x 900 GB 10K RPM SAS
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter or Standard Edition with
stacked licenses (Hyper-V role enabled)
Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
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Virtual Machines
Hardware
CPU
RAM
Networks
Storage
Operating System
Virtual Machines
Hardware
1 x Lync Standard Edition Virtual Machine
Primary Lync Front End Standard Edition VM
1 x Office Web Apps Server Virtual Machine
1 x Persistent Chat Server Virtual Machine
Host2 for Lync Core Server
Dell PowerEdge R620 rack server with up to 10 x 2.5-inch drive
chassis
2 x Intel Xeon processor E5-2660 CPUs with 8 cores per CPU
64 GB
Quad-port Broadcom® network adapter (within a network
team)
PERC H710P
10 x 900 GB 10K RPM SAS
Windows Server 2012 Datacenter or Standard Edition with
stacked licenses (Hyper-V role enabled)
1 x Lync Standard Edition Virtual Machine
Backup Registrar Lync Front End VM
1 x Office Web Apps Server Virtual Machine
1 x Back End SQL Server® Virtual Machine
Host3 and Host4 for Lync Edge Server
Dell PowerEdge R420 rack server with 2.5-inch drive Chassis
CPU per Host
2 x Intel Xeon processor E5-2420 CPUs with 6 cores per CPU
RAM per Host
Network per Host
32 GB
Quad-port Broadcom network adapter (within 2 network teams)
Storage
PERC H710P
4 x 900 GB 10K RPM SAS
Operating System
Windows Server 2012 Standard Edition (Hyper-V role enabled)
Virtual Machines per Host
1 x Edge Server Virtual Machine
1 x Reverse Proxy Virtual Machine
As shown above, PowerEdge R620s are used for the Lync core architecture, and two of these servers are
required, as detailed in section 3.2. For the Edge and Reverse Proxy, two PowerEdge R420 servers are
required.
Please note that the server hosts can use either Windows Server 2012 Datacenter edition or optionally
Windows Server 2012 Standard edition with stacked licenses as detailed below.
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•
On the hosts deployed for virtualizing the Lync Server roles, two Windows® Server 2012 Standard
10
edition licenses are stacked. This allows up to four virtual machines on the same physical server
running Windows Server 2012 Standard edition. For the Edge Server role, one Windows Server 2012
Standard license is required.
Table 6
Voice Components
2 x Sonus SBC 1000 or SBC 2000
Voice Gateways
Table 7
Networking (Core
Architecture)
Networking (Client
Connectivity) – Wired
and Wireless
Remote Management
4.2.1
Enterprise Voice Components
Additional Recommended Components
Additional Recommended Components
2 x Dell Networking S55
Dell Networking 7048P (PoE capable)
Dell Networking W 3200 Controller and Dell Networking W-AP135
Access Point
1 x iDRAC 7 with vFlash 8GB SD Card per host server
Peripherals—Tablets and
Notebooks
Dell Venue Pro Tablet
Dell Latitude Tablet
Dell XPS Ultrabook
Peripherals—Personal
Phones
Peripherals—
Conferencing
Peripherals—Personal
Headsets
Polycom CX 300, 500, 600
Polycom Roundtable CX5000, CX7000
Plantronics 620
Plantronics Voyager Pro UC B230-M
Jabra GN 2000 Duo
Jabra Pro 350-MS
Dell PowerEdge Servers
For the Front End hosts, the architecture uses Dell PowerEdge R620 rack servers with two Intel Xeon
processor E5-2660 CPUs with eight cores per CPU. These servers enable remarkably fast processing for
compute-intensive tasks. This server supports up to 768 GB of memory, which is more than sufficient for
the Front End hosts. Sufficient internal storage is critical to this design. The PowerEdge R620 server
10
Windows Server 2012 Licensing Data Sheet
Windows Server 2012 Licensing & Pricing FAQ
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Reference Architecture | DellTM Unified Communication Solution with Microsoft® Lync® Server 2013 for Single Site
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provides up to 10 terabyte of internal storage. The preferred chassis is the option that accommodates 10
2.5-inch drives.
For the perimeter network hosts, the platform chosen is the Dell PowerEdge R420 server equipped with
two Intel Xeon processor E5-2420 CPUs with six cores per CPU. Memory support for the PowerEdge
R420 server is up to 384 GB. The preferred chassis is the eight-drive option. Further details on Dell
PowerEdge servers are available on the Dell PowerEdge Portfolio site.
Figure 11 Dell PowerEdge R620 Server
Figure 12 Dell PowerEdge R420 Server
4.2.2
Dell Networking
The Dell networking portfolio includes top-of-rack, aggregation, core and distributed core switches. This
implementation can use Dell™ Networking S55 or Dell™ Networking 7048 switches within the data
center. The Dell Networking S55 provides 44 10/100/1000Base-T ports and four ports that can be
configured as copper or fiber (SFP). It is a 1 rack unit top-of-rack, low-latency switch. The Dell Networking
7048 provides 48 10/100/1000Base-T ports. Both switches can also accommodate two 10GbE modules,
each with dual 10Gbps ports.
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Figure 13 Dell Networking S55 Layer 3 Top of Rack Switch
Figure 14 Dell Networking 7048 Layer 3 Top of Rack Switch
For client devices (access switches), Dell™ Networking 7048P Power over Ethernet can be used. These
switches provide 30.8 watts per port for Lync clients, including the Polycom CX600 IP phones, and
eliminate the need for an external power source.
4.2.3
Wireless Networking
For Lync 2013 real-time workloads, Dell recommends the Dell Networking W-Series wireless controllers
and access points (PowerConnect W). The W-Series 3200 controller can support up to 2,048 users and
can manage 32 LAN access points and 128 remote access points (APs). The access point chosen for this
configuration is W-AP135, which can deliver wireline-like data rates of up to 450 Mbps. This translates to a
capability to handle numerous audio-video sessions simultaneously, assuming each audio stream is 65
Kbps and each video stream is 500 Kbps. It should be noted though that the performance and quality of
experience of Lync Server must be monitored, and these throughput values should not be used as the only
metric to assess quality of experience.
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Figure 15 Dell Networking W-3200 Controller and Dell Networking W-AP135 Access Point
4.2.4
Sonus SBC 1000/2000 Gateway
The SBC 1000/2000 are advanced session border controllers (SBC) built for smaller enterprise networks. It
delivers robust security, high availability and proven interoperability with Lync Server 2013. The SBC 1000
is a versatile device that can work as a traditional gateway with T1/E1 trunks or as a session border
controller with newer SIP trunks. The SBC 1000 is a Lync 2013 qualified gateway as well as Lync 2013
qualified session border controller. The SBC 1000 provides up to two x T1/E1 interfaces, while the SBC
2000 can support up to 16 x T1/E1 interfaces. For complete details on the Lync 2013 qualification matrix,
check the Microsoft Infrastructure qualified for Microsoft Lync page.
Figure 16 Sonus SBC 1000
4.2.5
Client Devices
This enterprise VoIP implementation has an end-to-end UC solution that includes client hardware
components in addition to data center hardware. Dell has a rich product portfolio of client devices that
can be used to run the Lync end-user client. The Dell Latitude, XPS, Inspiron, Precision and Venue Pro
product lines offer a complete range of productivity devices that are ideally suited to run the Lync 2013
client software/app. Visit the Dell Laptops, Tablets and Workstations site to browse client products suited
for the workplace.
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Figure 17 Dell Venue 8 Pro Tablet (left) and Dell XPS12 Convertible Ultrabook (right)
The Polycom CX300, CX500 and CX600 are third-party desk phones that can be used as Lync endpoints.
For a complete list of client devices available for Lync, please contact Dell Services.
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Verification
Verification of the topology involved a number of different scenarios in the lab. These included
performance validation of Lync Server, quality of experience (QoE) results from monitoring server reports,
validation of the Sonus SBC 1000 gateway and SBC configuration and performance, failover validation of
the Lync Front End, and verification with Lync and Polycom clients.
The performance verification involved measurements from performance monitor after the Lync Stress and
Performance Tool was run. There were a number of different counters that were looked at, including CPU,
memory, disk I/O, conferencing statistics and connected users. In line with Microsoft recommendations,
CPU performance was taken from the hosts, since these counters are a more reliable indicator than CPU
performance counters taken directly from the VM. QoE, which is particularly important for real-time
traffic, such as audio and video in Lync, was also measured using the Lync Monitoring Server. These results
indicate that the suggested reference architecture is adequate for 1,000 Lync users.
Figure 18 Lync Server 2013 Load Configuration Tool
Figure 18 shows the general scenario load settings of the Lync Server 2013 Load Configuration, which is
part of the Lync Stress and Performance Tool. This utility is used to set the Lync feature scenario and the
load parameters to be stressed against the Lync infrastructure. As seen from the screen shot, the load level
across the different feature scenarios was set to high. The multi-view video conference was also set to
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true by changing the settings under Audio Conferencing to ensure that video conferencing load was
simulated by the tool.
In addition to performance analysis, Dell conducted a thorough investigation of other components in the
architecture, including the Sonus SBC 1000 SBC/gateway. The SBC 1000 was validated for SIP trunking
and T1/E1 connectivity, i.e. both as an SBC and as a gateway. In addition, the failover capability of the
device in an active-active pair was also verified. In an active-active pair, the SBC 1000 provides the needed
availability in case one unit was to fail.
Next, failover functionality of the Front End to the backup registrar pool was also verified. Failover to the
backup registrar is relatively simple and can be accomplished by running the following commands:
Invoke-CsManagementServerFailover -BackupSqlServerFqdn <backupregistrarfqdn>
BackupSqlInstanceName RTC –Force
Invoke-CsPoolFailOver –PoolFqdn <poolfqdn> –Disastermode –Verbose
It should be noted that the user contact lists and presence are not available until the IT administrator takes
these manual steps in the event that failover is needed. However, ongoing instant messages and
audio/video/web conferences continue even upon failure of the primary Front End.
Lastly, client devices were validated for both internal and external connectivity. Devices used included Dell
Latitude 10 tablets and Polycom CX600 phones. The Latitude 10 tablets provide audio/video/web
conferencing using the Lync app available from the Microsoft store.
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Conclusion
The Dell Unified Communication Solution as presented in this reference architecture provides an end-toend Unified Communication solution for organizations with up to 1,000 users. This integrated solution
uses Microsoft Lync Server 2013 as the Unified Communication software and is built on the wide ranging
Dell product portfolio, including Dell servers, wired/wireless networking and client devices.
This reference architecture focuses on deployment of Lync Server 2013 with different communication
modalities using Lync 2013 Standard Edition. Deploying Lync Server 2013 as detailed in this document
results in a solution that is cost-effective and simple to manage and administer. Certain best practices
were adhered to while implementing this solution. In addition to these tenets, three design principles—
availability, application performance and resource consolidation— determined the overall architecture for
1,000 users.
To verify the implementation, the Lync Stress and Performance Tool was run with instant messaging,
audio conferencing, video conferencing using multi-view, application sharing, and other workloads. The
performance of the Lync Front End was verified as being within recommended thresholds.
Leveraging this configuration to run Microsoft Lync provides benefits that include consolidation and
availability. Lync Server roles are deployed in virtual machines, reducing physical server count and making
the above configuration a well-suited design for organizations looking to save on hardware and
maintenance costs. Further, the solution caters to more than just instant messaging and conferencing
needs within the organization. Enterprise Voice recommendations to reach external telephone users are
provided, as well as Edge Server and Reverse Proxy guidance for Lync clients connecting remotely.
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A
Additional Resources
Dell is focused on meeting your needs with proven services and
support: http://www.dell.com/learn/us/en/555/by-service-type-it-consulting
or http://www.dell.com/learn/us/en/555/services/unified-communications-consulting
DellTechCenter.com is an IT community where you can connect with Dell customers and Dell employees
for the purpose of sharing knowledge, best practices and information about Dell products and installations.
Other references:
• Dell PowerEdge Rack Servers:
http://www.dell.com/us/business/p/poweredge-rack-servers
• Dell Networking Switches:
http://www.dell.com/networking
• Dell Networking Wireless:
http://www.dell.com/wireless
• Dell Networking Lync Certification
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/lync/gg131938
• Lync Stress and Performance Tool:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36819
• Lync Sizing Guidance for Physical Environments:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36828
• Lync Planning Tool:
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36823
• Lync Requirements, Planning and Deployment:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg398616.aspx
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