Canon IRC2100 Technical data

Color Network Printer Board-A1
Color Guide
Printer (PS) Manual
Please read this manual before operating this equipment.
After you finish reading this manual, store it in a safe place for future reference.
ENGLISH
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Contents
Introduction
About the documentation
xiii
Key features of ColorWise
xiv
Chapter 1: iR C2100/2100S Color Management
Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
1-1
Rendering styles
1-4
RGB Source Profile
1-5
RGB Separation
1-6
CMYK Simulation Profile
1-7
CMYK Simulation Method
1-8
Output Profile
1-9
Pure Black Text/Graphics
1-9
Black Overprint
1-10
Spot Color Matching
1-11
Printer Drivers and Print Options
1-12
What a printer driver does
1-12
PostScript printer driver for Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 2000 1-13
Adobe PostScript printer driver for Mac OS
1-18
Chapter 2: Simple and Advanced Workflows
Workflow concepts
2-1
Short-run printing versus color proofing
2-1
RGB, CMYK, and PANTONE colors
2-2
Desktop versus iR C2100/2100S color management
2-2
Simple workflows
2-3
Select your colors wisely
2-4
Select a short workflow
2-4
Advanced workflows
2-7
Short-run printing examples
Color proofing examples
2-8
2-12
viii
Contents
Chapter 3: Color Calibration
Introduction
3-1
Understanding calibration
3-2
How calibration works 3-2
Scheduling calibration
3-4
Checking calibration status
3-4
Using a densitometer
3-5
Setting up the densitometer
3-5
Calibrating the densitometer 3-7
Calibrating with ColorWise Pro Tools 3-8
Expert Mode 3-13
Calibrating from the Control Panel using ReaderCal
3-15
Removing calibration
3-16
Calibrating from the Control Panel using VisualCal
3-16
Limits and 30% Match
3-17
Gray Balance
3-17
Chapter 4: ColorWise Pro Tools
Profile Manager
4-1
Setting the default profiles 4-2
Downloading profiles 4-5
Managing profiles
4-6
Defining profiles 4-8
Changing global settings
4-10
Chapter 5: Working with Color in Applications
Working with color
5-1
Color reference pages
5-2
Office applications
5-3
Choosing colors in office applications
5-4
PostScript applications
5-4
Choosing colors in PostScript applications
5-5
Default output profile
5-7
CMYK simulation
5-7
ix
Contents
Chapter 6: Office Applications
Working with office applications
6-1
Defining colors
6-1
Working with imported files
6-1
Selecting options when printing
6-2
Output profiles
6-2
Chapter 7: Adobe Photoshop
Photoshop 5.x
7-1
Photoshop 5.x color settings
7-1
ColorSync defaults
7-6
Defining colors
7-6
Saving files for importing into other documents
7-7
Selecting options when printing
7-9
Printing tips for advanced users
7-10
Photoshop 4.x
7-12
Defining colors
7-12
Saving files for importing into other documents
7-12
Selecting options when printing
7-14
Chapter 8: Page Layout Applications
Working with page layout applications
8-1
Defining colors
8-1
Importing images
8-1
CMYK simulation
8-2
Adobe PageMaker 6.5 for Mac OS and Windows
8-3
Importing images
8-3
Selecting options when printing
8-4
Optional Color Management from PageMaker
8-5
QuarkXPress 4.02 for Mac OS and Windows
8-5
Importing images
8-6
Selecting options when printing
8-6
Optional Color Management from QuarkXPress
8-7
QuarkXPress 3.32 for Mac OS and Windows
8-7
Importing images
8-7
Selecting options when printing
8-8
x
Contents
Chapter 9: Illustration Applications
Working with illustration applications
9-1
Defining colors
9-1
Importing images
9-2
CMYK simulation
9-2
Adobe Illustrator 8.x for Windows and Mac OS
9-3
Defining colors
9-3
Importing images
9-3
Optional Color Management in Illustrator
9-3
Selecting options when printing
9-4
Saving files for importing into other documents
9-5
Macromedia FreeHand 8.x for Windows and Mac OS
9-5
Defining colors
9-5
Importing images
9-6
Selecting options when printing from FreeHand
9-7
Saving files for importing into other documents
9-8
Optional Color Management in FreeHand
9-8
CorelDRAW for Windows and Mac OS
9-8
Defining colors
9-8
Importing images
9-9
Selecting options when printing
9-9
Saving files for importing into other documents
9-10
Optional Color Management in CorelDRAW
9-10
Appendix A: Desktop Color Primer
The properties of color
A-1
The physics of color
A-1
CIE color model
A-2
Hue, saturation, and brightness
A-2
Additive and subtractive color systems
A-3
Printing techniques
A-4
Halftone and continuous tone devices
A-5
xi
Contents
Using color effectively
A-6
A few rules of thumb
A-6
Color wheel
A-7
Color and text
A-7
Raster images and vector images
A-8
Optimizing files for processing and printing
A-9
Resolution of raster images
A-9
Scaling
A-11
Appendix B: Color Management
Controlling printed color
B-1
Maintaining copier/printer consistency
B-1
Print device gamut
B-2
Basics of color management
B-3
Color conversion
B-4
Appendix C: Importing densitometer measurements
Simple ASCII Import File Format (SAIFF)
C-1
Example of 1D Status T density for EFI 34 patch page
C-2
Example of 1D Status T density for EFI 21 patch page
C-2
Example of 1D Status T density for an arbitrary page
C-3
Glossary
Bibliography
Index
xiii
Introduction
About the documentation
Welcome to the Color Guide. This manual introduces you to the concepts
and issues associated with printing to the Color Network Printer Board-A1™,
a special-purpose controller board built into the Canon iR C2100/C2100S
series. It enables you to use your copier/printer as a high-speed, networked
color printer. This manual outlines key workflow scenarios, provides
information on calibration and color profiles, and contains application notes
that explain how to print to the Color Network Printer Board-A1 from
popular Windows and Mac OS applications.
This manual is one book in a set of documentation that also includes
manuals for users and system administrators. All the other manuals should be
available at your site—refer to them for a complete description of your Color
Network Printer Board-A1.
N OTE : The term “iR C2100/2100S” is used in this manual to refer to the
Canon iR C2100/C2100S series in which the Color Network Printer
Board-A1 is embedded. The term “copier/printer” is used to refer to the
Canon iR C2100/C2100S series. The term “ColorWise” is used to refer to
ColorWise 2®, the current version of the iR C2100/2100S built-in color
management system.
About the documentation
The Color Guide is organized to supply you with key information about
managing the color output of your iR C2100/2100S. Chapter 1 discusses the
iR C2100/2100S print options and how to get the best color results, and
Chapter 2 describes several effective workflows. ColorWise Pro Tools are
discussed in the next two chapters. Chapter 3 covers Calibrator and other
methods used to calibrate the copier/printer, and Chapter 4 takes you
through the features of Profile Manager, used to manage color profiles on the
iR C2100/2100S. Succeeding chapters offer tips for printing from business
and graphics applications. Finally, the appendixes offer information about
color theory and color management.
Words in bold, for example, output profile, are terms that appear in the
glossary. The bibliography at the end of this manual provides sources for
further investigation of color printing issues.
xiv
Introduction
Color terms and concepts such as “RGB data,” “color space,” “spot color,”
“gamut,” and “source profile” are used throughout this manual. If you are
new to desktop color or if any terms are unfamiliar, be sure to read
Appendixes A and B or check the glossary.
This manual is part of a set of iR C2100/2100S documentation that also
includes the following manuals for users and system administrators:
• The Configuration Guide explains basic configuration and administration
of the iR C2100/2100S for the supported platforms and network
environments. It also includes guidelines for setting up UNIX, Windows
NT, and NetWare servers to provide PostScript printing services to clients.
• Getting Started describes how to install software to enable users to print to
the iR C2100/2100S. Specifically, it describes installation of PostScript
printer drivers, printer description files, and other user software provided
on the User Software CD. It also explains how to connect each user to the
network.
• The Printing Guide describes the printing features of the iR C2100/2100S
for users who send jobs via remote workstations on the network.
• The Job Management Guide explains the functions of the iR C2100/2100S
client utilities, including the Command WorkStation, and how they can be
used to manage jobs. This book is intended for an operator or
administrator, or a user with the necessary access privileges, who needs to
monitor and manage job flow, and troubleshoot problems that may arise.
• Release Notes provide last-minute product information and workarounds
for some of the problems you may encounter.
Key features of ColorWise
ColorWise is the second-generation color management system (CMS) built
into the iR C2100/2100S and designed to provide both casual and expert
users the best color output for a variety of purposes. The ColorWise default
settings were specifically selected to provide great out-of-box color from
many applications and Windows and Mac OS platforms. This means that
casual users can get good quality output without knowing about or changing
any color settings on the iR C2100/2100S.
To get consistent color you should be sure that the iR C2100/2100S is
calibrated on a regular basis. ColorWise Pro Tools include a simple-to-use
calibrator, which allows you to calibrate using built-in methods or an
optional densitometer (see Chapter 3).
xv
Key features of ColorWise
There are a number of features that can be used to modify printing results.
Depending on your particular needs, you can:
• Set the behavior of CMYK printing to emulate DIC, Euroscale, and
SWOP offset press standards
• Match PANTONE colors for the best match when printed using fourcolor press conditions or when printed using presses with extra, custom
plates
• Select a color rendering dictionary (CRD), also called a rendering style,
for RGB printing. CRDs allow for rich, saturated printing of presentation
graphics; smooth, accurate printing of photographs; and relative or
absolute colorimetric rendering for specialized needs
• Define the source of incoming RGB color data for better screen matching,
and you can provide for better color conversion of RGB data with no
source information
• Define whether RGB data is converted into the full gamut of the copier/
printer or whether it is first converted into the gamut of another device,
such as a press standard. This feature is very helpful for making one device
behave like another. It is also useful for evaluating the appearance of the
RGB file under different printing conditions without having to reprocess
the RGB data each time
ColorWise offers an open color architecture, letting users customize the
iR C2100/2100S to meet new printing needs as they arise. ColorWise
supports ICC profiles, which are industry standard color profiles that define
the color behavior of a device. By downloading ICC profiles to the
iR C2100/2100S, it can simulate a custom press (or another copier/printer)
as well as accurately print colors from a particular monitor or a particular
scanner. In addition, you can create customized ICC profiles for the copier/
printer.
ColorWise also lets you use any Status T densitometer by importing data in a
standard file format (see Appendix C). In this case, it is important to note
that the quality of the instrument used will determine the quality of the
calibration.
1
1-1
Chapter 1:
iR C2100/
2100S Color
Management
Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
The first part of this chapter describes the options available from the
ColorWise color management system and explains how you can customize
the color settings for your particular needs. It provides descriptions of the
preset default settings of ColorWise and covers additional options for users
who need to customize ColorWise.
Beginning on page 1-12 is a detailed explanation of what a PostScript Level 2
or PostScript 3 printer driver does, as well as information on the capabilities
of various printer drivers and instructions for setting color options with the
PostScript drivers for Windows and Mac OS.
Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
There are three ways to modify the iR C2100/2100S printing behavior:
• You can select ColorWise options for an individual print job using menus
that appear from the printer driver.
• You can select most ColorWise options as server defaults from iR C2100/
2100S Setup or from the Control Panel, as described in the Configuration
Guide. These defaults will apply to all subsequent print jobs unless you
override them.
• You can select some ColorWise options, particularly default ICC profile
settings and calibration options, from ColorWise Pro Tools. These options
include default Simulation Profile (see page 1-7), Simulation Method (see
page 1-8), Appear in Driver as (see page 4-8), default Source Profile (see
page 1-5), RGB Separation (see page 1-6), and associated calibration set
(see page 3-3).
Applications can generate color data for the iR C2100/2100S in many
different color spaces. The most common type of color data produced from
office applications is RGB, while prepress applications generally produce
CMYK data. Desktop applications can also generate spot colors such as
PANTONE colors. To complicate matters, a single page may contain a mix
of RGB, CMYK, and spot colors. The iR C2100/2100S lets users control the
printing of these mixed-color documents with features that apply specifically
to RGB, CMYK, or spot color data.
1
1-2
iR C2100/2100S Color Management
iR C2100/2100S color management generates CMYK data to be sent to the
copier/printer; additional processing may then be performed before printing
begins.
The diagram below illustrates the print options in the iR C2100/2100S color
management process that affect color data conversions. You access these print
options when you send a print job to the iR C2100/2100S. Most of these
options and settings are described in subsequent sections of this chapter.
RGB data
RGB Source Profile
Gamma
Phosphors
White Point
Rendering Style (CRD)
Brightness
Pure Black Text/Graphics
Black Overprint
RGB Separation
Output profile
CMYK data
CMYK Simulation Profile
CMYK Simulation Method
iR C2100/
2100S
color
processor
Color data
sent to
copier/
printer
Brightness
Pure Black Text/Graphics
Black Overprint
Combine Separations
Output profile
Spot color data
Spot Color Matching
RGB Source Profile is the only color option that applies strictly to RGB color
data. The other options that affect RGB color also affect the more rarely used
Lab, XYZ, and other calibrated color spaces.
N OTE : For users who are familiar with PostScript 3.0 color, RGB Source
Profile affects all CIEBasedABC color spaces (if the source space is RGB).
Also, if you send CMYK data to the iR C2100/2100S in CIEBasedDEFG
format, for example, by choosing PostScript Color Management in Adobe
Photoshop, the iR C2100/2100S’s Rendering Style selection—which
normally affects only RGB data—will also affect this CMYK data.
1
1-3
Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
Settings for the following options can be specified via print options when you
send a job to the iR C2100/2100S. Some can also be set as defaults by the
administrator during iR C2100/2100S Setup. Settings specified via print
options override the defaults.
iR C2100/2100S color print option:
Brightness
85% Lightest to 115% Darkest
Rendering Style
Photographic/Presentation/Relative
Colorimetric/Absolute Colorimetric
(Default set at Setup)
RGB Source Profile
EFIRGB/sRGB (PC)/Apple Standard/
Other/Source 1–10/None
(Default set at Setup or with
ColorWise Pro Tools)
(Other) Gamma
1.0/1.2/1.4/1.6/1.8/2.0/2.2/2.4/2.6/2.8/
3.0
(Other) Phosphors
Hitachi EBU/Hitachi-Ikegami/NTSC/
Radius Pivot/SMPTE/Trinitron
(Other) White Point
5000 K (D50)/5500 K/6500 K (D65)/
7500 K/9300 K
RGB Separation
Output/Simulation
CMYK Simulation Profile
SWOP-Coated/DIC/Euroscale/
Simulation 1–10/Match Copy/None
(Default set at Setup or in
ColorWise Pro Tools)
What it does:
Performs a color adjustment on all color channels to make the printed
output lighter or darker.
Applies a iR C2100/2100S color rendering style (CRD) to RGB data
(see page 1-4), or to any incoming data with a PostScript source color
space definition, including CMYK.
Applies an RGB source space definition to RGB data (see page 1-5). If
you choose the Other setting, you can specify particular settings for
gamma, phosphors, and white point. See the corresponding options in
this table. This option, along with Gamma, Phosphors, and White
Point, are the only ColorWise options that affect only DeviceRGB or
calibrated RGB color spaces.
Applies the specified gamma value to the RGB source space definition
(see page 1-5). To use this print option, you must choose Other as the
RGB Source setting.
Applies the specified phosphor (monitor type) information to the RGB
source space definition (see page 1-5). To use this print option, you
must choose Other as the RGB Source setting.
Applies the specified white point value to the RGB source color space
definition (see page 1-5). To use this print option, you must choose
Other as the RGB Source setting.
Determines which CMYK color space your original RGB data will be
separated into—CMYK for the copier/printer (Output) or CMYK for a
specified simulation (Simulation) (see page 1-6). It is important to note
that when RGB Separation is set to Simulation, RGB colors are affected
by CMYK Simulation Profile and CMYK Simulation Method.
Adjusts CMYK color data to simulate an offset press standard or a
custom color gamut defined at your site. The Match Copy setting
bypasses iR C2100/2100S calibration to match a copy made from the
copier glass. Choosing None bypasses simulation (see page 1-7).
N OTE : Some of the Simulation settings have slightly different names
depending on the model of copier/printer.
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
iR C2100/2100S color print option:
Quick simulation applies one-dimensional transfer curves that adjust
output density only. Full simulation applies colorimetric
transformations that adjust hue as well as output density (see page 1-8).
CMYK Simulation Method
Quick/Full
(Default set at Setup or in
ColorWise Pro Tools)
Output Profile
Default output profile/Output 1–10
(Default set at Setup or in
ColorWise Pro Tools)
Pure Black Text/Graphics
On/Off
(Default set at Setup)
Black Overprint
On/Off (Default set at Setup)
Spot Color Matching
On/Off
(Default set at Setup or with
ColorWise Pro Tools)
What it does:
The Output Profile is applied to all data in the print job (see page 1-9).
User-defined output profiles can be downloaded to the iR C2100/
2100S with ColorWise Pro Tools (see Chapter 4).
The On setting optimizes the quality of black text and line art output
(see page 1-9).
The On setting overprints black text placed on colored backgrounds; it
automatically activates the Pure Black Text/Graphics option (see
page 1-10).
The On setting enables iR C2100/2100S matching of PANTONE
colors; Off instructs the iR C2100/2100S to match color output to a
Pantone-specified CMYK combination (see page 1-11).
Detailed explanations of how these and other settings affect your print jobs
are provided in subsequent sections of this chapter.
Rendering styles
The Rendering Style option specifies a CRD for color conversions. You can
modify the Rendering Style option to control the appearance of images, such
as prints from office applications or RGB photographs from Photoshop. The
iR C2100/2100S lets you select from the four rendering styles currently
found in industry standard ICC profiles.
iR C2100/2100S rendering style:
Best used for:
Photographic—Typically results in less
saturated output than presentation
rendering when printing out-of-gamut
colors. It preserves tonal relationships
in images.
Photographs, including scans and
images from stock photography CDs.
Equivalent
ICC rendering
style:
Image,
Contrast, and
Perceptual
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Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
Equivalent
ICC rendering
style:
iR C2100/2100S rendering style:
Best used for:
Presentation—Creates saturated colors
but does not match printed colors
precisely to displayed colors. In-gamut
colors such as flesh tones are rendered
well, similar to the Photographic
rendering style.
Artwork and graphs in presentations.
In many cases it can be used for mixed
pages that contain both presentation
graphics and photographs.
Saturation,
Graphics
Relative Colorimetric—Provides
Advanced use when color matching is
important but you prefer white colors
in the document to print as paper
white. It may also be used with
PostScript color management to affect
CMYK data for simulation purposes.
Same
Situations when exact colors are
needed and visible borders are not
distracting. It may also be used with
PostScript color management to affect
CMYK data for simulation purposes.
Same
white-point transformation between
the source and destination white
points. For example, the bluish gray of
a monitor will map to neutral gray.
You may prefer this style to avoid
visible borders when not printing fullbleed.
Absolute Colorimetric—Provides no
white point transformation between
the source and destination white
points. For example, the bluish gray of
a monitor will map to a bluish gray.
RGB Source Profile
The RGB Source Profile setting allows you to define the characteristics of
the RGB data in your document so that the appropriate color conversion can
occur on the iR C2100/2100S. Commonly used monitor color spaces are
available from the driver and from the ColorWise Pro Tools Profile Manager.
In addition, for special needs you can use ColorWise Pro Tools to download
custom monitor or scanner profiles.
When you specify a setting other than None for the RGB Source Profile, the
iR C2100/2100S overrides source color space definitions or profiles that
other color management systems may have specified. For example, if you
specified a ColorSync System Profile on your Mac OS computer, the RGB
Source Profile setting overrides it. In cases where you do not want this setting
to override another specified source color space, choose the None setting.
When you specify a setting other than None for the RGB Source Profile—
since the color space definitions are overridden—the prints from the
iR C2100/2100S will be consistent across platforms. Below are the
iR C2100/2100S’s RGB Source Profile options.
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
• EFIRGB specifies an EFI-defined color space recommended for users who
have no detailed information about their RGB data.
• sRGB (PC) specifies the industry standard definition for a generic Windows
PC monitor.
• Apple Standard specifies the definition of all standard Mac OS computer
monitors.
• Other allows you to specify custom RGB source settings. If you choose
Other as the RGB Source setting, you can choose settings for the Gamma,
Phosphors, and White Point options.
• Sources 1-10 specify the definitions you download as RGB source profiles.
(For more information about downloading RGB source profiles, see
Chapter 4.)
If you are printing with the PostScript driver for Windows 95/98, the
name of each downloaded or custom profile is represented in the RGB
Source Profile setting pop-up menu. If you are printing with the AdobePS
driver from a Mac OS, Windows NT, or Microsoft PS driver from
Windows 2000 computer, downloaded or custom profiles appear as Source
1 through Source 10.
• None instructs the iR C2100/2100S to allow the RGB sources you defined
elsewhere, such as in the application, to be used. When you set RGB
Source to None, the appearance of colors will not be independent of the file
type. For example, RGB EPS files will look different from RGB TIFF files.
With RGB Source set to None, PostScript RGB data that contains a source
color space definition is converted using the CRD specified by the
Rendering Style option (see page 1-4). NonPostScript RGB data and
PostScript RGB data that does not contain a source color space definition
is converted using a general undercolor removal conversion method.
RGB Separation
The RGB Separation option determines how RGB colors (as well as Lab and
XYZ colors) are converted to CMYK. The name of this option is meant to be
descriptive, since the option defines the color spaces that will be used by the
iR C2100/2100S to “separate” the RGB data into CMYK values.
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Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
The two choices available for this option determine whether RGB data is
converted into the full gamut of the copier/printer (Output) or whether it is
first converted into the gamut of another digital printer or a press standard
(Simulation). This feature is helpful for making one device behave like
another for RGB data. For example, if a high-quality ICC profile is available
for another print device, the copier/printer can simulate the behavior of that
device.
RGB Separation is also useful for prepress applications. For example, it lets
you experiment with the appearance of an RGB scan under different press
printing conditions without having to convert the RGB data to CMYK data
for each printing condition. When the desired printing condition is found,
you can then convert the file to CMYK, if desired, using the same CMYK
simulation profile that was used during the experimentation.
N OTE : The RGB Separation print option should be used in conjunction with
the Output Profile or CMYK Simulation Profile print options.
• Output converts all RGB colors into the CMYK color space of your copier/
printer (when the Output Profile option is set to Printer’s default), or a
customized CMYK color space for your copier/printer (when the Output
Profile option is set to Output 1-10).
• Simulation converts all RGB colors into the CMYK color space for a
specified simulation (make sure to select the desired simulation with the
CMYK Simulation Profile print option).
CMYK Simulation Profile
The CMYK Simulation Profile print option allows you to print press proofs
or simulations. This setting specifies the offset press standard or other color
printing device that you want to simulate. This option affects CMYK data
only.
On Windows 95/98, you can also view an unlimited number of custom
Quick and Full simulations created using ColorWise Pro Tools. On
Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Mac OS computers, you can view up to
10 Quick and 10 Full custom simulations. The number of custom
simulations is limited by the disk space on the iR C2100/2100S.
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
N OTE : If you are printing with the PostScript printer driver on a Windows
95/98 computer, the name of each profile is visible in the pop-up menu for
the CMYK Simulation Profile setting. If you are printing with the PostScript
printer driver on Windows NT, Windows 2000, or a Mac OS computer,
custom simulations appear as Simulation 1 through Simulation 10.
The CMYK Simulation Profile setting you should specify depends on the
press standard for which the CMYK data was separated.
• For images that were separated using a custom separation (such as a
separation produced with an ICC profile), choose the corresponding
profile on the iR C2100/2100S with the CMYK Simulation Profile setting.
• For images that were separated for SWOP, choose SWOP as the CMYK
Simulation Profile setting.
N OTE : To properly simulate a printed image that was separated through the
use of an ICC profile, the same profile must be present on the iR C2100/
2100S. For more information about downloading ICC profiles to the
iR C2100/2100S, see “Downloading profiles” on page 4-5.
• The Match Copy setting bypasses iR C2100/2100S calibration to simulate
the color of a copy produced by the copier/printer
CMYK Simulation Method
The CMYK Simulation Method setting specifies the quality of simulation to
perform.
• Quick applies one-dimensional transfer curves that adjust output density
only.
• Full provides a more complete and accurate simulation by applying
colorimetric transformations that adjust hue as well as output density. The
Full Simulation option also maintains the integrity of the black channel by
adjusting it independently. This is especially important for images
separated using an optimized black generation (UCR/GCR) setting either
from a scan or from within an application such as Photoshop.
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Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
Output Profile
The output profile is applied to all data in the print job, so make sure the
selected profile is right for your job. The default output profile consists of
both a profile for your copier/printer, describing its color characteristics, and
a calibration target that describes the expected behavior of the copier/printer.
You can use ColorWise Pro Tools’ Profile Manager to download your own
output profile to the iR C2100/2100S (see page 4-5). Downloaded output
profiles are at first associated with the calibration target that is tied to the
default output profile.
Pure Black Text/Graphics
The Pure Black Text/Graphics option affects the printout for black text and
vector graphics on a page. Under most circumstances it is preferable to leave
this option set to the On position. When Pure Black Text/Graphics is on,
black colors generated by applications are printed using 100 percent blackonly toner (for example, RGB = 0, 0, 0; CMYK = 0%, 0%, 0%, 100%; or K
= 100%). This means the black text and line art will not exhibit halftone
artifacts and will not be misregistered, since there is only one toner used. In
addition, this setting eliminates blasting. This option is automatically set to
On when the Black Overprint option is set to On.
For some jobs it is preferable to turn this option Off, for example, if the page
includes gradient fills that use black. The table below describes the behavior
of the Pure Black Text/Graphics option with black data defined in different
color spaces.
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
N OTE : The Pure Black Text/Graphics option can be used only when printing
composites, not when printing separations.
Input
black
color:
RGB
Pure Black Text/Graphics:
On
Prints 100% black
Off
With the default profile, prints a rich black
using all toners.
CMYK
Prints only with black toner, because CMYK
simulations preserve the black channel. The
actual amount of toner used depends on the
current simulation and the calibration state of
the copier/printer.
Spot
Prints only with black toner, because spot
color simulations preserve the black channel.
The actual amount of toner used depends on
the current simulation and the calibration state
of the copier/printer.
N OTE : PostScript applications, such as QuarkXPress, may convert elements
defined as RGB = 0, 0, 0 to four-color CMYK black before sending the job to
the iR C2100/2100S. These elements are not affected by the Pure Black Text/
Graphics option. See the application notes for details. Also, black text and
line art defined as RGB = 0, 0, 0 in office applications (such as Microsoft
Word) are converted to single-color black (CMYK = 0%, 0%, 0%, 100%) by
the Microsoft PostScript Level 3 driver for Windows 2000. To print this
single-color black at the maximum toner density of the copier/printer, set the
Pure Black Text/Graphics option to On.
Black Overprint
The Black Overprint option lets you specify whether or not black text,
defined as RGB = 0, 0, 0, or as CMYK = 0%, 0%, 0%, 100%, overprints
colored backgrounds.
• On—Black text overprints colored backgrounds, eliminating white gaps
and reducing halo effects or misregistration of colors. Setting Black
Overprint to On automatically activates the Pure Black Text/Graphics
option.
• Off—Black text knocks out colored backgrounds.
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Managing color on the iR C2100/2100S
N OTE : PostScript applications may perform their own black overprint
conversions before sending the print job to the iR C2100/2100S.
One example of how you might use this setting is with a page that contains
some black text on a light blue background. The background blue color is
CMYK = 40%, 30%, 0%, 0% and the black text is CMYK = 0%, 0%, 0%,
100%.
• With Black Overprint On, the final text portions of the page are
overprinted, or combined with the underlying colors. This results in
CMYK = 40%, 30%, 0%, 100% for the color used for the text. There is no
transition in the cyan and magenta toners, and the quality of the output is
improved since it will not show artifacts near the edges of the text. The
option also works with text defined in the RGB color space, that is RGB =
0, 0, 0.
• With Black Overprint Off, the border of the text is on an edge that has
cyan and magenta toners on one side (outside the text) and black toner on
the other side (inside the text). On many devices, this transition causes
visible artifacts because of the practical limitations of the copier/printer.
Spot Color Matching
The Spot Color Matching option provides automatic matching of
PANTONE colors with their best CMYK equivalents.
• On—The iR C2100/2100S uses its built-in table to generate the closest
CMYK matches of PANTONE colors your copier/printer can produce.
(New tables are generated when you add new output profiles.)
• Off—The iR C2100/2100S uses the CMYK equivalents defined by your
application to print PANTONE colors.
For jobs that include PANTONE spot colors, set Spot Color Matching to
On unless you are printing press simulations. In that case, set Spot Color
Matching to Off and choose the appropriate CMYK Simulation setting (see
page 1-7).
N OTE : You can use the Spot Color Matching option only when printing
composites, not when printing separations.
1
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
Spot Color Matching and the PANTONE Coated Color Reference
The PANTONE Coated Color Reference (described on page 5-6) prints
differently depending on the Spot Color Matching setting.
• On—The iR C2100/2100S uses its built-in table to generate the best
matches of the PANTONE colors that your copier/printer can produce.
The PANTONE number is printed below each swatch.
• Off—The iR C2100/2100S prints swatches using the CMYK values
recommended by Pantone (and used by applications that provide
PANTONE color libraries). The CMYK values used to generate the color,
as well as the PANTONE number of the color, are printed below each
swatch. These CMYK values are printed through the selected CMYK
Simulation and Output Profile settings.
Printer Drivers and Print Options
This section describes the role of the printer driver and explains how to use
Windows and Mac OS printer drivers for iR C2100/2100S printing.
N OTE : The term “PostScript” by itself is used to refer to Adobe PostScript
Level 3 or later. “PostScript” can also refer to Microsoft PostScript.
What a printer driver does
To take full advantage of the features of the iR C2100/2100S, your print jobs
must be sent as PostScript data. Since most applications cannot generate
PostScript data directly, it is the function of a printer driver to interpret
instructions from the application and convert them to PostScript data.
A PostScript printer driver also allows you to select print options specific to
your copier/printer. To do this, the printer driver must be matched with a
PostScript printer description file (PPD) for your iR C2100/2100S. The
PPD contains information about the particular features supported by the
iR C2100/2100S and the copier/printer. The PPD can be thought of as the
lines of PostScript code in the file that are device-specific. When you print a
job, the printer driver lets you choose among features by displaying print
options.
A few PostScript applications can send PostScript data directly to the copier/
printer and present print options within the application interface. Even these
applications, however, require that you use a PostScript printer driver.
1
1-13
Printer Drivers and Print Options
Your iR C2100/2100S user software includes Adobe PostScript printer
drivers for Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, and Mac OS computers or
Microsoft PostScript printer driver for Windows 2000. These are the
recommended printer drivers for printing to the iR C2100/2100S. (See
Getting Started for information on installing printer drivers.)
N OTE : For information on setting the color print options in the
Windows 2000 printer driver, see the Printing Guide.
It is recommended that you set the print options initially in iR C2100/2100S
Setup (see the Configuration Guide). This provides you with a default
configuration that is appropriate for most iR C2100/2100S print jobs.
PostScript printer driver for Windows 95/98,
Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 2000
The printer driver options described in this section can be accessed by
clicking Start\Settings\Printers, right-clicking the appropriate PPD name,
and selecting Properties (Windows 95/98), Document Defaults
(Windows NT), or Printing Preferences (Windows 2000) from the pop-up
menu. These settings are also accessible from the Print Setup or Page Setup
dialog boxes of most applications.
For Window 95/98, the iR C2100/2100S driver interface enables you to save
combinations of settings that you can later access. Additionally, you can
choose different settings for individual jobs from the applications you use.
The printer driver writes a PostScript file containing the instructions
generated by your application and the iR C2100/2100S print options you
selected. The printer driver sends the PostScript file to the iR C2100/2100S.
The iR C2100/2100S then performs PostScript processing and color
conversions and sends raster color data to the print device.
N OTE : The following illustrations and instructions do not apply to all
applications. Many applications, such as PageMaker, Photoshop, Illustrator,
QuarkXPress, and CorelDRAW, have other color management options in
addition to those presented in the printer driver. For information on specific
applications, see Chapters 6 through 9.
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
Setting color management print options for Windows 95/98
This section explains how to set iR C2100/2100S color print options with
the Adobe PostScript printer driver version 4.3.x for Windows 95/98, a
PostScript 3 printer driver that can take full advantage of the color features of
the iR C2100/2100S. Before you proceed, make sure you have completed the
following procedures described in Getting Started:
• Install the Adobe PostScript Printer Driver version 4.3.x (Windows 95/98)
and the iR C2100/2100S PPD.
• Set up the iR C2100/2100S for printing.
To set print options, open the PPD as described on page 1-13. Under the
Fiery Printing tab, click the ColorWise menu to select settings for the print
options described on page 1-3.
Click the ColorWise
menu
1
1-15
Printer Drivers and Print Options
Click the Expert
Settings button to
access additional
ColorWise options
Click the Expert Settings button on the ColorWise window (above), and
click Update to display the current iR C2100/2100S settings. This brings up
the Expert Color Settings flowchart window (below), which displays
additional color settings for the iR C2100/2100S. Each option includes a
pop-up menu from which you can select settings for your specific job.
1
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
Selecting Other for RGB Source Profile brings up the following window for
specifying custom RGB source settings (see page 1-5).
Clicking on the Update button on the lower right-hand side of the Expert
Color Settings window (on the previous page) queries the iR C2100/2100S
for the current default settings. This feature is available only when you enable
Two-Way Communication in the driver (see Getting Started).
N OTE : For most users, the default settings provide the right level of color
control.
For more information about individual print options, see page 1-3.
Setting color management print options for Windows NT 4.0
This section explains how to set iR C2100/2100S color print options with
the Adobe PostScript Printer Driver version 5.x for Windows NT 4.0.
AdobePS version 5.x is a PostScript 3 driver that can take full advantage of
the color features of the iR C2100/2100S. Before you proceed, make sure
you have completed the following procedures described in Getting Started:
• Install the Adobe PostScript Printer Driver and iR C2100/2100S PPD.
• Set up the iR C2100/2100S for printing.
1
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Printer Drivers and Print Options
To set print options, open the PPD as described on page 1-13. From the
Advanced tab of the Default Document Properties dialog box, choose settings
for the print options described on page 1-3.
Setting color management print options for Windows 2000
This section explains how to set iR C2100/2100S color print options with
the Microsoft PostScript Printer Driver for Windows 2000. This is a
PostScript driver that can take full advantage of the color features of the
iR C2100/2100S. Before you proceed, make sure you have completed the
following procedures described in Getting Started:
• Install the Microsoft PostScript Printer Driver and iR C2100/2100S PPD.
• Set up the iR C2100/2100S for printing.
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
To set print options, open the PPD as described on page 1-13. From the
Advanced tab of the Printing Preferences dialog box, choose settings for the
print options described on page 1-3.
Adobe PostScript printer driver for Mac OS
This section explains how to set color management print options with the
AdobePS 8.7 printer driver for Mac OS, a PostScript 3 driver that takes full
advantage of the color features of the iR C2100/2100S and lets you save a set
of print option settings.
Before you continue, make sure you have completed the following:
• Install the AdobePS printer driver and the iR C2100/2100S PPD as
described in Getting Started.
• Select the iR C2100/2100S in the Chooser and set it up with the
iR C2100/2100S PPD.
N OTE : The following illustrations and instructions do not apply to all
applications. Many applications, such as PageMaker, Photoshop, Illustrator,
QuarkXPress, and CorelDRAW have other color management options in
addition to those presented in the printer driver. For information on specific
applications, see Chapters 6 through 9.
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Printer Drivers and Print Options
Setting color management print options
You choose print options from the various panes of the AdobePS driver
dialog box. To access the initial AdobePS dialog box, choose Print from your
application’s File menu.
N OTE : The word “pane” is used to describe the different pages that appear in
the driver’s dialog box when you make selections from the pull-down menu at
the top left. Each pane presents a particular set of print options.
The AdobePS driver includes the following Color Matching options.
• Color/Grayscale—When this setting is used to print to the iR C2100/
2100S, ColorWise provides all color conversions on the iR C2100/2100S.
Typically, you should use this option when printing to the iR C2100/
2100S.
• PostScript Color Matching—Intended for use with PostScript devices such
as the iR C2100/2100S. It provides for color conversion on the iR C2100/
2100S using a color rendering dictionary resident on the iR C2100/2100S
(that is, a iR C2100/2100S CRD) or a color rendering dictionary that is
downloaded with the print job.
N OTE : If you use the PostScript Color Matching option, the driver may,
depending on the application you are using, attach a CMYK source
definition to the CMYK data in your document. In such a case, the CMYK
data in your document is reseparated using a iR C2100/2100S CRD. The
destination color space for the CRD is determined by the RGB Separation
print option. By setting RGB Separation to Simulation, CMYK data is
printed according to all specified CMYK Simulation Profile and CMYK
Simulation Method settings. By setting RGB Separation to Output, CMYK
data is converted to the selected output profile’s CMYK color space.
• ColorSync Color Matching—Provides for color conversion on the host
computer. This option can be used with PostScript devices such as the
iR C2100/2100S, but it is intended for use with PostScript Level 1 devices.
If you use this option, be sure to specify the iR C2100/2100S’s ICC profile
as the Printer Profile. ColorSync Color Matching is not a suggested color
matching method because it does not work in conjunction with all
applications and requires that you disable features of ColorWise on the
iR C2100/2100S.
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iR C2100/2100S Color Management
Setting iR C2100/2100S color management options
In the AdobePS Print dialog box, choose Color Matching from the pulldown menu.
Choose Color Matching from the
pull-down menu
In the Color Matching pane, choose Color/Grayscale from the Print Color
pop-up menu.
Choose Color/Grayscale
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Printer Drivers and Print Options
In the Printer Specific Options pane, choose settings for the print options
described on page 1-3.
If these settings are ones you use regularly, click Save Settings to save them for
subsequent jobs.
2
2-1
Chapter 2:
Simple and
Advanced
Workflows
Workflow concepts
This chapter discusses color management workflows used in short-run color
printing as well as color proofing on the iR C2100/2100S. It also gives
examples of color management in specific desktop applications and the
interaction between those applications and ColorWise color management.
Workflow concepts
The term “workflow” is used to describe the path a job follows from its
creation in a desktop application to final printed output. It is helpful to think
of the following categories when describing workflows:
• Short-run printing versus color proofing for eventual output on an offset
press
• RGB, CMYK, and PANTONE color systems
• Desktop color management within an application versus color
management on the iR C2100/2100S, along with the notion that different
versions of desktop applications handle color management differently. So it
is important to pay close attention to the version of a particular application
when considering the workflows in this chapter.
Short-run printing versus color proofing
Short-run color printing refers to those jobs for which the iR C2100/2100S
is the final print device. Printing jobs to the iR C2100/2100S in preparation
for printing on an offset press is referred to as color proofing. Both types of
iR C2100/2100S print jobs use RGB, CMYK, and PANTONE colors.
• For short-run jobs, bright, saturated colors are often desirable. These are
achieved by using the full range of colors available, referred to as the full
gamut of copier/printer, or more simply copier/printer CMYK. See
“Advanced Workflows” on page 2-7 for short-run printing examples.
• Offset jobs proofed on the iR C2100/2100S require the printed colors to
match those from another set of CMYK printing conditions. Colors that
are specified for an offset press require CMYK simulation that is optimized
for proofing on the copier/printer. See “Advanced Workflows” on page 2-7
for color proofing examples that simulate the gamut of another digital
printer or press standard.
2
2-2
Simple and Advanced Workflows
RGB, CMYK, and PANTONE colors
Colors can be defined in several different color models, the most common
being RGB, CMYK, and the PANTONE color matching system. Each
model requires a different color conversion at the iR C2100/2100S. These
different color conversion workflows are explained below.
• RGB source profiles and color rendering dictionaries are used to map RGB
colors through a device-independent color space to a destination space,
either the full copier/printer gamut in a short-run printing workflow or
CMYK simulation in a color proofing workflow.
• CMYK colors are device-dependent. In a proofing scenario, colors
specified in prepress applications are adjusted so the gamut of the
iR C2100/2100S copier/printer can simulate that of the press. In a shortrun printing workflow, specifying CMYK colors according to the
calibrated copier/printer output eliminates the need for simulation during
printing.
• PANTONE spot colors are special inks manufactured to run on an offset
printing press. Spot colors can be simulated using CMYK copier/printer
toners or process color inks. Two basic workflows exist for printing
PANTONE colors to the iR C2100/2100S:
Spot Color Matching On instructs the iR C2100/2100S to match the
output of the copier/printer to the PANTONE spot color.
Spot Color Matching Off instructs the iR C2100/2100S to match the
copier/printer output to a Pantone-specified process simulation. This
CMYK combination is then printed with the CMYK Simulation setting
you choose, such as SWOP or DIC, and CMYK Simulation Method set to
Full.
Desktop versus iR C2100/2100S color management
A desktop color management system uses ICC profiles to convert colors from
one device gamut to the next (see Appendix B). The color data is converted
when it is passed from one application to another or when the job is sent to
the copier/printer, so the processing occurs on your computer as opposed to
the iR C2100/2100S.
2
2-3
Simple workflows
One advantage of using ColorWise color management over desktop color
management is that your computer is spared the added processing chores;
delaying color conversions until the color data reaches the iR C2100/2100S
frees up your computer so you can continue working, and color conversions
on the iR C2100/2100S are in most cases much faster than similar conversions on a host computer.
Managing most or all of your color on the iR C2100/2100S can also
eliminate the potential for undesirable color management-related conflicts,
such as iterative color conversions and inconsistent color. The iR C2100/
2100S applies global corrections to specific groups of RGB, CMYK, and
PANTONE colors to avoid such conflicts.
Finally, by sending RGB files instead of larger CMYK files from applications
to the iR C2100/2100S, network traffic is minimized and jobs are generally
printed more quickly.
ColorWise uses ICC profiles to convert colors to the copier/printer gamut or
to simulate other devices such as an offset printing press. ColorWise manages
color conversions for all users printing to the iR C2100/2100S from
Windows and Mac OS computers. It lets users follow a simple workflow with
minimal intervention using robust default settings, while giving advanced
users the control and precision they need.
The iR C2100/2100S can intelligently manage the printed appearance of
RGB, CMYK, and PANTONE colors. You can let the iR C2100/2100S
manage color for most short-run color printing jobs without adjusting any
settings.
Simple workflows
Every time you print a document containing colors that were not chosen for
your specific copier/printer, those colors need to be converted, which requires
color management. Colors can be defined or modified at any stage in the
workflow. Since ColorWise is compatible with most other color management
systems, you can use the workflow most familiar to you.
This section provides examples of color workflows that should meet the needs
of most iR C2100/2100S users. For information on specific desktop
applications, see Chapters 6 through 9.
2
2-4
Simple and Advanced Workflows
Select your colors wisely
For the colors you see on your monitor to match those on your printed
output, they must go through color management, including precise
calibration of your monitor and copier/printer. If you are not equipped or
inclined to maintain accurate monitor color management, you may opt for
an easier approach. First, determine which is more important for you—
printed colors or monitor displayed colors.
If displayed colors are more important, trust your eyes and your monitor.
Visually select colors on your monitor, but be aware that colors will be
optimized only for your monitor. When the document is opened on other
monitors, the colors may look different. And even though printed colors may
not match those displayed on your monitor, they will still print on the
iR C2100/2100S with good results.
If printed colors are your priority, choose colors from printed samples. By
using these sample colors, your printed output will remain consistent
regardless of how the colors appear on different monitors. Print the palette of
available colors from business applications and then select colors from the
printed samples. The iR C2100/2100S comes with color reference files on
the user software CD (see page 5-2). You can also print the color charts from
the Control Panel and select colors by numbers or by name from the printed
samples. Advanced applications let you define colors in the easier-to-control
PANTONE and CMYK color spaces. See Chapter 5 for more advice on color
selection.
No matter which workflow most closely matches your own, you should
calibrate your copier/printer regularly (see Chapter 3).
Select a short workflow
Every time colors are converted, performance and color accuracy are affected.
Therefore, a workflow with fewer steps minimizes the risk of error.
Workflow 1 using ColorWise calibration—minimal workflow
A minimal color workflow requires that you calibrate the copier/printer.
Select from printed colors as described in the previous page, and set the
CMYK Simulation option to None, since simulation is not needed when
colors are already defined using CMYK values optimized for your calibrated
copier/printer.
2
2-5
Simple workflows
N OTE : CMYK Simulation set to None is also useful when you want to prepare
an output profile of your calibrated copier/printer or when you use less
efficient color management from the desktop (such as ColorSync or ICM).
In this workflow, colors are modified only at the calibration stage. This is
indicated by the black box in the diagram below.
Workflow 1—Colors you define in an applicationColors in output from the copier/printer
Application
CMS
File format
Printer driver
ColorWise
CMS
ColorWise
calibration
While this workflow lends some control over the color quality produced by
the copier/printer, you should consider additional ColorWise color
management, as described in the next section.
Workflow 2 using ColorWise color management—standard workflow
iR C2100/2100S servers are highly optimized for the specific copier/printer
they drive, and ColorWise addresses many issues unique to your copier/
printer, including screens, individual toner response, interactions among
toners, natural smoothness of blends, and the capability to render
PANTONE and custom colors. The iR C2100/2100S distinguishes text and
graphic from image elements, so the black channel information is preserved
while parameters used for CMYK color separations are maintained.
Conventional color management systems typically address only color
conversions, and they occupy your computer’s processor. When you use
ColorWise, jobs leave your computer faster to be processed more quickly on
the iR C2100/2100S.
The recommended standard color workflow (indicated by the black boxes in
the diagram below) uses ColorWise calibration and color management.
Workflow 2—Colors you define in an applicationColors in output from the copier/printer
Application
CMS
File format
Printer driver
ColorWise
CMS
ColorWise
calibration
2
2-6
Simple and Advanced Workflows
The iR C2100/2100S comes into play near the end of the color workflow. To
ensure that the colors you have selected reach the iR C2100/2100S and
ColorWise in a usable form, you should bypass any color management from
applications and printer drivers. Keep in mind, however, that color
management from applications and printer drivers is fully supported by
ColorWise (see “Advanced workflows” on page 2-7).
You must print with the CMYK Simulation print option set to match the
CMYK color space in your application when you selected the colors. Any
CMYK Simulation setting (except Match Copy) applies calibration, so the
response of the copier/printer will appear to be stable.
The recommended values for CMYK Simulation are SWOP in America,
Euroscale in Europe, and DIC in Japan—choices that respect the color
standard for each region. If colors have been selected specifically for your
calibrated copier/printer, set CMYK Simulation to None.
See the table on page 1-3 for the list and descriptions of ColorWise print
options affecting CMYK, RGB, PANTONE, and other colors.
Workflow 3 bypassing ColorWise—not recommended
Bypassing ColorWise color management, while an option, is not a
recommended workflow. When you bypass ColorWise, you must choose
colors using only CMYK formulas designed specifically for your copier/
printer, and you must print with the CMYK Simulation option set to Match
Copy. The iR C2100/2100S still prints pages using your PostScript files, and
drives the copier/printer and its accessories, but it does not perform CMYK
color transformation, nor does it consider the calibration of the copier/
printer. Calibration is needed in order to get consistent output, since the
color response from your copier/printer varies significantly depending on
wear, heat, humidity, and service.
The diagram below indicates that no modifications are made to colors in this
workflow.
Workflow 3—Colors you define in an applicationColors in output from the copier/printer
Application
CMS
File format
Printer driver
ColorWise
CMS
ColorWise
calibration
2
2-7
Advanced workflows
Turn off color management in your application
Generally, when printing to the iR C2100/2100S, it is best to disable color
management in the application to ensure that the iR C2100/2100S receives
color data properly and prints it accurately.
Save your files using color-safe settings
There are several additional steps you can take to ensure color accuracy.
• When saving EPS files, do not include PostScript Color Management
information. This minimizes the risk conflicting data and multiple color
conversions. PostScript Color Management causes your CMYK and RGB
colors to be interpreted by the iR C2100/2100S as though they were
supplied in the Lab color space and, as a result, to be processed by CRDs
rather than your simulation settings.
• Include ICC color information in files. ColorWise will not conflict with
this information, and such data can be useful to identify the specific color
space used by your files.
• Do not include halftone and transfer functions.
• Turn off color management in the printer driver.
On Windows machines, if the printer driver offers Image Color Matching
options, select Printer Image Color Matching.
On Mac OS computers, you should set the printer driver to include no
color management commands at print time (see page 1-18).
Advanced workflows
The following sections present advanced color management workflow
examples for three short-run printing and three color proofing situations.
Each workflow example consists of a brief description, steps for creating and
manipulating the files, a list of the ColorWise settings used in the example,
and a table that summarizes the workflow.
N OTE : These examples use specific software packages to represent image-
editing, illustration, page-layout, and business/office applications; they are
Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, QuarkXPress, and Microsoft
PowerPoint, respectively.
2
2-8
Simple and Advanced Workflows
Short-run printing examples
The following examples illustrate short-run printing on the iR C2100/
2100S.
Photoshop RGB workflow
This short-run workflow of printing an RGB image from Photoshop is one of
the simplest iR C2100/2100S color workflows. In it, RGB data is sent from
the application, through the printer driver, to the iR C2100/2100S, and the
RGB-to-CMYK conversion takes place on the iR C2100/2100S using a
CRD rather than in the application. Use the settings illustrated in this
workflow for printing photographs and artwork.
This document could be created as follows:
• Create an RGB image in Photoshop.
• Print the file directly to the iR C2100/2100S.
See Chapter 7 for recommended print settings from Photoshop.
• Use ColorWise to convert the RGB image to copier/printer CMYK, or the
full gamut of copier/printer.
The ColorWise settings used in this example are:
• RGB Source Profile set to EFIRGB or another RGB source definition
• Rendering Style set to Photographic
• RGB Separation set to Output
2
2-9
Advanced workflows
The diagram below indicates the steps for this particular workflow in black.
Photoshop RGB workflow
Photoshop
Printer driver
ColorWise
print options
Read Embedded Profiles
Define RGB Source
Embed Source Profiles
Convert RGB to CMYK
Convert CMYK to CMYK
Select RGB Mode
Select CMYK Mode
Select Destination Profile
Save as TIFF
Save as EPS
Save as JPEG
Print
(Mac OS-Only)
Black and White
Color/Grayscale
ColorSync Color Matching
PostScript Color Matching
Define RGB Source
Select RGB Source: None
Select Rendering Style (CRD)
Select RGB Separation: Output
Select RGB Separation: Simulation
Convert Press CMYK to Press Sim.
Convert Press CMYK to Custom Sim.
Select Device CMYK Sim.: None
Turn Spot Color Matching On
Turn Spot Color Matching Off
Select Output Profile
Select Custom Output Profile
Photoshop RGB with Illustrator and QuarkXPress CMYK and PANTONE
colors
This workflow involves short-run printing of a complex page layout with
images saved in Photoshop, illustrations created in Illustrator, and
PANTONE spot colors. A Photoshop image is saved in an RGB color space
using the EPS file format. Illustrator artwork contains objects defined as
CMYK and as PANTONE spot colors selected from printed output, and
they are saved using the Illustrator EPS file format. After all of these
individual objects are imported into QuarkXPress, additional design elements
in QuarkXPress are colored using CMYK process colors or PANTONE spot
colors. Use the settings illustrated in this workflow for printing brochures,
newsletters, and other layouts.
N OTE : Anytime CMYK colors are placed in a document, they should be
selected from printed output (see page 2-4).
This document could be created as follows:
• Create an RGB image in Photoshop and save it as an EPS.
• Create a graphic in Illustrator using CMYK and PANTONE colors and
save as Illustrator EPS.
• Use CMYK colors and a PANTONE color in a QuarkXPress document.
• Import the Illustrator EPS into QuarkXPress and place the Photoshop EPS
image.
2
2-10
Simple and Advanced Workflows
• Print the QuarkXPress document to the iR C2100/2100S.
• Use ColorWise to convert the RGB image to copier/printer CMYK, to
adjust the process colors for short-run printing, and to match the
PANTONE spot colors using the full copier/printer gamut.
The ColorWise settings used in this example are:
• RGB Source Profile set to EFIRGB or another RGB source definition
• Rendering Style set to Photographic
• RGB Separation set to Output
• CMYK Simulation set to None
• Spot Color Matching set to On
The diagram below indicates the steps for this particular workflow in black.
Photoshop RGB workflow with Illustrator, QuarkXPress CMYK, and PANTONE colors
Photoshop
Illustrator
Read Embedded
Profiles
Define RGB
Source
Embed Source
Profiles
Convert RGB
to CMYK
Convert CMYK
to CMYK
Select RGB Mode
Select CMYK Mode
Select Destination
Profile
Save as TIFF
Save as EPS
Save as JPEG
Print
Read Embedded
Profile
Define RGB Colors
Define CMYK Colors
Define PANTONE Colors
Convert RGB to CMYK
Convert PANTONE
to CMYK
Embed Source Profile
Select Destination
Profile
Export as TIFF
Save as EPS
Print
QuarkXPress
Printer driver
Read Embedded
(Mac OS-Only)
Profile
Black and White
Define RGB Colors
Color/Grayscale
Define CMYK Colors
ColorSync Color
Define PANTONE Colors
Matching
Convert RGB to CMYK PostScript Color
Convert CMYK to CMYK
Matching
Convert PANTONE
to CMYK
Embed Source Profile
Select Destination
Profile
Export as TIFF
Save as EPS
Print
ColorWise
print options
Define RGB Source
Select RGB Source:
None
Select Rendering Style
(CRD)
Select RGB Separation:
Output
Select RGB Separation:
Simulation
Convert Press CMYK to
Press Sim.
Convert Press CMYK to
Custom Sim.
Select Device CMYK Simulation:
None
Turn Spot Color Matching On
Turn Spot Color Matching Off
Select Output Profile
Select Custom Output Profile
2
2-11
Advanced workflows
Photoshop RGB with Illustrator CMYK and PANTONE and PowerPoint
RGB
This workflow involves short-run printing of a complex presentation
document with images saved in Photoshop, illustrations created in Illustrator,
and PANTONE spot colors. All elements are imported into PowerPoint for
output.
This document could be created as follows:
• Create an RGB image in Photoshop and save it as Photoshop EPS.
• Create a graphic in Illustrator using CMYK colors and a PANTONE spot
color and save as Illustrator EPS.
• Create a presentation in PowerPoint using RGB colors.
• Import the Illustrator EPS graphic into the PowerPoint presentation and
place the Photoshop EPS image.
• Print the PowerPoint document to the iR C2100/2100S.
• Use ColorWise to convert the PowerPoint RGB colors and Photoshop
RGB image to copier/printer CMYK, to adjust the process colors for more
saturated short-run printing, and to match the PANTONE spot colors
using the full copier/printer gamut.
The ColorWise settings used in this example are:
• RGB Source Profile set to EFIRGB or another RGB source definition
• Rendering Style set to Presentation
• RGB Separation set to Output
• CMYK Simulation set to None
• Spot Color Matching set to On
2
2-12
Simple and Advanced Workflows
The diagram below indicates the steps for this particular workflow in black.
Photoshop RGB and Illustrator CMYK and PANTONE in PowerPoint RGB workflow
Photoshop
Illustrator
PowerPoint
Printer driver
ColorWise
print options
Read Embedded
Profiles
Define RGB
Source
Embed Source
Profiles
Convert RGB
to CMYK
Convert CMYK
to CMYK
Select RGB Mode
Select CMYK Mode
Select Destination
Profile
Save as TIFF
Save as EPS
Save as JPEG
Print
Read Embedded
Profile
Define RGB Colors
Define CMYK Colors
Define PANTONE colors
Convert RGB to CMYK
Convert PANTONE
to CMYK
Embed Source Profile
Select Destination
Profile
Export as TIFF
Save as EPS
Print
Define RGB Colors
Convert CMYK to RGB
Print
(Mac OS-Only)
Black and White
Color/Grayscale
ColorSync Color
Matching
PostScript Color
Matching
Define RGB Source
Select RGB Source:
None
Select Rendering Style
(CRD)
Select RGB Separation:
Output
Select RGB Separation:
Simulation
Convert Press CMYK to
Press Sim.
Convert Press CMYK to
Custom Sim.
Select Device CMYK Simulation:
None
Turn Spot Color Matching On
Turn Spot Color Matching Off
Select Output Profile
Select Custom Output Profile
Color proofing examples
The following examples illustrate methods for simulating the output from
another printing system, such as an offset press. Each of the proofing
examples uses an ICC profile to describe the destination color space. While
some examples use simulation profiles built in to the iR C2100/2100S,
others use ColorWise Pro Tools (see Chapter 4) to download custom ICC
output profiles to the iR C2100/2100S for use as simulation profiles.
Photoshop 5.x RGB-to-CMYK conversion using a custom ICC profile
This workflow is useful for prepress environments that have integrated ICC
color management and have profiles for the presses they use. In this example,
an image in Photoshop 5.x is converted from RGB to CMYK using
Photoshop’s ICC color conversion features in the CMYK Setup option. (For
more information on CMYK Setup, see your Photoshop 5.x documentation.)
Using the Simulation settings available in ColorWise, the CMYK image is
printed to the iR C2100/2100S, and the output is made to appear as if it
were printed on an offset press.
2
2-13
Advanced workflows
This document could be created as follows:
• In Photoshop 5.x, set CMYK Model in CMYK Setup to ICC.
• In the Profile menu, select an ICC profile for the desired offset press. Click
OK.
• Open an RGB image. From the Image pull-down menu select
Mode>CMYK Color.
• Save the image in any file format.
• Print directly to the iR C2100/2100S.
• Use ColorWise Pro Tools to select a simulation profile or download a
custom ICC profile to the iR C2100/2100S for use as a CMYK Simulation
Profile.
The ColorWise settings used in this example are:
• CMYK Simulation Profile set to the desired press standard or to the
corresponding custom simulation (Simulation 1-10) if you downloaded
your profile with ColorWise Pro Tools
• CMYK Simulation Method set to Full
The diagram below indicates the steps for this particular workflow in black.
Photoshop RGB-to-CMYK workflow using ICC profile
Photoshop 5.x
Printer driver
Read Embedded Profiles
Define RGB Source
Embed Source Profiles
Convert RGB to CMYK
Convert CMYK to CMYK
Select RGB Mode
Select CMYK Mode
Select Destination Profile
Save as TIFF
Save as EPS
Save as JPEG
Print
(Mac OS-Only)
Black and White
Color/Grayscale
ColorSync Color Matching
PostScript Color Matching
ColorWise
print options
Define RGB Source
Select RGB Source: None
Select Rendering Style (CRD)
Select RGB Separation: Output
Select RGB Separation: Simulation
Convert Press CMYK to Press Sim.
Convert Press CMYK to Custom Sim.
Select Device CMYK Simulation: None
Turn Spot Color Matching On
Turn Spot Color Matching Off
Select Output Profile
Select Custom Output Profile
2
2-14
Simple and Advanced Workflows
Photoshop 5.x Built-in RGB-to-CMYK workflow
This workflow is useful for prepress environments that have not integrated
ICC color management and do not have profiles for the presses they use. In
this example, an image is converted from RGB to CMYK using Photoshop
5.x’s Built-in color conversion features in the CMYK Setup option. (For more
information on CMYK Setup, see your Photoshop 5.x documentation.)
Using the Simulation settings available in ColorWise, the CMYK image is
printed to the iR C2100/2100S, and the output is made to appear as if it
were printed on an offset press.
This document could be created as follows:
• Select the Built-in radio button from CMYK Setup in Photoshop 5.x
Color Settings.
• Adjust the Ink Options and Separation Options to match your offset press.
• Select the Tables radio button in CMYK Setup and click Save.
This saves your settings as a CMYK ICC profile that you will later
download to the iR C2100/2100S as a custom simulation profile.
• Click on the Built-in radio button in CMYK Setup again and click OK.
• Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and download your new CMYK ICC profile
to the iR C2100/2100S as a custom Simulation profile.
For the Appear in Driver as option in Profile Settings, select Simulation-1.
(For more information on downloading profiles, see page 4-5.)
• Open an RGB image in Photoshop 5.x. From the Image menu, select
Mode>CMYK Color. Save the image as Photoshop EPS.
• Print the image directly to the iR C2100/2100S and choose Simulation-1
as the CMYK Simulation Profile setting.
The ColorWise settings used in this example are:
• CMYK Simulation Profile set to Simulation-1
• CMYK Simulation Method set to Full
2
2-15
Advanced workflows
The diagram below indicates the steps for this particular workflow in black.
Photoshop5.x RGB-to-CMYK workflow
Photoshop 5.x
Printer driver
Read Embedded Profiles
Define RGB Source
Embed Source Profiles
Convert RGB to CMYK
Convert CMYK to CMYK
Select RGB Mode
Select CMYK Mode
Select Destination Profile
Save as TIFF
Save as EPS
Save as JPEG
Print
(Mac OS-Only)
Black and White
Color/Grayscale
ColorSync Color Matching
PostScript Color Matching
ColorWise
print options
Define RGB Source
Select RGB Source: None
Select Rendering Style (CRD)
Select RGB Separation: Output
Select RGB Separation: Simulation
Convert Press CMYK to Press Sim.
Convert Press CMYK to Custom Sim.
Select Device CMYK Simulation: None
Turn Spot Color Matching On
Turn Spot Color Matching Off
Select Output Profile
Select Custom Output Profile
Photoshop RGB and QuarkXPress CMYK
This workflow exemplifies the use of the RGB Separation feature of
ColorWise. An RGB image, originally saved in Photoshop, is printed to the
iR C2100/2100S from QuarkXPress. To simulate how the RGB image would
print on an offset press, the RGB Separation feature of ColorWise is set to
Simulation. This workflow—useful for proofing brochures, newsletters, and
other layouts—lets you maintain consistency by using the source RGB file for
multiple purposes.
This document could be created as follows:
• Create an RGB image in Photoshop and save it as Photoshop EPS.
• Place the EPS image in a QuarkXPress document.
• Create several process-colored page elements alongside the image and
print.
• Use ColorWise to convert the RGB image to simulated press CMYK and
to adjust the process colors for proofing to the copier/printer.
The ColorWise settings used in this example are:
• RGB Source Profile set to EFIRGB or another RGB source definition
• Rendering Style set to Photographic
• RGB Separation set to Simulation
2
2-16
Simple and Advanced Workflows
• CMYK Simulation Profile set to SWOP
• CMYK Simulation Method set to Full
The diagram below indicates the steps for this particular workflow in black.
Photoshop RGB and QuarkXPress CMYK workflow
Photoshop
QuarkXPress
Printer driver
Read Embedded Profiles
Define RGB Source
Embed Source Profiles
Convert RGB to CMYK
Convert CMYK to CMYK
Select RGB Mode
Select CMYK Mode
Select Destination Profile
Save as TIFF
Save as EPS
Save as JPEG
Print
Read Embedded Profile
Define RGB Colors
Define CMYK Colors
Define PANTONE Colors
Convert RGB to CMYK
Convert CMYK to CMYK
Convert PANTONE to CMYK
Embed Source Profile
Select Destination Profile
Export as TIFF
Save as EPS
Print
(Mac OS-Only)
Black and White
Color/Grayscale
ColorSync Color Matching
PostScript Color Matching
ColorWise
print options
Define RGB Source
Select RGB Source: None
Select Rendering Style (CRD)
Select RGB Separation: Output
Select RGB Separation: Simulation
Convert Press CMYK to Press Sim.
Convert Press CMYK to Custom Sim.
Select Device CMYK Simulation: None
Turn Spot Color Matching On
Turn Spot Color Matching Off
Select Output Profile
Select Custom Output Profile
3
3-1
Chapter 3:
Color Calibration
Introduction
Calibrating the iR C2100/2100S ensures consistent, reliable color output.
You can calibrate the iR C2100/2100S with ColorWise Pro Tools using an
X-Rite DTP32 automatic scanning densitometer (available as an option). By
connecting the densitometer to the serial port on your computer, you can
quickly measure color patches and download measurements to the
iR C2100/2100S. You can also obtain measurements from the copier’s builtin scanner and calibrate using ReaderCal, which does not require the use of a
densitometer and can be run from ColorWise Pro Tools or from the Control
Panel. A third calibration method, VisualCal, is intended for use with the
printer model only and is run from the Control Panel on the
iR C2100/2100S.
This chapter explains how calibration works and provides instructions for all
calibration procedures. Calibrating with ColorWise Pro Tools is described on
page 3-8; calibrating from the iR C2100/2100S Control Panel with
ReaderCal is described on page 3-15, and calibrating from the Control Panel
with VisualCal is described on page 3-16.
A format for inputting color measurements from other densitometers is
described in Appendix C.
The procedures described in Chapters 3 and 4 are fundamentally the same
for Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, and Mac OS
computers, including those running Command WorkStation software. The
main differences are the interface cable and the port used to connect to the
densitometer.
N OTE : The term computer is used to refer to any computer running
ColorWise Pro Tools.
Introduction
Calibration generates curves that adjust for the difference between the actual
toner densities (measurements) and the response expected by the output
profile.
• Measurements represent the actual color behavior of the copier/printer.
• Calibration sets are sets of measurements.
3
3-2
Color Calibration
• A calibration target that describes the expected behavior of the
copier/printer is contained in each output profile.
Once you have calibrated the iR C2100/2100S, a calibration set is stored on
the iR C2100/2100S. This calibration set will be used when it is associated
with an output profile. Every output profile has an associated calibration set.
If you have not specified one, the calibration set associated with the default
output profile is used.
N OTE : Changing calibration has the potential to affect all jobs for all users, so
you may want to limit the number of people authorized to perform
calibration. An Administrator password can be set from the iR C2100/2100S
Control Panel or in Setup from the Command WorkStation to control access
to calibration.
Understanding calibration
Although most users’ needs are met by the default calibration set, the
iR C2100/2100S allows you to choose a calibration set to customize
calibration for specialized jobs.
Calibration allows you to:
• Maximize the color reproduction capabilities of the iR C2100/2100S
• Ensure consistent color quality over time
• Produce consistent output across iR C2100/2100S servers that are
connected to the same print engine
• Achieve better color matches when reproducing spot colors such as
PANTONE colors or other named color systems
• Optimize the iR C2100/2100S for using ColorWise rendering styles
(CRDs) and CMYK simulations, and for using ICC profiles
How calibration works
Success in obtaining satisfactory print quality from a color server such as a
iR C2100/2100S connected to a copier/printer depends on many factors.
Among the most important are establishing and maintaining optimal toner
densities. Density is a measure of the light absorbed by a surface. By carefully
regulating toner densities, you can obtain consistent printed color.
3
3-3
Understanding calibration
Even with a calibrated system, toner density is affected by service settings,
humidity, and temperature; it also tends to drift over time. Regular
measurement detects day-to-day variations in densities, and calibration
corrects for them.
Calibration works by creating calibration curves on the iR C2100/2100S that
compensate for the difference between actual (measured) and desired (target)
density values.
Calibration curves are the graphic equivalent of transfer functions, which are
mathematical descriptions of changes that will be made to the data you start
with. Transfer functions are often graphed as input or output curves.
The iR C2100/2100S generates calibration curves after comparing measured
values to the final target values for each of the four toner colors. The target
values are based on the output profile specified.
Measurements
Measurement files contain numerical values that correspond to the toner
density produced by the copier/printer when it prints solid cyan, magenta,
yellow, and black, and graduated tints of those colors.
To create a measurement file, first print a page of color patches from
ColorWise Pro Tools or from the Control Panel to the copier/printer. Then
you measure the patches using either an X-Rite DTP32 densitometer
connected to a computer on the network or using the copier’s scanner
(ReaderCal). The new measurements are automatically downloaded to the
iR C2100/2100S. When using the VisualCal method, you evaluate the
patches with your own eyes and input numbers at the Control Panel of the
printer.
Output profiles and calibration sets
Output profiles and calibration sets define desired calibration results. One or
more output profiles and one or more calibration sets are provided with the
iR C2100/2100S. When you calibrate the iR C2100/2100S, you can select
the calibration set that corresponds to the typical printing jobs at your site.
This same calibration set can be associated with one or more output profiles.
(For more information on output profiles, see page 1-9.)
3
3-4
Color Calibration
Scheduling calibration
In general, you should calibrate the iR C2100/2100S at least once a day,
depending on the volume of print jobs. If it is very important to maintain
consistent color, or if the copier/printer is subject to wide fluctuations in
temperature or humidity, calibrate every few hours. To get the best
performance, calibrate whenever there is a noticeable change in print quality.
If you need to split a print job into two or more batches to be printed at
different times, it is especially important to calibrate before printing each
batch. You should also calibrate the iR C2100/2100S after copier/printer
maintenance. However, because the copier/printer may be less stable
immediately after maintenance, wait until you have printed approximately 50
pages before you calibrate.
N OTE : Since printed output from the copier/printer is very sensitive to
changes in temperature and humidity, the copier/printer should not be
installed near a window or in direct sunlight, near a heater or air conditioner.
Paper is sensitive to climate changes as well. It should be stored in a cool, dry,
stable environment, and reams should remain sealed until they are needed.
Print color reference pages, such as the Color Charts (from the Control Panel
or from the Command WorkStation) and the color reference pages included
with the user software (see Getting Started). All of these pages include fully
saturated color patches and pale tints of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black.
Images with skin tones offer a very good basis for comparison. You can save
and compare pages you printed at different times. If there is a noticeable
change in appearance, you should calibrate the iR C2100/2100S.
If the solid density patches (100% cyan, magenta, yellow, or black) look less
saturated with time, show the pages to your copier/printer service technician
to find out whether adjusting the copier/printer can improve output.
Checking calibration status
You can check whether the iR C2100/2100S is calibrated, which calibration
set and output profile were used, and when the copier/printer was last
calibrated:
• Print a Configuration page or Test Page from the Control Panel or the
Command WorkStation.
• When you select a calibration set in Calibrator, the last calibration and the
user who performed it are displayed.
3
3-5
Using a densitometer
Using a densitometer
ColorWise Pro Tools are designed to work with the X-Rite DTP32 reflection
densitometer where color measurements are entered automatically. When you
cannot obtain an expected result with ReaderCal, use this procedure.
N OTE : Measurements from other densitometers can be input using a simple
ASCII file format (see page C-1).
Setting up the densitometer
Before you calibrate the iR C2100/2100S, you need to connect, configure,
and calibrate the densitometer to prepare for measuring the printed patches
(see “Calibrating the densitometer” on page 3-7). For additional information
about setting up and using the densitometer, see the documentation included
with it.
TO
CONNECT THE
X-R ITE DTP32
TO THE COMPUTER :
1.
Turn off the computer.
2.
Plug the square end of the interface cable (looks like a modular phone plug)
into the I/O port on the side of the X-Rite DTP32.
Square connector
3
3-6
3.
Color Calibration
Attach the connector to the computer.
For a Windows computer, insert the 8-pin mini-DIN end of the interface
cable into the 9-pin DB9 Connector cable adapter. Insert the 9-pin end into
the COM1 or COM2 port on the computer and tighten the screws. If the
available port on your computer is 25-pin, you must use the 8-pin-to-25-pin
adapter.
Unused connector
Square connector
Connect to computer
Connect to adapter
Interface cable
For a Mac OS computer, connect the 8-pin mini-DIN plug directly into the
serial port of the computer.
Unused connector
Connect to serial port
N OTE : For Macintosh computers with a USB port (for example, an iMac) you
need an adapter to connect the DTP32 to your computer. See the X-Rite,
Inc. web site (www.x-rite.com) for information on supported adapters.
3
3-7
4.
Calibrating the densitometer
Use the AC adapter to provide power.
Plug the small connector on the adapter cable into the side of the X-Rite
DTP32 and plug the adapter into a wall outlet.
Small connector
AC adapter
5.
Turn on the computer.
6.
Calibrate the densitometer (see page 3-7).
7.
Use ColorWise Pro Tools to calibrate the iR C2100/2100S (see page 3-8).
Calibrating the densitometer
You will need the black-and-white X-Rite Auto-Cal Strip included with the
densitometer. Calibrating the densitometer does not require
ColorWise Pro Tools.
TO
CALIBRATE THE
X-R ITE DTP32:
1.
Connect the densitometer to the computer and supply power (see page 3-5).
2.
From the Main Menu on the X-Rite DTP32 display, press the p1 key once to
reach p2.
3.
Press the cal key.
Calibrating motor speed is displayed, followed by the words INSERT CAL
STRIP.
3
3-8
4.
Color Calibration
Insert the arrow end of the X-Rite Auto-Cal Strip into the 35mm slot on the
front of the X-Rite DTP32 until it stops or the roller starts pulling the strip.
Reading appears momentarily, followed by the density values and
CALIBRATION OK. The densitometer automatically returns to the MAIN MENU.
If UNRECOGNIZABLE STRIP appears, repeat the process or try cleaning the strip
(see the X-Rite DTP32 Operating Manual).
5.
Start ColorWise Pro Tools and proceed to calibrate the iR C2100/2100S (see
the next section).
Recalibrate the densitometer at least once per month. For critical color,
calibrate the densitometer every time you calibrate the iR C2100/2100S. The
densitometer may also warn periodically that it requires calibration.
Calibrating with ColorWise Pro Tools
Using the densitometer or ReaderCal, you can quickly measure color patches
and download these measurements to the iR C2100/2100S using
ColorWise Pro Tools Calibrator.
N OTE : Multiple users can be connected to one server with
ColorWise Pro Tools, but only one user at a time can use Calibrator. An error
message appears if you try to calibrate when another user is already using
ColorWise Pro Tools to calibrate.
ColorWise Pro Tools for Windows and Mac OS computers are
fundamentally the same; differences are noted in this chapter. The windows
and dialog boxes you see illustrated are the Windows version.
N OTE : Changing the calibration has the potential to affect all jobs for all
users, so you may want to limit the number of people authorized to perform
calibration. An Administrator password can be set from the iR C2100/2100S
Control Panel to control access to calibration.
3
3-9
TO
Calibrating with ColorWise Pro Tools
CALIBRATE THE COPIER / PRINTER USING
1.
C ALIBRATOR :
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and connect to the iR C2100/2100S.
For instructions on configuring the connection to the iR C2100/2100S, see
Getting Started.
N OTE : If the connection to the iR C2100/2100S from Command
WorkStation that also allows for access to ColorWise Pro Tools is not
established, you can directly launch ColorWise Pro Tools independently of
Command WorkStation.
2.
Click Calibrator.
3
3-10
3.
Color Calibration
Select a measurement method.
ReaderCal (copier only) and X-Rite DTP32 should appear as the
measurement methods. This information is provided to Calibrator by the
iR C2100/2100S. If neither option appears, make sure you are connected to
the iR C2100/2100S.
4.
Under Check Print Settings, choose the desired calibration set.
Choose the appropriate calibration set you will use most often.
N OTE : For this calibration to take effect, the calibration set must be associated
with one or more output profiles. The default calibration set is already
associated with the default output profile, so there is no need to make any
new associations.
5.
Under Generate Measurement Page, click Print.
6.
In the Print Options dialog box that appears, choose the page type, paper
size, and input tray to use for the measurement page and click Print.
For ReaderCal, the Page Type pop-up menu states ReaderCal Page. For the
densitometer method, select either 34 or 21 Sorted Patches.
3
3-11
Calibrating with ColorWise Pro Tools
In the Paper Size pop-up menu, specify the paper size for the measurement
page:
For ReaderCal, LTR/A4 appears in this menu. For densitometer, the menu
will automatically select LTR/A4 for 21 Sorted Patches or 11x17/A3 for 34
Sorted Patches.
In the Input Tray pop-up menu, specify the paper source.
Print Options windows
for DTP32 (left) and
ReaderCal (right)
calibration methods
7.
Under Get Measurements, click Measure.
8.
If you chose the ReaderCal method, follow the directions in the dialog box
that appears for placing the measurement page on the copier glass.
3
3-12
9.
Color Calibration
If you chose the densitometer method, select the Page Type and Paper Size
options you selected for the measurements page, and click Measure.
Then follow the directions in the dialog box that appears for feeding the
measurement page through the X-Rite DTP32.
The Status field displays instructions for selecting the port and feeding the
measurement page through the DTP32 four times, once for each color strip.
10.
When the Status field indicates that the measurements were read
successfully, click Accept.
11.
In the Measure dialog box, click OK.
12.
In the Calibrator window, click Apply to implement the new calibration set.
13.
In the Information dialog box, click OK.
This completes the calibration process.
3
3-13
TO
Calibrating with ColorWise Pro Tools
RESTORE DEFAULT CALIBRATION MEASUREMENTS :
1.
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and click Calibrator.
2.
Click Restore Device.
3.
Click OK to restore the preset default calibration set.
N OTE : Restore device applies only to the currently selected calibration set.
Expert Mode
Expert Mode offers two additional options: Print Pages and View
Measurements.
3
3-14
Color Calibration
With the Print Pages option, you can print a calibration Comparison Page
showing the results of the new measurements with any profile associated with
the currently selected calibration set. You can also create a custom
comparison page and save it as a PostScript or an Encapsulated PostScript
(EPS) file called CALIB.PS. Then print the file to the Hold Queue of the
iR C2100/2100S from your application or download it to the Hold Queue
with Fiery Downloader. An additional way to create the CALIB.PS file is to
rename any job in the Hold Queue using Command WorkStation.
With the View Measurements option, you can view the current set of
measurements as a table or as a graph that shows both the measurements and
the target curves (shown below).
Output profile name
appears here
When more than one profile use the same target, an additional menu called
Plot Against appears at the top right of the window above. It lists all output
profiles that use that same calibration set. Selecting an output profile from
this menu displays the target curves associated with that profile. If each
output profile contains a unique calibration target, when you switch profiles,
the curves displayed also change.
3
3-15
Calibrating from the Control Panel using ReaderCal
Calibrating from the Control Panel using
ReaderCal
You can calibrate the iR C2100/2100S from the Control Panel using
ReaderCal, which calibrates the iR C2100/2100S using the copier’s built-in
scanner as a densitometer. If an Administrator password has been set, you will
need it for calibration.
N OTE : This method is for the copier model only. If you have the printer
model, use the VisualCal calibration method described on page 3-16.
For instructions on using the iR C2100/2100S Control Panel, see the
Configuration Guide.
TO
ACCESS AND USE
R EADER C AL :
1.
At the Idle screen, press the Menu button to enter the Functions menu.
2.
Choose Calibration, and choose Set Up Calibration.
If a password is set on the iR C2100/2100S, enter it and press OK.
3.
For Calibration Mode, select Standard or Expert.
Expert Mode adds the option to print a Comparison Page (see page 3-13).
4.
For Measurement Method, chose ReaderCal.
5.
For Tray, choose the paper source for the measurement page and press OK.
6.
Choose Calibrate.
7.
From the Calibration Set pull-down menu, choose 600dpi, 1200dpi, or
1200dpi (Fine).
8.
When prompted, select Yes to print the measurement page.
This page is comprised of swatches of color that will be measured by the
copier/printer and then compared to the target color values. After the page is
printed, the Measure Page screen is displayed.
9.
10.
Select Yes in the Measure Page screen.
Place the color measurement page face-down.
Place the page at the upper left-hand corner of the copier glass.
11.
Close the platen glass cover, being careful not to move the color
measurement page.
3
3-16
12.
Color Calibration
Click OK.
Status messages display the progress of scanning and calculating
measurements.
13.
When prompted to Print Comparison Page (Expert Mode only), select Yes to
print a preview of the selected calibration.
Select from a list of output profiles that use the same calibration set and press
OK. This option appears only in Expert Mode calibration.
14.
When prompted to overwrite calibration, select Yes.
15.
Select Yes to confirm.
Status messages display progress information.
Removing calibration
It is also possible to remove calibration from the iR C2100/2100S. In
general, it is not necessary because any new calibration replaces the existing
one if the same calibration set is selected.
TO
REMOVE CALIBRATION FROM THE
C ONTROL P ANEL :
1.
From the iR C2100/2100S Control Panel, access the Calibration menu as
described on page 3-15.
2.
Choose Remove Calibration.
3.
When prompted, verify that you want to proceed with removing calibration.
The current measurements are removed and a default calibration is restored.
Calibrating from the Control Panel using
VisualCal
VisualCal is a calibration method that allows you to calibrate your printer to
a color output standard defined by the manufacturer. The calibration
calculations performed by the controller software are based on a series of
values entered on the control panel. The values used in the calculations are
determined by evaluating toner densities and color combinations produced
on two specially designed calibration pages printed from the control panel.
3
3-17
Calibrating from the Control Panel using VisualCal
Limits and 30% Match
The first VisualCal page, “Limits and 30% Match,” provides the basis for
calculating the most acceptable luminosity (brightness) of the toners. This
page consists of rows of CMYK dots in a graduated range of toner densities.
The variables needed to recalculate the density of the colored toners are
determined by identifying the leftmost dots that can be fully distinguished
against their fields in each row, and sequentially entering their corresponding
numeric values on the control panel. The variable needed to recalculate the
luminosity of the toners is determined in a slightly different way—you
identify the black dot which best matches a 30% dot gain field. When all
values have been entered, the printer’s toner density and luminosity settings
are recalculated.
Gray Balance
The second VisualCal page, “Gray Balance,” provides the basis for calculating
a “neutral gray balance,” that is, a CMY gray that as closely as possible
matches a pure K (BlacK) gray produced by the printer’s engine. This page
consists of rows of CMY gray patches on a field of gray produced solely from
black.The variables needed to calculate the printer’s most neutral gray balance
are determined by identifying the CMY patch that best matches this field,
and entering its row and column location on the control panel. When the
values have been entered, the printer’s gray balance is recalculated.
TO
PERFORM
V ISUAL C AL
CALIBRATION :
1.
At the Idle screen, press the Functions button to enter the Functions menu.
2.
Choose Calibration, and choose Set Up Calibration.
If a password is set on the iR C2100/2100S, enter it and press OK.
3.
For Calibration Mode, select Standard or Expert.
Expert Mode adds the option to print a Comparison Page (see page 3-13).
4.
For Measurement Method, chose VisualCal.
5.
Back at the main calibration screen, select Calibrate.
6.
From the Calibration Set pull-down menu, choose 600dpi, 1200dpi, or
1200dpi (Fine).
3
3-18
7.
Color Calibration
Press Yes to print the Limits and 30% Match page.
To reset the printer’s toner density and luminosity settings, follow the
instructions provided on the Limits and 30% Match page. Use the touch
screen to change numbers; do not use the numerical keypad.
N OTE : Zero (0) and 9 are unacceptable values for color calibration. If you
select 0 for any of the colors, the resulting calibration will be inaccurate. If
the entered value for any color is 0 or 9, the Limits and 30% Match page is
reprinted automatically. Re-enter values for all color rows starting with Black
Start.
When you have finished entering all values, the PRINT GRAYS screen appears.
8.
Press Yes to print the Gray Balance page.
To reset the printer’s gray balance, follow the instructions provided on the
Gray Balance page. When you have finished entering all values, the PRINT
COLOR TEST screen appears.
N OTE : If the Gray Balance page is printed after the Limits calculations have
been made, the gray field on which the CMY patches appear on the Limits
page will use the new density and luminosity calibration settings.
9.
Select Yes to print the Canon Comparison Page.
10.
If you are satisfied with the printer’s calibration based on the new values,
select YES from the APPLY CHANGES screen that appears, and press OK to
calibrate the printer based on the previously entered values.
11.
Choose Exit Calibration to return to the Functions menu.
Use the following suggestions for adjusting VisualCal for your specific
preferences:
• If your print seem to be color balanced but too dark, enter a lower value for
the 30% Match entry on the Limits and 30% Match page, last row.
• If your print seems too light, enter a higher value.
• If light areas on your prints have a color cast, enter a lower value in the
Start row for that toner.
• If dark areas on your prints have a color cast, enter a higher value in the
End row for that toner.
4
4-1
Chapter 4:
ColorWise Pro
Tools
Profile Manager
ColorWise Pro Tools are color management applications that give you
flexible control of color printing. There are two tools:
• Calibrator (see Chapter 3)
• Profile Manager
ColorWise Pro Tools for Windows and Mac OS computers are
fundamentally the same; differences are noted in this chapter. The windows
and dialog boxes illustrated are the Windows version. For information on
installing and configuring a connection to ColorWise Pro Tools, see Getting
Started.
Profile Manager
Profile Manager allows you to manage and edit ICC profiles. In the case of
the iR C2100/2100S, these profiles are divided into RGB Source,
Simulation, and Output profiles.
• RGB Source contains all monitor profiles resident on the iR C2100/2100S.
RGB Source profiles are used to define the source color space for RGB
colors processed by the iR C2100/2100S.
• Simulation contains printer profiles used to simulate another device on the
iR C2100/2100S.
• Output contains copier/printer profiles that describe the attached
copier/printer. For more information on output profiles, see page 1-9.
N OTE : Changing the iR C2100/2100S default profiles affects all jobs for all
users, so you might want to limit the number of people authorized to use
ColorWise Pro Tools by setting an Administrator password.
4
4-2
ColorWise Pro Tools
Several profiles are provided with the iR C2100/2100S, and you can create
additional ones as needed by modifying the existing ones. You can also
download profiles from any workstation to the iR C2100/2100S. The
profiles provided are:
RGB Source:
• sRGB (PC)—source color space for a generic Windows computer monitor
• Apple Standard—standard source color space for Mac OS computer
monitors with older versions of ColorSync
• EFIRGB—preset default setting for a iR C2100/2100S
Simulation:
• SWOP-Coated—the United States press standard
• Euroscale—the European press standard
• DIC—the Japanese press standard
Output:
• Canon CP21x0-iR20x0 1200dpi Fine v1f
• Canon CP21x0-iR20x0 600dpi v1f
• Canon CP21x0-iR20x0 1200dpi v1f
N OTE : For more information on output profiles, see page 1-9.
Setting the default profiles
The default profiles are applied to all print jobs sent to the iR C2100/2100S,
unless you override them using print options. Therefore, the defaults should
be the most commonly used profiles.
4
4-3
TO
Profile Manager
SPECIFY A DEFAULT PROFILE :
1.
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and click Profile Manager.
The left side of the screen lists the ICC profiles in the default directory of
your computer. The right side lists each of the three types of profiles on the
iR C2100/2100S.
The lock icon (
) to the left of a profile name indicates that the profiles
cannot be deleted and can be edited only if it is saved under a new name.
Only Simulation and Output profiles can be edited.
A small icon to the left of a profile name indicates the default profile for each
category (RGB Source, Simulation, and Output). If you designate a different
profile as the default, the icon appears next to your designated profile. The
icon indicating the default RGB Source and Output profiles looks like a
target ( ). The icon indicating the default Simulation profile changes in
appearance depending on whether the default RGB Separation setting is set
to Simulation (
) or Output (
).
2.
Select the profile you want as the default for a profile type, and click Profile
Settings.
4
4-4
ColorWise Pro Tools
3.
In the Profile Settings dialog box, click Default and click Apply.
4.
Click OK.
5.
In the main Profile Manager window, the target icon appears next to the new
default profile you specified. Repeat steps 2 through 4 for each type of
profile.
Profile Settings windows for
Simulation (left) and
Output (right)
If no default is set for RGB Source, then the RGB Source print option is set
to None. If no default profile is set for Simulation, then the CMYK
Simulation print option is set to None. For more information on print
options, see Chapter 1.
For Output there is always a default profile. You can change the Output
default by selecting a preset profile you want as the default and clicking
Profile Settings. Or you can create a new default under a new name by
selecting a preset profile and specifying your choice of the calibration set in
the Use Calibration Set pop-up menu and a new name in the Profile
Description menu.
N OTE : When you specify the output profile with locked icon in Profile
Description and associate it with the name of a defined custom profile,
Output1 though Output 10, you can select it using the Output Profile print
option in the printer driver. The procedure is the same one as applying a
downloaded or edited profile to the print job (see “Defining profiles” on
page 4-8).
4
4-5
Profile Manager
Downloading profiles
The iR C2100/2100S comes with default profiles. It is possible to download
additional profiles from any computer connected to the iR C2100/2100S.
TO
DOWNLOAD A PROFILE :
1.
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and click the Profile Manager.
The left side of the main Profile Manager windows lists the ICC profiles in
the default directory of your workstation.
For Windows 95/98, the default directory is \Windows\System\Color.
For Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000, the default directory is
\Winnt\System32\Color.
For Mac OS, the default directory is System Folder:Preferences:ColorSync™
Profiles for ColorSync 2.0, and System Folder:ColorSync™ Profiles if you
have ColorSync 2.5 or later.
2.
If the desired profile does not appear, click Browse to go to a different
directory.
Browse to the directory containing the profile you want to download and
click OK.
3.
When the profile you wish to download appears in the list in the main Profile
Manager window, select it.
If the profile is compatible with the iR C2100/2100S, a green arrow indicates
that the profile is available for download. Only output device profiles are
downloadable to Simulation and Output. Only input device profiles are
downloadable to RGB Source.
4
4-6
ColorWise Pro Tools
N OTE : On Windows computers, the profiles must have an extension of .icc or
.icm to be listed. On Mac OS computers, the profiles must have a file type of
profile.
All ICC profiles in the selected directory on your computer are displayed in
the list in the main Profile Manager window. However, because a profile is
listed does not necessarily mean it can be downloaded to the
iR C2100/2100S.
Simulation profiles should be only profiles of devices for which you want the
iR C2100/2100S to match in terms of color output characteristics. Output
profiles should be only profiles of the device to which your iR C2100/2100S
is connected. Although CMYK printer profiles can be downloaded as
Simulation or Output, consider how they will be used. If you want the
iR C2100/2100S prints to look like another printer, download that profile as
a Simulation. If you have a custom profile of the copier/printer your
iR C2100/2100S is connected to, download that profile as an Output profile.
4.
Click the arrow to download the profile and click OK when the download is
complete.
The new profile now appears on the list of profiles on the right side of the
Profile Manager main window.
For Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, and Mac OS computers, this profile
must be associated with one of the predefined names (Source-1 through 10
for RGB Source, Simulation-1 through 10 for Simulation, or Output-1
through 10 for Output) or set as the default before it can be used. For
Windows 95/98, all profiles can appear in the printer driver by their profile
descriptions. See “Defining profiles” on page 4-8.
N OTE : When an output profile is downloaded, it inherits the calibration
target of the current default output profile.
Managing profiles
With Profile Manager, you can back up profiles and delete profiles. You
should always back up profiles before updating iR C2100/2100S software to
ensure that no custom profiles are lost.
N OTE : You can back up and delete only those profiles that appear in the main
Profile manager window without the lock icon next to them. Locked profiles
cannot be deleted, but most can be backed up.
4
4-7
TO
Profile Manager
BACK UP PROFILES :
1.
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and click Profile Manager.
2.
Select the profile on the iR C2100/2100S to upload.
The arrow in the middle of the Profile Manager window turns green and
points to the left, indicating the profile is available for upload.
3.
Click the green arrow, choose a name and location for the profile, and click
Save.
The name will be the filename of the profile, but the profile description will
be the original one or the one you entered in the Profile Settings dialog box.
N OTE : When saving the profile on a Windows computer, be sure to include
the extension .icm. If the extension is not included, additional dialog boxes
appear.
4.
Click OK when you are notified that the profile was successfully uploaded.
Delete profiles to make sure no one uses the wrong profile and to free up disk
space on the iR C2100/2100S (although profiles are small and don’t take up
much space).
T O DELETE PROFILES FROM THE
I R C2100/2100S HARD DISK :
1.
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and click Profile Manager.
2.
Select the profile you wish to delete and click Delete.
A Warning dialog box asks you to confirm deletion.
N OTE : You cannot delete preset profiles, profiles that are currently set as
default, or profiles that are linked to any of the predefined custom names, for
example Simulation-1.
3.
Click Yes to delete the profile.
If you want to delete a profile that is currently set as the default or associated
with a custom name, click Profile Settings and uncheck the default option.
4
4-8
ColorWise Pro Tools
Defining profiles
For Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, and Mac OS computers, before you
can apply any downloaded or edited profile to a print job, that profile must
be linked to one of the predefined custom names, or you can set the profile as
the default for all print jobs (See Setting the default profiles on page 4-2).
There are 10 names available for custom profiles— Source-1 through 10 for
RGB Source, Simulation-1 through 10 for Simulation, or Output-1 through
10 for Output. For Windows 95/98, all profiles appear by their actual names
in the printer driver. These fixed names are used in the PPD so that you can
select profiles per job even if your driver does not have the capability to
obtain an updated list from the server.
N OTE : You can also apply a preset output profile to a print job.
N OTE : A custom simulation profile is used to illustrate this procedure. The
same steps apply for defining custom or downloaded output profiles.
TO
DEFINE A PROFILE :
1.
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and click Profile Manager.
Custom
profile
For the purposes of this example, assume DIC-new is a custom simulation
profile. As you can see, DIC-new has no information under the heading
“Appear in Driver as.”
2.
Select DIC-new in the Simulation list, and click Profile Settings or doubleclick DIC-new.
4
4-9
3.
Profile Manager
Select the “Appear in Driver as” checkbox, choose one of the predefined
custom simulation names (Simulation-1 through Simulation-10) from the
pop-up menu, and then click Apply.
Make sure to choose a name that is not already linked with another
simulation. If you try to define two profiles with the same name, you will get
an error message.
For an output profile, the predefined custom names would be Output-1
through Output-10.
N OTE : While you cannot delete a preset profile, you can use a preset profile’s
name for your downloaded profile when you select the “Appear in Driver as”
option. This replaces the preset profile with your own profile.
When you choose Profile Settings for an output profile, the Use Calibration
Set option also appears. You must calibrate the iR C2100/2100S with this
calibration set before this option has any effect. If you have never measured
for this calibration set, default measurements will be used. For more
information about calibration sets, see page 3-2.
In Profile Settings you can also change profile descriptions for all non-locked
profiles.
4
4-10
4.
ColorWise Pro Tools
Click OK.
DIC-new will
appear in
driver as
Simulation-1
Simulation-1 now appears under the “Appear in Driver as” column for
DIC-new. Choosing Simulation-1 from the CMYK Simulation option of the
printer driver applies the DIC-new simulation to the print job.
If you do not define a custom simulation profile, your job will print with
CMYK Simulation Profile set to None. If you do not define a custom RGB
Source or Output profile, the default profile is used.
Changing global settings
Use the Global Settings button to open a dialog box where you can set the
default simulation method and the profile used for RGB Separation. You can
also access information on how all the profiles are applied to color data in a
job.
4
4-11
TO
Profile Manager
CHANGE THE
G LOBAL S ETTINGS :
1.
Launch ColorWise Pro Tools and click Profile Manager.
2.
Click Global Settings at the top right corner.
Click
Global
Settings
3.
Choose Full or Quick for the Default CMYK Simulation Method.
See Chapter 1 for details on print options.
4
4-12
4.
ColorWise Pro Tools
Choose Simulation or Output for RGB Separation.
See Chapter 1 for details on print options. Although the RGB Separation
feature is primarily intended for RGB, it can also apply to data in the Lab
color space or data that uses PostScript Color Management.
5.
To see a diagram of how color settings affect print jobs, click the question
mark (?) button at the bottom left.
The diagram is illustrative and does not include selectable options. Click OK
to close.
6.
Click Apply to apply any changes you have made. Click OK to close the
window.
5
5-1
Chapter 5:
Working with
Color in
Applications
Working with color
This chapter provides guidelines for defining colors in your documents to
produce the results you want. The following topics are covered:
• Factors affecting how you work with color
• Choosing colors in applications that rely on GDI or QuickDraw to
communicate data to the printer driver, such as presentation applications
and word processing programs
• Choosing colors in applications that have the ability to write their own
PostScript, such as some page-layout programs, illustration programs, and
pixel-editing applications
Working with color
The two main factors that influence how you work with color in the creation
of documents are the application you use and the final print device.
Applications vary in the methods they provide for choosing colors and in the
way they transmit color data to the print device.
• Office applications such as presentation software, spreadsheets, and word
processing programs use the RGB color model. They typically transmit
only RGB data to the print device.
• Illustration applications use both the RGB and CMYK color models but
typically transmit only CMYK data to the print device.
• Pixel-editing applications use both the RGB and CMYK color models.
They also transmit both RGB and CMYK data to the print device.
The type of printing you plan for the document—short-run color printing
on the iR C2100/2100S versus color printing for eventual printing on an
offset press—determines the way you define colors as well as the print option
settings you choose.
• For short-run color printing on the iR C2100/2100S, use any type of
application and define colors in either RGB or CMYK. If your application
supports it, you can also choose colors from the PANTONE color library.
Placed images may be limited to the RGB color space. Choose the
appropriate settings for print options affecting color output (see page 1-1).
5
5-2
Working with Color in Applications
• For color proofing, use an application that writes its own PostScript and
define colors in RGB, CMYK, or choose colors from the application’s
PANTONE color library. Placed images can also be defined in RGB or
CMYK. Choose the appropriate settings for print options affecting color
output (see page 1-1).
N OTE : The iR C2100/2100S allows you to use RGB or CMYK data when
printing proofs for an offset press run. However, sending data to an
imagesetter most often requires CMYK data.
Color reference pages
iR C2100/2100S user software includes several types of color reference pages
that let you see the range of colors that can be printed on your copier/printer.
For predictable color, use the color reference pages when defining the colors
in your document.
• RGB Color Reference—a Microsoft Word file and a Microsoft PowerPoint
file that let you view the colors available in the standard palettes of office
applications and see how those colors print on the iR C2100/2100S (see
page 5-4).
• CMYK Color Reference—an 11-page downloadable PostScript file of
CMYK color patches (see page 5-6).
• PANTONE Coated Color Reference—a 19-page downloadable PostScript
file of color patches showing CMYK equivalents of PANTONE Coated
colors. This file prints differently depending on the setting of the Spot
Color Matching option (see page 5-6).
In addition, you can print RGB, CMY, and PANTONE color charts from
the iR C2100/2100S Control Panel.
5
5-3
Office applications
Office applications
The iR C2100/2100S must receive PostScript instructions to print an image
or a document. Many applications do not create these PostScript instructions
by themselves, and instead rely on the printer driver to create them. Included
in this category are most word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation
packages. These applications use Windows Graphics Device Interface
(GDI) to display and print when running under Windows and Apple
QuickDraw to display and print when running on Mac OS computers. We
refer to these GDI and QuickDraw applications as “office applications.”
All office applications handle color similarly, using the same RGB color
model used for the color monitor display. Most office applications allow you
to choose colors from a palette of preselected colors; some allow you to add
new colors to the palette using a color picker. Although some applications
allow you to specify color using the CMY, HSL, and HSV color models,
these applications always send RGB color data to the iR C2100/2100S. (An
exception to this is a CMYK EPS file placed in the document, which is sent
as CMYK data.)
When working with color in office applications, keep in mind that:
• The range of colors that can be displayed in RGB on your monitor is much
larger than the range of colors that can be printed on your copier/printer.
When you print the document, out-of-gamut RGB colors are mapped to
colors your copier/printer can produce.
• These applications send only RGB data to the iR C2100/2100S. You
control the rendering style of the color conversion with your selection of a
CRD.
Each CRD uses a different color rendering style, and therefore has a
different way of mapping unprintable colors to the color gamut of your
copier/printer. iR C2100/2100S color rendering styles are described on
page 1-4.
5
5-4
Working with Color in Applications
Choosing colors in office applications
Two RGB color reference pages, a Microsoft Word file and a Microsoft
PowerPoint file, are provided with your iR C2100/2100S user software. Print
these files using different CRDs to see how the colors appear when printed to
the iR C2100/2100S. For best results, print the color reference page using
the same print options you plan to use for your final document. Select the
colors you want to use from the printed version of the RGB color reference
page and then use those colors in your document.
RGB Color Reference (Microsoft PowerPoint)
PostScript applications
Most applications used for illustration, pixel editing, and page layout can
create the PostScript information they send to PostScript copier/printer or
save in PostScript files. Illustrator, Photoshop, PageMaker, QuarkXPress, and
FreeHand are all PostScript applications.
PostScript applications work with color in many different ways. Most allow
you to choose process colors (by entering percentages for cyan, magenta,
yellow, and black), as well as named colors from a custom color system such
as PANTONE. When you print composites, these applications send processcolor equivalents for named spot colors to the copier/printer. In some
applications, you can also choose colors using the RGB, HSB, HSL, or other
color models.
5
5-5
PostScript applications
Generally, PostScript applications send color information to the iR C2100/
2100S as CMYK data. An exception to this is an RGB image placed in the
document, which is sent directly to the iR C2100/2100S (unless you specify
special color management settings in the application). In addition, some
PostScript applications that allow you to define colors in RGB or other color
models can also send data to the iR C2100/2100S in those color spaces.
Color controls in PostScript applications are typically designed for printing
on an offset press, and some adjustments are required for printing to the
iR C2100/2100S. Displayed versions of colors you choose in these
applications may not match iR C2100/2100S output exactly, and named
colors may not print accurately on the iR C2100/2100S, since these colors
typically require custom inks.
Choosing colors in PostScript applications
With PostScript applications, you can create colors using any of the color
models supported by the application. All PostScript applications support
CMYK; some also support RGB and other color models based on monitor
display values. PostScript applications also allow you to choose named colors
using one or more color libraries, such as PANTONE (see page 5-6).
You should use swatch color matching to ensure predictable color printing
results with the iR C2100/2100S or to match your iR C2100/2100S color
output to colors produced by other print devices.
Swatch color matching
iR C2100/2100S user software includes several color reference pages (see
page 5-2). By choosing colors from these reference pages, you can be sure of
obtaining the same color from your copier/printer. For best results, calibrate
the iR C2100/2100S before printing the reference pages.
N OTE : Swatch color matching does not match monitor colors to printed
colors. For this you must use a color management system and calibrate your
monitor.
Working with Color in Applications
Using the CMYK Color Reference
The CMYK Color Reference included with your iR C2100/2100S user
software lets you see how various cyan, magenta, yellow, and black
combinations look when printed on your copier/printer.
Yellow: 0
Black
0
25 50 75
Magenta
0
0
10
10
20
20
30
30
40
40
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
100
10
10
20
20
30
30
40
40
Cyan
5
5-6
50
50
60
60
70
70
80
80
90
90
100
100
page 1
To print the CMYK Color Reference, download the file to the iR C2100/
2100S. The printed pages display groups of color patches in graduated
combinations of yellow, magenta, and cyan, and smaller patches that include
25%, 50%, and 75% black. Refer to these pages to pick colors and specify
process color values in your application. For the location of the file on the
User Software CD, see Getting Started.
PANTONE Coated Color Reference
The PANTONE Coated Color Reference included with your iR C2100/
2100S user software can help ensure predictable results with colors chosen
from the PANTONE color library.
5
5-7
PostScript applications
The information printed by the PANTONE Coated Color Reference
depends on the setting of the Spot Color Matching setting.
• On—Prints swatches of the closest equivalents of PANTONE colors your
copier/printer can produce. The equivalent PANTONE color name/
number is printed below each swatch.
• Off—Prints swatches of the CMYK equivalents of PANTONE colors as
defined by Pantone. (These are the same CMYK values defined in
applications that include PANTONE libraries.) The CMYK values used to
produce the color, as well as the PANTONE color name/number, are
printed below each swatch.
To print the PANTONE Coated Color Reference, download the file to the
iR C2100/2100S. (For the location of the file on the User Software CD, see
Getting Started.) If the default Spot Color Matching setting on the iR C2100/
2100S is not the setting you want to use for printing the PANTONE colors,
download the file to the Hold queue. Then use Fiery WebSpooler,
Fiery Spooler, or Command WorkStation to override the Spot Color
Matching setting. (For instructions on using Command WorkStation, Fiery
WebSpooler or Fiery Spooler, see the Job Management Guide.)
Default output profile
The default output profile consists of both a profile for your copier/printer,
describing its color characteristics, and a calibration target that describes the
expected behavior of the copier/printer. For more information on output
profiles, see page 1-9.
You can use ColorWise Pro Tools to download your own output profile to
the iR C2100/2100S (see page 4-5). Downloaded output profiles are at first
associated with the default calibration target.
CMYK simulation
If you are using the iR C2100/2100S to print proofs for an offset press job or
to simulate another print device, choose the appropriate CMYK Simulation
Profile and CMYK Simulation Method print option settings (see page 1-7).
6
6-1
Chapter 6:
Office
Applications
Working with office applications
This chapter provides instructions for printing color documents from GDI
and QuickDraw applications such as presentation, spreadsheet, and word
processing software. You can use these instructions with the Microsoft Office
2000, Microsoft Office 97, and Microsoft Office 95 suite of applications.
Working with office applications
Before printing from these applications, make sure the appropriate printer
driver and the iR C2100/2100S PPD are installed on your computer as
described in Getting Started. The iR C2100/2100S ColorWise color
management system provides complete color management for jobs printed
from office applications.
Defining colors
Office applications use the RGB color model. For instructions on defining
colors, see “Choosing colors in office applications” on page 5-4.
The only way to use CMYK or PANTONE colors is to define them in EPS
files with an illustration or page layout application, and then place these files
into MS Office documents. Colors in EPS files are preserved until they reach
the iR C2100/2100S (assuming no PostScript Color Management
information was included).
MS Office applications lack finesse when displaying EPS files, so use these
files only when RGB colors are not practical in your specific workflow. EPS
files are also useful when using large or complex images that need to be
printed at full resolution or cannot fit some MS Office configurations with
limited memory.
Working with imported files
Although your application may allow you to import a variety of file formats,
EPS files are recommended for all raster images you want to import; some
applications have printing problems when using file formats such as TIFF
and PICT.
N OTE : You may have to perform a “custom install” of your Office application
if you are not able to import EPS elements.
6
6-2
Office Applications
Although there are no color management options within Office applications,
color conversions do occur when you import images or page elements that
were not defined in RGB. To avoid such conversions with imported files, use
the EPS file format for artwork that is to be imported into Office
applications.
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings.
Tip for advanced users
If you place multiple RGB images, mixed non-photographic and
photographic, a single CRD may not be suitable for all the images. In this
case you may want the photographic images to bypass the CRD altogether.
To accomplish this, save the image in CMYK mode with a pixel-editing
application such as Photoshop and perform color correction on it. Then save
it as an EPS file and import it into the document.
Selecting options when printing
There are few differences among office applications with regard to iR C2100/
2100S printing. The instructions in this chapter apply to all office
applications. Use the instructions in Chapter 1 to specify print options and
color management settings. To specify these options, you must use a
PostScript Level 2 (or later) printer driver, such as an Adobe PostScript
Printer Driver.
Because office applications send RGB data to the iR C2100/2100S, your
choices of RGB Source and Rendering Style settings are important. Be sure to
specify the appropriate CRD for the color effect you want (see “Rendering
styles” on page 1-4).
Output profiles
All color data in the job is affected by the output profile on the iR C2100/
2100S. This profile may be the one designed for your copier/printer and
shipped with the iR C2100/2100S, or it may be a custom profile created at
your site (see page 1-9). If necessary, print the Test Page to see which profile is
currently resident on the iR C2100/2100S.
7
7-1
Chapter 7:
Adobe
Photoshop
Photoshop 5.x
This chapter covers features of Adobe Photoshop versions 4.x and 5.x for
Windows and Mac OS. The illustrations show only Mac OS dialog boxes,
but the information and instructions apply equally to the Windows version
of Photoshop.
Photoshop 5.x
Because Photoshop 5.x uses a sophisticated color management system, there
are several setup steps you should take before you begin working. These steps
include:
• Calibrating your monitor
• Adjusting Photoshop 5.x color settings
• Setting ColorSync defaults (Mac OS only)
For information on monitor calibration and color setup in Photoshop
(version 5.02 or later) open the Adobe Color Management Assistant
(Mac OS) or Adobe Color Management Wizard (Windows) by choosing
Color Management from the Photoshop Help menu. (See your Adobe
Photoshop 5.x documentation or Adobe’s Technical Guidelines for
Photoshop on the internet at www.adobe.com.)
Photoshop 5.x color settings
Photoshop 5.x has a control panel and three setup dialog boxes that control
how color is managed when you open and save RGB and CMYK images. You
should calibrate your monitor using the Adobe Gamma control panel, and
specify settings in Photoshop’s Profile Setup, RGB Setup, and CMYK Setup
dialog boxes before you begin working with images in Photoshop.
N OTE : The Adobe Gamma control panel performs similar functions on both
Windows and Mac OS computers.
7
7-2
Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Gamma control panel
You can use the Adobe Gamma control panel to create and customize ICC
profiles for your monitor. Photoshop properly displays images on your
monitor by compensating between your chosen working space (see the
following section on RGB Setup) and the description of your monitor
defined by its profile. If you do not create a profile in the Adobe Gamma
control panel that corresponds to your monitor, you may encounter poor
monitor-to-print matching.
N OTE : If a profile for your particular monitor is not available, use the Adobe
Gamma control panel’s setup Assistant (or Wizard on Windows) to
customize an available profile that at least has the same type of phosphors as
your monitor.
• Display the Adobe Gamma control panel by double-clicking its icon in
either the Windows or Mac OS Control Panel. If you have not yet selected
your monitor’s profile or wish to customize your current profile, click the
Assistant (Wizard on Windows) button.
7
7-3
Photoshop 5.x
Profile Setup
From the Photoshop 5.x File menu, choose Color Settings>Profile Setup.
In the Embed Profiles area, check all boxes to embed the appropriate ICC
profile when saving a file. By embedding a profile during the saving process,
Photoshop can link a color space (working space) definition with that file for
future use. When you open an image that already contains a profile,
Photoshop can alert you as to which color space the file was saved in. Be
aware that you should avoid conversions between color spaces as much as
possible (each conversion results in loss of color information).
In the Assumed Profiles area, choose Ask When Opening from the RGB and
CMYK menus. When you open files that do not contain an ICC profile, you
have the choice to convert the file to your current Photoshop working space
setting or leave the file unconverted—the preferred choice, but make sure the
current Photoshop working space setting matches the intended color space of
the image.
In the Profile Mismatch Handling area, choose Ask When Opening from the
RGB and CMYK menus. When you open a file that contains an ICC profile
that does not match your current Photoshop working space setting, you have
the choice to convert from the embedded profile or not. If you want to
preserve the color integrity of the source image, do not convert. When you
open the image, immediately go to RGB or CMYK Setup to specify the
working space for the image. If your working space is set to your output
device, you may want to convert.
7
7-4
Adobe Photoshop
RGB Setup
Photoshop 5.x allows you to simultaneously use two RGB spaces, one for the
monitor and one for the Photoshop RGB working space. The monitor RGB
space setting does not affect the image data in the file; it affects only the way
the image is displayed on the monitor. Even if an RGB image has been
prepared with different monitor settings, it is still correctly displayed on your
monitor, without changes to the original values in the file.
From the Photoshop 5.x File menu, choose Color Settings>RGB Setup.
Check this option
Check this option
From the RGB menu, choose your current Photoshop RGB color space,
which should reflect the color space of most RGB files you will be opening. If
you create new RGB files or if you want to standardize your RGB files, you
should choose EFIRGB.
Click Load if the file is not visible in the RGB pop-up menu. You can load
the Calibrated RGB setup file, EFIRGB ICC ColorSync file, or the
EFIRGB.ICM file. All describe the same RGB space and automatically set
the Gamma, White Point, and Primaries. You may consider sRGB if you
usually view images on a generic PC monitor, or if you rely on a Windows
operating system to manage color on your monitor. If you choose sRGB as a
working space, make sure to print with the iR C2100/2100S RGB Source
option set to sRGB.
N OTE : EFIRGB is set as the default RGB Source color space on the
iR C2100/2100S. No matter what RGB space you select, make sure it is
available on the iR C2100/2100S. For more information on downloading
RGB Source profiles to the iR C2100/2100S, see Chapter 4.
The Monitor area shows the currently selected profile in the Adobe Gamma
control panel. Turn on both the Display Using Monitor Compensation and
Preview options.
7
7-5
Photoshop 5.x
CMYK Setup
From the Photoshop 5.x File menu, choose Color Settings>CMYK Setup.
Check this
option
Turn on the Preview option. For CMYK Model, select ICC. Previous
versions of Photoshop used Photoshop Separation Tables, and you can load
them for Photoshop 5.x. However, you will get better results using ICC
profiles and the built-in color management system.
In the ICC Options area, choose from the Profile, Engine, and Intent menus.
• For Profile, choose your final output copier/printer ICC profile. Prepress
users should choose an ICC describing their target press, such as SWOP.
Office users should choose the ICC profile describing the copier/printer
connected to the iR C2100/2100S. In this case, you should avoid
converting RGB to CMYK in Photoshop. Instead, leave images in RGB
and allow the iR C2100/2100S to convert them to CMYK.
N OTE : With the RGB Separation feature of the iR C2100/2100S, you can
preview (print) your conversions from RGB to any simulated CMYK space
by downloading the desired target profile to the iR C2100/2100S. For more
information about downloading profiles, see Chapter 4.
• From the Engine menu, choose Built-in so that the Photoshop engine will
be used.
• From the Intent menu, choose Perceptual (Images), which is appropriate
for photographs normally edited in Photoshop. The Intent setting is used
only when you convert between color spaces.
It is often better to turn on the Black Point Compensation option. With
many ICC profiles, this check box has no effect. However, when it does, it
has a dramatic effect on the dark areas of your image. If you want this effect,
leave Black Point Compensation on; if not, turn it off.
7
7-6
Adobe Photoshop
ColorSync defaults
You should have ColorSync 2.5.x or later installed on your Mac OS
computer. The ICC profiles used by ColorSync are saved in System
Folder:ColorSync Profiles. From the Apple menu, choose Control
Panel>ColorSync.
Use the following settings:
• System Profile—choose the customized ICC profile for your monitor. You
need to set up the Adobe Gamma profile to ensure that your monitor’s
profile is already present (Mac OS only).
• RGB default—choose the same RGB working color space that you set in
Photoshop 5.x.
N OTE : The System Profile is the same one used in your monitor calibration
and in your Monitors and Sounds control panel.
• CMYK default—choose the same CMYK color space that you set in
Photoshop 5.x.
• Preferred CMM—choose LinoColor CMM (both ColorSync 2.0 and
Microsoft ICM 2.0 are based on this color management module).
Defining colors
You can choose colors in Photoshop with various color models including
HSB, CIE Lab, RGB, and CMYK. You can also choose named colors from
the PANTONE Coated color library. For best results, use the color definition
methods described in Chapter 5.
7
7-7
Photoshop 5.x
Saving files for importing into other documents
Before saving a file, perform any rotating, cropping, and resizing needed.
This speeds processing when printing from the application in which the
image is placed.
It is recommended that you use EPS or TIFF file formats to save RGB images
that will be imported into other documents and printed to the iR C2100/
2100S. You can import EPS and TIFF files into virtually all page layout
applications.
N OTE : Although TIFF files display better when imported into other
applications, their color and resolution characteristics may be altered by the
application into which they were imported. EPS files are left untouched.
Choose Photoshop EPS or TIFF
In the EPS Options dialog box, choose binary encoding and do not check
PostScript Color Management (see the following section for more
information on PostScript Color Management). Do not include transfer
functions or halftone screens. A TIFF preview is compatible with both
Windows and Mac OS computers.
Do not choose any
of these options
N OTE : If you choose JPEG encoding, keep a backup of the original image
saved with binary encoding until you have seen the printed results of the
JPEG file. Occasionally the compression used for JPEG encoding produces
unwanted artifacts. If you see unexpected results in the printed output of a
JPEG file, revert to a binary version instead.
7
7-8
Adobe Photoshop
If you experience problems printing the document in which you place the
image, substitute an ASCII version of the same image, and print the
document again. Binary encoding is much more compact than ASCII
encoding but occasionally causes printing problems with some system
configurations.
Tips for advanced users
Use the following information to implement alternate, more complex, color
workflows with Photoshop.
Saving EPS Documents with PostScript Color Management
Turning on the PostScript Color Management option when saving either a
CMYK or RGB EPS file prompts Photoshop to embed PostScript color
information—which is independent of ICC profiles—in the resulting
document. This information is intended for PostScript devices like the
iR C2100/2100S.
Printing RGB EPS Files Saved with PostScript color management
When you print an RGB EPS file (that contains an embedded profile) to the
iR C2100/2100S, the working space information from the embedded RGB
profile can be used as an RGB source definition for iR C2100/2100S CRDs.
To use the embedded profile’s source color space information with iR C2100/
2100S CRDs, choose None as the iR C2100/2100S RGB Source when you
print. This holds true when you print directly from Photoshop, or when the
same RGB EPS file is imported into another application for output.
To override an EPS document’s embedded profile using an RGB Source
definition made available by the iR C2100/2100S, choose anything except
None as the iR C2100/2100S RGB Source Profile.
Printing CMYK EPS files saved with PostScript color management
If you decide to turn on Photoshop’s PostScript Color Management option
when you save a CMYK EPS image, Photoshop embeds PostScript color
information that defines the CMYK source color space of the image. When
you print a CMYK EPS file that contains PostScript color information to the
iR C2100/2100S, CRDs are used instead of ColorWise CMYK Simulation
and Simulation Method settings. Make sure to choose the appropriate setting
for the Rendering Style option.
7
7-9
Photoshop 5.x
Selecting options when printing
You can print RGB or CMYK images from Photoshop.
• When you print an RGB image, you can choose whether the conversion to
CMYK is performed by the iR C2100/2100S (using a CRD), by
PostScript (using PostScript Color Management), or by Photoshop's builtin color management engine (by choosing an Output profile from the
Space menu).
• When you print a CMYK image, you can print composites or color
separations.
N OTE : You cannot use the Combine Separations feature of the iR C2100/
2100S to recombine separations printed from Photoshop.
Printing RGB images
Use the following instructions to print RGB images.
Choose an encoding
method
Choose RGB
Color as the
color space
Do not check PostScript
Color Management
Choose RGB Color from the Space pop-up menu. Any other setting causes
Photoshop to convert image data to that color space before sending it to the
iR C2100/2100S. With the AdobePS 8.7 printer driver for Mac OS, these
options appear in the Adobe Photoshop pane of the Print dialog box.
7
7-10
Adobe Photoshop
Printing CMYK images
Use the following instructions to print CMYK images.
Choose an encoding
method
Choose CMYK
Color
as the color
space
Choose CMYK Color from the Space pop-up menu. Any other setting causes
Photoshop to convert image data to that color space before sending it to the
iR C2100/2100S. (With the AdobePS 8.7 printer driver for Mac OS, these
options appear in the Adobe Photoshop pane of the Print dialog box.)
N OTE : If you choose JPEG encoding, keep a backup of the original image
saved with binary encoding until you have seen the printed results of the
JPEG file. Occasionally the compression used for JPEG encoding produces
unwanted artifacts. If you see unexpected results in the printed output of a
JPEG file, use a binary version instead.
Printing tips for advanced users
Use the following information to implement alternate, more complex, color
workflows with Photoshop.
Printing RGB images with Photoshop PostScript color management
If you select an RGB color space and decide to use PostScript Color
Management from the Photoshop pane of the printer driver, Photoshop
sends RGB data to the iR C2100/2100S along with PostScript color
information defining this RGB color space. Remember that when you select
PostScript Color Management, a CRD will be used to perform color
conversions to CMYK.
N OTE : The included RGB source color space information is overridden by the
iR C2100/2100S RGB Source option unless it is set to None.
7
7-11
Photoshop 5.x
For fastest print times, choose JPEG encoding, but check printed output
carefully for unwanted artifacts that can appear as a result of JPEG
compression. If you see unexpected results in the printed output, print the
job again using Binary or ASCII encoding.
Choose other print options you want to use (see Chapter 1).
Printing CMYK images with Photoshop PostScript color management
If you select a CMYK color space and decide to use PostScript Color
Management from the Photoshop pane of the printer driver, Photoshop
sends CMYK data to the iR C2100/2100S along with PostScript color
information defining this CMYK color space. Remember that when you
select PostScript Color Management, a CRD will be used to perform color
conversions to the CMYK color space of the iR C2100/2100S.
The destination color space for the CRDs is determined by the RGB
Separation print option. By setting RGB Separation to Simulation, CMYK
image is printed according to all specified CMYK Simulation Profile and
CMYK Simulation Method settings. By setting RGB Separation to Output,
CMYK image is converted to the selected Output profile’s CMYK color
space.
Choose other print options (see Chapter 1). The Spot Color Matching
setting has no effect because Photoshop converts PANTONE colors to
CMYK values when you work in CMYK mode.
• If the image was separated for an offset press standard, apply the
corresponding CMYK Simulation setting. For example, if the image is
separated for SWOP, choose SWOP as the CMYK Simulation setting.
• If Photoshop is configured for a custom separation using ICC profiles,
select the corresponding profile from the CMYK Simulation print option
for the iR C2100/2100S.
N OTE : The above custom simulation setting requires that the same profile
used for separation in Photoshop also resides on the iR C2100/2100S. For
more information on downloading CMYK Simulation profiles to the
iR C2100/2100S with ColorWise Pro Tools, see page 4-5.
7
7-12
Adobe Photoshop
Photoshop 4.x
A special feature of Photoshop allows you to save RGB EPS (PostScript)
images that include independent source color space information. This feature
is sometimes referred to as “PostScript Level 2 tagging” or “RGB tagging.”
You define the source color space to apply to RGB EPS images by specifying a
Monitor Setup in Photoshop. However, this Photoshop-specific source color
space definition is overridden by the RGB Source print option setting located
in the Print dialog box under Printer Specific Options, unless you set the
latter to Off (see page 1-5).
Defining colors
You can choose colors in Photoshop with various color models including
HSB, CIE Lab, RGB, and CMYK. You can also choose named colors from
the PANTONE color library in Photoshop. For best results, use the color
definition methods described in Chapter 5.
Saving files for importing into other documents
Before saving an RGB EPS file, check the Photoshop Monitor Setup. This
setting defines the RGB source color space information that will be included
in the RGB EPS image. You can override this source color space with the
RGB Source setting in the Print dialog box under Printer Specific Options
(see page 1-5).
Before saving a file, perform any rotating, cropping, and resizing needed.
This speeds processing when printing from the application in which the
image is placed.
7
7-13
Photoshop 4.x
It is recommended that you use the EPS or TIFF file formats to save RGB
images that will be imported into other documents and printed to the
iR C2100/2100S. EPS and TIFF files can be imported into virtually all page
layout applications.
Choose Photoshop EPS or TIFF
In the EPS Format dialog box, choose binary encoding and do not include
transfer functions or halftone screens. A TIFF preview is compatible with
both Mac OS and Windows computers.
N OTE : If you experience problems printing the document in which you place
the image, substitute an ASCII-encoded version of the same image, and print
the document again. Binary encoding is much more compact than ASCII
encoding but occasionally causes printing problems with some system
configurations.
N OTE : If you choose JPEG encoding, keep a backup of the original image
saved with binary encoding until you have seen the printed results of the
JPEG-encoded file. Although not often, at times the compression used for
JPEG encoding may produce unwanted artifacts in the file. If you see
unexpected results in the printed output of a JPEG-encoded file, use a
binary-encoded version instead.
7
7-14
Adobe Photoshop
Selecting options when printing
You can print RGB or CMYK images from Photoshop.
• When you print RGB images, you can choose whether the conversion to
CMYK data is performed by the iR C2100/2100S (using a CRD), by
PostScript (using PS Color Management), or by Photoshop (using
Photoshop’s separation settings).
• When you print CMYK images, you can print composites or color
separations.
N OTE : You can not use the Combine Separations feature of the iR C2100/
2100S to re-combine separations printed from Photoshop.
Printing RGB images
Use the following instructions to print RGB images.
Click to print using a
iR C2100/2100S CRD
Click to print using Photoshop’s
separation settings
Choose whether to print in RGB or CMYK. (With the AdobePS 8.7 printer
driver for Mac OS, these options appear in the Adobe Photoshop pane of the
Print dialog box.)
• If you select Print in RGB, Photoshop sends RGB data to the iR C2100/
2100S and a CRD is used to perform color conversion. Choose the
appropriate print option settings for RGB data (see Chapter 1).
• If you select Print in CMYK, Photoshop performs a color conversion and
sends CMYK data to the iR C2100/2100S. With this setting, RGB Source,
Rendering Style, and Spot Color Matching settings have no effect.
7
7-15
Photoshop 4.x
For printing in CMYK, consider these Photoshop separation settings:
• If Photoshop is configured for separating to an offset press standard, apply
the corresponding CMYK Simulation setting. For example, if Photoshop is
configured for separating to SWOP, choose SWOP as the CMYK setting.
• If Photoshop is configured for a custom separation (not a press standard),
choose None as the CMYK Simulation setting, or choose the
corresponding custom simulation profile on the iR C2100/2100S if one
has been downloaded with the Profile Manager. For more information on
the Profile Manager and ColorWise Pro Tools, see Chapter 4.
N OTE : If you choose JPEG encoding, keep a backup of the original image
saved with binary encoding until you have seen the printed results of the
JPEG-encoded file. Although not often, at times the compression used for
JPEG encoding may produce unwanted artifacts in the file. If you see
unexpected results in the printed output of a JPEG-encoded file, use a
binary-encoded version instead.
Printing CMYK images
Use the following instructions to print CMYK images.
Choose an encoding method. (With the AdobePS 8.7 printer driver for
Mac OS, these options appear in the Adobe Photoshop pane of the Print
dialog box.) For fastest print times, select JPEG encoding. You should,
however, check the printed output carefully for unwanted artifacts that can
appear as a result of JPEG compression. If you see unexpected results in the
printed output when printing with JPEG encoding, print the job again using
binary encoding.
7
7-16
Adobe Photoshop
Choose other print options (see Chapter 1). RGB Source and Rendering
Style settings have no effect on CMYK images. The Spot Color Matching
setting is also irrelevant because Photoshop converts PANTONE colors to
CMYK values when you work in CMYK mode.
• If the image was separated for an offset press standard, apply the
corresponding CMYK Simulation setting. For example, if the image is
separated for SWOP, choose SWOP as the CMYK Simulation setting.
• If the image was separated using a custom separation (not a press standard),
choose None as the CMYK Simulation setting, or choose the
corresponding custom simulation profile on the iR C2100/2100S if one
has been downloaded with the Profile Manager. For more information on
the Profile Manager and ColorWise Pro Tools, see Chapter 4.
8
8-1
Chapter 8:
Page Layout
Applications
Working with page layout applications
This chapter provides instructions for printing color documents from Adobe
PageMaker 6.5, QuarkXPress 4.02, and QuarkXPress 3.32.
Before printing from these applications, make sure the appropriate printer
driver and the iR C2100/2100S PPD are installed on your computer as
described in Getting Started.
Working with page layout applications
The following sections apply to all page layout applications.
Defining colors
Page layout applications generally use the CMYK color model. Some allow
you to define colors with other color models and may be able to send that
data to the iR C2100/2100S in those other color models. Generally, however,
CRDs (which affect only RGB data) do not affect colors defined in page
layout applications. For predictable results with CMYK colors, use the
CMYK Color Reference when defining colors in page layout applications.
See “Choosing colors in PostScript applications” on page 5-5.
N OTE : If the application allows you to define colors in RGB, you should
determine whether it converts the RGB data to CMYK before sending it to
the iR C2100/2100S. If it does, this will determine which iR C2100/2100S
print options affect your job. For example, if the application converts RGB
black (defined in the document as R0%, G0%, B0%) to four-color CMYK
black when it sends the job to the iR C2100/2100S, the Pure Black Text/
Graphics option will have no effect when you print the job.
You can also choose named colors from the PANTONE color library. See
“PANTONE Coated Color Reference” on page 5-6.
Importing images
EPS and TIFF are the recommended formats for images imported into page
layout documents. Support for importing other file formats may be provided
by individual applications.
8
8-2
Page Layout Applications
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by the RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings. The iR C2100/2100S color management system
applies the specified RGB Source setting to all RGB data and then uses the
specified Rendering Style (CRD) to perform a color conversion. An exception to this occurs if you assign ICC profiles to RGB images using the application’s color management tools (see “Tips for advanced users” below). In this
case, the application performs the color conversion of the image and sends
CMYK data to the iR C2100/2100S.
N OTE : To take advantage of RGB Source and Rendering Style settings for
images imported into QuarkXPress 4.02, either save images in the EPS
format, or use Quark’s PrintRGB XTension, which outputs RGB TIFF image
files without converting them to CMYK.
Tips for advanced users
If you place multiple RGB images, some non-photographic and some
photographic, a single CRD may not be suitable for all the images. In this
case you may want the photographic images to bypass the CRD altogether.
To accomplish this, separate the image to CMYK data with a pixel-editing
application such as Photoshop and perform color correction on it. Then save
it as an EPS or TIFF file and import it into the document.
Or you can save the RGB image in TIFF format and assign it an ICC profile
and rendering intent when you import it into the document, if your
application supports this feature.
CMYK simulation
You can specify a CMYK Simulation and a CMYK simulation method for
the job with the CMYK Simulation Profile and CMYK Simulation Method
print options (see page 1-7). The CMYK Simulation setting affects all
CMYK color data sent by the page layout application. It can also affect RGB
data if RGB Separation is set to Simulation.
• If the document contains CMYK images that were separated for an offset
press standard, apply the corresponding CMYK Simulation setting. For
example, for images separated for SWOP, choose SWOP as the CMYK
Simulation setting.
If you print separations to the iR C2100/2100S and choose use the
Combine Separations feature in conjunction with Full Simulation, the
result may not match that of the same page printed as composite.
8
8-3
Adobe PageMaker 6.5 for Mac OS and Windows
• If the document contains CMYK images that were separated according to
the color characteristics of a custom ICC profile (not a press standard
profile), choose the corresponding profile as the CMYK Simulation Profile
print option on the iR C2100/2100S.
N OTE : To achieve the workflow described above, the profile used for the
separation of CMYK images in the document should also reside on the
iR C2100/2100S. For more information on downloading CMYK Simulation
profiles to the iR C2100/2100S with ColorWise Pro Tools, see Chapter 4.
Adobe PageMaker 6.5 for Mac OS and Windows
The Mac OS and Windows versions of PageMaker 6.5 are essentially the
same. The illustrations in this section show only the Windows version, except
where differences exist between the two versions.
Windows version requirement
For the Windows version of PageMaker 6.5, make sure a copy of the
iR C2100/2100S PPD file is in both of the following folders:
• PM65\RSRC\USENGLSH\PPD4
• Windows\System
Importing images
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by your RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings. For best results with placed images, use the
instructions in “Importing images” on page 8-1 and “CMYK simulation” on
page 8-2.
N OTE : You should choose whether you want to use ColorWise color
management or the CMS options built into PageMaker. It is important that
you do not use both systems for the same print job. If you do not wish to use
PageMaker 6.5’s color management features, choose File>Preferences
>General, then click the CMS Setup button and choose Off from the Color
Management pop-up menu. Then click OK. (Color management can be
disabled for a specific bitmapped image by selecting the image and choosing
Element>Image>CMS Source, then choosing None from the This Item Uses
pop-up menu.)
8
8-4
Page Layout Applications
Selecting options when printing
All print settings are specified from the various Print dialog boxes in
PageMaker 6.5. The printer driver interface described in Chapter 1 is not
used.
Choose the iR C2100/2100S PPD
Click Options
In the Print Document dialog box, choose the iR C2100/2100S PPD from
the PPD menu.
Choose Normal
Click Features
In the Print Options dialog box, choose Normal (not the Optimized
Subsampling default) from the “Send image data” menu to ensure that TIFF
images print at their full resolution.
8
8-5
QuarkXPress 4.02 for Mac OS and Windows
If a document contains RGB placed images or colors defined in RGB that
will not be separated to process colors, choose RGB Source and Rendering
Style settings in the Print Features dialog box. If the document contains
PANTONE colors, choose the appropriate Spot Color Matching setting.
When you click Print from any of the PageMaker 6.5 dialog boxes, the job is
sent to the iR C2100/2100S. You do not see the printer driver dialog boxes
described in Chapter 1.
Optional Color Management from PageMaker
If you have additional color management requirements not offered by
ColorWise, such as managing color on non-iR C2100/2100S devices, you
may want to consider using the color management features offered by
PageMaker. For more information, see your PageMaker documentation.
QuarkXPress 4.02 for Mac OS and Windows
If you have additional color management requirements not offered by
ColorWise, you may want to consider using features offered by the
Quark CMS XTension for QuarkXPress 4.02. These features allow advanced
users to control RGB to CMYK color conversions. If you plan to use these
features, make sure the Quark CMS XTension is installed before starting
QuarkXPress. If it is not, use the Quark XTensions Manager to install it.
Refer to your QuarkXPress documentation for instructions.
N OTE : Quark CMS converts RGB TIFF, JPEG, and PICT images to CMYK
before sending color data to the iR C2100/2100S. RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings have no effect on this data unless you use Quark’s
PrintRGB XTension, which outputs RGB TIFF image files without
converting them to CMYK.
8
8-6
Page Layout Applications
Importing images
With the exception of RGB images that are saved in EPS format or that use
Quark’s PrintRGB XTension, QuarkXPress 4.02 converts all RGB data into
CMYK, even when the Quark CMS XTension is disabled.
Only RGB images saved in EPS format are affected by RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings. For best results with placed images, use the
instructions in “Importing images” on page 8-1 and “CMYK simulation” on
page 8-2.
Selecting options when printing
Choose the iR C2100/2100S PPD from the Printer Description menu in the
Print dialog box.
Mac OS
Choose the iR C2100/2100S PPD
Choose an output paper size
Click to specify printer settings
Windows
Choose the iR C2100/2100S
copier/printer
Choose the
iR C2100/2100S PPD
Click to specify
printer settings
8
8-7
QuarkXPress 3.32 for Mac OS and Windows
If the document contains PANTONE colors, choose the appropriate Spot
Color Matching setting. For instructions on specifying print options, see
Chapter 1.
Optional Color Management from QuarkXPress
If you have additional color management requirements not offered by
ColorWise, such as managing color on non-iR C2100/2100S devices, you
may want to consider using the color management features offered by
QuarkXPress. For more information, see your QuarkXPress documentation.
QuarkXPress 3.32 for Mac OS and Windows
Before starting QuarkXPress 3.32, make sure the EfiColor XTension is not
loaded in the XTensions folder. EFICOLOR profiles are not currently
provided with iR C2100/2100S products. Without the correct EFICOLOR
profile, the EfiColor XTension cannot perform color conversions on placed
images.
Windows version requirement
For the Windows version of QuarkXPress, make sure a copy of the
iR C2100/2100S PPD file is in the \XPRESS\PDF folder.
Importing images
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by your RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings. For best results with placed images, use the
instructions in “Importing images” on page 8-1 and “CMYK simulation” on
page 8-2.
8
8-8
Page Layout Applications
Selecting options when printing
You must select the iR C2100/2100S PPD from the Printer Type menu in
the Page Setup (Mac OS) or Printer Setup (Windows) dialog box.
Mac OS
Choose the iR C2100/2100S PPD
Choose an output paper size
Choose Binary
Windows
Choose an
output paper
size
Choose the iR C2100/2100S PPD
Choose Binary
If a document contains RGB placed images or RGB colors that QuarkXPress
will print without converting to CMYK, choose RGB Source and Rendering
Style settings. If the document contains PANTONE colors, choose the
appropriate Spot Color Matching setting. For instructions on specifying print
options, see Chapter 1.
9
9-1
Chapter 9:
Illustration
Applications
Working with illustration applications
This chapter provides instructions for using Adobe Illustrator for Windows
and Mac OS, Macromedia FreeHand for Windows and Mac OS, and
CorelDRAW for Windows and Mac OS.
Before printing from these applications, make sure the appropriate PostScript
printer driver and the iR C2100/2100S PPD are installed on your computer
as described in Getting Started.
Working with illustration applications
You can print directly from an illustration application or use it to create and
save files that will be imported into a page layout document. To print from an
illustration application, use the printer driver and the print settings
recommended in Chapter 1.
N OTE : These application notes provide instructions for printing composites
only. For instructions on printing color separations, refer to the
documentation for your application.
As a general rule, use the EPS file format when saving files with an illustration
application.
Defining colors
All illustration applications use the CMYK color model. While some also
allow you to define colors using other color models, they all send CMYK data
to the iR C2100/2100S. Consequently, the RGB Source and Rendering Style
settings in the PPD do not affect all colors printed from illustration
applications. For predictable results with CMYK colors, use the CMYK
Color Reference pages when defining colors (see “Choosing colors in
PostScript applications” on page 5-5).
N OTE : If you define colors in RGB and print directly from the application,
the application converts the RGB data to CMYK before sending it to the
iR C2100/2100S. This conversion by the application will determine which
iR C2100/2100S print options affect your job. For example, if the
application converts RGB black (defined in your document as R0%, G0%,
B0%) to four-color CMYK black when it sends the job to the iR C2100/
2100S, the Pure Black Text/Graphics option in the PPD will have no effect
when you print the job.
9
9-2
Illustration Applications
You can also choose named colors from the PANTONE color library. See
“PANTONE Coated Color Reference” on page 5-6.
Importing images
In general, all images placed into illustration application documents should
be in EPS format.
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by the RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings in the PPD. The iR C2100/2100S color
management system applies the specified RGB Source setting to all RGB data
and then uses the specified Rendering Style (CRD) to perform a color
conversion to CMYK. An exception to this occurs if you assign ICC profiles
to RGB images using the application’s color management tools (see “Tips for
advanced users” below). In this case, the application performs the color
conversion of the image and sends CMYK data to the iR C2100/2100S.
Tips for advanced users
If you place multiple RGB images, some non-photographic and some
photographic, a single CRD may not be suitable for all the images. In this
case you may want the photographic images to bypass the CRD altogether.
To accomplish this, separate the image to CMYK data with a pixel-editing
application such as Photoshop and perform color correction on it. Then save
it as an EPS or TIFF file and import it into the document. Or you can save
the RGB image in TIFF format and assign it an ICC profile and rendering
intent when you import it into the document (see the individual application
notes in this chapter).
CMYK simulation
You can specify a press simulation target and a press simulation method for
the job with print options (see Chapter 1). The CMYK Simulation setting
affects all CMYK color data sent by the illustration application.
• If the document contains CMYK images that were separated for an offset
press standard, apply the corresponding CMYK Simulation setting. For
example, for images separated for SWOP, choose SWOP-Coated as the
CMYK Simulation setting.
• If the document contains CMYK images that were separated according to
the color characteristics of a custom ICC profile (not a press standard
profile), select the corresponding profile from the CMYK Simulation
Profile print option on the iR C2100/2100S.
9
9-3
Adobe Illustrator 8.x for Windows and Mac OS
N OTE : The workflow described above requires that the profile used for the
separation of CMYK images in the document also resides on the iR C2100/
2100S. For more information on downloading CMYK Simulation profiles to
the iR C2100/2100S with ColorWise Pro Tools, see Chapter 4.
Adobe Illustrator 8.x for Windows and Mac OS
If you are using ColorWise color management, disable Illustrator's color
management by removing the Color Conversion and Color Conversion
Utilities files from the Adobe Illustrator>Plug-ins>Extensions folder.
Defining colors
Any colors defined in Illustrator are sent to the copier/printer in CMYK—
even those defined using other color models. For best results, use the color
definition methods described on “Choosing colors in PostScript applications”
on page 5-5.
Importing images
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by the RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings you select in the PPD. For best results with placed
images, use the instructions in “Importing images” on page 9-2 and “CMYK
simulation” on page 9-2.
Optional Color Management in Illustrator
If you have additional color management requirements not offered by
ColorWise, such as managing color on non-iR C2100/2100S devices, you
may want to consider using the color management features offered by
Illustrator. For more information, see your Illustrator documentation.
9
9-4
Illustration Applications
Selecting options when printing
For the Windows version of Illustrator, select the appropriate copier/printer
from the Name pop-up menu and select PostScript Level 2 or 3.
Windows
Click Properties to set
print options
Select the copier/printer
name
Choose Composite
Choose PostScript
Level 2 or 3
For the Mac OS version of Illustrator, choose Composite output and
PostScript Level 2.
Mac OS
Choose Composite
Choose
PostScript
Level 2
9
9-5
Macromedia FreeHand 8.x for Windows and Mac OS
If a document contains placed RGB images, click on the Properties button
(Windows) or select Printer Specific Options from the pop-up menu
(Mac OS) and choose RGB Source and Rendering Style settings for the
iR C2100/2100S. With the exception of placed RGB images, these settings
have no effect on colors printed with Illustrator 8.x. If the document contains
named PANTONE named colors, choose the appropriate Spot Color
Matching setting.
For instructions on setting print options, see Chapter 1.
Saving files for importing into other documents
When saving files in Illustrator 8.x for importing into other types of
documents, use the EPS file format. Illustrator can save color information in
both RGB and CMYK. The iR C2100/2100S’s RGB Source and Rendering
Style settings affect color output of RGB artwork saved in Illustrator EPS and
imported into other kinds of documents (even when both RGB and CMYK
artwork exists in the same file). In the case of Illustrator files imported into
Photoshop, however, vector data from the Illustrator file is rasterized into
bitmaps in Photoshop, and the final color space of the bitmap data is
determined by the color mode you set in Photoshop.
Macromedia FreeHand 8.x for Windows and
Mac OS
The information in this section applies to both the Windows and Mac OS
versions of FreeHand 8.x. Only Mac OS dialog boxes are shown, but the
information and instructions are identical for the Windows version of
FreeHand.
N OTE : If you are using ColorWise color management, you should turn off
FreeHand 8.x color management features by choosing None from the
Colors>Color Management>Type pop-up menu.
Defining colors
Any colors defined in FreeHand are sent to the copier/printer in CMYK—
even those defined using other color models. For best results, use the color
definition methods described on “Choosing colors in PostScript applications”
on page 5-5.
9
9-6
Illustration Applications
You can control the conversion of RGB colors defined in FreeHand by specifying settings in the Preferences dialog box under the Colors category, or by
clicking the Color Management button in the FreeHand pop-up menu on
the Print dialog box.
Click on Colors to access the
color management settings
Importing images
A number of file types can be imported into FreeHand 8.x, but once
imported, all are treated as either EPS images, TIFF images, or editable paths.
For details, see your FreeHand documentation.
When you import an EPS image into your document, FreeHand inserts a
link to the image rather than embedding the original file, resulting in a
smaller file size. If the image is a CMYK EPS file, the colors print just as they
would from the originating application.
N OTE : Before placing a CMYK EPS file, be sure the file was saved with
Desktop Color Separation (DCS) set to off. If the file was saved with DCS on,
FreeHand prints composites of the image at the low resolution used for
screen viewing.
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by your RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings in the PPD. For best results with placed images, use
the instructions in “Importing images” on page 9-2 and “CMYK simulation”
on page 9-2.
9
9-7
Macromedia FreeHand 8.x for Windows and Mac OS
Selecting options when printing from FreeHand
When printing, refer to the following illustrations to select options.
Choose Normal
Click to access
FreeHand Print
Setup
Click to select a PPD
PPD name shown here
In the Print dialog box, make sure the Use PPD option is turned on. From
the Print setting menu, choose Normal.
• If the Use PPD option is on, a plus sign (+) appears in front of the word
“Normal.”
• If the PPD name for your iR C2100/2100S is not displayed next to the
PPD button, click the button marked “…” and choose the appropriate
PPD from the menu that appears.
To use iR C2100/2100S color management features, turn off the “Convert
RGB to process” checkbox in the File>Output Options dialog box. If this
option is turned on, FreeHand’s color management settings are used to
convert RGB colors and RGB TIFF, PICT, and JPEG images to CMYK.
Turn off to
use iR C2100/2100S color
management
9
9-8
Illustration Applications
If a document contains placed RGB images, choose RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings in the PPD. With the exception of placed RGB
images, these settings have no effect on colors printed with FreeHand. If the
document contains PANTONE named colors, choose the appropriate Spot
Color Matching setting in the PPD.
Refer to your FreeHand documentation for information about other
FreeHand print options.
Saving files for importing into other documents
When saving files in FreeHand 8.x for importing into other types of
documents, use the EPS file format. FreeHand saves all color information in
CMYK. The RGB Source and Rendering Style print options have no effect
on the color output of RGB artwork saved in FreeHand 8.x and imported
into other kinds of documents. In the case of FreeHand files imported into
Photoshop, however, vector data from the FreeHand file is rasterized into
bitmaps in Photoshop, and the final color space of the bitmap data is
determined by the color mode you set in Photoshop.
Optional Color Management in FreeHand
If you have additional color management requirements not offered by
ColorWise, such as managing color on non-iR C2100/2100S devices, you
may want to consider using the color management features offered by
FreeHand. For more information, see your FreeHand documentation.
CorelDRAW for Windows and Mac OS
Defining colors
Any colors defined in CorelDRAW 9.x for Windows or CorelDRAW 8.x for
Mac OS are sent to the copier/printer in CMYK—even those defined using
other color models. For the best results, use the color definition methods
described in “Choosing colors in PostScript applications” on page 5-5.
You can control the conversion of RGB colors defined in CorelDRAW by
specifying settings in the Color Management dialog boxes. On Windows
machines, the Color Management dialog boxes are located in Tools>Color
Management. On Mac OS computers, the Color Management functions are
located under Edit>Preferences>Global.
9
9-9
CorelDRAW for Windows and Mac OS
N OTE : If you do not wish to use color management in CorelDraw, do not
check options under Color Management and Color Management/General,
and select None from the Composite Printer pop-up menu under Color
Management/Profiles.
Importing images
All RGB images placed in a document are affected by your RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings in the PPD. For best results with placed images, use
the instructions in “Importing images” on page 9-2 and “CMYK simulation”
on page 9-2.
Selecting options when printing
On Windows computers, in the Print dialog box under the General tab,
make sure the correct copier/printer and PPD are selected and check the Use
PPD box. Click Properties to specify iR C2100/2100S print options.
Print device name appears here
Printer driver/PPD name
appears here
Click Properties to
access
iR C2100/2100S print
options
On Mac OS computers, click on the Printer button in the General Print
dialog box to select the copier/printer and print options.
To use iR C2100/2100S color management, make sure the “Use color
profile” option in the Misc tab of the Print dialog box is not on. If this option
is turned on, CorelDRAW color management settings are used to convert
RGB colors and images to CMYK.
9
9-10
Illustration Applications
To use iR C2100/2100S
color management, do not
check this box
If a document contains placed RGB images, choose RGB Source and
Rendering Style settings for your copier/printer. With the exception of placed
RGB images, these settings have no effect on colors printed with
CorelDRAW. If the document contains PANTONE named colors, choose
the appropriate Spot Color Matching setting.
Saving files for importing into other documents
When saving files in CorelDRAW for importing into other types of
documents, use the EPS file format. CorelDRAW saves all color information
in CMYK, so RGB Source and Rendering Style print options have no effect
on color output of artwork saved with CorelDRAW and imported into other
kinds of documents. In the case of CorelDRAW files imported into
Photoshop, however, vector data from the CorelDRAW file is rasterized into
bitmaps in Photoshop, and the final color space of the bitmap data is
determined by the color mode you set in Photoshop.
Optional Color Management in CorelDRAW
If you have additional color management requirements not offered by
ColorWise, such as managing color on non-iR C2100/2100S devices, you
may want to consider using the color management features offered by
CorelDRAW. For more information, see your CorelDRAW documentation.
A
A-1
Appendix A:
Desktop Color
Primer
Desktop Color Primer
This appendix covers concepts that are basic to printing in color, including:
• The properties of color
• Printing techniques
• Using color effectively
• Raster images and vector images
• Optimizing files for processing and printing
If you are already familiar with color theory and digital color printing, you
can skip to the last section (“Optimizing files for processing and printing” on
page A-9) for tips on optimizing files for printing.
The properties of color
This section introduces concepts that are basic to color theory. You will
encounter some of these concepts (such as hue, saturation, and brightness)
when you work with color in applications; others provide useful background
information. Color is a complex topic, so consider this a starting point for
experimentation and further research.
The physics of color
The human eye can see electromagnetic radiation at wavelengths between
400 nanometers (purplish blue) and 700 nanometers (red). This range is
called the visible spectrum of light. We see pure spectral light as intensely
saturated or pure colors. Sunlight at midday, which we perceive as white or
neutral light, is composed of light from across the visible spectrum in more or
less equal proportions. Shining sunlight through a prism separates it into its
spectral components, resulting in the familiar rainbow of colors (plate 1).
Like the sun, most light sources we encounter in our daily environment emit
a mixture of light wavelengths, although the particular distribution of
wavelengths can vary considerably. Light from a tungsten light bulb, for
example, contains much less blue light than sunlight. Tungsten light appears
white to the human eye, which, up to a point, can adjust to the different light
sources. However, color objects appear different under tungsten light than
they do in sunlight because of the different spectral makeup of the two light
sources.
A
A-2
Desktop Color Primer
The mixture of light wavelengths emitted by a light source is reflected
selectively by different objects. Different mixtures of reflected light appear as
different colors. Some of these mixtures appear as relatively saturated colors,
but most appear to us as grays or impure hues of a color.
CIE color model
In the 1930s, the Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) defined a
standard color space, a way of defining colors in mathematical terms, to help
in the communication of color information. This color space is based on
research on the nature of color perception. The CIE chromaticity diagram
(plate 2) is a two-dimensional model of color vision. The arc around the top
of the horseshoe encompasses the pure, or spectral, colors from blue-violet to
red. Although the CIE chromaticity diagram is not perceptually uniform—
some areas of the diagram seem to compress color differences relative to
others—it is a good tool for illustrating some interesting aspects of color
vision.
By mixing any two spectral colors in different proportions, we can create all
the colors found on the straight line drawn between them in the diagram. It
is possible to create the same gray by mixing blue-green and red light or by
mixing yellow-green and blue-violet light. This is possible because of a
phenomenon peculiar to color vision called metamerism. The eye does not
distinguish individual wavelengths of light. Therefore, different combinations
of spectral light can produce the same perceived color.
Purple colors, which do not exist in the spectrum of pure light, are found at
the bottom of the diagram. Purples are mixtures of red and blue light—the
opposite ends of the spectrum.
Hue, saturation, and brightness
A color can be described in terms of three varying characteristics, called the
HSB color model:
• Hue—tint (the qualitative aspect of a color—red, green, or orange)
• Saturation—the purity of the color
• Brightness—relative position between white and black.
While the CIE chromaticity diagram (plate 2) conveys hue and saturation, a
three-dimensional color model is required to add the brightness component
(plate 3).
A
A-3
Desktop Color Primer
Many computer applications include dialog boxes in which you choose colors
by manipulating hue, saturation, and brightness. For example, Photoshop
uses a square Color Picker (plate 4) which can be reconfigured according to
your preference.
Additive and subtractive color systems
Color devices used in desktop publishing and printing simulate the range of
visible colors using a set of primary colors that are combined to create other
colors. There are two methods for creating a range of colors from a set of
primary colors. Computer monitors and scanners are based on the additive
color model. Printing technologies, including iR C2100/2100Ss and offset
presses, are based on the subtractive color model.
Additive (RGB) color
Color devices that use the additive color model make a range of colors by
combining varying amounts of red, green, and blue light. These colors are
called the additive primaries (plate 5). White is created by adding the
maximum amount of red, green, and blue light available. Black occurs
wherever all three colors are absent. Grays are created by adding equal
amounts of all three color together. Combining varying amounts of any two
of the additive primaries creates a third, saturated hue.
A familiar device that is based on this color model is the computer monitor
(plate 6). Monitors have red, green, and blue phosphors that emit varying
amounts of light to display a given color. Scanners create digital
representations of colors by measuring their red, green, and blue components
through colored filters.
Subtractive (CMY and CMYK) color
The subtractive color model is the basis for color printing and for color
photographic prints and transparencies. While the additive color model
simulates the visible spectrum of color by adding light of three primary hues,
the subtractive color model starts with a “white” or neutral light source
containing light of many wavelengths. Inks, toners, or other colorants are
used to selectively absorb (subtract) certain wavelengths of light that
otherwise would be reflected or transmitted by the media in use.
A
A-4
Desktop Color Primer
The subtractive primaries are cyan, magenta, and yellow; they absorb red,
green, and blue light, respectively (plate 7). Combining any two subtractive
primaries creates a new color that is relatively pure or saturated. For example,
you can make red by combining magenta and yellow, which absorb green and
blue light, respectively. White occurs when no colorant is applied.
Combining all three subtractive primaries in theory yields black, but due to
deficiencies of cyan, magenta, and yellow colorants, combining these three
primaries actually yields a muddy brown. Black colorant is added to
compensate for the deficiencies of cyan, magenta, and yellow colorants.
Consequently, color printing uses four process colors: Cyan, Magenta,
Yellow, and blacK (CMYK). The use of black toner helps in producing rich,
solid blacks and allows for improved rendering of black text.
The CMYK colorants used in offset printing and by your iR C2100/2100S
copier/printer are to some degree transparent. When one layer of colorant is
applied on top of another, you see the effect of both. To create a range of
intermediary colors, a method is required for varying the amount of each
colorant that is applied. A technique called halftoning is used in offset
printing, while color print devices typically use a proprietary system for
applying ink or toner colors that is similar to halftoning.
Printing techniques
Until recently, most color printing was done on printing presses using one of
several printing techniques—offset lithography, flexography, and gravure,
to name a few. All traditional printing techniques require lengthy preparation
before a print run can take place. Short-run color printing, including
iR C2100/2100S printing, eliminates most of this preparation. By
streamlining the process of color printing, the iR C2100/2100S makes short
print runs economically feasible.
A
A-5
Desktop Color Primer
In contemporary offset lithographic printing, digital files from desktop
computers are output to an imagesetter, which creates film separations. The
film is used to make a prepress proof, which is an accurate predictor of the
final print job and allows you to make corrections before going to press. Once
the proof is approved, the printer makes plates from the film and runs the
print job on the press.
Desktop
computer
Desktop
computer
Imagesetter
Film
Print device
Proof
Press
Print run
Color prints
With a iR C2100/2100S, you simply print the file. The iR C2100/2100S
processes the PostScript information in the file and sends four bitmaps (one
each for cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) to the print engine. The ease of
iR C2100/2100S printing makes possible experimentation that would be too
costly on press, allowing unlimited fine-tuning of color and design elements.
Halftone and continuous tone devices
Halftoning is used in offset printing to print each process color at a different
intensity, allowing millions of different colors to be reproduced using only
the four process colors. Depending on the required intensity of a given color,
toner is placed on paper in dots of different size. The grid of dots used for
each toner color is called a screen. Halftone screens are aligned to unique
angles designed to eliminate interference patterns called moiré that can arise
with halftoning.
Some color print devices are commonly referred to as continuous tone (or
“contone”) devices. They do not use traditional halftone screen patterns and
angles. Contone devices are capable of varying the intensity of individual
dots.
A
A-6
Desktop Color Primer
Even if your color printing is done exclusively on the iR C2100/2100S, you
will encounter concepts from offset printing if you use high-end graphics
applications. For example, color controls in illustration applications such as
Illustrator are geared toward specifying color for offset printing using process
and spot colors. Many applications allow you to specify the screening used for
each printing plate.
Using color effectively
The ability to print in color can greatly increase the effectiveness of your
message, whether you are printing a presentation or a newsletter, or proofing
an ad concept that will later be printed on press. Some potential benefits of
using color include:
• Conveying information rapidly by using color cues
• Making use of the emotive aspects of different colors
• Increasing impact and message retention
Color can also be a source of distraction and discord if it is used poorly. This
section outlines some tips and concepts that will prove useful as you approach
designing color materials.
A few rules of thumb
Try some of the following strategies for creating successful color materials:
• Rather than applying colors indiscriminately, use color to aid
comprehension. In presentations, graphs, and charts, use color to highlight
patterns and emphasize differences.
• In general, fewer colors work better than many colors.
• Use red as an accent color. Red is particularly effective when used in
otherwise monochromatic materials.
• Consider the tastes of your target audience when choosing colors.
• Keep a file of printed color pieces that appeal to you or strike you as
effective. Refer to it for ideas when designing your own documents.
A
A-7
Desktop Color Primer
Color wheel
A color wheel (plate 8) is a helpful tool for understanding the interrelation of
colors. The colors on one side of the color wheel, from magenta to yellow,
appear to most people to be warm colors, while those on the other side, from
green to blue, appear to be cool. The distance between two colors on the
color wheel can help predict how they will appear when seen side by side.
Colors opposite one another on the wheel are called complements (plate 9),
and create a striking contrast side by side. This can be the basis for a bold
graphical design, but it is an effect you should use with discretion since it can
be visually fatiguing. Other bold combinations to consider are split
complements (a color and the two colors adjacent to its complement) and
triads (three colors evenly spaced on the color wheel). Colors adjacent to one
another on the color wheel result in subtle harmonies.
The color wheel simplifies color relationships for the purpose of clarity,
showing only saturated or pure colors. Adding the myriad variations of each
hue to the palette (more or less saturated, darker or lighter) creates a wealth of
possibilities. Taking a pair of complements from the color wheel and varying
the saturation and brightness of one or both colors produces a very different
result from the pure complements. Combining a light tint of a warm color
with a darker shade of its cooler complement often gives pleasing results.
Combining a darker shade of a warm color with a light tint of its cooler
complement produces an unusual effect you may like.
Once you have mastered the concept of the color wheel, you have a good
framework for experimenting with color combinations. Many books targeted
at graphic designers show groups of preselected color combinations. Some are
organized by themes or moods, and some are based on a custom color
system such as PANTONE. The more you develop a critical facility for
judging color combinations, the more you will be able to trust your own eye
for color. The bibliography at the back of this manual includes books on
design.
Color and text
It is not a coincidence that the overwhelming majority of text you see is
printed in black on white paper. Text in black on white is highly legible and is
not fatiguing to read for extended periods. For many color materials, using
black text on a white background and confining color to graphic elements
and headings is a good choice.
A
A-8
Desktop Color Primer
Color text can add flair to documents printed on paper when used skillfully.
This technique is widely used in presentations. When using color text, avoid
dazzling text and background combinations created from primary
complements, especially red and cyan or red and blue; they are visually
fatiguing and hard to read. Color text is more legible when distinguished
from its background by a difference in lightness—for example, dark blue text
on a light beige background. In addition, using many different colors in a
string of text makes for a confused appearance and is hard to read. However,
using a single highlight color is an effective way to draw the reader’s eye to
selected words. See plate 10 for color text samples.
When using color text, keep in mind that small font sizes typically do not
print in color with the same sharpness as in black. In most applications, black
text prints exclusively in black toner, while color text usually prints with two
or more toners. Any misregistration between the different toners on paper
causes color text to lose definition. You can make test prints to find the
smallest point size at which color text prints clearly. When using high-end
graphics applications that allow you to specify color as percentages of cyan,
magenta, yellow, and black, you can create pure cyan or pure magenta text
that prints with the same sharpness as black text. (Pure yellow text is
extremely hard to read on anything but a dark or complementary
background.)
Raster images and vector images
Two broad categories of artwork can be printed from a personal computer to
a color printer: raster and vector images (plate 11).
A raster image, also referred to as a bitmap, is composed of a grid of pixels,
each assigned a particular color value. The grid, when sufficiently enlarged,
resembles a mosaic made from square tiles. Examples of raster images include
scans and images created in painting or pixel-editing applications, such as
Photoshop and Painter.
The amount of data found in a raster image depends on its resolution and
bit depth. The resolution of a raster describes the compactness of the pixels
and is specified in pixels per inch (ppi). The bit depth is the number of bits of
information assigned to each pixel. Black and white raster images require only
one bit of information per pixel. Grayscale images require 8 bits per pixel. For
photographic quality color, 24 bits of RGB color information are required
per pixel, yielding 256 levels of red, green, and blue. For CMYK images, 32
bits per pixel are required.
A
A-9
Desktop Color Primer
When printing raster artwork, the quality of the output depends on the
resolution of the source raster. If the raster resolution is too low, individual
pixels become visible in the printed output as small squares. This effect is
sometimes called “pixelation.”
In vector images, picture objects are defined mathematically as lines or
curves between points—hence the term “vector.” Picture elements can have
solid, gradient, or patterned color fills. Vector artwork is created in
illustration and drawing applications such as Illustrator and CorelDRAW.
Page layout applications such as QuarkXPress also allow you to create simple
vector artwork with their drawing tools. PostScript fonts are vector-based as
well.
Vector artwork is resolution-independent; it can be scaled to any size and
resolution without danger of pixels becoming visible in printed output.
Optimizing files for processing and printing
The following sections provide tips on how to create image files that produce
the highest possible print quality while minimizing the processing time and
disk space they require.
Resolution of raster images
While a 72 ppi raster image appears sharp on a monitor, the same image
would likely appear pixelated when printed to the iR C2100/2100S. Color
print devices are capable of much greater detail than monitors, and require
correspondingly higher resolution image files. However, high-resolution files
can be large, and therefore cumbersome to transmit over a network, process
for printing, store on disk, and edit.
Beyond a certain threshold, a higher image resolution greatly increases file
size while having a minimal effect on output quality. The optimal image
resolution depends on the resolution of the final print device. Aim for the
resolution that optimizes both file size and output quality.
A
A-10
Desktop Color Primer
The resolution of a raster image, along with its bit depth and physical
dimensions, determine its file size. The following table shows the file sizes of
color raster images at different dimensions and resolutions.
File size at:
Image size:
100 ppi
150 ppi
200 ppi
400 ppi
600 ppi
RGB/CMYK
RGB/CMYK
RGB/CMYK
RGB/CMYK
RGB/CMYK
3" x 4"
0.4/0.5 MB
0.8/1.0 MB
1.4/1.8 MB
5.5/7.3 MB
12.4/16.5 MB
5" x 7"
1.0/1.3 MB
2.3/3.0 MB
4.0/5.3 MB
16.0/21.4 MB
36.1/48.1 MB
8.5" x 11"
2.7/3.6 MB
6.0/8.0 MB
10.7/14.3 MB
42.8/57.1 MB
96.4/128.5 MB
11" x 17"
5.4/7.1 MB
12.0/16.1 MB
21.4/28.5 MB
85.6/114.1 MB
192.7/256.9 MB
In this table, the shaded areas indicate that 200 ppi is typically the best tradeoff between image quality and file size. However, higher resolutions (e.g., 250
to 300 ppi) may be needed for offset printing, when quality is of the utmost
importance, or for images containing sharp diagonal lines.
To find the best image resolution for your purposes, make test prints of some
raster artwork at different resolutions. Start with a high-resolution image
(400 ppi) and save versions at progressively lower resolutions, down to 100
ppi, using a pixel-editing application such as Photoshop. Always save a copy
of the original high-resolution version in case you need to revert to it. The
high-resolution data cannot be recreated from a lower resolution version.
A
A-11
Desktop Color Primer
Print the files and examine the output. You will likely begin to see a marked
deterioration in output quality at resolutions below 200 ppi, while above 200
ppi the improvement may be very subtle.
Image quality
100 ppi
200 ppi
300 ppi
400 ppi
500 ppi
600 ppi
Image resolution
Raster images prepared for offset printing may need to be at higher
resolutions than needed for proofing on your iR C2100/2100S.
Scaling
Ideally, each raster image should be saved at the actual size, and it will be
placed into the document at the optimal resolution for the print device. If the
image resolution is correct for the print device, there is no quality advantage
to be gained by scaling an image down to a percentage of its actual size. If you
scale a large image down to a percentage of its actual size, you incur
unnecessary file transfer time because the image data for the entire large
image is sent to the printer. If an image is placed multiple times at markedly
different sizes in a document, save a separate version of the image at the
correct size for each placement.
If you need to place an image at greater than 100% in a document, remember
that the output image resolution is affected. For example, if you scale a 200
ppi image to 200%, the image is printed at 100 ppi.
B
B-1
Appendix B:
Color
Management
Color Management
This appendix provides information on controlling and managing color
output in order to achieve predictable color results. It also discusses the basics
of color management.
Controlling printed color
When working with color materials, whether they be presentations,
illustrations, or complicated page designs, you make aesthetic decisions about
the colors you use. Once you have decided on your goal, you then need to
realize it in print. Your color printing system becomes an ally in this creative
process to the extent that results are predictable.
• If you designed a poster to print on the iR C2100/2100S, you want the
printed colors to match the design specification.
• If you are printing presentations on the iR C2100/2100S, you want to
preserve the vivid colors you see on your monitor.
• If you are working with color that will be printed on an offset press, you
want the iR C2100/2100S output to match other prepress proofs or
PANTONE color swatch books.
The type of print job and the final print device, iR C2100/2100S or offset
press, determine the methodology you use to achieve the best results.
No matter what your goals are, two factors always impact color print output:
print device consistency and the range of colors the device can print, known
as its gamut. These concepts are covered briefly in this appendix. Creating
successful color documents and presentations also requires an understanding
of color management software as it is implemented by the iR C2100/2100S
and on your desktop computer. Most of this appendix is devoted to
discussing the various elements of color management that contribute to
predictable color results.
Maintaining copier/printer consistency
The factors described below affect print device consistency, as well as color
fidelity and overall output quality.
B
B-2
Color Management
Paper stock and toner
The paper and toner used by your copier/printer can greatly affect printed
color. For best results, use the supplies recommended by the manufacturer of
the copier/printer.
Maintenance
Problems such as streaking and insufficient or excessive amounts of one or
more toners arise when a copier/printer does not receive periodic
maintenance or needs major repairs. In addition to having it serviced
regularly, monitor the condition of your copier/printer by making standard
test prints at regular intervals. You can do this easily by printing the
iR C2100/2100S Test Page. Save the prints and show them to the service
technician whenever output densities vary from the norm or other problems
appear.
Print device gamut
Different color reproduction techniques have different color capabilities, or
gamuts. Color transparency films have comparatively large gamuts, as do
color monitors. The color gamut that can be produced using process inks or
CMYK toners on paper is smaller. This is why some colors that can be
displayed on a color monitor, especially bright saturated colors, cannot be
reproduced exactly by your iR C2100/2100S copier/printer—nor, for that
matter, can they be reproduced on a press using process colors. Moreover,
different print devices have different gamuts—some colors that your copier/
printer can produce cannot be reproduced on an offset press, and vice versa.
The following illustration provides a graphical representation of this concept.
Color transparency film
RGB monitor
Offset press (white)
Other print device
B
B-3
Color Management
You need to account for the gamut of your print device when designing on a
color monitor. When printed, colors that fall outside the print device gamut
are “mapped” to printable colors. This process, referred to as gamut
mapping, takes place when color data is converted or adjusted to meet the
gamut requirements of a print device.
The iR C2100/2100S is specially designed to perform gamut mapping at
high speed with high quality results. It provides these color management
features automatically, using either built-in default settings or settings that
you specify for a particular print job. For added flexibility, the iR C2100/
2100S color management system can also be used in combination with color
management systems on Windows and Mac OS computers.
Basics of color management
The past several years have seen progress toward standardization in the field
of digital color management systems. Both the Windows and Mac OS
operating systems now support a standard format developed by the
International Color Consortium (ICC). This ICC format is implemented on
Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0, and Windows 2000 computers in Image
Color Matching (ICM) and on Mac OS computers in ColorSync. More and
more software developers are also incorporating color management systems
into high-end applications. The iR C2100/2100S color management system,
ColorWise, supports this industry standard profile format.
A color management system, or CMS, is a “translator” between the color
space of the source image (the monitor, or a scanner, for example) and the
color space of the output device. The CMS uses a device-independent color
space, such as CIELAB, as its intermediate color space. To perform its
translation, the CMS needs information about the color space of the source
image and the gamut of the print device. This information is provided in the
form of profiles, often created by the makers of the monitor or print device.
The end product of a CMS conversion is a printed document or an image file
in the gamut of a particular device.
N OTE : If color matching between computer display and printed output is
critical, you should calibrate your monitor as well as your printer. For most
users, predictability of printed color output is adequate and monitor
calibration is not necessary. For information on monitor calibration, see your
Photoshop or Illustrator documentation.
B
B-4
Color Management
Color conversion
Before a color document can be printed, the color data in it must be
converted to the gamut of the print device. Whether performed by the
iR C2100/2100S or by a host-based CMS, the process of converting color
data for a print device is the same: the CMS interprets RGB image data
according to a specified source profile and adjusts both RGB and CMYK data
according to a specified output profile, also called a destination profile by
some color management systems.
Color management system
Source
profile
Input data
Output
profile
Device-independent
color space
Printed data or file
The source profile defines the RGB color space of the image’s source—
characteristics such as the white point, gamma, and type of phosphors used.
The output profile defines the gamut of the output device. The iR C2100/
2100S (or the host-based CMS) uses a device-independent color space to
translate between the source color space and the color space of the output
device.
The iR C2100/2100S allows you to specify default and override settings for
the source color space information and the output profile information (see
page 1-1). When you use these settings, you do not need to use the features of
other color management systems. Your iR C2100/2100S software includes
ICC profiles for use with other color management systems, if you choose to
use them, although conflicts may arise when the iR C2100/2100S CMS is
used in conjunction with a host CMS.
Color management systems can also be used to adjust color data to the gamut
of a print device other than the one to which you are printing. This process of
simulating another print device is commonly used for proofing jobs that will
print on an offset press. The iR C2100/2100S simulation feature is described
on page 1-7.
C
C-1
Appendix C:
Importing
densitometer
measurements
Importing densitometer measurements
This appendix describes Simple ASCII File Format, which can be used to
import density measurements from measurement devices. To use your own
measurement data from an alternate densitometer, record your individual
readings in a text file and structure it as described below.
Simple ASCII Import File Format (SAIFF)
This format describes Status T measurement data and is for import into the
ColorWise Pro Tools Calibrator. There are three possible file formats:
• 1D Status T density for EFI 34 patch page
• 1D Status T density for EFI 21 patch page
• 1D Status T density for other pages (maximum of 256 patches per ink)
The file format is ASCII and has no tabs. A single space or multiple spaces are
used as delimiters. Blank lines are not allowed. Each line in the file represents
four patches (C, M, Y, K) of a specific ink value. Comments may be on any
line in the file, and these lines start with a pound sign (#) followed by a space.
A line with a pound sign followed by any character other than a space has
been reserved. Comments must be on an entire line by themselves.
Each line of data contains five values. The first number is the sequential patch
number (for EFI 34 and EFI 21 pages) or the ink value percentage (for other
pages). The following four values are the density values of C, M, Y, and K of
the corresponding patch. Lines are ordered either by increasing sequential
patch numbers or by increasing the ink percentage.
For Windows computers, the file extension must be .cm1. For Mac OS
computers, the file type must be ‘TEXT’.
Measurement data in EFI 34 and EFI 21 are paper-relative. For other pages,
if the first line corresponds to zero ink value, the Calibrator assumes that the
measurement data is absolute and adjusts it to become paper-relative by
subtracting the density values of the first line from the remaining patches.
C
C-2
Importing densitometer measurements
Example of 1D Status T density for EFI 34 patch page
This file format is used to specify the Status T density measurements of the
EFI 34 patch page. The value in the first column is the patch number. The
first patch must be 1 and the last must be 34.
#!EFI 3
# EFI ColorWise 2.0 Data
type: 1DST34
# Cyan
Magent Yellow Black
1 0.0300 0.0400 0.0200 0.0400
2 0.0600 0.0700 0.0800 0.0700
3 0.1000 0.1000 0.1000 0.1000
(…more data…)
33 1.6700 1.3400 0.8900 1.6700
34 1.7200 1.4300 0.9300 1.7500
Example of 1D Status T density for EFI 21 patch page
This file format is used to specify the Status T density measurements of the
EFI 21 patch page. The value in the first column is the patch number. The
first patch must be 1 and the last must be 21.
#!EFI 3
# EFI ColorWise 2.0 Data
type: 1DST21
# Cyan
Magent Yellow Black
1 0.0300 0.0400 0.0200 0.0400
2 0.0600 0.0700 0.0800 0.0700
3 0.1000 0.1000 0.1000 0.1000
(…more data…)
20 1.6700 1.3400 0.8900 1.6700
21 1.7200 1.4300 0.9300 1.7500
C
C-3
Importing densitometer measurements
Example of 1D Status T density for an arbitrary page
This file format is used to specify the Status T density measurements of a
user-defined patch page. The value in the first column is the ink/toner
percentage of the patch. The first percentage must be 0 and the last
percentage must be 100. The percentages must increase in between.
#!EFI 3
# EFI ColorWise 2.0 Data
type: 1DST
# percnt Cyan Magent Yellow Black
0.0000 0.0300 0.0400 0.0200 0.0400
0.3922 0.0600 0.0700 0.0800 0.0700
1.1765 0.1000 0.1000 0.1000 0.1000
(…more data…)
98.0000 1.6700 1.3400 0.8900 1.6700
100.0000 1.7200 1.4300 0.9300 1.7500
Glossary
additive color model
blasting
A system in which colors are produced
by combining red, green, and blue
light (the additive primaries). An RGB
video monitor is based on an additive
color model.
An undesirable effect that occurs
when excess amounts of toner,
possibly combined with certain types
of paper stock, cause objects in an
image to spread beyond its boundaries
as defined in the file.
additive primaries
Red, green, and blue light that is used
in additive color systems. When added
together in proper amounts, these
colors of light produce white.
BMP
artifact
calibration
A visible defect in an image, usually
caused by limitations in the input or
output process (hardware or software);
a blemish or error.
The process of ensuring that a device
behaves consistently with respect to a
set of specifications.
banding
See color management system.
Visible steps between shades in a color
gradient.
CMYK
bit depth
Amount of information used for each
pixel in a raster image. Black and
white images require only one bit per
pixel. Grayscale images with 256
shades of gray require 8 bits (or 1
byte) per pixel. Photographic quality
color images can require 24 bits per
pixel (RGB images) or 32 bits per
pixel (CMYK images).
bitmap
An image comprised of small squares
arranged in a grid. Each square in the
grid is a pixel. The number of pixels
per inch defines the resolution of a
bitmap.
A graphics file format established by
Microsoft and native to the Windows
operating system.
CMS
A subtractive color model that uses
cyan, magenta, yellow, and black, or
process colors, used in color printing;
a color model used in the printing of
colors in four-color process printing.
color channel
A single-color image that can be
edited separately from the other color
channels comprising a color space—
for example, the red channel of an
RGB image.
color gamut
See gamut.
color management system (CMS)
System used to match color across
different input, display, and output
devices.
G-2
Glossary
color rendering dictionary
continuous tone (contone)
See CRD (color rendering dictionary).
Describes a photographic image that
contains gradient tones from black to
white (such as a 35mm transparency
or a photograph). Continuous tones
cannot be reproduced in that form for
printing, but must be screened to
translate the image into dots.
color separation
The process of separating a color
image into the color components for
printing—cyan, magenta, yellow, and
black. Also used to refer to the four
sheets of film that result from the
process of separating a color image.
color space
A model for representing color in
terms of measurable values, such as
the amount of red, green, and blue in
an image. RGB and CMYK color
spaces correspond to color devices—
monitors and copier/printers
respectively. Other color spaces, such
as CIE Lab, are based on
mathematical models and are deviceindependent. They are not based on
the color response of a particular
device. See gamut.
colorant
An ink, dye, toner, paint, or other
pigment that modifies the color of
media to which it is applied.
ColorWise color management
iR C2100/2100S’s ICC-open color
management solution, which is an
easy-to-use system that addresses the
needs of both casual and experienced
color management users.
composite printer
Any output device that can print
directly in color without first creating
color separations. A composite print
can be used as an early proof of an
offset print job.
continuous tone (contone) image
An image containing fine gradations
of tones, such as a photographic
image.
CRD (Color Rendering Dictionary)
A feature of color management
systems and PostScript Level 2 and
PostScript 3 color copier/printers that
maintains the best possible translation
of color from one color device to
another. A color rendering dictionary
(CRD) is used by the color
management system or the copier/
printer’s PostScript interpreter when
converting data between color spaces.
The iR C2100/2100S includes several
CRDs, each of which provides a
different color rendering style.
custom color system
A system of named color swatches that
can be matched on press using process
or spot colors. PANTONE and
TruMatch are examples of custom
color systems.
DCS (Desktop Color Separation)
A data file standard defined by Quark,
Inc., to assist in making color
separations with desktop publishing
system; five files are created, four color
files (one each for C, M, Y, and K) and
a composite color preview file of the
color image. It allows an image-
G-3
Glossary
editing application to perform color
separation and pass it through to final
output with its integrity intact.
density
A measurement of the light-absorbing
quality of a photographic or printed
image.
densitometer
An instrument commonly used in the
graphic arts industry to measure
density according to a specified
standard.
desktop color separation
See DCS.
DIC
A Japanese standard of specifications
for separations, proofs, and color
printing.
gamma
A numeric value representing the
relationship (gamma curve) between
the input and output values of a color
device. If gamma equals 1, input
values are mapped exactly to output
values.
gamut
A range of colors. A device gamut is
the range of colors that a device, such
as a copier/printer, can produce. An
image gamut is the range of colors in a
particular image.
gamut mapping
The conversion of color coordinates
from one device’s gamut to another—
usually accomplished with algorithms
or look-up tables.
GDI (Graphics Device Interface)
A PostScript file format designed to be
embedded in another PostScript
stream.
Graphics and display technology used
by computers running Windows.
GDI applications rely on GDI (rather
than the PostScript language) to send
text and pictures to copier/printers.
Euroscale
GIF (Graphics Interchange Format)
A European standard of specifications
for separations, proofs, and color
printing.
A standard developed by CompuServe
for bitmap graphics of up to 256
colors and used for posting
photographic images on the Internet
or intranet pages; rarely used for
professional printing.
EPS or EPSF (Encapsulated
PostScript)
flexography
A printing technology that uses
flexible raised-image plates.
Flexography can be used to print on
non-flat materials such as cans.
four-color printer
A printing device that uses cyan,
magenta, yellow, and black ink or
toner.
gradient
A smooth transition between two
different colors or between two shades
of a color.
Graphics Device Interface
See GDI.
G-4
Glossary
Graphics Interchange Format
imagesetter
See GIF.
Raster-based film output device; a
high-resolution laser output device
that writes bitmapped data onto
photosensitive paper or film.
gravure
A printing technology that uses an
etched cylinder that has been
immersed in ink. The ink that remains
in the etched areas is applied to the
paper. The non-etched surfaces of the
cylinder are non-printing areas.
halftoning
A method for representing an original
continuous tone image using a pattern
of dots, lines or other patterns.
HSB
A color model where each color is
represented by its hue, saturation, and
brightness components; supported by
most color applications.
ICC profile
An industry standard color profile
format developed by the International
Color Consortium (ICC) that
describes the color capabilities,
including the gamut, of a color device
based on the differences between an
ideal and the current device. The ideal
is often provided by the manufacturer
as a color reference file. ICC profiles
are implemented on Mac OS
computers in ColorSync and on
Windows 95/98, Windows NT 4.0,
and Windows 2000 computers in
Image Color Matching (ICM). The
iR C2100/2100S’s color management
system, ColorWise, supports ICC
profiles.
JPEG
A graphics file format defined by the
Joint Photographic Experts Group
committee of ISO (International
Standards Organization); a standard
for digital compression of still image
graphic data.
metamerism
Phenomenon in which two colors
composed of different combinations
of light wavelengths appear identical
under a specific light source, but may
look different under other light
sources. The colors are called
“metamers.”
moiré
An undesirable pattern in images
made using halftone screens. Moiré
can be caused by the improper line
frequency of the screens, improper
screen angles, improper alignment of
halftone screens, or by the
combination of a halftone screen with
patterns in the image itself.
named color
A color that is defined according to a
custom color system. For example,
PANTONE 107 C is a named color.
office applications
Software applications commonly used
for business purposes, including
presentation applications,
spreadsheets, and word processing
programs.
G-5
Glossary
offset lithography
Printing in which ink is transferred
from printing plates to a rubber
blanket and then from the blanket to
paper.
output profile
The output profile describes the color
characteristics of a printing device. It
consists of both a profile for your
copier/printer and a calibration target
that defines the expected density
response of the copier/printer.
phosphor
Material used in making computer
monitors; phosphors glow and emit
red, green, and blue light when struck
by an electron beam, thus creating an
image.
photographic rendering
A color rendering style that preserves
tonal relationships in images.
Unprintable colors are mapped to
printable colors in a way that retains
differences in lightness, sacrificing
color accuracy as necessary.
pixel
The smallest distinct element of a
raster image. The term is a
combination of the words “picture”
and “element.”
PostScript
A device-independent page description language developed by Adobe,
which is used to print and display pictures and text. PostScript 3 includes
many enhancements to older versions
of PostScript, including improved
image quality and color with
Enhanced Image Technology, faster
performance with Advanced Page Processing, and ease of use and setup with
NetWorks System.
PPD (PostScript Printer Description
file)
A file containing information about a
particular PostScript print device’s
capabilities and restrictions. The
information in the PPD is presented
via the printer driver.
prepress proof
A print made from a set of film
separations or other file to simulate
the results of printing. A prepress
proof is the last opportunity to catch
problems before the print job goes to
press.
presentation graphics rendering
A color rendering style that creates
saturated colors but does not match
printed colors precisely to displayed
colors. It is appropriate for bright
saturated colors used in illustrations
and graphs.
process colors
The four ink colors used in printing to
simulate full-spectrum color images:
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK
(CMYK).
QuickDraw
Graphics and display technology built
into Mac OS computers. QuickDraw
applications rely on QuickDraw
(rather than the PostScript language)
to send text and pictures to copier/
printers.
G-6
Glossary
raster image
source color space
Electronic representation of a page or
image using a grid of points called
pixels.
The color environment of the
originating source of an image,
including scanners and color
monitors.
rendering intent
The style of color rendering, or gamut
mapping, designed for a particular
type of color job. An example of a
rendering intent is Photographic
rendering—also referred to as Image
rendering or Contrast rendering—
which is designed for photographic
images.
resolution
The number of pixels per inch (ppi) in
a bitmap image or the number of dots
per inch (dpi) that a device can render.
RGB
An additive color model that makes a
range of colors by combining red,
green, and blue light, called the
additive primaries. Commonly used to
refer to the color space, mixing
system, or monitor in color computer
graphics.
simulation profile
The simulation profile describes the
color characteristics of another print
device, such as a printing press, that
you want the iR C2100/2100S to
simulate.
solid color rendering
A color rendering style intended for
use when color accuracy is crucial.
Unprintable colors are mapped to the
closest printable colors. Solid color
rendering does the best job of
preserving the saturation of displayed
colors.
source profile
A profile used by the color
management system to determine the
characteristics of the color values
specified in a source digital image.
spectral light
The wavelengths of electromagnetic
radiation emitted by a given light
source that can be seen by the human
eye.
spot color
A color that is printed on its own
separation plate when separations are
specified. A spot color is printed using
a custom ink for that color, in contrast
to process colors that are printed using
combinations of cyan, magenta,
yellow, and black.
Status T
A spectral response for graphic arts
reflection densitometers defined by
ANSI (the American National
Standards Institute).
subtractive color model
A system in which color is produced
by combining colorants such as paint,
inks, or dyes on media such as paper
or transparent film or acetate. All
printing devices use the subtractive
color model.
G-7
Glossary
subtractive primaries
white point
Cyan, magenta, and yellow colorants
used in subtractive color systems for
color printing. Combining the
subtractive primaries produces darker
colors. Black is added to the
subtractive primaries to compensate
for deficiencies of the toners or inks,
and for more efficient black printing.
The color temperature of any white
light source, typically expressed in
degrees Kelvin (for example, 6500 K,
typical for the white of a monitor).
substrate
In printing, the material upon which
the job is printed.
SWOP
The abbreviation for Specifications for
Web Offset Publications. A standard
of specifications for separations,
proofs, and color printing on a web
offset press (not a sheet fed press).
undercolor removal
In areas where all three process colors
(C, M, Y) overprint, the amounts of
those colors are reduced and replaced
by black. This improves wet ink
trapping and reduces ink costs in
process color printing.
vector image
Graphic illustration created on
computers where picture objects are
defined mathematically as lines or
curves between points. These
mathematical definitions are
interpreted by an image language such
as PostScript. Vector images include
artwork created with illustration
applications (such as Illustrator or
FreeHand) and page layout
applications (such as PageMaker).
workflow
The path a print job follows from
creation to destination. A workflow
may originate with an RGB scan
imported to the client workstation
and opened on the desktop in an
image processing application, such as
Photoshop. After adjustments are
made to the scanned image, it is
evaluated on a color proofing device
for eventual color printing on the
same device or on press.
Bibliography
Books
Adobe Print Publishing Guide. Adobe Systems Incorporated, 1995. (Comes as
part of the documentation for Adobe products such as Adobe Photoshop and
Adobe Illustrator, P/N 0397 0719.)
Blatner, David and Fraser, Bruce. Real World Photoshop 3: Industrial Strength
Production Techniques. Berkeley: Peachpit Press, 1996.
Bruno, Michael H., ed. Pocket Pal ®: A Graphic Arts Production Handbook.
Seventeenth Edition. Memphis: International Paper, 1997.
Hunt, R.W.G. The Reproduction of Colour. Fifth Edition. Surrey: Fountain
Press, 1996.
Kieran, Michael. The Color Scanning Success Handbook. Toronto: DPA
Communications Corp., 1997.
Kieran, Michael. Understanding Desktop Color, Second Edition. Berkeley:
Peachpit Press, 1994.
Margulis, Dan. Professional Photoshop: Color Correction, Retouching, and
Image Manipulation with Adobe Photoshop. John Wiley & Sons, 1995.
Miller, Marc D. and Zaucha, Randy. The Color Mac. Second Edition.
Hayden Books, 1995.
X-Rite Color Guide and Glossary: Communication, Measurement, and Control
for Digital Imaging and Graphic Arts. X-Rite Incorporated, 1996. (Provided as
part of the documentation for X-Rite densitometers, P/N XRC-550.)
World Wide Web sites
International Color Consortium: www.color.org
Graphic Arts Technical Foundation: www.gatf.org
Seybold Seminars Online: www.seyboldseminars.com
Adobe Systems Incorporated: www.adobe.com
Magazines
Adobe Magazine. Seattle: Adobe Systems Incorporated
Publish!. San Francisco: Integrated Media Inc.
Index
Numerics
8-pin DIN plug 3-6
A
Absolute Colorimetric 1-5
accent color A-6
additive color model A-3
additive primaries A-3
Adobe Illustrator, see Illustrator
Adobe PageMaker, see PageMaker
Adobe Photoshop, see Photoshop
Adobe PostScript Printer Driver
Mac OS 1-18
Apple Standard setting, RGB Source
option 1-6
B
bit depth, of raster images A-8, A-10
bitmaps A-5
see also raster images
Black Overprint option 1-4, 1-10
black text 1-10
line art 1-9
brightness A-1, A-2
Brightness option 1-3
C
calibration
bypassing 1-3, 1-8
checking status 3-4
color 3-16
COM1 and COM2 port 3-6
densitometer 3-5 to 3-7
from ColorWise Pro Tools 3-2
from the Control
Panel 3-2, 3-8, 3-15, 3-16
importing measurements C-1
measurements 3-1, 3-2, 3-3, 3-14
overview 3-1 to 3-4
scheduling 3-4
targets 3-1, 3-2, 3-3
VisualCal 3-18
see also densitometer, ColorWise Pro
Tools
calibration patch page 3-3
charts, using color in A-6
CIE
chromaticity diagram A-2
color model A-2
CIELAB color space B-3
CMY color model 5-3
CMYK Color Reference 5-2, 5-6
CMYK Simulation Method
option 1-4, 1-8
CMYK Simulation Profile
option 1-3, 1-7
color
accent color A-6
additive model A-3
calibration 3-16
choosing in applications 5-1
CMY model 5-3
complements A-7
controlling printing results B-1
conversion by color management
systems B-4
custom color systems 5-4
defining in applications 5-1
HSB model 5-4, A-2
HSL model 5-3, 5-4
HSV model 5-3
illustration applications 9-1
physics of A-1
process colors A-5
proofing examples 2-12
properties of A-1
reference pages 5-2
RGB model 5-3, 5-4
split complements A-7
spot colors 5-4, A-6
subtractive model A-3
subtractive primaries A-4
swatch color matching 5-5
text A-7
theory A-1
triads A-7
using effectively A-6 to A-8
I-2
Index
wheel A-7
working with 5-1
Color Charts 3-4
color management
basics B-3 to B-4
ColorWise 1-1 to 1-12, 2-2
color management print options for
Windows 95/98 1-14
color management system (CMS) xiv, B-3
color matching systems, see custom color
systems
color monitors, see monitors
Color Reference pages 3-4
color rendering styles, see rendering styles
color space 1-1, A-2
color theory A-1
color wheel A-7
colorants A-3
Colorimetric ICC rendering style 1-5
ColorSync B-3
ColorWise B-3
key features xiv
ColorWise Pro Tools
calibration from 3-2
checking calibration status 3-4
overview 3-8 to 3-14
Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage,
see CIE
Comparison Page 3-14
complements, color A-7
compression,
JPEG 7-7, 7-10, 7-11, 7-13, 7-15
computer monitors, see monitors
Configuration page
calibration status 3-4
continuous tone devices A-5
Contrast ICC rendering style 1-4
Control Panel
calibration from 3-2, 3-8
removing calibration 3-16
CorelDRAW 9-8
CRDs
bypassing 6-2, 8-2, 9-2
PostScript color matching 1-19
rendering intent 5-3
custom color systems 5-4, A-7
custom simulations 1-7
D
default color controls set in Setup 1-3
densitometer
calibrating 3-7, 3-8
DTP32 3-1, 3-5 to 3-7, 3-8
density patches 3-4
device profiles B-3
drivers, see printer drivers
E
EFICOLOR
profiles 8-7
XTension 8-7
EPS (Encapsulated PostScript)
color conversion of RGB EPS
images 1-6
recommended for imported
images 6-1, 7-7, 7-13, 8-1, 9-1, 9-2
, 9-5, 9-8, 9-10
RGB images saved with
Photoshop 7-7, 7-12, 7-13
Excel, see Microsoft Office
F
file size, of raster images 2-3, A-10
flexography A-4
font size, for color text A-8
FreeHand 5-4, 9-5
Full simulation 1-7
G
gamma B-4
Gamma option 1-3
gamut
of monitors B-2
of photographic transparencies B-2
of print devices B-1
gamut mapping B-3
GDI applications, using color in 5-3 to
5-4
Graphics Device Interface, see GDI
Graphics ICC rendering style 1-5
graphs, using color in A-6
gravure A-4
I-3
Index
H
halftoning A-4, A-5
HSB color model 5-4, A-2
HSL color model 5-3, 5-4
HSV color model 5-3
hue, saturation, and brightness A-1, A-2
I
ICC profiles
assigning to RGB images 9-2
included with user software B-4
rendering styles 1-4
workflow 2-12
ICC standard for color management
systems B-3
ICM
profiles, applied to RGB images 9-2
illustration applications 9-1
Illustrator 5-4, 9-3
Image Color Matching, see ICM
Image ICC rendering style 1-4
ink B-2
International Color Consortium, see ICC
J
JPEG 7-7, 7-10, 7-11, 7-13, 7-15
L
light A-1 to A-2
line art, see vector images
M
Mac OS
printer driver 1-18
Macintosh interface cable 3-6
Macromedia FreeHand, see FreeHand
maintenance of print devices B-2
Match Copy setting of CMYK Simulation
option 1-3, 1-8
measurements file 3-3, 3-14
metamerism A-2
Microsoft Excel, see Microsoft Office
Microsoft Office 6-1 to 6-2
Microsoft PowerPoint, see Microsoft
Office
Microsoft Printer Driver
Windows 2000 1-17
Microsoft Word, see Microsoft Office
misregistration of colors A-8
moiré A-5
monitors
calibration B-3
color model A-3
gamut of B-2
phosphors A-3
N
named colors 5-4
None setting, RGB Source option 1-6
O
office applications 5-1, 5-3 to 5-4, 6-1 to
6-2
offset lithographic printing A-4
offset press print jobs, workflow issues 5-2
offset press printing A-4 to A-6
Other setting, RGB Source option 1-6
output profile
color conversion B-4
Output Profile option 1-4
P
page-layout applications 8-1
PageMaker 5-4, 8-3
painting applications A-8
PANTONE
color system 5-4, 5-5
PANTONE Coated Color
Reference 1-12, 5-2
paper stock B-2
passwords
for calibration 3-2, 3-8
Perceptual ICC rendering style 1-4
phosphors A-3, B-4
Phosphors option 1-3
photographic prints A-3
Photographic rendering style 1-4
photographic transparencies A-3, B-2
Photoshop 5-4, 7-1 to 7-16
Photoshop 5.0 for Mac OS and
Windows 7-1 to 7-11
I-4
Index
physics of color A-1
pixel-editing applications A-8, A-10
pixels in raster images A-8
PostScript and non-PostScript RGB
data 1-6, 7-12
PostScript applications
color handling 5-5
using color in 5-4 to 5-7
PostScript printer description file, see PPD
PostScript Printer Driver
Windows 95/98 1-13
Windows NT 4.0 1-16
PostScript printer drivers 6-2
PowerPoint, see Microsoft Office
PPD 1-12, 1-14, 1-16, 1-17, 1-18, G-5
prepress proof A-5, B-1
presentation print jobs
rendering styles appropriate for 1-5
using color in A-6
Presentation rendering style 1-5
press simulation, see CMYK Simulation
option
print devices
consistency B-1
gamut B-1
maintenance B-2
printing test prints B-2
printer
recalibrating color output 3-16
printer drivers
Mac OS 1-18
Windows 1-13 to 1-18
printing
calibration pages 3-16
raster images A-9
techniques A-4
prism A-1
process colors 5-6, A-4, A-5, A-6
profiles, device B-3
proofing
prepress A-5, B-1
Pure Black Text/Graphics option 1-4, 1-9
Q
QuarkXPress 5-4, 8-5
Quick simulation 1-7
QuickDraw applications, using color
in 5-3 to 5-4
R
raster images
bit depth A-8, A-10
file size A-10
for offset press printing A-11
printing A-9
resolution A-8, A-9 to A-11
scaling of A-11
ReaderCal calibration 3-15, 3-16
registration of colors A-8
Relative Colorimetric 1-5
Rendering Style option 1-3
rendering styles 1-4, 5-3
resolution of raster images A-8, A-9 to
A-11
RGB color model 5-3, 5-4
RGB Color Reference 5-2, 5-4
RGB images
EPS, color conversion 1-6
PostScript and non-PostScript 1-6
RGB Separation option 1-3, 1-6
RGB source color space, see source color
space
RGB Source option 1-3, 1-5
S
saturation A-1, A-2
Saturation ICC rendering style 1-5
scaling of raster images A-11
scanners A-3
screens, used in halftoning A-5
Server Status option 3-4
Setup, default color controls set in 1-3
short-run color jobs, workflow issues 5-1
short-run color printing 2-1
simulation, see CMYK Simulation option
I-5
Index
simulations, custom 1-7
Source 1–10 option 1-6
source color space B-4
source color space profile
color conversion B-4
spectral colors A-2
spectral components of light A-1, A-2
split complements A-7
Spot Color Matching
option 1-4, 1-11, 5-7
spot colors 5-4, A-6
Status T C-1
subtractive color model A-3
subtractive primaries A-4
sunlight A-1
swatch color matching 5-5
T
targets 3-3
Test Page
calibration status 3-4
test prints B-2
text
font size A-8
using color with A-7
TIFF images
assigning ICC profiles to 8-2
preview 7-7, 7-13
printing at full resolution 8-4
recommended for imported
images 7-7, 7-13, 8-1
RGB 9-2
tint A-2
toner B-2
transfer functions 3-3
transparencies (photographic) A-3, B-2
triads A-7
V
vector images A-8, A-9
visible spectrum of light A-1
VisualCal calibration method 3-16
W
white point B-4
White Point option 1-3
Windows 95/98
color management print options 1-14
Windows Graphics Device Interface, see
GDI applications
Windows 2000 printer driver 1-17
Windows 95/98 printer driver 1-13
Windows NT 4.0 printer driver 1-16
Word, see Microsoft Office
workflow
advanced 2-7
color proofing 2-1
ICC profiles 2-12
short-run jobs 2-1
simple 2-3
with Illustrator 2-9
with Photoshop 2-8, 2-14