OWNER’S HANDBOOK
APRICOT MS
apricot
COMPACT
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Apricot MS Owner’s Handbook
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Intel and Pentium are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation.
Microsoft ® and Windows ® 95 are registered trademarks of Microsoft in the
U.S. and other countries.
Soundblaster is a registered trademark of Creative Labs Inc.
Any other trademarks referred to within this document but not listed above are
hereby recognised and acknowledged.
Apricot Computers Ltd. have a policy of continuous research and development
and therefore reserve the right to amend or modify this handbook, or parts
thereof that are subject to specification change, without notice.
Any software described in this manual that has been furnished with the
computer is supplied subject to a license agreement. The software may be used
or copied only in accordance with the terms of this agreement. It may be an
offence punishable by law to copy any disk or part of a disk supplied for any
purpose other than the purchaser’s personal use unless specifically authorised
within the licence agreement.
All rights reserved. No use or disclosure or reproduction in any form of this
manual in part or whole is permitted without prior written consent from the
publishers.
Copyright © Apricot Computers Limited 1995
Published by
Apricot Computers Limited
3500 Parkside
Birmingham Business Park
Birmingham B37 7YS
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Printed in the United Kingdom
SAFETY NOTICES
Safety and Regulatory Notices
Read the separate Power Connection Guide before using the computer for the
first time.
The computer uses a safety ground and must be earthed. The system unit
AC power cord is its ‘disconnect device’. Ensure that the system unit is
positioned close to the AC power outlet and that the plug is easily
accessible. The power cord packed with the computer complies with the
safety standards applicable in the country in which it is first sold. Use only
this power cord. Do not substitute a power cord from any other equipment.
It is imperative that the system unit is set to the correct voltage range before
use. If not, the machine may be irreparably damaged.
To prevent fire and electric shock, do not expose any part of the computer
to rain or moisture.
When positioning the system unit, monitor and keyboard, take into account
any local or national regulations relating to ergonomic requirements.
Microphone, headphone and speaker cables should be less than 2 metres
long.
Replace a discharged configuration (CMOS) battery with one of the same
type. Dispose of the battery in accordance with the manufacturer's
recommended instructions. Do not attempt to recharge, disassemble or
incinerate. Keep away from children.
Any CD-ROM drive fitted in this system is
classified as a CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
according to IEC825 Radiation Safety of Laser
Products (Equipment Classification: Requirements
and User's Guide).. The CLASS 1 LASER
PRODUCT label is located on the under side
of the system unit.
Use the CD-ROM drive only as described in
this manual. Failure to do so may result in
exposure to hazardous radiation.
Refer to the labels on the computer to establish
which of the following applies.
SAFETY/1
SAFETY NOTICES
E.E.C.
This equipment complies with the relevant clauses of following European directives:
89/836/EEC and 73/23/EEC, and is able to bear the CE mark.
U.S.A
FCC Class A
Warning - this equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing
device, pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC rules. Only peripherals (computer input/output devices,
terminals, printer, etc.) certified to comply with the Class A limits may be attached to this computer.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause unacceptable interference to radio and television
reception requiring the operator to take whatever steps are necessary to correct the interference.
FCC Class B
Warning - this equipment has been certified to comply with the limits for a Class B computing device,
pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC rules. Only peripherals (computer input/output devices, terminals,
printer, etc.) certified to comply with the Class B limits may be attached to this computer. Operation with
non-certified peripherals is likely to result in interference with radio and TV reception.
Radio and television interference
The computer described in this manual generates and uses radio frequency energy for its operation. If it is not
installed and used properly, in strict accordance with the manual, it may cause interference with radio and
television reception.
The computer has been tested and found to comply with the RF emission limits for an FCC Class B
computing device which is intended to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a
residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation.
If this equipment does cause interference with radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of
the following measures:
•
Move the computer away from the receiver being interfered with.
•
Turn the computer with respect to the receiver.
•
Turn the receiver with respect to the computer.
•
Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different branch circuit from the receiver.
•
Disconnect and remove any I/O cables that are not being used.
•
Unplug and remove any expansion cards that are not being used. Replace the relevant blanking
plates.
•
Make sure that the computer is plugged into a grounded outlet
If you need additional help, consult your supplier. You may find the following booklet helpful, How to
Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference Problems. This booklet is available from the US Government
Printing Office: Washington DC 20402 - Stock No. 004-000-000345-4.
SAFETY/2
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
1
THE BEGINNING
Connections
Turning on and booting up
Energy saving features
Installing other software
Turning the power off
Cleaning and transporting
2
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
Using the floppy drive
Using a CD-ROM drive
The Hard disk drive
Software backup
3
3/2
3/6
MEMORY UPGRADES
Adding system memory
Adding cache memory
Adding video memory
5
2/1
2/3
2/5
2/7
EXPANSION
Configuring a card
Installing a card
4
1/1
1/2
1/3
1/3
1/4
1/5
4/1
4/5
4/7
MULTIMEDIA FEATURES
The device drivers
The CD-ROM drive
The sound connections
5/1
5/1
5/3
CONTENTS/1
CONTENTS
6
TROUBLESHOOTING
Problems when starting
Restoring the Software
Checklist
System disk drives
Software security
A
THE SYSTEM UNIT
Anti-static precautions
Opening the system unit
The components inside
Drive specification
Physical characteristics
B
B/1
B/2
B/4
B/6
B/8
SYSTEM BIOS AND SET-UP
Entering set-up
Control keys
Set-up runs on its own
Opening screen
Sub-menu pages
Error messages
CONTENTS/2
A/1
A/2
A/3
A/4
A/5
SYSTEM MOTHERBOARD
General specification
Board layout
External ports/connections
Jumper configurations
Replacing CMOS battery
C
6/1
6/3
6/3
6/5
6/5
C/1
C/1
C/2
C/3
C/4
C/11
THE BEGINNING
1
THE BEGINNING. . .
You should read this chapter even if you do not read any other. It
provides important basic information to help you in using your
computer. It is the minimum you need to know in order to start
work straight away. Computers are very easy to use providing you
establish a routine with a few basic disciplines.
Note particularly the information given in the section
‘Energy Saving Features’.
Connections
Individual details of the rear port connections are shown in the
appendix B ‘System Motherboard’, but an overall view is given here.
3
4
1
1
2
5
6
7
10101
2
8
9
10
1
Mains in socket
2
Power out to monitor
3
System security loop
4
Rear audio panel *a
5
Keyboard port
6
PS/2 mouse port
7
Serial port (COM1)
8
Serial port (COM2) *c
9
Parallel/printer port
10
Monitor connection *b
*a See chapter ‘Multimedia’ for details on connections.
*b Looped to TV card, if fitted (see colour detail on ‘connect up’ boxtopper)
*c Not available when system supplied with remote control.
The Security loop (3) above can be used for an alarmed loop cable or a padlocking
mechanism, to help deter either unauthorised removal of the system, or its cover.
1/1
THE BEGINNING
Turning on and booting the computer
Turning the power on
To turn on the computer, press the lower POWER button. The green
POWER ON light should come on to show that the system unit is
powered. Remember that the monitor has its own power control (see
the monitor’s User’s Guide for details) and that it may take a few
moments to warm up.
If nothing happens when the POWER button is pressed, check that
the system unit and monitor power cords are securely connected and
that the AC power supply is switched on. See also the chapter on
‘Troubleshooting’.
Power-on self-test
Whenever the computer is turned on, the ‘power-on self test’ (POST)
routine checks the actual set-up of the computer against that
recorded in its internal configuration memory. During this time,
various messages are displayed. Further information on the
computer’s Basic In/Out System (BIOS) and its set-up can be found
in Appendix C, ‘System BIOS and set-up’.
The boot sequence
Once through the POST the computer will boot the operating
system. By default, the computer will first look for a system diskette,
then for a bootable hard disk partition or area.
System diskette
A system diskette is a diskette bearing the basics of an operating
system. If the computer finds such a diskette in the diskette drive, it
boots from it. If it finds a non-system diskette, the computer will ask
you to replace it.
Bootable Hard disk
Most computers with a hard disk containing pre-installed software
normally arrive set up with a single ‘partition’, the C: drive.
1/2
THE BEGINNING
Inexperienced or new users should take a few moments to run one or more
of the many tutorials in the HELP menu. This is accessible in Windows 95
by clicking on the START button in the bottom left of the screen.
Comprehensive help and tutorials are available in Windows 95 and in most
of the currently available Windows applications.
Energy Saving features
Standard systems
All models in this range are designed to exceed the requirements of
the latest ‘Energy Star’ programme for energy-efficient computers.
If the system is left unattended for more than a predetermined length
of time, it will go into ‘Low power mode’. The screen will go blank,
software will still run but slower. This is meant to happen. A light
on the purple standby button will be flashing.
To restart the system, just move the mouse, press a keyboard key or
press the purple standby button. Everything will return to the exact
state in which it was left prior to entering ‘Low power’ mode.
The timing and other features of the ‘Low power mode’ can be
changed or disabled in the system BIOS, see appendix C, ‘System
BIOS and set-up’.
Warning
Energy saving features built into this computer are designed to be used with the
monitor supplied with the system. If you wish to use another, or older monitor
it may not be compatible and permanent damage may be caused. Check
with your Apricot dealer.
Installing other software
With a CD-ROM drive in your system it may be a good idea to
purchase all software in that format if possible. It can often be
cheaper and of course CDs are easier to store, being far less bulky.
Some manufacturers still only supply their software on 3.5 inch
1/3
THE BEGINNING
floppy disks and these would of course have to use the floppy disk
drive.
Guidance on using either the CD drive, or the floppy drive, is given
in chapter 2 ‘The system drives’. The only thing you need to know is
the name of the program on the disk that does the work. The
software’s accompanying literature should tell you, but it is usually
either ‘SETUP’ or ‘INSTALL’.
From the ‘start’ button in Windows select ‘run’ and then enter details
in the box, first the drive letter, either D: or A: followed by the
programme name.
EXAMPLES Software from CD and the name is ‘setup’ = d:setup
or, from floppy, and the name is ‘install’ = A:install
Typical software you might install could be anything from Word
Processing, Accounting, Publishing, Education plus of course,
games.
Turning the power off
Before turning off the computer, run through the following simple
checklist:
• Quit or exit from all the applications you are running, making
sure to save any files you have altered or created. Unless you save
it, information held in the computer’s memory will be lost
when you turn off the computer.
• Select ‘Shut Down’ from the Start menu in Windows. Windows
will then tell you when it is safe to switch off. This procedure
will close down all your applications in an orderly manner and
will prompt you to save any unsaved work in the process.
• You should always turn off any attached peripherals first.
However, there is no need to turn off the monitor (if it is
powered from the system unit).
1/4
THE BEGINNING
• To turn off the computer, simply press the POWER button again.
The power indicator on the system goes out. If the monitor is
powered from the system unit, it will be turned off at the same
time.
• After you turn the computer off, wait at least 5 seconds before
turning it on again. The computer may not initialise itself
properly if you turn it off then on again in quick succession.
Cleaning and Transporting
Your Apricot computer requires little physical maintenance other
than occasional cleaning, but you must take care when transporting
it to avoid damage to some of its more delicate components,
particularly the hard disk.
Warning
Turn off the system unit and unplug all power cords before cleaning or moving
the computer.
Cleaning the computer
Do not use solvents or abrasives, they might damage the system
unit surfaces.
Do not use aerosols or sprays near any part of the system, in
particular, air vents or grills, ports, or removable-media drives, as
microscopic droplets can remain in the air for some time and then
penetrate and cause irreparable damage.
The system unit
• Occasionally wipe the system unit with a soft, slightly damp,
lint-free cloth.
• Occasionally wipe the air vents on the rear and sides of the
system unit. Dust and fluff can block the vents and limit the
airflow. A small, clean, soft brush may be useful.
1/5
THE BEGINNING
• Occasionally clean the removable media drives using a special
disk cleaning kit. These are available from many sources.
The monitor
Occasionally wipe the monitor with a soft, slightly damp, lint-free
cloth. It is best to use anti-static glass cleaner on the monitor screen.
Do not spray glass cleaner directly onto the screen, it could run
down inside the case and damage the circuitry.
The keyboard
When necessary, clean the keycaps with a slightly damp cloth and a
minimum amount of a non-abrasive cleaning agent.
Regularly check the keyboard cable for wear and tear, particularly
near table or shelf edges.
Take care not to spill any liquid or drop small objects, e.g. paper
clips or staples, onto the keyboard. Follow these steps if this should
happen to the keyboard and it stops working:
1. Switch off and unplug the keyboard.
2. If the liquid is sticky or viscous, unplug the keyboard and call
your supplier or an authorised maintainer.
3. If the liquid is thin and clear, try unplugging the keyboard,
turning it upside down to let the liquid drain out, and drying it
for at least 24 hours at room temperature. If the keyboard does
not work, call your supplier or an authorised maintainer.
4. If a solid object drops between the keys, turn the keyboard
upside down and shake it gently. Do not probe between the
keys as this may cause serious damage.
The mouse
The mouse is the most heavily used component of many systems,
particularly within Windows and is susceptible to damage, but a
little care should minimise this.
1/6
THE BEGINNING
Dust and fluff often accumulates in the ball tracking mechanism of
the mouse and should be checked for regularly. To clean the mouse:
1. Unplug the mouse, turn it upside down and locate the plastic
cover that holds the ball in place. Depending on the model, the
plastic cover can be removed either by rotating it counterclockwise or by sliding it forward slightly.
2. Remove the cover and set it aside.
3. Cupping one hand over the underside, turn the mouse back the
right way up. The ball should drop into your hand.
4. Blow gently into the mouse to remove any dust that has
collected there.
5. Inside the mouse there are three small rollers. Using a cotton
swab moistened with a solvent cleaner, gently wipe off any oil or
dust that has collected on the rollers, rotating them to reach all
of their surfaces.
6. Use clear water, or water with a mild detergent, to clean the ball.
Then dry it with a clean, lint-free cloth.
7. Put the ball back in its socket and replace the plastic cover. It
should click into place.
The mouse cable should also be regularly checked for wear and tear,
especially near table or shelf edges.
Transporting the computer
Use common sense when handling the computer. Hard disks in
particular can be damaged if the computer is dropped or handled
roughly. As a precaution, back up your data from the hard disks to
tape or floppy disks before moving the computer. (See the Hard disk
section of the chapter ‘System drives’).
Do not try to move the computer while it is plugged into the AC
power supply or with any other cables, network, printer etc., still
attached.
1/7
THE BEGINNING
When lifting and carrying the computer, grip the metal underside of
the system unit. Do not lift the unit by the plastic side trims or the
front bezel. Never attempt to use the door as a carrying handle.
Never attempt to lift the system unit with a monitor on top.
Do not leave floppy disks or CDs in the drives while moving the
system as irreparable damage could occur to either drives or disks.
If you need to transport the computer any great distance, use the
original packing materials.
Warning
If you intend to use the computer in another country, read the information in
the Power Connection Guide before doing anything else.
1/8
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
2
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
This chapter contains useful information about the drives that are
currently fitted in your computer, either behind the front pull-down
panel or, in the case of the hard drive, inside the system.
Using the floppy disk drive
The floppy disk drive is usually configured in the system BIOS as
drive A:, with a capacity of 1.44 Mbytes.
Virtually all software still supplied on floppy disk is now sent out in
HD (or 1.44 MB) format from the manufacturer. This is the type of
drive fitted to your Apricot computer. This drive will however read
the common older type of DS-DD (or 720KB). the immediately
obvious physical differences are shown below.
The true high density floppy has the ‘HD’ logo near the window
and an extra hole beside the label, to enable the drive to identify it.
The other hole, that exists on both disks, is for a write protect tab
(on the underside) which, if closed, will prevent the system from
writing any data onto the disk.
Do not try to force the format of a DS-DD disk to the higher
format of 1.44 Mbytes as this will lead to many formatting errors,
with a very high risk of losing all data placed on that disk. This is
due to the ‘HD’ disk having a very different magnetic surface.
2/1
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
Disks should always be kept away from bright sunlight, dust,
moisture and any strong magnetic fields, e.g. do not place them on
the monitor, printer, or near a telephone. It is common to store them
in a lockable “disk-box”, away from the computer itself. Avoid
opening the metal window on the disk as this exposes the magnetic
surface to contamination which could damage the data or cause the
disk to become useless.
Hint
It is always a good idea to keep a few spare ready formatted disks handy for
saving work or backing up your software. Information on formatting disks
and software backup can be found in the Windows 95 help pages.
COMPACT
.
Inserting a floppy disk
1. Pull down the drive bezel and identify the floppy drive. Test the
button to ensure there are no disks in the drive.
2. Insert the disk with the metal window first, with the label side
uppermost into the drive. This will push open the drive door,
which will stay open, leaving the disk just visible.
3. Push the disk gently home until it “clicks” into place. The drive
button will also move outwards slightly.
2/2
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
4. The system should now be able to access the disk and the
information it may contain. While the system is accessing the
disk, the “drive in use” LED should be lit.
Pressing the button, when the drive is not in use, will eject the
floppy disk.
Using a CD-ROM drive
Unless either a second hard drive has been installed, or the existing
hard drive has been given more than one partition then the CDROM drive is usually drive D:.
There has recently been a vast increase in the amount of multimedia
software supplied on CD format due to its large capacity, typically
600 Mbytes plus.
With the appropriate software, a CD-ROM drive can retrieve
multimedia data from CD-ROM discs, pictures from Multisession
Photo-CD discs and also play commercial audio CDs.
DISC DRAWER
T
COMPAC
HEADPHONE JACK
AND HEADPHONE LEVEL
BUSY
INDICATOR
EMERGENCY
EJECT HOLE
EJECT
BUTTON
Although the drive has its own headphone jack, with associated
volume level control, for use in playing audio CDs, you can plug in
the power speakers at the rear socket, shown in the chapter
‘Multimedia’. It is also possible to link the headphone socket via a
cable, to your Hi-fi system, and play CDs at higher power.
2/3
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
Warning
The laser beam inside the CD-ROM drive is harmful to the eyes if looked at
directly. Do not attempt to remove the drive cover or otherwise disassemble the
CD-ROM drive. If a fault occurs, call an authorised maintainer.
Keep CDs well away from dust, moisture and temperature extremes
and avoid touching the surface of the CD. Store them in solid
containers wherever possible. Replacement plastic CD containers are
available from most large record stores.
Inserting a compact disc
1. Pull down the front drives bezel and identify the CD drive.
2. Press the EJECT button on the front of drive.
3. Place the CD centrally face up on the platter.
T
COMPAC
4. If the platter ejected fully, push the EJECT button again, or gently
push the front of the platter, and it will be drawn back into the
drive.
Note
Wait a few seconds for the CD to spin up to full speed before attempting either
to play the audio tracks or to read data from it.
2/4
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
To remove a compact disc, press the eject button and then lift out
the CD. It is best to close the draw, to prevent dust getting in, unless
you intend to put in a new CD.
Do not attempt to move the computer while a CD is in the drive.
Vibration can cause the CD to move and jam in the drive. Serious
damage could be caused to both the CD and the drive, especially if
the drive is active at the time.
To remove a CD manually (for example, during a power failure) you
must first ensure that the computer is turned off. Insert a thin metal
rod (such as an unwound paper clip) into the emergency eject hole.
Push carefully and firmly (see below).
T
COMPAC
The hard disk drive
All modern computers are fitted with a ‘hard’ disk drive (HDD).
These can have very large capacities. They have delicate, sealed and
air-tight, mechanisms. They operate within microscopic tolerances
and spin at high speed.
Caution
Try not to jar or move the computer while the system is powered up as this
could cause irreparable damage to the delicate drive surface.
2/5
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
The primary hard drive
Your Apricot computer is supplied with one internal or ‘primary’
hard drive (HDD) designated as the C: drive. Windows 95 will
normally be installed on this drive.
Data is stored on the HDD in Directories and Subdirectories, now
referred to in Windows 95 as ‘folders’. More details on directories
and folders will be found in the Windows 95 guide, as will
information on software utilities, such as one to compress the
software into a smaller space (referred to later in this chapter.)
A secondary hard drive
Caution
Apricot Computers Limited test many types of hard disks from a wide variety
of manufacturers and all of our upgrade parts are fully guaranteed. The
quality or compatibility of components supplied from any other source cannot
be guaranteed.
Computers can have two hard disk drives, designated as Master and
Slave, and the Apricot system BIOS is capable of handling this.
Any slave drive will be supplied completely blank, but should be
supplied with full instructions. Fitting and setting up a second hard
drive is not difficult, but there can be many issues to be resolved,
only one of which is drive type. There are these facts to consider:
• Handling and fixing the delicate module
• Master to slave compatibility
• Jumpers and links on the drives
• Partitioning and formatting
• Existing ribbon cable re-connection and/or extension
If you do not feel confident about installing a second hard drive you
may wish to have your supplier or an authorised engineer complete
this task for you.
2/6
THE SYSTEM DRIVES
DriveSpace
It is possible, as an alternative to the expense of fitting a second
HDD, to use disk utility software such as DriveSpace within
Windows 95, which increases the usable capacity of your HDD. It
can double the usable size of the drive using software compression
technology. See the Windows 95 HELP for details on using this
utility. Remember it is advisable to backup your software first.
Software backup
Within Windows 95 there is considerable Help on numerous topics
including backing up, or making a security copy of, your software. It
is vital to maintain a discipline of regular backup of your data.
Power cuts or hard disk failure are just two reasons.
Your operating system or applications e.g. word processing software,
can be simply reinstalled from your master disks or CD’s. The
letters or files you have created would be lost permanently. Your files
may not be very large, but they will be impossible to replace once
lost.
Copy your data files to floppy disks, or use proprietary utilities
designed to do software backups, such as the one in Windows 95.
Do this regularly and then keep the back-up in a safe place. It is
good practice to perform a back-up regularly using two or more sets
of disks, rotated for safety.
Quite a few companies manufacture backup units, accompanied by
dedicated software, some of which can backup your complete hard
disk two or three times over on to one small tape cassette in a
comparatively short time. These are mostly used in networked office
environments, but there are much simpler and more economic
versions designed for personal or home use.
2/7
SYSTEM EXPANSION
3
SYSTEM EXPANSION
Your computer can accept various Expansion cards or boards. Most
are simple to install with the benefit of the ‘Plug and Play’ features,
explained in the guide to Windows 95. (Look out for the ‘Plug and
Play’ symbol on the packaging of these add-in boards). You can
extend the capabilities of the computer, for example:
• A graphics/movie card can provide more specialised video
functions than those offered by the on-board EVGA system.
• A modem card can provide a connection to the Internet or a
bulletin board via a telephone line.
• A network card can provide a connection to an office or business
network fileserver and possibly mainframe.
• A television card can enable you to watch TV on your monitor
and capture individual frames.
This computer system has room for five expansion boards:
one,
two,
one,
one,
full length Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) card.
half length ISA cards.
half length Peripheral Component Interface (PCI) card.
either full length ISA or full length PCI card.
These can be arranged into the internal Riser card generally as
shown in this rear view (the blanking plates have been removed for
simplicity of showing the layout).
FULL ISA
1/2 ISA
FULL PCI
FULL ISA
1/2 PCI
1/2 ISA
AUDIO REAR CONNECTIONS
(IF FITTED)
1
10101
2
3/1
SYSTEM EXPANSION
Configuring the card
Part of the installation procedure for many expansion cards involves
setting up or configuring the card so it works correctly in the
system. To configure, you assign values to various settings on the
card, which enable the card to communicate with the computer. The
chosen settings MUST be registered in the BIOS see appendix C
‘System BIOS and set-up’ and the section ‘ISA Legacy resources’.
Many cards require that you specify at least two of the following:
• Interrupt request level (IRQ)
• Direct memory access (DMA) channel
• Base input/output (I/O) port address
• Base memory address
The important thing to understand is that the settings used by the
card must be different to existing hardware in the computer. That is
the settings must not conflict with other cards or a component on
the motherboard.
Some settings are done by jumpers and/or switches on the card and
are best completed before installation, others are configured by
running installation software after the card has been fitted inside the
computer. Some cards use a mixture of both methods.
The documentation accompanying the card should tell you what is
required. Remember to check any diskettes supplied with the card
for README or other help files, before you start. If you are in any
doubt consult the supplier or manufacturer.
Cards often come with pre-configured or default settings. It is best
to rely on these settings as much as possible, and change them only
if they conflict with other devices.
3/2
SYSTEM EXPANSION
ISA Interrupt request level (IRQ)
The interrupt request level or IRQ (the two terms are used
interchangeably) is the line over which the expansion card sends a
signal to get the attention of, or interrupt, the processor. Many of
these are reserved for components on the computer’s motherboard.
Some interrupts are fixed, others can be re-assigned. The following
table lists the interrupts used by the computer and shows which may
be available for use by expansion cards.
IRQ
Default assignment
Available?
IRQ0
System timer
No
IRQ1
Keyboard controller
No
IRQ2
System
No
IRQ3
Serial port 2/Remote controller
No
IRQ4
Serial port 1
Optionally
IRQ5
Audio (if fitted)
Yes
IRQ6
Diskette controller
No
IRQ7
Parallel port
Optionally
IRQ8
Real time clock
No
IRQ9
Yes
IRQ10
Yes
IRQ11
Yes
IRQ12
Mouse
No
IRQ13
Coprocessor
No
IRQ14
Primary ATA/IDE interface
No
IRQ15
Secondary ATA/IDE interface
No
With the BIOS Set-up utility IRQ4 is available if you disable serial
port1. Similarly, if you have no intention of using the parallel port,
you can disable it with the BIOS Set-up utility, completely freeing
IRQ7 for use by an expansion card. Do not disable ports unless you
have no intention of using them.
3/3
SYSTEM EXPANSION
Direct memory access (DMA) channel
Some hardware devices can use a DMA channel to access system
memory without directly burdening the processor. Computers have
DMA channels numbered DMA0 to DMA7.
The following table lists the DMA channels used by the computer
and shows which are available for use by expansion cards.
DMA
Default assignment
DMA0
Available?
Yes
DMA1
8-bit Audio
Optionally
DMA2
Diskette/floppy disk controller
No
DMA3
Enhanced Capabilities Port (default)
Optionally
DMA4
System
No
DMA5
16-bit Audio
Optionally
DMA6
Yes
DMA7
Yes
Base input/output (I/O) port address
I/O ports are an area of ‘address space’ used by the processor to
communicate with hardware devices.
Some expansion cards are also controlled by I/O ports. The base
I/O port address specifies where the card’s ports begin. The
following table lists the I/O ports used by devices on the
motherboard.
Any ports not listed are available for expansion cards.
3/4
SYSTEM EXPANSION
I/O ports
Default assignment
All addresses below 100h are used by the system board for various
fixed system components and chipset controller settings.
They are unavailable for use.
1F0h-1F7h
Hard disk drive controller
200h-207h
Game I/O
278h-27Fh
Parallel port 2
2B0h-2DFh
Alternate VGA
2F8h-2FFh
Serial port 2
378h-37Fh
Parallel port 1
3B0h-3BFh
Monochrome display and printer adapter
3B4h, 3B5h, 3BAh
Video subsystem
3C0h-3C5h
VGA
3C6h-3C9h
Video DAC
3CAh-3DFh
VGA
3F0h-3F7h
Diskette drive controller
3F8h-3FFh
Serial port 1
Base memory address
Some expansion cards are fitted with memory of their own, usually
read-only memory (ROM) containing functional extensions to the
computer’s BIOS (basic input/output system) ROM. Some cards also
have random-access memory (RAM).
In order that this memory can be recognised by the system
processor, it must be mapped somewhere within the computer’s own
address space. By setting the base memory address you specify
where the card’s memory begins within the address space. Typically,
an expansion card’s memory must be mapped onto the addresses
between C8000h and EFFFFh in upper memory. With most modern
expansion cards this is fully automatic.
3/5
SYSTEM EXPANSION
Note
Memory addresses are always written in base 16 or hexadecimal notation.
Unlike the ten digits of the decimal system (0-9), hexadecimal uses sixteen
digits (0-9 and A-F, where A=10, B=11, C=12 and so on up to F=15).
Hexadecimal numbers are denoted either by the suffix “h” or by the prefix
“0x”. The final digit of a five-digit memory address is often omitted, so
C8000h may be written as C800h. Since amounts of memory are usually
stated as kilobytes rather than in hexadecimal notation, the following
conversion table may be helpful:
4 Kbytes = 1000h
8 Kbytes = 2000h
16 Kbytes = 4000h
32 Kbytes = 8000h
64 Kbytes = 10000h
128 Kbytes = 20000h
The card’s documentation should list its possible base memory
addresses. You will also need to know how much memory the card
has, so that you can leave the right gap between this card’s base
address and the next.
Installing the card
The only tool required is a small cross-head screwdriver
1. Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords.
2. Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the system unit
cover.
Note
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static precautions and/or the
process of removing the system unit cover, refer to Appendix A, “Inside the
System Unit”.
3/6
SYSTEM EXPANSION
3. At the rear of the system unit are metal blanking plates, one for
each expansion card slot. Opposite the blanking plates, at the
front of the system unit, there are card guides. These ensure that
the front edge of a full-length card is supported securely.
4. First decide in which of the available slots you wish to install the
card. In general it is easiest to start with the lowest slot and work
upwards.
5. Check on two things, the type of board (ISA or PCI) and then its
length. Not all slots take the same length or type of card.
6. Remove the blanking plate of the chosen slot by removing its
securing screw. On the power supply side, remove the security
plate, then slide the blanking plate out of its slot. Keep all the
screws, etc., they will be needed later to secure the card.
7. If the card you are installing is configured by the means of
jumpers or switches, check that it is correctly configured before
proceeding.
Note
If the card uses the video or audio feature connector on the motherboard, you
may need to connect this before you install the card (otherwise, the card could
get in the way of the connector). See appendix B,’System Motherboard’ for
location of these connections.
3/7
SYSTEM EXPANSION
8. Position the expansion card alongside the slot in which you wish
to install it. Align the rear of the card with the slot in the rear of
the system unit, and, if the card is full length, align the front of
the card with the card guide.
9. Slide the card into the slot ensuring that the card edge connector
engages correctly with the socket on the riser board. Do not
use excessive force.
10. Secure the card by replacing all the screws/clamps that you
removed in Step 5.
11. Connect any necessary signal cables to the card.
12. Check to ensure no other cables or connectors have become
dislodged and replace the system unit cover.
Before you switch on, read the manuals supplied with the card. If
you are certain all is correct, switch on. Your first task if you have
just fitted an ISA card will be to enter the BIOS to register the
settings in the ‘ISA Legacy resources’ section. See Appendix C ‘System
BIOS and set-up’. Then follow any other installation requirements,
such as software etc. PCI cards of course will not need this step.
If you are installing a new video controller card and subsequently
encounter problems, try disabling the built in EVGA video controller
by removing the jumper on the motherboard. Refer to the
motherboard layout diagram in Appendix B, ‘System Motherboard’, to
locate PL22 with the EVGA controller jumper.
Installing expansion cards can be one of the most difficult operations
you may ever perform within your computer. If you are in any
doubt, or come into difficulties you are unable to resolve, contact the
supplier of the expansion board or ask your Apricot dealer for advice
or assistance.
3/8
MEMORY UPGRADES
4
MEMORY UPGRADES
Read this chapter before purchasing any memory upgrade
and if in any doubt consult your supplier. Then, if having read the
relevant instructions, you still do not feel confident about installing
the upgrade, you may wish to have your supplier or service
organisation install it for you.
Caution
Apricot Computers Ltd have extensively tested many combinations of memory
and all of our upgrade parts are guaranteed. The quality or compatibility of
components obtained from any other source cannot be guaranteed.
Appendix A, “The System Unit”, provides an overview of anti-static
precautions, instructions on removing the top cover and the
appendix B ‘System Motherboard’, an outline guide showing all of the
appropriate memory locations.
The only tool required is a small cross-head screwdriver.
Warning
Never carry out any work inside the computer with AC power applied. Turn
off the computer and unplug all power cords before starting work.
Adding more system memory
The computer’s motherboard is fitted with sockets for up to four
SIMMs (single in-line memory modules). You may need to add more
memory if you want to run complex operating systems or large
application programs.
The SIMM sockets are located at the front of the motherboard. Each
pair of sockets, or bank, can be fitted with SIMMs. SIMMs with
capacities of 2, 4, 8, 16 or 32 Mbytes are supported, giving a
maximum capacity of 128 Mbytes.
SIMMs must be fitted in pairs and the pair must be identical.
4/1
MEMORY UPGRADES
Either bank can be used first. A normal specification of 32-Bit
SIMMs having an access time of 70ns for a 5V power supply
applies.
Parity checking (36-Bit) SIMMs are not necessary.
The Electronic Data Output (EDO) type SIMMs are fully supported
and will give enhanced performance, more noticeably if L2 cache is
low or not fitted.
This table shows all the supported memory configurations.
Total memory
MM1
8 Mb
12 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
20 Mb
24 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
36 Mb
40 Mb
48 Mb
64 Mb
64 Mb
68 Mb
72 Mb
80 Mb
96 Mb
128 Mb
4 Mb
4 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
8 Mb
8 Mb
8 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
+
MM2
MM3 +
MM4
4 Mb
4 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
8 Mb
8 Mb
8 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
16 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
32 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
16 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
16 Mb
32 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
16 Mb
2 Mb
4 Mb
8 Mb
16 Mb
32 Mb
Installing and removing SIMMs
1. Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords.
2. Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the system unit
cover.
4/2
MEMORY UPGRADES
Caution
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static precautions and/or the
process of removing the system unit cover, refer to Appendix A, “The System
Unit”.
3. Remove carefully the floppy disk drive module which restricts
access to the SIMM sockets (first identifying the way all cables
are fitted) by disconnecting the cables, loosening the screws and
lifting out.
4. Compare the current configuration of SIMMs with the
configuration for the memory upgrade you intend to install. If
necessary, remove the existing SIMMs, before going on to install
the new SIMMs.
To install a SIMM
1. Take the SIMM out of its anti-static packaging. Hold it by its
edges and avoid touching the metal contacts.
Note that the SIMM is not symmetrical. There are small notches in
one end and also slightly off-centre along the connection edge, as
shown in the picture above, it will only fit into the socket one way.
2. Place the SIMM in the socket at a 15o angle to the vertical.
4/3
MEMORY UPGRADES
3. Pushing gently on its top corners, stand the SIMM upright in the
socket until the pegs of the socket engage the holes on the
SIMM and the metal clips hold both ends of the SIMM firmly in
position.
Do not use excessive force.
4. If the SIMM will not fit easily, remove it and start again.
5. Repeat these steps for each SIMM you want to install.
Note
It is not important which pair of SIMM sockets are used first, but it is usual to
start with the outer bank (sockets MM1 and MM2).
To remove a SIMM
1. Gently disengage the metal holding clips on each side of the
socket using your thumbs, while placing your forefingers on the
top edge of the SIMM. Then tilt the SIMM forward to about 15o
to the vertical.
2. Lift the SIMM out of its socket. Hold the SIMM by its edges and
avoid touching the metal contacts.
3. Place the SIMM in suitable anti-static packaging.
When you have finished, replace and reconnect the drive module
you removed earlier, then refit and secure the system unit cover.
Reconfiguring the system
The first time you turn on the computer after adding or removing
SIMMs the memory change will be automatically detected by the
system BIOS, but you will have to confirm to the BIOS that the
change it has detected is correct. See appendix C ‘System BIOS and setup’
If an error message occurs check that you have:
1. Installed a configuration supported in the list above.
2. Correctly fitted the SIMMs in their slots.
4/4
MEMORY UPGRADES
3. The SIMMs are of the correct type
It may be necessary to refit the original memory SIMMs to check if
there is a problem with your new SIMMs. If in any doubt contact
your supplier.
Adding more cache memory
An external or secondary level (L2) cache is a small amount of
specialised memory with significantly faster access times than the
computer’s system RAM. A controller ensures that it always contains
a copy of the most recently accessed areas of RAM, so that the
processor is able to read it quickly, without waiting for the slower
main memory.
In this system only the first 64 Mb of RAM is cached.
First-level (L1) cache is contained within the processor itself, and is
not changeable. It could be either 8 Kb or 16 Kb.
You can improve the performance of some software applications by
adding or upgrading the L2 cache memory.
To decide if an upgrade is possible:
• Check the BIOS summary page, to find out how much cache
memory the computer already has. See Appendix C, ‘System BIOS
and set-up’.
• Check with your supplier to find out what upgrade kits are
available.
Caution
Some older software is very speed sensitive and in some cases, to use it, you may
have to disable the cache memory.
To fit cache memory
1. Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords.
2. Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the system unit
cover.
4/5
MEMORY UPGRADES
Caution
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static precautions and/or the
process of removing the system unit cover, refer to Appendix A, “The System
Unit”.
3. Identify the cache memory socket see appendix B ‘System
Motherboard’, in conjunction with the picture below.
4. To fit or remove a module in the cache socket, you may have to
remove any expansion cards that are in the way. (Take note of
which way all cables are connected.) Disconnect any cables
connected to the cards, remove the screws that secure the cards
at the rear of the system unit, then remove the cards from the
system unit.
5. Remove the existing Cache memory SIMM module (if fitted) by
carefully lifting by the edges. It is a tight fit.
6. Fit the new Cache memory SIMM module by aligning the
module with the slot and carefully pressing home. It will only fit
in one way. Remember, it is a fairly tight fit.
7. If necessary, replace any expansion cards you removed earlier
and reconnect all cables etc.
4/6
MEMORY UPGRADES
8. Refit and secure the system unit cover, reconnect the system and
switch on.
9. Check the BIOS sign-on message to see the new value of cache
memory is displayed.
Adding more video memory
Video memory is memory reserved for use by the on-board EVGA
controller. More video memory provides more colours and/or
higher resolutions (provided that your monitor can cope).
The on board vidoe section of your computer has 1 Mbyte of video
memory, which is more than adequate for normal use. For specialist
graphics applications you can upgrade it to 2 Mbytes by adding
memory chips to the fitted sockets.
There are no changes to be made to the system BIOS. The only
immediate differences will be apparent when you come to make
changes to your video settings. More features will be available.
1. Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords.
2. Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the system unit
cover.
Caution
If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static precautions and/or the
process of removing the system unit cover, refer to Appendix A, “The System
Unit”.
3. If there are any expansion cards in the way, you may have to
remove them. (Take note of which way all of the cables are
connected.) Disconnect any cables connected to the cards,
remove the screws that secure the cards at the rear of the system
unit, then remove the cards from the system unit.
4. Identify the two video memory upgrade sockets, see appendix B,
“System Motherboard”
5. Unpack the upgrade kit and lay the memory chips out on an
anti-static surface. Hold each chip by its edges and be careful not
4/7
MEMORY UPGRADES
to touch the metal pins. These memory chips are particularly
static sensitive. Handle with extreme caution.
6. It is extremely important that the chips are fitted the right
way round. Each chip has a notch at one end or small bevel at
one corner, corresponding to the notch or bevel on the socket
corner. These must be aligned as shown.
7. One at a time, press the chips in the sockets., push firmly home.
8. If necessary, replace any expansion cards you removed earlier
and reconnect any cables etc.
9. Refit and secure the system unit cover. Then switch on and
check your system.
Remember, no immediate on-screen changes will be apparent, unless
there is a fault with the upgrade chips just fitted. Running the video
driver set-up software will highlight extra capabilities.
4/8
MULTIMEDIA
5
MULTIMEDIA
This chapter is designed to give you basic information on a few of
the multimedia features that may be fitted to your computer. It is a
catch-all term that covers audio, CD-ROM, communications,
education, fax, games, Internet, modem, movies, networking, photoediting, publishing, radio, scanners. television, voice-mail and more,
as it is an area under continuous development.
This Apricot computer is supplied fitted with on board audio in the
form of a Soundblaster 16 bit sound system. There is also a Quad
speed CD-ROM drive, the audio ouitput of which is internally wired
to the sounblaster system.
Software and Drivers
All of the Multimedia aspects are controlled by software drivers that
are loaded by the operating system, Windows 95 and its internal
control files. These files are read by your computer when it boots up
after pressing the power button and the software initialises the CDROM drive, the Sound system, plus any other devices that may be
installed.
All of the software should have been installed, either by our factory
or your supplier. You should not initially attempt to reinstall any of
the device drivers as it may lead to conflicts in the computer as it
tries to boot up, causing the software to believe, for example, that
there may be two CD drives. If you have any difficulties contact your
supplier or authorised maintainer. If you are making changes or
adding expansion cards yourself, some useful information is in the
chapter ‘System Expansion’.
The CD-ROM drive
The drive specification is detailed in appendix A ‘The system unit’
and its basic operation in the chapter ‘System drives’. There are few
controls for the CD-ROM drive, the most important being on the
bottom right - the ‘open drive’ or eject button.
5/1
MULTIMEDIA
DISC DRAWER
T
COMPAC
HEADPHONE JACK
AND HEADPHONE LEVEL
BUSY
INDICATOR
EMERGENCY
EJECT HOLE
EJECT
BUTTON
This causes the drive tray to open in order to place a CD into the
drive. The other two controls are as shown above, headphone
connection and volume control, which are for use whilst playing
commercial audio or music CDs. That is if you are not using any
external speakers, or feeding the output to your hi-fi system.
Note
You can still use all the other facilities on your computer while you are playing
music from your CD drive.
Remember to allow a few seconds to enable the CD to reach full
speed before attempting to play the audio tracks or read the data.
You can play audio or music CDs by using the utilities in Windows
95. Check with the Windows 95 HELP under multimedia topics for
detailed information
Inside your system, the CD drive audio connection is hard wired
directly to the on board sound system, so that the full stereo sound is
amplified and controlled by the Soundblaster.
Photo CDs
Photo CDs can hold up to 100 full colour photographs and with
appropriate software they can be viewed, edited and then printed out
via your computer, or included in your letters and reports. Most
reputable camera or photo shops can provide further information on
getting your best pictures transferred to CD. There are several
5/2
MULTIMEDIA
software titles designed to read and edit images from the standard
Photo CD formats. The word ‘Multisession’ is often used to describe
Photo CDs. It simply means that some of the photographs were
recorded on the CD at different times or in separate ‘sessions’. This
is no problem for modern CD drives.
The sound connections
There is a rear panel for audio connections, mounted at the bottom
of the expansion slot area. All the stereo jack sockets are standard
size common to most modern audio systems.
Microphone
The input circuitry will accept most of the popular types of mono
microphone that are available, providing phantom power for the
electret condenser types.
Rear connections
1. Joystick/MIDI port.
2. Microphone socket.
3. Line IN socket.
4. Line OUT socket.
5. Speakers jack socket.
1
2
3
4
5
1
10101
2
5/3
TROUBLESHOOTING
6
TROUBLESHOOTING
This chapter offers advice if you suspect a fault with your computer.
If in doubt
Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords before consulting your
supplier or maintenance provider. Make a note of any of the symptoms, error
codes, display messages etc., before calling.
This chapter is concerned mainly with problems caused by the
computer itself, although problems can often arise from other sources
such as your network cabling, operating system or application
software.
It must also be remembered that it can be very easy to leave off or
dislodge cables and connectors inside the computer when fitting
expansion cards, or upgrading the memory, or indeed anything that
may require temporary removal of the system cover.
Problems when starting
If you suspect a blown fuse
In the United Kingdom, and some other countries, AC plugs contain
fuses. Your Apricot computer is initially supplied with the correct
fuse fitted for operation within the UK. If the fuse in the system
unit’s AC plug blows when you turn it on, this may be caused by an
AC power surge, but is more likely a symptom of problems with the
computer or its peripherals. Follow these steps:
1. Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords.
2. Unplug all peripherals from the system, e.g. monitor.
3. Look for any obvious cause of the fault. If none is apparent,
replace the blown fuse with one of the same rating, reconnect the
system power cord and try to turn it on again.
6/1
TROUBLESHOOTING
4. If the replacement fuse blows, call your supplier or maintenance
provider.
5. If the replacement fuse does not blow, reconnect one peripheral
at a time and switch it on. Repeat this step for each peripheral in
turn.
Power-on self-test
Whenever the computer is switched on, the POST routine tests
various hardware components, including memory, and compares the
actual configuration of the computer with that recorded in
configuration (CMOS) memory. During this time, BIOS sign-on and
POST messages are displayed.
A configuration discrepancy could arise if you have just installed or
removed a hardware option (for example, if you have added or
replaced a SIMM). In this case you may be diverted directly into the
BIOS set-up. If POST detects a hardware fault, one or more error
messages may be displayed. A full list of these is given at the end of
appendix C ‘System BIOS and set-up’.
Your first action should be to turn off the computer, wait at least 30
seconds, and then turn it on again to see if the error is transitory or
persistent. Persistent POST errors may indicate a fault in the system.
The computer may be able to continue despite the error indication
(for example, if a memory chip fails POST, the computer can
sometimes continue with less memory).
If after checking the BIOS settings you are unable to clear the
hardware problem call your supplier or authorised maintainer.
Failure to boot
The computer attempts to boot from a system diskette or bootable
HDD partition.
Failure to boot correctly may result in an error message, most of
which will be from the BIOS. One other may be ;
Non system disk or disk error. Replace and strike any key when ready.
There may be a floppy disk in the drive which is not a bootable
6/2
TROUBLESHOOTING
floppy, in which case remove it, or replace it with one that is. If the
message persists there may be a fault with the HDD, in which case,
check the BIOS settings are correct. If they are then the HDD may
need to be reformatted and the system software restored.
Restoring the Software
In the event of a complete disaster the original software can be
restored by means of the special sealed pack supplied with the
system. Full instructions are supplied with this CD and floppy disk.
To prevent risk of confusion with other CD’s and floppies, this pack
should not be opened unless there is no alternative.
Warning
It should not be used other than for a complete system restore. It will erase the
contents of your hard disk. You will need to re-enter your original system
settings (video, printer, etc.) by use of the Windows 95 installation CD.
Troubleshooting checklist
If you encounter a problem with the computer the following sections
suggest checks to make before you alert your dealer, authorised
maintainer or support organisation. The checks listed cover the
causes of common problems.
Connections
Check that all power and signal cables are securely connected to the
correct port on the computer.
The keyboard and mouse are particularly easy to connect into the
wrong port. Although the connectors are identical, the keyboard will
not work if plugged into the mouse port, and vice versa.
The two serial ports also appear identical. If you have a problem
make sure that the cable is connected to the correct port.
6/3
TROUBLESHOOTING
Power
Check that the AC power supply is switched on, and that the fuse in
the AC plug (if any) has not blown. If the system still does not seem
to be getting power, obtain another power cord from your supplier.
Monitor
If there is no display check that the monitor is turned on, and the
brightness and contrast controls are not turned to minimum.
Expansion cards
If an expansion card does not work, check that all internal cables are
securely connected, that the card is configured correctly and does not
‘conflict’ with another card or motherboard component. Check also
that the software that controls or uses the card is correctly
configured. Check in the chapter ‘Upgrading’ for information on, for
example IRQ’s and in the Appendix C ‘System BIOS and set-up’
whether your chosen settings are usable. Check also that the
resources used are registered in the BIOS.
Video
If you have fitted a new video controller card and subsequently
encounter problems, try disabling the built in EVGA video controller
by removing the jumper on the motherboard. Refer to the
motherboard layout diagram in Appendix B, ‘System Motherboard’, to
locate PL22 with the EVGA controller jumper.
If you have difficulty reading the screen, or some programs do not
seem to display correctly, try a different video resolution or colour
setting. Some graphics may require a particular colour setting.
System BIOS
Check the system BIOS to ensure that it has not been disturbed from
the original settings. If the settings appear to have altered, there may
be a fault with the BIOS battery. See Appendix B, ‘System
Motherboard’ and Appendix C ‘System BIOS and set-up’.
6/4
TROUBLESHOOTING
The system’s disk drives
Refer also to the chapter on using the ‘system drives’.
Floppy disk drives
If you have problems accessing a diskette or floppy disk, check that
it is inserted correctly, that it has been correctly formatted, that is not
write-protected, and that the permissions assigned by the BIOS
allow the intended access. Some application software may not allow
you to read or write to floppy disks while performing certain other
tasks, or waits until you are about to exit the programme.
CD-ROM drives
If you have problems accessing a CD, check that you have allowed a
few seconds for the disk to spin up to full speed, that the disk is the
correct way up in the drive and that it is a data CD. Remember that
you cannot save your data onto a CD with a conventional CD drive
and disk.
Hard disk drives
If you have problems accessing your hard disk drive, check that the
controller to which the drive is connected is enabled, that the disk
has been correctly formatted, and that the permissions assigned by
the BIOS or the software that you are using allow the intended
access.
Software security
It is regrettable but it is now a requirement to regularly scan your
system for software ‘virus’ intrusion. Viruses can cause strange effects
and serious damage to both software and sometimes hardware. Even
the system BIOS is not immune.
Inability to access drives, destruction of data and even wiping of
system BIOS have been experienced by unknowing recipients.
If possible, check all floppy disks of unknown origin with virus
scanning software before use, If it was supplied from an unauthorised
6/5
TROUBLESHOOTING
source, e.g. ‘a friend gave me this great program’, be especially on
your guard. The supplier may not be aware of the potential problem.
Illegal copying of programs has led to vast distribution of the many
common types of virus.
There are various software companies who design Anti-Virus
software for both home and corporate use and some of these are very
reliable. They are however no substitute for tight control of your
system and your software.
Virus infection can be avoided. It should never be any great threat
providing reasonably simple precautions are taken:
• Purchase software from only reputable sources.
• Avoid ‘second hand’ software.
• Do not lend other people your software master disks.
• Write protect your floppy disks.
• Perform regular backups of your data.
• Always be aware of what other people might be doing when
they have open access to your computer.
• With any ‘Second hand’ disks, format them first.
Very few software problems are caused by a virus and the vast
majority of users will not get infected by them. For most users it is
more likely to be simply a corruption of some of the data.
It is also possible to see problems when trying to load the wrong
type of file into an application. This can sometimes cause the
application to stop, or even the system to crash completely. In this
situation, remove any floppy disks and switch the system of for a few
moments, then restart.
6/6
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
A
THE SYSTEM UNIT
This appendix provides instructions regarding access to the inside of
the system unit for the purposes of maintaining or upgrading the
system, plus some of the general system/drives specifications. The
only tool required is a small cross head screwdriver.
Warning
Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords before removing the top
cover.
Anti-static precautions
Static electricity can cause permanent damage to electronic
components. You should be aware of this risk, and take precautions
against the discharge of static electricity into the computer.
Static electricity can be generated by moving on a chair, brushing
against desks or walls, or simply walking across an ordinary carpet.
Items handed from one person to another, or being wrapped or
unwrapped, can acquire a static charge. Air conditioning systems can
also result in very high levels of static.
Clothing made of synthetic fibres is particularly likely to generate
static electricity; this static electricity is often completely unnoticed
by the wearer, but can be sufficient to cripple or destroy sensitive
electronic components in computers.
The computer is at risk from static discharge while the top cover is
off, as the electronic components of the motherboard are exposed.
Memory modules, cache upgrades and OverDrive processors are
other examples of electrostatic sensitive devices (ESSDs).
All work that involves removing the cover must be done in an area
completely free of static electricity. We recommend using a Special
Handling Area (SHA) as defined by EN 100015-1: 1992. This
means that working surfaces, floor coverings and chairs must be
connected to a common earth reference point, and you should wear
A/1
TECHNICAL INFOMATION
an earthed wrist strap and anti-static clothing. It is also a good idea
to use an ionizer or humidifier to remove static from the air.
•
When installing any upgrade, be sure you understand what the
installation procedure involves before you start. This will enable
you to plan your work, and so minimise the amount of time that
sensitive components are exposed.
•
Do not remove the system unit cover, nor the anti-static bag or
wrapping of any upgrade, until you need to.
•
Handle static-sensitive items with extreme care. Hold expansion
cards and add-on components only by their edges, avoiding their
electrical contacts. Never touch the components or electrical
contacts on the motherboard or on expansion cards. In general,
do not handle static-sensitive items unnecessarily.
•
Keep all conductive material, foodstuffs and especially liquids,
away from your work area and the open computer.
1
10101
2
CASING SCREW
CASING SCREW
Opening the system unit
To remove the system unit cover:
1. Turn off both the system unit and the monitor.
2. If your AC power outlets have switches, set them to their Off
positions.
3. Unplug all power cords from rear of the system unit.
4. Remove the two casing screws, and put them to one side.
A/2
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
5. Slide the top cover rearwards slightly, then lift it off.
Refitting the cover is simply the reverse of removal. Take effective
anti-static precautions while the top cover is off.
8
9
10
1
7
2
3
5
4
6
The components inside
1
System main board, for details see ‘appendix B’.
2
Processor and system cooling fan.
3
Future expansion area for multimedia.
4
Floppy disk drive, see chapter ‘The system drives’
5
CD-ROM drive, see chapter ‘The system drives’.
6
Hard disk drive, (below 5)
7
‘Power’ and ‘Standby / Restore’ switches
8
Power supply unit.
9
Rear audio sub-board see chapter ‘multimedia’.
10
Riser board, see chapter ‘Expansion’
For simplicity, ribbon and other cables are not shown in the above illustration
A/3
TECHNICAL INFOMATION
Drive Specification summary
Floppy disk drive
(removable media only)
Manufacturer
Interface
Power
Mitsubishi
Disk formats
(3 Mode)
Reliability
MTBF
Manufacturer
Interface
Sony
IDE
Mode 2
Speed
Quadruple
Access time
Cache
Power
Built in
Connector
Loading
Internal line
Headphones
Size
Types
Connector
Loading
MF355F-450MP
34 Pin connector
4 pin miniature
1.5W during read/write
100mW during standby
(400ms start time)
DS-DD 720 Kb
1.2 Mb (NEC, Japan)
HD 1.44 Mb
Estimate, 80,000 hours
CD-ROM drive
Audio
Disks
Laser
Reliability
Type
Wavelength
Power
MTBF
CDU76E
ATA-PI (on main board)
Burst mode 8.3Mb/s (max.)
4Mb/s typical
600Kb/s Mode 1
220 ms average
410 ms full stroke
256Kb
Standard 4 pin
26W (max. at tray open/close)
750mV at 47Kohms
550mV at 32ohms
12 cm, or 8 cm
CD-ROM mode 1, or 2, data
CD audio disks
Audio-combined CD-ROM
Multisession Photo-CD
GaA1As semiconductor
780 nm
0.6 mW
Estimate, 100,000 hours
Warning
The laser beam inside the CD-ROM drive is harmful to the eyes if looked at
directly. Do not attempt to remove the drive cover or otherwise disassemble the
CD-ROM drive. If a fault occurs, call an authorised maintainer.
A/4
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Physical Characteristics
(system unit)
Weight and dimensions
Height
Depth
Width
Component
Weight
120 mm
400 mm
435 mm
System unit
11-12 Kg*
40 mm
205 mm
488 mm
Keyboard
1.4 Kg
* Depending on configuration
Temperature and Humidity ranges
Range
Temperature
Storage/Transport
+5 to +55OC
20% to 80%
O
+10 to +35 C
20% to 80%
Setting
AC Voltage
Frequency
115V
100 to 120V
50 to 60 Hz
230V
220 to 240V
50 to 60 Hz
Operational
Relative humidity with no
condensation
Voltage range
Warning
The power cord supplied with the system complies with the safety standards
applicable to the country in which it was originally sold. You should consult
an Apricot dealer before using the system in another country .
A/5
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
B
SYSTEM MOTHERBOARD
This appendix details the specification and settings for the main
processor board fitted inside your computer. Normally the vast
majority of jumper settings should never be changed.
Board Specification
Processor
Type
Intel Pentium 75Mhz upward
Bus speeds
50, 60, 66 MHz
Support logic
BIOS
Intel TRITON chipset
Surepath 1.3
1 Mb Flash BIOS ROM
Battery
On board Lithium battery
3V, type CR2032 or equal
Memory
SIMMs
32 Bit, 70ns, 5V,
Parity not required,
four SIMMs, in two pairs,
Max. 128 Mb. EDO support.
Cache
Modules
L2 Write-back, Pipeline burst,
256 Kb or 512 Kb modules
with integral TAG RAMs
Only the first 64 Mb of main memory is cached.
Video
On board
Cirrus Logic GD543x
Video RAM
1 Mb on board, upgradeable
to 2 Mb
Upgrading Memory
For Upgrading information of either main, cache, or video memory refer to the
chapter titled ‘Memory Upgrades’.
B/1
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Audio
On board
Creative Labs 16 Bit.
Drives
Floppy drives
Support for 720 Kb, 1.2 Mb
(3-Mode), 1.44 Mb at 3.5 in.
and
1.2 Mb at 5.25in. formats
Hard drives
PCI/IDE controller built into
Triton chipset
CD-ROM
ATA-PI IDE drives.
(Primary connector for IDE Hard disk drives)
(Secondary connector for ATA-PI CD-ROM drives)
Ports
Parallel
25-way female ‘D’ connector
IEEE1284 (EPP/ECP)
Serial
Two 9 way male ‘D’ type
RS232, 16550 chipset.
NOTE : - COM2 not available when Remote control supplied with system
Keyboard
PS/2 compatible
Mouse
PS/2 compatible
Monitor
VGA, SVGA, EVGA.
Expansion
By means of a riser board fitted to a socket on the motherboard, this
riser board can support 5 expansion boards as follows:
B/2
ISA
one full length card
two half length cards
PCI
one half length card
ISA/PCI
one full length of either type
Technical Information
14
Video
Parallel
Com 2
13
12
Com 1
Mouse Key/Bd
11
10
9
15
8
7
6
16
5
4
17
18
19
20
21
1
3
2
Board layout
1
4
7
10
13
16
19
Front audio connection
Floppy ribbon connector
Wave table connection
CD audio connector
Riser board socket
Video upgrade sockets
System connections
2
5
8
11
14
17
20
SIMMs sockets 3, 4
CD ribbon connector
Modem audio connector
Rear audio connection
External ports
CMOS Battery
Processor ZIFF socket
3
6
9
12
15
18
21
SIMMs sockets 1, 2
HDD ribbon connector
TV audio connector
Power connections
Video feature connection
Cache memory socket
Power module (if fitted)
B/3
Technical Information
System Ports
(external connections)
Serial communications COM 1, COM 2
9 way Male D-type connector
10101
1
5
6
9
1. Data carrier detect
2. Receive data
3. Transmit data
4. Data terminal ready
5. Signal ground
6. Data set ready
7. Request to send
8. Clear to send
9. Ring indicate
Parallel port
25 way female D-type connector
1
13
25
B/4
14
1. -Strobe
2. Data bit 0
3. Data bit 1
4. Data bit 2
5. Data bit 3
6. Data bit 4
7. Databit 5
8. Data bit 6
9. Data bit 7
10. -ACK
11. BUSY
12. PE
13. SLCT
14. -Auto Feed
15. -ERROR
16. -INIT
17. -SLCT IN
18. to 25. (incl.) Ground.
Technical Information
Keybord and Mouse ports
6 pin miniature DIN connector
5
3
1
6
6
4
4
5
3
2
2
1
Both of the connections have the same voltages and signals.
1. Data
2. Reserved 3. Ground
4. +5V DC 5. Clock
6. Reserved
Monitor port
15 way (3 row) female D-type connector
5
1
6
10
15
11
PIN
Output
Monochrome
1
Red
No pin
Colour
Red
2
Green
Mono
Green
3
Blue
No pin
Blue
4
Reserved
No pin
No pin
5
DIGITAL Ground
Self test
Self test
6
Red signal return
Key pin
Red signal return
7
Green signal return
Mono signal return
Green signal return
8
Blue signal return
No pin
Blue signal return
9
Plug
No pin
No pin
10
DIGITAL Ground
DIGITAL Ground
DIGITAL Ground
11
Reserved
No pin
DIGITAL Ground
12
Reserved
DIGITAL Ground
DDC Data
13
H-sync
H-sync
H-sync
14
V-sync
V-sync
V-sync
15
Reserved
No pin
DDC Clock
B/5
Technical Information
Jumper configurations
There are very few jumpers that will ever need changing, most of
them have been factory set for your system and its needs, but for
completeness, the details are given here.
Internal speaker operation
PL2
Next to outer SIMM socket, default position link pins 4
and 5 gives audio output to the internal speaker in mono.
Only to be removed in a system case having internal
stereo speakers.
Internal ‘audio’ modem
PL4
Just along from the CD audio connection, default position
if no internal modem is fitted, link pins 3 and 4. Remove
only when fitting an internal modem supporting sound.
BIOS reprogramme
These links are for special purposes. Only to be used for an official
upgrade to the system BIOS. Do not move for any other reason.
PL5
Next to PL2, normal link 2 and 3. This link is used in the
event of a disaster occurring during an upgrade to the
system BIOS. Link moved to pins 1 and 2 will enable the
system to be booted up from an internal backup of the
BIOS held in a secure area in the system ROM.
PL6
Normal link 2 and 3, move to pins 1 and 2 to enable
BIOS reprogramming (requires specialist software).
Floppy disk control mode
PL13
B/6
Next to floppy disk ribbon connector, default position
link pins 3 and 4. To enable 3-mode operation of the
drive (Japan only), link pins 1 to 3.
Technical Information
Clear BIOS settings
PL21
Next to outer video upgrade socket, default position link
pins 1 and 2. Moving the link to pins 2 and 3 disconnects
the battery from the BIOS memory, and will cause all the
user settings to be lost. To be used with caution and only
in the event of an access password being lost.
PL22
A single jumper may be the only one fitted, at the end
nearest PL21. Only needs to be removed if fitting a new
high feature ‘plug in’ video card and serious problems are
encountered. If taken out, it must be replaced if the
upgrade video card is subsequently removed.
VESA option
Processor and BUS clock
These settings must not be changed except in the event of a
processor upgrade. Full details of the processor’s required settings
should accompany the new processor and the appropriate board
links should then be identified from the table below.
Warning
DO NOT alter these links under normal circumstances as it
may damage the processor and/or other vital components on
the motherboard.
Processor speed
Pentium
PL17
P 75
VRE
P 90
VRE
P 100
VRE
P 120
VRE
P 133
VRE
P 150
VRE
SW 1, Â= Link, = No link
Pin 1
Pin 1
Pin 1
Pin 1
Pin 1
Pin 1
 Â
 Â
 ÂÂ
  Â
 Â
   Â
ISA (MHz)
8.33
7.5
8.33
7.5
8.33
7.5
B/7
Technical Information
PL24, PL28
PL28
Pin1
PL24
Pin1
This range of pins is not for jumpers, but is used to connect various
features around the system case to the motherboard.
PL24
Pins:
1 to 4
HDD active light
5 to 9
Keylock (not fitted)
10 & 11 System in ‘power standby’ light
12 & 13 System hardware reset (not fitted)
PL28
Pins:
1&2
System standby restore switch
3 to 7
Infrared controller
8,9,10
Fan, slow mode
11,12,13 Fan, full speed mode
14 to 17 Internal speaker
Replacing the CMOS battery
The battery has an average life of 3-5 years. If you have to
reconfigure the computer every time you turn it on, the battery has
discharged and needs to be replaced.
B/8
Technical Information
The battery is a 3 volt lithium type (CR2032 or equivalent)
typically used in calculators, watches and other small,
battery-powered electronic items.
To replace the battery
1. Turn off the computer and unplug all power cords.
2. Take suitable anti-static precautions and remove the system unit
cover. If you are unfamiliar with the recommended anti-static
precautions and/or the process of removing the system unit
cover, refer to Appendix A, “Inside the System Unit”.
3. Identify the battery holder from the diagram of the
Motherboard.
4. Carefully disconnect and remove any expansion cards that may
obstruct easy access to the battery.
Warning
Do not use a metal or other conductive implement to remove the battery. If a
short-circuit is accidentally made between its positive and negative terminals, it
may cause the battery to explode.
5. Lift the edge of the battery far enough to clear the base of the
holder, then slide the battery from under the contact spring.
6. Check that the replacement battery is identical to the battery you
have removed.
7. Taking care not to touch the top or bottom surface of the
battery, pick up the replacement with the positive (+) terminal
upwards.
8. Slide the battery into the holder from the same side the old
battery was removed.
9. Replace any expansion cards you had to remove in step 4.
10. Replace the system unit cover.
11. Dispose of the old battery according to the makers instructions.
When you turn on the computer you will have to run the
BIOS Set-up utility to re-enter the hardware configuration.
See appendix C ‘System BIOS and set-up’. if in any doubt.
B/9
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
C
SYSTEM BIOS AND SET-UP
When the system is switched on, the POST does its job depending
upon the information it finds in the BIOS and sets up the computer
to boot into operation. You can access the BIOS and check or alter
the configuration via its set-up utility.
Caution
The BIOS has been set in our factory for the optimum system performance and
operation. It is not advisable to alter any settings under normal use.
Entering Set-up
During, or just after, the POST, a small box appears in the top right
corner of the screen.
It looks like this :
~~~~
~~~
~~~~
~~~
~~~~
~~~
While this is on the screen press F1 on the keyboard, and in a few
seconds you will be presented with the BIOS set-up screen.
You cannot enter this set-up utility at any other time or by any other method.
Control keys
F1
Help on the highlighted topic, pressing it a second time
transfers you to the general help pages.
Esc
Exit either the set-up, or go back a page if in a sub-menu.
C/1
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
↑ and ↓ Scroll through a menu list.
←and→ To toggle values or settings.
↵
0
/9
The enter key, to select the highlighted item.
Numbers, used in places where values are to be entered.
+/_
Used when required, similar to numbers.
F9
Restores the original settings that you entered with.
F10
To restore the original default setting
Warning
F9 will not restore the date settings and pressing F10 may put in a default
setting that could have been changed by our factory during production build.
We recommend that you make a note of ALL of the settings before any
changes are made.
Set-up starts on its own
This can happen for three reasons:
• There is a configuration error, or fault. In which case an error
message may well appear. A list of these is given at the end of
this chapter.
• The BIOS battery may be running down. In this case you may
also get error messages. If it happens every time you boot up,
you may have to change the motherboard battery. Instructions
for this are in the appendix B ‘System Motherboard’.
• The system‘s configuration may have been changed. More system
memory, more cache memory, or an upgrade that uses ISA
interrupts etc.
If you are unable to resolve any problem, do not alter too many
settings, but make a note of them and any error messages that
appeared on the screen and call your Apricot dealer or authorised
maintainer.
C/2
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Opening screen
On entering the set-up utility a main menu screen appears. If there is
an associated sub-menu, or a further sub-menu available, then the
listed options have a preceding bullet, as shown below:
•System summary
•Devices and I/O ports
•Date and time
•Security
•Start options
•Advanced set-up
•ISA Legacy resources
•Power management
Information about the system.
Processor, memory, drives etc.
The settings for serial, parallel ports,
IDE interfaces, HDD.
Change the system master clock.
View or change access to HDD, user
and administrator passwords.
Boot from A: or C:, keyboard speed,
POST speed etc.
Change the cache settings, ROM
shadowing and other related topics.
Register resources used by new ISA
expansion cards, memory, DMA,
interrupts etc.
Change settings for the Low power and
Standby energy saving modes.
Save settings
Saves any changes that have been made.
Restore settings
Restores all the settings to the values
that were in force when you entered
set-up, same as pressing F9.
Load default settings
Restores the settings to their default
(possibly blank) state.
Exit set-up
Ends the session and starts the system
POST again. If you have changed any
settings you will be asked if you wish
to save the new settings.
C/3
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Sub-menu pages
System summary
This page cannot be edited, but gives a summary of the system main
settings. Changes made in other pages will be reflected here. Make a
note of the information on this page before you progress any further
or make any changes.
Devices and I/O ports
Serial ports 1 & 2 (COM1 & COM2)
Selects the I/O ports and interrupts used by the two serial ports.
Normally set to default settings. Do not disable the serial ports unless
you are absolutely sure you are not going to need them.
Parallel port
This sets the I/O port and interrupt used by the parallel port. You
can select standard, or extended port modes. To obtain the extended
port modes it will be necessary to change the I/O setting.
Standard mode
Extended mode
Output only.
Bi-directional
Simple two way data.
EPP
Enhanced parallel port
compatible operation.
ECP
Extended capabilities port
operation.
Any parallel port devices that you may wish to attach, such as a tape
streamer or external hard drive etc., will have full instructions
supplied with them that will tell you if the port capabilities need to
be altered to one of the extended options above.
Mouse
This tells the system that a mouse is connected to the mouse port.
The mouse is then detected by the POST. You should not normally
change this setting.
C/4
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Floppy disk drives
This is available purely to change the mode of the floppy drive. The
drive supplied and fitted is a 3.5inch 1.44 Mbyte. This setting, if
changed, could prevent software access to the fitted drive.
Hard disk drives
Hard disk type is auto detected on switch on, but various parameters
can be manually set for each drive, the system being capable of
controlling two HDDs, and two CD-ROMs.
HDD 0
HDD 1
The system hard drives are normally attached to
the primary PCI IDE interface. The system is
supplied with a master HDD (HDD 0).
CDROM 2
CDROM 3
The CD-ROM drives are included in this section
as most new types are controlled from the
secondary IDE interface.
Selecting either of the HDDs will put you into a further sub-menu
where their settings can be changed:
Performance
Select either Compatible or High
performance
The default setting is High performance.
Transmission mode
Select either Extended or Standard
The default setting is Extended
Selecting either of the CDROMs will put you into their sub-menu
where the changeable setting for these drives is for:
Performance
select either Compatible and High
performance
The default setting is Compatible.
Date and Time
This is to enable a change to the Real Time Clock (RTC) on the
system motherboard. This RTC is normally maintained by the
motherboard battery when the system is switched off.
C/5
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
System time
Using the left and right arrow keys to move around, you then use
either the number keys to insert new figures or the + and - keys to
increase/decrease the existing number. The time is in 24 hour
format.
System date
The procedure is the same as setting the time, the date being in UK
format of Day / Month / Year, e.g. 1st August 95 = 01 / 08 / 1995
System security
This is to allow you to set, change or delete a set of passwords for
either user or administrator, plus control access independently to
HDD and floppy drives.
Caution
This menu can have interaction with the START OPTIONS menu. You must
ensure that a user has access to a START-UP DEVICE, or the system could
end up being impossible to use.
User password
If a user password is enabled, the correct password must be entered
every time the system is switched on or re-booted. If you select this
option a sub-menu appears::
Enter User Password
Type in your password, use numbers
and letters only.
Enter Password Again
Re-type it as above.
Set Or Change
Select this to accept the password for
all future sessions.
If you have not changed or entered a password before selecting ‘Set
Or Change’, a box will appear asking you to press ENTER to
confirm deletion of the existing password, effectively choosing ‘no
password’. If you make any mistakes, press ‘Esc’ to return to the
main menu and start again.
C/6
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Delete User password
Use this to clear or remove the existing password, without replacing
it with a new one. You may be asked for confirmation or to enter the
old password.
Warning
Remember your passwords, But do not write them down on a piece of paper
and leave it in your desk drawer, or pin it on your wall !
Password prompt
The system can be set to ‘ask’ for the password on switch on or reboot. You may not wish to have a prompt for security reason, but the
user is still required to enter a password.
Administrator Password
This allows the setting of a supervisory password and to choose
whether a user can change their individual password. This
administrator password will be requested in order to enter the BIOS
SET-UP. If the user password is entered instead, there is only access
to the System Summary and (if enabled) access to setting the User
Password of System Security.
The procedure is generally the same as for the User Password, with
the addition of User Password changeable by User. Select either
Yes or No for this feature.
Start Options
Certain features can be set or enabled for system boot up.
Keyboard Numlock
If ON, the keyboard number lock is enabled when the system boots
and the right hand section of the keyboard is numbers only.
The default setting is ON.
Keyboard speed
This sets the speed at which a pressed key will repeat.
The default setting is FAST.
C/7
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Diskette-less Operation
If this option is Disabled, POST will report a fault or any absence of
the floppy drive and halt the boot process, if Enabled, POST will
bypass the floppy test and continue, providing another boot device is
available e.g. HDD.
Displayless Operation
If this option is Disabled, POST will halt on any absence of a
monitor, Enabled, will allow the system to start without a monitor
e.g. when used as a small fileserver.
Keyboardless Operation
Similar principle to the above.
Start-up Devices
This allows the choice of sequence that the BIOS uses to look for a
‘boot’, drive. The default sequence is:
Diskette drive 0 ; Hard disk 0 (i.e. A: then C:)
It should not need to be changed for normal operation.
Power On Self Test
The POST can be selected to either run only a short set of tests
(Quick) or a full test (Enhanced)
The default setting is Enhanced.
Virus Detection
When Enabled, the BIOS will perform a checksum operation on the
boot sector to find if a ‘boot virus’ has crept in. It is not an
infallible check against the newer types of virus, but it may help.
Advanced Set-up
Any settings changed here, if incorrect, may cause the system to halt
or may cause your software to malfunction. A warning to this effect
appears on the screen as you enter this item from the menu.
C/8
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Cache Control
A simple two line screen allows you to either enable or disable the
L2 cache memory (external to the processor).
The default setting is Enabled, and should not normally be
changed. Some older software is speed sensitive and on rare
occasions you may need to disable the L2 cache.
Cache Size
This value also appears in the System Summary. It is detected by the
POST and the value is not editable.
ROM Shadowing
The contents of the Read Only Memory are copied into the faster
Random Access Memory during start-up, providing faster access and
enhancing system performance. Choosing this option displays a submenu showing a split up table of the memory address range, with
the range sectioned into 32K blocks. Some areas are greyed out as
they are already in use by parts of the system.
Changes should only be made to the supplied settings when fitting a
new expansion board, if asked to do so, and then with great care,
using the information supplied with the particular card.
ISA Legacy Resources
When expanding your system with an ISA card this menu section is
used to ‘register’ the system resources that the card uses. This needs
to be done as the system cannot auto-detect their being in use, but
must know about them so as to auto-configure any PCI Plug and
Play cards and avoid conflicts. There is a menu for each topic.
The resources affected are:
Memory, I/O port addresses, DMA channels, System interrupts.
Some areas are shown as Allocated by the system and shown only for
your information. Finer detail is shown in the chapter dealing with
Expansion, which should be consulted in conjunction with the
information supplied with the expansion card.
Each resource can be set to either Available or Not available.
C/9
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
If shown as available, it is assumed by the system not to be in use by
any ISA card or device and therefore will be made available for the
PCI auto-configure process.
Power Management
Certain settings are not adjustable, while some of them will have
been pre-set in our factory to ensure compliance with the Energy
Star Programme. Timing changes, or disabling the features, are both
straight forward.
Control keys are shown on page 1 of this chapter.
Menu option
Settings
Hard disk standby
Disable, Enable.
Timing for this is set at 20 mins. and is
not adjustable.
Standby time-out
Disable, or range of times in minutes.
Monitor
Disable, Enable.
Wake up on alarm
Disable, Daily, Single.
You can set a daily alarm or a one-off.
Alarm
Date
Enter a date as required.
Time
Enter a time as required.
Warning
The energy saving features built into this computer are designed to be used with
the monitor supplied with the system. If you wish to use another, or older
monitor it may not be compatible and permanent damage may be caused.
Check with your Apricot dealer.
C/10
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Error Messages
Code
Cause
Code
Cause
101
Timer tick interrupt failure
301
Keyboard clock line failure
102
Timer 2 test failure
301
Keyboard data line failure
106
Diskette controller failure
301
Keyboard stuck key failure
110
System board memory parity interrupt
604
Diskette drive 0 failure
114
Option ROM checksum failure
604
Diskette drive 1 failure
151
Real time clock failure
605
Diskette unlocked problem
161
Real time clock battery failure
662
Diskette drive configuration
162
CMOS RAM checksum failure
762
Coprocessor configuration
162
Invalid configuration information
1762
Hard disk configuration
163
Time of day not set -preboot
1780
Fixed disk 0 failure
164
Memory size does not match CMOS
1781
Fixed disk 1 failure
175
Bad EEPROM CRC #1
1782
Fixed disk 2 failure
176
System tampered
1783
Fixed disk 3 failure
177
Bad PAP checksum
1800
No more IRQ available
178
EEPROM is not functional
1801
No more room for option ROM
183
PAP update required
1802
No more I/O space available
184
Bad POP checksum
1803
No more memory <1Mb available
185
Corrupted Boot sequence
1804
No more memory >1MB available
186
Hardware problem
1805
Checksum error or 0 size option ROM
189
Excessive password attempts
1962
No bootable device
201
Base memory error
2400
Display adapter failed ; using alternate
229
External cache failure
2462
Video configuration
303
Keyboard controller failure
5962
IDE CD-ROM configuration
301
Keyboard failure
8603
Pointer device has been removed
C/11
APRICOT COMPUTERS LIMITED
3500 PARKSIDE
BIRMINGHAM BUSINESS PARK
BIRMINGHAM B37 7YS
UNITED KINGDOM
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
APRICOT COMPUTERS LIMITED
TRAVELLERS LANE
HATFIELD
HERTFORDSHIRE AL10 8XB
UNITED KINGDOM
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE GmbH
GOTHAER STRASSE 8
POSTFACH 1548
40835 RATINGEN
DEUTSCHLAND