SW310
USER MANUAL
Arima Computer Corp.
Building Your Competitive Advantage
1
TABLE OF CONTENTS:
LEGAL DISCLAIMER.................................................................................................... 4
COPYRIGHT NOTICE ................................................................................................... 4
TECHNICAL SUPPORT................................................................................................. 5
ABOUT THIS USER GUIDE .......................................................................................... 5
SAFETY INSTRUCTION ............................................................................................... 6
CHAPTER 1. GETTING STARTED ............................................................................ 7
1.1 CONGRATULATIONS .................................................................................................. 7
1.2 UNPACKING ............................................................................................................... 7
1.2.1 Quick Installation Guide................................................................................... 8
1.3 FEATURES HIGHLIGHT ............................................................................................... 9
1.4 MOTHERBOARD SPECIFICATION .............................................................................. 10
1.5 MOTHERBOARD LAYOUT [MAJOR COMPONENTS] .................................................... 12
CHAPTER 2. HARDWARE INSTALLATION ......................................................... 13
2.1 MOUNTING THE MOTHERBOARD .............................................................................. 13
2.2 INSTALLING THE PROCESSOR ................................................................................... 14
2.3 INSTALLING THE MEMORY ....................................................................................... 19
2.3.1 DIMM combination......................................................................................... 19
2.3.2 Installing DIMM modules ............................................................................... 21
2.4 JUMPERS CONFIGURATION ...................................................................................... 23
2.4.1 Clear CMOS header ....................................................................................... 23
2.4.2 PCI-X Slot Clock Select Jumper ..................................................................... 24
2.4.3 PCI-X-ZCR Slot Clock Select Jumper............................................................. 25
2.4.4 On-Board VGA Select Jumper Setting:........................................................... 26
2.4.5 On-Board SCSI Select Jumper Setting: .......................................................... 27
2.5 POWER SUPPLY ....................................................................................................... 28
2.5.1 ATX 24-pin power connector .......................................................................... 28
2.5.2 ATX 8-pin power connector ............................................................................ 29
2.6 CABLES & CONNECTORS ......................................................................................... 30
2.6.1 IDE and SATA connectors .............................................................................. 30
2.6.2 Front Panel Connectors.................................................................................. 31
2.6.3 Speaker Connectors ........................................................................................ 33
2.6.4 Rear Panel I/O ports....................................................................................... 34
2.6.5 Back Panel LAN LED ..................................................................................... 35
2.6.6 Front USB Connector ..................................................................................... 36
CHAPTER 3. BIOS SETUP.......................................................................................... 37
3.1 ENTERING BIOS SETUP ..................................................................................... 37
3.2 USING SETUP ........................................................................................................... 38
3.3 TROUBLESHOOTING ................................................................................................. 39
3.4 MAIN MENU:........................................................................................................... 40
3.5 ADVANCED MENU:.................................................................................................. 41
3.5.1 Chipset Feature Sub Menu.............................................................................. 42
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3.5.2 Disk Configurations Sub Menu....................................................................... 43
3.5.2.1 Primary Master/Slave Sub Menu ................................................................. 44
3.5.3 Integrated Peripherals Sub Menu................................................................... 46
3.5.3.1 Keyboard Configuration Sub Menu ............................................................. 48
3.5.4 Console Redirection Sub Menu....................................................................... 49
3.6 SECURITY MENU: .................................................................................................... 50
3.7 POWER MENU:........................................................................................................ 51
3.8 BOOT MENU:........................................................................................................... 52
3.8.1 Boot Priority Sub Menu .................................................................................. 53
3.9 SERVER MENU: ....................................................................................................... 54
3.9.1 Hardware Monitor Sub Menu......................................................................... 55
3.9.2 IPMI Sub Menu ............................................................................................... 56
3.10 EXIT MENU: .......................................................................................................... 57
Saving Changes......................................................................................................... 57
Exit Discarding Changes .......................................................................................... 57
Load Setup Defaults.................................................................................................. 57
Discard Changes....................................................................................................... 58
Save Changes ............................................................................................................ 58
3.11 ABOUT THE BOOT UTILITIES ................................................................................. 59
3.11.1 Using Phoenix QuietBoot ............................................................................. 59
3.11.2 Phoenix MultiBoot ........................................................................................ 60
3.12 BIOS FLASH UPGRADE UTILITY ........................................................................... 61
3.12.1 Executing Phoenix Phlash ............................................................................ 61
APPENDIX I: GLOSSARY ........................................................................................... 62
APPENDIX II: BLOCK DIAGRAM ............................................................................ 67
APPENDIX III: FAQ .................................................................................................... 68
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Legal Disclaimer
The information provided in this document is subject to change without notice.
Arima Computer Corp. makes no warranty regarding this document.
Always read the safety instructions carefully.
Arima Computer Corp. cannot anticipate all of your working conditions; for safety, you should use caution,
care and good judgment when following the procedures described in this material. Arima Computer Corp.
shall not be liable for errors contained in this material nor any damage incurred in the use of this material.
Arima Computer Corp. assumes no responsibility for any damage to property, injury to persons, or losses
incurred as a result of misuse of the information provided.
Arima Computer Corp. assumes no responsibility for the reliability of its software on equipments that are
not manufactured by Arima Computer Corp..
Copyright Notice
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright. All rights are reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, translated into any
language or computer language, or transmitted in any form whatsoever without the prior written consent of
Arima Computer Corp.. We reserve the right to make changes to this document without notice.
Copyright© 2004 by Arima Computer Corp.. All rights reserved.
Other products and companies referred to herein are the trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective companies or mark-holders.
Opteron is registered trademarks of AMD Corporation.
ServerWorks is registered trademarks of Broadcom Corporation.
Windows® 98/2000/NT/XP are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Revision Version: 1.00
Release Date: Oct. 2005
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Technical Support
If a problem arises with your system during installation or operation and is unable to be resolved from the
user manual, consult the following list of resources for help:
¾ Contact the place of purchase for help. This is the recommended solution as they can provide the
quickest assistance.
¾ Visit Arima Computer Corp. website for up to the minute FAQ, guides and updates. The website can
be found at: http://www.arima.com.tw/server
¾ Or contact our support staff at: server@arima.com.tw
About this User Guide
This manual contains some special icons that accompany special sections that are meant to help you along
in the installation process. The special sections contain useful and/or critical information that you should
know. Watch for these icons as you read through the manual.
Type of icons:
Description:
NOTE
This icon indicates useful and timely information
that will aid you in the setup.
WARNING
This icon indicates information on dangerous
and/or costly behavior to avoid.
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Safety Instruction
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
¾
Keep this manual for future reference.
Keep the equipments in a safe, cool, dry place.
Perform the installation on a dry, flat surface.
Ground yourself by touching a plugged-in power supply, which displaces static electricity.
Adjust the power source to the proper voltage before connecting the equipment to the power outlet.
Place the power cord in such a manner as to ensure that no one can step on it or trip over it.
Always unplug the power cord when performing installation.
Do not have liquid nearby as electrical shock can occur if liquid spills onto the equipment.
Pay attention to the warnings in the installation instructions when appropriate.
In the following cases, do not try to fix the problem yourself, contact a party in Technical Support
y The power cord or plug is damaged.
y Liquid has been spilled onto the equipment.
y Obvious sign of damage can be detected on the equipment.
Danger of explosion if battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace only with
the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer.
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Chapter 1. Getting Started
1.1 Congratulations
You have in possession one of the most powerful and versatile 2-way AMD Opteron processor solutions,
the SW310. Powered by cutting edge ServerWorks HT2000 and HT1000 chipsets, SW310 efficiently
utilizes the combined strength of 2000MT/sec HyperTransport, two PCI-X slot and integrated SATA-II
controller, to name just a few. SW310 supports independent buses for PCI-X slot as well, providing the
most efficient bus management to date. It provides versatility, performance, value and dependability for
today’s computing environment. In just a couple of pages, a detailed specification will provide you with a
comprehensive view of the capabilities of SW310. Thank you for purchasing Arima Computer Corp.
family of products.
1.2 Unpacking
Arima Computer Corp. provides a number of accessories for your convenience. Check for the following
items that come with your motherboard:
2 sets of CPU retention units
2 SATA-II Data Cable / 1 SATA power cable
1 Ultra320 SCSI cable
1 Cable Kit (including 1 x Floppy cable, 1 x IDE cable, and 3 x jumpers)
1 I/O shield
1 Driver CD
1 Quick Installation Guide
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1.2.1 Quick Installation Guide
CN27 Clear CMOS Header
1-2
Normal
(default)
2-3
Clear CMOS
CN33 Onboard VGA Select Jumper
1-2
2-3
VGA Enabled
VGA Disabled
(default)
CN18 PCI-X Slot Clock Select Jumper
1-2
2-3
133 MHz Enabled
100 MHz Enabled
(default)
CN32 PCI-X-ZCR Slot Clock Select Jumper
1-2
2-3
133 MHz Enabled
100 MHz Enabled
(default)
CN38 SCSI Select Jumper
1-2
SCSI Enabled
2-3
SCSI Disabled
CN35 Front Panel Switch
CN30
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
COM2 Header
Description
Pin
DCD
2
Serial In
4
Serial Out
6
DTR
8
GND
CN21
Pin
1
3
5
7
9
USB Header
Description
VCC_1
Data -_1
Data +_1
Ground_1
Pin
2
4
6
8
10
CN37
Pin
1
3
5
7
SATA LED Header
Description
SATA0 LED
SATA1 LED
SATA2 LED
SATA3 LED
CN36
Pin
1
2
4
Speaker PIN Header
Description
Speaker
Buzzer
Speaker Power
Description
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
Description
VCC_2
Data -_2
Data +_2
Ground_2
NC/Key
LAN Connector Indicator Light
Indication
Meaning
LED off
No link
Left LED Green
Active
Right LED Green
Link
Recommended Memory Configurations
1 DIMM
H1 Bank: Slot 1 or Slot 3 (This only provides 64-bit memory access)
2 DIMMs
H1 Bank: Slot 1, 2 or Slot 3, 4
4 DIMMs
Single Processor
H1 Bank: Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
Dual Processor
6 DIMMs
The Latest BIOS, Manual, Memory AVL, Drivers and Utility can be downloaded from
http://www.arima.com.tw/server
H1 Bank: Slot 1, 2 or Slot 3, 4
H2 Bank: Slot 1, 2 or Slot 3, 4
H1 Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
H2 Slot 1, 2
8 DIMMs
H1 Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
H2 Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
* To support full speed of DDR400, please use [Single, Single, Single, Single] or [Double, Double, Single, Single] or
[Single, Single, Double, Double]. Besides, DDR400 is supported by CPU rev C0 and later.
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1.3 Features Highlight
CPU:
¾ Supports high productivity 2-way AMD Opteron processors configuration
¾ Supports Single and Dual Core AMD Opteron processor
CHIPSET:
¾ Runs state of the art ServerWorks HT2000 and HT1000 Chipsets
SYSTEM MEMORY:
¾ Eight 184-pin DDR 400 memory slots
¾ Up to 32GB system memory size
EXPANSION SLOTS:
¾ Supports PCI-Express X8, X1 and 64 -bit PCI-X slots
STORAGE:
¾ Total support of hard disk formats from SATA II to SATA to ATA
INTEGRATED LAN CONTROLLER:
¾ Dual Gigabit Ethernet Ports
SYSTEM MANAGEMENT:
¾ SMBIOS 2.3.3 and DMI 2.0 compliant
¾ 64 bit OS ready
¾ Soft Power-down
¾ Multiple boot support (with BIOS Boot Specification v3.1 (BBS) support
¾ Wake on LAN
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1.4 Motherboard Specification
Processors
™ Dual uPGA 940 sockets
™ Dual onboard 4-phase VRD
™ Supports one or two AMD Opteron 200 series processors
™ Supports Single and Dual Core AMD Opteron processor
™ Supports 2000MT/s HyperTransport
Chipsets
™ ServerWorks HT2000 and HT1000 chipsets
™ Supports two independent PCI-X buses
™ National Semiconductor Super I/O PC87417 chip
Memory
™ 4+4 184-pin 2.6-Volt DDR DIMM sockets
™ Dual channel memory bus
™ Four-way interleaved memory banks (pair of DIMMs required)
™ Supports DDR-400/333/266 memory
™ Supports Registered ECC type memory modules only
™ Supports up to 32GB
Expansion Slots
™ Two PCI-Express X8 slot
™ One PCI-Express X1 slot
™ Three 64-bit 133/100MHz PCI-X Slots
™ Total of six usable slots
ServerWorks HT1000 Integrated SATA II
™ Independent DMA operation on 4 ports
™ DMA Transfers up to 1.5Gb/s
ServerWorks HT1000 Integrated ATA
™ Provides one PCI bus master channel for up to two enhanced IDE devices
™ Support for UDMA 100/66/33 IDE drives and ATAPI compliant device
ServerWorks HT2000 Integrated LAN Controller
™ ServerWorks HT2000 dual channel Gigabit Ethernet controller
™ Two RJ-45 connectors with LEDs
™ PXE option ROM solution
Integrated U320 SCSI Controller (Optonal)
™ LSI 1020A Single-Channel Ultra320 SCSI controller connected PCI-X bus
™ NVRAM support RAID
™ Two 68-pin SCSI connectors
™ Supports LSI Zero Channel RAID (ZCR) solution (LSI Logic MegaRAID SCSI 320-0
ZCR) – card not included
™ Double transition clocking for 320 MB/sec throughput on each channel
Integrated Graphics Controller
™ ATI RADEON RAGE XL PCI graphics controller
™ 8MB Frame Buffer of video memory
ServerWorks HT1000 Integrated USB 2.0
™ Four USB 2.0 ports (two rear panel connectors and one header)
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™ Header support up to 2 USB devices
Super I/O
™ National Semiconductor Super I/O PC87417 chip
™ One floppy connector supports two drives
™ PS/2 mouse and PS/2 keyboard rear panel connectors
™ Two 9-pin serial ports (one rear panel connector and one header)
Rear Panel I/O
™ Stacked PS/2 mouse and PS/2 keyboard rear panel connectors
™ Stacked two USB-2.0 connectors
™ One 9-pin serial connector
™ One DB15 Video connector
™ Two RJ-45 connectors with LEDs
BIOS
™
™
™
™
™
™
4Mb Phoenix BIOS
Legacy USB support
MP 1.1 & 1.4 compliant
SMBIOS 2.3.1 and DMI 2.0 compliant
Soft Power-down
Multiple boot support (with BIOS Boot Specification v3.1 (BBS) support)
System Management
™ SMC by Arima Scorpio Server Management Card (optional)
™ MiniPCI connector
™ IPMI 2.0 compliant (IPMI 1.5 fully compliant + Serial over Lan ready)
Form Factor
™ SSI form factor with size: 12” X 13” (10 layers)
™ EPS 12V power connectors (24pin + 8pin)
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1.5 Motherboard Layout [major components]
The following diagram indicates all the major components of the motherboard.
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Chapter 2. Hardware Installation
2.1 Mounting the motherboard
!INSTALLATION WARNING!
Use Caution When Installing the ServerBoard into the System Chassis
The components underneath the PS/2 Mouse/Keyboard connectors around the mounting hole are very
FRAGILE and can be knocked off of their soldered positions, resulting in IRREPARABLE DAMAGE
during installation when sliding the board into a system chassis.
Gently install the ServerBoard into the chassis, and use a Mylar Sheet to cover and protect the underside of
the ServerBoard during installation. Take care NOT to scrape the bottom of the ServerBoard on the chassis
stand-offs and mounting holes.
These components are necessary for many different operations, including the Mouse and the Keyboard. If
you damage any of these chips, one of the symptoms is that the ServerBoard will NOT respond to key
strokes through the PS/2 port and the ServerBoard will have to be replaced. Other symptoms include the
loss of response or functionality in any of the rear I/O ports. Contact your authorized dealer for more
information.
The Damage noted here in this WARNING may require the ServerBoard to be replaced. Due to the Nature
of the Damage, this may be considered Out-of-Warranty Damage. Make certain that ALL documented
procedures are followed correctly.
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2.2 Installing the processor
SW310 operates best when dual AMD Opteron processors are in use. When using only one processor,
install it in CPU1 socket.
We discourage you from installing in the CPU2 socket if you have
only one processor to install. The result may be unpredictable.
Procedure:
First read the instructions that comes with the CPU
1. Flip over the motherboard and install the backplate. There are two holes around each CPU socket;
align the backplate with the two holes around the CPU socket, insert the backplate from the back of the
motherboard through the four holes. The backplate should now clamp onto the motherboard .
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A good quality backplate should have tape over some parts of it that
prevents electrical damage. Whenever possible, use high quality
backplates to prolong the life of your motherboard.
2. Lift up the lever. Refer to the following picture.
15
3. Place the CPU with the correct orientation (B) as shown in the following pictures. The lever is still up
and the two triangles are in the same corner.
The CPU will not fit if the orientation is wrong. Do not try to force
the CPU into the socket; it could result in irreparable damage to the
CPU.
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4. Lower the socket locking lever in place.
5. Now, rest the motherboard into the chassis, align the two holes of the backplate.
We do not recommend you to apply thermal grease at this point of the
installation. The heatsink provided already has thermal grease on the
bottom for your convenience. Do not apply more thermal grease if it is
already present. Too much thermal grease will spill onto the CPU
circuit and damage the CPU.
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6. Mount the CPU heatsink to the top of the CPU and socket. Align the screws of the heatsink with the
two holes of the backplate, then fasten them securely.
Repeat the steps for the installation of another CPU.
Heatsink not included in the package.
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2.3 Installing the memory
2.3.1 DIMM combination
The following diagram indicates the locations of memory sockets.
Types of memory supported:
Eight sockets of 184-pin 2.6Volt DDR DIMM supporting DDR-400/333/266.
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They are running on dual channel memory bus and two-way interleaved memory banks. Therefore, the
memories must be INSTALLED IN MEMORY DIMM 1 AND 2, OR 3 AND 4. Be sure that every
memory module is of the same speed, size and rank.
DDR memory types are determined by two factors: speed and rank. SW310 supports DDR 400/333/266
speed in both single/dual rank. The rank of your memory could impact the effectiveness of the
motherboard. Besides DDR400 is supported by Opteron CPU rev. C0 and later.
The number of memory chips and how they are stacked on a memory
module do not indicate the rank of that memory module. The only
way to determine the rank of a memory module is to contact the
memory manufacturer for its specification.
1 DIMM
2 DIMMs
4 DIMMs
6 DIMMs
8 DIMMs
Table 1.
H1 Bank: Slot 1 or Slot 3 (This only provides 64-bit memory access)
H1 Bank: Slot 1, 2 or Slot 3, 4
Single Processor
H1 Bank: Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
Dual Processor
H1 Bank: Slot 1, 2 or Slot 3, 4
H2 Bank: Slot 1, 2 or Slot 3, 4
H1 Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
H2 Slot 1, 2
H1 Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
H2 Slot 1, 2, 3, 4 *
*To support full speed of DDR400, please use [Single, Single, Single, Single] or [Double, Double, Single,
Single] or [Single, Single, Double, Double].
Any configuration other than the recommended is not guaranteed to
work. Please refrain from using those configurations as we cannot
provide technical support on them.
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2.3.2 Installing DIMM modules
1. Open up the brackets:
2. Line up the memory with socket. Make sure the gap fits into the socket.
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3. Push in the memory stick until bracket can be closed securely onto the stick. Make sure the brackets
hold onto the memory module.
These pictures only show one memory stick but remember to install
them in pairs.
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2.4 Jumpers Configuration
2.4.1 Clear CMOS header
Header CN27 controls CMOS setting. Position your motherboard as it appears in the following diagram.
To clear CMOS:
1. Turn off the system.
2. Short pin 2and pin 3 using a jumper for a few seconds.
3. Take out the jumper.
4. Turn on the system and reconfigure the BIOS.
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2.4.2 PCI-X Slot Clock Select Jumper
Header CN18 controls PCI-X Slot setting. When CN18 is 2-3 short, PCI-X slots are set to 133MHz. When
CN18 is 1-2 short, PCI-X slot is set to 100MHz. The frequencies describe here are maximum operating
frequencies. If PCI-X channel is shared with other devices, then maximum operating frequency cannot be
achieved. Refer to the following diagram for the location of CN18.
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2.4.3 PCI-X-ZCR Slot Clock Select Jumper
Header CN32 controls PCI-X-ZCR Slot setting. When CN32 is 2-3 short, PCI-X slots are set to 133MHz.
When CN32 is 1-2 short, PCI-X slot is set to 100MHz. The frequencies describe here are maximum
operating frequencies. If PCI-X channel is shared with other devices, then maximum operating frequency
cannot be achieved. Refer to the following diagram for the location of CN32.
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2.4.4 On-Board VGA Select Jumper Setting:
Header CN33 controls On-Board VGA setting. When CN33 is 1-2 short, On-Board VGA is enabled. When
CN33 is 2-3 short, On-Board VGA is disabled. Refer to the following diagram for the location of CN33.
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2.4.5 On-Board SCSI Select Jumper Setting:
Header CN38 controls On-Board SCSI setting. When CN38 is 1-2 short, On-Board SCSI is enabled. When
CN38 is 2-3 short, On-Board SCSI is disabled. Refer to the following diagram for the location of CN38.
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2.5 Power Supply
2.5.1 ATX 24-pin power connector
There are two 24 pin power connectors on the motherboard. Only one is needed to make the motherboard
operational. The redundancy is built-in for your convenience; you may choose either one to hook up
depending on the layout of your system chassis. The 24-pin connector provides power to the motherboard
and the 8-pin connector provides power to the CPU. So both must be connected for the system to run
properly.
Be sure to plug the power supply connector in the right direction. Failure to do so could cause damage to
the motherboard.
Make sure your power supply can support at least 2 amps standby power for the Advanced Configuration
and Power Interface (ACPI) functions.
Refer to the following diagram for the connector locations and orientations.
Make sure the AC adapter is not plugged into the wall outlet during
installation. The electric current could damage the motherboard.
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2.5.2 ATX 8-pin power connector
The 8-pin connector provides dedicated power to the CPU.
Refer to the following diagram for its location and configuration.
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2.6 Cables & Connectors
2.6.1 IDE and SATA connectors
The following diagram indicates the location of the IDE and SATA connectors:
As always, read the instructions that come with the IDE drive and then consult the instructions here.
For Parallel ATA, installing IDE drives has become simpler over the years. The cables are now “keyed” to
guide the user to the correct installation configuration. IDE connector can support two IDE drives.
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Remember to set BIOS to match the configuration that you
implement here. Go to Advanced Menu section of BIOS
for detail.
2.6.2 Front Panel Connectors
You can find the pin number on the corner of the pin block. Pin 2 is located closer to the outer edge of the
motherboard than pin 1. Pin 34 is closer to the outer edge of the motherboard than pin 33.
The red + indicates the anode, or the +5V. The opposite pin, then, indicates the cathode or the ground.
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Power LED:
This 3-pin connector attaches to the power LED.
HDD Activity LED:
This 2-pin connector attaches to the LED of the hard disk. The LED lights up
when HDD is active.
This 2-pin connector attaches to the power button of the system.
Power Switch:
Reset Switch:
This 2-pin connector attaches to the case-mounted reset switch for rebooting your
computer without turning on/off your power switch.
LAN#1 Activity LED:
This connector connects to the LED that lights up when there is activity on the
LAN 1 port.
LAN#2 Activity LED:
This connector connects to the LED that lights up when there is activity on the
LAN 2 port.
# Pin-27 to Pin-34 are reserved for OEM purpose
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2.6.3 Speaker Connectors
You can find the pin number on the corner of the pin block. When CN36 is 1-2 short, Internal Buzzer is
enabled. Refer to the following diagram for the location of CN36.
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2.6.4 Rear Panel I/O ports
The following illustration displays the motherboard I/O port array.
Type of Port
Function
PS/2 Mouse connector
The system will direct IRQ12 to the PS/2 mouse if
one is detected. If not detected, IRQ12 can be used
for expansion slot.
PS/2 Keyboard connector
This connection is for a standard keyboard using a
PS/2 plug (mini DIN). This connector will not
allow standard AT size (large DIN) keyboard
plugs. You may use a DIN to mini DIN adapter on
standard AT keyboards.
USB Port 1 & 2
Two external USB 2.0 ports that allow
simultaneous connections of 2 USB devices.
Serial Port connector (9-pin male)
This serial port can be used for pointing devices or
other serial devices. See BIOS setup.
VGA connector (15-pin female)
The VGA port connects display devices such as a
monitor. See the BIOS setup.
Gigabit Ethernet Port 1 & 2
These ports are RJ-45. The motherboard uses
Broadcom 57xx dual channel Gigabit Ethernet
Controller, depending on the manufacturing option.
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2.6.5 Back Panel LAN LED
Indication
LED off
Left LED Green
Right LED Green
Meaning
No link
Active
Link
35
2.6.6 Front USB Connector
Header CN21 controls the two front USB connections.
To activate the front USB, connect the two USB wire to CN21. Each USB wire requires 4 pins; CN21 has
9 pins, therefore supports two USB connections. The one extra pin is for chassis ground use.
Refer to the following diagram for the location of CN21.
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CHAPTER 3. BIOS SETUP
This chapter discusses the PhoenixBIOS setup program built into the ROM BIOS.
BIOS is the basic input/output system, the firmware on the motherboard that enables the hardware to
interface with the software. The setup program allows the users to modify the basic system configurations
according to their needs. The configuration is then stored in battery-backed NVRAM so that it retains the
configuration when the power is turned off. The PhoenixBIOS installed in the motherboard’s ROM is a
custom version of an industry standard BIOS.
The rest of the chapter will list all the menus and sub-menus in the BIOS. Along with them, you can also
find the list of possible values for any configurable item in the BIOS.
3.1 ENTERING BIOS SETUP
The PhoenixBIOS is activated when the system powers on. The BIOS reads the system information
contained in the CMOS and begins the process of checking out the system and configuring it. After
finishing configuring the whole system, BIOS will seek an OS on disk and turn over control of the system
to the OS found.
While BIOS is in control, the Setup menu can be accessed by pressing the <F2> key when the following
message appears briefly at the bottom of the screen during Power On Self Test: “Press <F2> to enter
SETUP.”
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3.2 Using Setup
The following table provides details about how to navigate the Setup program using keyboard.
KEY
FUNCTION
Up Arrow ↑
Move to the previous item.
Down Arrow ↓
Move to the next item.
Left Arrow ←
Move to the previous menu.
Right Arrow →
Move to the next menu.
Esc
In the submenu: Exit the submenu.
In the main menu: Exit without saving.
Enter
Select the item. A pop-up window will appear to allow setting of the item’s
value. If the item has a 4in front of it, it means that the item leads to a submenu. Pressing <Enter> will take you to the sub-menu.
PgUp
Increase the numeric value or goes to the previous setting value.
PgDn
Decrease the numeric value or goes to the next setting value.
+
Increase the numeric value or goes to the previous setting value.
-
Decrease the numeric value or goes to the next setting value.
F1
General help on setup navigation keys. Press <F1> key to pop up a small help
window that describe the appropriate keys to use and the possible selections for
the highlighted item. To exit the Help Window, press <ESC> key or <F1> key
again.
F9
Setup Defaults.
F10
Save and Exit.
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3.3 Troubleshooting
In case the system cannot be booted after some changes in BIOS, use the clear CMOS jumper setting to
reset the BIOS to default. To avoid such problem, configure only the items that you thoroughly understand
and refrain from modifying the default chipset settings.
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3.4 Main Menu:
Main
Advanced
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Boot
Server
Exit
Item Specific Help
System Time
System Date
[12:59:59]
[07/26/2005]
BIOS Version
Legacy Diskette A:
V1.00
[1.44/1.25 MB 3½]
 System Memory:
 Extended Memory:
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
<Tab>, <Shift-Tab>,
or <Enter> selects
field.
608 KB
4030KB
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Main menu page:
Item
Options
Description
System Time
No options.
System Date
No options.
Legacy Diskette A
System Memory
Disabled
360 Kb
1.2 MB
720 Kb
1.44/1.25 MB
2.88 MB
No options.
Extended Memory
No options.
Shows the time of the day in the
format of Hour/Min/Sec.
Shows the date in the format of
MM/DD/YYYY.
Selects floppy type. Note that
1.25 MB 3½” references a 1024
byte/sector Japanese media
format. The 1.25 MB, 3½”
diskette requires a 3-Mode
floppy-disk drive.
This item is not configurable to
user.
This item is not configurable to
user.
40
3.5 Advanced Menu:
Main
Advanced
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Boot
Server
Exit
Item Specific Help
Reset Configuration Data:
QuickBoot Mode:
Boot-Time Diagnostic:
Select ‘Yes’ if
you want to clear
the extended
system
configuration
data (ESCD)
area.
[NO]
[Disabled]
[Disabled]
►Chipset Feature
►Disk Configurations
►Integrated Peripherals
►Console Redirection
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Advanced menu page:
Item
Reset Configuration Data
Options
No
Yes
Description
Select ‘Yes’ if you want to clear
the extended system
configuration data (ESCD) area.
QuickBoot Mode
Disabled
Enabled
Allows the system to skip
certain tests while booting. This
will decrease the time needed to
boot the system.
Boot-Time Diagnostic Screen
Disabled
Enabled
Display the diagnostic screen
during boot.
41
3.5.1 Chipset Feature Sub Menu
The Chipset Feature Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Item Specific Help
Chipset Feature
ACPI SRAT Table
Memory Frequency Downgrade
Memhole mapping
Dram Bank Interleave
Node Memory Interleave
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
[Enabled]
[AUTO]
[Hardware]
[Disabled]
[Disabled]
Enable ACPI 2.0
static resources
affinity table for
ccNUMA system
NOTE:
This cannot be
enabled if node
interleave is also
enabled. Table will
not be created if node
interleave is enabled
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Chipset Feature sub-menu page:
Item
ACPI SRAT Table
Options
Disabled
Enabled
Memory Frequency Downgrade
AUTO
DDR266
DDR333
DDR400
Memhole mapping
Disabled
Software
Hardware
Disabled
Enabled
Dram Bank Interleave
Node Memory Interleave
Description
Enable ACPI 2.0 static resources
affinity table for ccNUMA
system
NOTE:
This cannot be enabled if node
interleave is also enabled. Table
will not be created if node
interleave is enabled
Memory Frequency Downgrade
AUTO: Follow AMD spec. to
downgrade MAX memory
frequency.
DDR266: Downgrade MAX.
frequency to 266MHz.
DDR333: Downgrade MAX.
frequency to 333MHz.
DDR400: Force MAX.
frequency as 400MHz.
Remapping scheme for PCI
memory hole.
Interleave memory blocks across
dram chip select. BIOS will auto
detect capability on each Node.
Interleave memory blocks across
Processor Nodes. BIOS will
auto detect capability of
Memory System.
Disabled
Enabled
42
3.5.2 Disk Configurations Sub Menu
The Disk Configurations Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Item Specific Help
Disk Configurations
Embedded SATA
SATA mode
►Primary Master
►Primary Slave
F1 Help
ESC Exit
Embedded SATA
enable or disable.
[Enabled]
[PATA]
[120GB]
[None]
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Disk Configuration sub-menu page:
Item
Embedded SATA
SATA mode
Options
Disabled
Enabled
PATA
SATA
Description
Embedded SATA enable or
disable.
PATA – Parallel ATA
emulation mode
SATA – Native SATA mode
43
3.5.2.1 Primary Master/Slave Sub Menu
The Primary Master/Slave Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Item Specific Help
Primary Master [120GB]
Type:
[Enabled]
Multi-Sector Transfers:
LBA Mode Control:
32 Bit I/O:
Transfer Mode:
Ultra DMA Mode:
[16 Sectors]
[Enabled]
[Disabled]
[Fast PIO 4]
[Mode 5]
User = you enter
parameters of harddisk drive installed at
this connection.
Auto = autotypes
hard-disk drive
installed here.
1-39 = you select predetermined type of
hard-disk drive
installed here.
CD-ROM = a CDROM drive is
installed here.
ATAPI Removable =
removable disk drive
is installed here.
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Primary Master/Slave sub-menu page:
Item
Type
Options
Auto
None
CD-ROM
ATAPI Removable
IDE Removable
Other ATAPI
User
Description
User = you enter parameters of
hard-disk drive installed at this
connection.
Auto = autotypes hard-disk
drive installed here.
1-39 = you select predetermined type of hard-disk
drive installed here.
CD-ROM = a CD-ROM drive
is installed here.
ATAPI Removable = removable
disk drive is installed here.
Multi-Sector Transfers
Disabled
2 Sectors
4 Sectors
8 Sectors
16 Sectors
Specify the number of sectors
per block for multiple sector
transfers. “MAX” refers to the
size the disk returns when
queried.
LBA Mode Control
Disabled
Enabled
Enabling LBA causes Logical
Block Addressing to be used in
place of Cylinders,
Heads_Sectors.
44
32 Bit I/O
Disabled
Enabled
This setting enables or disables
32 bit IDE data transfers.
Transfer Mode
Standard
Fast PIO 1
Fast PIO 2
Fast PIO 3
Fast PIO 4
FPIO 3 / DMA 1
FPIO 4 / DMA 2
Disabled
Mode 1
Mode 2
Mode 3
Mode 4
Mode 5
Select the method for moving
data to/from the drive. Autotype
the drive to select the optimum
transfer mode.
Ultra DMA Mode
45
Select the Ultra DMA mode
used for moving data to/from the
drive. Autotype the drive to
select the optimum transfer
mode.
3.5.3 Integrated Peripherals Sub Menu
The Integrated Peripherals Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Item Specific Help
Integrated Peripherals
►Keyboard Configuration
Legacy USB Support:
Floppy disk controller:
Enables 2nd Logical
Processor.
[Enabled]
[Enabled]
Serial port A:
Base I/O address:
Serial port B:
Base I/O address:
[Enabled]
[3F8/IRQ 4]
[Enabled]
[2F8/IRQ 3]
Onboard SCSI (LSI53C1020A)
Onboard GLAN OPROM Scan:
[Enabled]
[Enabled]
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
This is applicable only
for Hyper-Threading
supported Operating
System.
Check with OS
vendor for detail.
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Integrated Peripherals sub-menu page:
Item
Legacy USB Support
Options
Disabled
Enabled
Floppy disk controller
Disabled
Enabled
Auto
Description
Enable or Disable support for
USB Keyboard and Mice.
(Enable for use with a non-USB
aware Operating System such as
DOS or UNIX)
Enable or disable onboard
legacy floppy diskette
controller.
NOTE:
If disable is chosen please set
main menu legacy diskettes to
disabled.
If not done and an add-in
removable device is used, it will
not be assigned drive number 0
(or a:)
Serial port A/B
Disabled
Enabled
Auto
Configure serial port A/B using
options:
[Disabled]
No Configuration
[Enabled]
User configuration
[Auto]
BIOS or OS chooses
configuration
46
Base I/O address
Onboard SCSI (LSI53C1020A)
Onboard GLAN OPROM Scan
3F8/IRQ 4
2F8/IRQ 3
3E8/IRQ 4
2E8/IRQ 3
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled
Disabled
Set the base I/O address for
serial port A/B.
Enable / Disable onboard SCSI
device
Enabled/Disabled Onboard
GLAN OPROM scan
47
3.5.3.1 Keyboard Configuration Sub Menu
The Keyboard Configuration Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Item Specific Help
Keyboard Configuration
NumLock:
Keyboard auto-repeat rate:
Keyboard auto-repeat delay:
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
Selects Power-on state
for Numlock
[On]
[30/sec]
[1/4 sec]
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Keyboard Configuration sub-menu page:
Item
Numlock
Options
On
Off
Description
Selects Power-on state for
Numlock
Keyboard auto-repeat rate
30/sec
26.7/sec
21.8/sec
18.5/sec
13.3/sec
10/sec
6/sec
2/sec
1/4 sec
1/2 sec
3/4 sec
1 sec
Selects key repeat rate
Keyboard auto-repeat delay
Selects delay before key repeat
48
3.5.4 Console Redirection Sub Menu
The Console Redirection Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Item Specific Help
Console Redirection
Com Port Address
If enabled, it will use
a port on the
motherboard.
[Disabled]
Baud Rate
[57.6K]
Console Type
[ANSI]
Flow Control
[None]
Console connection
[Direct]
Continue C.R. after POST [Off]
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Console Redirection sub-menu page:
Item
Com Port Address
Options
Disabled
On-board COM A
On-board COM B
Description
If enabled, it will use a port on
the motherboard.
Baud Rate
300
1200
2400
9600
19.2K
38.4K
57.6K
Enables the specified baud rate.
Console Type
VT100
VT100, 8bit
ANSI, 7bit
ANSI
VT100+
UTF8
Enables the specified console
type.
Flow Control
None
XON/XOFF
CTS/RTS
Enables flow control
Console connection
Direct
Via modem
Indicate whether the console is
connected directly to the system
or a modem is used to connect.
Continue C.R. after POST
Off
On
Enables Console Redirection
after OS has loaded.
49
3.6 Security Menu:
Main
Advanced
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Boot
Server
Exit
Item Specific Help
Supervisor Password Is:
User Password Is:
Clear
Clear
Set Supervisor Password:
Set User Password:
[Enter]
[Enter]
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
Supervisor Password
controls access to the
setup utility.
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Security menu page:
Item
Supervisor Password Is
Options
Clear
Set
Description
Displays the password if there is
one.
User Password Is
Clear
Set
Displays the password if there is
one.
Set Supervisor Password
Enter
Supervisor Password controls
access to the setup utility.
Set User Password
Enter
*Note: to use this feature, you
must first set supervisor
password.
50
3.7 Power Menu:
Main
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Advanced
Boot
Server
Exit
Item Specific Help
WakeUp On LAN
[Disabled]
Resume On Time:
Resume Time:
[Off]
[00:00:00]
WakeUp On LAN
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Power menu page:
Item
WakeUp On LAN
Resume On Time
Resume Time
Options
Disabled
Enabled
Off
On
No Options
Description
WakeUp On LAN
Enabled wakes the system up at
a specific time.
Specify the time when the
system is to wake up.
<Tab>, <Shift-Tab>, or <Enter>
selects field.
51
3.8 Boot Menu:
Main
Advanced
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Boot
Server
Exit
Item Specific Help
Summary Screen:
[Disabled]
Display system
configuration on boot
►Boot Priority
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Boot menu page:
Item
Summary Screen
Options
Disabled
Enabled
Description
Display system configuration on
boot
52
3.8.1 Boot Priority Sub Menu
All the possible devices that you can boot from are automatically detected and listed on the page.
The items with a ‘+’ in front of it indicates that the item is a category with more devices nested under it.
You can use <Enter> to display the nested devices.
The first device listed is the first boot device. In the example shown below, the CD-ROM is the first boot
device, followed by the ST380023AS-(P0) in the category of hard drive.
The Boot Priority Sub Menu looks like the following:
Main
Advanced
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Boot
Server
Item Specific Help
Boot Priority
CD-ROM Drive
-Removable Devices
Legacy Floppy Drivers
-Hard Drive
ST380023AS-(P0)
Bootable Add-in Cards
MBA v8.2.5 Slot 0420
MBA v8.2.5 Slot 0421
LSI MPI Boot Support
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
Exit
Keys used to view or
configure devices:
<Enter> expands or
collapses devices with
a + or - <Ctrl-Enter>
expands all <Shift-1>
enables or disables a
device. <+> and <->
moves the device up
or down. <n> may
move removable
device between Hard
Disk or Removable
Disk. <d> Remove a
device that is not
installed.
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
53
3.9 Server Menu:
Main
Advanced
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Boot
Server
Exit
Item Specific Help
Display without KB Err Msg:
[No]
Control the Post Error
Message display or
not when without KB.
►Hardware Monitor
►IPMI
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the Boot menu page:
Item
Display without KB Err Msg
Options
Yes
No
Description
Control the Post Error Mesaage
display or not when without KB
54
3.9.1 Hardware Monitor Sub Menu
The Hardware Monitor Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Server
Item Specific Help
Hardware Monitor
CPU1-Fan1 Speed =
CPU2-Fan1 Speed =
CPU2-Fan2 Speed =
Front-Fan1 Speed =
Front-Fan2 Speed =
5000RPM
5000RPM
No Function
No Function
No Function
CPU 1 Temperature =
CPU 2 Temperature =
On-Chip Temperature =
63°C
54°C
37°C
Vbat :
Vcc(5V) :
-12V :
+12V :
Vcore0 :
Vcore1 :
VLDT(1.2V) :
Vcc3(3.3V) :
Vsb(3.3V) :
CPU1(2.5V) :
CPU2(2.5V) :
CPU1(1.25V) :
CPU2(1.25V) :
3.2894V
5.1969V
-12.2404V
+12.960V
1.5086V
1.5036V
1.1876
3.2588V
3.3064V
2.6875V
2.6875V
1.3200V
1.3366V
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
All items on this
menu cannot be
modified in user
mode. If any items
require changes,
please consult your
system Supervisor.
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
55
3.9.2 IPMI Sub Menu
The IPMI Sub Menu looks like the following:
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Advanced
Item Specific Help
IPMI
BMC/Scorpio Configuration
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
[Enabled]
[192.168.254.001]
[255.255.255.000]
[192.168.254.000]
IPMI Specification Version
BMC Firmware Version
System Event Logging
Existing Event Log number
Event Log Control
SYS Firmware Progress
BIOS POST Errors
(Unknown)
(Unknown)
[Enabled]
0
F1 Help
ESC Exit
Enabling this
selection will force
the BIOS to
Configuration IP
Address
[Disabled]
[Enabled]
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following table shows the items that you can customize on the IPMI sub-menu page:
Item
BMC/Scorpio Configuration
Options
Disabled
Enabled
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
System Event Logging
No options.
Description
Enabling this selection will
force the BIOS to Configuration
IP Address
Display/Set IP Address, Subnet
Mask, and Gateway.
Disabled
Enabled
Enable/Disable IPMI event
logging. Disabling will still log
events received via the system
interface.
SYS Firmware Progress
Disabled
Enabled
Enabling this selection will log
POST Progress.
BIOS POST Errors
Disabled
Enabled
Enabling this selection will log
POST errors.
To learn more about the IPMI selections, refer to a
separate Arima IPMI manual for detailed usage.
56
3.10 Exit Menu:
Main
Advanced
PhoenixBIOS Setup Utility
Security
Power
Boot
Server
Exit
Item Specific Help
Exit Saving Changes
Exit Discarding Changes
Load Setup Defaults
Discard Changes
Save Changes
F1 Help
ESC Exit
↑↓ Select Item
←→Select Menu
Exit System Setup and
save your changes to
CMOS.
-/+ Change Values
Enter Select►Sub-Menu
F9 Setup Defaults
F10 Save and Exit
The following sections describe each of the options on this menu. Note that <Esc> does not exit this menu.
You must select one of the items from the menu or menu bar to exit.
Saving Changes
After making your selections on the Setup menus, select “Exit Saving Changes" or "Save Changes" to see a
screen similar to the following:
Setup Confirmation
Save configuration changes and exit now?
[Yes]
[No]
Select Yes and press <Enter> to save the changes.
Both procedures store the selections displayed in the menus in CMOS (short for "battery-backed CMOS
RAM") a special section of memory that stays on after you turn your system off. The next time you boot
your computer, the BIOS configures your system according to the Setup selections stored in CMOS.
During boot up, PhoenixBIOS attempts to load the values saved in CMOS. If those values cause the system
boot to fail, reboot and press <F2> to enter Setup. In Setup, you can get the Default Values (as described
below) or try to change the selections that caused the boot to fail.
Exit Discarding Changes
Use this option to exit Setup without storing in CMOS any new selections you may have made. The
selections previously in effect remain in effect.
Load Setup Defaults
To display the default values for all the Setup menus, select "Load Setup Defaults" from the Main Menu.
The program displays this message:
Setup Confirmation
Load default configuration now?
[Yes]
[No]
Select Yes and press <Enter> to load the default configuration.
If, during boot up, the BIOS program detects a problem in the integrity of values stored in CMOS, it
displays these messages:
System CMOS checksum bad - run SETUP
Press <F1> to resume, <F2> to Setup
The CMOS values have been corrupted or modified incorrectly, perhaps by an application program that
changes data stored in CMOS.
Press <F1> to resume the boot or <F2> to run Setup with the ROM default values already loaded into the
menus. You can make other changes before saving the values to CMOS.
57
Discard Changes
If, during a Setup Session, you change your mind about changes you have made and have not yet saved the
values to CMOS, you can restore the values you previously saved to CMOS.
Selecting “Discard Changes” on the Exit menu updates all the selections and displays this message:
Setup Confirmation
Load previous configuration now?
[Yes]
[No]
Select Yes and press <Enter> to load the previous configuration.
Save Changes
Selecting “Save Changes” saves all the selections without exiting Setup.
Setup Confirmation
Save configuration changes now?
[Yes]
[No]
Select Yes and press <Enter> to save configuration changes and continue working in BIOS Setup.
You can return to the other menus if you want to review and change your selections.
58
3.11 About the Boot Utilities
The MainBoard comes with the following boot utilities:
Phoenix QuietBoot™: Phoenix QuietBoot displays a graphic illustration rather than the traditional POST
messages while keeping you informed of diagnostic problems.
Phoenix MultiBoot™: Phoenix MultiBoot is a boot screen that displays a selection of boot devices from
which you can boot your operating system.
3.11.1 Using Phoenix QuietBoot
Right after you turn on or reset the computer, Phoenix QuietBoot displays the QuietBoot Screen, a graphic
illustration created by the computer manufacturer instead of the text-based POST screen, which displays a
number of PC diagnostic messages.
To exit the QuietBoot screen and run Setup, display the MultiBoot menu, or simply display the PC
diagnostic messages, you can simply press one of the hot keys described below.
The QuietBoot Screen stays up until just before the operating system loads unless one of the following
actions occurs:
Press <ESC> to display the POST screen
Press <F2> to enter Setup
POST issues an error message
The BIOS or an option ROM requests keyboard input
The following explains each of these situations.
When <ESC>
is pressed
Press <ESC> switch to the POST screen and take one of two
actions:
1. If MultiBoot is installed, the boot process continues with the
POST screen until the end of POST, and then displays the
Boot First Menu, text-based with these options:
A: Load the operating system from a boot device of your
choice.
B: Enter Setup.
C: Exit the Boot First Menu (with <Esc>) and load the
operating system from the boot devices in the order
specified in Setup.
2. If MultiBoot is not installed, the boot process continues as
usual.
Press <F2> to
enter Setup
Press <F2> at any time during POST switch to the POST screen
(if not already displayed) and enters Setup.
POST issues
an error
message
Whenever POST detects a non-fatal error, QuietBoot switches to
the POST screen and displays the errors. It then displays this
message:
Press <F1> to resume, <F2> to Setup
Press <F1> to continue with the boot. Press <F2> if you want
to correct the error in Setup.
The BIOS or
an option
ROM requests
keyboard input
If the BIOS or an Option ROM (add-on card) requests keyboard
input, QuietBoot switches over to the POST screen and the
Option ROM displays prompts for entering the information.
POST continues from there with the regular POST screen.
59
3.11.2 Phoenix MultiBoot
Phoenix MultiBoot expands your boot options by letting you choose your boot device, which could be a
hard disk, floppy disk, or CD ROM. You can select your boot device in Setup, or you can choose a
different device each time you boot during POST by selecting your boot device in The Boot First Menu.
MultiBoot consists of:
The Setup Boot Menu
The Boot First Menu
Refer to the Boot menu in BIOS setup for more information on Setup Boot Menu. The following describes
the Boot First Menu.
The Boot First Menu
Display the Boot First Menu by pressing <ESC> during the POST. In response, the BIOS first displays the
message, "Entering Boot Menu ..." and then displays the Boot Menu at the end of POST. Use the menu to
select any of these options:
* Override the existing boot sequence (for this boot only) by selecting another boot device. If the specified
device does not load the operating system, the BIOS reverts to the previous boot sequence.
* Enter Setup.
* Press <Esc> to continue with the existing boot sequence.
Boot Menu
1.
CD-ROM Drive
2. +Removable Devices
3. +Hard Drive
4.
MBA v8.2.5 Slot 0420
5.
MBA v8.2.5 Slot 0421
6.
LSI MPI Boot Support
<Enter Setup>
If there is more than one bootable hard drive, the first one in the Setup Boot menu is the one represented
here.
60
3.12 BIOS Flash Upgrade Utility
Phoenix Phlash gives you the ability to update your BIOS from a floppy disk without having to install a
new ROM BIOS chip.
Phoenix Phlash is a utility for "flashing" (copying) a BIOS to the Flash ROM installed on your computer
from a floppy disk. A Flash ROM is a Read-Only Memory chip that you can write to using a special
method called "flashing." Use Phoenix Phlash for the following tasks:
Update the current BIOS with a new version.
Restore a BIOS when it has become corrupted.
3.12.1 Executing Phoenix Phlash
You can run Phoenix Phlash to update or replace your current BIOS in Command Line Mode. To execute
Phlash in this mode, move to the directory into which you have installed Phoenix Phlash and type “Phlash”
at the prompt:
C:\PHLASH16 [filename] /BBL /C /Mode=3
Phoenix Phlash automatically updates or replaces the current BIOS with the one which your OEM or dealer
supplies you.
Phlash may fail if your system is using memory managers, in which case the utility displays the following
message:
Cannot flash when memory managers are present.
If you see this message after you execute Phlash, you must disable the memory manager on your system.
To do so, follow the instructions in the following sections.
Disabling Memory Managers
To avoid failure when flashing, you must disable the memory managers that load from CONFIG.SYS and
AUTOEXEC.BAT. There are two recommended procedures for disabling the memory managers. One
consists of pressing the <F5> key (only if you are using DOS 5.0 or above), and the other requires the
creation of a boot diskette.
DOS 5.0 (or later version)
For DOS 5.0 and later, follow the two steps below to disable any memory managers on your system. If you
are not using at least DOS 5.0, then you must create a boot diskette to bypass any memory managers (See
Create a Boot Diskette, below).
1. Boot DOS 5.0 or later version. (In Windows 95, at the boot option screen, choose Option 8, "Boot
to a previous version of DOS.")
2. When DOS displays the “Starting MS-DOS” message, press <F5>.
After you press <F5>, DOS bypasses the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files, and therefore does
not load any memory managers.
You can now execute Phlash.
Create a Boot Diskette
To bypass memory managers in DOS versions previous to 5.0, follow this recommended procedure:
3. Insert a diskette into your A: drive.
4. Enter the following from the command line: Format A: /S
5. Reboot your system from the A: drive.
Your system will now boot without loading the memory managers, and you can then execute Phlash.
Commend:
A:\> PHLASH16 SW300.100 /BBL /C /Mode=3
Where:
PHLASH16
Phlash command name
SW300.100
Filename of new BIOS ROM supplied by dealer
/BBL
Flash the Boot Block
/C
Clear CMOS
/Mode=3
Update both the BIOS and DMI information (reset system DMI
strings).
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APPENDIX I: Glossary
ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface): a power management
specification that allows the operating system to control the amount of power distributed
to the computer’s devices. Devices not in use can be turned off, reducing unnecessary
power expenditure.
AGP (Accelerated Graphics Port): a PCI-based interface which was designed
specifically for demands of 3D graphics applications. The 32-bit AGP channel directly
links the graphics controller to the main memory. While the channel runs only at 66 MHz,
it supports data transmission during both the rising and falling ends of the clock cycle,
yielding an effective speed of 133 MHz.
ATAPI (AT Attachment Packet Interface): also known as IDE or ATA; a drive
implementation that includes the disk controller on the device itself. It allows CD-ROMs
and tape drives to be configured as master or slave devices, just like HDDs.
ATX: the form factor designed to replace the AT form factor. It improves on the AT
design by rotating the board 90 degrees, so that the IDE connectors are closer to the drive
bays, and the CPU is closer to the power supply and cooling fan. The keyboard, mouse,
USB, serial, and parallel ports are built-in.
Bandwidth: refers to carrying capacity. The greater the bandwidth, the more data the bus,
phone line, or other electrical path can carry. Greater bandwidth results in greater speed.
BIOS (Basic Input/Output System): the program that resides in the ROM chip, which
provides the basic instructions for controlling your computer’s hardware. Both the
operating system and application software use BIOS routines to ensure compatibility.
Buffer: a portion of RAM which is used to temporarily store data; usually from an
application though it is also used when printing and in most keyboard drivers. The CPU
can manipulate data in a buffer before copying it to a disk drive. While this improves
system performance (reading to or writing from a disk drive a single time is much faster
than doing so repeatedly) there is the possibility of losing your data should the system
crash. Information in a buffer is temporarily stored, not permanently saved.
Bus: a data pathway. The term is used especially to refer to the connection between the
processor and system memory, and between the processor and PCI or ISA local buses.
Bus mastering: allows peripheral devices and IDEs to access the system memory
without going through the CPU (similar to DMA channels).
Cache: a temporary storage area for data that will be needed often by an application.
Using a cache lowers data access times since the information is stored in SRAM instead
of slower DRAM. Note that the cache is also much smaller than your regular memory: a
typical cache size is 512KB, while you may have as much as 4GB of regular memory.
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Closed and open jumpers: jumpers and jumper pins are active when they are “on” or
“closed”, and inactive when they are “off” or “open”.
CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductors): chips that hold the basic
startup information for the BIOS.
COM port: another name for the serial port, which is called as such because it transmits
the eight bits of a byte of data along one wire, and receives data on another single wire
(that is, the data is transmitted in serial form, one bit after another). Parallel ports transmit
the bits of a byte on eight different wires at the same time (that is, in parallel form, eight
bits at the same time).
DDR (Double Data Rate): a technology designed to double the clock speed of the
memory. It activates output on both the rising and falling edge of the system clock rather
than on just the rising edge, potentially doubling output.
DIMM (Dual In-line Memory Module): faster and more capacious form of RAM than
SIMMs, and do not need to be installed in pairs.
DIMM bank: sometimes called DIMM socket because the physical slot and the logical
unit are the same. That is, one DIMM module fits into one DIMM socket, which is
capable of acting as a memory bank.
DMA (Direct Memory Access): channels that are similar to IRQs. DMA channels allow
hardware devices (like soundcards or keyboards) to access the main memory without
involving the CPU. This frees up CPU resources for other tasks. As with IRQs, it is vital
that you do not double up devices on a single line. Plug-n-Play devices will take care of
this for you.
DMI: A specification that establishes a standard framework for managing networked
computers. DMI covers hardware and software, desktop systems and servers, and defines
a model for filtering events and describing interfaces.
DRAM (Dynamic RAM): widely available, very affordable form of RAM which looses
data if it is not recharged regularly (every few milliseconds). This refresh requirement
makes DRAM three to ten times slower than non-recharged RAM such as SRAM.
ECC (Error Correction Code or Error Checking and Correcting): allows data to be
checked for errors during run-time. Errors can subsequently be corrected at the same time
that they’re found.
EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable ROM): also called Flash BIOS, it is
a ROM chip which can, unlike normal ROM, be updated. This allows you to keep up
with changes in the BIOS programs without having to buy a new chip.
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ESCD (Extended System Configuration Data): a format for storing information about
Plug-n-Play devices in the system BIOS. This information helps properly configure the
system each time it boots.
Firmware: low-level software that controls the system hardware.
Form factor: an industry term for the size, shape, power supply type, and external
connector type of the Personal Computer Board (PCB) or motherboard. The standard
form factors are the AT and ATX.
IDE (Integrated Device/Drive Electronics): a simple, self-contained HDD interface. It
can handle drives up to 8.4 GB in size. Almost all IDEs sold now are in fact Enhanced
IDEs (EIDEs), with maximum capacity determined by the hardware controller.
IDE INT (IDE Interrupt): a hardware interrupt signal that goes to the IDE.
I/O (Input/Output): the connection between your computer and another piece of
hardware (mouse, keyboard, etc.)
IRQ (Interrupt Request): an electronic request that runs from a hardware device to the
CPU. The interrupt controller assigns priorities to incoming requests and delivers them to
the CPU. It is important that there is only one device hooked up to each IRQ line;
doubling up devices on IRQ lines can lock up your system. Plug-n-Play operating
systems can take care of these details for you.
Latency: the amount of time that one part of a system spends waiting for another part to
catch up. This occurs most commonly when the system sends data out to a peripheral
device and has to wait for the peripheral to spread (peripherals tend to be slower than
onboard system components).
NVRAM: ROM and EEPROM are both examples of Non-Volatile RAM, memory that
holds its data without power. DRAM, in contrast, is volatile.
OPROM: Firmware on adapter cards that control bootable peripherals. The system
BIOS interrogates the option ROMs to determine which devices can be booted.
Parallel port: transmits the bits of a byte on eight different wires at the same time.
PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect): a 32 or 64-bit local bus (data pathway)
which is faster than the ISA bus. Local buses are those which operate within a single
system (as opposed to a network bus, which connects multiple systems).
PCI PIO (PCI Programmable Input/Output) modes: the data transfer modes used by
IDE drives. These modes use the CPU for data transfer (in contrast, DMA channels do
not). PCI refers to the type of bus used by these modes to communicate with the CPU.
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PCI-to-PCI bridge: allows you to connect multiple PCI devices onto one PCI slot.
PnP (Plug-n-Play): a design standard that has become ascendant in the industry. Plug-nPlay devices require little set-up to use. Devices and operating systems that are not Plugn-Play require you to reconfigure your system each time you add or change any part of
your hardware.
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks): a way for the same data to be stored
in different places on many hard drives. By using this method, the data is stored
redundantly and multiple hard drives will appear as a single drive to the operating system.
RAID level 0 is known as striping, where data is striped (or overlapped) across multiple
hard drives, but offers no fault-tolerance. RAID level 1 is known as mirroring, which
stores the data within at least two hard drives, but does not stripe. RAID level 1 also
allows for faster access time and fault-tolerance, since either hard drive can be read at the
same time. RAID level 0+1 is both striping and mirroring, providing fault-tolerance,
striping, and faster access all at the same time.
SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic RAM): called as such because it can keep two sets of
memory addresses open simultaneously. By transferring data alternately from one set of
addresses and then the other, SDRAM cuts down on the delays associated with nonsynchronous RAM, which must close one address bank before opening the next.
Serial port: called as such because it transmits the eight bits of a byte of data along one
wire, and receives data on another single wire (that is, the data is transmitted in serial
form, one bit after another).
Sleep/Suspend mode: in this mode, all devices except the CPU shut down.
SRAM (Static RAM): unlike DRAM, this type of RAM does not need to be refreshed in
order to prevent data loss. Thus, it is faster and more expensive.
SMBIOS: The system management specification addresses how motherboard and system
vendors present management information about their products in a standard format by
extending the BIOS interface on Intel architecture systems.
Standby mode: in this mode, the video and hard drives shut down; all other devices
continue to operate normally.
UltraDMA-33/66/100: a fast version of the old DMA channel. UltraDMA is also called
UltraATA. Without a proper UltraDMA controller, your system cannot take advantage of
higher data transfer rates of the new UltraDMA/UltraATA hard drives.
USB (Universal Serial Bus): a versatile port. This one port type can function as a serial,
parallel, mouse, keyboard or joystick port. It is fast enough to support video transfer, and
is capable of supporting up to 127 daisy-chained peripheral devices.
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ZCR (Zero Channel RAID): ZCR card provides RAID-5 solution by working with the
onboard SCSI/SATA/SATA-II chip through special PCI-X slot with Intel RAIDIOS logic,
thus lowering cost of RAID-5 solution
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APPENDIX II: Block Diagram
For your convenience, we have included this block diagram to show the internal design
of the motherboard in order to better aid you in troubleshooting. This diagram shows the
bus and the channel of data flow. A good understanding of this diagram can help you
clarify the configuration choices for your own optimization.
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APPENDIX III: FAQ
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