Dell EMC AX4-5I Troubleshooting guide

Dell/EMC AX4-5 Fibre Channel
Storage Arrays With
Microsoft® Windows Server®
Failover Clusters
Hardware Installation
and Troubleshooting
Guide
Notes, Cautions, and Warnings
NOTE: A NOTE indicates important information that helps you make better use
of your computer.
CAUTION: A CAUTION indicates potential damage to hardware or loss of data
if instructions are not followed.
WARNING: A WARNING indicates a potential for property damage, personal
injury, or death.
____________________
Information in this document is subject to change without notice.
© 2008-2010 Dell Inc. All rights reserved.
Reproduction of these materials in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of Dell Inc.
is strictly forbidden.
Trademarks used in this text: Dell, the DELL logo, PowerEdge, and PowerVault are trademarks of
Dell Inc.; Active Directory, Microsoft, Windows, Windows Server, and Windows NT are either
trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other
countries.; EMC, Navisphere, and PowerPath are registered trademarks and MirrorView, SAN
Copy, and SnapView are trademarks of EMC Corporation.
Other trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities
claiming the marks and names or their products. Dell Inc. disclaims any proprietary interest in
trademarks and trade names other than its own.
January 2010
Rev A01
Contents
1
Introduction .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster Solution
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster Hardware Requirements
Cluster Nodes .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster Storage .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
9
10
. . . . . . . . . . .
11
11
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Direct-Attached Cluster
Other Documents You May Need
2
8
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Cluster Configurations .
SAN-Attached Cluster
7
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware .
. . . . . . .
Cabling the Mouse, Keyboard, and Monitor
Cabling the Power Supplies .
13
15
. . . . . .
15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Cabling Your Cluster for Public and
Private Networks . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
17
Cabling the Public Network
. . . . . . . . . . . .
19
Cabling the Private Network
. . . . . . . . . . . .
19
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
NIC Teaming
Cabling the Storage Systems
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Cabling Storage for Your
Direct-Attached Cluster
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Cabling Storage for Your
SAN-Attached Cluster .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
Cabling a SAN-Attached Cluster to an
AX4-5F Storage System . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . .
Contents
27
3
3
Preparing Your Systems
for Clustering . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cluster Configuration Overview .
Installation Overview
. . . . . . . . . . . .
35
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Installing the Fibre Channel HBAs .
. . . . . . . . . . .
Installing EMC PowerPath .
38
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Implementing Zoning on a Fibre Channel
Switched Fabric . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
39
Using Worldwide Port Name Zoning
. . . . . . . .
39
. . . . . . . . .
41
Installing and Configuring the Shared
Storage System . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Navisphere Storage System
Initialization Utility . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
41
Installing the Expansion Pack Using
Navisphere Express . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . .
42
Installing Navisphere Server Utility.
. . . . . . . .
43
Registering a Server With a Storage System .
. . .
43
Assigning the Virtual Disks to Cluster Nodes .
. . .
44
. . . . . .
44
Advanced or Optional Storage Features
Installing and Configuring a Failover Cluster .
Contents
38
. . . . .
Installing the Fibre Channel HBA Drivers .
4
35
. . . . .
46
A Troubleshooting .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B Cluster Data Form
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
55
. . . . . . . . . . .
57
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
59
C Zoning Configuration Form
Index
47
Contents
5
6
Contents
Introduction
A failover cluster combines specific hardware and software components to
provide enhanced availability for applications and services that are run on the
cluster. A failover cluster is designed to reduce the possibility of any single
point of failure within the system that can cause the clustered applications or
services to become unavailable. It is recommended that you use redundant
components like server and storage power supplies, connections between the
nodes and the storage array(s), connections to client systems or other servers
in a multi-tier enterprise application architecture in your cluster.
This document provides information and specific configuration tasks that
enable you to configure your Microsoft® Windows Server® failover cluster
with Dell/EMC AX4-5F (2 Fibre Channel ports per Storage Processor) or
Dell/EMC AX4-5FX (4 Fibre Channel ports per Storage Processor) storage
array(s).
NOTE: Throughout this document, Dell/EMC AX4-5 refers to Dell/EMC AX4-5F and
Dell/EMC AX4-5FX storage arrays.
NOTE: Throughout this document, Windows Server 2008 refers to Windows Server
2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 operating systems.
For more information on deploying your cluster with Windows Server 2003
operating systems, see the Dell™ Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows
Server 2003 Installation and Troubleshooting Guide on the Dell Support
website at support.dell.com/manuals. For more information on deploying
your cluster with Windows Server 2008 operating systems, see the Dell
Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Installation and
Troubleshooting Guide on the Dell Support website at
support.dell.com/manuals.
For a list of recommended operating systems, hardware components, and
driver or firmware versions for your Dell Windows Server Failover Cluster, see
the Dell Cluster Configuration Support Matrices located on the Dell High
Availability Clustering website at dell.com/ha.
Introduction
7
Cluster Solution
Your cluster implements a minimum of two node to a maximum of either eight
nodes (for Windows Server 2003) or sixteen nodes (for Windows Server 2008)
clustering and provides the following features:
•
8-Gbps and 4-Gbps Fibre Channel technologies
•
High availability of resources to network clients
•
Redundant paths to the shared storage
•
Failure recovery for applications and services
•
Flexible maintenance capabilities, allowing you to repair, maintain, or
upgrade a node or storage system without taking the entire cluster offline
Implementing Fibre Channel technology in a cluster provides the following
advantages:
•
Flexibility — Fibre Channel allows a distance of up to 10 km between
switches without degrading the signal.
•
Availability — Fibre Channel components use redundant connections,
providing multiple data paths and greater availability for clients.
•
Connectivity — Fibre Channel allows more device connections than
SCSI. Because Fibre Channel devices are hot-swappable, you can add or
remove devices from the nodes without bringing down the cluster.
Cluster Hardware Requirements
Your cluster requires the following hardware components:
8
•
Cluster nodes
•
Cluster storage
Introduction
Cluster Nodes
Table 1-1 lists the hardware requirements for the cluster nodes.
Table 1-1.
Cluster Node Requirements
Component
Minimum Requirement
Cluster nodes
A minimum of two identical Dell™ PowerEdge™ servers are
required. The maximum number of nodes that is supported
depends on the variant of the Windows Server operating
system used in your cluster, and on the physical topology in
which the storage system and nodes are interconnected.
RAM
The variant of the Windows Server operating system that is
installed on your cluster nodes determines the minimum
required amount of system RAM.
HBA ports
Two Fibre Channel HBAs per node, unless the server employs
an integrated or supported dual-port Fibre Channel HBA.
Where possible, place the HBAs on separate PCI buses to
improve availability and performance.
NICs (public and
private networks)
At least two NICs: one NIC for the public network and
another NIC for the private network.
NOTE: It is recommended that the NICs on each public network
are identical, and that the NICs on each private network are
identical.
Internal disk
controller
One controller connected to at least two internal hard drives
for each node. Use any supported RAID controller or disk
controller.
Two hard drives are required for mirroring (RAID 1) and at
least three are required for disk striping with parity (RAID 5).
NOTE: It is strongly recommended that you use hardwarebased RAID or software-based disk-fault tolerance for the
internal drives.
NOTE: For more information about supported systems, HBAs and operating system
variants, see the Dell Cluster Configuration Support Matrices located on the Dell
High Availability Clustering website at dell.com/ha.
Introduction
9
Cluster Storage
Cluster nodes can share access to external storage systems. However, only one
of the nodes can own any redundant array of independent disks (RAID)
volume in the external storage system at any time. Microsoft Cluster Services
(MSCS) controls which node has access to each RAID volume in the shared
storage system.
Table 1-2 lists supported storage systems and the configuration requirements
for the cluster nodes and stand-alone systems connected to the storage
systems.
Table 1-2. Cluster Storage Requirements
Hardware Components Requirement
Supported storage
systems
One to four supported Dell/EMC storage systems. For
specific storage system requirements see Table 1-3.
Cluster nodes
All nodes must be directly attached to a single storage
system or attached to one or more storage systems
through a SAN.
Multiple clusters and
stand-alone systems
Can share one or more supported storage systems using
optional software that is available for your storage system.
See "Installing and Configuring the Shared Storage
System" on page 41.
The storage systems work together with the following hardware components:
10
•
Disk processor enclosure (DPE)—Configured with storage processors that
control the RAID arrays in the storage system and provide storage
functionalities such as snapshots, LUN masking, and remote mirroring.
•
Disk array enclosure (DAE)—Provides additional storage and is attached
to the disk processor enclosure.
•
Standby power supply (SPS)—Provides backup power to protect the
integrity of the disk processor write cache. The SPS is connected to the
disk processor enclosure
Introduction
Table 1-3 lists hardware requirements for the disk processor enclosures DPE
DAE, and SPS.
Table 1-3.
Dell/EMC Storage System Requirements
Storage
System
Minimum Required
Storage
Possible Storage
Expansion
AX4-5
1 DPE with at least 4 Up to 3 DAE with a
and up to 12 hard
maximum of 12 harddrives
drives each
SPS
First is required,
the second SPS is
optional
NOTE: Ensure that the core software version running on the storage system is
supported by Dell. For specific version requirements, see the Dell Cluster
Configuration Support Matrices located on the Dell High Availability Cluster website
at dell.com/ha.
Supported Cluster Configurations
Direct-Attached Cluster
In a direct-attached cluster, all nodes of the cluster are directly attached to a
single storage system. In this configuration, the RAID controllers (or storage
processors) on the storage systems are connected by cables directly to the
Fibre Channel HBA ports in the nodes.
Figure 1-1 shows a basic direct-attached, single-cluster configuration.
Introduction
11
Figure 1-1.
Direct-Attached, Single-Cluster Configuration
public network
cluster node
cluster node
private network
Fibre Channel
connections
Fibre Channel
connections
storage system
EMC® PowerPath® Limitations in a Direct-Attached Cluster
EMC PowerPath provides failover capabilities and multiple path detection as
well as dynamic load balancing between multiple ports on the same storage
processor. However, direct-attached clusters supported by Dell connect to a
single port on each storage processor in the storage system. Because of the
single port limitation, PowerPath can provide only failover protection, not
load balancing, in a direct-attached configuration.
SAN-Attached Cluster
In a SAN-attached cluster, all of the nodes are attached to a single storage
system or to multiple storage systems through a SAN using redundant switch
fabrics. SAN-attached clusters are superior to direct-attached clusters in
configuration flexibility, expandability, and performance.
Figure 1-2 shows a SAN-attached cluster.
12
Introduction
Figure 1-2. SAN-Attached Cluster
public network
cluster node
cluster node
private network
Fibre Channel
connections
Fibre Channel
connections
Fibre Channel
switch
Fibre Channel
switch
storage system
Other Documents You May Need
CAUTION: The safety information that is shipped with your system provides
important safety and regulatory information. Warranty information may be
included within this document or as a separate document.
NOTE: To configure Dell blade server modules in a Dell PowerEdge cluster, see the
Using Dell Blade Servers in a Dell PowerEdge High Availability Cluster document
located on the Dell Support website at support.dell.com/manuals.
•
The Rack Installation Guide included with your rack solution describes
how to install your system into a rack.
•
The Getting Started Guide provides an overview of initially setting up your
system.
•
The Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Installation
and Troubleshooting Guide provides more information on deploying your
cluster with the Windows Server 2003 operating system.
•
The Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Installation
and Troubleshooting Guide provides more information on deploying your
cluster with the Windows Server 2008 operating system.
Introduction
13
•
The Dell Cluster Configuration Support Matrices provides a list of
recommended operating systems, hardware components, and driver or
firmware versions for your Dell Windows Server Failover Cluster.
•
The HBA documentation provides installation instructions for the HBAs.
•
Systems management software documentation describes the features,
requirements, installation, and basic operation of the software.
•
Operating system documentation describes how to install (if necessary),
configure, and use the operating system software.
•
The Dell PowerVault™ tape library documentation provides information
for installing, troubleshooting, and upgrading the tape library.
•
The EMC PowerPath documentation that came with your HBA kit(s) and
Dell/EMC Storage Enclosure User’s Guides.
•
Updates are sometimes included with the system to describe changes to
the system, software, and/or documentation.
NOTE: Always read the updates first because they often supersede
information in other documents.
•
14
Release notes or readme files may be included to provide last-minute
updates to the system or documentation, or advanced technical reference
material intended for experienced users or technicians.
Introduction
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
NOTE: To configure Dell blade server modules in a Dell™ PowerEdge™ cluster, see
the Using Dell Blade Servers in a Dell PowerEdge High Availability Cluster
document located on the Dell Support website at support.dell.com/manuals.
Cabling the Mouse, Keyboard, and Monitor
When installing a cluster configuration in a rack, you must include a switch
box to connect the mouse, keyboard, and monitor to the nodes. See the
documentation included with your rack for instructions on cabling each
node’s connections to the switch box.
Cabling the Power Supplies
Refer to the documentation for each component in your cluster solution to
ensure that the specific power requirements are satisfied.
The following guidelines are recommended to protect your cluster solution
from power-related failures:
•
For nodes with multiple power supplies, plug each power supply into a
separate AC circuit.
•
Use uninterruptible power supplies (UPS).
•
For some environments, consider having backup generators and power
from separate electrical substations.
Figure 2-1, and Figure 2-2 illustrate recommended methods for power cabling
for a cluster solution consisting of two PowerEdge systems and two storage
systems. To ensure redundancy, the primary power supplies of all the
components are grouped onto one or two circuits and the redundant power
supplies are grouped onto a different circuit.
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
15
Figure 2-1. Power Cabling Example With One Power Supply in the PowerEdge Systems
and One Standby Power Supply (SPS) in an AX4-5 Storage System
primary power
supplies on one AC
power strip (or on one
AC PDU [not shown])
SPS
redundant power
supplies on one AC
power strip (or on one
AC PDU [not shown])
NOTE: This illustration is intended only to demonstrate the power
distribution of the components.
16
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
Figure 2-2. Power Cabling Example With Two Power Supplies in the PowerEdge
Systems and Two SPS(s) in an AX4-5 Storage System
A
B
A
B
A
B
0 Fibre 1 Fibre
0 Fibre 1 Fibre
A
B
primary power supplies
on one AC power strip
(or on one AC PDU [not
shown])
redundant power supplies
on one AC power strip (or
on one AC PDU [not
shown])
Cabling Your Cluster for Public and Private
Networks
The network adapters in the cluster nodes provide at least two network
connections for each node, as described in Table 2-1.
NOTE: To configure Dell blade server modules in a Dell PowerEdge cluster, see the
Using Dell Blade Servers in a Dell PowerEdge High Availability Cluster document
located on the Dell Support website at support.dell.com/manuals.
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
17
Table 2-1.
Network Connections
Network Connection
Description
Public network
All connections to the client LAN.
At least one public network must be configured for
Mixed mode for private network failover.
Private network
A dedicated connection for sharing cluster health and
status information only.
Figure 2-3 shows an example of cabling in which dedicated network adapters
in each node are connected to each other (for the private network) and the
remaining network adapters are connected to the public network.
Figure 2-3.
Example of Network Cabling Connection
public network
private
network
adapter
public
network
adapter
private network
cluster node 1
18
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
cluster node 2
Cabling the Public Network
Any network adapter supported by a system running TCP/IP may be used to
connect to the public network segments. You can install additional network
adapters to support additional public network segments or to provide
redundancy in the event of a faulty primary network adapter or switch port.
Cabling the Private Network
The private network connection to the nodes is provided by a different
network adapter in each node. This network is used for intra-cluster
communications. Table 2-2 describes two possible private network
configurations.
Table 2-2.
Private Network Hardware Components and Connections
Method
Hardware Components
Connection
Network
switch
Gigabit or 10 Gigabit
Depending on the hardware, connect
Ethernet network adapters the CAT5e or CAT6 cables, the
and switches
multimode optical cables with LC
(Local Connector) connectors, or the
twin-ax cables from the network
adapters in the nodes to a switch.
Point-to-Point Gigabit or 10 Gigabit
Connect a standard CAT5e or CAT6
(two-node
Ethernet network adapters Ethernet cable between the network
clusters only) with RJ-45 connectors
adapters in both nodes.
10 Gigabit Ethernet
network adapters with
SFP+ connectors
Connect a twin-ax cable between the
network adapters in both nodes.
Optical Gigabit or 10
Connect a multi-mode optical cable
Gigabit Ethernet network between the network adapters in both
adapters with LC
nodes.
connectors
NOTE: For more information on the supported cable types, see your system or NIC
documentation.
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
19
Using Dual-Port Network Adapters
You can configure your cluster to use the public network as a failover for
private network communications. If dual-port network adapters are used, do
not use both ports simultaneously to support both the public and private
networks.
NIC Teaming
NIC teaming combines two or more NICs to provide load balancing and fault
tolerance. Your cluster supports NIC teaming, but only in a public network;
NIC teaming is not supported in a private network.
You should use the same brand of NICs in a team, and you cannot mix brands
of teaming drivers.
Cabling the Storage Systems
This section provides information for connecting your cluster to a storage
system in a direct-attached configuration, or to one or more storage systems
in a SAN-attached configuration.
Cabling Storage for Your Direct-Attached Cluster
NOTE: Ensure that the management port on each storage processor is connected
to the storage server with the management station, using an Ethernet network
cable.
A direct-attached cluster configuration consists of redundant Fibre Channel
host bus adapter (HBA) ports cabled directly to a Dell/EMC storage system.
Direct-attached configurations are self-contained and do not share any
physical resources with other server or storage systems outside of the cluster.
Figure 2-4 shows an example of a direct-attached, single cluster configuration
with redundant HBA ports installed in each cluster node.
20
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
Figure 2-4. Direct-Attached Cluster Configuration
public network
cluster node
cluster node
private network
Fibre Channel
Connections
Fibre Channel
Connections
storage system
Each cluster node attaches to the storage system using two multi-mode
optical cables with LC connectors that attach to the HBA ports in the cluster
nodes and the storage processor (SP) ports in the Dell/EMC storage system.
These connectors consist of two individual Fibre optic connectors with
indexed tabs that must be aligned properly into the HBA ports and SP ports.
WARNING: Do not remove the connector covers until you are ready to insert the
connectors into the HBA port, SP port, or tape library port.
NOTE: The connections listed in this section are representative of one proven
method of ensuring redundancy in the connections between the cluster nodes and
the storage system. Other methods that achieve the same type of redundant
connectivity may be acceptable.
Cabling a Two-Node Cluster to an AX4-5F Storage System
1 Connect cluster node 1 to the storage system.
a
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 0 to SP-A Fibre port 0
(first fibre port).
b
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 1 to SP-B Fibre port 0
(first fibre port).
2 Connect cluster node 2 to the storage system.
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
21
a
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 0 to SP-A Fibre port
1(second fibre port).
b
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 1 to SP-B Fibre port
1(second fibre port).
Figure 2-5 and Figure 2-6 illustrate the method of cabling a two-node
direct-attached cluster to an AX4-5F and AX4-5FX storage system
respectively.
NOTE: The cables are connected to the storage processor ports in sequential
order for illustrative purposes. While the available ports in your storage system may
vary, HBA port 0 and HBA port 1 must be connected to SP-A and SP-B, respectively.
Figure 2-5.
Cabling a Two-Node Cluster to an AX4-5F Storage System
cluster node 1
01
cluster node 2
HBA ports (2)
HBA ports (2)
SP-B
SP-A
A
B
0 Fibre 1 Fibre
0 Fibre 1 Fibre
A
B
AX4-5F storage system
22
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
10
Figure 2-6. Cabling a Two-node Cluster to an AX4-5FX Storage System
HBA ports (2)
HBA ports (2)
1 0
0 1
SP-A
SP-B
AX4-5FX storage system
Cabling a Four-Node Cluster to a Dell/EMC AX4-5FX Storage System
You can configure a 4-node cluster in a direct-attached configuration using a
Dell/EMC AX4-5FX storage system:
1 Connect cluster node 1 to the storage system:
a
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 0 to the first front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 1 to the first front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
2 Connect cluster node 2 to the storage system:
a
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 0 to the second front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 1 to the second front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
3 Connect cluster node 3 to the storage system:
a
Install a cable from cluster node 3 HBA port 0 to the third front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 3 HBA port 1 to the third front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
4 Connect cluster node 4 to the storage system:
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
23
a
Install a cable from cluster node 4 HBA port 0 to the fourth front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 4 HBA port 1 to the fourth front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
Cabling 2 Two-Node Clusters to a Dell/EMC AX4-5FX Storage System
The following steps are an example of how to cable a 2 two-node cluster to a
Dell/EMC AX4-5FX storage system:
1 In the first cluster, connect cluster node 1 to the storage system:
a
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 0 to the first front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 1 to the first front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
2 In the first cluster, connect cluster node 2 to the storage system:
a
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 0 to the second front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 1 to the second front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
3 In the second cluster, connect cluster node 1 to the storage system:
a
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 0 to the third front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 1 HBA port 1 to the third front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
4 In the second cluster, connect cluster node 2 to the storage system:
24
a
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 0 to the fourth front-end
fibre channel port on SP-A.
b
Install a cable from cluster node 2 HBA port 1 to the fourth front-end
fibre channel port on SP-B.
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
Cabling Storage for Your SAN-Attached Cluster
A SAN-attached cluster is a cluster configuration where all cluster nodes are
attached to a single storage system or to multiple storage systems through a
SAN using a redundant switch fabric.
SAN-attached cluster configurations provide more flexibility, expandability,
and performance than direct-attached configurations.
Figure 2-7 shows an example of a two-node, SAN-attached cluster.
Figure 2-8 shows an example of an eight-node, SAN-attached cluster.
Similar cabling concepts can be applied to clusters that contain a different
number of nodes.
NOTE: The connections listed in this section are representative of one proven
method of ensuring redundancy in the connections between the cluster nodes and
the storage system. Other methods that achieve the same type of redundant
connectivity may be acceptable.
Figure 2-7. Two-Node SAN-Attached Cluster
public network
cluster node
private network
Fibre Channel
connections
cluster node
Fibre Channel
connections
Fibre Channel
switch
Fibre Channel
switch
storage system
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
25
Figure 2-8.
Eight-Node SAN-Attached Cluster
public network
private
network
cluster
nodes (8)
Fibre
Channel
switch
Fibre
Channel
switch
storage system
Each HBA port is cabled to a port on a Fibre Channel switch. One or more
cables connect from the outgoing ports on a switch to a storage processor on a
Dell/EMC storage system.
26
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
Cabling a SAN-Attached Cluster to an AX4-5F Storage System
1 Connect cluster node 1 to the SAN.
a
Connect a cable from HBA port 0 to Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0).
b
Connect a cable from HBA port 1 to Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1).
2 Repeat step 1 for each cluster node.
3 Connect the storage system to the SAN.
a
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-A Fibre
port 0(first fibre port).
b
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-B Fibre
port 1(second fibre port).
c
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-A Fibre
port 1(second fibre port).
d
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-B Fibre
port 0(first fibre port).
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
27
Figure 2-9.
Cabling a SAN-Attached Cluster to an AX4-5F Storage System
cluster node 2
cluster node 1
HBA ports (2)
HBA ports (2)
01
0 1
sw1
sw0
SP-A
SP-B
A
B
0 Fibre 1 Fibre
0 Fibre 1 Fibre
A
B
AX4-5F storage system
Cabling a SAN-Attached Cluster to an AX4-5FX Storage System
1 Connect cluster node 1 to the SAN.
a
Connect a cable from HBA port 0 to Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0).
b
Connect a cable from HBA port 1 to Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1).
2 Repeat step 1 for each cluster node.
3 Connect the storage system to the SAN.
28
a
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-A Fibre port
0(First fibre port).
b
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-A Fibre port
1(Second fibre port).
c
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-B Fibre port
2(Third fibre port).
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
d
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-B Fibre port
3(Fourth fibre port).
e
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-A Fibre port
2(Third fibre port).
f
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-A Fibre port
3(Fourth fibre port).
g
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-B Fibre port
0(first fibre port).
h
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-B Fibre port
1(Second fibre port).
Figure 2-10.
Cabling a SAN-Attached Cluster to an AX4-5FX Storage System
cluster node 2
cluster node 1
HBA ports (2)
HBA ports (2)
0 1
0 1
sw1
sw0
SP-A
SP-B
AX4-5FX storage system
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
29
Cabling Multiple SAN-Attached Clusters to a Dell/EMC Storage System
To cable multiple clusters to the storage system, connect the cluster nodes to
the appropriate Fibre Channel switches and then connect the Fibre Channel
switches to the appropriate storage processors on the processor enclosure.
See the Dell Cluster Configuration Support Matrices located on the Dell High
Availability Clustering website at dell.com/ha for rules and guidelines for
SAN-attached clusters.
NOTE: The following procedure uses Figure 2-9 as an example for cabling
additional clusters.
Cabling Multiple SAN-Attached Clusters to the AX4-5 Storage System
1 In the first cluster, connect cluster node 1 to the SAN.
a
Connect a cable from HBA port 0 to Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0).
b
Connect a cable from HBA port 1 to Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1).
2 In the first cluster, repeat step 1 for each node.
3 For each additional cluster, repeat step 1 and step 2.
4 Connect the storage system to the SAN.
a
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-A Fibre
port 0(first fibre port).
b
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 0 (sw0) to SP-B Fibre
port 1(second fibre port).
c
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-A Fibre
port 1(second fibre port).
d
Connect a cable from Fibre Channel switch 1 (sw1) to SP-B Fibre
port 0(first fibre port).
Connecting a PowerEdge Cluster to Multiple Storage Systems
You can increase your cluster storage capacity by attaching multiple storage
systems to your cluster using a redundant switch fabric. PowerEdge cluster
systems can support configurations with multiple storage units attached to
clustered servers. In this scenario, the MSCS software can fail over disk drives
in any cluster-attached shared storage array between the cluster nodes. When
attaching multiple storage systems with your cluster, the following rules apply:
•
30
There is a maximum of four storage systems per cluster.
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
•
The shared storage systems and firmware must be identical. Using
dissimilar storage systems and firmware for your shared storage is not
supported.
•
MSCS is limited to 22 drive letters. Because drive letters A through D are
reserved for local disks, a maximum of 22 drive letters (E to Z) can be used
for your storage system disks.
•
Windows Server 2003 and 2008 support mount points, allowing greater
than 22 drives per cluster.
For more information, see "Assigning Drive Letters and Mount Points"
section of Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2003
Installation and Troubleshooting Guide or Dell Failover Clusters with
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Installation and Troubleshooting Guide on
the Dell Support website at support.dell.com/manuals.
Figure 2-11 provides an example of cabling the cluster nodes to four
Dell/EMC storage systems.
Figure 2-11.
PowerEdge Cluster Nodes Cabled to Four Storage Systems
cluster node
cluster node
private network
Fibre Channel
switch
Fibre Channel
switch
storage systems (4)
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
31
Connecting a PowerEdge Cluster to a Tape Library
To provide additional backup for your cluster, you can add tape backup
devices to your cluster configuration. The Dell PowerVault™ tape libraries
may contain an integrated Fibre Channel bridge, or Storage Network
Controller (SNC), that connects directly to your Dell/EMC Fibre Channel
switch.
Figure 2-12 shows a supported PowerEdge cluster configuration using
redundant Fibre Channel switches and a tape library. In this configuration,
each of the cluster nodes can access the tape library to provide backup for
your local disk resources, as well as your cluster disk resources. Using this
configuration allows you to add more servers and storage systems in the
future, if needed.
NOTE: While tape libraries can be connected to multiple fabrics, they do not
provide path failover.
Figure 2-12.
Cabling a Storage System and a Tape Library
cluster node
cluster node
private network
Fibre Channel
switch
Fibre Channel
switch
tape library
storage systems
Obtaining More Information
See the storage and tape backup documentation for more information on
configuring these components.
32
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
Configuring Your Cluster With SAN Backup
You can provide centralized backup for your clusters by sharing your SAN
with multiple clusters, storage systems, and a tape library.
Figure 2-13 provides an example of cabling the cluster nodes to your storage
systems and SAN backup with a tape library.
Figure 2-13.
Cluster Configuration Using SAN-Based Backup
cluster 1
cluster 2
Fibre Channel switch
Fibre Channel switch
storage systems
tape library
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
33
34
Cabling Your Cluster Hardware
Preparing Your Systems for
Clustering
CAUTION: Only trained service technicians are authorized to remove and access
any of the components inside the system. See the safety information that shipped
with your system for complete information about safety precautions, working
inside the computer, and protecting against electrostatic discharge.
Cluster Configuration Overview
1 Ensure that your site can handle the cluster’s power requirements.
Contact your sales representative for information about your region's
power requirements.
2 Install the systems, the shared storage array(s), and the interconnect
switches (example: in an equipment rack), and ensure that all these
components are powered on.
NOTE: For more information on step 3 to step 7 and step 10 to step 13, see
"Preparing your systems for clustering" section of Dell Failover Clusters with
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Installation and Troubleshooting Guide or Dell
Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Installation and
Troubleshooting Guide located on the Dell Support website at
support.dell.com/manuals.
3 Deploy the operating system (including any relevant service pack and
hotfixes), network adapter drivers, and storage adapter drivers (including
Multipath I/O drivers(MPIO)) on each of the systems that will become
cluster nodes. Depending on the deployment method that is used, it may
be necessary to provide a network connection to successfully complete this
step.
NOTE: To help in planning and deployment of your cluster, record the relevant
cluster configuration information in the "Cluster Data Form" on page 55 and
zoning information in the "Zoning Configuration Form" on page 57.
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
35
4 Establish the physical network topology and the TCP/IP settings for
network adapters on each server node to provide access to the cluster
public and private networks.
5 Configure each cluster node as a member in the same Microsoft®
Windows Active Directory® Domain.
NOTE: You can configure the cluster nodes as Domain Controllers. For more
information, see “Selecting a Domain Model” section of Dell Failover Clusters
with Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Installation and Troubleshooting Guide
or Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Installation and
Troubleshooting Guide located on the Dell Support website at
support.dell.com/manuals.
6 Establish the physical storage topology and any required storage network
settings to provide connectivity between the storage array and the servers
that will be configured as cluster nodes. Configure the storage system(s) as
described in your storage system documentation.
7 Use storage array management tools to create at least one logical unit
number (LUN). The LUN is used as a cluster Quorum disk for Windows
Server 2003 Failover cluster and as a Witness disk for Windows Server
2008 Failover cluster. Ensure that this LUN is presented to the servers that
will be configured as cluster nodes.
NOTE: For security reasons, it is recommended that you configure the LUN on
a single node as mentioned in step 8 when you are setting up the cluster.
Later, you can configure the LUN as mentioned in step 9 so that other cluster
nodes can access it.
8 Select one of the systems and form a new failover cluster by configuring
the cluster name, cluster management IP, and quorum resource. For more
information, see "Preparing Your Systems for Clustering" on page 35.
NOTE: For Windows Server® 2008 Failover Clusters, run the Cluster
Validation Wizard to ensure that your system is ready to form the cluster.
9 Join the remaining node(s) to the failover cluster. For more information,
see "Preparing Your Systems for Clustering" on page 35.
10 Configure roles for cluster networks. Take any network interfaces that are
used for iSCSI storage (or for other purposes outside of the cluster) out of
the control of the cluster.
11 Test the failover capabilities of your new cluster.
36
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
NOTE: For Windows Server 2008 Failover Clusters, you can also use the
Cluster Validation Wizard.
12 Configure highly-available applications and services on your failover
cluster. Depending on your configuration, this may also require providing
additional LUNs to the cluster or creating new cluster resource groups.
Test the failover capabilities of the new resources.
13 Configure client systems to access the highly available applications and
services that are hosted on your failover cluster.
Installation Overview
Each node in your Dell Windows Server failover cluster must have the same
release, edition, service pack, and processor architecture of the Windows
Server operating system installed. For example, all nodes in your cluster may
be configured with Windows Server 2003 R2, Enterprise x64 Edition. If the
operating system varies among nodes, it is not possible to configure a failover
cluster successfully. It is recommended to establish server roles prior to
configuring a failover cluster, depending on the operating system configured
on your cluster.
For a list of Dell PowerEdge Servers, Fibre Channel HBAs and switches, and
recommended list of operating system variants, specific driver and firmware
revisions, see the Cluster Configuration Support Matrices located on Dell
High Availablity Cluster website at dell.com/ha.
For more information on deploying your cluster with Windows Server 2003
operating systems, see the Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows
Server 2003 Installation and Troubleshooting Guide. For more information on
deploying your cluster with Windows Server 2008 operating systems, see the
Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Installation and
Troubleshooting Guide.
The following sub-sections describe steps that must be taken to enable
communication between the cluster nodes and your shared Dell/EMC AX4-5
Fibre Channel storage array, and to present disks from the storage array to the
cluster. Install and configure the following components on each node:
1 The Fibre Channel HBA(s) and driver on each cluster node
2 EMC PowerPath on each cluster node
3 Zoning, if applicable
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
37
4 The shared storage system
5 A failover cluster
Installing the Fibre Channel HBAs
For dual-HBA configurations, It is recommended that you install the Fibre
Channel HBAs on separate peripheral component interconnect (PCI) buses.
Placing the adapters on separate buses improves availability and performance.
See the Dell Cluster Configuration Support Matrices located on the Dell High
Availability Clustering website at dell.com/ha for more information about
your system's PCI bus configuration and supported HBAs.
Installing the Fibre Channel HBA Drivers
See the EMC documentation that is included with your HBA kit for more
information.
See the Emulex support website located at emulex.com or the Dell Support
website at support.dell.com for information about installing and configuring
Emulex HBAs and EMC-approved drivers.
See the QLogic support website at qlogic.com or the Dell Support website at
support.dell.com for information about installing and configuring QLogic
HBAs and EMC-approved drivers.
See the Dell Cluster Configuration Support Matrices located on the Dell High
Availability Clustering website at dell.com/ha for information about
supported HBA controllers and drivers.
Installing EMC PowerPath
EMC® PowerPath® detects a failed storage path and automatically re-routes
I/Os through an alternate path. PowerPath also provides load balancing of
data from the server to the storage system. To install PowerPath:
1 Insert the PowerPath installation media in the CD/DVD drive.
2 On the Getting Started screen, go to the Installation section, and click the
appropriate link for the operating system that is running on the node.
3 Select Run this program from its current location and click OK.
4 In the Choose Language Setup screen, select the required language, and
click OK.
38
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
5 In the Welcome window of the setup wizard, click Next.
6 In the CLARiiON AX-Series window, select and click Next. Follow the
onscreen instructions to complete the installation.
7 Click Yes to reboot the system.
Implementing Zoning on a Fibre Channel
Switched Fabric
A Fibre Channel switched fabric consists of one or more Fibre Channel
switches that provide high-speed connections between servers and storage
devices. The switches in a Fibre Channel fabric provide a connection through
inbound and outbound points from one device (sender) to another device or
switch (receiver) on the network. If the data is sent to another switch, the
process repeats itself until a connection is established between the sender and
the receiver.
Fibre Channel switches provide you with the ability to set up barriers between
different devices and operating environments. These barriers create logical
fabric subsets with minimal software and hardware intervention. Similar to
subnets in the client/server network, logical fabric subsets divide a fabric into
similar groups of components, regardless of their proximity to one another.
The logical subsets that form these barriers are called zones.
Zoning automatically and transparently enforces access of information to the
zone devices. More than one PowerEdge cluster configuration can share
Dell/EMC storage system(s) in a switched fabric using Fibre Channel switch
zoning. By using Fibre Channel switches to implement zoning, you can
segment the SANs to isolate heterogeneous servers and storage systems from
each other.
Using Worldwide Port Name Zoning
PowerEdge cluster configurations support worldwide port name zoning.
A worldwide name (WWN) is a unique numeric identifier assigned to Fibre
Channel interfaces, such as HBA ports, storage processor (SP) ports, and
Fibre Channel to SCSI bridges or storage network controllers (SNCs).
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
39
A WWN consists of an 8-byte hexadecimal number with each byte separated
by a colon. For example, 10:00:00:60:69:00:00:8a is a valid WWN. Using
WWN port name zoning allows you to move cables between switch ports
within the fabric without having to update the zones.
Table 3-1 provides a list of WWN identifiers that you can find in the
Dell/EMC cluster environment.
Table 3-1.
Port Worldwide Names in a SAN Environment
Identifier
Description
xx:xx:00:60:69:xx:xx:xx
Dell/EMC or Brocade switch
xx:xx:xx:00:88:xx:xx:xx
McData switch
50:06:01:6x:xx:xx:xx:xx
Dell/EMC storage processor
xx:xx:00:00:C9:xx:xx:xx
Emulex HBA ports
xx:xx:00:E0:8B:xx:xx:xx
QLogic HBA ports (non-embedded)
xx:xx:00:0F:1F:xx:xx:xx
Dell 2362M HBA port
xx:xx:xx:60:45:xx:xx:xx
PowerVault 132T and 136T tape
libraries
xx:xx:xx:E0:02:xx:xx:xx
PowerVault 128T tape autoloader
xx:xx:xx:C0:01:xx:xx:xx
PowerVault 160T tape library and Fibre
Channel tape drives
xx:xx:xx:C0:97:xx:xx:xx
PowerVault ML6000 Fibre Channel
tape drives
WARNING: When you replace a switch module, a storage controller, or a Fibre
Channel HBA in a PowerEdge server, reconfigure your zones to provide continuous
client data access.
Single Initiator Zoning
Each host HBA port in a SAN must be configured in a separate zone on the
switch with the appropriate storage ports. This zoning configuration, known
as single initiator zoning, prevents different hosts from communicating with
each other, thereby ensuring that Fibre Channel communications between
the HBAs and their target storage systems do not affect each other.
When you create your single-initiator zones, follow these guidelines:
40
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
•
Create a zone for each HBA port and its target storage devices.
•
Each AX4-5 storage processor port can be connected to a maximum of 64
HBA ports in a SAN-attached environment.
•
Each host can be connected to a maximum of four storage systems.
•
The integrated bridge/SNC or fibre-channel interface on a tape library
can be added to any zone.
Installing and Configuring the Shared Storage
System
NOTE: You must configure the network settings and create a user account to
manage the AX4-5 storage system from the network.
To install and configure the Dell/EMC storage system in your cluster:
1 Install and use Navisphere® Storage System Initialization Utility from a
node or management station to initialize your AX4-5 storage system.
2 Install the expansion pack using Navisphere Express (optional).
3 Install the Navisphere Server Utility on each cluster node.
4 Register the cluster node with the storage system.
5 Assign the virtual disks to the cluster nodes.
Installing Navisphere Storage System Initialization Utility
The Navisphere Storage System Initialization Utility provides a user interface
to initialize your AX4-5 storage system. Using the utility, you can configure
the IP address, subnet mask, default gateway address for the storage system’s
SPs, and assign user names and password for storage system access.
1 To install the software from the support media that is shipped with the
storage system:
a
Insert the installation media in the CD/DVD drive.
b
In the Choose Language Setup screen, select the appropriate
language and click OK.
c
On Server screen, click Install Products.
d
In the Install Products menu, click Navisphere Storage System
Initialization Utility.
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
41
e
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.
2 To initialize the storage system:
a
Select Start→Programs→EMC→Navisphere→Navisphere Storage
System Initialization.
b
Read the license agreement, click I accept and then click Next.
c
From the Uninitialized Systems list, select the storage system to be
initialized, and click Next.
d
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the initialization.
Installing the Expansion Pack Using Navisphere Express
Each storage system in the cluster is centrally managed by one host system
(also called a management station) running EMC Navisphere Express—a
centralized storage management application used to configure Dell/EMC
storage systems.
If you have an expansion pack option for the storage system and it has not
been installed, install it now by following the steps listed below:
1 From the management host, open an Internet browser.
2 Enter the IP address of an SP in the storage system.
3 Log in to Navisphere Express with the username and password that you
specified during the storage system initialization.
4 In the Navisphere Express navigation pane under System, click Software.
5 In the System Software screen, click Upgrade Software.
6 Insert the expansion pack media into the CD/DVD drive on the host from
which you are running Navisphere Express.
7 Browse for the expansion tier enabler software file (.ena file), and click
Upgrade.
You can use Navisphere Express to perform tasks such as creating disk pools,
binding the virtual disks, and downloading the firmware. Additionally, you
can use Snapshot Management to capture point-in-time images of a virtual
disk for backups or testing without affecting the contents of the source virtual
disk. You can also use the SAN Copy™ feature in Navisphere Express to move
data from the virtual disks on one storage system to the virtual disks on
another storage system without using the host CPU cycles.
42
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
Installing Navisphere Server Utility
The Navisphere Server Utility registers the cluster node HBAs with the
storage systems, allowing the nodes to access the cluster storage data. The
tool is also used for the following cluster node maintenance procedures:
•
Updating the cluster node host name and/or IP address on the storage
array
•
Updating file system information
•
Adding, removing, or replacing an HBA
•
Starting and stopping a snapshot
To install Navisphere Server Utility:
1 Log in to the Windows server using an account with administrative
privileges.
2 Insert the installation media in the CD/DVD drive.
3 In the Choose Language Setup screen, select the appropriate language
and click OK.
4 In the main menu, click Install Products on Server.
5 In the Install Products menu, click Navisphere Server Utility.
6 Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation.
Registering a Server With a Storage System
To register the server with the storage system:
1 Start the Navisphere Server Utility by clicking Start→Programs→EMC→
Navisphere→Navisphere Server Utility.
2 In the Choose Language Setup screen, select the appropriate language
and click OK.
3 In the Navisphere Server Utility dialog window, select Register this server to
all connected storage systems. The utility automatically scans for all
connected storage systems and lists them under Connected Storage Systems.
4 Select the WWN of the HBA you just installed. The HBA should appear
once for every SP port it is connected to.
5 Click Next to register the server with the storage system.
6 Click Finish to exit the utility.
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
43
Assigning the Virtual Disks to Cluster Nodes
NOTE: For best practice, have at least one virtual disk for each application. If
multiple NTFS partitions are created on a single LUN or virtual disk, these partitions
will not be able to fail over individually from node-to-node.
To perform data I/O to the virtual disks, assign the virtual disks to a cluster
node by performing the following steps:
1 Open a Web browser.
2 Type the storage system IP address in the Address field.
The Navisphere Express console is displayed.
3 Login with user name and password that were created during the storage
initialization.
4 In the Manage menu,
a
Click Disk Pools. You can create multiple disk pools.
b
Click Virtual Disks. You can create multiple virtual disks for each disk
pool.
c
In the Virtual Disks screen, select the virtual disks that you want to
assign to the cluster node and click Assign Server.
5 In Assign Server screen, select the cluster nodes that you want to assign to
the virtual disk and click Apply.
6 Repeat step 4 and step 5 for each virtual disk.
7 Close the Navisphere Express window.
8 Verify that the PowerPath on the cluster nodes can access all paths to the
virtual disks.
Advanced or Optional Storage Features
Your Dell/EMC AX4-5 storage array may be configured to provide optional
features that can be used in with your cluster. These features include
Snapshot Management, SANCopy, Navisphere Manager and MirrorView™.
44
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
Snapshot Management
Snapshot Management captures images of a virtual disk and retains the image
independently of subsequent changes to the files. The images can be used to
share virtual disks with another system without affecting the contents of the
source virtual disk. Snapshot Management creates copies of either virtual
disks or snapshots. Snapshots are virtual copies that create an image of the
source virtual disk at the time the snapshot was created. This snapshot is
retained independently of subsequent changes to the source virtual disk. You
can use snapshots to facilitate backups or to allow multiple hosts to access
data without affecting the contents of the source virtual disk.
WARNING: To avoid data corruption, do not access a snapshot from the same
node as its source.
SAN Copy
SAN Copy allows you to move data between storage systems without using
host processor cycles or LAN bandwidth. It can be used in conjunction with
SnapView™ or MirrorView and is managed from within Navisphere Manager.
Navishphere Manager
Optionally, you can also upgrade Navisphere Express to EMC Navisphere®
Manager—a centralized storage management application used to configure
Dell/EMC storage systems.
EMC Navisphere Manager adds the support for EMC MirrorView, an
optional software that enables synchronous or asynchronous mirroring
between two storage systems.
MirrorView
MirrorView automatically duplicates primary storage system data from a
cluster or stand-alone system to a secondary storage system. It can be used in
conjunction with SnapView and is managed from within Navisphere Manager.
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
45
Installing and Configuring a Failover Cluster
You can configure the operating system services on your Dell Windows Server
failover cluster, after you have established the private and public networks
and have assigned the shared disks from the storage array to the cluster nodes.
The procedures for configuring the failover cluster are different depending on
the Windows Server operating system you use.
For more information on deploying your cluster with Windows Server 2003
operating systems, see the Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows
Server 2003 Installation and Troubleshooting Guide. For more information on
deploying your cluster with Windows Server 2008 operating systems, see the
Dell Failover Clusters with Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Installation and
Troubleshooting Guide.
46
Preparing Your Systems for Clustering
Troubleshooting
This section provides troubleshooting information for your cluster
configuration.
Table A-1 describes general cluster problems you may encounter and the
probable causes and solutions for each problem.
Table A-1.
General Cluster Troubleshooting
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
The nodes cannot
access the storage
system, or the cluster
software is not
functioning with the
storage system.
The storage system is
not cabled properly to
the nodes or the
cabling between the
storage components is
incorrect.
Ensure that the cables are
connected properly from the
node to the storage system. See
"Cabling Your Cluster for Public
and Private Networks" for
more information.
The length of the
interface cables
exceeds the maximum
allowable length.
Ensure that the fibre optic
cables do not exceed 300 m
(multimode) or 10 km (single
mode switch-to-switch
connections only).
One of the cables is
faulty.
Replace the faulty cable.
Switching zone is not Verify that all switched zones are
configured correctly. configured correctly.
LUNs are not assigned Verify that all LUNs are assigned
to the hosts.
to the hosts.
The cluster is in a
Verify the following:
SAN, and one or more • Each zone contains only one
zones are not
initiator (Fibre Channel
configured correctly.
daughter card).
• Each zone contains the
correct initiator and the
correct storage port(s).
Appendix:Troubleshooting
47
Table A-1.
General Cluster Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
One of the nodes takes a The node-to-node
long time to join the
network has failed due
cluster.
to a cabling or
hardware failure.
or
One of the nodes fail to
join the cluster.
Long delays in nodeto-node
communications may
be normal.
One or more nodes
may have the Internet
Connection Firewall
enabled, blocking
Remote Procedure
Call (RPC)
communications
between the nodes.
48
Appendix:Troubleshooting
Corrective Action
Check the network cabling.
Ensure that the node-to-node
interconnection and the public
network are connected to the
correct NICs.
Verify that the nodes can
communicate with each other
by running the ping command
from each node to the other
node. Try both the host name
and IP address when using the
ping command.
Configure the Internet
Connection Firewall to allow
communications that are
required by the Microsoft®
Cluster Service (MSCS) and the
clustered applications
or services.
See Microsoft Knowledge Base
article KB883398 at the
Microsoft Support website at
support.microsoft.com for more
information.
Table A-1.
General Cluster Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Attempts to connect to The Cluster Service
a cluster using Cluster has not been started.
Administrator fail.
A cluster has not been
formed on the system.
The system has just
been booted and
services are still
starting.
Corrective Action
Verify that the Cluster Service is
running and that a cluster has
been formed. Use the Event
Viewer and look for the
following events logged by the
Cluster Service:
Microsoft Cluster
Service successfully
formed a cluster on
this node.
or
Microsoft Cluster
Service successfully
joined the cluster.
If these events do not appear in
Event Viewer, see the Microsoft
Cluster Service Administrator’s
Guide for instructions on
setting up the cluster on your
system and starting the
Cluster Service.
The cluster network
name is not
responding on the
network because the
Internet Connection
Firewall is enabled on
one or more nodes.
Configure the Internet
Connection Firewall to allow
communications that are
required by MSCS and the
clustered applications
or services.
See Microsoft Knowledge Base
article KB883398 at the
Microsoft Support website at
support.microsoft.com for more
information.
Appendix:Troubleshooting
49
Table A-1.
General Cluster Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
You are prompted to
configure one network
instead of two during
MSCS installation.
The TCP/IP
configuration
is incorrect.
The node-to-node network and
public network must be assigned
static IP addresses on different
subnets. For information about
assigning the network IPs with a
specific variant of the Windows
Server operating system (for
example: Windows Server 2003
or Windows Server 2008), see
Dell Failover Clusters with
Microsoft Windows Server
Installation and
Troubleshooting Guide.
The private (point-to- Ensure that all systems are
point) network is
powered on so that the NICs in
disconnected.
the private network
are available.
Using Microsoft
Windows NT® 4.0 to
remotely administer a
Windows Server 2003
cluster generates error
messages.
50
Normal. Some
resources in
Windows Server 2003
are not supported in
Windows NT 4.0.
Appendix:Troubleshooting
Dell strongly recommends that
you use Windows XP
Professional or Windows Server
2003 for remote administration
of a cluster running Windows
Server 2003.
Table A-1.
General Cluster Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
Unable to add a node to The new node cannot Ensure that the new cluster
the cluster.
access the shared
node can enumerate the cluster
disks.
disks using Windows Disk
The shared disks are Administration. If the disks do
not appear in Disk
enumerated by the
Administration, check the
operating system
following:
differently on the
cluster nodes.
• Check all cable connections
• Check all zone configurations
• Check the LUN Settings. Use
the "Advanced" with
"Minimum" option
One or more nodes
may have the Internet
Connection Firewall
enabled, blocking
RPC communications
between the nodes.
Configure the Internet
Connection Firewall to allow
communications that are
required by the MSCS and the
clustered applications
or services.
See Microsoft Knowledge Base
article KB883398 at the
Microsoft Support website at
support.microsoft.com for more
information.
The disks on the shared
cluster storage appear
unreadable or
uninitialized in
Windows Disk
Administration
This situation is
No action required.
normal if you stopped
the Cluster Service. If
you are running
Windows Server 2003,
this situation is
normal if the cluster
node does not own the
cluster disk.
Appendix:Troubleshooting
51
Table A-1.
General Cluster Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Cluster Services does
not operate correctly on
a cluster running
Windows Server 2003
and the Internet
Firewall enabled.
The Windows
Perform the following steps:
Internet Connection
1 On the Windows desktop,
Firewall is enabled,
right-click My Computer and
which may conflict
click Manage.
with Cluster Services. 2 In the Computer
Management window, doubleclick Services.
3 In the Services window,
double-click Cluster Services.
4 In the Cluster Services
window, click the Recovery
tab.
5 Click the First Failure dropdown arrow and select Restart
the Service.
6 Click the Second Failure
drop-down arrow and select
Restart the service.
7 Click OK.
Corrective Action
For information on how to
configure your cluster with the
Windows Internet Connection
Firewall enabled, see Microsoft
Base (KB) articles 258469 and
883398 at the Microsoft Support
website at
support.microsoft.com and the
Microsoft Windows Server 2003
Technet website at
www.microsoft.com/technet.
52
Appendix:Troubleshooting
Table A-1.
General Cluster Troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Probable Cause
Corrective Action
Public network clients
cannot access the
applications or services
that are provided by the
cluster.
One or more nodes
may have the Internet
Connection Firewall
enabled, blocking
RPC communications
between the nodes.
Configure the Internet
Connection Firewall to allow
communications that are
required by the MSCS and the
clustered applications
or services.
See Microsoft Knowledge Base
article KB883398 at the
Microsoft Support website at
support.microsoft.com for more
information.
Appendix:Troubleshooting
53
54
Appendix:Troubleshooting
Cluster Data Form
You can attach the following form in a convenient location near each cluster
node or rack to record information about the cluster. Use the form when you
call for technical support.
Table B-1.
Cluster Information
Cluster Solution
Cluster name and IP
address
Server type
Installer
Date installed
Applications
Location
Notes
Table B-2.
Node Name
Service Tag
Number
Public IP Address Private IP Address
Appendix: Cluster Data Form
55
Additional Networks
Table B-3.
Array Array xPE Type
Array Service Tag
Number or World Wide
Name Seed
1
2
3
4
56
Appendix: Cluster Data Form
Number of Attached
DAEs
Zoning Configuration Form
Node
HBA WWPNs or Storage
Alias Names
WWPNs or
Alias Names
Zone Name
Zone Set for
Configuration
Name
Appendix: Zoning Configuration Form
57
58
Appendix: Zoning Configuration Form
Index
C
cable configurations
cluster interconnect, 19
for client networks, 19
for mouse, keyboard, and
monitor, 15
for power supplies, 15
cluster configurations
connecting to multiple shared
storage systems, 30
connecting to one shared storage
system, 11
direct-attached, 11, 20
SAN-attached, 12
cluster storage
requirements, 10
clustering
overview, 7
about, 20
drivers
installing and configuring
Emulex, 38
E
Emulex HBAs
installing and configuring, 38
installing and configuring
drivers, 38
H
HBA drivers
installing and configuring, 38
host bus adapter
configuring the Fibre Channel
HBA, 38
D
Dell | EMC CX3-40
Cabling a two-node cluster, 21
Dell|EMC CX3-20
Cabling a two-node cluster, 21
Dell|EMC CX3-80
configuring, 41
installing, 41
direct-attached cluster
K
keyboard
cabling, 15
M
monitor
cabling, 15
Index
59
cabling, 17
mouse
cabling, 15
MSCS
installing and configuring, 46
S
N
SAN
configuring SAN backup in your
cluster, 33
Navisphere Manager
about, 45
hardware view, 45
storage view, 45
network adapters
cabling the private
network, 18-19
cabling the public network, 19
single initiator zoning
about, 40
T
tape library
connecting to a PowerEdge
cluster, 32
O
operating system
Windows Server 2003, Enterprise
Edition
installing, 37
troubleshooting
connecting to a cluster, 49
shared storage subsystem, 47
W
P
power supplies
cabling, 15
private network
cabling, 17, 19
hardware components, 19
hardware components and
connections, 19
public network
60
SAN-attached cluster
about, 25
configurations, 11
Index
warranty, 13
worldwide port name zoning, 39
Z
zones
implementing on a Fibre Channel
switched fabric, 39
using worldwide port names, 39