Roland VR-09 Editor Owner`s manual

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V-Combo VR-09 Workshop
The VR-09 and the iPad
© 2013 Roland Corporation U.S.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in
any form without the written permission of Roland Corporation U.S.
iPad® is a registered trademark of Apple Inc.
VR09WS04
1
About the VR-09 Workshop Booklets
Roland’s V-Combo VR-09 is designed for today’s performing musician,
with everything he or she needs in a single, affordable instrument
that weighs just a little more than 12 easy-to-carry pounds. All of the
must-have sounds are here, from Roland’s acclaimed piano, electric
piano, and Virtual Tone Wheel organ to synths, horns, strings, drums,
and anything you’d want to pull off a gig in style. There’s no digging
through menus while your audience waits, either—it’s all right there at
your fingertips. And with the six always-live effect knobs and D Beam,
your audience won’t believe what you can do with the V-Combo VR-09.
There’s also a free iPad app for serious sound programming. Of course,
battery power also means you can take your musical magic anywhere.
Taking Total Control of VR-09 Sounds
Once you’ve connected your VR-09 to your iPad, you’ll be in total
control of all of the settings for the current ORGAN or SYNTH sound.
Any changes you make on the iPad instantly change the sound
beneath your fingertips on the VR-09 itself.
This makes the VR-09 Editor app a great way to
About This Booklet
If you’ve got an Apple iPad, you can edit and create VR-09 ORGAN and
SYNTH sounds using our free VR-09 Editor app, available in Apple’s
App Store. This booklet explains how to connect your VR-09 to your
iPad and how the VR-09 Editor app works.
Understanding the Symbols in This Booklet
Throughout this booklet, you’ll come across information that deserves
special attention—that’s the reason it’s labeled with one of the
following symbols.
•
program sounds offstage—when you’ve got the time to really dig in
and create something all your own. The VR-09 itself is built for the
stage, where programming takes a back seat to performance. The
VR-09 Editor app lets you dig deep down into the VR-09 sounds.
•
manipulate sounds onstage—since you have control of all their
settings, the iPad can serve as a powerful realtime controller.
Connecting Your VR-09 and iPad
You can connect your VR-09 and your iPad
•
wirelessly via WiFi—using the Roland
Wireless Connect system. Roland Wireless
Connect requires the purchase of a
Roland WNA1100 Wireless USB Adapter
(sold separately) for your VR-09. We’ll
discuss setting up a wireless connection in
“Connecting Via WiFi” on page 3.
•
using a USB cable—when you’ve purchased and attached the
required USB adapter for your iPad (USB cable and adapter sold
separately). To jump to the section of this booklet explaining how
to set up a wired USB connection, see “Connecting Via USB” on
page 6, which you can jump to by clicking here.
A note is something that adds information about the topic at hand.
A tip offers suggestions for using the feature being discussed.
Warnings contain important information that can help you avoid
possible damage to your equipment, your data, or yourself.
2
Connecting Via WiFi
You have a choice of how you want your VR-09 and iPad to wirelessly
communicate.
•
•
If you’re going to be using the VR-09 and iPad at home—you can
use your home’s WiFi network, or LAN (“Local Area Network”).
Your iPad’s probably already
using it, so when your VR-09
joins the network they’ll be
able to communicate with
each other. You can use a
LAN connection anywhere
LAN
there’s a WiFi network to
which you can connect.
If you want to be able to use the VR-09 and iPad anywhere—
you can connect them directly
to each other using the VR-09’s
Ad-Hoc mode. This method
works when no LAN is available
Ad-Hoc
to you, so it’s a good way to
connect your VR-09 and iPad in locations where there may be no
network, such as in clubs or other performance venues. Ad-Hoc
mode also doesn’t require a WiFi router as a LAN does.
Here’s how to get your LAN connection set up:
1
Insert the WNA1100 into the jack inside the VR-09’s front-panel
USB MEMORY compartment.
2
Press the VR-09’s MENU button, and then highlight Wireless.
3
Press the ENTER button.
If you see “<<Wireless>> NOT AVAILABLE,” make sure your
WNA1100 is correctly installed in its jack.
The default Wireless screen appears:
Some Details About the VR-09 and WiFi
You only need to set up communication the first time you use the
VR-09 and iPad together.
If this screen isn’t what you see, use the CURSOR
buttons to find it.
The WNA1100 is an 802.11 b/g/n-compliant device that can be used
with most any WiFi network’s router and with any iPad.
Routers make a WPS connection after receiving a message
from the device being connected. Most WPS-supporting routers
have a button you can press to prepare the router to receive this
message.
When you connect the VR-09 to a LAN, it uses WPS (“WiFi Protected
Setup”). Most routers support this super-simple connection protocol.
Apple Airport Extreme routers do support WPS, though they refer
to it as “connecting to a WiFi printer” instead of as “WPS.” If you’re
using another kind of WPS router and it doesn’t have a WPS
button, check its manual to learn how it handles WPS.
and
If your router doesn’t have a WPS button, consult its
documentation to learn how to use its WPS feature.
4
Press your router’s WPS button.
3
If you’re using an Airport Extreme, double-click your base station,
and then select Add WiFi Printer... from the Base Station menu.
5
Connecting the VR-09 and iPad Directly Via WiFi
When you’re connecting an iPad directly to the VR-09, the iPad’s
normal WiFi network connection is replaced by its connection to
the VR-09. Therefore, its internet access via WiFi will be inactive
until you restore its connection to a WiFi network.
Press the VR-09’s ENTER button—the VR-09 and the router
exchange handshakes.
When the connection’s been made, the VR-09 confirms
communication.
1
Insert the WNA1100 into the jack inside the VR-09’s front-panel
USB MEMORY compartment.
2
Press the VR-09’s MENU button, and then highlight Wireless.
3
Press the ENTER button.
This will be your WiFi
network’s name.
At this point, you can jump ahead to “Keeping an Eye on Your
WiFi Connection” on page 5 in this booklet by clicking here.
If You Have More Than One VR-09
You can connect more than one VR-09 to your iPad. You do this by
assigninig each VR-09 a unique number, and then selecting each one
as needed from the iPad. To do this:
1
Use CURSOR
and
to display the Options screen:
2
Press the ENTER button.
3
Turn the VALUE dial to set the desired Wireless ID number. With
one VR-09, this should be left at 0. If you change the number, the
VR-09 appears to the iPad as “VR-09_[the selected ID number].”
If you see “<<Wireless>> NOT AVAILABLE,” make sure your
WNA1100 is correctly installed in its jack.
4
Use the CURSOR
and
and then press ENTER.
buttons to find the Options screen,
5
Press the
6
Turn the VALUE dial to set Ad-Hoc mode to ON, and then press
the EXIT button a few times to return to the main menu.
7
With Wireless highlighted, press ENTER—after a few moments,
the VR-09 displays the VR-09’s Ad-Hoc information.
button once to display the Ad-Hoc Mode screen.
This will be a different
value on your VR-09.
4
8
On your iPad, open the Settings app.
9
Touch Wi-Fi along the left-hand edge.
Settings
If You Have Trouble Connecting in Ad-Hoc Mode
If you have problems making or maintaining a connection between the
VR-09 and iPad, try changing the VR-09 Ad-Hoc mode channel:
10
1
On the VR-09, press MENU, select Wireless, and then press
ENTER.
2
Use the CURSOR buttons to display the Options screen, and
then press ENTER.
3
Use the CURSOR buttons to display the Ad-Hoc Channel
screen and turn the VALUE dial to select a different channel.
4
Redo Steps 8-11 above for selecting the VR-09 on the iPad.
In the Choose a Network... area, touch VR-09.
Keeping an Eye on Your WiFi Connection
The Enter Password sheet appears:
After making your WiFi connection, press EXIT on the VR-09 until
you return to the main screen in Organ or Synth mode. In the upperrighthand corner of the screen, you’ll see an icon that gives you the
status of your WiFi connection at a glance.
This icon
Tells you this about your WiFi connection
As with the bars on a cell phone, this shows you the
strength of your WiFi connection to your LAN.
Your WNA1100 is installed, but there’s no WiFi
connection currently active.
11
Enter the five-digit Ad-Hoc KEY number from the screen of your
VR-09 into the iPad’s Password field, and then touch Join.
You’re returned to the iPad’s WiFi tab where the checkmark next
to “VR-09” shows that the WiFi connection’s been made.
You’re using an Ad-Hoc WiFi connection directly to
your iPad.
no icon
Your WNA1100 isn’t inserted in the USB MEMORY
jack.
5
Connecting Via USB
Using the VR-09 Editor iPad App
To connect your iPad to the VR-09, you’ll need to purchased and attach
a USB adapter to your iPad. If you’ve got an
•
iPad 3 or earlier—you’ll need an Apple iPad Camera Connection
Kit.
•
iPad 4 or later, or iPad mini—you’ll need an Apple Lightning to USB
Camera Adapter.
Configuration
When you first launch the VR-09 Editor app on your iPad, you’ve got to
pair it with your VR-09. Here’s how.
1
To connect the iPad and VR-09:
1
Attach your iPad’s USB adapter to the iPad’s
connector jack.
2
Connect the wide, flat A plug of a standard USB
A-B cable to the iPad’s USB adapter.
3
Connect the narrower B plug of the USB cable
to the VR-09’s rear-panel USB COMPUTER
jack.
A
plug
In the VR-09 Editor, touch the gear icon located in
the upper-righthand corner of the screen to display a
window in which you can see your VR-09.
B
plug
If you’ve got multiple VR-09s WiFi-enabled, you’ll see them all in
this list.
2
Touch the VR-09 you want to program—a checkmark appears
next to its name.
3
Touch somewhere outside the list to close it.
6
Programming on the iPad
Whether you’re programming ORGAN or SYNTH sounds, you can hear
the changes you make on the Pad by playing the VR-09 keyboard as
you make them. Here’s how to operate the iPad’s ORGAN and SYNTH
controls in general:
•
Adjust bar, slider and knob values—by dragging up or down over
the slider or knob.
•
Toggle switches and buttons on and off—by touching the switches
or buttons.
To program an ORGAN sound, touch the ORGAN button at the top
left of the iPad screen. To program a SYNTH sound, touch the SYNTH
button next to it.
After selecting the type of sound you want to program, touch the READ
button to the left of the ORGAN and SYNTH buttons—the VR-09 Editor
updates its settings to match the VR-09’s current settings so things
stay in sync.
Working with ORGAN Sounds on the iPad
Everything
else
Drawbars
The VR-09’s SuperNATURAL Virtual Tonewheel technology is a
powerful tool for creating authentic and organically responsive organ
sounds. Its many settings are described in the Owner’s Manual,
beginning on page 16.
About the iPad Drawbars
These drawbars act like the ORGAN-section sliders on the VR-09 itself,
allowing you to set the frequency content, and therefore the timbre, of
ORGAN sounds.
When you’re playing
Use
a single, unlayered ORGAN sound
the UPPER drawbars for
controlling the ORGAN sound.
a split with an ORGAN sound for
both the left and right hands
the LOWER drawbars for
controlling the left hand sound,
and the UPPER bars for
controlling the right.
a split with an ORGAN sound
for the left hand and a PIANO or
SYNTH sound for the right
the LOWER drawbars for the
ORGAN sound.
a split/layer combo with an
ORGAN sound for the left hand,
and second ORGAN sound
layered with a PIANO or SYNTH
sound for the right hand
use the LOWER drawbars
for the lefthand organ, and
the UPPER drawbars for the
righthand organ.
Onscreen, the VR-09 Editor swaps the left/right positions of the
UPPER and LOWER drawbars so that they fall under your free
hand as you play.
The PEDAL drawbars control the timbre of the ORGAN sound
played by a connected Roland PK-6 or PK-9 (purchased separately)
as described on page 8 of the Owner’s Manual. The pedal option
is available when you’re using a Jazz Organ or Rock Organ type.
7
About Everything Else
The Two SYNTH Screens
Obviously, these controls affect any single, unlayered ORGAN sound
you’re programming. What may be less obvious is that when you’re
working with a spit, a layer, or a split/layer, they affect all of the ORGAN
sounds together, including any pedal drawbars you’re using.
The VR-09’s SYNTH sounds have more settings than can fit on a single
Pad screen.
Working with SYNTH Sounds on the iPad
To get to the second screen, touch the LFO tab.
The LFO
tab
Selecting the SYNTH Sound You Want to Program
The VR-09 Editor app allows you to work with any SYNTH sound,
whether it’s being played alone, in a layer, or in a split. At the top of
the iPad SYNTH screen, you can see the VR-09’s currently selected
SYNTH sounds. Each SYNTH sound is shown with a lit blue button.
The currently
active tab is
orange.
To switch back to the first SYNTH screen, touch OSC FILTER/AMP tab.
In this example, a single SYNTH sound is selected
on the VR-09. A single SYNTH sound is shown as
being UPPER 1.
To program a SYNTH sound, touch its SELECT button, as shown
above. The button turns red to show you which SYNTH sound—if
there’s a layer or split in use—is selected for programming.
The OSC
FILTER/AMP
tab
Here’s what a layer looks like with a SYNTH sound
as the second layer. It’s currently selected.
Here’s a split using two SYNTH sounds. The righthand sound is currently selected for programming.
8
Understanding SYNTH Programming
SYNTH Sound Control Area
Sound name
Sound categpry
Value display
The VR-09 Editor app reveals the complete structure of a VR-09
SYNTH sound. If you’re familiar with synthesizer programming, it’ll
all look familiar, as the sounds are built using a traditional subtractive
synthesis architecture.
The SYNTH Sound Control area applies to the entire SYNTH sound. It
shows you the sound’s name and category, and its Value display shows
you the current value of any parameter you adjust as you’re adjusting
it. Here’s what else is there and what it does.
Setting
This parameter:
Can be set to:
UNISON SW
turns the Unison feature on and
off. Unison slightly detunes the
sound’s partials to make the
sound bigger.
ON, OFF
The Anatomy of a SYNTH Sound
UNISON SIZE
2, 4, 6, 8
Each SYNTH sound in the VR-09 is made up of the combination of
as many as three “partials” playing together. Each partial contributes
some characteristic to the overall SYNTH sound.
adjusts the amount of Unison
detuning.
MONO
sets whether only single notes
can be played at a time, or
whether chords can be played.
MONO (single
notes), POLY
(chords)
PORTAMENTO
SW
turns Portamento on and off.
Portamento causes pitches
to glide from played note to
played note.
ON, OFF
PORTAMENTO
TIME
sets the speed of note-gliding.
0-127
If, however, you’re new to synth programming, the following sections
explain how everything works.
Partial 1
Partial 2
Partial 3
SYNTH
sound
There are controls that affect the individual partials, and controls that
affect the behavior of the overall SYNTH sound. Let’s start on the first
SYNTH screen with settings that control the whole sound.
(Continued on next page)
9
Setting
This parameter:
Can be set to:
WAVE SHAPE
adds bottom to the sound by
adding a second pitch, one
octave down, to Partial 1 when
it’s using one of the first five
WAVE options, as described in
the OSC Controls table below.
0-127
determines the overall volume
of the SYNTH sound.
0-127
TONE LEVEL
OSC Controls—These controls set the basic sound, pitch, and
shape of the partial.
Setting
This parameter:
Can be set to:
WAVE
determines the most basic
aspect of the partial’s
sound: the type of sound
wave it produces.
• —sawtooth wave
• —square wave
• —pulse/PWM
• —triangle wave
• NOISE
• SUPER SAW
• PCM—these are
The Partial Switches and SELECT Buttons
sampled sound
waves. With PCM
selected, touch the
PCM number to
display a menu from
which you can select
the desired sound
wave.
Partial
switches
The Partial switches turn each of the sound’s three partials on or off.
When a partial is turned on, its switch lights yellow.
VARIATION
selects one of three
variations available for the
selected wave.
A, B, C—The WAVE
button’s color shows
the current variation:
• A—Unlit
• B—red
• C—green
PITCH
sets the pitch of the partial
in semitones.
-24 to +24
DETUNE
adjusts the pitch of the
partial in fine increments.
-50 to +50
You program a single partial at a time. To select the partial you want to
work on, touch its SELECT button so it lights orange.
As you work on a partial, you can temporarily turn the sound’s
other partials off to better hear what you’re doing.
Programming a Partial
Once you’ve selected a partial to program, you can set up the chain of
virtual devices through which its sound passes. Each device in some
way shape’s the partial’s sound.
OSC
(Oscillator)
(Continued on next page)
MOD
FILTER
Here’s what the controls for these devices do.
AMP
turns Ring Modulation on
or off. Ring Modulation
combines the first two
partials to create a
complex timbre.
OFF, RING
10
OSC Controls—These controls set the basic sound, pitch, and
shape of the partial.
OSC Controls—These controls set the basic sound, pitch, and
shape of the partial.
Setting
This parameter:
Can be set to:
Setting
This parameter:
Can be set to:
PWM
adjusts the amount of
change, or “modulation,”
applied by the LFO to the
width of the pulse wave
when WAVE is set to
pulse/PWM.
0 to 127
ENV
DEPTH
-63 to + 63
PW
manually sets the width
of the pulse wave when
WAVE is set to pulse/
PWM.
0 to 127
sets the degree to which
the pitch envelope affects
the partial’s pitch. Settings
higher than 0 cause the
pitch to go sharp of the
PITCH and DETUNE
settings; values below 0
cause the pitch to go flat.
SUPER
SAW
DETUNE
sets the width of the
SUPER SAW wave when
WAVE is set to SUPER
SAW.
0 to 127
A
sets the envelope Attack
time, the amount of time it
takes for a note to reach
its highest pitch after a key
is pressed, as set by ENV
DEPTH, described below.
0 to 127
D
sets the envelope Decay
time, the amount of time it
takes for a note’s pitch to
go from its highest pitch
to the one set with PITCH
and DETUNE.
0 to 127
The A, D, and ENV DEPTH OSC settings together make up the
partial’s pitch “envelope.” A pitch envelope makes the tuning of a
partial less static and more alive. When some real instruments—
guitar and trumpet, for example—are played, each note goes
slightly sharp for an instant before settling into tune. You can
simulate this behavior using a positive ENV DEPTH setting and
short A and D times. Negative ENV DEPTH settings cause a note
to start slightly flat and then bend upwards. Longer A and D times
produce interesting, if less organic, pitch movement.
11
FILTER Controls—Each partial’s sound is a stack of sound waves
vibrating over and over at different speeds, or “frequencies,” and
therefore different pitches. Combined, they act as the partial’s
overtones, producing its tonal character. By removing frequency
ranges from a partial, you change its tone. Each frequency range is
called a “frequency” for short.
FILTER Controls—Each partial’s sound is a stack of sound waves
vibrating over and over at different speeds, or “frequencies,” and
therefore different pitches. Combined, they act as the partial’s
overtones, producing its tonal character. By removing frequency
ranges from a partial, you change its tone. Each frequency range is
called a “frequency” for short.
Setting
This setting:
Can be set to:
Setting
This setting:
Can be set to:
MODE
selects a type of filter.
• BYPASS—so the
RESONANCE
sets the volume of the
cutoff frequency range.
0 to 127
KEY FOLLOW
so the Cutoff frequency
automatically changes
as you move up and
down the keyboard.
-100 to +100. Positive
values make the Cutoff
higher as you move
up the keyboard, and
lower as you move
down. Negative values
raise it as you go
down, and lower it as
you go up.
A
sets the amount of time
it takes for the Cutoff to
reach its highest value
from its manual setting
after a key is pressed.
0 to 127
D
sets how long it
takes the Cutoff value
to change from its
maximum to its Sustain
setting, described next.
0 to 127
S
sets the Cutoff value
that remains in place
until you let go of a key.
0 to 127
•
•
•
•
filter’s turned off.
LPF—so the filter
removes frequencies
above the Cutoff
frequency, described
below.
HPF—so the filter
removes frequencies
below the Cutoff.
BPF—so the filter
removes frequencies
around the Cutoff.
PKG—so the filter
removes frequencies
everywhere except
around the Cutoff.
CUTOFF
determines the manual
setting of the Cutoff,
the frequency at which
the filter starts removing
content from the partial.
0 to 127. The
frequency range the
filter removes relative
to the Cutoff depends
on the MODE setting.
SLOPE
determines how steeply
the filter removes
frequencies above
or below the Cutoff
frequency.
-12dB / oct (for more
gradual filtering),
-24db / oct (for more
sudden, extreme
filtering)
(Continued on next page)
12
FILTER Controls—Each partial’s sound is a stack of sound waves
vibrating over and over at different speeds, or “frequencies,” and
therefore different pitches. Combined, they act as the partial’s
overtones, producing its tonal character. By removing frequency
ranges from a partial, you change its tone. Each frequency range is
called a “frequency” for short.
Setting
This setting:
Can be set to:
R
sets how long it takes
for the Cutoff value to
return to its manual
setting when you let go
of the key.
0 to 127
ENV DEPTH
determines how strongly
the filter envelope affects
the Cutoff setting.
-63 to +63. Positive
values push the cutoff
above its manual
setting. Negative
values lower it.
The A, D, S, and R and ENV DEPTH FILTER envelope settings
allow you to automatically change the manual Cutoff setting over
time. Without an envelope, the partial’s frequencies are filtered
according the manual Cutoff setting over the length of the note, so
the note has one bright/warm character throughout. An envelope
allows you to automatically move the Cutoff value over time,
producing automated tonal changes as the note plays to make it
more animated.
AMP Controls—These controls set the final volume and panning of
the partial and determine the way that its volume changes over time.
Setting
This setting:
Can be set to:
PAN
determines the left/right position
of the partial in the VR-09’s stereo
output.
64L (al the way
left) to 63R (all
the way right)
LEVEL
sets the volume of the partial.
Each partial has its own volume,
and then there’s a TONE LEVEL
setting for the entire SYNTH sound,
as described in “SYNTH Sound
Controls” on page 9.
0 to 127
A
sets how long it takes for a partial
note to reach its LEVEL setting,
above, after a key is pressed.
0 to 127
D
sets how long it takes the partial’s
volume to change from its manual
LEVEL setting to its Sustain setting,
described next.
0 to 127
S
sets a volume that remains in place
until you let go of a key.
0 to 127
R
sets how long it takes for the note
to fade away to silence after you
release its key.
0 to 127
As with a filter envelope, the A, D, S, and R envelope settings allow
you to automatically change the partial’s manual LEVEL setting
over time. This allows you to make the sound of the partial more
expressive by adding dynamic movement to its notes.
13
To finish programming the partial, touch the LFO tab to change to the
LFO screen.
“LFO” stands for “Low Frequency Oscillator.” An LFO produces sound
like a partial does, only it’s so low-pitched you can’t hear it directly.
Instead, the LFO is applied to other settings, causing them to rise and
fall over and over at the LFO’s frequency.
Each partial has two LFOs, and their use is optional. LFOs aren’t
devices the partial passes through—rather, they affect the behavior of
the OSC, FILTER, and AMP devices.
MODULATION LFO Controls—These settings control vibrato added
to the partial when you push the VR-09’s Pitch Bend/Modulation
lever forward.
Setting
This setting:
Can be set to:
SHAPE
sets the type of wave shape
the lever LFO uses as it
cycles over and over.
•
•
•
•
•
TEMPO
SYNC
acts as an on/off switch for
Tempo Sync, which locks
the lever LFO cycle with the
VR-09’s DRUM-area tempo.
ON (green), OFF (unlit)
RATE
sets the rhythmic
relationship between the
lever LFO and the DRUM
tempo when Tempo Sync
is on.
16, 12, 8, 4, 2, 1
(beat value), assorted
time signatures
RATE
CONTROL
sets how much pushing the
lever forward affects the
lever Rate value.
-63 to +63
PITCH
DEPTH
sets the amount of the lever
LFO applied to the partial’s
pitch.
-63 to +63
LFO
OSC
(Oscillator)
FILTER
Modulation
LFO
AMP
—triangle wave
—sine wave
—sawtooth wave
—square wave
—sample and
hold—the wave
shape changes with
each cycle.
• RND (Random)—the
LFO shape changes
randomly constantly.
(Continued on next page)
14
MODULATION LFO Controls—These settings control vibrato added
to the partial when you push the VR-09’s Pitch Bend/Modulation
lever forward.
Setting
This setting:
Can be set to:
FILTER
DEPTH
sets the amount of the lever
LFO applied to the partial’s
filter Cutoff.
-63 to +63
AMP
DEPTH
sets the amount of the lever
LFO applied to the partial’s
volume.
-63 to +63
LFO Controls—These settings determine the behavior of an LFO you
can apply to the partial’s pitch, filter, and/or volume.
LFO Controls—These settings determine the behavior of an LFO you
can apply to the partial’s pitch, filter, and/or volume.
Setting
This setting:
Can be set to:
RATE
sets the rhythmic relationship
between the LFO and the
DRUM tempo when Tempo
Sync is on.
16, 12, 8, 4, 2,
1 (beat value),
assorted time
signatures
FADE
TIME
sets how long it takes for the
LFO to reach its full effect after
the key is pressed.
0 to 127
PITCH
DEPTH
sets the amount of the LFO
applied to the partial’s pitch.
-63 to +63
This setting:
Can be set to:
FILTER
DEPTH
SHAPE
sets the type of wave shape
the LFO uses as it cycles over
and over.
•
•
•
sets the amount of the LFO
applied to the partial’s filter
Cutoff.
-63 to +63
Setting
AMP
DEPTH
sets the amount of the LFO
applied to the partial’s volume.
-63 to +63
TEMPO
SYNC
acts as an on/off switch for
Tempo Sync, which locks the
LFO cycle with the VR-09’s
DRUM-area tempo.
—triangle wave
—sine wave
—sawtooth
wave
• —square wave
• —sample and
hold—the wave
shape changes
with each cycle.
• RND (Random)—
the LFO shape
changes randomly
constantly.
ON (green), OFF
(unlit)
Saving iPad ORGAN and SYNTH Sounds
Changes you make to sounds using the VR-09 Editor app are
temporary—to preserve them, save them as registrations on the VR-09.
To learn all about registrations, see the VR-09 Workshop booklet
Using Registrations.
The End
We hope you’ve found this Workshop booklet helpful. If you’re
interested in learning more, we’ve got some great VR-09 video articles
in our Knowledge Base. And be sure to keep an eye out for other VR-09
downloads at www.RolandUS.com.
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