Installation, Administration and Maintenance of the SIP

Installation, Administration and
Maintenance of the SIP-DECT solution
Aastra Telecom
© June 2007 - All Rights Reserved
No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying,
recording, or information storage and retrieval system, for any purpose without the express written permission of Aastra.
Installation, Administration and Maintenance
Table of contents
1
OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................................................................... 4
1.1
PURPOSE ........................................................................................................................................................ 4
1.2
ABBREVIATIONS AND DEFINITIONS ............................................................................................................... 4
1.2.1
Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. 4
1.2.2
Definitions...................................................................................................................................... 4
1.3
REFERENCES.................................................................................................................................................. 6
2
INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................................................. 8
2.1
ABOUT THE AASTRA SIP-DECT SOLUTION ................................................................................................. 8
2.2
ABOUT THE ACCESS POINTS (RFP’S) ........................................................................................................... 9
2.3
OPENMOBILITY MANAGER ......................................................................................................................... 11
2.4
IP SIGNALLING AND MEDIA STREAM ........................................................................................................... 11
2.5
RFP SYNCHRONIZATION ............................................................................................................................. 14
2.6
RFP CHANNEL CAPACITY ............................................................................................................................ 15
2.7
ABOUT THE PORTABLE PARTS .................................................................................................................... 16
2.8
SYSTEM CAPACITIES.................................................................................................................................... 16
3
INSTALLATION AND CONFIGURATION................................................................................................... 17
3.1
OPENMOBILITY START UP ........................................................................................................................... 17
3.1.1
Start up of the RFPs ..................................................................................................................... 17
3.1.1.1
3.1.2
3.1.3
3.1.3.1
3.1.3.1.1
3.1.3.1.2
3.1.3.1.3
3.1.3.2
3.1.4
DHCP client ............................................................................................................................... 18
DHCP request ............................................................................................................................ 18
DHCP offer ................................................................................................................................ 19
Retries ........................................................................................................................................ 19
TFTP client................................................................................................................................. 19
Application................................................................................................................................... 19
3.1.4.1
3.1.4.1.1
3.1.4.1.2
3.1.4.2
3.2
3.3
Booting overview....................................................................................................................... 17
Start up of the OpenMobility Manager ....................................................................................... 18
Booter ........................................................................................................................................... 18
Booter update ............................................................................................................................. 20
Automatic booter update ........................................................................................................... 20
Automatic booter update for major release changes................................................................. 21
Selecting the right DHCP server................................................................................................ 21
3.1.5
RFP LED status............................................................................................................................ 21
3.1.6
State graph of the start up phases ................................................................................................ 23
STATIC LOCAL CONFIGURATION OF AN RFP ............................................................................................... 24
CONFIGURING THE OPENMOBILITY MANAGER .......................................................................................... 26
3.3.1
Service Login procedure.............................................................................................................. 26
3.3.2
System .......................................................................................................................................... 27
3.3.2.1
3.3.2.1.1
3.3.2.1.2
3.3.2.1.3
3.3.2.2
3.3.2.3
3.3.2.4
3.3.2.5
3.3.3
RFP configuration ........................................................................................................................ 34
3.3.3.1
3.3.3.2
3.3.3.3
3.3.4
System settings........................................................................................................................... 28
Restarting the OMM.................................................................................................................. 29
Encryption.................................................................................................................................. 29
Regulatory domain .................................................................................................................... 30
SIP .............................................................................................................................................. 30
User account............................................................................................................................... 32
Time zones ................................................................................................................................. 32
Backup........................................................................................................................................ 34
DECT configuration................................................................................................................... 36
States of a RFP ........................................................................................................................... 36
OMM / RFP SW version check ................................................................................................. 36
Configuration of Portable Parts ................................................................................................... 38
4
MAINTENANCE................................................................................................................................................. 41
4.1
BOOTER ....................................................................................................................................................... 41
4.2
SITE SURVEY MEASUREMENT EQUIPMENT .................................................................................................. 41
4.3
CHECKING THE AASTRA DECT 142 HANDSET FIRMWARE VERSION ......................................................... 41
4.4
DIAGNOSTIC ................................................................................................................................................ 41
4.4.1
Aastra DECT 142 site survey mode ............................................................................................ 41
4.4.2
Aastra DECT 142 auto call test mode ......................................................................................... 42
4.4.3
Aastra DECT 142 auto answer test mode ................................................................................... 42
4.4.4
Syslog ........................................................................................................................................... 43
5
APPENDIX ........................................................................................................................................................... 44
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
5.1
5.2
COMMUNICATIONS REGULATION INFORMATION FOR AASTRA PHONE 142 US ........................................ 44
COMMUNICATIONS REGULATION INFORMATION FOR RFP 32 OR RFP 34 (NA) ...................................... 45
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
1
Overview
1.1
Purpose
This document describes the installation, configuration and maintenance of
the Aastra SIP-DECT solution.
1.2
Abbreviations and definitions
1.2.1
Abbreviations
AC
ADPCM
DHCP
DSP
Authentication Code
Adaptive Differential Pulse Code
Modulation
Digital Enhanced Cordless
Telecommunication
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
Digital Signal Processor
FCC
GAP
IPEI
HTTP
OMM
PARK
PP
SNMP
TFTP
RFP
RTCP
RTP
Federal Communications Commission
Generic Access Profile
International Portable Equipment Identity
Hyper Text Transfer Protocol
OpenMobility Manager
Portable Access Rights Key
Portable Part (DECT handset)
Simple Network Management Protocol
Trivial File Transfer Protocol
Radio Fixed Part (Access Point)
Real Time Control Protocol
Real Time Protocol
DECT
1.2.2
Definitions
Aastra DECT 142 Aastra DECT 142 Handset
Handset
In the context of the Aastra SIP-DECT solution, an Aastra
DECT 142 handset and Portable Part (PP) are
interchangeable.
Access Point
Access Point
In the context of the Aastra SIP-DECT solution, an Access
Point and a Radio Fixed Part (RFP) are interchangeable.
Asterisk
Asterisk
Asterisk is a complete Open Source PBX in software. It
runs on Linux, BSD and MacOSX and provides many
features. Asterisk supports voice over IP in many
protocols, and can interoperate with almost all standardsbased telephony equipment.
DECT
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Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunication
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
•
The standard (ETS 300 175) essentially specifies the
air interface, known as the radio interface. Voice and
data can both be transmitted via this interface.
•
Its technical key characteristics for Europe are:
•
•
•
•
•
Frequency range: approx. 1.880 – 1.900 GHz
(approximately 20 MHz bandwidth)
10 carrier frequencies (1.728 MHz spacing) with 12
time slots each)
Doubling the number of time slots (to 24) using the
TDMA process
Net data rate per channel of 32 kbps
(for voice transmission using ADPCM)
Voice coding using the ADPCM method
Its technical key characteristics for North American are:
•
•
•
•
•
GAP
Aastra Telecom
Frequency range: approx. 1.920 – 1.930 GHz
(approximately 10 MHz bandwidth)
5 carrier frequencies (1.728 MHz spacing) with 12
time slots each)
Doubling the number of time slots (to 24) using the
TDMA process
Net data rate per channel of 32 kbps
(for voice transmission using ADPCM)
Voice coding using the ADPCM method
Generic Access Profile
• GAP is the abbreviation for Generic Access Profile
•
The GAP standard (ETS 300 444) is based on the
same technology as DECT, but is limited to the most
important basic features. This standard was created in
order to allow telephones of different vendors to be
used on any type of DECT system. It thus represents
the smallest common denominator of all manufacturerspecific variants of the DECT standard.
•
An important limitation in the GAP standard is that
external handover is not possible. For this reason
connection handover is used, which is supported by
GAP terminals.
•
The operation of GAP-capable telephones is
comparable to that of analogue terminals. For
example, features can be called up via ‘*’ and ‘#’
procedures.
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
Handover
Handover
A handover is similar to roaming, but occurs during an
ongoing call. A handover normally takes place “in the
background”, without disrupting the call (seamless
handover).
IPEI
International Portable Equipment Identity
• 13-digit identification code for PPs
• Example: 00019 0592015 3
(the final digit is the checksum).
• The code is represented in decimal form.
• This code is globally unique.
PARK
Portable Access Rights Key
Access code for the Portable Part. This code determines
whether a PP can access a particular DECT system. Used
for unique selection of the system at handset
enrolment/subscription time. Provided with the Aastra
OMM Activation Kit and unique to each SIP-DECT
deployment.
Roaming
Roaming
While in motion, the PP performs ongoing measurements
to determine which RFP is best received. The one that can
be best received is defined as the active RFP. To prevent
the PP from rapidly switching back and forth between two
RFPs that have similar signal strength, certain threshold
values are in effect.
1.3
References
/1/ RFC 1350, The TFTP Protocol, Revision 2, July 1992
/2/ RFC 1889, RTP: A Transport Protocol for Real-Time Applications,
January 1996
/3/ RFC 2030, Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) Version 4 for IPv4,
IPv6 and OSI, October 1996
/4/ RFC 2131, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, March 1997
/5/ RFC 2327, SDP: Session Description Protocol, April 1998
/6/ RFC 2474, Definition of the Differentiated Service Field (DS Field) in the
IPv4 and IPv6 Headers, December 1998
/7/ RFC 2617, HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access
Authentication, June 1999
/8/ RFC 3164, The BSD Sys Log Protocol, August 2001
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/9/ RFC 2833, RTP Payload for DTMF Digits, Telephony Tones and
Telephony Signals, May 2000
/10/ RFC 3261, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), June 2002
/11/ RFC 3264, An Offer/Answer Model with Session Description Protocol
(SDP), June 2002
/12/ RFC 3420, Internet Media Type message/sipfrag, November 2002
/13/ RFC 3515, The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Refer method, April
2003
/14/ RFC 3665, The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Basic Call Flow
Examples, December 2003
/15/ RFC 3842, A Message Summary and Message Waiting Indication
Event Package for the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), August 2004
/16/ RFC 3891, The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) “Replaces” Header,
September 2004
/17/ RFC 3892, The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) Referred-By
Mechanism, September 2004
/18/ OpenMobility Diagnostic Tools
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2
Introduction
2.1
About the Aastra SIP-DECT solution
The Aastra SIP-DECT solution comprises the following components:
•
Aastra SIP-DECT Access Points (also known as Radio Fixed Parts
(RFP’s)) being distributed over an IP network and offering DECT wireless
and IP interfaces.
•
A SIP Call Manager/IP PBX/Media Server platform (e.g. Asterisk).
•
Aastra DECT Handsets (also known as Portable Parts (PP))
•
OpenMobility Manager (OMM): Management interface for Aastra’s SIP
DECT solution, which runs on one of the Radio Fixed Parts.
The following pictures give a graphical overview of the architecture of the IP
DECT wireless solution:
Media Server
Media Gateway
Radio Fixed Parts
255 max.
Web browser for
administration purposes
OMM
The IP PBX/media server/media gateway, OMM and the RFPs communicate
through the IP infrastructure. The RFPs and the Portable Parts communicate
over the air.
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2.2
About the Access Points (RFP’s)
Aastra has two versions of Access Points, indoor and outdoor models RFP32
and RFP34 respectively. RFP references apply to both models.
In general all RFPs have the same hardware and software capabilities.
Please be aware of the regulatory differences between North America and
all other areas of the world . These differences lead to different RFP variants
which use specific frequency bands and field strengths:
•
•
RFP 32 IP or RFP 34 IP (EMEA)
-
Frequency Band 1.880 to 1.900 Mhz
-
10 carrier frequencies
-
Transmit Power 24 dBm
RFP 32 NA or RFP 34 NA (NA)
-
Frequency Band 1.920 to 1.930 Mhz
-
5 carrier frequencies
-
Transmit Power 20 dBm
One RFP within a SIP-DECT installation must be declared to operate as the
OpenMobility Manager (OMM). The RFP acting as the OMM may also act as
a regular RFP as well if it is included into a DECT Cluster.
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RFP only mode
Within this mode the RFP converts IP protocol to DECT protocol and then
transmits the traffic to and from the handsets over a DECT time slot. On air
the RFP has 12 available time slots, 8 can have associated DSP resources
for media streams, the remaining 2 time slots are used for control signalling
between RFPs and the PPs, and 2 time slots are reserved for hand-in
purposes.
Groups of RFPs can be built which are named clusters. Within a cluster
RFPs are synchronized to enable a seamless handover when a user crosses
from one RFP’s zone of coverage to another. For synchronization it is not
necessary for an RFP to communicate directly with all other RFPs in the
system. Each RFP only needs to be able to communicate with the next RFP
in the chain. But it is preferable for a RFP to see more than one RFP to
guarantee synchronization in the event that one of the RFPs fails.
The 2 control signalling channels are also used to carry bearer signals that
signal the handset to start the handover process. If the radio signal of
another RFP is stronger than that of the current RFP, then the handset starts
the handover process to the RFP that has the stronger signal as the user
moves around the site.
OpenMobility Manager mode
In this mode a RFP functions as a regular RFP. Additionally it is responsible
for SIP signalling between the IP DECT system and the telephony or media
server. Further on it takes over the management part of the IP DECT
solution. You designate a RFP as the OMM by assigning an IP address to
the RFP within the DHCP scope (see 3). After a RFP is designated as the
OMM, it starts the extra services on board (for example, the web service that
supports the management interface). All RFP’s download the same firmware
from a TFTP server but only one RFP activates the OMM services.
Note: It is possible to deactivate the DECT part of a RFP. If the DECT
interface is deactivated then the resources (CPU and memory) are available
for the OMM.
RFP32
Unused LED
LED green (Application)
LED orange (Application)
LED red (Booter)
Ethernet jack
Power supply in line with Power over LAN™
standard IEEE 802.3af
Power jack (120 V/230 V AC adapter)
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2.3
OpenMobility Manager
The OpenMobility Manager (OMM) performs the following tasks:
•
Signalling gateway (SIP <-> DECT).
•
Media stream management.
•
Managing sync-over-air functions between RFPs.
•
Facilitating system configuration modifications.
The OpenMobility Manager (OMM) runs on one of the RFP’s.
2.4
IP signalling and media stream
To establish a call between an IP Phone and a PP (Aastra DECT 142
Handset), the following IP streams must be established:
•
A signalling channel to and from the SIP phone.
•
A signalling channel to and from the OMM.
•
A control interface between the OMM and the RFP that has a connection
to the PP (known as the primary RFP).
•
A Real Time Protocol (RTP) / Real Time Control Protocol (RTCP)
connection between the SIP phone and the media gateway and then a
RTP/RTCP connection between the media gateway and the RFP.
The following figure illustrates this scenario.
SIP-Phone
Media Server
Media Gateway
Primary RFP
OMM
(RFP in OMM mode)
Signalling
RFP Control Interface
RTP/RTCP
To establish a call between two PPs the same IP streams must be
established like in the scenario before, except the IP phone is not involved.
The following figure illustrates this scenario.
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Media Server
Media Gateway
OMM
(RFP in OMM mode)
Signalling
RFP Control Interface
RTP/RTCP
A call from one PP to another that resides on the same RFP will loop back
within the RFP, if no media gateway is involved. So the call will not pass
through to the Local Area Network (LAN). Although the voice packets will not
impact LAN traffic, signal packets will.
It is also be possible to direct the media stream to connect directly the IP
phone and the RFP, as shown in the following figures.
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If the PP user is moving, the PP detects that another RFP has a better signal
strength and, therefore, it starts the handover process. The media stream
from the IP phone cannot move to the secondary RFP, so the primary RFP
uses the LAN to direct the voice to the secondary RFP, as shown in the
following figure.
SIP-Phone
Media Server
Media Gateway
Secondary RFP
Primary RFP
OMM
(RFP in OMM mode)
Signalling
RFP Control Interface
RTP/RTCP
As the PP user moves into the next RFP zone of coverage, the PP detects
that the RFP has a better signal strength. Again the media stream from the
SIP phone cannot move to the secondary RFP, so the primary RFP uses the
LAN to direct the voice to the new secondary RFP.
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SIP-Phone
Media Server
Media Gateway
New secondary RFP
Primary RFP
OMM
(RFP in OMM mode)
Signalling
RFP Control Interface
RTP/RTCP
2.5
RFP Synchronization
To guarantee a seamless handover if a caller moves from one RFP zone of
coverage to another RFP zone of coverage, an accurate synchronization of
the RFPs is necessary.
The RFPs are synchronized over the air interface. The first RFP to complete
start-up will transmit a signal on the air for the other RFPs to synchronize
from. If a RFP gets in sync then it will transmit a signal on the air and will be
the sync source for the next RFP. Only RFPs which can receive a
synchronization signal will become synchronized.
For the RFP to sync to another RFP the signal strength cannot drop below
–70 dBm. You must consider this requirement during the site survey.
The first active RFP will be chosen by the ADMM.
Unsynchronized RFP,
which
R does
101 not receive a R 102
signal from another RFP
R 103
R 104
R 108
R 107
R 105
Unsynchronized RFP,
which receives a signal
from another RFP and
tries to get synchronized
R 111RFP,
R 110
R 109
Synchronized
which receives and
transmits a signal on the
air interface
R 106
As long as an RFP is not in sync, no calls can be established using this RFP.
If a RFP loses the synchronization the RFP does not accept new calls (“busy
bit”). There is a delay of maximum 3 minutes until the active calls on this RFP
are finished. Then it tries to get synchronized again.
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An IP DECT installation is more reliable if a RFP can receive the signal from
more than only one RFP, because the other signals are also used for
synchronization.
Unreliable Installation
R 101
R 102
R 103
R 104
R 105
Don‘t
R 111
R 110
R 109
R 108
R 107
R 106
Reliable Installation
R 101
R 102
R 111
R 110
R 109
R 103
R 108
R 104
R 107
R 105
R 106
The sync-over-air solution is very reliable, because all existing redundant
paths are used for synchronization. Thus, hardware tolerances have only
very little influence. No RFP has a key position.
Only unfavourable setups without redundant synchronization paths can
cause problems.
Sometimes RFPs do not need to be synchronized, e.g. if they are in different
buildings. These RFPs can be put into different clusters. RFPs in different
clusters will not be synchronized with each other. Different clusters start up at
the same time independently.
2.6
RFP channel capacity
The RFP has 12 available air time slots:
•
8 slots can have associated DSP resources for media streams.
•
The remaining 4 slots are used for e.g. control signalling between RFPs
and PPs, and hand-in purposes.
If all 8 media stream channels are used the RFP announces a “busy bit”. In
that case the PPs determine whether another RFP has an appropriate signal
strength. If so, the PP will handover to that RFP. Once the handover has
been completed, the RFP will then lower its “busy bit”.
Whenever the busy state is announced a log entry is made to the system
logs. If the announcement of busy raises in a specific area, a further RFP
should be installed to double the number of media streams available for calls.
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2.7
About the Portable Parts
Portable Part (PP) is DECT standard terminology and in the context of the
SIP-DECT solution is interchangeable with Aastra DECT 142 Handset.
Please be aware of differences in regulatory requirements between North
America and all other areas of the world. These differences lead to different
PP variants which use specific frequency bands and field strengths:
•
•
Aastra Phone 142 (EMEA)
-
Frequency Band 1.880 to 1.900 Mhz
-
120 duplex channels
-
250 mW (maximum output per active channel)
-
10 mW (average output per active channel)
Aastra DECT 142 DECT142 (NA)
-
Frequency Band 1.920 to 1.930 Mhz
-
60 duplex channels
-
100 mW (maximum output per active channel)
-
5 mW (average output per active channel)
In addition to the Aastra DECT 142 Handset, standard 3rd party DECT GAP
phones may operate on the SIP-DECT solution. But the functionality may be
limited by the characteristics of the 3rd party DECT phone.
2.8
System capacities
There is only one OpenMobility Manager (OMM) in the system. The OMM
capacities are:
•
Up to 256 RFPs (Access Points) can be controlled.
•
Up to 512 PPs (Handsets) are handled.
It is possible to deactivate the DECT part of a RFP. If the DECT interface is
deactivated then the resources (CPU and memory) are available for the
OMM only.
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3
Installation and configuration
To establish and maintain an IP DECT installation, a network infrastructure is
assumed, which comprises at least the following components:
•
•
•
RFPs
PPs
IP PBX/media server (e.g. Asterisk)
The following services should be provided:
•
•
•
TFTP
DHCP
Syslog daemon
Note: Outdoor RFP’s should only be installed with antenna shipped with the
units. No other antennas or cabling is permitted.
3.1
OpenMobility start up
3.1.1
Start up of the RFPs
For booting a RFP there must at least a TFTP server on the attached
network to load the OMM/RFP application software.
The essential network settings can be alternatively
• Communicated by a DHCP server at startup time.
• Configured on the RFP with the tool OM Configurator. The settings made
by the OM Configurator will be saved permanently in the internal flash
memory of each OMM/RFP.
The RFP gets the boot image file from a TFTP server. The used TFTP server
needs to support Section 1.3 reference /1/. A used DHCP server needs to
support Section 1.3 reference /4/.
The TFTP and DHCP server need not to reside on the same host.
3.1.1.1 Booting overview
Booting is performed in two steps:
1. Starting the boot process.
2. Starting the application.
Booter
The RFP has only a little standalone application built into the flash. This
software realizes the so called net boot process.
On startup each RFP tries to determine its own IP address and other settings
of the IP interface from the configuration settings in the internal flash
memory. If no settings are available or these settings are disabled, the RFP
tries to determine these settings via DHCP.
The RFP gets the application image file from the TFTP server.
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Application
After starting the application image the RFP checks the local network settings
in its internal flash memory once again. If no settings are available or if they
are disabled it starts a DHCP client to determine the IP address of the OMM
and other startup settings.
3.1.2
Start up of the OpenMobility Manager
There is no difference in booting that RFP, which is chosen to be running in
OMM mode from those which are in the RFP only mode.
The decision is driven by the OMM IP address, which is read
• Within the local network settings, if active.
• Via DHCP request.
The RFP which has the same IP address as the dedicated OMM IP address,
will be the RFP which the OMM software runs on.
3.1.3
Booter
3.1.3.1 DHCP client
Within the initial boot process the DHCP client supports the following
parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
IP address
Netmask
Gateway
Boot file name
TFTP server
Public option 224: “OpenMobility”
mandatory
mandatory
mandatory
mandatory
mandatory
mandatory
•
Public option 226: OMM IP Address
mandatory (used with Option 43)
3.1.3.1.1 DHCP request
3.1.3.1.1.1 Vendor class identifier (code 60)
The DHCP client sends the vendor class identifier “OpenMobility”.
3.1.3.1.1.2 Parameter request list (code 55)
The DHCP client in the booter requests the following options in the
parameter request list:
• Subnet mask option (code 1)
• Router option (code 3)
• Public option 224 (code 224)
• Public option 225 (code 225)
• Public option 226 (code 226)
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3.1.3.1.2 DHCP offer
The DHCP client selects the DHCP server according to the following rules:
•
The public options (code 224) has a value equal to the string
“OpenMobility”.
or
•
the file field in the DHCP message has a sub string equal to “ip_rfp.cnt”.
If none of the two rules above match the DHCP offer is ignored.
Information retrieved from the DHCP offer:
• The IP address to use is taken from the yiaddr field in the DHCP
message.
• The IP netmask is taken from the subnet mask option (code 1).
• The default gateway is taken from the router option (code 3).
• The TFTP server IP address is taken from the (code 66) field in the DHCP
message.
• The boot image filename is taken from the (code 67) field in the DHCP
message, if this field is empty the default filename “iprfp.bin” is used.
3.1.3.1.3 Retries
If the DHCP client does not get an appropriate DHCP offer a new DHCP
request is send after 1 second. After 3 DHCP requests are sent the DHCP
client will sleep for 60 seconds.
During this time the booter will accept a local configuration with the
OpenMobility Configurator (OMC).
This cycle will repeat every 3 minutes until either ALL the required DHCP
options are provided or the system is manually configured using the OM
Configurator tool.
3.1.3.2 TFTP client
The TFTP client will download the application image from the TFTP server.
Both TFTP server and the name of the application image are supplied via the
DHCP client. The application image is checksum protected.
3.1.4
Application
After successfully downloading and starting the application the RFP will
determine the IP address of the OMM from DHCP.
The DHCP client is capable of receiving broadcast and unicast DHCP
replies. Therefore the flags field is 0x0000.
The DHCP request contains the well-known magic cookie (0x63825363)
and the end option (0xFF).
The following parameters will be supported within this step:
Option / Field
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Meaning
Mandatory
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yiaddr
IP-Address of the IP-RFP
yes
Code 66
Parameter named Boot Server Host Name with
value as the IP-Address of the TFTP server
yes
Code 67
Parameter named Bootfile Name with value of
the path (optional) and name of the application
image. For example omm_ffsip.tftp.
yes
code 1
Subnet mask
yes
code 3
Default Gateway
yes
code 6
Domain Name Server
No
code 15
Domain Name
No
code 42
IP-Address of a NTP server
No
code 43
Vendor Specific Options
yes
public option 224
Parameter named magic_str must set to value
"OpenMobility".
yes
The Vendor Specific Options consist of:
Vendor Specific
Option
option 226
option 7
option 15
option 17
option 18
Meaning
Mandatory
ommip: Used to select the IP-RFP who should
reside the Open Mobility Manager (OMM)
yes
syslogip: IP-Address of a Syslog Daemon
syslogport: Port of a Syslog Daemon
Country: Used to select the country in which the
OMM resides. This enables country specific
tones (busy tone, dial tone, ...)
ntpservname: Name of a NTP Server
No
No
No
No
An example of the minimal contents for the Option 43 parameter value would be:
11 02 00 01 0a 04 C0 A8 00 01 where C0 A8 00 01 represents 192.168.0.1 for the OMM IP
Tones for the following countries are supported:
country
code
1
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
14
16
25
100
101
country
Germany
Great Britain
Suisse
Spain
Italy
Russia
Belgium
Netherlands
Czechia
Finland
Poland
Taiwan
North America
France
3.1.4.1 Booter update
3.1.4.1.1 Automatic booter update
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Each application SW comes with the latest released booter SW. The
application SW will update the booter automatically as long as the major
release number of the booter SW has not changed, e.g booter SW 2.1.2 will
not be automatically updated by the booter SW 3.x.y, but the booter SW
3.0.0 will be automatically updated by the booter SW 3.1.0.
3.1.4.1.2 Automatic booter update for major release changes
The update of booters with a major release number change will be performed
automatically when the DHCP client in the application receives an DHCP
offer with the public option 254 with a value “UPDATE”.
3.1.4.2 Selecting the right DHCP server
The DHCP client requests its own IP address using code 50. The DHCP
client will select the DHCP server that offers the currently used IP address.
Additionally the mandatory options must be offered otherwise the DHCP offer
is ignored by the DHCP client.
If no matching reply was received the DHCP client resends the request for 2
times after 1 second. Then the DHCP client will wait for 1 minute before
resending 3 requests again.
If the DHCP client cannot accept an DHCP offer within 3 minutes the RFP is
rebooted.
3.1.5
RFP LED status
The following diagram shows the LED status of a RFP according to the
different states during start up.
The RFP32 IP has three separate LEDs for red, orange and green to show
the different states during start up.
RFP32
Unused LED
LED green (Application)
LED orange (Application)
LED red (Booter)
Ethernet jack
Power supply in line with Power over LAN™
standard IEEE 802.3af
Power jack (120 V/230 V AC adapter)
State
LED state
Remarks
Booter (Start up)
Red on
Waiting for link up
Booter DHCP
Red flashing 0.5 Hz
Launching a DHCP request and
waiting for an DHCP offer
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State
LED state
Remarks
Booter (TFTP)
Red flashing 2.5 Hz
Downloading the application
image
Application (DHCP)
Orange on
Launching DHCP request and
waiting for DHCP reply
Application (init)
Green flashing 0.5 Hz
RFP is initializing its internal
components
Application (init)
Green flashing 1 Hz
RFP tries to connect to the
OMM
Application (init)
Green flashing (2 sec on, 0.5
sec off)
The DECT part of the RFP
does not work (either not
configured or not synchronized
with other RFP’s)
Application (init)
Green
RFP is up and running
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3.1.6
State graph of the start up phases
LED RED ON
Start-up
wait for link up
BOOTER
LED red
flashing 0,5 Hz
LED red
flashing 0,25 Hz
retry
DHCP no answer / offer not o.k.
DHCP
Wait for 60 seconds
wait for reply
LED red
flashing 2,5 Hz
TFTP
File download
TFTP failed
Kernel
LED orange
DHCP
wait for reply
LED green
flashing (0,5 Hz)
Application
Init
LED green
flashing 1 Hz
Init failed
Application
Connect to OMM
LED green
flashing 2 seconds
on / 50ms off
DHCP no answer; offer not o.k.
(try 3 minutes)
Application
Connection attempt to OMM failed
Failure, i.e. connection to OMM lost
Synchronize DECT
LED green
Application
Failure, i.e. connection to OMM lost
Up & running
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3.2
Static local configuration of an RFP
As an alternative to DHCP configuration, the RFPs/OMM may be individually
statically configured using the OM Configurator tool.
For a static local configuration you must use the java configuration tool
OpenMobility Configurator which requires Java Runtime Environment version
1.4 or higher.
The settings, which are configured on the RFP with the tool OM Configurator,
will be saved permanently in the internal flash memory of an RFP.
The parameters configurable via the OM Configurator comply with the DHCP
option, please see section 3.1 for details.
If a local static configuration has been done, DHCP is not used anymore.
The following figure shows the OM Configurator. Note, version number will
change with each OMM release.
To configure an RFP, at least the MAC address and all mandatory options
(see table below) have to be set. The MAC address must be entered in a
format such as xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
If the RFP has an IP address enter this address in the IP address field. In this
case you can reach the RFP from outside the local LAN segment. Optional.
To set additional parameters, press the “Add parameter” button and choose
the desired parameter.
IMPORTANT: Select the “yes” checkbox for the RFP to “Use local
configuration” otherwise DHCP will be used.
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The recommended parameters that should be configured through the
OpenMobility Configurator Tool are:
•
Use local configuration: YES
•
IP Address
•
Subnet
•
TFTP Server Address
•
TFTP File Name
•
OMM IP Address
•
Router Addresses (default gateway)
•
DNS Addresses
•
DNS Domain
•
Country (ie 100 for North American tones)
•
NTP Server Address
Press the “Send configuration” button to transmit the parameters to an RFP.
The configuration can only be set after powering up or at the retry phase
(LED flashing 0,25 Hz) or in kernel mode, please see section 3.1.6 for
details. The configurator tool waits 2 seconds and retries transmitting the
data 3 times.
If you want to read the configuration parameters from an RFP set the MAC
address and the IP address additionally and press the “List configuration”
button. All parameters will be listed in the OM Configurator tool.
Press the “Reset configuration" button to clean all input fields and additional
parameters.
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3.3
Configuring the OpenMobility Manager
The OMM runs on a designated RFP within a SIP-DECT deployment. The
OMM is designated via DHCP options or statically declared via the OM
Configurator tool. All other RFPs in the deployment are configured to point
back to the OMM in the deployment.
The OMM can be configured via HTTP. The OMM acts as a HTTP server
which binds to port 80 by default. If executed in host mode the port can be
configured via the command line interface.
The configuration data will be either read from the internal flash memory or
from a local file. A local file is only used if specified on the command line on a
PC host.
The configuration file is a human readable ASCII file. Changing the
configuration file outside the OMM is not permitted.
The configuration file can be downloaded and uploaded via the web
interface.
The service access is restricted to one active session at a time and is
password protected.
The browser used for service access has to be at least Microsoft Internet
Explorer 6.0 or Mozilla Firefox 1.0 and must have frame support, JavaScript
and cookies enabled.
3.3.1
Service Login procedure
The OMM allows only one user at a time to configure the system. A user
must authenticate with a user name and a password. Both strings are
checked case sensitive.
Default login is “omm” and password is “omm”. Administrators should
change the admin password on the System page after accessing the OMM.
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After login there are the following options available:
ƒ
Configuration of general SIP-DECT system parameters.
ƒ
Administration of the attached RFPs.
ƒ
Administration of the PPs.
If no user action takes place the OMM logs out the user after 5 minutes.
To logout from the system click the “Logout” button.
Note: If the browser is closed without logging out first the service access will
be blocked for other clients for 5 minutes.
3.3.2
System
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3.3.2.1 System settings
The system settings cover global settings for the OpenMobility Manager like:
•
System Name
•
DECT Authentication Code.
The authentication code is used during initial PP subscription as a
security option (see chapter 3.3.4). It is optional.
•
PARK
Each DECT network requires a unique PARK key. Enter the PARK
key as provided with the OMM Activation Kit product. It is mandatory.
•
Encryption as described in the chapter 3.3.2.1.2
•
Regulatory Domain as described in the chapter 3.3.2.1.3
•
DECT Monitor
For monitoring the DECT system behaviour of the OpenMobility
Manager a separate application will be delivered. This tool needs an
access to the OpenMobility Manager which is disabled by default and
can be enabled on the system page.
•
ToS and TTL Parameters
To allow the prioritisation of Voice Packets and/or Signalling Packets
(SIP) inside the used network the IP parameter ToS (Type of Service)
should be configured here.
•
Syslog Parameters
The OpenMobility Manager and the RFPs are capable of propagating
syslog messages. This feature together with the IP address of a host
collecting these messages can be configured.
•
Date and Time Parameters
If SNTP is not used, date and time can be configured at the OMM.
This has to be done to provide date and time to the Aastra Phone 142.
The time zone, which is shown on this web page, has been configured
at the IP region section of the web service.
Please note, that in the case that SNTP is not used, the date and time
has to be configured after every restart of the RFP, where the
OpenMobility Manager is running.
The date and time will be provided by the OpenMobility Manager to
the Aastra Phone 142 if the Aastra Phone 142 initiates a DECT
location registration. This will be done in the following cases:
Aastra Telecom
•
Subscribing at the OMM
•
Entering the network again after the DECT signal was lost
•
Power on
•
Silent charging feature is active at the phone and the phone is
taken out of the charger
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•
After a specific time to update date and time
3.3.2.1.1 Restarting the OMM
To restart the OMM select “System Settings” from the navigation tree and
then select ‘Restart’. There is also the option to reset the configuration data.
A reset web page is loaded then displaying a progress bar and the login web
page is loaded automatically if the OMM is reachable again.
3.3.2.1.2 Encryption
Encryption is only available on RFP32/34 products. Therefore it can only be
enabled on the “System Settings” web page if there are no other Aastra RFP
variants connected to the OMM.
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If encryption is enabled and another RFP variant connects to the OMM, its
DECT air interface will not be activated.
Note: The PPs have to support DECT encryption which is not a mandatory
feature.
3.3.2.1.3 Regulatory domain
To define where the IP DECT is used the parameter regulatory domain has
to be configured. Existing installations are updated to the default value
“EMEA (ETSI)”.
To setup a North American FCC compliant installation the value has to be set
to “US (FCC/CI)”
In a North American US (FCC/CI) deployment, ETSI compliant RFPs are
made inactive and can not be activated if the regulatory domain is set to “US
(FCC/CI)”. Vice-versa is also true.
Only US (FCC/CI) DECT 142 handsets may be connected to RFPs/OMM
designed for the US market and configured to use the US (FCC/CI)
regulatory domain.
3.3.2.2 SIP
The SIP settings cover all global settings matching the SIP signalling and the
RTP voice streams.
Aastra Telecom
•
Proxy Server
IP address or name of the SIP proxy server. If a hostname and
domain are used for the proxy server parameter, ensure that a
DNS server and domain are specified for your SIP-DECT
system via DHCP or the OMM Configurator tool.
•
Proxy Port
SIP proxy server’s port number. Default is 5060. To enable
DNS SRV support for proxy lookups, use a value of 0 for the
proxy port.
•
Registrar Server
IP address or name of the SIP registrar. Enables the PPs to be
registered with a Registrar. If a hostname and domain are used
for the proxy server parameter, ensure that a DNS server and
domain are specified for your SIP-DECT system via DHCP or
the OMM Configurator tool.
•
Registrar Port
SIP Registrar’s port number. Default is 5060. To enable DNS
SRV support for registrar lookups, use a value of 0 for the
registrar port.
•
Registration Period
The requested registration period, in seconds from the registrar.
Default is 3600.
•
Outbound Proxy
Address of the outbound proxy server. All SIP messages
originating from the OMM are sent to this server. For example, if
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you have a Session Border Controller in your network, then you
would normally set its address here. Optional.
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•
Outbound Proxy Port
The proxy port on the proxy server to which the OMM sends all
SIP messages. Optional.
•
Explicit MWI Subscription
Some Media Server such as the Asterisk support Message
Waiting Indication (MWI) based on /15/. A MWI icon will be
presented on an Aastra DECT 142 if the user has received a
voice message on his voice box which is supported by the
Media Server. If Explicit MWI Subscription is enabled the OMM
sends explicit for each PP a MWI Subscription message to the
Proxy or Outbound Proxy Server.
•
RTP Port Base
Each RFP needs a continuous port area of 68 UDP ports for
RTP voice streaming. The RTP Port Base is the start port
number of that area. Default is 16320.
•
Preferred Codec 1 – 5
Specifies a customized codec preference list which allows you
to use the preferred Codecs. The Codec 1 has the highest and
Codec 5 the lowest priority.
•
Silence Suppression
Used to configure whether Silence Suppression is preferred or
not.
•
DTMF Out-of-Band
The OMM supports DTMF based on Section 1.3 reference /9/.
•
DTMF Payload Type
If Out-of-Band is enabled the Payload Type specify the payload
type which is used for sending DTMF events based on Section
1.3 reference /9/.
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3.3.2.3 User account
After initial installation or after removing the configuration file the
OpenMobility service is accessible via a build-in user account with user “omm”
and password “omm”. These settings which are case sensitive can be
changed on the “User Account” web page.
3.3.2.4 Time zones
A time and date resynchronization of the Aastra Phone 142 devices is
described in chapter 3.3.2.1.
In the time zone section the OpenMobility Manager provides all available
time zones. They are set with their known daylight savings time rules
adjusted to the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) per default. The difference
to the UTC time is shown in the “UTC Difference” column. In case of a
configured daylight savings time rule this is also marked for each time zone.
There is a possibility to change the time zone rules for maximal five time
zones. Changed rules are marked with a bold time zone name in the table.
The changes are saved in the configuration file and are restored after each
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OpenMobility Manager startup. The “Default” button sets all time zones back
to the default values and deletes the changed time zone rules in the
configuration file.
With the “Configure Time Zone” dialog the standard time and the daylight
savings time (DST) of a time zone can be changed. If the time zone has no
DST only the UTC difference can be configured. For the DST both points of
time (begin of standard time and begin of daylight savings time) have to be
specified exactly. Therefore a certain day in the month or a certain week day
in a month can be used. See the following screen shots as an example:
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3.3.2.5 Backup
The web service interface allows to save a copy of the current configuration
on the local host (host where the browser application is executed) as well as
to restore an older configuration.
Restoring a previously saved configuration will lead to a reset of the OMM to
take effect.
3.3.3
RFP configuration
All configured RFPs are listed in tables grouped to clusters by its topographic
relations. The RFPs are sorted by their Ethernet addresses.
To ensure correct handover of a PP during a call, all involved RFPs must
deliver the same clock signal to the PP. This is achieved by having the RFPs
synchronized.
There are conditions where synchronization is not possible, for instance with
RFPs at remote locations. In this case the RFPs shall be grouped in different
clusters. The OpenMobility Manager will not try to synchronize RFPs over
cluster borders.
All used clusters are displayed in the navigation bar on the left side and the
OMM RFP is marked with a bold font.
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When the RFPs are connecting the OMM they submit their HW type. This
type is displayed on the RFP list web page.
New RFPs can be added to the system by pressing the “New” button. A
popup window appears providing the configuration of a new RFP.
Each RFP is identified by its MAC address (6 bytes hex format, colon
separated). The Ethernet address is unique and can be found on the back of
the chassis.
For easier administration each RFP can be associated with a location string.
The location string can hold up to 20 characters.
The same popup window could be opened for an existing RFP by pressing
the tool icon of the appropriate RFP.
An RFP could be deleted by pressing the trash can icon . A similar popup
window asks for confirmation showing the current configuration of this RFP.
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3.3.3.1 DECT configuration
The DECT functionality for each RFP can be switched on/off. If DECT is
active the RFP can be added to a cluster.
3.3.3.2 States of a RFP
For each RFP the state of the DECT subsystem is displayed. The states are:
Synchronous
The RFP is up and running. The RFP recognizes and is recognized by other
RFPs in its cluster through its air interface and delivers a synchronous clock
signal to the PPs.
Asynchronous but active
The RFP has not been able to synchronize to its neighbours yet. No DECT
communication is possible. But nevertheless the RFP has already been able
to connect to the OMM. This phase should usually last only for a few seconds
after starting up the RFP or the OMM. If this state lasts longer this is an
indication for a hardware or network failure.
Searching
The RFP has lost synchronization to its neighbours. No DECT
communication is possible. This phase should usually last only for a few
seconds after starting up the RFP or the OMM. If this state lasts longer or is
re-entered after being in a synchronous state this is an indication for a bad
location of the RFP.
Inactive
The RFP has connected to the OMM but the air interface has not been
switched on yet. For any RFP with activated DECT functionality this phase
should last only for a few seconds after starting up the RFP. If this state lasts
longer this may indicate a hardware failure.
Not connected
The RFP was configured but has not connected to the OMM yet. Therefore
the IP address column is empty.
3.3.3.3 OMM / RFP SW version check
When the RFPs are connecting the OMM they submit their SW version. If this
version differs from the OMM SW version the RFP connection attempt is
rejected. This could happen when using several DHCP servers with different
OpenMobility SW versions. In this case the RFP is marked with an error
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message. Moreover a global error message is displayed on the RFP list web
page if at least one version mismatch has been found.
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3.3.4
Configuration of Portable Parts
At the Portable Parts web page all configured DECT handsets are sorted by
their number. To keep the list concise, the complete list is split up into sub
lists containing up to 100 handsets. The user can move back and forth in
steps of 100 handsets. Because the browser function can not be used to
search for a certain handset in all sub lists, a search function is available,
which allows to find a handset by a given number or IPEI.
Adding Portable Parts to the SIP-DECT system
A new PP can be added to the system by pressing the “New” button. The
following popup window appears allowing the configuration of a new PP.
The Name parameter represents the SIP Display Name field. This parameter
is optional but recommended.
The Number is the SIP account number or extension for the PP.
The IPEI is the DECT 142 handset IPEI number which can be found in the
System Options menu of the DECT 142 handset.
The DECT authentication code is used during initial DECT subscription as a
security option and can be set here for each PP separately. If it is not
configured the global authentication code on the “System Settings” web
page, it is used (see chapter 3.3.2.1). This parameter is optional.
Note: The authentication code can only be changed if the PP is not
subscribed. The PP name can be changed, but this will not take effect until
the PP is subscribed again.
The SIP Authentication User Name is optional but recommended. It
represents the name which will be used during SIP registration and
authentication. If no name is given the number will be used by default. The
password will be used during SIP registration and authentication.
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Subscribing Portable Parts to the SIP-DECT system
After adding a PP configuration to the OMM the PP must be subscribed. The
OMM must first be enabled to allow subscriptions to be take place from PP
handsets. This is done by pressing the “Subscribe” button on the Portable
Parts OMM webpage. The OMM will allow a subscription of configured but
not subscribed PPs during the next hour only. The administrator must press
the Subscribe button again to permit more PP handsets to subscribe to the
SIP-DECT system.
After the PP configuration is complete on the OMM and the OMM is allowing
new subscriptions, each PP must subscribe to the system.
On each PP handset, the administrator or user must subscribe to the SIPDECT system through the System/Subscriptions menu. The specific PARK
code for the SIP-DECT system must be entered in order to subscribe to the
system.
IMPORTANT: the PARK code in numeric format can be found at the top-right
corner of the Portable Parts OMM web page. Each SIP-DECT deployment
will have a unique PARK code that was provided with the OMM Activation kit.
If the administrator configured a global or individual Portable Part DECT
authentication code, the administrator/user must enter in the code before the
PP will subscribe to the system.
If administrators/users have any difficulties subscribing to the SIP-DECT
system, it is recommended that they power-off the PP handset and reattempt
subscription again.
This completes the subscription process for a PP on the SIP-DECT system.
Editing Portable Parts in the SIP-DECT system
A popup window appears when configuring an existing PP by pressing the
tool icon . The only difference between the popup window for adding and
editing PP units is the delete subscription checkbox. If this option is selected,
the PP will be unsubscribed.
Deleting Portable Parts in the SIP-DECT system
Deleting of a PP can be done by pressing the trash can icon . A popup
window appears and asks for confirmation.
Searching for Portable Parts in the SIP-DECT system
If the user wants to find a certain handset then the search function can be
used. A click on the “Search” button provides the following pop-up window.
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The user can enter the handsets’ number or IPEI. At least one parameter has
to be set. The entered number or IPEI has to match exactly with a handset’s
number or IPEI. If number and IPEI are given then a handset has to exist in
the OMM’s database whose number and IPEI match both otherwise the
search fails.
If a handset with the specified number and/or IPEI was found then a list is
displayed which has this handset as the first entry. The search function can
also be used to get to the right sub list in one step.
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4
Maintenance
4.1
Booter
The booter may be automatically upgraded via the DHCP option 254
“UPDATE” (see chapter 3.1.4.1).
4.2
Site survey measurement equipment
If an SIP-DECT installation has to be planned, a sufficient distribution of the
RFPs is necessary, which fulfills the requirements for reliable synchronization
and connectivity to the Portable Parts. The site survey kit may help you. It
comprises:
•
•
•
•
•
4.3
One measuring RFP with its own power supply.
A tripod and a battery for the RFP.
Two reference PPs with chargers.
Battery chargers.
A measuring handset, which can monitor other makers DECT radio
sources.
Checking the Aastra DECT 142 Handset firmware version
You can display the version information of the Aastra Phone 142 with a few
keystrokes. Check the firmware version to determine whether an update is
required to overcome any user issues.
1. Press the “Menu” soft key
2. Select “System” (only to highlight)
3. Press “OK”.
4. Select “Version Number”
5. Press “OK”.
The display will show the software and the hardware version of the Aastra
DECT 142 handset.
4.4
Diagnostic
4.4.1
Aastra DECT 142 site survey mode
You can set the Aastra DECT 142 in “site survey mode” with a few
keystrokes. In this mode the phone will display the RFPs and the actual field
strength of the receiving signal in dBM.
1) Press the “Menu” soft key
2) Enter the following key sequence “R***76#”
3) Select “Site Survey”
4) Press “OK”.
To leave the site survey mode switch the phone off and on again.
The following display is shown on the Aastra Phone 142:
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PARK: 1F-10-FF-F0-21
RFPI
RFP ID: 02*
10FFF21 02
Frame error
FE
PP: FP:
Field strength
-dBm
50
57
RFP ID
RPN 02
01
00
Menu
50
Phonebook
RFP ID: 02*
*The ID of RFP to which the PP is currently associated to.
In this example the PP is currently connected to the RFP with the number 02.
The RFP 01 and 00 are also visible. The number “10FFF221 02” on the
upper right side refers to the PARK (Example 1F-10-F2-21) of the SIP-DECT
system and to the RFP to which the phone is currently connected to.
4.4.2
Aastra DECT 142 auto call test mode
You can set the Aastra DECT 142 to “auto call test mode” with a few
keystrokes. In this mode the phone will call a specified number cyclically. You
can use this feature to generate traffic for test purposes. This mode is also
active if the phone is on the charger.
1) Press the “Menu” soft key
2) Enter the following key sequence “R***76#”
3) Select “Auto Call Test”
4) Press “OK”.
5) Enter the phone number to call.
6) Press “OK”.
7) Enter a number of seconds between two calls.
8) Press “OK”.
9) Enter a number of seconds a call shall be active.
10) Press “OK”. The test will be started automatically.
To stop the test, switch the phone off and on again.
4.4.3
Aastra DECT 142 auto answer test mode
You can set the Aastra DECT 142 to “auto answer test mode” with a few
keystrokes. In this mode the phone will answer incoming calls automatically.
You can use this feature together this phones in the “auto call test mode” for
test purposes. This mode is also active if the phone is on the charger.
1) Press the “Menu” soft key
2) Enter the following key sequence “R***76#”
3) Select “Auto Answer”
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
4) Press “OK”.
5) Enter a number of seconds the phone shall ring before it will answer the
call.
6) Press “OK”.
7) Enter a number of seconds a call shall be active.
8) Press “OK”. The test will be started automatically.
To stop the test switch the phone off and on again.
4.4.4
Syslog
The OpenMobility Manager and the RFPs are capable of propagating syslog
messages conforming to /8/. This feature together with the IP address of a
host collecting these messages can be configured.
Syslog has to be enabled by
•
DHCP using the public options 227 and 228.
•
Setting the syslog daemon server and port via the web interface.
To set up the syslog via DHCP or OM Configurator has the advantage, that
syslogs are available in earlier states of the RFP start up.
The level of syslog messages in the default state allows the user, to have
control over the general system state and major failures. If it is wished to
increase the level for diagnostic reasons, this can be done via the telnet user
shell by increasing the spy level of each subsystem (see chapter 0).
You can also read syslogs if you type the command logread within the telnet
user shell.
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
5
Appendix
5.1
Communications Regulation Information for
Aastra Phone 142 US
FCC Notices (U.S. Only)
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful
interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Modifications not expressly approved by this company could void the user's
authority to operate the equipment.
NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits
for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These
limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and
can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
. Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
. Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
. Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that
to which the receiver is connected.
. Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Health and Safety Information
Exposure to Radio Frequency (RF) Signals:
The wireless phone is a radio transmitter and receiver. It is designed and
manufactured not to exceed the emission limits for exposure to radio
frequency (RF) energy set by the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) of the U.S. Government. These limits are part of comprehensive
guidelines and establish permitted levels of RF energy for the general
population. The guidelines are based on the safety standards previously set
by both U.S. and international standards bodies. These standards include a
substantial safety margin designed to assure the safety of all persons,
regardless of age and health.
This device and its antenna must not be co-located or operating in
conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter.
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This EUT has been shown to be capable of compliance for localized specific
absorption rate (SAR) for uncontrolled environment/general population
exposure limits specified in ANSI/IEEE Std. C95.1-1992 and had been tested
in accordance with the measurement procedures specified in FCC/OET
Bulletin 65 Supplement C (2001) and IEEE 1528-2003.
Industry Canada (Canada only)
Operation of this device is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this
device may not cause interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference, including interference that may cause undesired operation of
the device.
Privacy of communications may not be ensured when using this telephone.
Exposure to Radio Frequency (RF) Signals:
The wireless phone is a radio transmitter and receiver. It is designed and
manufactured not to exceed the emission limit for exposure to radio
frequency (RF) energy set by the Ministry of Health (Canada), Safety Code 6.
These limits are part of comprehensive guidelines and established permitted
levels of RF energy for the general population. These guidelines are based
on the safety standards previously set by international standard bodies.
These standards include a substantial safety margin designed to assure the
safety of all persons, regardless of age and health.
This device and its antenna must not be co-located or operating in
conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter.
This device has been shown to be capable of compliance for localized
specific absorption rate (SAR) for uncontrolled environment / general public
exposure limits specific in ANSI/IEEE C95.1-1992 and had been tested in
accordance with the measurement procedures specified in IEEE 1528-2003.
5.2
Communications Regulation Information for RFP 32 or RFP
34 (NA)
FCC Notices (U.S. Only)
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful
interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Modifications not expressly approved by this company could void the user's
authority to operate the equipment.
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits
for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These
limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and
can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
. Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
. Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
. Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that
to which the receiver is connected.
. Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Exposure to Radio Frequency (RF) Signals:
The wireless phone is a radio transmitter and receiver. It is designed and
manufactured not to exceed the emission limits for exposure to radio
frequency (RF) energy set by the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) of the U.S. Government. These limits are part of comprehensive
guidelines and establish permitted levels of RF energy for the general
population. The guidelines are based on the safety standards previously set
by both U.S. and international standards bodies. These standards include a
substantial safety margin designed to assure the safety of all persons,
regardless of age and health.
This device and its antenna must not be co-located or operating in
conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter.
The radiating element of the RFP should be installed during operating at a
separation distance greater than 20 cm between user and device. The device
comply with the requirements for routine evaluation limits ”
Industry Canada (Canada only)
Operation of this device is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this
device may not cause interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference, including interference that may cause undesired operation of
the device.
Privacy of communications may not be ensured when using this telephone.
Exposure to Radio Frequency (RF) Signals:
The wireless phone is a radio transmitter and receiver. It is designed and
manufactured not to exceed the emission limit for exposure to radio
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Installation, Administration and Maintenance
frequency (RF) energy set by the Ministry of Health (Canada), Safety Code 6.
These limits are part of comprehensive guidelines and established permitted
levels of RF energy for the general population. These guidelines are based
on the safety standards previously set by international standard bodies.
These standards include a substantial safety margin designed to assure the
safety of all persons, regardless of age and health.
This device and its antenna must not be co-located or operating in
conjunction with any other antenna or transmitter.
The radiating element of the RFP should be installed during operating at a
separation distance greater than 20 cm between user and device. This
device comply with the requirements for routine evaluation limits.
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