Owner’s Manual
1803PC, 1815, 1817
PC Programmable Telephone Entry Systems
DoorKing, Inc.
120 Glasgow Avenue
Inglewood, California 90301
U.S.A.
Phone: 310-645-0023
Fax: 310-641-1586
www.doorking.com
P/N 1815-065 REV J, 3/01
Copyright 2001 DoorKing, Inc. All rights reserved.
2
Use this manual with the following models only.
All 1803PC models with circuit board 1844-010 REV A and B.
All 1815 models with circuit board 1840-010 REV D and E.
All 1817 models with circuit board 1841-010 REV F and G.
DoorKing, Inc. reserves the right to make changes in the products described in this manual
without notice and without obligation of DoorKing, Inc. to notify any persons of any such revisions
or changes. Additionally, DoorKing, Inc. makes no representations or warranties with respect to
this manual. This manual is copyrighted, all rights reserved. No portion of this manual may be
copied, reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium without prior written consent
from DoorKing, Inc.
3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Preface
Important Notices................................................................................................................................................. 6
General Information ............................................................................................................................................. 7
Features ............................................................................................................................................................. 8
Section 1 – Installation
1.1
Installation Guidelines – All Systems ............................................................................................... 9
1.1.1
Surface Mount Units ............................................................................................................. 10
1.1.2
Surface Mount Units with Recess Box .................................................................................. 11
1.1.3
Flush Mount Units................................................................................................................. 12
1.1.4
Flush Mount Rough-in Box ................................................................................................... 13
1.1.5
Flush Mount Trim Ring ......................................................................................................... 14
1.1.6
Flush Mount Surface Mounting Kit ........................................................................................ 15
1.2
1.1.7
Wall Mount Units .................................................................................................................. 16
Memory Chip Installation ................................................................................................................... 17
1.3
Postal Lock Installation ..................................................................................................................... 18
Section 2 – Wiring
General Information ........................................................................................................................................... 19
Maximum Wire Run Distance Charts ................................................................................................................ 20
2.1
2.2
Main Terminal Description................................................................................................................. 21
Weigand Terminals
2.2.1
2.3
Weigand Power Terminals.................................................................................................... 22
2.2.2
Weigand Data Terminals ...................................................................................................... 22
2.2.3
Elevator Control Terminals ................................................................................................... 23
2.2.4
RS-232 Terminals................................................................................................................. 23
Relay Wiring (Typical)
2.3.1
Controlling a Single Door or Gate ......................................................................................... 24
2.3.2
Controlling a Gate and a Pedestrian Gate or Door................................................................ 25
2.3.3
Controlling a Gate Operator and Two Pedestrian Doors or Gates......................................... 26
2.3.4
Tracker Expansion Board Control ......................................................................................... 27
Section 3 – Programming
3.1
3.2
3.3
General Programming Information
3.1.1
Programming with a PC........................................................................................................ 29
3.1.2
Programming from the Keypad ............................................................................................. 30
3.1.3
Programming with an IBM Keyboard .................................................................................... 30
3.1.4
System Memory ................................................................................................................... 31
Programming with a PC
3.2.1
Master Code ......................................................................................................................... 32
3.2.2
Single or Multiple Systems ................................................................................................... 32
3.2.3
Programming for Call Up Operation...................................................................................... 33
3.2.4
PC Programming Table ........................................................................................................ 33
General Programming
3.3.1
Relay Strike Time ................................................................................................................. 34
3.3.2
Talk Time ............................................................................................................................. 34
3.3.3
Tone Open Numbers ............................................................................................................ 35
3.3.4
Postal Switch........................................................................................................................ 35
3.3.5
Touch-tone / Rotary-dial ....................................................................................................... 36
3.3.6
Rotary-dial 9 ......................................................................................................................... 36
4
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
Programming Letters, Numbers and Messages
3.4.1
Programming Letters and Numbers ...................................................................................... 37
3.4.2
Programming the User Message – 1815............................................................................... 38
3.4.3
Programming the Instruction Message – 1815...................................................................... 39
3.4.4
Programming the User Message – 1817............................................................................... 40
3.4.5
Programming the Instruction Message – 1817...................................................................... 41
Programming Phone Numbers and Names ...................................................................................... 42
3.5.1
Programming the Directory Code Length.............................................................................. 43
3.5.2
Programming 7-digit Phone Numbers................................................................................... 43
3.5.3
Programming Area Codes .................................................................................................... 44
3.5.4
Programming Phone Numbers with Area Codes................................................................... 44
3.5.5
Programming Names............................................................................................................ 45
3.5.6
Deleting Individual Phone Numbers ...................................................................................... 45
3.5.7
Delete Names....................................................................................................................... 45
3.5.8
Delete Area Codes ............................................................................................................... 46
3.5.9
Display Phone Numbers ....................................................................................................... 46
Device Codes
3.6.1
Programming Device Codes ................................................................................................. 47
3.6.2
Deleting Device Codes ......................................................................................................... 47
Four-digit Entry Codes
3.7.1
Programming Four-digit Entry Codes.................................................................................... 48
3.7.2
Delete Four-digit Entry Codes............................................................................................... 48
3.7.3
Entry Code Ranges .............................................................................................................. 48
Section 4 – Adjustments
Circuit Board Adjustments.................................................................................................................................... 49
1815 Adjustment Locations .................................................................................................................................. 51
1817 Adjustment Locations .................................................................................................................................. 52
Section 5 – Operating Instructions
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
Guest Instructions.............................................................................................................................. 53
Resident Instructions
5.2.1
Responding to a Guest Call .................................................................................................. 54
5.2.2
Using an Entry Code............................................................................................................. 54
System Administrator
5.3.1
Opening from a Remote Location ......................................................................................... 55
5.3.2
Tracker Board Override Hold Open Command ..................................................................... 55
5.3.3
Relay Check ......................................................................................................................... 56
5.3.4
Time and Date Check ........................................................................................................... 56
Miscellaneous Operating Instructions
5.4.1
Talk Time.............................................................................................................................. 57
5.4.2
Line Sharing ......................................................................................................................... 57
5.4.3
Connection to a PBX ............................................................................................................ 57
5.4.4
10-digit Dialing...................................................................................................................... 57
Section 6 – Maintenance and Trouble Shooting
6.1
Trouble Shooting
6.1.1
RS-232 Test ......................................................................................................................... 61
6.1.2
Weigand Test ....................................................................................................................... 62
6.1.3
Elevator Board Hardware Test.............................................................................................. 62
6.1.4
Elevator Board Floor Hardware Test..................................................................................... 63
6.2
Accessories.......................................................................................................................................... 64
6.2
Log Tables ........................................................................................................................................... 65
5
IMPORTANT NOTICE
FCC - UNITED STATES
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a class A digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules and Regulations. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial
environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
FCC Registration Number: DUF6VT-12874-OT-T
DOC - CANADA
The Canadian Department of Communications label identifies certified equipment. This certification
means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective, operational, and
safety requirements. The Department does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the users
satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be connected to the
facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an
acceptable means of connection. The customer should be aware that compliance with the above
conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian maintenance facility
designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or
equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to
disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure, for their own protection, that the electrical ground connections of the power
utility, telephone lines, and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together.
This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
CAUTION: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact the
appropriate electric inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
DOC Registration Number: 1736 4528 A
Notice:
The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes the percentage of the total load to
be connected to a telephone loop which is used by the device, to prevent overloading. The
termination on a loop may consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that
the sum of the load numbers of all the devices does not exceed 100.
Notice:
DoorKing does not provide a power transformer on units sold into Canada. Use only transformers that
are CSA listed to power the telephone entry system. 1802, 1803, 1808, 1810, 1814, 1815, 1818 and
all "P" series systems require a 16.5-volt, 20 VA transformer. The models 1816 and 1817 require a
16.5-volt, 40 VA transformer. The model 1812 requires a 24-volt, 20 VA transformer.
Listing:
This product has been tested to and found to be in compliance with the U.L 294 Safety Standard by
Intertek Testing Services NA Inc. (a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory) and is ETL listed.
6
GENERAL INFORMATION
•
Prior to beginning the installation of the telephone entry system, we suggest that you become
familiar with the instructions, illustrations, and wiring guidelines in this manual. This will help
insure that you installation is performed in an efficient and professional manner.
•
The proper installation of the telephone entry panel is an extremely important and integral
part of the overall access control system. Check all local building ordinances and building
codes prior to installing this system. Be sure your installation is in compliance with local
codes.
•
When used to control a door or pedestrian gate, try to locate the telephone entry system as
near as possible to the entry point. The unit should be mounted on a rigid wall to prevent
excessive shock and vibration from closing doors or gates. Continuous vibration and shock
from slamming doors or spring-loaded pedestrian gates will damage the circuit board. Under
no circumstances should the unit be mounted directly to a moving door or gate.
•
ADA mounting requirements for door control. The mounting of the unit shall be in such a
way that the LCD display is positioned so that it is readily visible to and usable by a person
sitting in a wheelchair with an approximate eye level of 45 inches and shall comply with the
following requirements:
1. If mounted vertically or tipped no more than 30 degrees away from the viewer, the
center line of the LCD shall be located a maximum of 52 inches above grade.
2. If the clear floor space allows only forward approach to the system, the maximum
high forward reach allowed is 48 inches above grade to the top of the keypad.
3. If the high forward reach to the system is over an obstruction of greater than 20
inches but less than 25 inches, the maximum high forward reach allowed is 44 inches
above grade to the top of the keypad.
4. If the clear floor space allows parallel approach by a person in a wheelchair, the
maximum high side reach shall be 54 inches above grade to the top of the keypad.
5. If the high side reach is over an obstruction of 24 inches or less, the maximum high
side reach allowed is 46 inches above grade to the top of the keypad.
•
When used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate operator, the telephone
entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from the gate and gate
operator, or in such a way that a person cannot operate the entry system and/or touch
the gate or gate operator at the same time.
•
Be sure that the system is installed so that it is not directly in the traffic lane. Goose neck
mounting post and kiosks work well for these type systems. When planning where to locate
the system, take into consideration traffic lane layouts, turn around lanes for rejected access,
conduit runs, power availability, etc.
•
Environmental factors must also be taken into account. Surface mount units are designed for
direct outdoor installations, however it is preferable to protect them from direct exposure to
driven rain or snow whenever possible. Flush mount and wall mount units must be protected
from direct exposure to the elements. Be sure that ample lighting is provided so that guest
can read both the directory and the operating instructions at night.
•
This telephone entry system contains a number of static sensitive components that can be
damaged or destroyed by static discharges during installation or use. Discharge any static
prior to removing the circuit board from the lobby panel by touching a proper ground device.
7
FEATURES
•
Can provide service for up to 3000 residents and can store up to 8000 card, transmitter or
digital PIN codes when ordered with 3000 MemPLUS chip set.
•
System can be programmed via modem or RS-232 interface with the Remote Account
Manager for Windows software included with the unit. Programming via RS-232 requires an
additional cable that is not included with the unit (P/N 1818-040).
•
System keypad will emit DTMF tones after a call is answered allowing the system to be used
with auto-attendants, answering machines, etc. This feature is available with the
following units only:
Model 1815 with 1840-010 circuit board, REV E or higher.
Model 1817 with 1841-010 circuit board, REV G or higher.
Model 1803PC with 1844-010 circuit board, REV B or higher.
•
Directory codes can be set from 1 to 4 digits in length and can be randomly assigned.
•
Transaction buffer stores the last 8000 events and has its own backup power source to retain
memory during power outages.
•
31-security levels total (security level 00 always denies entry, security level 01 always admits
entry), with 29 programmable security levels, each with four time zones allows you to control
and restrict user access as needed.
•
10 programmable area codes allow the system to be used in areas requiring 10 and 11-digit
dialing.
•
Three internal relays allow the system to control a main entry point plus two additional entry
points.
•
System can be expanded to control up to 16 entry points in addition to the main entry point.
Tracker expansion boards are required (one for each additional entry point) and are not
included with the system. Tracker boards also provide output for door ajar and forced entry
alarms.
•
Optional elevator control board(s) can control up to four elevators with each elevator serving
up to 64 floors.
•
System will interface with selected models of DKS DoorKing vehicular gate operators to
provide gate operator information and data (requires a Tracker board for each gate operator
that is to send data to the system).
8
SECTION 1 - INSTALLATION
Order your telephone line at least two weeks prior to the planned installation date. This will assure
that a phone line is available when the unit is installed. The telephone company will require the
following information from you:
Type:
Ringer Equivalence:
Jack Type:
FCC Registration (US):
DOC (Canada):
Electrical Listing:
Touch Tone, Loop Start
0.0 A
RJ11C
DUF6VT-12874-OT-T
1736 4528 A
Complies with U.L. 294 - ETL Listed
CALLER ID: You may want to consider ordering caller ID blocking from the telephone company for
the entry system phone line. Without caller ID blocking, tenants with the proper phone equipment will
be able to identify the telephone number that the entry system is installed on. This may or may not
be desirable.
1.1 INSTALLATION GUIDELINES – ALL SYSTEMS
1. Open the cabinet of the telephone entry system and disconnect the keypad ribbon cable
from the main circuit board.
2. Remove the 6-32 x 1/2 round head screws from the upper corners of the circuit board.
3. Remove the circuit board by gently pulling it out of the main terminal edge connector.
CAUTION - the circuit board contains static sensitive components. Discharge any static
electricity from your hands by touching a proper ground device before removing the
circuit board. Place the circuit board where it will not be damaged.
4. Mount the cabinet of the telephone entry system. Be sure that mounting screws do not
protrude into the cabinet where they could cause a short on the back of the circuit board.
Make any necessary conduit connections.
5. Route wiring into the cabinet. Do not apply any power at this time.
6. Clean out the cabinet. Be sure that all dirt, metal and/or wood debris is removed from the
cabinet and that the terminal strip edge connector is clean and free of any loose particles.
7. Re-install the circuit board into the cabinet by gently pushing the circuit board terminals
into the edge connector. CAUTION - the circuit board contains static sensitive
components. Discharge any static electricity from your hands by touching a proper
ground device before removing the circuit board.
8. Secure the circuit board to the cabinet using the screws removed in step 2.
9. Plug the keypad ribbon cable into the circuit board. The cable points down.
9
1.1.1 Surface Mount Units
Surface mount units can be mounted directly to a wall or pilaster, or can be post mounted using a
DoorKing heavy-duty mounting post (p/n 1200-047 and 1200-048). Be sure the unit is mounted
securely and is not subject to vibration from closing doors or gates.
CAUTON! If this entry system is used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate operator, the
entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from the gate and gate operator, or
in such a way that a person cannot operate the entry system and touch the gate or gate operator at
the same time.
4.75
9.0
.875
13.0
11.0
.25 DIA
.5
.875 DIA
2.625
3.25
5.625
11.25
1.625
2.5
.875 DIA
10
1.1.2 Surface Mount Units with Recess Box
Surface mount units can be semi-flush mounted into a wall or pilaster by using the optional recessmounting box (p/n 1803-150). Be sure the unit is mounted securely and is not subject to vibration
from closing doors or gates.
CAUTON! If this entry system is used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate operator, the
entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from the gate and gate operator, or
in such a way that a person cannot operate the entry system and touch the gate or gate operator at
the same time.
2.125
15.00
11.125
3.625
2.125
10-24 x 1.25 STUD
13.25
11.0
8.375
15.25
13.25
12.0
.25 DIA
4.875
2.25
3.375
.5
.25 DIA
2.0
1.375 DIA
1.06
1803-150
Recess Box
8.812
2.68
Surface Mount
Entry System
.25 DIA
.5
2.2
5.75
9.3
11.5
11
1.1.3 Flush Mount Units
1.125
Flush mount units are installed into a wall with flush mount kits 1814-065 (stainless) or 1814-066
(gold). Flush mount kits are not included with the entry system. Flush mount units are not designed
for direct exposure to the weather. Be sure the unit is mounted securely and is not subject to
vibration from closing doors or gates.
CAUTON! If this entry system is used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate operator, the
entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from the gate and gate operator, or
in such a way that a person cannot operate the entry system and touch the gate or gate operator at
the same time.
12.0
1.125
3.0
9.0
.875 DIA
2.625
.50
.875
2.625
5.625
1.625
11.25
.875 DIA
2.5
12
13.0
13.25
11.0
.25 DIA
1.1.4 Flush Mount Rough-in Box
The flush mount installation kit has two parts; the rough-in box and the trim ring. The rough-in box is
installed first.
1.25
12.75
1.875
9.0
4.25
1.75
3.875
14.5
11.0
13.25
10.25
7.25
10-24 x 1.125 Stud
1.125 DIA
3.5
1.75
9.25
1.75
.25 DIA
1.75
6.375
11.0
13
1.1.5 Flush Mount Trim Ring
Flush mount units can be mounted by using the 1814-065 (stainless) or 1814-066 (gold) mounting kit.
Flush mounting kits are not included with the unit. Flush mount units are not designed for direct
exposure to the weather. Be sure the unit is mounted securely and is not subject to vibration from
closing doors or gates.
CAUTON! If this entry system is used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate operator, the
entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from the gate and gate operator, or
in such a way that a person cannot operate the entry system and touch the gate or gate operator at
the same time.
14.25
2.625
9.0
2.25
3.625
13.625
16.0
11.0
.25 DIA
1.0
.875
1.25 DIA
3.0
Rough-in
Box
1.625
1.25 DIA
1.125
5.875
3.0
7.0
8.5
11.75
14
Trim
Ring
Flush Mount
Entry System
1.1.6 Flush Mount Surface Mounting Kit
Flush mount units can be surface mounted by using the optional 1814-152 surface mount trim ring.
Flush mount units are not designed for direct exposure to the weather. Be sure that the unit is
securely mounted and is not subject to vibration from closing doors or gates.
CAUTON! If this entry system is used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate operator, the
entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from the gate and gate operator, or
in such a way that a person cannot operate the entry system and touch the gate or gate operator at
the same time.
12.0
1.0
2.625
13.5
.375
6.0
1.125
.375
7.5
.875
9.0
3.0
1.125 DIA
1.125 SQ
1814-152
Trim Ring
15
Flush Mount
Entry System
1.1.7 Wall Mount Units
Wall mount units (models 1815 and 1817 only) are designed to be mounted directly onto a wall
without the need of cutting a large hole as is necessary with flush mount units. Wall mount units are
not designed for direct exposure to the weather. Be sure the unit is mounted securely and is not
subject to vibration from closing doors or gates.
CAUTON! If this entry system is used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate operator, the
entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from the gate and gate operator, or
in such a way that a person cannot operate the entry system and touch the gate or gate operator at
the same time.
12.375
10.0
3.125
1.187
1.75
.875 DIA
3.0
3.0
1.375
3.187
16
14.125
11.625
.25 DIA
1.2 MEMORY CHIP INSTALLATION
The telephone entry system is shipped with two memory chips packaged in a separate box inside the
shipping container. The memory chips must be installed for the telephone entry system to operate.
CAUTION!! Do not install the memory chips with power to the telephone entry system turned
on. Attempting to install the memory chips with power on will irrevocably damage the chips.
CAUTION!! The memory chips are a static sensitive component. Discharge any static
electricity from your hands by touching a proper ground device before removing the control
board. Handle the memory chips with care.
1. The large memory chip socket is colored black and is located in the center of the circuit
board. Be sure that the handle is in the un-locked position (pointing up). Be sure that
power to the telephone entry system is off.
2. Carefully insert the memory chip into the socket. The small half circular indentation on
the chip must be at the top. CAUTION: Installing the memory chip upside down will
cause permanent damage to the chip. Be sure that the memory chip is seated correctly
in the socket.
3. Move the lever on the chip socket to the locked position (down).
4. Install the small memory chip in the socket located at the bottom of the circuit board. The
small circular indentation on the chip must be at the top. CAUTION: Installing the
memory chip upside down will cause permanent damage to the chip. Be sure that the
memory chip is seated correctly in the socket. If it is necessary to remove this chip, use
a small bladed flat blade screwdriver to carefully pry the chip from the socket. Take extra
caution to be sure to not bend the pins on the chip.
17
1.3 POSTAL LOCK INSTALLATION
At some locations, such as gated communities, it will be necessary to provide access to the mail
carrier so that they can deliver the mail. Mail carrier access will be provided by the installation of an
Arrow Postal Lock. This is the same lock that the Post Office uses for gang mailboxes. These locks
are not available to the public. The installer or the building owner/manager will have to call the Post
Office and arrange for the installation of this lock into the telephone entry system. All DoorKing
commercial telephone entry systems are designed to accept installation of the postal lock.
Prior to installation of the postal lock, be sure power to the telephone entry system is turned off.
1.
2.
3.
Remove the hole plug on the faceplate of the telephone entry system.
Cut the wire tie wrapped around the micro switch next to the postal lock access hole.
Remove the two hex nuts from the postal lock-mounting studs. Mount the postal lock
on the two studs and secure with the hex nuts.
When the lock is installed, check to be sure that the pawl of the lock, in its extended position, is
depressing the micro switch (the micro switch is wired normally closed). When the mail carrier inserts
his key and turns the postal lock, the pawl is withdrawn and the micro switch will activate the relay
that has been programmed for this function for the programmed strike time.
18
SECTION 2 – WIRING
Prior to installing wiring to the telephone entry system, we suggest that you become familiar with the
instructions, illustrations, and wiring guidelines in this manual. This will help insure that you
installation is performed in an efficient and professional manner.
The wiring of the telephone entry panel is an extremely important and integral part of the
overall access control system. Use proper wire for the communication line, power wires, and
be sure that the system is properly grounded. Check all local building ordinances and
building codes prior to installing this system. Be sure your installation is in compliance with
local codes.
If this telephone entry system is used to control a vehicular gate with an automatic gate
operator, the telephone entry system must be mounted a minimum of ten (10) feet away from
the gate and gate operator. If this unit has been installed closer to the automated vehicular
gate, do not proceed with any wiring until the unit has been moved and re-installed so that it is
in compliance with these instructions.
Use only the supplied transformers (or U.L. listed equivalent) to power the telephone entry system
(16.5 VAC, 20 VA for 1803PC and 1815, 16.5 VAC, 40 VA for 1817) and any weigand input devices
(16.5 VAC, 20 VA). Do not power any other devices (electric strikes, magnetic locks, etc.) from these
power transformers. For wire runs up to 100 feet, use 18 AWG, 600 volt insulated wire. For wire
runs up to 200 feet, use 16 AWG, 600 volt insulated wire. Power wires are susceptible to noise and
hum pickup; therefore it is preferable that you keep power wire runs as short as possible.
This telephone entry system contains a number of static sensitive components that can be damaged
or destroyed by static discharges during installation or use. Discharge any static prior to removing
the circuit board from the lobby panel by touching a proper ground device.
Proper grounding of this system is a requirement. The use of surge suppressers can significantly
reduce the chance of component failure because of static charges or surges. To be effective, ground
connections should be made with a minimum 12 AWG, 600 volt insulated wire to a ground point
within 10 feet of the telephone entry system. The ground point must be at an electrical panel, a
metallic cold water pipe that runs in the earth, or a stainless steel grounding rod driven at least ten
(10) feet into the soil.
Be sure that you use proper wire that has an insulation rated for an underground environment. All
wires should be placed in conduits. Proper pre-planning can greatly ease the installation and wiring
of this system. Always check with the local building code to determine the type of wire required in
your municipality.
If Tracker expansion boards are being used with this system, refer to the Tracker Installation and
Wiring manual that came with the Tracker expansion boards, for detailed information on wiring
Tracker boards to the PC programmable telephone entry system.
If Elevator Control is used with this system, refer to the Elevator Control Installation and Wiring
manual for detailed information on wiring the elevator control boards to this system and to the
elevator push button control panel.
19
RS-232 Input
(OPTIONAL)
Connections to 2348
Elevator Control Board
(OPTIONAL)
Weigand Power
Inputs for weigand
control devices
(OPTIONAL)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
16 VAC
20 VA
Power Wiring Maximum Distance
16 VAC
20 VA
Phone Wiring Maximum Distance
100 Feet
18AWG
800 Feet
24 AWG
200 Feet
16 AWG
1600 Feet
22 AWG
Weigand Wiring Maximum Distance
Elevator Control Maximum Wiring
500 Feet
Belden 9931
500 Feet
Belden 9931
500 Feet
Consolidated
5324-CL
500 Feet
Consolidated
5324-CL
20
2.1 MAIN TERMINAL DESCRIPTION
TERMINAL
DESCRIPTION
1
Phone Line Connection – 800 ft. maximum with 24 AWG wire; 1600 ft. maximum with 22 AWG wire.
2
Phone Line Connection – 800 ft. maximum with 24 AWG wire; 1600 ft. maximum with 22 AWG wire.
3
Earth Ground Only.
4
Switch Input. A closure between terminals 4 and 6 will cause the designated relay(s) to activate for the
programmed strike time. The Postal Switch is connected here.
5
Microphone Input.
6
Common for switch input, microphone, speaker, AZ buttons, keyboard and battery negative.
7
Speaker Output.
8
Keyboard Data Input.
9
Keyboard 5 VDC Power.
10
Keyboard Clock Input.
11
Z Button Input.
12
A Button Input.
13
Relay 2 Common – 30 Volt, 3 Amp maximum.
14
Relay 2 Contact (set for normally open or normally closed by the relay contact shorting bar on the circuit
board) – 30 Volt, 3 Amp maximum.
15
Relay 1 Common – 30 Volt, 3 Amp maximum.
16
Relay 1 Normally Open – 30 Volt, 3 Amp maximum.
17
Relay 1 Normally Closed – 30 Volt, 3 Amp maximum.
18
Back-up Battery POSITIVE (connect negative to terminal 6).
19
16 VAC Input Power – 20 VA minimum for 1803PC and 1815; 40 VA minimum for 1817.
100 ft. maximum with 18 AWG wire; 200 ft. maximum with 16 AWG wire.
20
16 VAC Input Power – 20 VA minimum for 1803PC and 1815, 40 VA minimum for 1817.
100 ft. maximum with 18 AWG wire; 200 ft. maximum with 16 AWG wire.
Do not run high voltage (115 V) power lines and communication lines in the same conduit. These
should be in separate conduits at least six (6) inches apart. Be sure that all phone line wiring is
twisted and completely isolated from ground.
Use only the supplied 16.5 VAC (or U.L. listed equivalent) to power the entry system. Do not power
any other devices (electric strikes, magnetic locks, lights, etc.) from this transformer. Do not
run 16 VAC entry system power lines over 200 feet. It is advisable to keep these wires as short as
possible. Use 18 AWG wire for wire runs up to 100 feet, and 16 AWG wire for wire runs up to
200 feet. Install a low voltage surge suppresser (DoorKing p/n 1878-010 or equivalent) to help
protect the entry system from power surges. Relay 1 contacts are located on the main terminal strip
(15, 16, 17). Relay 2 contacts are located on the main terminal strip (13, 14) and are set for N.O or
N.C. operation by the relay 2 shorting bar. Relay 0 contacts are located on an auxiliary terminal and
are labeled on the board left to right: NO, NC, C.
A 12 volt .8 amp hour gel-cell battery (DoorKing p/n 1801-008) can be installed in the system to
provide stand-by power in the event of a power outage. Connect the positive (RED) lead to terminal
18; connect the negative (BLACK) lead to terminal 6.
21
2.2 WEIGAND TERMINAL DESCRIPTION
There are four (4) auxiliary terminals on the 1840 control board which provide inputs for: weigand
data, elevator control, RS232 communication, and power for these various features.
2.2.1 Weigand Power Terminals
16 VAC, 20 VA power must be supplied to these power terminals; otherwise RS232 communication
and all weigand devices will fail to operate. Do not power any other devices (electric strikes,
magnetic locks, lights, etc.) from this transformer. Do not run 16 VAC weigand power lines over 200
feet. Use only U.L. listed 600 volt insulated wire for RS232 / weigand power wiring. It is advisable to
keep these wires as short as possible. Use 18 AWG wire for wire runs up to 100 feet, and 16 AWG
wire for wire runs up to 200 feet. Install a low voltage surge suppresser (DoorKing p/n 1878-010 or
equivalent) to help protect the circuit board from power surges.
TERMINAL
DESCRIPTION
1
16 VAC, 20 VA Weigand Input Power.
100 ft. maximum with 18 AWG wire; 200 ft. maximum with 16 AWG wire.
2
16 VAC, 20 VA Weigand Input Power.
100 ft. maximum with 18 AWG wire; 200 ft. maximum with 16 AWG wire.
2.2.2 Weigand Data Terminals
These terminals are used to input weigand data to the circuit board from external weigand devices
such as card readers, weigand keypads, RF receivers, etc. These terminals are also used to input
weigand data from the Tracker boards when they are used to expand the system.
The 16 VAC available on weigand terminals 1 and 2 (not the two weigand power terminals) is used
for lights only. For example, a weigand card reader may have lights built into the housing that will
require 16 VAC power for the lights to illuminate. Do not power any other devices (electric strikes,
magnetic locks, etc.) from this power source.
Maximum wire run for weigand data is 500 feet using Belden 9931, Consolidated 5324-CL, or
equivalent six (6) conductor shielded wire. Do not use twisted pair with weigand format. Float the
shield at the weigand device. Do not connect the shield to the weigand device common.
If Tracker expansion boards are being used with this system, refer to the Tracker Installation and
Wiring manual that came with the Tracker expansion boards, for detailed information on wiring
Tracker boards to the PC programmable telephone entry system.
TERMINAL
DESCRIPTION
10
+12 VDC POWER
9
COMMON
8
DATA 1
7
DATA 0
6
+12 VDC POWER
5
COMMON
4
DATA 1
3
DATA 0
2
16 VAC Light Power
1
16 VAC Light Power
Weigand devices connected to these
terminals will activate RELAY 1 on
the main control board when a valid
code is received by the device.
Weigand devices connected to these
terminals will activate RELAY 2 on
the main control board when a valid
code is received by the device.
Used for light power only.
22
2.2.3 Elevator Control Terminals
The elevator control terminals are used when the 2348-010 elevator control board is connected to the
system to enable elevator control. Do not connect any other devices to these terminals.
Maximum wire run for weigand data is 500 feet using Belden 9931, Consolidated 5324-CL, or
equivalent six (6) conductor shielded wire. Do not use twisted pair with weigand format. Float the
shield at the elevator control board. Do not connect the shield to the elevator board common.
If elevator control boards (2348-010) are being used with this system, refer to the Elevator Control
Installation and Wiring manual that came with the elevator control boards, for detailed information on
wiring these boards to the PC programmable telephone entry system.
TERMINAL
DESCRIPTION
1
DATA 1 – to elevator control board terminal 20.
2
DATA 0 – to elevator control board terminal 21.
3
COMMON – to elevator control board terminal 22.
2.2.4 RS-232 Terminals
The PC programmable telephone entry system may be programmed using the RS-232 serial
communication terminal. This terminal allows a direct connection to a computer using a standard DB9 serial connector on one end, and loose wires on the other that connect to the RS-232 terminals on
the board. You can order a 6-foot cable from DoorKing (P/N 1818-040), or make your own using the
wiring scheme shown below. A cross reference is also provided for a DB-25 connector.
RED
BLACK
WHITE
BROWN
GREEN
SHIELD
P/N 1818-040
5
9
1
6
1
2
3
4
5
6
BOARD
DB-9
DB-25
TERMINALS
PINS
PINS
1
3
2
Transmit Data
2
2
3
Receive Data
3
7
4
Request to Send
4
8
5
Clear to Send
5
5
7
Signal Ground - Shell
6
FUNCTION
Not Used
23
2.3 RELAY WIRING (TYPICAL)
2.3.1 Controlling a Single Door or Gate
Relay 2
Relay 1 COM
Relay 1 NC
Relay 1 NO
Relay 0
Relay 2 COM
Relay 0 NO
Relay 0 NC
Relay 0 COM
Relay 1 is typically used when the system will control a single door or vehicular gate operator. Note
that the electric strike and magnetic lock are each powered by their own power supply. Electric
strikes are connected through the normally open (NO) contact and magnetic locks are connected
through the normally closed (NC) contact.
13
14
15
16
17
Gate Operator
OR
Electric Strike
OR
Magnetic Lock
24
2.3.2 Controlling a Gate Operator and Pedestrian Gate (or Door)
Relay 2
Relay 1 COM
Relay 1 NC
Relay 1 NO
Relay 0
Relay 2 COM
Relay 0 NO
Relay 0 NC
Relay 0 COM
When controlling a gate operator and pedestrian gate (or door), relay 1 is typically used to control the
gate operator while relay 2 is typically used to control the door or gate. Note that the electric strike
and the magnetic lock are powered from their own power supply. The relay 2 contact is set to either
normally open (NO) for electric strikes, or normally closed (NC) for magnetic locks by placing the
relay 2 contact shorting bar on either the NO or NC pins.
A variation of this diagram is for the system to control two doors or two gates.
13
14
15
16
17
Gate Operator
AND
Electric Strike
OR
Magnetic Lock
25
2.3.3 Controlling a Gate Operator and Two Pedestrian Doors (or Gates)
Relay 2
Relay 1 COM
Relay 1 NC
Relay 1 NO
Relay 0
Relay 2 COM
Relay 0 NO
Relay 0 NC
Relay 0 COM
The diagram below shows how it is possible to control a gate operator and two pedestrian doors or
gates from the system. Relay 0 is typically used to control the gate operator and relays 1 and 2 are
used to control pedestrian doors and/or gates. Note that the electric strike and the magnetic lock are
powered from their own power supply. The relay 2 contact is set to either normally open (NO) for
electric strikes, or normally closed (NC) for magnetic locks by placing the relay 2 contact shorting bar
on either the NO or NC pins.
A variation of this diagram is for the system to control three doors, or two gate operators (entry and
exit) and a door, or three gate operators.
13
14
15
16
17
Magnetic Lock
AND
Electric Strike
AND
Gate Operator
26
2.3.4 Tracker Expansion Board Control
Relay 2
Relay 1 COM
Relay 1 NC
Relay 1 NO
Relay 0
Relay 2 COM
Relay 0 NO
Relay 0 NC
Relay 0 COM
When Tracker expansion boards are used with the system to control up to 16 additional entry points,
relays 1 and 2 are designated as tracker command relays and connect to the Tracker expansion
boards. In this diagram, relay 0 is used to control the gate operator and relays 1 and 2 are connected
to the tracker expansion boards. The relay 2 shorting bar is set for normally open (NO) contacts.
For more information on Tracker expansion boards and wiring, refer to the Tracker Board Installation
Manual, P/N 2351-065.
13
14
15
16
17
To Tracker Boards 9-16
To Tracker Boards 1-8
Gate Operator
27
28
SECTION 3 – PROGRAMMING
IMPORTANT! Many of the advanced features available with this telephone entry system cannot be
programmed from the system keypad. These features include relay hold open time zones, security
levels, and elevator control options. If any of these features are used, the system must be
programmed with the DoorKing Remote Account Manager for Windows software, VERSION 5.0.
Refer to the software User's Manual for more information on these features.
We strongly suggest that you read these programming instructions in their entirety before beginning
any programming of this telephone entry system.
3.1 GENERAL PROGRAMMING INFORMATION
The DoorKing PC Programmable Telephone Entry System is primarily programmed by using the
DoorKing Remote Account Manager for Windows software and the user supplied PC by either RS232 connection or by modem, however it can also be programmed from the keypad on the front of the
entry system or with an IBM AT type keyboard. When programming from an off site location with a
PC, the RING pin must be installed on the circuit board.
The PC programmable telephone entry systems have three relays on the circuit board, all of which
are programmable for any function required. These relays are designated as Relay 0 (R-0), Relay 1
(R-1), and Relay 2 (R-2). If Tracker expansion boards are used with this system, it is very important
that you understand the function of these three relays. The weigand input auxiliary terminals (also
the Tracker board input terminals) can only cause R-1 or R-2 to activate. Weigand input devices
cannot cause R-0 to activate. Therefore, if Tracker expansion boards are used with this system, R-0
must be designated as the PRIMARY relay, and R-1 and R-2 are then designated as Tracker board
command (CMD) relays with R-2 controlling tracker boards 1 through 8 (system relays 3-10), and R-1
controlling tracker boards 9 through 16 (system relays 11-18). The PRIMARY relay is the relay that a
resident activates from their telephone after receiving a call from a visitor. When tracker boards or
other weigand devices are used with the system, be sure that R-0 is programmed to respond to the
tone open number (typically 9), the postal switch input, and the rotary dial 9 function.
Refer to the Remote Account Manager User's Manual for more information on Tracker board relay
numbering scheme and designations.
3.1.1 Programming with a PC
Prior to programming the system with a personal computer and the DoorKing Remote Account
Manager for Windows software, there is certain information that you must know and must program
into the system before the computer can communicate with the system. See page 24 to set-up the
telephone entry system for PC programming. Programming the system with a PC may be
accomplished either by modem or by direct connection using the RS-232 communications terminal on
the circuit board. Using the RS-232 communications terminal will require the use of a cable with a
DB-9 connector on one end (DoorKing P/N 1818-040), and the DoorKing Remote Account Manager
for Windows software VERSION 5.0.
29
3.1.2 Programming from the Keypad
Follow the programming instructions as described in each section of this manual. The system will
prompt you with short tones (beep) when programming steps have been followed correctly, and with
a long tone (beeeeeep) when the programming step is ended. The display will also assist you in
viewing the information that you are programming. It is highly recommended that you complete the
resident listing in the appendix prior to starting any programming from the keypad. This listing will
provide you with the information needed to complete the manual programming sequence.
B
in the programming steps indicates numbers that you will need to enter, one number
This symbol
per symbol. When programming from the keypad, after each programming step is performed
correctly, a short tone (beep) will be heard. When the programming session is ended, a long tone
(beeeeeep) will be heard.
NOTE: Relay hold open time zones, security levels, and elevator control functions cannot be
programmed from the system keypad. These functions can only be programmed from a PC
using the Remote Account Manager software, version 5.0.
3.1.3 Programming with an IBM Keyboard
The 5-pin keyboard connector is located on the bottom of surface mount units, and inside the
faceplate of the flush and wall mount units.
1. Insert the 5-pin keyboard connector into the matching connector in the telephone entry
system.
2. Follow the instructions as described in each section with the following exceptions:
Use the ENTER key on the keyboard in place of the key.
Use the ESC key on the keyboard in place of the key.
Use the END key on the keyboard in place of
together input.
R
NOTE: When programming resident names from the keyboard, it is not necessary to press
the ENTER key after each letter as indicated in the programming instructions. Type the
entire name and then press the ENTER key.
NOTE: Relay hold open time zones, security levels, and elevator control functions cannot be
programmed using this programming method. These functions can only be programmed from
a PC using the Remote Account Manager software, version 5.0.
30
3.1.4 System Memory
Prior to starting the programming of the PC programmable telephone entry system, you must know
the memory capacity and the type of the EEPROM chips that are installed in the unit. This can be
determined by inspecting the small chip that has a tag listing the memory size on it. This memory
size determines the number of residents, vendors and four-digit entry code numbers that can be
stored in the system. If the memory chips are MemPLUS chips, device (card, transmitter) codes,
relay hold time zones, security levels, and elevator control functions can be entered into the system
memory. MemPLUS chips are identified by the letters “MP” printed on the tag on the small chip. If
the tag does not indicate MP, the chips are standard chips and the system will not have advanced
feature capabilities. The table below list the valid numbers available with each memory level.
Standard Chip
500
MP
500
MemPLUS Chip
System
Memory
Phone Number
Capacity
Name
Capacity
Entry Code
Capacity
Device Code
Capacity
25
25
25
25
625
75
75
75
75
1875
125
125
125
125
3125
250
250
250
250
6250
500
500
500
500
8000
1000
1000
1000
1000
8000
2000
2000
2000
2000
8000
3000
3000
3000
3000
8000
IMPORTANT!! MemPLUS (MP) chips must be installed in this system if device (card,
transmitter, PIN) codes, tracker expansion boards, or elevator control boards are used with
the system. Relay hold open time zones, security levels, and elevator control functions
require MemPLUS chips. None of these features are available if standard (non-MP) chips are
used.
31
3.2 PROGRAMMING WITH A PC
Prior to programming the PC Programmable Telephone Entry System with the DoorKing Remote
Account Manager for Windows software and the user supplied PC, the system must have the
MASTER CODE programmed into it, and must be programmed to operate in the SINGLE or
MULTIPLE system format. These programming functions cannot be set with the PC and must be
programmed from the system keypad.
This telephone entry system has a programming function that is used in special circumstances when
interfaced with a DoorKing 1816 Telephone Intercom System. This CALL UP feature provides
special programming that will allow the system to call the phone number of a CO line connected to
the 1816 system. Once the 1816 answers the call, the system will automatically send out DTMF
tones that will activate the CALL UP feature in the 1816 system, and then send the four digit directory
code to the resident selected by the visitor. This allows visitors to contact tenants in the building that
do not have CO phone service through the telephone entry system. This feature IS NOT
programmable from the software and must be turned ON or OFF at the system keypad (3.2.3).
3.2.1 Master Code
This programming step sets the system MASTER CODE. The master code is the four-digit number
required to gain access to the system memory. You need to know the master code prior to
programming the system with the PC, or to perform any of the programming functions on the
following pages.
NOTE: The master code cannot be programmed from an off-site location. The master code
can only be programmed from the system keypad.
Factory setting = 9999
1. Open the cabinet of the telephone entry system and turn the master code switch (the
small toggle switch) on.
2. Enter a four-digit master code
then press (beep).
3. Turn the master code switch off and close the cabinet.
BBBB
3.2.2 Single or Multiple Systems
This program sequence sets the telephone entry system to operate as a single unit on the phone line,
or to share the phone line with other units. If multiple systems are sharing the same phone line, then
each one must be set as a "multiple system" and each must have a unique master code.
Factory setting = Single System.
1. Press
2. Enter
3. Press
and then enter the four-digit MASTER CODE BBBB (beep).
(beep) for a single system or (beep) for multiple systems.
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
32
3.2.3 Programming for Call-up Operation
This feature is only used when the telephone entry system is interfaced with a DoorKing 1816
Telephone Intercom system under certain special applications. The factory setting for this feature is
OFF. Do not change this feature to ON. Refer to the 1816 Installation Manual, and check with your
DoorKing representative on the special applications that this feature is used for.
Factory Setting = OFF
1.
2.
3.
Press
Enter
Enter
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE BBBB (beep).
(beep) to turn the call up feature OFF.
(beep) to turn call up ON.
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
3.2.4 PC Programming Table
The information in the chart will be required when you program the PC programmable telephone entry
system from your PC. The chart is provided for you to record the information that has been
programmed in the preceding steps.
Control Board
Series
40E
(enhanced)
Master Code
Memory Size
Memory Chip
Single / Multiple
(enter number)
(circle one)
(circle one)
(circle one)
25 75 125 250
500 1000 2000
3000
MemPLUS
SINGLE
STANDARD
MULTIPLE
STOP!!
If the telephone entry system is to be programmed from a PC, no other programming is required at
the system itself. Complete the chart in section 3.2.4 as this information will be required when
programming the unit from your computer. Refer to the Remote Account Manager for Windows
software manual for additional programming information. Continue with the remaining sections in this
chapter if the telephone entry system will be programmed by any other method. If the factory setting
matches your need, there is no reason to reprogram that section.
Remember that relay hold open time zones, security levels, and elevator control functions can only be
programmed from the Remote Account Manager software. If any of these features are being used,
do not proceed with any other programming steps in this manual.
33
3.3 GENERAL PROGRAMMING
Proceed with the programming steps on the following pages only if PC programming will not be used.
3.3.1 Relay Strike Time
These steps will program Relay 0, Relay 1 and Relay 2 strike times. Strike times can be programmed
from 1/4 second (enter 00 in step 4) up to 99 seconds by entering the desired time in seconds. If
Tracker expansion boards are going to be used with this system, set Relay 2 strike time to 00 for
Tracker boards 1-8. If more than 8 Tracker boards are being used, set Relay 1 strike time to 00 (for
Tracker boards 9-16) and then set Relay 0 strike time for the desired time in seconds. In this
application, Relay 0 becomes the PRIMARY relay that will open the door or gate after the tenant
presses 9 on their telephone.
Factory setting for relay strike times are: Relay 0 = 99, Relay 1 = 01, Relay 2 = 01.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Press
Press
to set relay 0, or
to set relay 1, or
to set relay 2 strike time.
Enter the two-digit strike time
(00-99) then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to set other relay strike times.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BB
3.3.2 Talk Time
This programming sequence sets the maximum time allowed for conversation when the entry system
places a call to the resident. The talk time can be set from 1 second up to 255 seconds (4 minutes,
15 seconds) and is entered as a three-digit number. For example, to set a talk time of 20 seconds,
enter 020 in step 3. The talk time set here does not affect the telephone numbers that are
programmed under directory codes 0, 00, 000, 0000 and 1, 01, 001, 0001. The talk time for these
two directory codes are factory set to the maximum. Phone numbers programmed under these
directory codes should be reserved for management or emergency phone numbers that generally
require longer conversations.
Factory setting for talk time = 60 seconds.
BBBB
1. Press
and enter the four digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
2. Enter three digits for talk time (seconds)
(001-255) then press
3. Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BBB
34
(beep).
3.3.3 Tone Open Numbers
These steps will program the tone open numbers for relays 0, 1 and 2. You will need to enter a fourdigit number (see chart below) to set the relay functions. If a function is not desired, enter # in place
of a number. For example, if you want the relay to have a momentary activation function only, and
in step 4. Do not
you want the relay to activate when the number 9 is pressed, enter
duplicate tone open numbers, i.e., don’t set relay 0, 1, and 2 tone-open numbers all to 9. If Tracker
expansion boards are connected to the system, there is no need to set a momentary open tone open
number for the tracker control relay(s). However, you may want to set HOLD and DEACTIVATE tone
numbers, which will allow management to have a function to automatically unlock all doors/gates
controlled by a Tracker board (refer to 5.3.1).
Factory setting is: Relay 0 = ####, Relay 1 = 9876, Relay 2 = 5432.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Press
to set relay 0 or
to set relay 1 or
to set relay 2 tone numbers.
Enter the four-digit tone open number code
then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to set the other relays tone open numbers.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BBBB
DIGIT
FUNCTION
1
Momentary activation. Relay will activate for the programmed strike time (3.3.1).
2
Relay hold. Relay will activate and remain activated until commanded to release.
3
Relay release. Deactivates the relay hold command.
4
Relay hold 1-hour. Relay will activate for 1-hour and then will automatically deactivate itself.
3.3.4 Postal Switch
This programming sequence sets that relay(s) will activate when the postal switch input is activated
on the telephone entry system. The system can be programmed so that only one relay will activate,
or any combination of relays will activate. HINT: The relay that you designate as the primary relay
should be programmed to activate from the postal switch input. To cause a relay to activate, enter a
1 in it's respective character slot, or enter a zero to not activate the relay. Any combination of 1's or
0's is permissible. For example, entering 010 in step 3 will cause only relay 1 to activate. Entering
101 will cause both relay 0 and relay 2 to activate.
Factory setting = 010.
1.
2.
3.
BBBB
BBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the three-digit (1's or 0's only) postal relay code
then press
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
35
(beep).
3.3.5 Touch-tone / Rotary-dial
This programming sequence will set the telephone entry system to dial out in either a touch-tone or
rotary format. Generally, this will be set for touch-tone.
Factory setting = touch-tone.
1.
2.
3.
Press
Enter
Press
and enter the four digit MASTER CODE BBBB (beep).
(beep) for touch-tone or enter (beep) for rotary.
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
3.3.6 Rotary-dial 9
This programming sequence sets which relay(s) will activate when the system receives a rotary-dial 9
open command from a residents rotary telephone. The system can be programmed so that only one
relay will activate, or any combination of relays will activate. HINT: The relay that you designate as
the primary relay should be programmed to activate from a rotary 9 command. To cause a relay to
activate, enter a 1 in it's respective character slot, or enter a 0 to not activate the relay. Any
combination of 1's or 0's is permissible. For example, entering 010 in step 3 will cause only relay 0 to
activate. Entering 101 will cause both relay 0 and relay 2 to activate.
Factory setting = 010.
1.
2.
3.
BBBB
BBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the three-digit (1's or 0's only) rotary 9 code
then press (beep).
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
36
3.4 PROGRAMMING LETTERS, NUMBERS and MESSAGES
These programming steps apply only to the 1815 and 1817 systems. The keypad on the 1815 and
1817 systems have all the letters of the alphabet, the numbers 0 through 9, and a space key printed
on it. This allows the keypad to be used to program all names and numbers into the systems
electronic directory.
NOTE: Names should not be programmed from a remote location using a touch-tone telephone.
3.4.1 Programming Letters and Numbers
When entering names into the electronic directory using the system keypad or a touch-tone
telephone, pressing the key once will display the first letter listed on the button, pressing twice will
display the second letter, pressing it a third time will display the third letter, and pressing it a fourth
time will display the number (or fourth letter).
Example using the number 6 key:
MNO
Press one time to display the letter M
Press two times to display the letter N
Press three times to display the letter O
Press four times to display the number 6
6
The chart below provides the sequence required to enter each letter and number from the keypad into
the system memory. A sequence is also provided to add a space, clear the display if a mistake is
made, and a sequence to skip a name if there is a desire not to provide a name with a phone number.
To Display
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
Press
To Display
Press
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
37
To Display
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
SPACE
CLEAR
SKIP NAME
Press
3.4.2 Programming the User Message – 1815 Systems
The user message, followed by the instruction message, scrolls across the screen from right to left
when the system is not in use. Both the user and instruction message can be programmed to display
your own message. The user message can be a maximum of 48 characters (spaces count as a
character) and is entered into the system memory in three blocks. The first two blocks contain 20
characters while the third block contains 8 characters. The example below shows how the sample
message was divided into three blocks. Use the blank matrix to organize your own message. Only
upper case letters, numbers and spaces can be programmed from the system keypad.
Factory Default User Message = This Space is For Your User Programmable Message
NOTE: The factory default message was programmed from a PC, therefore upper and lower case
letters are displayed.
Exam ple
THANK YOU FOR VISITING OAKWOOD CONDOMINIUMS
1
2
3
A
Block 1
T
H
Block 2
N
G
Block 3
U
M
S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
N
K
Y
O
U
O
A
K
W
O
O
D
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
F
O
R
C
12
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
V
I
S
I
T
I
O
N
D
O
M
I
N
I
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
After organizing the user message in the matrix above, follow the instructions below to enter the
message into the system. After each desired letter, number or space is displayed on the directory,
remember to press
to enter that character. Spaces count as a character and must be entered into
memory as a character. After a complete block has been entered, press
to enter the block, then
start the next block.
BBBB (beep). The screen will
Enter the characters into block 1. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
After the last character in block 1 has been entered, press (beep) to enter the entire
block. The screen will display: BLOCK 2.
Enter the characters into block 2. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
After the last character in block 2 has been entered, press (beep) to enter the entire
block. The screen will display: BLOCK 3.
Enter the characters into block 3. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
After the last character in block 3 has been entered, press (beep) to enter the entire
block.
Press to enter all three blocks into the system memory.
Press together to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
1. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
display: BLOCK 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10. The new user message will begin to scroll across the screen.
38
3.4.3 Programming the Instruction Message – 1815 Systems
The instruction message scrolls across the screen from right to left when the system is not in use and
follows the user message programmed in 3.4.2. The instruction message can be a maximum of 52
characters (spaces count as a character) and is entered into the system memory in three blocks. The
first two blocks contain 20 characters while the third block contains 12 characters. The example
below shows how the sample instruction message was divided into three blocks and programmed
into the system. Use the blank matrix to organize your own message. Only upper case letters,
numbers and spaces can be programmed from the system keypad.
Factory Default Instruction Message: Push A-Z To Find Name Or No. Enter Code Or Push Call
NOTE: The factory default instruction message was programmed from a PC, therefore upper and
lower case letters, dashes (-) and periods (.) are allowed.
Exam ple
PUSH A OR Z BUTTON TO FIND NAME ENTER CODE OR PUSH CALL
1
2
3
4
Block 1
P
Block 2
N
Block 3
U
S
H
A
A
M
E
E
N
U
S
H
C
A
L
L
1
2
3
5
6
7
8
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
O
R
T
E
R
9
10
11
12
13
14
T
O
C
O
D
E
12
13
14
15
Z
11
15
16
F
16
17
18
19
D
I
N
O
R
17
18
20
P
19
20
Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
After organizing the instruction message in the matrix above, follow the instructions below to enter the
message into the system. After each desired letter, number or space is displayed on the directory,
remember to press
to enter that character. Spaces count as a character and must be entered into
memory as a character. After a complete block has been entered, press
to enter the block, then
start the next block.
BBBB (beep). The screen will
Enter the characters into block 1. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
After the last character in block 1 has been entered, press (beep) to enter the entire
block. The screen will display: BLOCK 2.
Enter the characters into block 2. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
After the last character in block 2 has been entered, press (beep) to enter the entire
block. The screen will display: BLOCK 3.
Enter the characters into block 3. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
After the last character in block 3 has been entered, press (beep) to enter the entire
block.
Press to enter all three blocks into the system memory.
Press together to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
1. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
display: BLOCK 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10. The new user message will begin to scroll across the screen
39
3.4.4 Programming the User Message – 1817 Systems
The user message is displayed on the top screen of the 1817. This message can be a maximum of
80 characters (spaces count as a character) and is entered into the system memory in four blocks.
The example below shows how the sample message was divided into four blocks and centered on
the screen. Use the blank matrix to organize your own message. Only upper case letters, numbers
and spaces can be programmed from the system keypad.
Factory Default User Message: This Space is For Your User Programmable Message
NOTE: The factory default message was programmed from a PC, therefore upper and lower case
letters are allowed.
Exam ple
WELCOME TO THE OAKWOOD CONDOMINIUMS PLEASE DRIVE CAREFULLY
1
2
3
O
A
K
Block 1
Block 2
4
5
3
8
9
10
O
M
E
C
O
11
12
13
14
T
O
N
D
O
M
D
R
I
E
L
C
W
O
O
D
P
L
E
A
S
E
C
A
R
E
F
U
L
L
Y
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Block 4
2
7
W
Block 3
1
6
4
5
15
16
17
18
19
20
T
H
E
I
N
I
U
M
S
V
E
15
16
17
18
19
20
Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
Block 4
After organizing the user message in the matrix above, follow the instructions below to enter the
message into the system. After each desired letter, number or space is displayed on the directory,
remember to press
to enter that character. Spaces count as a character and must be entered into
memory as a character. After a complete block has been entered, press
to enter the block, then
start the next block.
BBBB
1. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep). The screen will
display: BLOCK 1.
2. Enter the characters into block 1. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
3. After the last character in block 1 has been entered, press
(beep) to enter the block.
The screen will display: BLOCK 2.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter characters into block 2. The screen will display: BLOCK 3.
5. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter characters into block 3. The screen will display: BLOCK 4.
6. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter characters into block 4.
7. After all four blocks are entered, press to enter them into the system memory.
8. Press
together to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
40
3.4.5 Programming the Instruction Message – 1817 Systems
The instruction message is displayed on the bottom screen of the 1817. This message can be a
maximum of 80 characters (spaces count as a character) and is entered into the system memory in
four blocks. The example below shows how the sample instruction message was divided into four
blocks and centered on the screen. Use the blank matrix to organize your own message. Only upper
case letters, numbers and spaces can be programmed from the system keypad.
Factory Default Instruction Message: Use A-Z to Find Name Or Number - Enter Code On
Keypad - Busy Press Any Key - Try Again.
NOTE: The factory default instruction message was programmed from a PC, therefore upper and
lower case letters, dashes (-) and periods (.) are allowed.
M essage
USE A Z TO FIND NAME OR NUMBER ENTER CODE ON KEYPAD BUSY PRESS ANY KEY TRY AGAIN
1
2
3
E
4
5
6
7
A
8
9
10
T
O
12
13
14
F
I
15
16
17
18
19
20
Block 1
U
S
N
D
N
A
M
E
Block 2
O
R
N
U
M
B
E
R
E
N
T
E
R
C
O
D
E
Block 3
O
N
K
E
Y
P
A
D
B
U
S
Y
P
R
E
S
S
Block 4
A
N
Y
K
E
Y
A
G
A
I
N
1
2
3
5
6
7
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
4
Z
11
8
T
R
Y
9
10
11
12
Block 1
Block 2
Block 3
Block 4
After organizing the instruction message in the matrix above, follow the instructions below to enter the
message into the system. After each desired letter, number or space is displayed on the directory,
remember to press
to enter that character. Spaces count as a character and must be entered into
memory as a character. After a complete block has been entered, press
to enter the block, then
start the next block.
BBBB (beep). The screen will
Enter the characters into block 1. Remember to press (beep) after each character.
After the last character in block 1 has been entered, press (beep) to enter the block.
1. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
display: BLOCK 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The screen will display: BLOCK 2.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter characters into block 2. The screen will display: BLOCK 3.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter characters into block 3. The screen will display: BLOCK 4.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter characters into block 4.
After all four blocks are entered, press to enter them into the system memory.
Press
together to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
41
3.5 Programming Phone Numbers and Names
Before beginning manual programming of this telephone entry system from the keypad, it is strongly
recommended that the resident log sheets in the back of this manual be competed in their entirety.
This will make programming easier and can be used as a reference when entering phone numbers,
names, entry codes and device numbers.
This section of the manual will instruct you on how to enter phone numbers and names into the
system memory from the keypad on the telephone entry system. Prior to entering any information,
you will set the directory code digits to the desired length. Changing the directory code length after
programming is complete will delete all programmed phone numbers, area codes, and names and will
require you to re-enter this information.
If you are in an area that requires 10 digit dialing, you will need to program the area code(s) required
as described in 3.5.3, and then program the resident phone numbers as described in 3.5.4. If 10-digit
dialing is not required, simply enter the 7-digit phone number as described in 3.5.2.
1815 - 1817 systems only. When you are entering names into the electronic directory, remember to
press
after each desired letter, number, or space is displayed on the LCD. When the entire name
is displayed on the directory, press
again to enter the entire name into the directory. If you make a
mistake, simply press
to clear the display and start over. Names cannot be more than 15
characters in length - spaces count as a character.
The example below shows the keypad sequence to enter JONES APT 1 into the directory.
To Enter: JONES APT 1
J
O
N
E
S
A
P
T
1
Press the 5 key one time to display J, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 6 key three times to display O, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 6 key twice to display N, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 3 key three times to display E, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 7 key four times to display S, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 1 key one time for a space, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 2 key twice to display A, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 7 key once to display P, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 8 key one time to display T, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 1 key one time for a space, then press the * key to enter.
Press the 1 key twice to display 1, then press the * key to enter.
Press the * key to enter the entire name.
42
3.5.1 Programming the Directory Code Length
This programming sequence sets the directory code length to 1 - 2 - 3 or 4 digits. If 11 or more
resident names or telephone numbers are going to be programmed into the system, the directory
code must be at least two-digits. If 101 or more resident names or telephone numbers are going to
be programmed, the directory code must be at least three-digits. If 1001 or more resident names or
telephone numbers are going to be programmed, the directory code must be set to four-digits.
Factory setting is three (3) digits.
CAUTION: This programming sequence will delete all phone numbers and directory codes
that have been previously programmed into the system.
BBBB
1. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep). The display shows
9999*.
2. This step is designed to be a check for what you are about to do. Basically, the system is
asking you: "Are you sure you want to do this?" If you want to proceed, enter
(beep) then proceed to step 3. To cancel the command, press
together (beeeeeep).
3. Enter the directory code digit length (1-2-3-4)
then press
(beep). This programming
sequence will automatically end itself. This will be indicated by a long tone (beeeeeep).
B
3.5.2 Programming 7-digit Phone Numbers
In this programming sequence, the directory codes and 7-digit phone numbers will be programmed
into the system. Be sure you have programmed the directory code length that you desire as
described in 3.5.1. Changing the directory code length after programming the telephone
numbers will erase all the numbers and directory codes that have been programmed. To
program phone numbers that will be referenced to an area code (long distance calls and 10 digit
calling), follow the instructions under Long Distance Phone Number Programming on the next page.
If you use directory codes 0, 00, 000, 0000 and/or 1, 01, 001, 0001 remember that the talk time for
these directory codes are factory set to the maximum and cannot be changed. Use these directory
codes to program management or emergency phone numbers, which generally require longer
conversation periods.
NOTE: If this telephone entry system is being used in an area that requires 10 digit dialing,
proceed to 3.5.3 and 3.5.4 to program the area code and phone number.
BBBB
1. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep). The display will
show CO.
2. Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in 3.5.1)
The display will show PHONE#.
BBBBBBB
3. Enter the seven-digit phone number
then press
(beep). If the number
that you are entering in this step is less than seven-digits, enter # in the empty spaces.
For example, if the system is connected to a PBX that requires four-digit extension
numbers and you want to enter extension 2217, you would enter this number as
then press (beep).
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter additional directory codes and phone numbers.
5. Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
43
3.5.3 Programming Area Codes
Up to 10 different area codes can be programmed for any 10-digit or long distance calling
requirements and will be referenced 0 through 9 (for a total of 10). The area codes will be entered as
a four-digit number (1 + the three digit area code). If area codes are being programmed to facilitate
10-digit calling requirements, precede the three-digit area code with #.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
B
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the area code reference number (0 through 9) then press
(beep).
Enter the area code
then press
(beep). NOTE-1: for long distance calling
requirements, enter 1 and the three-digit area code. NOTE-2: for 10-digit calling
requirements, enter # and the three-digit area code.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter additional area codes. Remember to use a different
area code reference number when entering more area codes.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BBBB
3.5.4 Programming Phone Numbers with Area Code Reference
In this section, phone numbers that are referenced to an area code (long distance and 10-digit dialing
calls) will be programmed. Be sure that the area code(s) have been programmed as described in the
preceding section.
NOTE: If long distance or 10-digit dialing is not required, program the seven digit telephone
numbers as described in 3.5.2.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep). The display
will show CO.
Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in
3.5.1) then press (beep). The display will show PHONE#.
Enter the area code reference number then press (beep).
Enter the seven-digit phone number
then press
(beep). If the
number that you are entering in this step is less than seven-digits, enter # in the
empty spaces. See 3.5.2, step 3.
Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 to enter additional long distance phone numbers.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
B
BBBBBBB
44
3.5.5 Programming Names (1815, 1817 Systems Only)
In this section, names will be programmed into the system. Names are referenced to a phone
number by entering the directory code that the persons phone number has been programmed to.
1.
2.
3.
4.
BBBB
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Press
Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in
3.5.1) then press (beep).
Begin entering the residents name one character at a time as described on page 30.
When the desired character (letter, number or space) is displayed, press
to enter
that character.
Repeat step 4 to enter additional characters until the desired name is displayed in the
directory. NOTE 1: 15 characters maximum. NOTE 2: If you make a mistake in steps
4 or 5, press to clear the display and start over.
After the last character has been entered, press
(beep) to enter the complete
name. The display will be blank.
Repeat steps 2, 3, 4, and 5 to enter additional names.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
5.
6.
7.
3.5.6 Deleting Individual Phone Numbers
This programming sequence is used to delete a single phone number under a known directory code.
Proceed to 3.5.7 to delete the resident name.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in
3.5.1) then press (beep).
Press
then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to delete additional phone numbers.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
3.5.7 Delete Names (1815, 1817 Systems Only)
This programming sequence is used to delete a resident name from the directory. These steps will
not erase the resident telephone number from the system. Go to section 3.5.6 to delete the resident
telephone number.
1.
2.
3.
4.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Use the A and Z buttons to locate the name that is to be erased, then press
(beep).
Repeat step 2 to erase additional names.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
45
3.5.8 Delete Area Codes
This program sequence deletes area code numbers that have been programmed into the system.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
B
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the area code reference number (0 through 9) then press (beep).
Enter
then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to delete additional area codes.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
3.5.9 Display Phone Numbers (1815, 1817 Systems Only)
Use this programming sequence to display phone numbers programmed under known directory
codes, i.e. if you wanted to see what phone number was programmed under directory code 271. This
programming sequence will not allow you to delete phone numbers.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in
3.5.1) then press (beep).
The phone number programmed under the directory code entered in step 3 will be
displayed on the LCD. If C C C C C C C is displayed, this indicates that no phone
number has been programmed under the entered directory code. If the first digit is
flashing, this is the area code reference code and indicates that the number
displayed is a long distance or 10-digit number.
To display additional phone numbers press and repeat step 2.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
46
3.6 PROGRAMMING DEVICE CODES
The PC programmable telephone entry system must be equipped with a MemPLUS chip to program
device codes into its memory. Device codes must be five (5) digits in length and are typically card
and transmitter codes. Each device code that you enter is assigned to the directory code that you
select. Up to 25 device numbers can be entered under a single directory code, up to a maximum of
8,000 for the system. You cannot duplicate device codes.
3.6.1 Programming Device Codes
This program sequence enters device (card, transmitter, digital) codes into the system memory.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the directory code that the device code is to be assigned to (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits
depending on what was programmed in 3.5.1) then press (beep).
Enter the five-digit device code
then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter additional device codes.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BBBBB
3.6.2 Deleting Device Codes
This program sequence deletes individual device codes.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in
3.5.1) then press (beep).
Enter the five-digit device code
then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to delete additional device codes.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BBBBB
47
3.7 FOUR-DIGIT ENTRYT CODES
Four-digit entry codes are entered on the system keypad preceded by # to allow the resident access.
Do not confuse four-digit entry codes with a five-digit device code entered from a weigand keypad.
3.7.1 Programming Four-digit Entry Codes
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in
3.5.1) then press (beep).
Enter the four-digit entry code
then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter additional entry codes.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BBBB
3.7.2 Delete Four-digit Entry Codes
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Enter the directory code (1, 2, 3 or 4 digits depending on what was programmed in
3.5.1) then press (beep).
Press
(beep).
Repeat steps 2 and 3 to delete more entry codes.
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
3.7.3 Entry Code Ranges
Four-digit entry codes can be made to activate relay 0, relay 1, or relay 2 or any combination of relays
by programming HI and LOW ranges for each relay. Ranges may overlap, which will cause more
than one relay to activate if this is desired. For example, if the low boundary for relay 0 and relay 1 is
2000, and the hi boundary is 3000 for relay 0 and 4000 for relay 1, then entry codes between 2000
and 3000 will activate both relays, and entry codes between 3001 and 4000 will only activate relay 1.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
Press
to set relay 0, or
to set relay 1, or
to set relay 2 boundaries.
Enter the four-digit low boundary
then press (beep).
Enter the four-digit high boundary
then press (beep).
Repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 to set the other relay boundaries (or proceed to step 7).
Press
TOGETHER to end this programming step (beeeeeep).
BBBB
BBBB
48
SECTION 4 – ADJUSTMENTS
4.1
Speaker Volume
1. Open the front of the telephone entry system and locate the speaker volume adjustment.
2. Place a phone call from the telephone entry system to a resident. While they are talking,
adjust the speaker volume potentiometer for adequate sound. To increase the volume
rotate the potentiometer clockwise, to decrease the volume rotate the potentiometer
counter clockwise.
4.2
Feedback
1. Open the front of the telephone entry system and locate the feedback adjustment.
2. Place a phone call from the telephone entry system to a resident. After they answer, ask
the resident to remain silent.
3. While rubbing your finger across the microphone hole, rotate the feedback potentiometer
clockwise, and then counter clockwise. When the noise from the speaker is minimum,
this is the correct adjustment for the feedback potentiometer.
4.3
Click Sensitivity
1. Open the front of the telephone entry system and locate the click sensitivity adjustment.
2. Place a phone call from the telephone entry system to a resident with a rotary dial type
phone. After they answer, ask the resident to dial 9 while you adjust the click sensitivity
potentiometer (the resident may have to dial 9 several times for you to obtain the correct
adjustment). When the door or gate opens, this is the correct adjustment for the click
sensitivity.
3. NOTE: Adjusting the click sensitivity too high (potentiometer fully clockwise) could cause
the system to respond to loud noises while it is in use. If this happens, rotate the click
sensitivity potentiometer counter clockwise 1/8 turn and re-test the system. You may
have to perform this step several times to find the correct adjustment.
4.4
Display Contrast (1815 Only)
1. Open the front of the telephone entry system and locate the contrast adjustment.
2. Turn the contrast potentiometer clockwise and then counter clockwise until the display is
satisfactory.
4.5
Display Contrast (1817 Only)
1. There are two contrast potentiometers on the 1817 LCD control board labeled
CONTRAST. The left one will adjust the contrast on the lower screen and the right one
will adjust the contrast on the upper screen. These adjustments are normally set at the
factory. Let the system run for 10 minutes before making any display contrast
adjustments.
49
4.6
Back-light Cutoff (1817 Only)
1. The back-light cutoff potentiometer is located on the LCD control board in the 1817
system only. This adjustment is not available in the 1815 system. This potentiometer
adjusts the intensity of the back lighted LCD panels and is normally factory set. To
increase the back-light, turn the potentiometer clockwise. To decrease the back-light,
turn the potentiometer counter clockwise.
4.7
Master Code Switch
1. The master code switch is left in the off position for normal operation. Turn the master
code switch on when setting the system master code. See programming instructions to
set the system master code. If the master code switch is turned on and a new master
code is not entered, the system will sound a long tone after approximately 30 seconds.
This tone will continue every 30 seconds until a new master code is entered, or until the
switch is turned off.
4.8
Ring Pin
1. The ring pin is labeled RING on the control board. This shorting pin must be installed to
allow the system to answer any calls placed to it. If remote programming or remote relay
operation is to be used, the shorting pin must be installed. Removing the shorting pin will
cause the system to never answer any call placed to it.
4.9
Relay 2 Contact Pin
1. This shorting pin sets the contacts on relay number two to be set to either Normally Open
(NO) or Normally Closed (NC). The pin is set to NO from the factory.
4.10
Auto – 1816 Pin
1. This shorting pin sets the system to operate as a stand-alone unit (AUTO), or to interface
with the 1816 Telephone Intercom System. The pin is set to AUTO from the factory.
4.11
HF – HS Pin
1. This shorting pin is located in the lower left hand corner of the circuit board. For Hands
Free (HF) operation, the shorting pin is placed on the HF pins. For a system with a Hand
Set (HS), the shorting pin is placed on the HS pins. The pin is set to HF from the
factory.
4.12
Security Level Pin
1. When the SEC LEVEL pin is in place, the circuit board has full feature capability. This
includes relay hold times, security levels, and elevator control functions. When the SEC
LEVEL pin is removed, the circuit board will act the same as a REV C board.
50
1815 Adjustment Locations
SEC LEVEL
CONTRAST
VOLUME
AUTO
FEEDBACK
RING PIN
HF
HS
1816
CLICK SENS
MASTER
CODE
RLY 2
51
1817 Adjustment Locations
SEC LEVEL
BACK LIGHT
CONTRAST
LOWER
CONTRAST
UPPER
VOLUME
AUTO
FEEDBACK
RING PIN
HF
HS
1816
CLICK SENS
MASTER
CODE
RLY 2
52
SECTION 5 – OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
5.1
Guest Instructions
Instructions on the telephone entry systems guide guest on the usage of the system and how to
locate and call the resident that they wish to visit. The 1815 and 1817 systems utilize A and Z scroll
buttons that a guest will use to locate the resident that they are wishing to visit. Pushing the A button
will cause the resident directory to scroll up while pushing the Z button causes the resident directory
to scroll down. Holding these buttons down will cause the system to scroll or page through the
resident directory rapidly. Resident names are listed in the directory alphabetically.
Although the systems are similar in the way that they operate, they differ in the way that the resident
information is presented to the guest. The 1815 electronic directory displays resident names (or
apartment numbers) and their respective directory code on a single line while the 1817 system
displays a page of eight resident names at a time. The 1803PC system relies on a separate directory
to provide guest with resident directory information.
1. If the guest knows the residents directory code, they can simply enter it on the system
keypad to place a call.
2. If the guest does not know the residents directory code, they must check the directory
and find the code assigned to the person they wish to visit.
1803PC Systems - Guest must check the separate directory listing to locate the person
they wish to visit to find their assigned directory code.
1815 Systems - Guest can use the A and Z buttons to locate the name in the directory.
Once the residents name is displayed, the guest presses the CALL button and the system
will connect to the resident’s telephone.
1817 Systems - Guest can use the A and Z buttons to locate the name in the directory.
Once the residents name is displayed, the guest simply enters the directory code next to
the residents name on the system keypad and the 1817 will connect to the resident’s
telephone.
If the residents line is busy, the system will emit a busy signal. If this happens, the guest can press
the # key or the CALL button to hang up and then try again. Residents can avoid missing calls (and
guest) from the telephone entry system by ordering call waiting from the local telephone company.
DTMF Tones – The telephone entry system can output DTMF tones from the keypad AFTER a call
has been answered. (This capability is only available on certain circuit boards. See page 8).
•
If the # key is pressed by itself – the system will hang-up.
Example:
•
If any key is pressed prior to the # key, then all keys pressed will emit DTMF tones.
Example:
•
= hang-up.
= DTMF tomes for all buttons including the # key.
If there is more than a 2-second delay between numbers and the # key, then the # key will
hang-up the system.
Example:
- - - - = hang-up.
53
5.2 RESIDENT INSTRUCTIONS
Resident control of the door or gate that the telephone entry system controls is limited to opening the
door or gate in response to a call from a guest, or they may open the door or gate by using their
assigned four-digit entry code. A resident instruction sheet is included in the back of this
manual and may be copied and passed out to your residents.
5.2.1 Responding to a Guest Call
When communication is established, the resident has the option of opening the door(s) or gate(s) by
pressing the programmed tone open number(s) on their touch tone telephone, or they can deny
access to their guest by pressing # on their telephone. If access is granted, the resident will hear a
confirmation tone in their handset indicating that the door or gate has opened, then the system will
automatically hang up.
Residents should be instructed by management to always press the # key on their telephone if
they wish to deny a guest access. If a resident hangs up to deny access instead of pressing #, the
telephone entry system will remain on line until its programmed talk time expires or until it detects dial
tone.
Some newer type telephones emit a short tone rather than a continuous tone when their keys are
pressed. This may cause the telephone entry system to not respond to the tone open number. If this
happens, simply press the tone open number twice in rapid succession to open the door or gate.
If a resident is using rotary dial telephone, they will grant access to their guest by dialing 9. To deny
access to their guest, residents with rotary phones must simply hang up.
5.2.2 Using an Entry Code
Four-digit entry codes provide a means for a resident to gain access by entering their assigned code
on the telephone entry system keypad. The four-digit entry code will operate relay 0, 1 or 2
depending on the boundaries that have been programmed into the system (3.7.3).
BBBB
1. To use entry codes, first press and then enter the four-digit entry code
.
2. The system will emit a tone (beep) and the display will show OPEN when a valid code is
entered on the keypad.
If management decides to utilize resident entry codes, residents should be instructed to keep their
unique code secret. Telling other persons their code or allowing other persons to use their code
compromises security and defeats the purpose of the system.
54
5.3 SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR
The administrator can perform the following operations from a remote location using a touch tone
telephone. You must know the phone number of the system and the system master code.
5.3.1 Opening from a Remote Location
1. Call the telephone number that the entry system is installed on. The system will answer
with a short tone (beep).
2. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
3. Press the desired tone open number
(beep). NOTE: Refer to 3.3.3 to determine
which tone open features have been programmed, i.e. momentary open, hold open,
release, hold open one hour and then release.
4. Hang up.
B
BBBB
5.3.2 Tracker Board Override Hold Open Command
The Tracker board override command is used when tracker expansion boards are connected to the
system. This command will cause ALL tracker boards connected to the telephone entry
system to open or unlock the gate or door that they are controlling, and will remain in this
state until commanded to return to normal operation. This feature is useful when management
wants to open all gates or unlock all doors - perhaps during an emergency situation as an example.
NOTE: Hold open tone numbers must be programmed for the override command to be
functional. See Section 3.3.3.
1. Call the telephone number that the entry system is installed on. The system will answer
with a short tone (beep).
2. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
3. Press the hold open tone number that was programmed in section 3.3.3 (beep).
4. Hang up.
5. To release the override hold command and return the system to normal operation, repeat
steps 1 through 4. In step 3, enter the DEACTIVATE tone number in place of the HOLD
tone number.
BBBB
55
B
5.3.3 Relay Check
The telephone entry system can be called and a check can be made to determine if any of the relays
in the system are in a "hold open" mode. This check can be useful if yourr gate (or door) is held open
and you suspect that the telephone entry system relay may be the cause.
1. Call the telephone number that the entry system is installed on. The system will answer
with a short tone (beep).
2. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE
(beep).
3. The system will emit a series of short tones if the relay is in a continuous activation mode.
Relay 1 activated:
beep - pause - beep - pause . . .
Relay 2 activated:
beep beep - pause - beep beep - pause . . .
Relay 0 activated:
beep beep beep - pause - beep beep beep - pause . . .
4. Press the programmed tone number
to deactivate the relay (beep). The system will
automatically hang up.
BBBB
B
5.3.4 Time and Date Check
This operating functions lets you check the current date, time and day of the week that the system is
currently programmed to. If the calendar chip in the system is not programmed, the system will emit
a long beeeeeep when this function is entered on the key pad. NOTE: The calendar chip can only
be set by the PC when communication is established either by modem or the RS-232 terminals.
1. Press
and enter the four-digit MASTER CODE BBBB (beep).
The display will show:
The date - Month / Day / Year
The time - Hours / Minutes / AM or PM (AM=0, PM=1)
The day of the week (1=Sunday, 7=Saturday).
This information will be displayed for approximately four-seconds, then the display
will return to normal.
56
5.4 MISCELLANEOUS OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
5.4.1 Talk Time
The talk time for directory codes 0, 00, 000, 0000 and 1, 01, 001, 0001 is factory set to 4 minutes 15
seconds and cannot be changed. These directory codes should be reserved for use with
management or emergency phone numbers that typically require longer talk times. For example, if
directory code 000 was programmed to call a management phone number, the system will allow the
full 4 minutes and 15 seconds of talk time before automatically ending the call.
5.4.2 Line Sharing
More than one telephone entry system can share the same phone line provided that the units have
been programmed for multiple systems on the same line (see 3.2.2). When the unit is programmed
for multiple systems sharing the same line, it checks the phone line for 48 volts (not busy) before
attempting to place a call. If the phone line is in use, the system will emit a busy signal. If two or
more systems are sharing the same phone line, it is important that each system be programmed with
its own unique master code. When more than one system is on the same phone line, and a call is
placed from one of the systems to a resident, only the system that placed the call will respond to any
tone open numbers. Do not be concerned that all the units will activate their relay when the resident
presses the tone open number.
5.4.3 Connection to a PBX
If the telephone entry system is going to be connected to a PBX system, you may need to program
extension numbers in place of a seven-digit telephone number. To do this, enter the extension
number and fill the remaining spaces with the # key in the phone number programming step. For
example, if the PBX system uses four-digit extensions and you want to program extension 2217 as a
phone number, in step 3, section 3.5.2 press:
3.
(beep).
If the PBX system requires you to dial 9 to obtain an outside line, and you want to program some
outside line phone numbers in the system, program the number 9 as one of the alternate area codes.
In step 3, section 3.5.3 press:
3.
(beep).
Then program the outside phone number as a long distance number (3.5.4) using the area code
reference number used to program 9.
5.4.4 Areas with 10-digit Dialing
If the telephone entry system is installed in an area where the telephone company has instituted 10
digit dialing, simply program the required number of alternate area codes into the system without
preceding the area code with the number 1. If 310 was one of the area codes required, in step 3,
section 3.5.3 press:
3.
(beep).
Then program the outside phone number as a long distance number (3.5.4) using the area code
reference number used to program 310. Program additional area codes and phone numbers as
described in sections 3.5.3 and 3.5.4.
57
58
SECTION 6 – MAINTENANCE
The DoorKing telephone entry system is essentially a maintenance free device. When the unit is
properly installed, it should provide years of trouble free service. Maintenance is limited to updating
the directory and phone number and/or entry codes when residents move in or out.
The faceplate of the unit should be cleaned on a regular basis to keep contaminants in the air from
sticking to the surface and possibly causing pitting. When cleaning the faceplate of the system, never
use an abrasive cleaner or cloth. Stainless steel cleaner works very well with a soft cloth for systems
with a stainless steel faceplate. A clean damp soft cloth should be used to clean gold plated
faceplates.
6.1 TROUBLE SHOOTING
If problems should develop with your telephone entry system, refer to the trouble-shooting guide on
the following pages to try and correct any problems. Our experience has shown that a majority of
reported problems are actually programming related and can be corrected on site. If problems persist
and they cannot be corrected, contact your authorized DoorKing dealer for assistance. Before
performing any trouble-shooting, check the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Have a good VOM meter handy to check voltages and continuity.
Have a telephone test set (DoorKing p/n 1800-050 or equivalent) to check the
telephone line. Noise on the phone line will cause problems with the entry system.
Be sure that the entry system case is properly grounded.
Be sure that the telephone wires are twisted.
A hum on the system indicates that the phone line or 16 VAC power lines may be
grounded. Check to be sure that the phone lines or power lines are not shorted to
ground.
Check the 16 VAC system power. Be sure that the transformer is properly rated (20
VA for 1803PC and 1815 systems; 40 VA for 1817 systems). Keep the wire run from
the transformer to the entry system as short as possible. Use 16 or 18 AWG, 600
volt insulated wire only. The importance of proper power wiring cannot be over
stressed!
Isolate the telephone entry system. Disconnect any external devices, such as
Tracker expansion boards, elevator control boards, RS232 connection, card readers,
RF receivers, keypads, etc. which may affect the operation of the system.
59
SYMPTON
POSSIBLE SOLUTION(S)
•
Wrong master code entered. Start over.
•
Waiting too long between pushing buttons. Enter information quicker.
•
Keypad is not plugged into board correctly. Cable points down.
•
Memory chips are installed upside down.
System emits a long
tone and cancels
programming.
•
Waiting too long between pushing buttons.
•
Forgetting to press
Keypad is dead.
•
No power. Check for 16 VAC input power.
•
Check that the keypad is properly connected to the circuit board. The cable on
the plug points down when connected to the circuit board.
•
Disconnect the phone line from the system and check it with a handset. If line
is noisy, problem is with the phone line and not the entry system.
•
Check for any shorts to ground behind the circuit board.
•
Check for pinched wires near the door hinge.
•
Check for 16-volt power shorted to ground.
•
Check for phone line shorted to ground.
•
Check that phone wires are twisted.
•
Check that the proper type of phone wire was used for an outdoor and / or
underground application.
•
Check that all wires, speaker, keypad, etc. are isolated from ground.
•
Check that the cabinet is properly grounded. Be sure that case ground
(terminal 3) is not used as a low voltage common.
Cannot get into
programming mode.
Buzz or noise on the
phone line.
first when programming.
•
Check for excessive voltage drop on 16 VAC power.
Ringing or howling
from the speaker.
•
Feedback improperly adjusted (4.2).
•
Volume is set too high (4.1).
After dial out, dial tone
is heard on the
speaker.
•
Phone line is a rotary-dial line. Have the phone company change it to a touchtone line.
Door strike locks on.
•
Excessive voltage-drop on 16 VAC line.
•
Using a transformer with too low VA rating.
•
Relay strike time programmed too long (3.3.1).
Door strike or gate
operator holds open.
•
System was given a hold open command. Call the system and press the tone
deactivate number (5.3.1).
Entry system will not
answer when called.
•
Ring pin is not installed (4.8).
•
Bad phone line or insufficient ring voltage.
Rotary dial 9 will not
activate relay.
•
Adjust click sensitivity (4.3).
Touch-tone 9 will not
activate relay.
•
Re-program tone-open number to 9 (3.3.3).
•
If resident phone emits a short pulse rather than a long tone, press 9 twice in
rapid succession
.
•
Try another phone that is known to work.
•
Lower speaker volume (4.1) and re-adjust feedback (4.2).
Relay activates but
gate operator will not
open.
•
Re-program relay strike time for a longer period (3.3.1).
•
Check wiring to gate operator.
•
Check gate operator.
Postal switch will not
activate relay.
•
Be sure that the wire-tie has been clipped off the postal switch.
•
Be sure that the relay has been programmed for postal switch input (3.3.4).
60
SYMPTON
POSSIBLE SOLUTION(S)
Four-digit entry codes
will not work.
•
Forgetting to press # first.
•
Re-program the entry code ranges (3.7.3).
Entry codes will not
activate relay 0.
•
Re-program relay 0 low and high ranges (3.7.3).
Entry codes will not
activate relay 1.
•
Re-program relay 0 low and high ranges (3.7.3).
Entry codes will not
activate relay 2.
•
Re-program relay 0 low and high ranges (3.7.3).
Security levels or
elevator control will
not function.
•
Check that the SEC LEVEL pin is in place (4.12).
System emits a beep
every 30 seconds.
•
Master code switch is in the ON position (4.7).
DTMF tones are
heard 15 seconds
after call is answered.
•
The system CALL UP feature is turned on. Re-program this feature to turn it
off (3.2.3).
LCD Display shows:
•
The memory chip size (small chip) and the main memory storage ship (large
chip) do not match in memory size. By pressing 1, the main memory storage
chip will be matched to the memory size chip. All data in the main memory
will be erased when this function is performed.
Reset Mem?
1=Y 2=N
LCD display shows:
•
Press 2 to cancel out of this function.
•
The small chip in the PC board socket is for an 1818 system and cannot be
used in the telephone entry system.
•
Adjust contrast (4.4, 4.5 and 4.6).
Need 1815(17) SM
MEMCHIP
LCD is unreadable.
6.1.1 RS-232 Test
This test procedure will check the RS-232 hardware to determine a pass or fail mode. You will need
two short pieces of wire to perform this test.
1. Open the cabinet of the telephone entry system and locate the RS-232 terminals in the
upper left hand corner of the control board.
2. Short terminal 1 to terminal 2 using the first piece of wire.
3. Short terminal 3 to terminal 4 using the second piece of wire.
4. Press
and enter the four-digit master code
(beep).
5. Press .
PASS - The display will indicate: RS232 HARDWARE PASS and a long tone will be heard
(Beeeeeep).
FAIL - The display will indicate RS232 HARDWARE FAIL and two short tones and then a
long tone will be heard (Beep - Beep - Beeeeeep).
6. Remove the jumper wires from the terminal after performing this test.
BBBB
61
6.1.2 Weigand Test (1815, 1817 Systems Only)
This programming sequence will allow you to view the weigand data on the display as it is received
by the control board. This will allow you to verify that the weigand device is functioning properly.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
BBBB
Press
and enter the four-digit master code
(beep).
Enter
(beep).
Activate one of the weigand input devices by placing a card on a card reader,
pressing a transmitter button, or entering a digital code on a weigand keypad.
If the weigand data is shown on the display, this verifies that the weigand device is
operating properly and sending the information to the entry system. If no data
appears on the display, the weigand devices are not functioning.
Press
TOGETHER to cancel the weigand test mode.
6.1.3 Elevator Board(s) Hardware Test
This programming sequence is designed for trouble shooting the elevator control board(s) that may
be connected to the telephone entry system. This sequence will take approximately four (4) minutes
to complete and will check the operation of the CALL relay, and then all the odd numbered relays,
then all the even numbered relays on the elevator control board(s). This test confirms communication
between the telephone entry system circuit board and the elevator control board(s).
BBBB
1.
2.
Press
and enter the four-digit master code
(beep).
The display will show: WHICH ELEVATOR? (1815 - 1817 systems only).
3.
Enter the elevator shaft number (1, 2, 3 or 4) then press (beep).
The display will show: ELEVATOR TEST 1 (1815 - 1817 systems only).
Once the test starts, the CALL relay (LED ON) will activate, and then ALL odd
numbered relays will activate, and then ALL even numbered relays will activate on
the 1st elevator control board. After this sequence, if more than one elevator control
board is connected, ALL odd numbered relays, and then ALL even numbered relays
will activate on the 2nd elevator control board. After this sequence, ALL odd
numbered relays, and then ALL even numbered relays will activate on the 3rd
elevator control board. After this sequence, ALL odd numbered relays, and then ALL
even numbered relays will activate on the 4th elevator control board. This sequence
will repeat itself ten (10) times.
Once the test is complete (approximately 4 minutes), this programming sequence will
automatically end itself.
4.
B
62
6.1.4 Elevator Board / Floor Hardware Test
This testing sequence will allow you to check activation of individual relays on the elevator control
board(s) and will confirm communication between the telephone entry system circuit board and the
elevator control board(s).
BBBB
1. Press
and enter the four-digit master code
(beep).
The display will show: WHICH ELEVATOR? (1815 - 1817 systems only).
2. Enter the elevator shaft number (1, 2, 3 or 4) , then press (beep).
The display will show: FLOOR? (1815 - 1817 systems only).
3. Enter the two-digit floor number
, then press (beep).
4. The relay LED on the elevator control board that represents the floor number entered will
turn ON for approximately 1 second.
5. To check other floor relays, repeat steps 2 and 3.
6. When complete with the testing, press
TOGETHER to end this testing sequence.
NOTE: This program test sequence will automatically end itself if no keypad inputs are
detected after approximately 30 seconds.
B
BB
Refer to the Elevator Control board installation manual for more information on trouble
shooting the elevator control boards.
63
6.2 ACCESSORIES
Surface Trim Ring
Flush Kit
Flush Ring
Stainless Steel Case
Surge Suppressers
Mounting Post
Telephone Test Set
Battery
Tracker Boards
RS-232 Cable
Elevator Board
Use to recess a surface mount unit into a wall or column. P/N 1803-150.
Use to install flush style units into a wall or column. Kit includes rough in
back box and trim ring. P/N 1814-165 comes with stainless steel trim
ring. P/N 1814-166 comes with gold plated trim ring.
Use to surface mount a flush style unit. P/N 1814-152.
Replaces the black steel surface mount case with a stainless steel case.
P/N 1810-102.
High voltage (115 V) suppresser. P/N 1878-076. Phone line
suppresser. P/N 1878-077. Low voltage (28 V) suppresser. P/N 1878078.
Heavy-duty goose-neck mounting post with mounting plate. P/N 1200048. Heavy-duty goose-neck mounting post with concrete base plate for
pad mounting. P/N 1200-047.
Includes clips, cord and carrying case. P/N 1800-050.
12 volt .8 amp hour gel cell provides stand by power during power
interruptions. P/N 1801-008.
Tracker expansion boards (P/N 2351-010) allow the 1815 / 1817 system
to operate up to sixteen individual doors or gates, provides door ajar and
forced entry alarms, and can activate local and building alarm systems.
Also allows DoorKing gate operators to report gate operator data and
activity to the entry system.
RS-232 cable with DB-9 connector on one end and wires on the other
end. Use this cable to program the entry system from a PC using RS232 communications instead of the modem. P/N 1818-040.
Elevator control boards (P/N 2348-010) provide control of up to four
elevators, with each elevator having a maximum of 64 floors.
64
6.3 LOG TABLES
Complete the information in the tables on the following pages to maintain a record of the information
that has been programmed into the telephone entry system if the system IS NOT being programmed
from a PC. If PC programming is being utilized, there is no reason to maintain these log sheets since
the PC will maintain a complete record of the information that has been programmed.
Make copies of the resident log sheet so that you have enough to complete a listing of all residents
and data. Enter the information as shown in the example below. AAC stands for Alternate Area
Code. Enter the alternate area code number if alternate area codes have been programmed and
assigned to this resident (3.5.3). DIR is the resident’s unique directory code and can be 1 to 4 digits
(3.5.1). Enter the resident’s four-digit entry code (3.7.1) in the ENT field if they are used. Enter the
resident’s unique device code (3.6.1) in the DEVICE field if access control devices (Transmitters,
cards, etc.) are used. Enter the SEC LEVEL (Security Level), FL (Floor), and ER (Elevator
Reference) numbers as required.
NAME
AAC
PHONE #
DIR
ENT
DEVICE
SEC LEVEL
FL
ER
Smith, John
3
765-0000
173
3812
04231
02
14
2
MASTER CODE (3.2.1)
RELAY STRIKE TIME (3.3.1)
RELAY 0
TONE OPEN NUMBERS (3.3.3)
RELAY 0
RELAY 1
RELAY 1
RELAY 2
RELAY 2
MOMENTARY ACTIVATION
CONTINUOUS ACTIVATION
RELEASE
ACTIVATE 1 HOUR
POSTAL SWITCH ACTIVATES (3.3.4)
RELAY 0
RELAY 1
ROTARY 9 ACTIVATES (3.3.6)
RELAY 2
ENTRY CODE RANGES (3.7.3)
RELAY 0
RELAY 1
RELAY 2
LOW BOUNDRY
HIGH BOUNDRY
AREA CODES (3.5.3)
1
2
3
4
5
6
65
7
8
9
0
NAME
AAC
PHONE
NUMBER
DIR
CODE
Make additional copies of this table as needed.
66
ENT
CODE
DEVICE
CODE
SEC
LEVEL
FL
ER
Resident Instruction Sheet
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