The Java API for XML Web Services (JAX-WS) 2.0

The Java API for XML Web Services
(JAX-WS) 2.0
Proposed Final Draft
October 7, 2005
Editors:
Roberto Chinnici
Marc Hadley
Rajiv Mordani
Comments to: jsr224-spec-comments@sun.com
Sun Microsystems, Inc.
4150 Network Circle
Santa Clara, CA 95054 USA
ii
JAX-WS 2.0
October 7, 2005
Specification: JSR-000224 - Java™API for XML Web Services v. 2.0 (“Specification”)
Status: Pre-FCS, Proposed Final Draft
Release: October 7, 2005
Copyright 2005 Sun Microsystems, Inc.
4150 Network Circle, Santa Clara, California 95054,
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October 7, 2005
JAX-WS 2.0
iii
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(Sun.pre-FCS.Spec.license.11.14.2003)
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JAX-WS 2.0
October 7, 2005
Document Status
This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. Other documents may
supersede this document; the latest revision of this document can be found on the JSR 224 homepage at
http://www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=224. This is the Proposed Final Draft of JSR 224 (JAXWS 2.0). It has been produced by the JSR 224 expert group. Comments on this document are welcome,
send them to jsr224-spec-comments@sun.com.
October 7, 2005
JAX-WS 2.0
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JAX-WS 2.0
October 7, 2005
Contents
1
Introduction
1
1.1
Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1.2
Non-Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
1.3
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
1.3.1
Relationship To JAXB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
1.3.2
Standardized WSDL Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
1.3.3
Customizable WSDL Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
1.3.4
Standardized Protocol Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
1.3.5
Standardized Transport Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
1.3.6
Standardized Handler Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
1.3.7
Versioning and Evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
1.3.8
Standardized Synchronous and Asynchronous Invocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
1.3.9
Session Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
Use Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
1.4.1
Handler Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
1.5
Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
1.6
Expert Group Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
1.7
Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
1.4
2
WSDL 1.1 to Java Mapping
9
2.1
9
Definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.1
Extensibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2
Port Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.3
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.3.1
Message and Part . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.3.2
Parameter Order and Return Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.3.3
Holder Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
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2.3.4
2.4
Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.5
Fault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.5.1
2.6
2.7
2.8
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.6.1
General Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.6.2
SOAP Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.6.3
MIME Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Service and Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.7.1
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
XML Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.8.1
3
Asynchrony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Name Collisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Java to WSDL 1.1 Mapping
3.1
29
Java Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.1.1
Name Collisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.2
Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.3
Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.4
Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.4.1
3.5
Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.5.1
3.6
Inheritance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
One Way Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Method Parameters and Return Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.6.1
Parameter and Return Type Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.6.2
Use of JAXB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.7
Service Specific Exception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.8
Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.9
3.8.1
Interface
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
3.8.2
Method and Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
SOAP HTTP Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3.9.1
Interface
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3.9.2
Method and Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3.10 Service and Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4
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Client APIs
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4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
5
4.1.1
Service Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.1.2
Provider and Service Delegate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.1.3
Handler Resolver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.1.4
Executor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.2.1
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.2.2
Asynchronous Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.2.3
Proxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.2.4
Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
javax.xml.ws.Dispatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.3.1
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.3.2
Operation Invocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.3.3
Asynchronous Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.3.4
Using JAXB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.3.5
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Catalog Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Service APIs
5.1
5.2
5.3
6
javax.xml.ws.Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
59
javax.xml.ws.Provider
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
5.1.1
Invocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
5.1.2
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
5.1.3
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
javax.xml.ws.Endpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.2.1
Endpoint Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.2.2
Publishing
5.2.3
Publishing Permission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
5.2.4
Endpoint Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
5.2.5
Endpoint Publishing and Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
5.2.6
Endpoint Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
5.2.7
Executor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceContext
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.3.1
MessageContext . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Core APIs
69
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7
6.1
javax.xml.ws.Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
6.2
javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
6.2.1
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
6.2.2
Creating Endpoint Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
6.2.3
Creating ServiceDelegate Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6.3
javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6.4
Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6.4.1
Protocol Specific Exception Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6.4.2
One-way Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Annotations
73
7.1
javax.xml.ws.ServiceMode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
7.2
javax.xml.ws.WebFault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
7.3
javax.xml.ws.RequestWrapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
7.4
javax.xml.ws.ResponseWrapper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
7.5
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceClient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
7.6
javax.xml.ws.WebEndpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
7.6.1
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
7.7
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceProvider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
7.8
javax.xml.ws.BindingType . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
7.9
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceRef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
7.9.1
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
7.10 Annotations Defined by JSR-181 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
7.10.1 javax.jws.WebService
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
7.10.2 javax.jws.WebMethod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
7.10.3 javax.jws.OneWay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
7.10.4 javax.jws.WebParam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
7.10.5 javax.jws.WebResult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
7.10.6 javax.jws.SOAPBinding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
7.10.7 javax.jws.HandlerChain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
8
x
Customizations
81
8.1
Binding Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
8.2
Binding Declaration Container . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
8.3
Embedded Binding Declarations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
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8.3.1
8.4
External Binding File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
8.4.1
9
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
8.5
Using JAXB Binding Declarations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
8.6
Scoping of Bindings
8.7
Standard Binding Declarations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
8.7.1
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
8.7.2
PortType . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
8.7.3
PortType Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
8.7.4
PortType Fault Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
8.7.5
Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
8.7.6
Binding Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
8.7.7
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
8.7.8
Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Handler Framework
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
93
Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
9.1.1
Types of Handler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
9.1.2
Binding Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
9.2.1
Programmatic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
9.2.2
Deployment Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Processing Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
9.3.1
Handler Lifecycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
9.3.2
Handler Execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
9.3.3
Handler Implementation Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Message Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
9.4.1
javax.xml.ws.handler.MessageContext . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
9.4.2
javax.xml.ws.handler.LogicalMessageContext . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
9.4.3
Relationship to Application Contexts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
10 SOAP Binding
105
10.1 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
10.1.1 Programmatic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
10.1.2 Deployment Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
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10.2 Processing Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
10.2.1 SOAP mustUnderstand Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
10.2.2 Exception Handling
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
10.3 SOAP Message Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
10.4 SOAP Transport and Transfer Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
10.4.1 HTTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
11 HTTP Binding
113
11.1 Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
11.1.1 Programmatic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
11.1.2 Deployment Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
11.2 Processing Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
11.2.1 Exception Handling
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
11.3 HTTP Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
11.3.1 One-way Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
11.3.2 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
11.3.3 Session Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
A Conformance Requirements
117
B Change Log
123
B.1 Changes since Public Draft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
B.2 Changes Since Early Draft 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
B.3 Changes Since Early Draft 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
B.4 Changes Since Early Draft 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Bibliography
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Chapter 1
Introduction
XML[1] is a platform-independent means of representing structured information. XML Web Services use
XML as the basis for communication between Web-based services and clients of those services and inherit
XML’s platform independence. SOAP[2, 3, 4] describes one such XML based message format and “defines,
using XML technologies, an extensible messaging framework containing a message construct that can be
exchanged over a variety of underlying protocols.”
WSDL[5] is “an XML format for describing network services as a set of endpoints operating on messages
containing either document-oriented or procedure-oriented information.” WSDL can be considered the defacto service description language for XML Web Services.
JAX-RPC 1.0[6] defined APIs and conventions for supporting RPC oriented XML Web Services in the
Java™ platform. JAX-RPC 1.1[7] added support for the WS-I Basic Profile 1.0[8] to improve interoperability between JAX-RPC implementations and with services implemented using other technologies.
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JAX-WS 2.0 (this specification) is a follow-on to JAX-RPC 1.1, extending it as described in the following
sections.
15
1.1
16
Goals
Since the release of JAX-RPC 1.0[6], new specifications and new versions of the standards it depends on
have been released. JAX-WS 2.0 relates to these specifications and standards as follows:
JAXB Due primarily to scheduling concerns, JAX-RPC 1.0 defined its own data binding facilities. With
the release of JAXB 1.0[9] there is no reason to maintain two separate sets of XML mapping rules
in the Java™ platform. JAX-WS 2.0 will delegate data binding-related tasks to the JAXB 2.0[10]
specification that is being developed in parallel with JAX-WS 2.0.
JAXB 2.0[10] will add support for Java to XML mapping, additional support for less used XML
schema constructs, and provide bidirectional customization of Java ⇔ XML data binding. JAXWS 2.0 will allow full use of JAXB provided facilities including binding customization and optional
schema validation.
SOAP 1.2 Whilst SOAP 1.1 is still widely deployed, it’s expected that services will migrate to SOAP 1.2[3,
4] now that it is a W3C Recommendation. JAX-WS 2.0 will add support for SOAP 1.2 whilst requiring
continued support for SOAP 1.1.
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Chapter 1. Introduction
WSDL 2.0 The W3C is expected to progress WSDL 2.0[11] to Recommendation during the lifetime of this
JSR. JAX-WS 2.0 will add support for WSDL 2.0 whilst requiring continued support for WSDL 1.1.
WS-I Basic Profile 1.1 JAX-RPC 1.1 added support for WS-I Basic Profile 1.0. WS-I Basic Profile 1.1 is
expected to supersede 1.0 during the lifetime of this JSR and JAX-WS 2.0 will add support for the
additional clarifications it provides.
A Metadata Facility for the Java Programming Language (JSR 175) JAX-WS 2.0 will define the use of
Java annotations[12] to simplify the most common development scenarios for both clients and servers.
Web Services Metadata for the Java Platform (JSR 181) JAX-WS 2.0 will align with and complement
the annotations defined by JSR 181[13].
Implementing Enterprise Web Services (JSR 109) The JSR 109[14] defined jaxrpc-mapping-info
deployment descriptor provides deployment time Java ⇔ WSDL mapping functionality. In conjunction with JSR 181[13], JAX-WS 2.0 will complement this mapping functionality with development
time Java annotations that control Java ⇔ WSDL mapping.
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5
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7
8
9
10
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13
Web Services Security (JSR 183) JAX-WS 2.0 will align with and complement the security APIs defined
by JSR 183[15].
15
JAX-WS 2.0 will improve support for document/message centric usage:
16
Asynchrony JAX-WS 2.0 will add support for client side asynchronous operations.
17
Non-HTTP Transports JAX-WS 2.0 will improve the separation between the XML message format and
the underlying transport mechanism to simplify use of JAX-WS with non-HTTP transports.
Message Access JAX-WS 2.0 will simplify client and service access to the messages underlying an exchange.
Session Management JAX-RPC 1.1 session management capabilities are tied to HTTP. JAX-WS 2.0 will
add support for message based session management.
JAX-WS 2.0 will also address issues that have arisen with experience of implementing and using JAX-RPC
1.0:
Inclusion in J2SE JAX-WS 2.0 will prepare JAX-WS for inclusion in a future version of J2SE. Application
portability is a key requirement and JAX-WS 2.0 will define mechanisms to produce fully portable
clients.
Handlers JAX-WS 2.0 will simplify the development of handlers and will provide a mechanism to allow
handlers to collaborate with service clients and service endpoint implementations.
Versioning and Evolution of Web Services JAX-WS 2.0 will describe techniques and mechanisms to ease
the burden on developers when creating new versions of existing services.
1.2
Non-Goals
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The following are non-goals:
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1.3. Requirements
Backwards Compatibility of Binary Artifacts Binary compatibility between JAX-RPC 1.x and JAX-WS
2.0 implementation runtimes.
Pluggable data binding JAX-WS 2.0 will defer data binding to JAXB[10]; it is not a goal to provide a
plug-in API to allow other types of data binding technologies to be used in place of JAXB. However,
JAX-WS 2.0 will maintain the capability to selectively disable data binding to provide an XML based
fragment suitable for use as input to alternative data binding technologies.
SOAP Encoding Support Use of the SOAP encoding is essentially deprecated in the web services community, e.g., the WS-I Basic Profile[8] excludes SOAP encoding. Instead, literal usage is preferred,
either in the RPC or document style.
SOAP 1.1 encoding is supported in JAX-RPC 1.0 and 1.1 but its support in JAX-WS 2.0 runs counter
to the goal of delegation of data binding to JAXB. Therefore JAX-WS 2.0 will make support for SOAP
1.1 encoding optional and defer description of it to JAX-RPC 1.1.
Support for the SOAP 1.2 Encoding[4] is optional in SOAP 1.2 and JAX-WS 2.0 will not add support
for SOAP 1.2 encoding.
Backwards Compatibility of Generated Artifacts JAX-RPC 1.0 and JAXB 1.0 bind XML to Java in different ways. Generating source code that works with unmodified JAX-RPC 1.x client source code is
not a goal.
Support for Java versions prior to J2SE 5.0 JAX-WS 2.0 relies on many of the Java language features
added in J2SE 5.0. It is not a goal to support JAX-WS 2.0 on Java versions prior to J2SE 5.0.
Service Registration and Discovery It is not a goal of JAX-WS 2.0 to describe registration and discovery
of services via UDDI or ebXML RR. This capability is provided independently by JAXR[16].
1.3
1.3.1
Requirements
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Relationship To JAXB
23
JAX-WS describes the WSDL ⇔ Java mapping, but data binding is delegated to JAXB[10]. The specification must clearly designate where JAXB rules apply to the WSDL ⇔ Java mapping without reproducing
those rules and must describe how JAXB capabilities (e.g., the JAXB binding language) are incorporated
into JAX-WS. JAX-WS is required to be able to influence the JAXB binding, e.g., to avoid name collisions
and to be able to control schema validation on serialization and deserialization.
26
1.3.2
29
Standardized WSDL Mapping
WSDL is the de-facto service description language for XML Web Services. The specification must specify
a standard WSDL ⇔ Java mapping. The following versions of WSDL must be supported:
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• WSDL 1.1[5] as clarified by the WS-I Basic Profile[8, 17]
32
• WSDL 2.0[11, 18, 19]
33
The standardized WSDL mapping will describe the default WSDL ⇔ Java mapping. The default mapping
may be overridden using customizations as described below.
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Chapter 1. Introduction
1.3.3
Customizable WSDL Mapping
1
The specification must provide a standard way to customize the WSDL ⇔ Java mapping. The following
customization methods will be specified:
Java Annotations In conjunction with JAXB[10] and JSR 181[13], the specification will define a set of
standard annotations that may be used in Java source files to specify the mapping from Java artifacts
to their associated WSDL components. The annotations will support mapping to both WSDL 1.1 and
WSDL 2.0.
WSDL Annotations In conjunction with JAXB[10] and JSR 181[13], the specification will define a set of
standard annotations that may be used either within WSDL documents or as in an external form to
specify the mapping from WSDL components to their associated Java artifacts. The annotations will
support mapping from both WSDL 1.1 and WSDL 2.0.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
The specification must describe the precedence rules governing combinations of the customization methods.
12
1.3.4
13
Standardized Protocol Bindings
The specification must describe standard bindings to the following protocols:
14
• SOAP 1.1[2] as clarified by the WS-I Basic Profile[8, 17]
15
• SOAP 1.2[3, 4]
16
The specification must not prevent non-standard bindings to other protocols.
17
1.3.5
18
Standardized Transport Bindings
The specification must describe standard bindings to the following protocols:
19
• HTTP/1.1[20].
20
The specification must not prevent non-standard bindings to other transports.
21
1.3.6
22
Standardized Handler Framework
The specification must include a standardized handler framework that describes:
23
Data binding for handlers The framework will offer data binding facilities to handlers and will support
handlers that are decoupled from the SAAJ API.
Handler Context The framework will describe a mechanism for communicating properties between handlers and the associated service clients and service endpoint implementations.
Unified Response and Fault Handling The handleResponse and handleFault methods will be unified and the the declarative model for handlers will be improved.
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1.4. Use Cases
1.3.7
Versioning and Evolution
1
The specification must describe techniques and mechanisms to support versioning of service endpoint interfaces. The facilities must allow new versions of an interface to be deployed whilst maintaining compatibility
for existing clients.
3
1.3.8
5
Standardized Synchronous and Asynchronous Invocation
There must be a detailed description of the generated method signatures to support both asynchronous and
synchronous method invocation in stubs generated by JAX-WS. Both forms of invocation will support a
user configurable timeout period.
1.3.9
Session Management
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7
8
9
The specification must describe a standard session management mechanism including:
10
Session APIs Definition of a session interface and methods to obtain the session interface and initiate sessions for handlers and service endpoint implementations.
HTTP based sessions The session management mechanism must support HTTP cookies and URL rewriting.
11
12
13
14
SOAP based sessions The session management mechanism must support SOAP based session information.
15
1.4
16
1.4.1
Use Cases
Handler Framework
17
1.4.1.1 Reliable Messaging Support
18
A developer wishes to add support for a reliable messaging SOAP feature to an existing service endpoint.
The support takes the form of a JAX-WS handler.
1.4.1.2 Message Logging
20
21
A developer wishes to log incoming and outgoing messages for later analysis, e.g., checking messages using
the WS-I testing tools.
1.4.1.3 WS-I Conformance Checking
22
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24
A developer wishes to check incoming and outgoing messages for conformance to one or more WS-I profiles
at runtime.
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Chapter 1. Introduction
1.5
Conventions
1
The keywords ‘MUST’, ‘MUST NOT’, ‘REQUIRED’, ‘SHALL’, ‘SHALL NOT’, ‘SHOULD’, ‘SHOULD
NOT’, ‘RECOMMENDED’, ‘MAY’, and ‘OPTIONAL’ in this document are to be interpreted as described
in RFC 2119[21].
3
For convenience, conformance requirements are called out from the main text as follows:
5
♦ Conformance (Example): Implementations MUST do something.
6
A list of all such conformance requirements can be found in appendix A.
7
Java code and XML fragments are formatted as shown in figure 1.1:
8
2
4
Figure 1.1: Example Java Code
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
package com.example.hello;
public class Hello {
public static void main(String args[]) {
System.out.println("Hello World");
}
}
Non-normative notes are formatted as shown below.
9
Note: This is a note.
10
This specification uses a number of namespace prefixes throughout; they are listed in Table1.1. Note that
the choice of any namespace prefix is arbitrary and not semantically significant (see XML Infoset[22]).
Prefix Namespace
env
http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope
xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
wsdl
soap
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/
jaxb
jaxws
http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb
http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws
11
12
Notes
A normative XML Schema[23, 24] document for
the http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope
namespace can be found at
http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope.
The namespace of the XML schema[23, 24]
specification
The namespace of the WSDL schema[5]
The namespace of the WSDL SOAP binding
schema[23, 24]
The namespace of the JAXB [9] specification
The namespace of the JAX-WS specification
Table 1.1: Prefixes and Namespaces used in this specification.
Namespace names of the general form ‘http://example.org/...’ and ‘http://example.com/...’ represent application or context-dependent URIs (see RFC 2396[20]).
All parts of this specification are normative, with the exception of examples, notes and sections explicitly
marked as ‘Non-Normative’.
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October 7, 2005
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14
15
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1.6. Expert Group Members
1.6
Expert Group Members
1
The following people have contributed to this specification:
2
Chavdar Baikov (SAP AG)
Russell Butek (IBM)
Manoj Cheenath (BEA Systems)
Shih-Chang Chen (Oracle)
Claus Nyhus Christensen (Trifork)
Ugo Corda (SeeBeyond Technology Corp)
Glen Daniels (Sonic Software)
Alan Davies (SeeBeyond Technology Corp)
Thomas Diesler (JBoss, Inc.)
Jim Frost (Art Technology Group Inc)
Alastair Harwood (Cap Gemini)
Marc Hadley (Sun Microsystems, Inc.)
Kevin R. Jones (Developmentor)
Anish Karmarkar (Oracle)
Toshiyuki Kimura (NTT Data Corp)
Jim Knutson (IBM)
Doug Kohlert (Sun Microsystems, Inc)
Daniel Kulp (IONA Technologies PLC)
Sunil Kunisetty (Oracle)
Changshin Lee (Tmax Soft, Inc)
Carlo Marcoli (Cap Gemini)
Srividya Natarajan (Nokia Corporation)
Sanjay Patil (SAP AG)
Greg Pavlik (Oracle)
Bjarne Rasmussen (Novell, Inc)
Sebastien Sahuc (Intalio, Inc.)
Rahul Sharma (Motorola)
Rajiv Shivane (Pramati Technologies)
Richard Sitze (IBM)
Dennis M. Sosnoski (Sosnoski Software)
Christopher St. John (WebMethods Corporation)
Mark Stewart (ATG)
Neal Yin (BEA Systems)
Brian Zotter (BEA Systems)
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1.7
Acknowledgements
38
Robert Bissett, Arun Gupta, Graham Hamilton, Mark Hapner, Jitendra Kotamraju, Rajiv Mordani, Vivek
Pandey, Santiago Pericas-Geertsen, Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart, Rama Pulavarthi, Paul Sandoz, Bill Shannon,
and Kathy Walsh (all from Sun Microsystems) have provided invaluable technical input to the JAX-WS 2.0
specification.
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Chapter 1. Introduction
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JAX-WS 2.0
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Chapter 2
WSDL 1.1 to Java Mapping
This chapter describes the mapping from WSDL 1.1 to Java. This mapping is used when generating web
service interfaces for clients and endpoints from a WSDL 1.1 description.
♦ Conformance (WSDL 1.1 support): Implementations MUST support mapping WSDL 1.1 to Java.
An application MAY customize the mapping using embedded binding declarations (see section 8.3) or an
external binding file (see section 8.4).
♦ Conformance (Customization required): Implementations MUST support customization of the WSDL
1.1 to Java mapping using the JAX-WS binding language defined in chapter 8.
In order to enable annotations to be used at runtime for method dispatching and marshalling, this specification requires generated Java classes and interfaces to be annotated with the Web service annotations
described in section 7.10. The annotations present on a generated class MUST faithfully reflect the information in the WSDL document(s) that were given as input to the mapping process, as well as the customizations
embedded in them and those specified via any external binding files.
♦ Conformance (Annotations on generated classes): The values of all the properties of all the generated
annotations MUST be consistent with the information in the source WSDL document and the applicable
external binding files.
Definitions
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12
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17
18
19
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21
22
A WSDL document has a root wsdl:definitions element. A wsdl:definitions element and its
associated targetNamespace attribute is mapped to a Java package. JAXB[10] (see appendix D) defines
a standard mapping from a namespace URI to a Java package name. By default, this algorithm is used to
map the value of a wsdl:definitions element’s targetNamespace attribute to a Java package name.
♦ Conformance (Definitions mapping): In the absence of customizations, the Java package name is mapped
from the value of a wsdl:definitions element’s targetNamespace attribute using the algorithm defined by JAXB[10].
October 7, 2005
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5
The following sections describe the default mapping from each WSDL 1.1 construct to the equivalent Java
construct. In WSDL 1.1, the separation between the abstract port type definition and the binding to a
protocol is not complete. Bindings impact the mapping between WSDL elements used in the abstract port
type definition and Java method parameters. Section 2.6 describes binding dependent mappings.
2.1
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Chapter 2. WSDL 1.1 to Java Mapping
An application MAY customize this mapping using the jaxws:package binding declaration defined in
section 8.7.1.
2
No specific authoring style is required for the input WSDL document; implementations should support
WSDL that uses the WSDL and XML Schema import directives.
4
♦ Conformance (WSDL and XML Schema import directives): Implementations MUST support the WS-I
Basic Profile 1.1[17] defined mechanisms (See R2001, R2002, and R2003) for use of WSDL and XML
Schema import directives.
2.1.1
Extensibility
1
3
5
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7
8
WSDL 1.1 allows extension elements and attributes to be added to many of its constructs. JAX-WS specifies
the mapping to Java of the extensibility elements and attributes defined for the SOAP and MIME bindings.
JAX-WS does not address mapping of any other extensibility elements or attributes and does not provide
a standard extensibility framework though which such support could be added in a standard way. Future
versions of JAX-WS might add additional support for standard extensions as these become available.
♦ Conformance (Optional WSDL extensions): An implementation MAY support mapping of additional
WSDL extensibility elements and attributes not described in JAX-WS.
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Note that such support may limit interoperability and application portability.
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Port Type
A WSDL port type is a named set of abstract operation definitions. A wsdl:portType element is mapped
to a Java interface in the package mapped from the wsdl:definitions element (see section 2.1 for a
description of wsdl:definitions mapping). A Java interface mapped from a wsdl:portType is called
a Service Endpoint Interface or SEI for short.
♦ Conformance (SEI naming): In the absence of customizations, the name of an SEI MUST be the value of
the name attribute of the corresponding wsdl:portType element mapped according to the rules described
in section 2.8.
An application MAY customize this mapping using the jaxws:class binding declaration defined in section
8.7.2.
♦ Conformance (javax.jws.WebService required): A mapped SEI MUST be annotated with a javax.jws.WebService annotation.
An SEI contains Java methods mapped from the wsdl:operation child elements of the corresponding
wsdl:portType, see section 2.3 for further details on wsdl:operation mapping. WSDL 1.1 does not
support port type inheritance so each generated SEI will contain methods for all operations in the corresponding port type.
2.3
Operation
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Each wsdl:operation in a wsdl:portType is mapped to a Java method in the corresponding Java service endpoint interface.
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♦ Conformance (Method naming): In the absence of customizations, the name of a mapped Java method
MUST be the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:operation element mapped according to the rules
described in section 2.8.
An application MAY customize this mapping using the jaxws:method binding declaration defined in section 8.7.3.
♦ Conformance (javax.jws.WebMethod required): A mapped Java method MUST be annotated with a
javax.jws.WebMethod annotation. The annotation MAY be omitted if all its properties would have the
default values.
The WS-I Basic Profile[17] R2304 requires that operations within a wsdl:portType have unique values for
their name attribute so mapping of WS-I compliant WSDL descriptions will not generate Java interfaces with
overloaded methods. However, for backwards compatibility, JAX-WS supports operation name overloading
provided the overloading does not cause conflicts (as specified in the Java Language Specification[25]) in
the mapped Java service endpoint interface declaration.
♦ Conformance (Transmission primitive support): An implementation MUST support mapping of operations that use the one-way and request-response transmission primitives.
♦ Conformance (Using javax.jws.OneWay): A Java method mapped from a one-way operation MUST
be annotated with a javax.jws.OneWay annotation.
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Mapping of notification and solicit-response operations is out of scope.
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Message and Part
Each wsdl:operation refers to one or more wsdl:message elements via child wsdl:input, wsdl:output, and wsdl:fault elements that describe the input, output, and fault messages for the operation
respectively. Each operation can specify one input message, zero or one output message, and zero or more
fault messages.
Fault messages are mapped to application specific exceptions (see section 2.5). The contents of input and
output messages are mapped to Java method parameters using two different styles: non-wrapper style and
wrapper style. The two mapping styles are described in the following subsections. Note that the binding of
a port type can affect the mapping of that port type to Java, see section 2.6 for details.
♦ Conformance (Using javax.jws.SOAPBinding): An SEI mapped from a port type that is bound using
the WSDL SOAP binding MUST be annotated with a javax.jws.SOAPBinding annotation describing
the choice of style, encoding and parameter style. The annotation MAY be omitted if all its properties would
have the default values (i.e. document/literal/wrapped).
♦ Conformance (Using javax.jws.WebParam): Generated Java method parameters MUST be annotated
with a javax.jws.WebParam annotation. If the style is rpc or if the style is Document and the parameter
style is BARE then the partName element of javax.jws.WebParam MUST refer to the wsdl:part
name of the parameter.
♦ Conformance (Using javax.jws.WebResult): Generated Java methods MUST be annotated with a
javax.jws.WebResult annotation. If the style is rpc or if the style is Document and the parameter style
is BARE then the partName element of javax.jws.WebResult MUST refer to the wsdl:part name of
the parameter. The annotation MAY be omitted if all its properties would have the default values.
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2.3.1.1 Non-wrapper Style
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A wsdl:message is composed of zero or more wsdl:part elements. Message parts are classified as
follows:
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in The message part is present only in the operation’s input message.
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out The message part is present only in the operation’s output message.
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in/out The message part is present in both the operation’s input message and output message.
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Two parts are considered equal if they have the same values for their name attribute and they reference
the same global element or type. Using non-wrapper style, message parts are mapped to Java parameters
according to their classification as follows:
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in The message part is mapped to a method parameter.
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out The message part is mapped to a method parameter using a holder class (see section 2.3.3) or is mapped
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to the method return type.
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in/out The message part is mapped to a method parameter using a holder class.
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♦ Conformance (Non-wrapped parameter naming): In the absence of any customizations, the name of a
mapped Java method parameter MUST be the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:part element mapped
according to the rules described in sections 2.8 and 2.8.1.
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An application MAY customize this mapping using the jaxws:parameter binding declaration defined in
section 8.7.3.
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Section 2.3.2 defines rules that govern the ordering of parameters in mapped Java methods and identification
of the part that is mapped to the method return type.
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2.3.1.2 Wrapper Style
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A WSDL operation qualifies for wrapper style mapping only if the following criteria are met:
22
(i) The operation’s input and output messages (if present) each contain only a single part
(ii) The input message part refers to a global element declaration whose localname is equal to the operation name
(iii) The output message part refers to a global element declaration
(v) The wrapper elements only contain child elements, they must not contain other structures such as
wildcards (element or attribute), xsd:choice, substitution groups (element references are not permitted) or attributes; furthermore, they must not be nillable.
♦ Conformance (Default mapping mode): Operations that do not meet the criteria above MUST be mapped
using non-wrapper style.
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(iv) The elements referred to by the input and output message parts (henceforth referred to as wrapper
elements) are both complex types defined using the xsd:sequence compositor
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In some cases use of the wrapper style mapping can lead to undesirable Java method signatures and use of
non-wrapper style mapping would be preferred.
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♦ Conformance (Disabling wrapper style): An implementation MUST support use of the jaxws:enableWrapperStyle binding declaration to enable or disable the wrapper style mapping of operations (see sec-
4
tion 8.7.3).
5
Using wrapper style, the child elements of the wrapper element (henceforth called wrapper children) are
mapped to Java parameters, wrapper children are classified as follows:
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in The wrapper child is only present in the input message part’s wrapper element.
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out The wrapper child is only present in the output message part’s wrapper element.
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in/out The wrapper child is present in both the input and output message part’s wrapper element.
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Two wrapper children are considered equal if they have the same local name, the same XML schema type
and the same Java type after mapping (see section 2.4 for XML Schema to Java type mapping rules). The
mapping depends on the classification of the wrapper child as follows:
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in The wrapper child is mapped to a method parameter.
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out The wrapper child is mapped to a method parameter using a holder class (see section 2.3.3) or is
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mapped to the method return value.
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in/out The wrapper child is mapped to a method parameter using a holder class.
17
♦ Conformance (Wrapped parameter naming): In the absence of customization, the name of a mapped Java
method parameter MUST be the value of the local name of the wrapper child mapped according to the rules
described in sections 2.8 and 2.8.1.
An application MAY customize this mapping using the jaxws:parameter binding declaration defined in
section 8.7.3.
♦ Conformance (Parameter name clash): If the mapping results in two Java parameters with the same name
and one of those parameters is not mapped to the method return type, see section 2.3.2, then this is reported as
an error and requires developer intervention to correct, either by disabling wrapper style mapping, modifying
the source WSDL or by specifying a customized parameter name mapping.
2.3.1.3 Example
Parameter Order and Return Type
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A wsdl:operation element may have a parameterOrder attribute that defines the ordering of parameters in a mapped Java method as follows:
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Figure 2.1 shows a WSDL extract and the Java method that results from using wrapper and non-wrapper
mapping styles. For readability, annotations are omitted.
2.3.2
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<!-- WSDL extract -->
<types>
<xsd:element name="setLastTradePrice">
<xsd:complexType>
<xsd:sequence>
<xsd:element name="tickerSymbol" type="xsd:string"/>
<xsd:element name="lastTradePrice" type="xsd:float"/>
</xsd:sequence>
</xsd:complexType>
</xsd:element>
<xsd:element name="setLastTradePriceResponse">
<xsd:complexType>
<xsd:sequence/>
</xsd:complexType>
</xsd:element>
</types>
<message name="setLastTradePrice">
<part name="setLastTradePrice"
element="tns:setLastTradePrice"/>
</message>
<message name="setLastTradePriceResponse">
<part name="setLastTradePriceResponse"
element="tns:setLastTradePriceResponse"/>
</message>
<portType name="StockQuoteUpdater">
<operation name="setLastTradePrice">
<input message="tns:setLastTradePrice"/>
<output message="tns:setLastTradePriceResponse"/>
</operation>
</portType>
// non-wrapper style mapping
SetLastTradePriceResponse setLastTradePrice(
SetLastTradePrice setLastTradePrice);
// wrapper style mapping
void setLastTradePrice(String tickerSymbol, float lastTradePrice);
Figure 2.1: Wrapper and non-wrapper mapping styles
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2.3. Operation
• Message parts are either listed or unlisted. If the value of a wsdl:part element’s name attribute is
present in the parameterOrder attribute then the part is listed, otherwise it is unlisted.
Note: R2305 in WS-I Basic Profile 1.1 [17] requires that if the parameterOrder attribute is present
then at most one part may be unlisted. However, the algorithm outlined in this section supports
WSDLs that do not conform with this requirement.
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• Parameters that are mapped from message parts are either listed or unlisted. Parameters that are
mapped from listed parts are listed; parameters that are mapped from unlisted parts are unlisted.
7
• Parameters that are mapped from wrapper children (wrapper style mapping only) are unlisted.
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• Listed parameters appear first in the method signature in the order in which their corresponding parts
are listed in the parameterOrder attribute.
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• Unlisted parameters either form the return type or follow the listed parameters
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• The return type is determined as follows:
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Non-wrapper style mapping Only parameters that are mapped from parts in the abstract output message may form the return type, parts from other messages (see e.g. section 2.6.2.1) do not qualify. If there is a single unlisted out part in the abstract output message then it forms the method
return type, otherwise the return type is void.
Wrapper style mapping If there is a single out wrapper child then it forms the method return type,
if there is an out wrapper child with a local name of “return” then it forms the method return
type, otherwise the return type is void.
• Unlisted parameters that do not form the return type follow the listed parameters in the following
order:
1. Parameters mapped from in and in/out parts appear in the same order the corresponding parts
appear in the input message.
2. Parameters mapped from in and in/out wrapper children (wrapper style mapping only) appear
in the same order as the corresponding elements appear in the wrapper.
3. Parameters mapped from out parts appear in the same order the corresponding parts appear in
the output message.
4. Parameters mapped from out wrapper children (wrapper style mapping only) appear in the same
order as the corresponding wrapper children appear in the wrapper.
2.3.3
Holder Class
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Holder classes are used to support out and in/out parameters in mapped method signatures. They provide
a mutable wrapper for otherwise immutable object references. JAX-WS defines a generic holder class
(javax.xml.ws.Holder<T>) that can be used for any Java class.
Parameters whose XML data type would normally be mapped to a Java primitive type (e.g., xsd:int to
int) are instead mapped to a Holder whose type parameter is bound to the Java wrapper class corresponding to the primitive type. E.g., an out or in/out parameter whose XML data type would normally be
mapped to a Java int is instead mapped to Holder<java.lang.Integer>.
♦ Conformance (Use of Holder): Implementations MUST map out and in/out method parameters using javax.xml.ws.Holder<T>, with the exception of a out part that has been mapped to the method’s
return type.
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2.3.4
Asynchrony
1
In addition to the synchronous mapping of wsdl:operation described above, a client side asynchronous
mapping is also supported. It is expected that the asynchronous mapping will be useful in some but not
all cases and therefore generation of the client side asynchronous methods should be optional at the users
discretion.
♦ Conformance (Asynchronous mapping required): An implementation MUST support the asynchronous
mapping.
♦ Conformance (Asynchronous mapping option): An implementation MUST support use of the jaxws:enableAsyncMapping binding declaration defined in section8.7.3 to enable and disable the asynchronous
mapping.
Editors Note 2.1 JSR-181 currently does not define annotations that can be used to mark a method as being
asynchronous.
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2.3.4.1 Standard Asynchronous Interfaces
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The following standard interfaces are used in the asynchronous operation mapping:
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javax.xml.ws.Response A generic interface that is used to group the results of a method invocation
with the response context. Response extends Future<T> to provide asynchronous result polling
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capabilities.
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javax.xml.ws.AsyncHandler A generic interface that clients implement to receive results in an asyn-
chronous callback.
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2.3.4.2 Operation
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Each wsdl:operation is mapped to two additional methods in the corresponding service endpoint interface:
Polling method A polling method returns a typed Response<ResponseBean> that may be polled using
methods inherited from Future<T> to determine when the operation has completed and to retrieve
the results. See below for further details on ResponseBean.
Callback method A callback method takes an additional final parameter that is an instance of a typed
AsyncHandler<ResponseBean> and returns a wildcard Future<?> that may be polled to determine
when the operation has completed. The object returned from Future<?>.get() has no standard
type. Client code should not attempt to cast the object to any particular type as this will result in
non-portable behavior.
♦ Conformance (Asynchronous method naming): In the absence of customizations, the name of the polling
and callback methods MUST be the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:operation suffixed with
“Async” mapped according to the rules described in sections 2.8 and 2.8.1.
♦ Conformance (Asynchronous parameter naming): The name of the method parameter for the callback
handler MUST be “asyncHandler”. Parameter name collisions require user intervention to correct, see
section 2.8.1.
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An application MAY customize this mapping using the jaxws:method binding declaration defined in section 8.7.3.
♦ Conformance (Failed method invocation): If there is any error prior to invocation of the operation, an
implementation MUST throw a WebServiceException1.
2.3.4.3 Message and Part
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The asynchronous mapping supports both wrapper and non-wrapper mapping styles, but differs in how it
maps out and in/out parts or wrapper children:
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in The part or wrapper child is mapped to a method parameter as described in section 2.3.1.
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out The part or wrapper child is mapped to a property of the response bean (see below).
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in/out The part or wrapper child is mapped to a method parameter (no holder class) and to a property of the
response bean.
2.3.4.4 Response Bean
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A response bean is a mapping of an operation’s output message, it contains properties for each out and
in/out message part or wrapper child.
♦ Conformance (Response bean naming): In the absence of customizations, the name of a response bean
MUST be the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:operation suffixed with “Response” mapped according to the rules described in sections 2.8 and 2.8.1.
A response bean is mapped from a global element declaration following the rules described in section 2.4.
The global element declaration is formed as follows (in order of preference):
• If the operation’s output message contains a single part and that part refers to a global element declaration then use the referenced global element.
• Synthesize a global element declaration of a complex type defined using the xsd:sequence compositor. Each output message part is mapped to a child of the synthesized element as follows:
– Each global element referred to by an output part is added as a child of the sequence.
If the resulting response bean has only a single property then the bean wrapper should be discarded in method
signatures. In this case, if the property is a Java primitive type then it is boxed using the Java wrapper type
(e.g. int to Integer) to enable its use with Response.
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Errors that occur during the invocation are reported when the client attempts to retrieve the results of the operation, see section
2.3.4.5.
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– Each part that refers to a type is added as a child of the sequence by creating an element in no
namespace whose localname is the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:part element and
whose type is the value of the type attribute of the wsdl:part element
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2.3.4.5 Faults
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Mapping of WSDL faults to service specific exceptions is identical for both asynchronous and synchronous
cases, section 2.5 describes the mapping. However, mapped asynchronous methods do not throw service specific exceptions directly. Instead a java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException is thrown when a
client attempts to retrieve the results of an asynchronous method invocation via the Response.get method.
♦ Conformance (Asynchronous fault reporting): A WSDL fault that occurs during execution of an asynchronous method invocation MUST be mapped to a java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException
thrown when the client calls Response.get.
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Response is a static generic interface whose get method cannot throw service specific exceptions. Instead
of throwing a service specific exception, a Response instance throws an ExecutionException whose
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cause is set to an instance of the service specific exception mapped from the corresponding WSDL fault.
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♦ Conformance (Asychronous fault cause): An ExecutionException that is thrown by the get method
of Response as a result of a WSDL fault MUST have as its cause the service specific exception mapped
from the WSDL fault, if there is one, otherwise the ProtocolException mapped from the WSDL fault
(see 6.4).
2.3.4.6 Mapping Examples
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Figure 2.2 shows an example of the asynchronous operation mapping. Note that the mapping uses Float
instead of a response bean wrapper (GetPriceResponse) since the synthesized global element declaration
for the operations output message (lines 17–24) maps to a response bean that contains only a single property.
19
2.3.4.7 Usage Examples
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• Synchronous use.
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3
Service service = ...;
StockQuote quoteService = (StockQuote)service.getPort(portName);
Float quote = quoteService.getPrice(ticker);
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Service service = ...;
StockQuote quoteService = (StockQuote)service.getPort(portName);
Response<Float> response = quoteService.getPriceAsync(ticker);
while (!response.isDone()) {
// do something while we wait
}
Float quote = response.get();
• Asynchronous callback use.
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• Asynchronous polling use.
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class MyPriceHandler implements AsyncHandler<Float> {
...
public void handleResponse(Response<Float> response) {
Float price = response.get();
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<!-- WSDL extract -->
<message name="getPrice">
<part name="ticker" type="xsd:string"/>
</message>
<message name="getPriceResponse">
<part name="price" type="xsd:float"/>
</message>
<portType name="StockQuote">
<operation name="getPrice">
<input message="tns:getPrice"/>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
</operation>
</portType>
<!-- Synthesized response bean element -->
<xsd:element name="getPriceResponse">
<xsd:complexType>
<xsd:sequence>
<xsd:element name="price" type="xsd:float"/>
</xsd:sequence>
</xsd:complexType>
</xsd:element>
// synchronous mapping
@WebService
public interface StockQuote {
float getPrice(String ticker);
}
// asynchronous mapping
@WebService
public interface StockQuote {
float getPrice(String ticker);
Response<Float> getPriceAsync(String ticker);
Future<?> getPriceAsync(String ticker, AsyncHandler<Float>);
}
Figure 2.2: Asynchronous operation mapping
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// do something with the result
1
}
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}
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Service service = ...;
StockQuote quoteService = (StockQuote)service.getPort(portName);
MyPriceHandler myPriceHandler = new MyPriceHandler();
quoteService.getPriceAsync(ticker, myPriceHandler);
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4
Types
JAXB supports mapping XML types to either Java interfaces or classes. By default JAX-WS uses the class
based mapping of JAXB but also allows use of the interface based mapping.
♦ Conformance (JAXB class mapping): In the absence of user customizations, an implementation MUST
use the JAXB class based mapping with generateValueClass set to true and generateElementClass set to false when mapping WSDL types to Java.
♦ Conformance (JAXB customization use): An implementation MUST support use of JAXB customizations during mapping as detailed in section 8.5.
♦ Conformance (JAXB customization clash): To avoid clashes, if a user customizes the mapping, an implementation MUST NOT add the default class based mapping customizations.
In addition, for ease of use, JAX-WS strips any JAXBElement<T> wrapper off the type of a method parameter if the normal JAXB mapping would result in one 2 . E.g. a parameter that JAXB would map to
JAXBElement<Integer> is instead be mapped to Integer.
JAXB provides support for the SOAP MTOM[26]/XOP[27] mechanism for optimizing transmission of binary data types. JAX-WS provides the MIME processing required to enable JAXB to serialize and deserialize MIME based MTOM/XOP packages. The contract between JAXB and an MTOM/XOP package processor is defined by the javax.xml.bind.AttachmentMarshaller and javax.xml.bind.AttachmentUnmarshaller classes. A JAX-WS implementation can plug into it by registering its
own AttachmentMarshaller and AttachmentUnmarshaller at runtime using the setAttachmentUnmarshaller method of javax.xml.bind.Unmarshaller (resp. the setAttachmentMarshaller
method of javax.xml.bind.Marshaller).
Fault
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♦ Conformance (javax.xml.ws.WebFault required): A mapped exception MUST be annotated with a
javax.xml.ws.WebWebFault annotation.
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A wsdl:fault element is mapped to a Java exception.
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7
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Mapping of XML Schema types to Java is described by the JAXB 2.0 specification[10]. The contents of a
wsdl:types section is passed to JAXB along with any additional type or element declarations (e.g., see
section 2.3.4) required to map other WSDL constructs to Java. E.g., section 2.3.4 defines an algorithm
for synthesizing additional global element declarations to provide a mapping from WSDL operations to
asynchronous Java method signatures.
2.5
6
JAXB maps an element declaration to a Java instance that implements JAXBElement.
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2.6. Binding
♦ Conformance (Exception naming): In the absence of customizations, the name of a mapped exception
MUST be the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:message referred to by the wsdl:fault element
mapped according to the rules in sections 2.8 and 2.8.1.
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2
3
An application MAY customize this mapping using the jaxws:class binding declaration defined in section
8.7.4.
5
Multiple operations within the same service can define equivalent faults. Faults defined within the same
service are equivalent if the values of their message attributes are equal.
7
♦ Conformance (Fault equivalence): An implementation MUST map equivalent faults within a service to a
single Java exception class.
A wsdl:fault element refers to a wsdl:message that contains a single part. The global element declaration3 referred to by that part is mapped to a Java bean, henceforth called a fault bean, using the mapping
described in section 2.4. An implementation generates a wrapper exception class that extends java.lang.Exception and contains the following methods:
WrapperException(String message, FaultBean faultInfo) A constructor where WrapperException is replaced with the name of the generated wrapper exception and FaultBean is replaced by the
name of the generated fault bean.
WrapperException(String message, FaultBean faultInfo, Throwable cause) A constructor
where WrapperException is replaced with the name of the generated wrapper exception and FaultBean
is replaced by the name of the generated fault bean. The last argument, cause, may be used to convey
protocol specific fault information, see section 6.4.1.
FaultBean getFaultInfo() Getter to obtain the fault information, where FaultBean is replaced by the
name of the generated fault bean.
The WrapperException class is annotated using the WebFault annotation (see section 7.2) to capture the
local and namespace name of the global element mapped to the fault bean.
Two wsdl:fault child elements of the same wsdl:operation that indirectly refer to the same global
element declaration are considered to be equivalent since there is no interoperable way of differentiating
between their serialized forms.
♦ Conformance (Fault equivalence): At runtime an implementation MAY map a serialized fault into any
equivalent Java exception.
2.5.1
Example
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Figure 2.3 shows an example of the WSDL fault mapping described above.
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Binding
The mapping from WSDL 1.1 to Java is based on the abstract description of a wsdl:portType and its
associated operations. However, the binding of a port type to a protocol can introduce changes in the
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WS-I Basic Profile[17] R2205 requires parts to refer to elements rather than types.
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<!-- WSDL extract -->
<types>
<xsd:schema targetNamespace="...">
<xsd:element name="faultDetail">
<xsd:complexType>
<xsd:sequence>
<xsd:element name="majorCode" type="xsd:int"/>
<xsd:element name="minorCode" type="xsd:int"/>
</xsd:sequence>
</xsd:complexType>
</xsd:element>
</xsd:schema>
</types>
<message name="operationException">
<part name="faultDetail" element="tns:faultDetail"/>
</message>
<portType name="StockQuoteUpdater">
<operation name="setLastTradePrice">
<input .../>
<output .../>
<fault name="operationException"
message="tns:operationException"/>
</operation>
</portType>
// fault mapping
@WebFault(name="faultDetail", targetNamespace="...")
class OperationException extends Exception {
OperationException(String message, FaultDetail faultInfo) {...}
OperationException(String message, FaultDetail faultInfo,
Throwable cause) {...}
FaultDetail getFaultInfo() {...}
}
Figure 2.3: Fault mapping
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2.6. Binding
mapping – this section describes those changes in the general case and specifically for the mandatory WSDL
1.1 protocol bindings.
♦ Conformance (Required WSDL extensions): An implementation MUST support mapping of the WSDL
1.1 specified extension elements for the WSDL SOAP and MIME bindings.
2.6.1
General Considerations
♦ Conformance (Unbound message parts): To preserve the protocol independence of mapped operations,
an implementation MUST NOT ignore unbound message parts when mapping from WSDL 1.1 to Java.
Instead an implementation MUST generate binding code that ignores in and in/out parameters mapped
from unbound parts and that presents out parameters mapped from unbound parts as null.
SOAP Binding
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This section describes changes to the WSDL 1.1 to Java mapping that may result from use of certain SOAP
binding extensions.
2.6.2.1 Header Binding Extension
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A soap:header element may be used to bind a part from a message to a SOAP header. As clarified by
R2208 in WS-I Basic Profile 1.1[17], the part may belong to either the message bound by the soap:body
or to a different message:
• If the part belongs to the message bound by the soap:body then it is mapped to a method parameter
as described in section 2.3. Such a part is always mapped using the non-wrapper style.
• If the part belongs to a different message than that bound by the soap:body then it may optionally
be mapped to an additional method parameter. When mapped to a parameter, the part is treated as an
additional unlisted part for the purposes of the mapping described in section 2.3. This additional part
does not affect eligibility for wrapper style mapping of the message bound by the soap:body (see
section 2.3.1); the additional part is always mapped using the non-wrapper style.
Note that the order of headers in a SOAP message is independent of the order of soap:header elements
in the WSDL binding – see R2751 in WS-I Basic Profile 1.0[8]. This causes problems when two or more
headers with the same qualified name are present in a message and one or more of those headers are bound
to a method parameter since it is not possible to determine which header maps to which parameter.
♦ Conformance (Duplicate headers in binding): When mapping, an implemention MUST report an error
if the binding of an operation includes two or more soap:header elements that would result in SOAP
headers with the same qualified name.
♦ Conformance (Duplicate headers in message): An implementation MUST generate a runtime error if,
during unmarshalling, there is more than one instance of a header whose qualified name is mapped to a
method parameter.
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R2209 in WS-I Simple SOAP Binding Profile 1.1[28] recommends that all parts of a message be bound but
does not require it.
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2.6.3
MIME Binding
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The presence of a mime:multipartRelated binding extension element as a child of a wsdl:input or
wsdl:output element in a wsdl:binding indicates that the corresponding messages may be serialized as
MIME packages. The WS-I Attachments Profile[29] describes two separate attachment mechanisms, both
based on use of the WSDL 1.1 MIME binding[5]:
wsiap:swaRef A schema type that may be used in the abstract message description to indicate a reference
to an attachment.
JAXB[10] describes the mapping from the WS-I defined wsiap:swaref schema type to Java and, since
JAX-WS inherits this capability, it is not discussed further here. Use of the mime:content construct is
outside the scope of JAXB mapping and the following subsection describes changes to the WSDL 1.1 to
Java mapping that results from its use.
2.6.3.1 mime:content
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Message parts are mapped to method parameters as described in section 2.3 regardless of whether the part
is bound to the SOAP message or to an attachment. JAXB rules are used to determine the Java type of
message parts based on the XML schema type referenced by the wsdl:part. However, when a message
part is bound to a MIME part (using the mime:content element of the WSDL MIME binding) additional
information is available that provides the MIME type of the data and this can optionally be used to narrow
the default JAXB mapping.
♦ Conformance (Use of MIME type information): An implementation MUST support using the jaxws:enableMIMEContent binding declaration defined in section 8.7.5 to enable or disable the use of the
additional metadata in mime:content elements when mapping from WSDL to Java.
JAXB defines a mapping between MIME types and Java types. When a part is bound using one or more
mime:content elements4 and use of the additional metadata is enabled then the JAXB mapping is customized to use the most specific type allowed by the set of MIME types described for the part in the binding.
The case where the parameter mode is INOUT and is bound to different mime bindings in the input and
output messages using the mime:content element MUST also be treated in the same way as described
above. Please refer to appendix H in the JAXB 2.0 specification [10] for details of the type mapping.
Parts bound to MIME using the mime:content WSDL extension are considered as additional unlisted parts
for the purposes of the mapping described in section 2.3. These additional parts do not affect eligibility for
wrapper style mapping of the message bound by the soap:body; additional parts are always mapped using
the non-wrapper style.
Figure 2.4 shows an example WSDL and two mapped interfaces: one without using the mime:content
metadata, the other using the additional metadata to narrow the binding. Note that in the latter the type of
the claimPhoto method parameter is Image rather than the default byte[].
♦ Conformance (MIME type mismatch): On receipt of a message where the MIME type of a part does not
match that described in the WSDL an implementation SHOULD throw a WebServiceException.
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mime:content A binding construct that may be used to bind a message part to an attachment.
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<!-- WSDL extract -->
<wsdl:message name="ClaimIn">
<wsdl:part name="body" element="types:ClaimDetail"/>
<wsdl:part name="ClaimPhoto" type="xsd:base64Binary"/>
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:portType name="ClaimPortType">
<wsdl:operation name="SendClaim">
<wsdl:input message="tns:ClaimIn"/>
</wsdl:operation>
</wsdl:portType>
<wsdl:binding name="ClaimBinding" type="tns:ClaimPortType">
<soapbind:binding style="document" transport="..."/>
<wsdl:operation name="SendClaim">
<soapbind:operation soapAction="..."/>
<wsdl:input>
<mime:multipartRelated>
<mime:part>
<soapbind:body parts="body" use="literal"/>
</mime:part>
<mime:part>
<mime:content part="ClaimPhoto" type="image/jpeg"/>
<mime:content part="ClaimPhoto" type="image/gif"/>
</mime:part>
</mime:multipartRelated>
</wsdl:input>
</wsdl:operation>
</wsdl:binding>
// Mapped Java interface without mime:content metadata
@WebService
public interface ClaimPortType {
public String sendClaim(ClaimDetail detail, byte claimPhoto[]);
}
// Mapped Java interface using mime:content metadata
@WebService
public interface ClaimPortType {
public String sendClaim(ClaimDetail detail, Image claimPhoto);
}
Figure 2.4: Use of mime:content metadata
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♦ Conformance (MIME part identification): An implementation MUST use the algorithm defined in the
WS-I Attachments Profile[29] when generating the MIME Content-ID header field value for a part bound
using mime:content.
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2.7
4
Service and Port
A wsdl:service is a collection of related wsdl:port elements. A wsdl:port element describes a port
type bound to a particular protocol (a wsdl:binding) that is available at particular endpoint address. On
the client side, a wsdl:service element is mapped to a generated service class that extends javax.xml.ws.Service (see section 4.1 for more information on the Service class).
♦ Conformance (Service superclass required): A generated service class MUST extend the javax.xml.ws.Service class.
♦ Conformance (Service class naming): In the absence of customization, the name of a generated service
class MUST be the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:service element mapped according to the
rules described in sections 2.8 and 2.8.1.
An application MAY customize the name of the generated service class using the jaxws:class binding
declaration defined in section 8.7.7.
In order to allow an implementation to identify the Web service that a generated service class corresponds to, the latter is required to be annotated with javax.xml.ws.WebServiceClient annotation.
The annotation contains all the information necessary to locate a WSDL document and uniquely identify a
wsdl:service inside it.
♦ Conformance (javax.xml.ws.WebServiceClient required): A generated service class MUST be
annotated with a javax.xml.ws.WebServiceClient annotation.
JAX-WS 2.0 mandates that two constructors be present on every generated service class.
♦ Conformance: The implementation class MUST have a public constructor that takes two arguments,
the wsdl location (a java.net.URL) and the service name (a javax.xml.namespace.QName). This
constructor MUST call the protected constructor in javax.xml.ws.Service passing as arguments the
WSDL location and the service name values with which it was invoked.
For each port in the service, the generated client side service class contains the following methods, one for
each port defined by the WSDL service and whose binding is supported by the JAX-WS implementation:
getPortName() One required method that takes no parameters and returns a proxy that implements the
mapped service endpoint interface. The method generated delegates to the Service.getPort(...)
method passing it the port name. The value of the port name MUST be equal to the value specified in
the mandatory WebEndpoint annotation on the method itself.
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♦ Conformance: A generated service class MUST have a default (i.e. zero-argument) public constructor. This constructor MUST call the protected constructor declared in javax.xml.ws.Service, passing as arguments the WSDL location and the service name. The values of the actual arguments for this
call MUST be equal (in the java.lang.Object.equals sense) to the values specified in the mandatory
WebServiceClient annotation on the generated service class itself.
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2.7. Service and Port
♦ Conformance (Failed getPort Method): A generated getPortName method MUST throw javax.xml.ws.WebServiceException on failure.
The value of PortName in the above is derived as follows: the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:port
element is first mapped to a Java identifier according to the rules described in section2.8, this Java identifier
is then treated as a JavaBean property for the purposes of deriving the getPortName method name.
An application MAY customize the name of the generated method for a port using the jaxws:method
binding declaration defined in section 8.7.8.
In order to enable an implementation to determine the wsdl:port that a port getter method corresponds to,
the latter is required to be annotated with a javax.xml.ws.WebEndpoint annotation.
♦ Conformance (javax.xml.ws.WebEndpoint required): The getPortName methods of generated service interface MUST be annotated with a javax.xml.ws.WebEndpoint annotation.
2.7.1
Example
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The following shows a WSDL extract and the resulting generated service class.
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<!-- WSDL extract -->
<wsdl:service name="StockQuoteService">
<wsdl:port name="StockQuoteHTTPPort" binding="StockQuoteHTTPBinding"/>
<wsdl:port name="StockQuoteSMTPPort" binding="StockQuoteSMTPBinding"/>
</wsdl:service>
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// Generated Service Class
@WebServiceClient(name="StockQuoteService",
targetNamespace="http://example.com/stocks",
wsdlLocation="http://example.com/stocks.wsdl")
public class StockQuoteService extends javax.xml.ws.Service {
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public StockQuoteService() {
super(new URL("http://example.com/stocks.wsdl"),
new QName("http://example.com/stocks",
"StockQuoteService"));
}
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public StockQuoteService(URL wsdlLocation, QName serviceName) {
super(wsdlLocation, serviceName);
}
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@WebEndpoint(name="StockQuoteHTTPPort")
public StockQuoteProvider getStockQuoteHTTPPort() {
return (StockQuoteProvider)super.getPort("StockQuoteHTTPPort",
StockQuoteProvider.class);
}
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@WebEndpoint(name="StockQuoteSMTPPort")
public StockQuoteProvider getStockQuoteSMTPPort() {
return (StockQuoteProvider)super.getPort("StockQuoteSMTPPort",
StockQuoteProvider.class);
}
}
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In the above, StockQuoteProvider is the service endpoint interface mapped from the WSDL port type
for both referenced bindings.
2.8
XML Names
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Appendix C of JAXB 1.0[9] defines a mapping from XML names to Java identifiers. JAX-WS uses this
mapping to convert WSDL identifiers to Java identifiers with the following modifications and additions:
Method identifiers When mapping wsdl:operation names to Java method identifiers, the get or set
prefix is not added. Instead the first word in the word-list has its first character converted to lower
case.
Parameter identifiers When mapping wsdl:part names or wrapper child local names to Java method
parameter identifiers, the first word in the word-list has its first character converted to lower case.
Clashes with Java language reserved words are reported as errors and require use of appropriate customizations to fix the clash.
2.8.1
Name Collisions
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WSDL name scoping rules may result in name collisions when mapping from WSDL 1.1 to Java. E.g., a
port type and a service are both mapped to Java classes but WSDL allows both to be given the same name.
This section defines rules for resolving such name collisions.
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The order of precedence for name collision resolution is as follows (highest to lowest);
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1. Service endpoint interface
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2. Non-exception Java class
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3. Exception class
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If a name collision occurs between two identifiers with different precedences, the lower precedence item has
its name changed as follows:
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Non-exception Java class The suffix “ Type” is added to the class name.
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Exception class The suffix “ Exception” is added to the class name.
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Service class The suffix “ Service” is added to the class name.
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If a name collision occurs between two identifiers with the same precedence, this is reported as an error
and requires developer intervention to correct. The error may be corrected either by modifying the source
WSDL or by specifying a customized name mapping.
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If a name collision occurs between a mapped Java method and a method in javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider (an interface that proxies are required to implement, see section 4.2), the prefix “ ” is added to
the mapped method.
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Chapter 3
Java to WSDL 1.1 Mapping
This chapter describes the mapping from Java to WSDL 1.1. This mapping is used when generating web
service endpoints from existing Java interfaces.
♦ Conformance (WSDL 1.1 support): Implementations MUST support mapping Java to WSDL 1.1.
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The following sections describe the default mapping from each Java construct to the equivalent WSDL 1.1
artifact.
An application MAY customize the mapping using the annotations defined in section 7.
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♦ Conformance (Standard annotations): An implementation MUST support the use of annotations defined
in section 7 to customize the Java to WSDL 1.1 mapping.
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Java Names
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♦ Conformance (Java identifier mapping): In the absence of annotations described in this specification,
Java identifiers MUST be mapped to XML names using the algorithm defined in appendix B of SOAP
1.2 Part 2[4].
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Name Collisions
WS-I Basic Profile 1.0[8] (see R2304) requires operations within a wsdl:portType to be uniquely named –
support for customization of the operation name allows this requirement to be met when a Java SEI contains
overloaded methods.
♦ Conformance (Method name disambiguation): An implementation MUST support the use of the javax.jws.WebMethod annotation to disambiguate overloaded Java method names when mapped to WSDL.
3.2
Package
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A Java package is mapped to a wsdl:definitions element and an associated targetNamespace attribute. The wsdl:definitions element acts as a container for other WSDL elements that together form
the WSDL description of the constructs in the corresponding Java package.
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A default value for the targetNamespace attribute is derived from the package name as follows:
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1. The package name is tokenized using the “.” character as a delimiter.
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2. The order of the tokens is reversed.
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3. The value of the targetNamespace attribute is obtained by concatenating “http://”to the list of
tokens separated by “ . ”and “/”.
E.g., the Java package “com.example.ws” would be mapped to the target namespace “http://ws.example.com/ ”.
♦ Conformance (Package name mapping): The javax.jws.WebService annotation (see section 7.10.1)
MAY be used to specify the target namespace to use for a Web service and MUST be used for classes or
interfaces in no package. In the absence of a javax.jws.WebService annotation the Java package name
MUST be mapped to the value of the wsdl:definitions element’s targetNamespace attribute using
the algorithm defined above.
No specific authoring style is required for the mapped WSDL document; implementations are free to generate WSDL that uses the WSDL and XML Schema import directives.
♦ Conformance (WSDL and XML Schema import directives): Generated WSDL MUST comply with the
WS-I Basic Profile 1.0[8] restrictions (See R2001, R2002, and R2003) on usage of WSDL and XML Schema
import directives.
3.3
Class
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A Java class (not an interface) annotated with a javax.jws.WebService annotation can be used to define
a Web service.
In order to allow for a separation between Web service interface and implementation, if the WebService
annotation on the class under consideration has a endpointInterface element, then the interface referred
by this element is for all purposes the SEI associated with the class.
Otherwise, the class implicitly defines a service endpoint interface (SEI) which comprises all of the public
methods that satisfy one of the following conditions:
1. They are annotated with the javax.jws.WebMethod annotation with the exclude element set to
false or missing (since false is the default for this annotation element).
2. They are not annotated with the javax.jws.WebMethod annotation but their declaring class has a
javax.jws.WebService annotation.
For mapping purposes, this implicit SEI and its methods are considered to be annotated with the same Web
service-related annotations that the original class and its methods have.
In pratice, in order to exclude a public method of a class annotated with WebService and not directly
specifying a endpointInterface from the implicitly defined SEI, it is necessary to annotate the method
with a WebMethod annotation with the exclude element set to true.
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♦ Conformance (Class mapping): An implementation MUST support the mapping of javax.jws.Web-
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Service annotated classes to implicit service endpoint interfaces.
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3.4
Interface
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A Java service endpoint interface (SEI) is mapped to a wsdl:portType element. The wsdl:portType
element acts as a container for other WSDL elements that together form the WSDL description of the
methods in the corresponding Java SEI. An SEI is a Java interface that meets all of the following criteria:
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• It MUST carry a javax.jws.WebService annotation (see 7.10.1).
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• Any of its methods MAY carry a javax.jws.WebMethod annotation (see 7.10.2).
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• javax.jws.WebMethod if used, MUST NOT have the exclude element set to true.
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• All method parameters and return types are compatible with the JAXB 2.0[10] Java to XML Schema
mapping definition
♦ Conformance (portType naming): The javax.jws.WebService annotation (see section 7.10.1) MAY
be used to customize the name and targetNamespace attributes of the wsdl:portType element. If not
customized, the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:portType element MUST be the name of the SEI
not including the package name and the target namespace is computed as defined above in section 3.2.
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Figure 3.1 shows an example of a Java SEI and the corresponding wsdl:portType.
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Inheritance
WSDL 1.1 does not define a standard representation for the inheritance of wsdl:portType elements. When
mapping an SEI that inherits from another interface, the SEI is treated as if all methods of the inherited
interface were defined within the SEI.
♦ Conformance (Inheritance flattening): A mapped wsdl:portType element MUST contain WSDL definitions for all the methods of the corresponding Java SEI including all inherited methods.
♦ Conformance (Inherited interface mapping): An implementation MAY map inherited interfaces to additional wsdl:portType elements within the wsdl:definitions element.
3.5
Method
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Each public method in a Java SEI is mapped to a wsdl:operation element in the corresponding wsdl:portType plus one or more wsdl:message elements.
♦ Conformance (Operation naming): In the absence of customizations, the value of the name attribute of
the wsdl:operation element MUST be the name of the Java method. The javax.jws.WebMethod (see
7.10.2) annotation MAY be used to customize the value of the name attribute of the wsdl:operation
element and MUST be used to resolve naming conflicts. If the exclude element of the javax.jws.WebMethod is set to true then the Java method MUST NOT be present in the wsdl as a wsdl:operation
element.
Methods are either one-way or two-way: one way methods have an input but produce no output, two way
methods have an input and produce an output. Section 3.5.1 describes one way operations further.
The wsdl:operation element corresponding to each method has one or more child elements as follows:
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• A wsdl:input element that refers to an associated wsdl:message element to describe the operation
input.
• (Two-way methods only) an optional wsdl:output element that refers to a wsdl:message to describe the operation output.
• (Two-way methods only) zero or more wsdl:fault child elements, one for each exception thrown
by the method. The wsdl:fault child elements refer to associated wsdl:message elements to
describe each fault. See section 3.7 for further details on exception mapping.
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The value of a wsdl:message element’s name attribute is not significant but by convention it is normally
equal to the corresponding operation name for input messages and the operation name concatenated with
“Response” for output messages. Naming of fault messages is described in section section 3.7.
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Each wsdl:message element has one of the following 1 :
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Document style A single wsdl:part child element that refers, via an element attribute, to a global element declaration in the wsdl:types section.
RPC style Zero or more wsdl:part child elements (one per method parameter and one for a non-void
return value) that refer, via a type attribute, to named type declarations in the wsdl:types section.
Figure 3.1 shows an example of mapping a Java interface containing a single method to WSDL 1.1 using
document style. Figure 3.2 shows an example of mapping a Java interface containing a single method to
WSDL 1.1 using RPC style.
Section 3.6 describes the mapping from Java methods and their parameters to corresponding global element
declarations and named types in the wsdl:types section.
3.5.1
One Way Operations
♦ Conformance (One-way mapping): Implementations MUST support use of the javax.jws.OneWay (see
7.10.3) annotation to specify which methods to map to one-way operations. Methods that are not annotated
with javax.jws.OneWay MUST NOT be mapped to one-way operations.
♦ Conformance (One-way mapping errors): Implementations MUST prevent mapping to one-way operations of methods that do not meet the necessary criteria.
Method Parameters and Return Type
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The javax.jws.WebParam and javax.jws.WebResult annotations can introduce additional parts into messages when the header element is true.
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A Java method’s parameters and return type are mapped to components of either the messages or the
global element declarations mapped from the method. Parameters can be mapped to components of the
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Only Java methods whose return type is void, that have no parameters that implement Holder and that do
not throw any checked exceptions can be mapped to one-way operations. Not all Java methods that fulfill
this requirement are amenable to become one-way operations and automatic choice between two-way and
one-way mapping is not possible.
3.6
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// Java
package com.example;
@WebService
public interface StockQuoteProvider {
float getPrice(String tickerSymbol)
throws TickerException;
}
<!-- WSDL extract -->
<types>
<xsd:schema targetNamespace="...">
<!-- element declarations -->
<xsd:element name="getPrice"
type="tns:getPriceType"/>
<xsd:element name="getPriceResponse"
type="tns:getPriceResponseType"/>
<xsd:element name="TickerException"
type="tns:TickerExceptionType"/>
<!-- type definitions -->
...
</xsd:schema>
</types>
<message name="getPrice">
<part name="getPrice" element="tns:getPrice"/>
</message>
<message name="getPriceResponse">
<part name="getPriceResponse" element="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
</message>
<message name="TickerException">
<part name="TickerException" element="tns:TickerException"/>
</message>
<portType name="StockQuoteProvider">
<operation name="getPrice">
<input message="tns:getPrice"/>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
<fault message="tns:TickerException"/>
</operation>
</portType>
Figure 3.1: Java interface to WSDL portType mapping using document style
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// Java
package com.example;
@WebService
public interface StockQuoteProvider {
float getPrice(String tickerSymbol)
throws TickerException;
}
<!-- WSDL extract -->
<types>
<xsd:schema targetNamespace="...">
<!-- element declarations -->
<xsd:element name="TickerException"
type="tns:TickerExceptionType"/>
<!-- type definitions -->
...
</xsd:schema>
</types>
<message name="getPrice">
<part name="tickerSymbol" type="xsd:string"/>
</message>
<message name="getPriceResponse">
<part name="return" type="xsd:float"/>
</message>
<message name="TickerException">
<part name="TickerException" element="tns:TickerException"/>
</message>
<portType name="StockQuoteProvider">
<operation name="getPrice">
<input message="tns:getPrice"/>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
<fault message="tns:TickerException"/>
</operation>
</portType>
Figure 3.2: Java interface to WSDL portType mapping using RPC style
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3.6. Method Parameters and Return Type
message or global element declaration for either the operation input message, operation output message
or both. The mapping depends on the parameter classification.The javax.jws.WebParam annotation’s
header element MAY be used to map parameters to SOAP headers. Header parameters MUST be included
as soap:header elements in the operation’s input message. The javax.jws.WebResult annotation’s
header element MAY be used to map results to SOAP headers. Header results MUST be included as
soap:header elements in the operation’s output message.
3.6.1
Parameter and Return Type Classification
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Method parameters and return type are classified as follows:
8
in The value is transmitted by copy from a service client to the SEI but is not returned from the service
endpoint to the client.
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out The value is returned by copy from an SEI to the client but is not transmitted from the client to the
service endpoint implementation.
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in/out The value is transmitted by copy from a service client to the SEI and is returned by copy from the
SEI to the client.
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A methods return type is always out. For method parameters, holder classes are used to determine the
classification. javax.xml.ws.Holder. A parameter whose type is a parameterized javax.xml.ws.Holder<T> class is classified as in/out or out, all other parameters are classified as in.
♦ Conformance (Parameter classification): The javax.jws.WebParam annotation (see 7.10.4) MAY be
used to specify whether a holder parameter is treated as in/out or out. If not specified, the default MUST
be in/out.
♦ Conformance (Parameter naming): The javax.jws.WebParam annotation (see 7.10.4) MAY be used to
specify the name of the wsdl:part or XML Schema element declaration corresponding to a Java parameter.
If both the name and partName elements are used in the javax.jws.WebParam annotation then the
partName MUST be used for the wsdl:part name attribute and the name element from the annotation
will be ignored. If not specified, the default is “argN”, where N is replaced with the zero-based argument
index. Thus, for instance, the first argument of a method will have a default parameter name of “arg0”, the
second one “arg1”and so on.
♦ Conformance (Result naming): The javax.jws.WebResult annotation (see 7.10.4) MAY be used to
specify the name of the wsdl:part or XML Schema element declaration corresponding to the Java method
return type. If both the name and partName elements are used in the javax.jws.WebResult annotations then the partName MUST be used for the wsdl:part name attribute and the name elment from the
annotation will be ignored. In the absence of customizations, the default name is return.
♦ Conformance (Header mapping of parameters and results): The javax.jws.WebParam annotation’s header element MAY be used to map parameters to SOAP headers. Header parameters MUST be included
as soap:header elements in the operation’s input message. The javax.jws.WebResult annotation’s
header element MAY be used to map results to SOAP headers. Header results MUST be included as
soap:header elements in the operation’s output message.
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3.6.2
Use of JAXB
1
JAXB defines a mapping from Java classes to XML Schema constructs. JAX-WS uses this mapping to
generate XML Schema named type and global element declarations that are referred to from within the
WSDL message constructs generated for each operation.
3
Three styles of Java to WSDL mapping are supported: document wrapped, document bare and RPC. The
styles differ in what XML Schema constructs are generated for a method. The three styles are described in
the following subsections.
6
The javax.jws.SOAPBinding annotation MAY be used to specify at the type level which style to use for
all methods it contains or on a per method basis if the style is document.
3.6.2.1 Document Wrapped
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This style is identified by a javax.jws.SOAPBinding annotation with the following properties: a style
of DOCUMENT, a use of LITERAL and a parameterStyle of WRAPPED.
For the purposes of utilizing the JAXB mapping, each method is converted to two Java bean classes: one for
the method input (henceforth called the request bean) and one for the method output (henceforth called the
response bean).
♦ Conformance (Default wrapper bean names): In the absence of customizations, the wrapper request bean
class MUST be named the same as the method and the wrapper response bean class MUST be named the
same as the method with a “Response” suffix. The first letter of each bean name is capitalized to follow Java
class naming conventions.
♦ Conformance (Default wrapper bean package): In the absence of customizations, the wrapper beans package MUST be a generated jaxws subpackage of the SEI package.
The javax.xml.ws.RequestWrapper and javax.xml.ws.ResponseWrapper annotations (see 7.3
and 7.4) MAY be used to customize the name of the generated wrapper bean classes.
♦ Conformance (Wrapper element names): The javax.xml.ws.RequestWrapper and javax.xml.ws.ResponseWrapper annotations (see 7.3 and 7.4) MAY be used to specify the qualified name of the elements generated for the wrapper beans.
♦ Conformance (Wrapper bean name clash): Generated bean classes must have unique names within a package and MUST NOT clash with other classes in that package. Clashes during generation MUST be reported
as an error and require user intervention via name customization to correct. Note that some platforms do not
distiguish filenames based on case so comparisons MUST ignore case.
A request bean is generated containing properties for each in and in/out non-header parameter. A response bean is generated containing properties for the method return value, each out non-header parameter,
and in/out non-header parameter. Method return values are represented by an out property named “return”. The order of the properties in the request bean is the same as the order of parameters in the method
signature. The order of the properties in the response bean is the property corresponding to the return value
(if present) followed by the properties for the parameters in the same order as the parameters in the method
signature.
The request and response beans are generated with the appropriate JAXB customizations to result in a global
element declaration for each bean class when mapped to XML Schema by JAXB. Whereas the element name
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is derived from the RequestWrapper or ResponseWrapper annotations, its type is named according to
the operation name (for the local part) and the target namespace for the portType that contains the operation
(for the namespace name).
2
Figure 3.3 illustrates this conversion.
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float getPrice(@WebParam(name="tickerSymbol") String sym);
@XmlRootElement(name="getPrice", targetNamespace="...")
@XmlType(name="getPrice", targetNamespace="...")
@XmlAccessorType(AccessType.FIELD)
public class GetPrice {
@XmlElement(name="tickerSymbol", targetNamespace="")
public String tickerSymbol;
}
@XmlRootElement(name="getPriceResponse", targetNamespace="...")
@XmlType(name="getPriceResponse", targetNamespace="...")
@XmlAccessorType(AccessType.FIELD)
public class GetPriceResponse {
@XmlElement(name="return", targetNamespace="")
public float _return;
}
Figure 3.3: Wrapper mode bean representation of an operation
When the JAXB mapping to XML Schema is utilized this results in global element declarations for the
mapped request and response beans with child elements for each method parameter according to the parameter classification:
6
in The parameter is mapped to a child element of the global element declaration for the request bean.
8
out The parameter or return value is mapped to a child element of the global element declaration for the
5
7
9
response bean. In the case of a parameter, the class of the value of the holder class (see section 3.6.1)
is used for the mapping rather than the holder class itself.
11
in/out The parameter is mapped to a child element of the global element declarations for the request and
12
response beans. The class of the value of the holder class (see section 3.6.1) is used for the mapping
rather than the holder class itself.
14
The global element declarations are used as the values of the wsdl:part elements element attribute, see
figure3.1.
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3.6.2.2 Document Bare
17
This style is identified by a javax.jws.SOAPBinding annotation with the following properties: a style
of DOCUMENT, a use of LITERAL and a parameterStyle of BARE.
19
In order to qualify for use of bare mapping mode a Java method must fulfill all of the following criteria:
20
1. It must have at most one in or in/out non-header parameter.
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Chapter 3. Java to WSDL 1.1 Mapping
2. If it has a return type other than void it must have no in/out or out non-header parameters.
1
3. If it has a return type of void it must have at most one in/out or out non-header parameter.
2
If present, the type of the input parameter is mapped to a named XML Schema type using the mapping
defined by JAXB. If the input parameter is a holder class then the class of the value of the holder is used
instead.
If present, the type of the output parameter or return value is mapped to a named XML Schema type using
the mapping defined by JAXB. If an output parameter is used then the class of the value of the holder class
is used.
A global element declaration is generated for the method input and, in the absence of a WebParam annotation, its local name is equal to the operation name. A global element declaration is generated for the
method output and, in the absence of a WebParam or WebResult annotation, the local name is equal to the
operation name suffixed with “Response”. The type of the two elements depends on whether a type was
generated for the corresponding element or not:
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Named type generated The type of the global element is the named type.
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No type generated The type of the element is an anonymous empty type.
15
The namespace name of the input and output global elements is the value of the targetNamespace attribute of the WSDL definitions element.
The global element declarations are used as the values of the wsdl:part elements element attribute, see
figure3.1.
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3.6.2.3 RPC
20
This style is identified by a javax.jws.SOAPBinding annotation with the following properties: a style
of RPC, a use of LITERAL and a parameterStyle of WRAPPED2 .
22
The Java types of each in, out and in/out parameter and the return value are mapped to named XML
Schema types using the mapping defined by JAXB. For out and in/out parameters the class of the value
of the holder is used rather than the holder itself.
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Each method parameter and the return type is mapped to a message part according to the parameter classification:
27
in The parameter is mapped to a part of the input message.
28
out The parameter or return value is mapped to a part of the output message.
29
in/out The parameter is mapped to a part of the input and output message.
30
The named types are used as the values of the wsdl:part elements type attribute, see figure 3.2. The
value of the name attribute of each wsdl:part element is the name of the corresponding method parameter
or “return”for the method return value.
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Use of RPC style requires use of WRAPPED parameter style. Deviations from this is an error
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3.7. Service Specific Exception
3.7
Service Specific Exception
1
A service specific Java exception is mapped to a wsdl:fault element, a wsdl:message element with
a single child wsdl:part element and an XML Schema global element declaration. The wsdl:fault
element appears as a child of the wsdl:operation element that corresponds to the Java method that
throws the exception and refers to the wsdl:message element. The wsdl:part element refers to an XML
Schema global element declaration that describes the fault.
♦ Conformance (Exception naming): In the absence of customizations, the name of the global element declaration for a mapped exception MUST be the name of the Java exception. The javax.xml.ws.WebFault
annotation MAY be used to customize the local name and namespace name of the element.
JAXB defines the mapping from a Java bean to XML Schema element declarations and type definitions
and is used to generate the global element declaration that describes the fault. For exceptions that match
the pattern described in section 2.5 (i.e. exceptions that have a getFaultInfo method and WebFault
annotation), the FaultBean is used as input to JAXB when mapping the exception to XML Schema. For
exceptions that do not match the pattern described in section 2.5, JAX-WS maps those exceptions to Java
beans and then uses those Java beans as input to the JAXB mapping. The following algorithm is used to
map non-matching exception classes to the corresponding Java beans for use with JAXB:
1. In the absence of customizations, the name of the bean is the same as the name of the Exception
suffixed with “Bean”.
2. In the absence of customizations, the package of the bean is a generated jaxws subpackage of the
SEI package. E.g. if the SEI package is com.example.stockquote then the package of the bean
would be com.example.stockquote.jaxws.
3. For each getter in the exception and its superclasses, a property of the same type and name is added
to the bean. The getCause, getLocalizedMessage and getStackTrace getters from java.lang.Throwable and the getClass getter from java.lang.Object are excluded from the list
of getters to be mapped.
4. The bean is annotated with a JAXB @XmlRootElement annotation whose name property is set, in
the absence of customizations, to the name of the exception.
♦ Conformance (Fault bean name clash): Generated bean classes must have unique names within a package
and MUST NOT clash with other classes in that package. Clashes during generation MUST be reported as
an error and require user intervention via name customization to correct. Note that some platforms do not
distiguish filenames based on case so comparisons MUST ignore case.
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Figure 3.4 illustrates this mapping.
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33
Bindings
In WSDL 1.1, an abstract port type can be bound to multiple protocols.
34
♦ Conformance (Binding selection): An implementation MUST generate a WSDL binding according to
the rules of the binding denoted by the BindingType annotation (see 7.8), if present, otherwise the default
is the SOAP 1.1/HTTP binding (see 10).
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@WebFault(name="UnknownTickerFault", targetNamespace="...")
public class UnknownTicker extends Exception {
...
public UnknownTicker(Sting ticker) { ... }
public UnknownTicker(Sting ticker, String message) { ... }
public UnknownTicker(Sting ticker, String message, Throwable cause) {
... }
public String getTicker() { ... }
}
@XmlRootElement(name="UnknownTickerFault" targetNamespace="...")
public class UnknownTickerFault {
...
public UnknownTickerBean() { ... }
public String getTicker() { ... }
public void setTicker(String ticker) { ... }
public String getMessage() { ... }
public void setMessage(String message) { ... }
}
Figure 3.4: Mapping of an exception to a bean for use with JAXB.
Each protocol binding extends a common extensible skeleton structure and there is one instance of each such
structure for each protocol binding. An example of a port type and associated binding skeleton structure is
shown in figure3.5.
2
The common skeleton structure is mapped from Java as described in the following subsections.
4
3.8.1
5
Interface
A Java SEI is mapped to a wsdl:binding element and zero or more wsdl:port extensibility elements.
1
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6
The wsdl:binding element acts as a container for other WSDL elements that together form the WSDL description of the binding to a protocol of the corresponding wsdl:portType. The value of the name attribute
of the wsdl:binding is not significant, by convention it contains the qualified name of the corresponding
wsdl:portType suffixed with “Binding”.
10
The wsdl:port extensibility elements define the binding specific endpoint address for a given port, see
section 3.10.
12
3.8.2
13
Method and Parameters
Each method in a Java SEI is mapped to a wsdl:operation child element of the corresponding wsdl:binding. The value of the name attribute of the wsdl:operation element is the same as the corresponding wsdl:operation element in the bound wsdl:portType. The wsdl:operation element has
wsdl:input, wsdl:output, and wsdl:fault child elements if they are present in the corresponding
wsdl:operation child element of the wsdl:portType being bound.
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<portType name="StockQuoteProvider">
<operation name="getPrice" parameterOrder="tickerSymbol">
<input message="tns:getPrice"/>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
<fault message="tns:unknowntickerException"/>
</operation>
</portType>
<binding name="StockQuoteProviderBinding">
<!-- binding specific extensions possible here -->
<operation name="getPrice">
<!-- binding specific extensions possible here -->
<input message="tns:getPrice">
<!-- binding specific extensions possible here -->
</input>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse">
<!-- binding specific extensions possible here -->
</output>
<fault message="tns:unknowntickerException">
<!-- binding specific extensions possible here -->
</fault>
</operation>
</binding>
Figure 3.5: WSDL portType and associated binding
3.9
SOAP HTTP Binding
1
This section describes the additional WSDL binding elements generated when mapping Java to WSDL 1.1
using the SOAP HTTP binding.
♦ Conformance (SOAP binding support): Implementations MUST be able to generate SOAP HTTP bindings when mapping Java to WSDL 1.1.
2
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4
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Figure 3.6 shows an example of a SOAP HTTP binding.
6
3.9.1
7
Interface
A Java SEI is mapped to a soap:binding child element of the corresponding wsdl:binding element
plus a soap:address child element of any corresponding wsdl:port element (see section 3.10).
The value of the transport attribute of the soap:binding is http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http. The value of the style attribute of the soap:binding is either document or rpc.
♦ Conformance (SOAP binding style required): Implementations MUST include a style attribute on a
generated soap:binding.
3.9.2
Method and Parameters
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<binding name="StockQuoteProviderBinding">
<soap:binding
transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http"
style="document"/>
<operation name="getPrice">
<soap:operation style="document|rpc"/>
<input message="tns:getPrice">
<soap:body use="literal"/>
</input>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse">
<soap:body use="literal"/>
</output>
<fault message="tns:unknowntickerException">
<soap:fault use="literal"/>
</fault>
</operation>
</binding>
Figure 3.6: WSDL SOAP HTTP binding
specified, the value defaults to the value of the style attribute of the soap:binding. WS-I Basic Profile[8]
requires that all operations within a given SOAP HTTP binding instance have the same binding style.
The parameters of a Java method are mapped to soap:body or soap:header child elements of the
wsdl:input and wsdl:output elements for each wsdl:operation binding element. The value of the
use attribute of the soap:body is literal. Figure 3.7 shows an example using document style, figure3.8
1
2
3
4
5
shows the same example using rpc style.
6
3.10
7
Service and Ports
A Java service implementation class is mapped to a single wsdl:service element that is a child of a
wsdl:definitions element for the appropriate target namespace. The latter is mapped from the value of
the targetNamespace element of the WebService annotation, if non-empty value, otherwise from the
package of the Java service implementation class according to the rules in section 3.2.
In mapping a @WebService-annotated class (see 3.3) to a wsdl:service, the serviceName element
of the WebService annotation are used to derive the service name. The value of the name attribute of
the wsdl:service element is computed according to the JSR-181 [13] specification. It is given by the
serviceName element of the WebService annotation, if present with a non-default value, otherwise the
name of the implementation class with the “Service”suffix appended to it.
8
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♦ Conformance (Service creation): Implementations MUST be able to map classes annotated with the javax-17
.jws.WebService annotation to WSDL wsdl:service elements.
18
A WSDL 1.1 service is a collection of related wsdl:port elements. A wsdl:port element describes a
port type bound to a particular protocol (a wsdl:binding) that is available at particular endpoint address.
Each desired port is represented by a wsdl:port child element of the single wsdl:service element
mapped from the Java package. JAX-WS 2.0 allows specifying one port of one binding type for each
service defined by the application. Implementations MAY support additional ports, as long as their names
do not conflict with the standard one.
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<types>
<schema targetNamespace="...">
<xsd:element name="getPrice" type="tns:getPriceType"/>
<xsd:complexType name="getPriceType">
<xsd:sequence>
<xsd:element name="tickerSymbol" type="xsd:string"/>
</xsd:sequence>
</xsd:complexType>
<xsd:element name="getPriceResponse"
type="tns:getPriceResponseType"/>
<xsd:complexType name="getPriceResponseType">
<xsd:sequence>
<xsd:element name="return" type="xsd:float"/>
</xsd:sequence>
</xsd:complexType>
</schema>
</types>
<message name="getPrice">
<part name="getPrice"
element="tns:getPrice"/>
</message>
<message name="getPriceResponse">
<part name="getPriceResponse" element="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
</message>
<portType name="StockQuoteProvider">
<operation name="getPrice" parameterOrder="tickerSymbol">
<input message="tns:getPrice"/>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
</operation>
</portType>
<binding name="StockQuoteProviderBinding">
<soap:binding
transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http" style="document"/>
<operation name="getPrice" parameterOrder="tickerSymbol">
<soap:operation/>
<input message="tns:getPrice">
<soap:body use="literal"/>
</input>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse">
<soap:body use="literal"/>
</output>
</operation>
</binding>
Figure 3.7: WSDL definition using document style
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<types>
<schema targetNamespace="...">
<xsd:element name="getPrice" type="tns:getPriceType"/>
<xsd:complexType name="getPriceType">
<xsd:sequence>
<xsd:element form="unqualified" name="tickerSymbol"
type="xsd:string"/>
</xsd:sequence>
</xsd:complexType>
<xsd:element name="getPriceResponse"
type="tns:getPriceResponseType"/>
<xsd:complexType name="getPriceResponseType">
<xsd:sequence>
<xsd:element form="unqualified" name="return"
type="xsd:float"/>
</xsd:sequence>
</xsd:complexType>
</schema>
</types>
<message name="getPrice">
<part name="tickerSymbol" type="xsd:string"/>
</message>
<message name="getPriceResponse">
<part name="result" type="xsd:float"/>
</message>
<portType name="StockQuoteProvider">
<operation name="getPrice">
<input message="tns:getPrice"/>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse"/>
</operation>
</portType>
<binding name="StockQuoteProviderBinding">
<soap:binding
transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http" style="rpc"/>
<operation name="getPrice">
<soap:operation/>
<input message="tns:getPrice">
<soap:body use="literal"/>
</input>
<output message="tns:getPriceResponse">
<soap:body use="literal"/>
</output>
</operation>
</binding>
Figure 3.8: WSDL definition using rpc style
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3.10. Service and Ports
♦ Conformance (Port selection): The portName element of the WebService annotation, if present, MUST
be used to derive the port name to use in WSDL. In the absence of a portName element, an implementation
MUST use the value of the name element of the WebService annotation, if present, suffixed with “Port”.
Otherwise, an implementation MUST use the simple name of the class annotated with WebService suffixed
with “Port”.
1
2
3
4
5
♦ Conformance (Port binding): The WSDL port defined for a service MUST refer to a binding of the type
indicated by the BindingType annotation on the service implementation class (see 3.8).
7
Binding specific child extension elements of the wsdl:port element define the endpoint address for a port.
E.g. see the soap:address element described in section 3.9.1.
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Chapter 4
Client APIs
This chapter describes the standard APIs provided for client side use of JAX-WS. These APIs allow a client
to create proxies for remote service endpoints and dynamically construct operation invocations.
Conformance requirements in this chapter use the term ‘implementation’ to refer to a client side JAX-WS
runtime system.
4.1
javax.xml.ws.Service
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Service is an abstraction that represents a WSDL service. A WSDL service is a collection of related
ports, each of which consists of a port type bound to a particular protocol and available at a particular
endpoint address.
10
Service instances are created as described in section 4.1.1. Service instances provide facilities to:
11
• Create an instance of a proxy via one of the getPort methods. See section 4.2.3 for information on
proxies.
• Create a Dispatch instance via the createDispatch method. See section 4.3 for information on
the Dispatch interface.
• Create a new port via the addPort method. Such ports only include binding and endpoint information
and are thus only suitable for creating Dispatch instances since these do not require WSDL port type
information.
• Configure per-service, per-port, and per-protocol message handlers using a handler resolver (see section 9.2.1.1).
• Configure the java.util.concurrent.Executor to be used for asynchronous invocations (see
section 4.1.4).
♦ Conformance (Service completeness): A Service implementation MUST be capable of creating proxies, Dispatch instances, and new ports.
All the service methods except the static create methods and the constructors delegate to javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate, see section 6.3.
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4.1.1
Service Usage
1
4.1.1.1 Dynamic case
2
In the dynamic case, when nothing is generated, a J2SE service client uses Service.create to create
Service instances, the following code illustrates this process.
1
2
3
URL wsdlLocation = new URL("http://example.org/my.wsdl");
QName serviceName = new QName("http://example.org/sample", "MyService");
Service s = Service.create(wsdlLocation, serviceName);
The following create methods may be used:
document and service name.
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create(QName serviceName) Returns a service object for a service with the given name. No WSDL
document is attached to the service.
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♦ Conformance (Service Creation Failure): If a create method fails to create a service object, it MUST
throw WebServiceException. The cause of that exception SHOULD be set to an exception that provides
more information on the cause of the error (e.g. an IOException).
4.1.1.2 Static case
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When starting from a WSDL document, a concrete service implementation class MUST be generated as
defined in section 2.7. The generated implementation class will have two public constructors, one with no
arguments and one with two arguments, representing the wsdl location (a java.net.URL) and the service
name (a javax.xml.namespace.QName) respectively.
When using the no-argument constructor, the WSDL location and service name are implicitly taken from
the WebServiceClient annotation that decorates the generated class.
The following code snippet shows the generated constructors:
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8
create(URL wsdlLocation, QName serviceName) Returns a service object for the specified WSDL
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// Generated Service Class
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@WebServiceClient(name="StockQuoteService",
targetNamespace="http://example.com/stocks",
wsdlLocation="http://example.com/stocks.wsdl")
public class StockQuoteService extends javax.xml.ws.Service {
public StockQuoteService() {
super(new URL("http://example.com/stocks.wsdl"),
new QName("http://example.com/stocks",
"StockQuoteService"));
}
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public StockQuoteService(String wsdlLocation, QName serviceName) {
super(wsdlLocation, serviceName);
}
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}
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4.1. javax.xml.ws.Service
4.1.2
Provider and Service Delegate
1
Internally, the Service class delegates all of its functionality to a ServiceDelegate object, which is part
of the SPI used to allow pluggability of implementations.
For this to work, every Service object internally MUST hold a reference to a javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate object (see 6.3) to which it delegates every non-static method call. The field used to
hold the reference MUST be private.
The delegate is set when a new Service instance is created, which must necessarily happen when the
protected, two-argument constructor defined on the Service class is called. The constructor MUST obtain
a Provider instance (see 6.2.2) and call its createServiceDelegate method, passing the two arguments
received from its caller and the class object for the instance being created (i.e. this.getClass()).
In order to ensure that the delegate is properly constructed, the static create method defined on the
Service class MUST call the protected constructor to create a new service instance, passing the same
arguments that it received from the application.
The following code snippet shows an implementation of the Service API that satisfies the requirements
above:
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public class Service {
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private ServiceDelegate delegate;
19
protected Service(java.net.URL wsdlDocumentLocation,
QName serviceName) {
delegate = Provider.provider()
.createServiceDelegate(wsdlDocumentLocation
serviceName,
this.getClass());
}
21
public static Service create(java.net.URL wsdlDocumentLocation,
QName serviceName) {
return new Service(wsdlDocumentLocation, serviceName);
}
29
// begin delegated methods
34
public <T> T getPort(Class<T> serviceEndpointInterface) {
return delegate.getPort(serviceEndpointInterface);
}
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...
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}
4.1.3
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Handler Resolver
42
JAX-WS provides a flexible plug-in framework for message processing modules, known as handlers, that
may be used to extend the capabilities of a JAX-WS runtime system. Chapter 9 describes the handler
framework in detail. A Service instance provides access to a HandlerResolver via a pair of getHandlerResolver/setHandlerResolver methods that may be used to configure a set of handlers on a
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per-service, per-port or per-protocol binding basis.
1
When a Service instance is used to create a proxy or a Dispatch instance then the handler resolver
currently registered with the service is used to create the required handler chain. Subsequent changes to the
handler resolver configured for a Service instance do not affect the handlers on previously created proxies,
or Dispatch instances.
4.1.4
Executor
3
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6
Service instances can be configured with a java.util.concurrent.Executor. The executor will
then be used to invoke any asynchronous callbacks requested by the application. The setExecutor and
getExecutor methods of Service can be used to modify and retrieve the executor configured for a
service.
♦ Conformance (Use of Executor): If an executor object is successfully configured for use by a Service via
the setExecutor method, then subsequent asynchronous callbacks MUST be delivered using the specified executor. Calls that were outstanding at the time the setExecutor method was called MAY use the
previously set executor, if any.
♦ Conformance (Default Executor): Lacking an application-specified executor, an implementation MUST
use its own executor, a java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor or analogous mechanism, to
deliver callbacks. An implementation MUST NOT use application-provided threads to deliver callbacks,
e.g. by ”borrowing” them when the application invokes a remote operation.
4.2
2
javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider
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The BindingProvider interface represents a component that provides a protocol binding for use by
clients, it is implemented by proxies and is extended by the Dispatch interface. Figure 4.1 illustrates
the class relationships.
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Figure 4.1: Binding Provider Class Relationships
The BindingProvider interface provides methods to obtain the Binding and to manipulate the binding
providers context. Further details on Binding can be found in section 6.1. The following subsection
describes the function and use of context with BindingProvider instances.
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4.2. javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider
4.2.1
Configuration
1
Additional metadata is often required to control information exchanges, this metadata forms the context of
an exchange.
A BindingProvider instance maintains separate contexts for the request and response phases of a message exchange with a service:
Request The contents of the request context are used to initialize the message context (see section 9.4.1)
prior to invoking any handlers (see chapter 9) for the outbound message. Each property within the
request context is copied to the message context with a scope of HANDLER.
Response The contents of the message context are used to initialize the response context after invoking any
handlers for an inbound message. The response context is first emptied and then each property in the
message context that has a scope of APPLICATION is copied to the response context.
♦ Conformance (Message context decoupling): Modifications to the request context while previously invoked operations are in-progress MUST NOT affect the contents of the message context for the previously
invoked operations.
The request and response contexts are of type java.util.Map<String,Object> and are obtained using
the getRequestContext and getResponseContext methods of BindingProvider.
In some cases, data from the context may need to accompany information exchanges. When this is required,
protocol bindings or handlers (see chapter 9) are responsible for annotating outbound protocol data units
and extracting metadata from inbound protocol data units.
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Note: An example of the latter usage: a handler in a SOAP binding might introduce a header into a SOAP
request message to carry metadata from the request context and might add metadata to the response context
from the contents of a header in a response SOAP message.
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4.2.1.1 Standard Properties
23
Table 4.1 lists a set of standard properties that may be set on a BindingProvider instance and shows
which properties are optional for implementations to support.
Table 4.1: Standard BindingProvider properties.
Name
Type
Mandatory
Description
javax.xml.ws.service.endpoint
.address
String
Y
The address of the service endpoint as
a protocol specific URI. The URI
scheme must match the protocol
binding in use.
javax.xml.ws.security.auth
.username
String
Y
Username for HTTP basic
authentication.
Password for HTTP basic
authentication.
.password
String
Y
Continued on next page
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Chapter 4. Client APIs
Table 4.1 – continued from previous page
Name
Type
Mandatory
Description
javax.xml.ws.session
.maintain
Boolean
Y
Used by a client to indicate whether it
is prepared to participate in a service
endpoint initiated session. The default
value is false.
javax.xml.ws.soap.http.soapaction
.use
Boolean
N
Controls whether the SOAPAction
HTTP header is used in SOAP/HTTP
requests. Default value is false.
The value of the SOAPAction HTTP
header if the javax.xml.ws.soap.http.soapaction.use property is
set to true. Default value is an empty
string.
.uri
String
N
♦ Conformance (Required BindingProvider properties): An implementation MUST support all properties shown as mandatory in table 4.1.
Note that properties shown as mandatory are not required to be present in any particular context; however,
if present, they must be honored.
♦ Conformance (Optional BindingProvider properties): An implementation MAY support the properties shown as optional in table 4.1.
4.2.1.2 Additional Properties
Implementation specific properties are discouraged as they limit application portability. Applications and
binding handlers can interact using application specific properties.
Asynchronous Operations
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BindingProvider instances may provide asynchronous operation capabilities. When used, asynchronous
operation invocations are decoupled from the BindingProvider instance at invocation time such that
the response context is not updated when the operation completes. Instead a separate response context is
made available using the Response interface, see sections 2.3.4 and 4.3.3 for further details on the use of
asynchronous methods.
♦ Conformance (Asynchronous response context): The local response context of a BindingProvider instance MUST NOT be updated on completion of an asynchronous operation, instead the response context
MUST be made available via a Response instance.
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♦ Conformance (Additional context properties): Implementations MAY support additional implementation
specific properties not listed in table4.1. Such properties MUST NOT use the javax.xml.ws prefix in their
names.
4.2.2
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4.2. javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider
When using callback-based asynchronous operations, an implementation MUST use the Executor set on
the service instance that was used to create the proxy or Dispatch instance being used. See 4.1.4 for more
information on configuring the Executor to be used.
4.2.3
Proxies
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Proxies provide access to service endpoint interfaces at runtime without requiring static generation of a stub
class. See java.lang.reflect.Proxy for more information on dynamic proxies as supported by the
JDK.
♦ Conformance (Proxy support): An implementation MUST support proxies.
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♦ Conformance (Implementing BindingProvider): An instance of a proxy MUST implement javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider.
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A proxy is created using the getPort methods of a Service instance:
11
T getPort(Class<T> sei) Returns a proxy for the specified SEI, the Service instance is responsible
for selecting the port (protocol binding and endpoint address).
The serviceEndpointInterface parameter specifies the interface that will be implemented by the
proxy. The service endpoint interface provided by the client needs to conform to the WSDL to Java mapping
rules specified in chapter 2 (WSDL 1.1). Creation of a proxy can fail if the interface doesn’t conform to the
mapping or if any WSDL related metadata is missing from the Service instance.
♦ Conformance (Service.getPort failure): If creation of a proxy fails, an implementation MUST throw
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceException. The cause of that exception SHOULD be set to an exception
that provides more information on the cause of the error (e.g. an IOException).
An implementation is not required to fully validate the service endpoint interface provided by the client
against the corresponding WSDL definitions and may choose to implement any validation it does require in
an implementation specific manner (e.g., lazy and eager validation are both acceptable).
4.2.3.1 Example
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The following example shows the use of a proxy to invoke a method (getLastTradePrice) on a service
endpoint interface (com.example.StockQuoteProvider). Note that no statically generated stub class is
involved.
javax.xml.ws.Service service = ...;
com.example.StockQuoteProvider proxy = service.getPort(portName,
com.example.StockQuoteProvider.class)
javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider bp = (javax.xml.ws.BindingProvider)proxy;
Map<String,Object> context = bp.getRequestContext();
context.setProperty("javax.xml.ws.session.maintain", Boolean.TRUE);
proxy.getLastTradePrice("ACME");
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Lines 1–3 show how the proxy is created. Lines 4–6 perform some configuration of the proxy. Lines 7
invokes a method on the proxy.
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T getPort(QName port, Class<T> sei) Returns a proxy for the endpoint specified by port. Note
that the namespace component of port is the target namespace of the WSDL definitions document.
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4.2.4
Exceptions
1
All methods of an SEI can throw javax.xml.ws.WebServiceException and zero or more service specific exceptions.
♦ Conformance (Remote Exceptions): If an error occurs during a remote operation invocation, an implemention MUST throw a service specific exception if possible. If the error cannot be mapped to a service
specific exception, an implementation MUST throw a ProtocolException or one of its subclasses, as
appropriate for the binding in use. See section 6.4.1 for more details.
♦ Conformance (Other Exceptions): For all other errors, i.e. all those that don’t occur as part of a remote
invocation, an implementation MUST throw a WebServiceException whose cause is the original local
exception that was thrown, if any.
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For instance, an error in the configuration of a proxy instance may result in a WebServiceException
whose cause is a java.lang.IllegalArgumentException thrown by some implementation code.
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13
javax.xml.ws.Dispatch
XML Web Services use XML messages for communication between services and service clients. The higher
level JAX-WS APIs are designed to hide the details of converting between Java method invocations and the
corresponding XML messages, but in some cases operating at the XML message level is desirable. The
Dispatch interface provides support for this mode of interaction.
♦ Conformance (Dispatch support): Implementations MUST support the javax.xml.ws.Dispatch interface.
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Dispatch supports two usage modes, identified by the constants javax.xml.ws.Service.Mode.MESSAGE 20
and javax.xml.ws.Service.Mode.PAYLOAD respectively:
21
Message In this mode, client applications work directly with protocol-specific message structures. E.g.,
when used with a SOAP protocol binding, a client application would work directly with a SOAP
message.
Message Payload In this mode, client applications work with the payload of messages rather than the
messages themselves. E.g., when used with a SOAP protocol binding, a client application would
work with the contents of the SOAP Body rather than the SOAP message as a whole.
Dispatch is a low level API that requires clients to construct messages or message payloads as XML and
requires an intimate knowledge of the desired message or payload structure. Dispatch is a generic class
that supports input and output of messages or message payloads of any type. Implementations are required
to support the following types of object:
javax.xml.transform.Source Use of Source objects allows clients to use XML generating and consuming APIs directly. Source objects may be used with any protocol binding in either message or
message payload mode.
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JAXB Objects Use of JAXB allows clients to use JAXB objects generated from an XML Schema to create and manipulate XML representations and to use these objects with JAX-WS without requiring
an intermediate XML serialization. JAXB objects may be used with any protocol binding in either
message or message payload mode.
javax.xml.soap.SOAPMessage Use of SOAPMessage objects allows clients to work with SOAP messages using the convenience features provided by the java.xml.soap package. SOAPMessage
objects may only be used with Dispatch instances that use the SOAP binding (see chapter 10) in
message mode.
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javax.activation.DataSource Use of DataSource objects allows clients to work with MIME-typed
messages. DataSource objects may only be used with Dispatch instances that use the HTTP
binding (see chapter 11) in message mode.
4.3.1
1
9
10
11
Configuration
12
Dispatch instances are obtained using the createDispatch factory methods of a Service instance. The
mode parameter of createDispatch controls whether the new Dispatch instance is message or message
payload oriented. The type parameter controls the type of object used for messages or message payloads.
Dispatch instances are not thread safe.
Dispatch instances are not required to be dynamically configurable for different protocol bindings; the
WSDL binding from which the Dispatch instance is generated contains static information including the
protocol binding and service endpoint address. However, a Dispatch instance may support configuration of
certain aspects of its operation and provides methods (inherited from BindingProvider) to dynamically
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query and change the values of properties in its request and response contexts – see section 4.2.1.1 for a list
of standard properties.
22
4.3.2
23
Operation Invocation
A Dispatch instance supports three invocation modes:
24
Synchronous request response (invoke methods) The method blocks until the remote operation completes and the results are returned.
Asynchronous request response (invokeAsync methods) The method returns immediately, any results
are provided either through a callback or via a polling object.
One-way (invokeOneWay methods) The method is logically non-blocking, subject to the capabilities of
the underlying protocol, no results are returned.
♦ Conformance (Failed Dispatch.invoke): When an operation is invoked using an invoke method, an
implementation MUST throw a WebServiceException if there is any error in the configuration of the
Dispatch instance or a ProtocolException if an error occurs during the remote operation invocation.
♦ Conformance (Failed Dispatch.invokeAsync): When an operation is invoked using an invokeAsync
method, an implementation MUST throw a WebServiceException if there is any error in the configuration of the Dispatch instance. Errors that occur during the invocation are reported when the client attempts
to retrieve the results of the operation.
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♦ Conformance (Failed Dispatch.invokeOneWay): When an operation is invoked using an invokeOneWay method, an implementation MUST throw a WebServiceException if there is any error in the
configuration of the Dispatch instance or if an error is detected1 during the remote operation invocation.
2
See section 10.4.1 for additional SOAP/HTTP requirements.
4
4.3.3
5
Asynchronous Response
Dispatch supports two forms of asynchronous invocation:
Callback The client supplies an AsyncHandler (see below) and the runtime calls the handleResponse
method when the results of the operation are available. The invokeAsync method returns a wildcard
Future (Future<?>) that may be polled to determine when the operation has completed. The object
returned from Future<?>.get() has no standard type. Client code should not attempt to cast the
object to any particular type as this will result in non-portable behavior.
In both cases, errors that occur during the invocation are reported via an exception when the client attempts
to retrieve the results of the operation.
♦ Conformance (Reporting asynchronous errors): If the operation invocation fails, an implementation MUST
throw a java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException from the Response.get method.
The cause of an ExecutionException is the original exception raised. In the case of a Response instance
this can only be a WebServiceException or one of its subclasses.
The following interfaces are used to obtain the results of an operation invocation:
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javax.xml.ws.Response A generic interface that is used to group the results of an invocation with
the response context. Response extends java.util.concurrent.Future<T> to provide asyn-
chronous result polling capabilities.
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javax.xml.ws.AsyncHandler A generic interface that clients implement to receive results in an asynchronous callback. It defines a single handleResponse method that has a Response object as its
argument.
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Using JAXB
27
Service provides a createDispatch factory method for creating Dispatch instances that contain an
embedded JAXBContext. The context parameter contains the JAXBContext instance that the created
Dispatch instance will use to marshall and unmarshall messages or message payloads.
♦ Conformance (Marshalling failure): If an error occurs when using the supplied JAXBContext to marshall a request or unmarshall a response, an implementation MUST throw a WebServiceException whose
cause is set to the original JAXBException.
1
The invocation is logically non-blocking so detection of errors during operation invocation is dependent on the underlying
protocol in use. For SOAP/HTTP it is possible that certain HTTP level errors may be detected.
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Polling The invokeAsync method returns a Response (see below) that may be polled using the methods
inherited from Future<T> to determine when the operation has completed and to retrieve the results.
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4.3.5
Examples
1
The following examples demonstrate use of Dispatch methods in the synchronous, asynchronous polling,
and asynchronous callback modes. For ease of reading, error handling has been omitted.
4.3.5.1 Synchronous, Payload-Oriented
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Source reqMsg = ...;
Service service = ...;
Dispatch<Source> disp = service.createDispatch(portName,
Source.class, PAYLOAD);
Source resMsg = disp.invoke(reqMsg);
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SOAPMessage soapReqMsg = ...;
Service service = ...;
Dispatch<SOAPMessage> disp = service.createDispatch(portName,
SOAPMessage.class, MESSAGE);
SOAPMessage soapResMsg = disp.invoke(soapReqMsg);
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JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance("primer.po");
Unmarshaller u = jc.createUnmarshaller();
PurchaseOrder po = (PurchaseOrder)u.unmarshal(
new FileInputStream( "po.xml" ) );
Service service = ...;
Dispatch<Object> disp = service.createDispatch(portName, jc, PAYLOAD);
OrderConfirmation conf = (OrderConfirmation)disp.invoke(po);
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In the above example PurchaseOrder and OrderConfirmation are interfaces pre-generated by JAXB
from the schema document ‘primer.po’.
4.3.5.4 Asynchronous, Polling, Message-Oriented
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SOAPMessage soapReqMsg = ...;
Service service = ...;
Dispatch<SOAPMessage> disp = service.createDispatch(portName,
SOAPMessage.class, MESSAGE);
Response<SOAPMessage> res = disp.invokeAsync(soapReqMsg);
while (!res.isDone()) {
// do something while we wait
}
SOAPMessage soapResMsg = res.get();
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class MyHandler implements AsyncHandler<Source> {
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public void handleResponse(Response<Source> res) {
Source resMsg = res.get();
// do something with the results
}
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Service service = ...;
Dispatch<Source> disp = service.createDispatch(portName,
Source.class, PAYLOAD);
MyHandler handler = new MyHandler();
disp.invokeAsync(reqMsg, handler);
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Catalog Facility
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JAX-WS mandates support for a standard catalog facility to be used when resolving any Web service document that is part of the description of a Web service, specifically WSDL and XML Schema documents.
The facility in question is the OASIS XML Catalogs 1.1 specification [30]. It defines an entity catalog that
handles the following two cases:
• Mapping an external entity’s public identifier and/or system identifier to a URI reference.
• Mapping the URI reference of a resource to another URI reference.
The catalog is assembled by taking into account all accessible resources whose name is META-INF/jax-ws-catalog.xml. Each resource MUST be a valid entity catalog according to the XML Catalogs 1.1
specification. When running on the Java SE platform, the current context class loader MUST be used to
retrieve all the resources with the specified name. Relative URIs inside a catalog file are relative to the
location of the catalog that contains them.
♦ Conformance (Use of the Catalog): In the process of resolving a URI that points to a WSDL document
or any document reachable from it, a JAX-WS implementation MUST perform a URI resolution for it, as
prescribed by the XML Catalogs 1.1 specification, using the catalog defined above as its entity catalog.
In particular, every JAX-WS API argument or annotation element whose semantics is that of a WSDL
location URI MUST undergo URI resolution using the catalog facility described in this section.
Although defined in the client API chapter for reasons of ease of exposure, use of the catalog is in no way
restricted to client uses of WSDL location URIs. In particular, resolutions of URIs to WSDL and schema
documents that arise during the publishing of endpoint metadata (see 5.2.5) are subject to the requirements
in this section, resulting in catalog-based URI resolutions.
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Using the entity catalog, an application can package one or more description and/or schema documents in
jar files, avoiding costly remote accesses, or remap remote URIs to other, possibly local ones. Since the
catalog is an XML document, a deployer can easily alter it to suit the local environment, unbeknownst to
the application code.
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Service APIs
This chapter describes requirements on JAX-WS service implementations and standard APIs provided for
their use.
5.1
javax.xml.ws.Provider
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JAX-WS services typically implement a native Java service endpoint interface (SEI), perhaps mapped from
a WSDL port type, either directly or via the use of annotations. Section 3.4 describes the requirements that
a Java interface must meet to qualify as a JAX-WS SEI. Section 2.2 describes the mapping from a WSDL
port type to an equivalent Java SEI.
Java SEIs provide a high level Java-centric abstraction that hides the details of converting between Java
objects and their XML representations for use in XML-based messages. However, in some cases it is
desirable for services to be able to operate at the XML message level. The Provider interface offers an
alternative to SEIs and may be implemented by services wishing to work at the XML message level.
♦ Conformance (Provider support required): An implementation MUST support Provider<Source> in
payload mode with all the predefined bindings. It MUST also support Provider<SOAPMessage> in
message mode in conjunction with the predefined SOAP bindings and Provider<javax.activation.DataSource> in message mode in conjunction with the predefined HTTP binding.
♦ Conformance (Provider default constructor): A Provider based service endpoint implementation MUST
provide a public default constructor.
A typed Provider interface is one in which the type parameter has been bound to a concrete class, e.g.
Provider<Source> or Provider<SOAPMessage>, as opposed to being left unbound, as in Provider<T>.
♦ Conformance (Provider implementation): A Provider based service endpoint implementation MUST
implement a typed Provider interface.
♦ Conformance (WebServiceProvider annotation): A Provider based service endpoint implementation
MUST carry a WebServiceProvider annotation (see 7.7).
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Provider is a low level generic API that requires services to work with messages or message payloads and
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hence requires an intimate knowledge of the desired message or payload structure. The generic nature of
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Provider allows use with a variety of message object types.
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5.1.1
Invocation
1
A Provider based service instance’s invoke method is called for each message received for the service.
2
5.1.1.1 Exceptions
3
The service runtime is required to catch exceptions thrown by a Provider instance. A Provider instance
may make use of the protocol specific exception handling mechanism as described in section 6.4.1. The
protocol binding is responsible for converting the exception into a protocol specific fault representation and
then invoking the handler chain and dispatching the fault message as appropriate.
5.1.2
Configuration
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The ServiceMode annotation is used to configure the messaging mode of a Provider instance. Use of
@ServiceMode(value=MESSAGE) indicates that the provider instance wishes to receive and send entire
protocol messages (e.g. a SOAP message when using the SOAP binding); absence of the annotation or
use of @ServiceMode(value=PAYLOAD) indicates that the provider instance wishes to receive and send
message payloads only (e.g. the contents of a SOAP Body element when using the SOAP binding).
Provider instances MAY use the WebServiceContext facility (see 5.3) to access the message context and
other information about the request currently being served.
The JAX-WS runtime makes certain properties available to a Provider instance that can be used to determine its configuration. These properties are passed to the Provider instance each time it is invoked using
the MessageContext instance accessible from the WebServiceContext.
5.1.3
4
Examples
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For brevity, error handling is omitted in the following examples.
20
Simple echo service, reply message is the same as the input message
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@WebServiceProvider
@ServiceMode(value=Service.Mode.MESSAGE)
public class MyService implements Provider<SOAPMessage> {
public MyService() {
}
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public SOAPMessage invoke(SOAPMessage request) {
return request;
}
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}
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Simple static reply, reply message contains a fixed acknowlegment element
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@WebServiceProvider
@ServiceMode(value=Service.Mode.PAYLOAD)
public class MyService implements Provider<Source> {
public MyService() {
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}
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public Source invoke(Source request) {
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Source requestPayload = request.getPayload();
4
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return reply;
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Using JAXB to read the input message and set the reply
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@WebServiceProvider
@ServiceMode(value=Service.Mode.PAYLOAD)
public class MyService implements Provider<Source> {
public MyService() {
}
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public Source invoke(Source request) {
JAXBContent jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(...);
Unmarshaller u = jc.createUnmarshaller();
Object requestObj = u.unmarshall(request);
...
Acknowledgement reply = new Acknowledgement(...);
return new JAXBSource(jc, reply);
}
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}
5.2
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javax.xml.ws.Endpoint
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The Endpoint class can be used to create and publish Web service endpoints.
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An endpoint consists of an object that acts as the Web service implementation (called here implementor)
plus some configuration information, e.g. a Binding. Implementor and binding are set when the endpoint is created and cannot be modified later. Their values can be retrieved using the getImplementor
and getBinding methods respectively. Other configuration information may be set at any time after the
creation of an Endpoint but before its publication.
5.2.1
Endpoint Usage
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Endpoints can be created using the following static methods on Endpoint:
35
create(Object implementor) Creates and returns an Endpoint for the specified implementor. If the
implementor specifies a binding using the javax.xml.ws.BindingType annotation it MUST be
used else a default binding of SOAP 1.1 / HTTP binding MUST be used.
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create(URI bindingID, Object implementor) Creates and returns an Endpoint for the specified
binding and implementor. If the bindingID is null and no binding information is specified via the
javax.xml.ws.BindingType annotation then a default SOAP 1.1 / HTTP binding MUST be used.
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publish(String address, Object implementor) Creates and publishes an Endpoint for the given
implementor. The binding is chosen by default based on the URL scheme of the provided address
(which must be a URL). If a suitable binding if found, the endpoint is created then published as if the
Endpoint.publish(String address) method had been called. The created Endpoint is then
returned as the value of the method.
These methods MUST delegate the creation of Endpoint to the javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider SPI class
(see 6.2) by calling the createEndpoint and createAndPublishEndpoint methods respectively.
An implementor object MUST be either an instance of a class annotated with the @WebService annotation
according to the rules in chapter 3 or an instance of a class annotated with the WebServiceProvider
annotation and implementing the Provider interface (see 5.1).
The publish(String,Object) method is provided as a shortcut for the common operation of creating
and publishing an Endpoint. The following code provides an example of its use:
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// assume Test is an endpoint implementation class annotated with @WebService
Test test = new Test();
Endpoint e = Endpoint.publish("http://localhost:8080/test", test);
♦ Conformance (Endpoint publish(String address, Object implementor) Method): The effect of invoking the
publish method on an Endpoint MUST be the same as first invoking the create method with the binding
ID appropriate to the URL scheme used by the address, then invoking the publish(String address)
method on the resulting endpoint.
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♦ Conformance (Default Endpoint Binding): If the URL scheme for the address argument of the Endpoint- 20
.publish method is ”http” or ”https” then an implementation MUST use the SOAP 1.1/HTTP binding (see 21
10) as the binding for the newly created endpoint.
22
♦ Conformance (Other Bindings): An implementation MAY support using the Endpoint.publish method 23
with addresses whose URL scheme is neither ”http” nor ”https”.
24
The success of the Endpoint.publish method is conditional to the presence of the appropriate permission
as described in section 5.2.3.
Endpoint implementors MAY use the WebServiceContext facility (see 5.3) to access the message context
and other information about the request currently being served. Injection of the WebServiceContext, if
requested, MUST happen the first time the endpoint is published. After any injections have been performed
and before any requests are dispatched to the implementor, the implementor method which carries a javax.annotation.PostConstruct annotation, if present, MUST be invoked. Such a method MUST satisfy
the requirements for lifecycle methods in JSR-250 [31].
5.2.2
Publishing
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An Endpoint is in one of three states: not published (the default), published or stopped. Published endpoints are active and capable of receiving incoming requests and dispatching them to their implementor.
Non published endpoints are inactive. Stopped endpoint were in the published until some time ago, then got
stopped. Stopped endpoints cannot be published again. Publication of an Endpoint can be achieved by
invoking one of the following methods:
publish(String address) Publishes the endpoint at the specified address (a URL). The address MUST
use a URL scheme compatible with the endpoint’s binding.
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publish(Object serverContext) Publishes the endpoint using the specified server context. The
1
server context MUST contain address information for the resulting endpoint and it MUST be compatible with the endpoint’s binding.
♦ Conformance (Publishing over HTTP): If the Binding for an Endpoint is a SOAP (see 10) or HTTP
(see 11) binding, then an implementation MUST support publishing the Endpoint to a URL whose scheme
is either ”http” or ”https”.
The WSDL contract for an endpoint is created dynamically based on the annotations on the implementor
class, the Binding in use and the set of metadata documents specified on the endpoint (see 5.2.4).
♦ Conformance (WSDL Publishing): An Endpoint that uses the SOAP 1.1/HTTP binding (see 10) MUST
make its contract available as a WSDL 1.1 document at the publishing address suffixed with ”?WSDL” or
”?wsdl”.
An Endpoint that uses any other binding defined in this specification in conjunction with the HTTP transport SHOULD make its contract available using the same convention. It is RECOMMENDED that an
implementation provide a way to access the contract for an endpoint even when the latter is published over
a transport other than HTTP.
The success of the two Endpoint.publish methods described above is conditional to the presence of the
appropriate permission as described in section 5.2.3.
Applications that wish to modify the configuration information (e.g. the metadata) for an Endpoint must
make sure the latter is in the not-published state. Although the various setter methods on Endpoint must
always store their arguments so that they can be retrieved by a later invocation of a getter, the changes they
entail may not be reflected on the endpoint until the next time it is published. In other words, the effects of
configuration changes on a currently published endpoint are undefined.
The stop method can be used to stop publishing an endpoint. A stopped endpoint may not be restarted. It
is an error to invoke a publish method on a stopped endpoint. After the stop method returns, the runtime
MUST NOT dispatch any further invocations to the endpoint’s implementor.
An Endpoint will be typically invoked to serve concurrent requests, so its implementor should be written
so as to support multiple threads. The synchronized keyword may be used as usual to control access to
critical sections of code. For finer control over the threads used to dispatch incoming requests, an application
can directly set the executor to be used, as described in section 5.2.7.
5.2.2.1 Example
// assume Test is an endpoint implementation class annotated with @WebService
Test test = new Test();
HttpServer server = HttpServer.create(new InetSocketAddress(8080),10);
server.setExecutor(Executor.newFixedThreadPool(10));
server.start();
HttpContext context = server.createContext("/test");
Endpoint endpoint = Endpoint.create(SOAPBinding.SOAP11HTTP_BINDING, test);
endpoint.publish(context);
Note that the specified server context uses its own executor mechanism. At runtime then, any other executor
set on the Endpoint instance would be ignored by the JAX-WS implementation.
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The following example shows the use of the publish(Object) method using a hypothetical HTTP server
API that includes the HttpServer and HttpContext classes.
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5.2.3
Publishing Permission
1
For security reasons, administrators may want to restrict the ability of applications to publish Web service endpoints. To this end, JAX-WS 2.0 defines a new permission class, javax.xml.ws.WebServicePermission, and one named permission, publishEndpoint.
2
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5
♦ Conformance (Checking publishEndpoint Permission): When any of the publish methods defined
by the Endpoint class are invoked, an implementation MUST check whether a SecurityManager is in6
stalled with the application. If it is, implementations MUST verify that the application has the WebServicePermission
7
identified by the target name publishEndpoint before proceeding. If the permission is not granted, imple8
mentations MUST NOT publish the endpoint and they MUST throw a java.lang.SecurityException. 9
5.2.4
Endpoint Metadata
10
A set of metadata documents can be associated with an Endpoint by means of the setMetadata(List<Source>) method. By setting the metadata of an Endpoint, an application can bypass the automatic generation of the endpoint’s contract and specify the desired contract directly. This way it is possible,
e.g., to make sure that the WSDL or XML Schema document that is published contains information that
cannot be represented using built-in Java annotations (see 7).
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♦ Conformance (Required Metadata Types): An implementation MUST support WSDL 1.1 and XML Schema16
1.0 documents as metadata.
17
♦ Conformance (Unknown Metadata): An implementation MUST ignore metadata documents whose type
it does not recognize.
When specifying a list of documents as metadata, an application may need to establish references between
them. For instance, a WSDL document may import one or more XML Schema documents. In order to do
so, the application MUST use the systemId property of the javax.xml.transform.Source class by
setting its value to an absolute URI that uniquely identifies it among all supplied metadata documents, then
using the given URI in the appropriate construct (e.g. wsdl:import or xsd:import).
5.2.5
Endpoint Publishing and Metadata
A WSDL document contains two different kinds of information: abstract information (i.e. portTypes and
any schema-related information) which affects the format of the messages and the data being exchanged,
and binding-related one (i.e. bindings and ports) which affects the choice of protocol and transport as well
as the on-the-wire format of the messages. Annotations (see 7) are provided to capture the former aspects
but not the latter. (The @SOAPBinding annotation is a bit of a hybrid, because it captures the signaturerelated aspects of the soap:binding binding extension in WSDL 1.1.) At runtime, annotations must be
followed for all the abstract aspects of an interaction, but binding information has to come from somewhere
else. Although the choice of binding is made at the time an endpoint is created, this specification does not
attempt to capture all possible binding properties in its APIs, since the extensibility of WSDL would make it
a futile exercise. Rather, when an endpoint is published, a metadata document for it, if present, is consulted
to determine binding information, using the wsdl:service and wsdl:port qualified names as a key.
By default, an implementation MUST generate a contract for the endpoint based on the annotation on the
implementor class and the binding in use. The resulting contract MUST follow the rules in chapter 3 and the
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This section details how metadata is used at publishing time to create a contract for the endpoint.
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JAXB specification [10]. Certain bindings, including standard ones, MAY specify that no contract must be
generated for them, typically because there is no recognized interoperable standard WSDL binding for them
at the time they were created. In this case, implementations MUST NOT generate a contract for endpoints
that use them.
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Note: This requirement guarantees that future versions of this specification may mandate support for additional WSDL binding in conjunction with the predefined binding identifiers without negatively affecting
existing applications.
The generated contract must reuse as much as possible the set of metadata documents provided by the application. In order to simplify an implementors’ task, this specification requires that only a small number
of well-defined scenarios in which the application provides metadata documents be supported. Implementations MAY support other use cases, but they MUST follow the general rule that any application-provided
metadata element takes priority over an implementation-generated one, with the exception of the overriding
of a port address. For instance, if the application-provided metadata contains a definition for portType foo
that in no case should the JAX-WS implementation create its own foo portType to replace the one provided
by the application in the final contract for the endpoint.
The exception to using a metadata document as supplied by the application without any modifications is the
address of the wsdl:port for the endpoint, which MUST be overridden so as to match the address specified
as an argument to the publish method or the one implicit in a server context.
When publishing the main WSDL document for an endpoint, an implementation MUST ensure that all references between documents are correct and resolvable. This may require remapping the metadata documents
to URLs different from those set as their systemId property. The renaming MUST be consistent, in that the
”imports” and ”includes” relationships existing between documents when the metadata was supplied to the
endpoint MUST be respected at publishing time. Moreover, the same metadata document SHOULD NOT
be published at multiple, different URLs.
When resolving URI references to other documents when processing metadata documents or any of the documents they may transitively reference, a JAX-WS implementation MUST use the catalog facility defined
in section 4.4, except when there is a metadata document whose system id matches the URI in question. In
other words, metadata documents have priority over catalog-based mappings.
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The scenarios which are required to be supported are the following:
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5.2.5.1 Application-specified Service
30
One of the metadata documents, say D, contains a definition for a WSDL service whose qualified name
, say S, matches that specified by the endpoint being published. In this case, a JAX-WS implementation
MUST use D as the service description. No further generation of contract-related artifacts may occur.
The implementation MUST also override the port address in D and the location and schemaLocation
attributes as detailed in the preceding paragraphs. It is an error if more than one metadata document contains
a definition for the sought-after service S.
5.2.5.2 Application-specified PortType
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No metadata document contains a definition for the sought-after service S, but a metadata document, say
D, contains a definition for the WSDL portType whose qualified name, say P, matches that specified by the
endpoint being published. In this case, a JAX-WS implementation MUST create a new description for S,
including an appropriate WSDL binding element referencing portType P. The metadata document D MUST
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Name
Type
Table 5.1: Standard Endpoint properties.
Description
javax.xml.ws.wsdl
.service
QName
.port
QName
Specifies the qualified name of the service.
Specifies the qualified name of the port.
be imported/included so that the published contract uses the definition of P provided by D. No schema generation occurs,as P is assumed to embed or import schema definitions for all the types/elements it requires.
Like in the previous case, the implementation MUST override any location and schemaLocation attributes. It is an error if more than one metadata document contains a definition for the sought-after portType
P.
3
5.2.5.3 Application-specified Schema or No Metadata
6
No metadata document contains a definition for the sought-after service S and portType P. In this case, a
JAX-WS implementation MUST generate a complete WSDL for S. When it comes to generating a schema
for a certain target namespace, say T, the implementation MUST reuse the schema for T among the available metadata documents, if any. Like in the preceding case, the implementation MUST override any
schemaLocation attributes. It is an error if more than one schema documents specified as metadata for
the endpoint attempt to define components in a namespace T used by the endpoint.
Note: The three scenarios described above cover several applicative use cases. The first one represents an
application that has full control over all aspects of the contract. The JAX-WS runtime just uses what the
application provided, with a minimum of adjustments to ensure consistency. The second one corresponds
to an application that defines all abstract aspects of the WSDL, i.e. portType(s) and schema(s), leaving
up to the JAX-WS runtime to generate the concrete portions of the contract. Finally, the third case represents an application that uses one or more well-known schema(s), possibly taking advantage of lots of
facets/constraints that JAXB cannot capture, and wants to reuse it as-is, leaving all the WSDL-specific aspects of the contract up to the runtime. This use case also covers an application that does not specify any
metadata, leaving WSDL and schema generation up to the JAX-WS (and JAXB) implementation.
5.2.6
Endpoint Properties
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An Endpoint has an associated set of properties that may be read and written using the getProperties
and setProperties methods respectively.
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Table 5.1 lists the set of standard Endpoint properties.
25
When present, the WSDL-related properties override the values specified using the WebService and WebServiceProvider annotations. This functionality is most useful with provider objects (see section 7.7),
27
since the latter are naturally more suited to a more dynamic usage. For instance, an application that publishes
a provider endpoint can decide at runtime which web service to impersonate by using a combination of
metadata documents and the properties described in this section.
5.2.7
Executor
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Endpoint instances can be configured with a java.util.concurrent.Executor. The executor will
then be used to dispatch any incoming requests to the application. The setExecutor and getExecutor
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methods of Endpoint can be used to modify and retrieve the executor configured for a service.
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♦ Conformance (Use of Executor): If an executor object is successfully set on an Endpoint via the setExecutor method, then an implementation MUST use it to dispatch incoming requests upon publication of
the Endpoint by means of the publish(String address) method. If publishing is carried out using
the publish(Object serverContext)) method, an implementation MAY use the specified executor or
another one specific to the server context being used.
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceContext
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The javax.xml.ws.WebServiceContext interface makes it possible for an endpoint implementation
object to access contextual information pertaining to the request being served.
The result of invoking any methods on the WebServiceContext of a component outside the invocation
of one of its web service methods is undefined. An implementation SHOULD throw a java.lang.IllegalStateException if it detects such a usage.
The WebServiceContext is treated as an injectable resource that can be set on an endpoint at the time
of its initialization. The WebServiceContext object will then use thread-local information to return
the correct information regardless of how many threads are concurrently being used to serve requests addressed to the same endpoint object. It is an error to attempt to request the injection of a resource of type
WebServiceContext on a component which does not constitute a Web service endpoint.
The following code shows a simple endpoint implementation class which requests the injection of its
WebServiceContext:
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5
6
7
4
6
♦ Conformance (Default Executor): If an executor has not been set on an Endpoint, an implementation
MUST use its own executor, a java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor or analogous mechanism, to dispatch incoming requests.
5.3
2
3
@WebService
public class Test {
@Resource
private WebServiceContext context;
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public String reverse(String inputString) { ... }
28
}
29
The javax.annotation.Resource annotation defined by JSR-250 [31] is used to request injection of
the WebServiceContext. The following constraints apply to the annotation elements of a Resource
annotation used to inject a WebServiceContext:
• The type element MUST be either java.lang.Object (the default) or javax.xml.ws.WebServiceContext. If the former, then the resource MUST be injected into a field or a method. In
this case, the type of field or the type of the JavaBeans property defined by the method MUST be
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceContext.
• The authenticationType, shareable elements, if they appear, MUST have their respective default values.
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Chapter 5. Service APIs
The above restriction on type guarantees that a resource type of WebServiceContext is either explicitely
stated or can be inferred from the annotated field/method declaration. Moreover, the field/method type must
be assignable from the type described by the annotation’s type element.
When running on the Java SE platform, the name and mappedName elements are ignored. As a consequence,
on Java SE there is no point in declaring a resource of type WebServiceContext on the endpoint class
itself (instead of one of its fields/methods), since it won’t be accessible at runtime via JNDI. When running
on the Java EE 5 platform, resources of type WebServiceContext are treated just like all other injectable
resources there and are subject to the constraints prescribed by the platform specification [32].
Note: When using method-based injection, it is recommended that the method be declared as non-public,
otherwise it will be exposed as a web service operation. Alternatively, the method can be marked with the
@WebMethod(exclude=true) annotation to ensure it will not be part of the generated portType for the
service.
5.3.1
MessageContext
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The message context made available to endpoint instances via the WebServiceContext acts as a restricted
window on to the MessageContext of the inbound message following handler execution (see chapter 9).
The restrictions are as follows:
• Only properties whose scope is APPLICATION are visible using a MessageContext obtained from
a WebServiceContext; the get method returns null for properties with HANDLER scope, the Set
returned by keySet only includes properties with APPLICATION scope.
• New properties set in the context are set in the underlying MessageContext with APPLICATION
scope.
• An attempt to set the value of property whose scope is HANDLER in the underlying MessageContext
results in an IllegalArgumentException being thrown.
• Only properties whose scope is APPLICATION can be removed using the context. An attempt to remove a property whose scope is HANDLER in the underlying MessageContext results in an IllegalArgumentException being thrown.
• The Map.putAll method can be used to insert multiple properties at once. Each property is inserted
individually, each insert operation being carried out as if enclosed by a try/catch block that traps any
IllegalArgumentException. Consequently, putAll is not atomic: it silently ignores properties
whose scope is HANDLER and it never throws an IllegalArgumentException.
The MessageContext is used to store handlers information between request and response phases of a
message exchange pattern, restricting access to context properties in this way ensures that endpoint implementations can only access properties intended for their use.
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Chapter 6
Core APIs
1
2
This chapter describes the standard core APIs that may be used by both client and server side applications.
3
6.1
4
javax.xml.ws.Binding
The javax.xml.ws.Binding interface acts as a base interface for JAX-WS protocol bindings. Bindings
to specific protocols extend Binding and may add methods to configure specific aspects of that protocol
binding’s operation. Chapter 10 describes the JAX-WS SOAP binding; chapter 11 describes the JAX-WS
XML/HTTP binding.
5
6
7
8
Applications obtain a Binding instance from a BindingProvider (a proxy or Dispatch instance) or
from an Endpoint using the getBinding method (see sections 4.2, 5.2).
10
Binding provides methods to manipulate the handler chain configured on an instance (see section 9.2.1).
11
♦ Conformance (Read-only handler chains): An implementation MAY prevent changes to handler chains
configured by some other means (e.g. via a deployment descriptor) by throwing UnsupportedOperationException from the setHandlerChain method of Binding
6.2
javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider
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15
Provider is an abstract service provider interface (SPI) factory class that provides various methods for the
creation of Endpoint instances and ServiceDelegate instances. These methods are designed for use by
other JAX-WS API classes, such as Service (see 4.1) and Endpoint (see 5.2) and are not intended to be
called directly by applications.
16
17
18
19
The Provider SPI allows an application to use a different JAX-WS implementation from the one bundled
with the platform without any code changes.
♦ Conformance (Concrete javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider required): An implementation MUST provide
a concrete class that extends javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider. Such a class MUST have a public constructor which takes no arguments.
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6.2.1
Configuration
1
The Provider implementation class is determined using the following algorithm. The steps listed below
are performed in sequence. At each step, at most one candidate implementation class name will be produced.
The implementation will then attempt to load the class with the given class name using the current context
class loader or, missing one, the java.lang.Class.forName(String) method. As soon as a step results
in an implementation class being successfully loaded, the algorithm terminates.
1. If a resource with the name of META-INF/services/javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider exists, then
its first line, if present, is used as the UTF-8 encoded name of the implementation class.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2. If the ${java.home}/lib/jaxws.properties file exists and it is readable by the java.util.Properties.load(InputStream) method and it contains an entry whose key is javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider, then the value of that entry is used as the name of the implementation class.
11
3. If a system property with the name javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider is defined, then its value is used
as the name of the implementation class.
13
4. Finally, a default implementation class name is used.
14
6.2.2
Creating Endpoint Objects
9
10
12
15
Endpoints can be created using the following methods on Provider:
16
createEndpoint(String bindingID, Object implementor) Creates and returns an Endpoint
17
for the specified binding and implementor.
18
createAndPublishEndpoint(String address, Object implementor) Creates and publishes an
Endpoint for the given implementor. The binding is chosen by default based on the URL scheme
of the provided address (which must be a URL). If a suitable binding if found, the endpoint is created then published as if the Endpoint.publish(String address) method had been called. The
created Endpoint is then returned as the value of the method.
An implementor object MUST be either:
20
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23
24
• an instance of a SEI-based endpoint class, i.e. a class annotated with the @WebService annotation
according to the rules in chapter 3, or
• an instance of a provider class, i.e. a class implementing the Provider interface and annotated with
the WebServiceProvider annotation according to the rules in 5.1.
The createAndPublishEndpoint(String,Object) method is provided as a shortcut for the common
operation of creating and publishing an Endpoint. It corresponds to the static publish method defined on
the Endpoint class, see 5.2.1.
♦ Conformance (Provider createAndPublishEndpoint Method): The effect of invoking the createAndPublishEndpoint method on a Provider MUST be the same as first invoking the createEndpoint
method with the binding ID appropriate to the URL scheme used by the address, then invoking the publish(String address) method on the resulting endpoint.
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6.3. javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate
6.2.3
Creating ServiceDelegate Objects
1
javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate 6.3 can be created using the following method on Provider:
2
createServiceDelegate(URL wsdlDocumentLocation, QName serviceName, Class serviceClass)
3
Creates and returns a ServiceDelegate for the specified service. When starting from WSDL the
4
serviceClass will be the generated service class as described in section 2.7. In the dynamic case where
there is no service class generated it will be javax.xml.ws.Service. The serviceClass is used by
the ServiceDelegate to get access to the annotations.
6.3
javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate
♦ Conformance (Concrete javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate required): An implementation MUST
provide a concrete class that extends javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate.
Exceptions
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15
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceException A runtime exception that is thrown by methods in JAX-WS
APIs when errors occur during local processing.
16
17
javax.xml.ws.ProtocolException A base class for exceptions related to a specific protocol binding.
Subclasses are used to communicate protocol level fault information to clients and may be used by a
service implementation to control the protocol specific fault representation.
javax.xml.ws.soap.SOAPFaultException A subclass of ProtocolException, may be used to
carry SOAP specific information.
18
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21
22
javax.xml.ws.http.HTTPException A subclass of ProtocolException, may be used to carry HTTP
specific information.
23
24
Editors Note 6.1 A future version of this specification may introduce a new exception class to distinguish
errors due to client misconfiguration or inappropriate parameters being passed to an API from errors that
were generated locally on the sender node as part of the invocation process (e.g. a broken connection or
an unresolvable server name). Currently, both kinds of errors are mapped to WebServiceException, but the
latter kind would be more usefully mapped to its own exception type, much like ProtocolException is.
Protocol Specific Exception Handling
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♦ Conformance (Protocol specific fault generation): When throwing an exception as the result of a protocol level fault, an implementation MUST ensure that the exception is an instance of the appropriate
ProtocolException subclass. For SOAP the appropriate ProtocolException subclass is SOAPFaultException, for XML/HTTP is is HTTPException.
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The following standard exceptions are defined by JAX-WS.
6.4.1
7
8
The javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate class is an abstract class that implementations MUST provide. This is the class that javax.xml.ws.Service 4.1 class delegates all methods, except the static
create methods to. ServiceDelegate is defined as an abstract class for future extensibility purpose.
6.4
5
6
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♦ Conformance (Protocol specific fault consumption): When an implementation catches an exception thrown
by a service endpoint implementation and the cause of that exception is an instance of the appropriate
ProtocolException subclass for the protocol in use, an implementation MUST reflect the information
contained in the ProtocolException subclass within the generated protocol level fault.
6.4.1.1 Client Side Example
1
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5
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7
6.4.1.2 Server Side Example
One-way Operations
4
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♦ Conformance (One-way operations): When sending a one-way message, implementations MUST throw
a WebServiceException if any error is detected when sending the message.
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3
13
public void endpointOperation() {
...
if (someProblem) {
SOAPFault fault = soapBinding.getSOAPFactory().createFault(
faultcode, faultstring, faultactor, detail);
throw new SOAPFaultException(fault);
}
...
}
6.4.2
2
5
try {
response = dispatch.invoke(request);
}
catch (SOAPFaultException e) {
QName soapFaultCode = soapFault.getFault().getFaultCodeAsQName();
...
}
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Chapter 7
1
Annotations
2
This chapter describes the annotations used by JAX-WS.
3
For simplicity, when describing an annotation we use the term “property” in lieu of the more correct “annotation elements”. Also, for each property we list the default value, which is the default as it appears in
the declaration of the annotation type. Often properties have logical defaults which are computed based on
contextual information and, for this reason, cannot be captured using the annotation element default facility
built into the language. In this case, the text describes what the logical default is and how it is computed.
JAX-WS 2.0 uses annotations extensively. For an annotation to be correct, besides being syntactically
correct, e.g. placed on a program element of the appropriate type, it must obey a set of constraints detailed
in this specification. For annotations defined by JSR-181, the annotation in question must also obey the
constraints in the relevant specification (see [13]).
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♦ Conformance (Correctness of annotations): An implementation MUST check at runtime that the annotations pertaining to a method being invoked, either on the client or on the server, as well as any containing
program elements (i.e. classes, packages) is in conformance with the specification for that annotation
14
♦ Conformance (Handling incorrect annotations): If an incorrect or inconsistent annotation is detected:
16
• In a client setting, an implementation MUST NOT invoke the remote operation being invoked, if any.
Instead, it MUST throw a WebServiceException, setting its cause to an exception approximating
the cause of the error (e.g. an IllegalArgumentException or a ClassNotFoundException).
• In a server setting, annotation, an implementation MUST NOT dispatch to an endpoint implementation object. Rather, it MUST generate a fault appropriate to the binding in use.
13
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An implementation may check for correctness in a lazy way, at the time a method is invoked or a request
is about to be dispatched to an endpoint, or more aggressively, e.g. when creating a proxy. In a container
environment, an implementation may perform any correctness checks at deployment time.
23
7.1
25
javax.xml.ws.ServiceMode
The ServiceMode annotation is used to specify the mode for a provider class, i.e. whether a provider wants
to have access to protocol message payloads (e.g. a SOAP body) or the entire protocol messages (e.g. a
SOAP envelope).
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Table 7.1: ServiceMode properties.
Property
value
Description
The service mode, one of
javax.xml.ws.Service.Mode. MESSAGE or
javax.xml.ws.Service.Mode.PAYLOAD.
MESSAGE means that the whole protocol
message will be handed to the provider
instance, PAYLOAD that only the payload of
the protocol message will be handed to the
provider instance.
Default
javax.xml.ws.Service.Mode.PAYLOAD
The ServiceMode annotation type is marked @Inherited, so the annotation will be inherited from the
superclass.
7.2
javax.xml.ws.WebFault
1
2
3
The WebFault annotation is used when mapping WSDL faults to Java exceptions, see section 2.5. It is used
to capture the name of the fault element used when marshalling the JAXB type generated from the global
element referenced by the WSDL fault message. It can also be used to customize the mapping of service
specific exceptions to WSDL faults.
4
5
6
7
Table 7.2: WebFault properties.
Property
name
targetNamespace
faultBean
Description
The local name of the element
The namespace name of the element
The name of the fault bean class
Default
””
””
””
Since the default value for the name property of this annotation is not a valid XML element local name, an
actual value must be specified in all cases.
7.3
javax.xml.ws.RequestWrapper
Table 7.3: RequestWrapper properties.
Property
74
Description
The local name of the element
The namespace name of the element
The name of the wrapper class
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10
The RequestWrapper annotation is applied to the methods of an SEI. It is used to capture the JAXB
generated request wrapper bean and the element name and namespace for marshalling / unmarshalling the
bean. The default value of localName element is the operationName as defined in WebMethod annotation and the default value for the targetNamespace element is the target namespace of the SEI. When
starting from Java, this annotation is used to resolve overloading conflicts in document literal mode. Only
the className element is required in this case.
localName
targetNamespace
className
8
Default
””
””
””
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7.6. javax.xml.ws.WebEndpoint
7.4
javax.xml.ws.ResponseWrapper
1
The ResponseWrapper annotation is applied to the methods of an SEI. It is used to capture the JAXB
generated response wrapper bean and the element name and namespace for marshalling / unmarshalling the
bean. The default value of the localName element is the operationName as defined in the WebMethod
appended with ”Response” and the default value of the targetNamespace element is the target namespace
of the SEI. When starting from Java, this annotation is used to resolve overloading conflicts in document
literal mode. Only the className element is required in this case.
2
3
4
5
6
7
Table 7.4: ResponseWrapper properties.
Property
localName
targetNamespace
className
7.5
Description
The local name of the element
The namespace name of the element
The name of the wrapper class
Default
””
””
””
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceClient
8
The WebServiceClient annotation is specified on a generated service class (see 2.7). It is used to associate a class with a specific Web service, identify by a URL to a WSDL document and the qualified name of
a wsdl:service element.
9
10
11
Table 7.5: WebServiceClient properties.
Property
name
targetNamespace
wsdlLocation
Description
The local name of the service
The namespace name of the service
The URL for the WSDL description of the
service
Default
””
””
””
When resolving the URI specified as the wsdlLocation element or any document it may transitively
reference, a JAX-WS implementation MUST use the catalog facility defined in section 4.4.
13
7.6
14
javax.xml.ws.WebEndpoint
The WebEndpoint annotation is specified on the getPortName() methods of a generated service class
(see 2.7). It is used to associate a get method with a specific wsdl:port, identified by its local name (a
NCName).
Table 7.6: WebEndpoint properties.
Property
name
October 7, 2005
Description
The local name of the port
JAX-WS 2.0
Default
””
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Chapter 7. Annotations
7.6.1
Example
1
The following shows a WSDL extract and the resulting generated service class.
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2
<!-- WSDL extract -->
<wsdl:service name="StockQuoteService">
<wsdl:port name="StockQuoteHTTPPort" binding="StockQuoteHTTPBinding"/>
<wsdl:port name="StockQuoteSMTPPort" binding="StockQuoteSMTPBinding"/>
</wsdl:service>
3
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5
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8
// Generated Service Interface
@WebServiceClient(name="StockQuoteService",
targetNamespace="...",
wsdlLocation="...")
public class StockQuoteService extends javax.xml.ws.Service {
public StockQuoteService() {
super(wsdlLocation_fromAnnotation, serviceName_fromAnnotation);
}
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public StockQuoteService(String wsdlLocation, QName serviceName) {
18
19
}
20
@WebEndpoint(name="StockQuoteHTTPPort")
21
public StockQuoteProvider getStockQuoteHTTPPort() {
22
return (StockQuoteProvider)super.gePort(portName, StockQuoteProvider.class);
23
}
24
25
@WebEndpoint(name="StockQuoteSMTPPort")
26
public StockQuoteProvider getStockQuoteSMTPPort() {
27
return (StockQuoteProvider)super.getPort(portName, StockQuoteProvider.class);
28
}
29
}
7.7
30
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceProvider
31
The WebServiceProvider annotation is specified on classes that implement a strongly typed javax.xml.ws.Provider. It is used to declare that a class that satisfies the requirements for a provider (see
5.1) does indeed define a Web service endpoint, much like the WebService annotation does for SEI-based
endpoints.
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34
35
Table 7.7: WebServiceProvider properties.
Property
wsdlLocation
serviceName
portName
targetNamespace
Description
The URL for the WSDL description
The name of the service
The name of the port
The target namespace for the service
Default
””
””
””
””
When resolving the URL specified as the wsdlLocation element or any document it may transitively
reference, a JAX-WS implementation MUST use the catalog facility defined in section 4.4.
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7.9. javax.xml.ws.WebServiceRef
7.8
javax.xml.ws.BindingType
1
The BindingType annotation is applied to an endpoint implementation class. It specifies the binding to
use when publishing an endpoint of this type.
2
3
Table 7.8: BindingType properties.
Property
value
Description
The binding ID (a URI)
Default
””
The default binding for an endpoint is the SOAP 1.1/HTTP one (see chapter 10).
4
7.9
5
javax.xml.ws.WebServiceRef
The WebServiceRef annotation is used to declare a reference to a Web service. It follows the resource
pattern exemplified by the javax.annotation.Resource annotation in JSR-250 [31].
The WebServiceRef annotation is required to be honored when running on the Java EE 5 platform, where
it is subject to the common resource injection rules described by the platform specification [32].
6
7
8
9
Table 7.9: WebServiceRef properties.
Property
name
wsdlLocation
type
value
mappedName
Description
The name identifying the Web service
reference.
A URL pointing to the location of the WSDL
document for the service being referred to.
The resource type as a Java class object
The service type as a Java class object
A product specific name that this resource
should be mapped to.
Default
””
””
Object.class
Object.class
””
The name of the resource, as defined by the name element (or defaulted) is a name that is local to the
application component using the resource. (It’s a name in the JNDI java:comp/env namespace.) Many
application servers provide a way to map these local names to names of resources known to the application
server. This mappedName is often a global JNDI name, but may be a name of any form. Application servers
are not required to support any particular form or type of mapped name, nor the ability to use mapped
names. A mapped name is product-dependent and often installation-dependent. No use of a mapped name
is portable.
There are two uses to the WebServiceRef annotation:
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1. To define a reference whose type is a generated service interface. In this case, the type and value
element will both refer to the generated service interface type. Moreover, if the reference type can be
inferred by the field/method declaration the annotation is applied to, the type and value elements
MAY have the default value (Object.class, that is). If the type cannot be inferred, then at least the
type element MUST be present with a non-default value.
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2. To define a reference whose type is a SEI. In this case, the type element MAY be present with its
default value if the type of the reference can be inferred from the annotated field/method declaration,
but the value element MUST always be present and refer to a generated service interface type (a
subtype of javax.xml.ws.Service).
1
2
3
4
The wsdlLocation element, if present, overrides the WSDL location information specified in the WebService5
annotation of the referenced generated service interface.
6
When resolving the URI specified as the wsdlLocation element or any document it may transitively
reference, a JAX-WS implementation MUST use the catalog facility defined in section 4.4.
8
7.9.1
9
Example
The following shows both uses of the WebServiceRef annotation.
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// Generated Service Interface
12
@WebServiceClient(name="StockQuoteService",
targetNamespace="...",
wsdlLocation="...")
public interface StockQuoteService extends javax.xml.ws.Service {
@WebEndpoint(name="StockQuoteHTTPPort")
StockQuoteProvider getStockQuoteHTTPPort();
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20
@WebEndpoint(name="StockQuoteSMTPPort")
StockQuoteProvider getStockQuoteSMTPPort();
21
22
}
23
// Generated SEI
25
@WebService(name="StockQuoteProvider",
targetNamespace="...")
public interface StockQuoteProvider {
Double getStockQuote(String ticker);
}
27
// Sample client code
33
@Stateless
public ClientComponent {
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// WebServiceRef using the generated service interface type
@WebServiceRef
public StockQuoteService stockQuoteService;
38
// WebServiceRef using the SEI type
@WebServiceRef(StockQuoteService.class)
private StockQuoteProvider stockQuoteProvider;
42
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45
// other methods go here...
46
}
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7.10. Annotations Defined by JSR-181
7.10
Annotations Defined by JSR-181
1
In addition to the annotations defined in the preceding sections, JAX-WS 2.0 uses several annotations defined
by JSR-181.
♦ Conformance (JSR-181 conformance): A JAX-WS 2.0 implementation MUST be conformant to the JAXWS profile of JSR-181 1.1 [13].
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
2
3
4
5
As a convenience to the reader, the following sections reproduce the definition of the JSR-181 annotations
applicable to JAX-WS.
7
7.10.1
8
javax.jws.WebService
@Target({TYPE})
public @interface WebService {
String name() default "";
String targetNamespace() default "";
String serviceName() default "";
String wsdlLocation() default "";
String endpointInterface() default "";
String portName() default "";
};
6
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Consistently with the URI resolution process in JAX-WS, when resolving the URI specified as the wsdlLocation
18
element or any document it may transitively reference, a JAX-WS implementation MUST use the catalog 19
facility defined in section4.4.
20
7.10.2
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3
4
5
6
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@Target({METHOD})
public @interface Oneway {
};
7.10.4
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@Target({METHOD})
public @interface WebMethod {
String operationName() default "";
String action() default "" ;
boolean exclude() default false;
};
7.10.3
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javax.jws.WebMethod
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javax.jws.WebParam
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@Target({PARAMETER})
public @interface WebParam {
public enum Mode { IN, OUT, INOUT };
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String name() default "";
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String targetNamespace() default "";
Mode mode() default Mode.IN;
boolean header() default false;
String partName() default "";
};
7.10.5
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javax.jws.WebResult
6
@Target({METHOD})
public @interface WebResult {
String name() default "return";
String targetNamespace() default "";
boolean header() default false;
String partName() default "";
};
7.10.6
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javax.jws.SOAPBinding
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@Target({TYPE, METHOD})
public @interface SOAPBinding {
public enum Style { DOCUMENT, RPC }
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public enum Use { LITERAL, ENCODED }
19
public enum ParameterStyle { BARE, WRAPPED }
21
Style style() default Style.DOCUMENT;
Use use() default Use.LITERAL;
ParameterStyle parameterStyle() default ParameterStyle.WRAPPED;
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}
7.10.7
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javax.jws.HandlerChain
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@Target({TYPE})
public @interface HandlerChain {
String file();
String name() default "";
}
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Chapter 8
Customizations
This chapter describes a standard customization facility that can be used to customize the WSDL 1.1 to Java
binding defined in section 2.
8.1
Binding Language
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5
JAX-WS 2.0 defines an XML-based language that can be used to specify customizations to the WSDL 1.1
to Java binding. In order to maintain consistency with JAXB, we call it a binding language. Similarly,
customizations will hereafter be referred to as binding declarations.
7
All XML elements defined in this section belong to the http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws namespace. For clarity, the rest of this section uses qualified element names exclusively. Wherever it appears, the
jaxws prefix is assumed to be bound to the http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws namespace name.
10
The binding language is extensible. Extensions are expressed using elements and/or attributes whose namespace name is different from the one used by this specification.
♦ Conformance (Standard binding declarations): The http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws namespace is reserved for standard JAX-WS binding declarations. Implementations MUST support all standard
JAX-WS binding declarations. Implementation-specific binding declaration extensions MUST NOT use the
http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws namespace.
♦ Conformance (Binding language extensibility): Implementations MUST ignore unknown elements and
attributes appearing inside a binding declaration whose namespace name is not the one specified in the
standard, i.e. http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws.
8.2
Binding Declaration Container
In either case, the jaxws:bindings element is used as a container for JAX-WS binding declarations. It
contains a (possibly empty) list of binding declarations, in any order.
JAX-WS 2.0
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There are two ways to specify binding declarations. In the first approach, all binding declarations pertaining
to a given WSDL document are grouped together in a standalone document, called an external binding
file (see 8.4). The second approach consists in embeddeding binding declarations directly inside a WSDL
document (see 8.3).
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1
2
3
4
5
<jaxws:bindings wsdlLocation="xs:anyURI"?
node="xs:string"?
version="string"?>
...binding declarations...
</jaxws:bindings>
Figure 8.1: Syntax of the binding declaration container
Semantics
1
@wsdlLocation A URI pointing to a WSDL file establishing the scope of the contents of this binding
declaration. It MUST NOT be present if the jaxws:bindings element is used as an extension
inside a WSDL document or one of its ancestor jaxws:bindings elements already contains this
attribute.
@node An XPath expression pointing to the element in the WSDL file in scope that this binding declaration
is attached to. It MUST NOT be present if the jaxws:bindings appears inside a WSDL document.
@version A version identifier. It MUST NOT appear on jaxws:bindings elements which have any
jaxws:bindings ancestors (i.e. on non top-level binding declarations).
2
3
4
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7
8
9
For the JAX-WS 2.0 specification, the version identifier, if present, MUST be "2.0". If the @version
attribute is absent, it will implicitly be assumed to be 2.0.
11
8.3
12
Embedded Binding Declarations
An embedded binding declaration is specified by using the jaxws:bindings element as a WSDL extension. Embedded binding declarations MAY appear on any of the elements in the WSDL 1.1 namespace that
accept extension elements, per the schema for the WSDL 1.1 namespace as amended by the WS-I Basic
Profile 1.1[17].
A binding declaration embedded in a WSDL document can only affect the WSDL element it extends. When
a jaxws:bindings element is used as a WSDL extension, it MUST NOT have a node attribute. Moreover,
it MUST NOT have an element whose qualified name is jaxws:bindings amongs its children.
8.3.1
Example
External Binding File
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The jaxws:bindings element MAY appear as the root element of a XML document. Such a document is
called an external binding file.
An external binding file specifies bindings for a given WSDL document. The WSDL document in question
is identified via the mandatory wsdlLocation attribute on the root jaxws:bindings element in the
document.
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Figure 8.2 shows a WSDL document containing binding declaration extensions. For JAXB annotations, it
assumes that the prefix jaxb is bound to the namespace name http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb.
8.4
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8.4. External Binding File
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<wsdl:definitions targetNamespace="..." xmlns:tns=..." xmlns:stns="...">
<wsdl:types>
<xs:schema targetNamespace="http://example.org/bar">
<xs:annotation>
<xs:appinfo>
<jaxb:bindings>
...some JAXB binding declarations...
</jaxb:bindings>
</xs:appinfo>
</xs:annotation>
<xs:element name="setLastTradePrice">
<xs:complexType>
<xs:sequence>
<xs:element name="tickerSymbol" type="xs:string"/>
<xs:element name="lastTradePrice" type="xs:float"/>
</xs:sequence>
</xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
<xs:element name="setLastTradePriceResponse">
<xs:complexType>
<xs:sequence/>
</xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
</xs:schema>
</wsdl:types>
<wsdl:message name="setLastTradePrice">
<wsdl:part name="setPrice" element="stns:setLastTradePrice"/>
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:message name="setLastTradePriceResponse">
<wsdl:part name="setPriceResponse" type="stns:setLastTradePriceResponse"/>
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:portType name="StockQuoteUpdater">
<wsdl:operation name="setLastTradePrice">
<wsdl:input message="tns:setLastTradePrice"/>
<wsdl:output message="tns:setLastTradePriceResponse"/>
<jaxws:bindings>
<jaxws:method name="updatePrice"/>
</jaxws:bindings>
</wsdl:operation>
<jaxws:bindings>
<jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>true</jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>
</jaxws:bindings>
</wsdl:portType>
<jaxws:bindings>
<jaxws:package name="com.acme.foo"/>
...additional binding declarations...
</jaxws:bindings>
</wsdl:definitions>
Figure 8.2: Sample WSDL document with embedded binding declarations
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In an external binding file, jaxws:bindings elements MAY appear as non-root elements, e.g. as a child
or descendant of the root jaxws:bindings element. In this case, they MUST carry a node attribute identifying the element in the WSDL document they annotate. The root jaxws:bindings element implicitly
contains a node attribute whose value is //, i.e. selecting the root element in the document. An XPath expression on a non-root jaxws:bindings element selects zero or more nodes from the set of nodes selected
by its parent jaxws:bindings element.
External binding files are semantically equivalent to embedded binding declarations (see 8.3). When a
JAX-WS implementation processes a WSDL document for which there is an external binding file, it MUST
operate as if all binding declarations specified in the external binding file were instead specified as embedded
declarations on the nodes in the in the WSDL document they target. It is an error if, upon embedding the
binding declarations defined in one or more external binding files, the resulting WSDL document contains
conflicting binding declarations.
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♦ Conformance (Multiple binding files): Implementations MUST support specifying any number of external JAX-WS and JAXB binding files for processing in conjunction with at least one WSDL document.
13
14
Please refer to section 8.5 for more information on processing JAXB binding declarations.
15
8.4.1
16
Example
Figures 8.3 and 8.4 show an example external binding file and WSDL document respectively that express
the same set of binding declarations as the WSDL document in 8.3.1.
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<jaxws:bindings wsdlLocation="http://example.org/foo.wsdl">
<jaxws:package name="com.acme.foo"/>
<jaxws:bindings
node="wsdl:types/xs:schema[targetNamespace=’http://example.org/bar’]">
<jaxb:bindings>
...some JAXB binding declarations...
</jaxb:bindings>
</jaxws:bindings>
<jaxws:bindings node="wsdl:portType[@name=’StockQuoteUpdater’]">
<jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>true</jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>
<jaxws:bindings node="wsdl:operation[@name=’setLastTradePrice’]">
<jaxws:method name="updatePrice"/>
</jaxws:bindings>
</jaxws:bindings>
...additional binding declarations....
</jaxws:bindings>
Figure 8.3: Sample external binding file for WSDL in figure8.4
8.5
Using JAXB Binding Declarations
19
It is possible to use JAXB binding declarations in conjunction with JAX-WS.
20
The JAXB 2.0 bindings element, henceforth referred to as jaxb:bindings, MAY appear as an annotation
inside a schema document embedded in a WSDL document, i.e. as a descendant of a xs:schema element
whose parent is the wsdl:types element. It affects the data binding as specified by JAXB 2.0.
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8.5. Using JAXB Binding Declarations
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<wsdl:definitions targetNamespace="..." xmlns:tns="..." xmlns:stns="...">
<wsdl:types>
<xs:schema targetNamespace="http://example.org/bar">
<xs:element name="setLastTradePrice">
<xs:complexType>
<xs:sequence>
<xs:element name="tickerSymbol" type="xs:string"/>
<xs:element name="lastTradePrice" type="xs:float"/>
</xs:sequence>
</xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
<xs:element name="setLastTradePriceResponse">
<xs:complexType>
<xs:sequence/>
</xs:complexType>
</xs:element>
</xs:schema>
</wsdl:types>
<wsdl:message name="setLastTradePrice">
<wsdl:part name="setPrice" element="stns:setLastTradePrice"/>
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:message name="setLastTradePriceResponse">
<wsdl:part name="setPriceResponse"
type="stns:setLastTradePriceResponse"/>
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:portType name="StockQuoteUpdater">
<wsdl:operation name="setLastTradePrice">
<wsdl:input message="tns:setLastTradePrice"/>
<wsdl:output message="tns:setLastTradePriceResponse"/>
</wsdl:operation>
</wsdl:portType>
</wsdl:definitions>
Figure 8.4: WSDL document referred to by external binding file in figure8.3
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Additionally, jaxb:bindings MAY appear inside a JAX-WS external binding file as a child of a jaxws:bindings element whose node attribute points to a xs:schema element inside a WSDL document. When
the schema is processed, the outcome MUST be as if the jaxb:bindings element was inlined inside the
schema document as an annotation on the schema component.
While processing a JAXB binding declaration (i.e. a jaxb:bindings element) for a schema document
embedded inside a WSDL document, all XPath expressions that appear inside it MUST be interpreted as if
the containing xs:schema element was the root of a standalone schema document.
Editors Note 8.1 This last requirement ensures that JAXB processors don’t have to be extended to incorporate knowledge of WSDL. In particular, it becomes possible to take a JAXB binding file and embed it in a
JAX-WS binding file as-is, without fixing up all its XPath expressions, even in the case that the XML Schema
the JAXB binding file refers to was embedded in a WSDL.
8.6
Scoping of Bindings
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Binding declarations are scoped according to the parent-child hierarchy in the WSDL document. For instance, when determining the value of the jaxws:enableWrapperStyle customization parameter for a
portType operation, binding declarations MUST be processed in the following order, according to the element they pertain to: (1) the portType operation in question, (2) its parent portType, (3) the definitions
element.
Tools MUST NOT ignore binding declarations. It is an error if upon applying all the customizations in
effect for a given WSDL document, any of the generated Java source code artifacts does not contain legal
Java syntax. In particular, it is an error to use any reserved keywords as the name of a Java field, method,
type or package.
8.7
1
Standard Binding Declarations
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22
The following sections detail the predefined binding declarations, classified according to the WSDL element they’re allowed on. All these declarations reside in the http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxws
namespace.
24
8.7.1
26
Definitions
The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL document, either as an extension to the wsdl:definitions element or in an external binding file at a place where there is a WSDL
document in scope.
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<jaxws:package name="xs:string">?
<jaxws:javadoc>xs:string</jaxws:javadoc>?
</jaxws:package>
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<jaxws:enableWrapperStyle>?
xs:boolean
</jaxws:enableWrapperStyle>
34
<jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>?
xs:boolean
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8.7. Standard Binding Declarations
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</jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>
1
<jaxws:enableMIMEContent>?
xs:boolean
</jaxws:enableMIMEContent>
3
2
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5
Semantics
6
package/@name Name of the Java package for the targetNamespace of the parent wsdl:definitions
element.
package/javadoc/text() Package-level javadoc string.
enableAsyncMapping If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), asynchronous mappings are
enabled (resp. disbled) by default for all operations.
enableMIMEContent If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), use of the mime:content
information is enabled (resp. disabled) by default for all operations.
The enableWrapperStyle declaration only affects operations that qualify for the wrapper style per the
JAX-WS specification. By default, this declaration is true, i.e. wrapper style processing is turned on
by default for all qualified operations, and must be disabled by using a jaxws:enableWrapperStyle
declaration with a value of false in the appropriate scope.
PortType
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The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL portType, either as an extension
to the wsdl:portType element or with a node attribute pointing at one.
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7
8
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8
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enableWrapperStyle If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), wrapper style is enabled
(resp. disabled) by default for all operations.
8.7.2
7
<jaxws:class name="xs:string">?
<jaxws:javadoc>xs:string</jaxws:javadoc>?
</jaxws:class>
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26
<jaxws:enableWrapperStyle>?
xs:boolean
</jaxws:enableWrapperStyle>
27
<jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>xs:boolean</jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>?
31
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Semantics
32
class/@name Fully qualified name of the generated service endpoint interface corresponding to the parent
wsdl:portType.
34
class/javadoc/text() Class-level javadoc string.
35
enableWrapperStyle If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), wrapper style is enabled
(resp. disabled) by default for all operations in this wsdl:portType.
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enableAsyncMapping If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), asynchronous mappings are
enabled (resp. disabled) by default for all operations in this wsdl:portType.
8.7.3
PortType Operation
2
3
The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL portType operation, either as an
extension to the wsdl:portType/wsdl:operation element or with a node attribute pointing at one.
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<jaxws:method name="xs:string">?
<jaxws:javadoc>xs:string</jaxws:javadoc>?
</jaxws:method>
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8
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<jaxws:enableWrapperStyle>?
xs:boolean
</jaxws:enableWrapperStyle>
10
<jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>?
xs:boolean
</jaxws:enableAsyncMapping>
14
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<jaxws:parameter part="xs:string"
childElementName="xs:QName"?
name="xs:string"/>*
18
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20
Semantics
21
method/@name Name of the Java method corresponding to this wsdl:operation.
22
method/javadoc/text() Method-level javadoc string.
23
enableWrapperStyle If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), wrapper style is enabled
(resp. disabled) by default for this wsdl:operation.
enableAsyncMapping If present with a boolean value of true, asynchronous mappings are enabled by
default for this wsdl:operation.
parameter/@part A XPath expression identifying a wsdl:part child of a wsdl:message.
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parameter/@childElementName The qualified name of a child element information item of the global
type definition or global element declaration referred to by the wsdl:part identified by the previous
attribute.
31
parameter/@name The name of the Java formal parameter corresponding to the parameter identified by
the previous two attributes.
33
It is an error if two parameters that do not correspond to the same Java formal parameter are assigned the
same name, or if a part/element that corresponds to the Java method return value is assigned a name.
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8.7. Standard Binding Declarations
8.7.4
PortType Fault Message
1
The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL portType operation’s fault message, either as an extension to the wsdl:portType/wsdl:operation/wsdl:fault element or with a
node attribute pointing at one.
1
2
3
<jaxws:class name="xs:string">?
<jaxws:javadoc>xs:string</jaxws:javadoc>?
</jaxws:class>
2
3
4
5
6
7
Semantics
8
class/@name The name of the generated exception class for this fault.
9
class/javadoc/text() Class-level javadoc string.
10
It is an error if faults that refer to the same wsdl:message element are mapped to exception classes with
different names.
8.7.5
Binding
<jaxws:enableMIMEContent>?
xs:boolean
</jaxws:enableMIMEContent>
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19
enableMIMEContent If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), use of the mime:content
information is enabled (resp. disabled) for all operations in this binding.
Binding Operation
20
21
22
The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL binding operation, either as an
extension to the wsdl:binding/wsdl:operation element or with a node attribute pointing at one.
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2
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5
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7
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10
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Semantics
8.7.6
12
13
The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL binding, either as an extension
to the wsdl:binding element or with a node attribute pointing at one.
1
2
3
11
23
24
<jaxws:enableMIMEContent>?
xs:boolean
</jaxws:enableMIMEContent>
25
<jaxws:parameter part="xs:string"
childElementName="xs:QName"?
name="xs:string"/>*
29
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<jaxws:exception part="xs:string">*
<jaxws:class name="xs:string">?
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<jaxws:javadoc>xs:string</jaxws:javadoc>?
</jaxws:class>
</jaxws:exception>
1
2
3
Semantics
4
enableMIMEContent If present with a boolean value of true (resp. false), use of the mime:content
information is enabled (resp. disabled) for this operation.
parameter/@part A XPath expression identifying a wsdl:part child of a wsdl:message.
5
6
7
parameter/@childElementName The qualified name of a child element information item of the global
type definition or global element declaration referred to by the wsdl:part identified by the previous
attribute.
10
parameter/@name The name of the Java formal parameter corresponding to the parameter identified by the
previous two attributes. The parameter in question MUST correspond to a soap:header extension.
12
8.7.7
13
Service
The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL service, either as an extension
to the wsdl:service element or with a node attribute pointing at one.
1
2
3
<jaxws:class name="xs:string">?
<jaxws:javadoc>xs:string</jaxws:javadoc>?
</jaxws:class>
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Semantics
19
class/@name The name of the generated service interface.
20
class/javadoc/text() Class-level javadoc string.
21
8.7.8
22
Port
The following binding declarations MAY appear in the context of a WSDL service, either as an extension
to the wsdl:port element or with a node attribute pointing at one.
1
2
3
4
5
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24
<jaxws:method name="xs:string">?
<jaxws:javadoc>xs:string</jaxws:javadoc>?
</jaxws:method>
26
<jaxws:provider/>?
29
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28
Semantics
30
method/@name The name of the generated port getter method.
31
method/javadoc/text() Method-level javadoc string.
32
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8.7. Standard Binding Declarations
provider This binding declaration specifies that the annotated port will be used with the javax.xml.ws.Provider interface.
A port annotated with a jaxws:provider binding declaration is treated specially. No service endpoint interface will be generated for it, since the application code will use in its lieu the javax.xml.ws.Provider
interface. Additionally, the port getter method on the generated service interface will be omitted.
Editors Note 8.2 Omitting a getXYZPort() method is necessary for consistency, because if it existed it would
specify the non-existing SEI type as its return type.
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Chapter 9
Handler Framework
JAX-WS provides a flexible plug-in framework for message processing modules, known as handlers, that
may be used to extend the capabilities of a JAX-WS runtime system. This chapter describes the handler
framework in detail.
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2
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4
5
♦ Conformance (Handler framework support): An implementation MUST support the handler framework.
6
9.1
7
Architecture
The handler framework is implemented by a JAX-WS protocol binding in both client and server side runtimes. Proxies, and Dispatch instances, known collectively as binding providers, each use protocol bindings to bind their abstract functionality to specific protocols (see figure9.1). Protocol bindings can extend
the handler framework to provide protocol specific functionality; chapter 10 describes the JAX-WS SOAP
binding that extends the handler framework with SOAP specific functionality.
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Figure 9.1: Handler architecture
Client and server-side handlers are organized into an ordered list known as a handler chain. The handlers
within a handler chain are invoked each time a message is sent or received. Inbound messages are processed
by handlers prior to binding provider processing. Outbound messages are processed by handlers after any
binding provider processing.
Handlers are invoked with a message context that provides methods to access and modify inbound and
outbound messages and to manage a set of properties. Message context properties may be used to facilitate
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communication between individual handlers and between handlers and client and service implementations.
Different types of handlers are invoked with different types of message context.
9.1.1
Types of Handler
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JAX-WS 2.0 defines two types of handler:
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Logical Handlers that only operate on message context properties and message payloads. Logical handlers
are protocol agnostic and are unable to affect protocol specific parts of a message. Logical handlers
are handlers that implement javax.xml.ws.handler.LogicalHandler.
Protocol Handlers that operate on message context properties and protocol specific messages. Protocol
handlers are specific to a particular protocol and may access and change protocol specific aspects of a
message. Protocol handlers are handlers that implement any interface derived from javax.xml.ws.handler.Handler except javax.xml.ws.handler.LogicalHandler.
Figure 9.2 shows the class hierarchy for handlers.
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Figure 9.2: Handler class hierarchy
Handlers for protocols other than SOAP are expected to implement a protocol-specific interface that extends
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javax.xml.ws.handler.Handler.
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9.1.2
15
Binding Responsibilities
The following subsections describe the responsibilities of the protocol binding when hosting a handler chain.
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9.1.2.1 Handler and Message Context Management
17
The binding is responsible for instantiation, invocation, and destruction of handlers according to the rules
specified in section 9.3. The binding is responsible for instantiation and management of message contexts
according to the rules specified in section 9.4
♦ Conformance (Logical handler support): All binding implementations MUST support logical handlers
(see section 9.1.1) being deployed in their handler chains.
♦ Conformance (Other handler support): Binding implementations MAY support other handler types (see
section 9.1.1) being deployed in their handler chains.
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♦ Conformance (Incompatible handlers): An implementation MUST throw WebServiceException when,
at the time a binding provider is created, the handler chain returned by the configured HandlerResolver
contains an incompatible handler.
♦ Conformance (Incompatible handlers): Implementations MUST throw a WebServiceException when
attempting to configure an incompatible handler using the Binding.setHandlerChain method.
9.1.2.2 Message Dispatch
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The binding is responsible for dispatch of both outbound and inbound messages after handler processing.
Outbound messages are dispatched using whatever means the protocol binding uses for communication.
Inbound messages are dispatched to the binding provider. JAX-WS defines no standard interface between
binding providers and their binding.
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9.1.2.3 Exception Handling
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The binding is responsible for catching runtime exceptions thrown by handlers and respecting any resulting
message direction and message type change as described in section 9.3.2.
Outbound exceptions1 are converted to protocol fault messages and dispatched using whatever means the
protocol binding uses for communication. Specific protocol bindings describe the mechanism for their
particular protocol, section 10.2.2 describes the mechanism for the SOAP 1.1 binding. Inbound exceptions
are passed to the binding provider.
9.2
Configuration
Programmatic Configuration
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JAX-WS only defines APIs for programmatic configuration of client side handler chains – server side handler chains are expected to be configured using deployment metadata.
9.2.1.1 javax.xml.ws.handler.HandlerResolver
1
Outbound exceptions are exceptions thrown by a handler that result in the message direction being set to outbound according
to the rules in section 9.3.2.
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A Service instance maintains a handler resolver that is used when creating proxies or Dispatch instances, known collectively as binding providers. During the creation of a binding provider, the handler
resolver currently registered with a service is used to create a handler chain, which in turn is then used to
configure the binding provider. A Service instance provides access to a handlerResolver property,
via the Service.getHandlerResolver and Service.setHandlerResolver methods. A HandlerResolver implements a single method, getHandlerChain, which has one argument, a PortInfo object.
The JAX-WS runtime uses the PortInfo argument to pass the HandlerResolver of the service, port and
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Handler chains may be configured either programmatically or using deployment metadata. The following
subsections describe each form of configuration.
9.2.1
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binding in use. The HandlerResolver may use any of this information to decide which handlers to use in
constructing the requested handler chain.
When a Service instance is used to create an instance of a binding provider then the created instance is
configured with the handler chain created by the HandlerResolver instance registered on the Service
instance at that point in time.
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2
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5
♦ Conformance (Handler chain snapshot): Changing the handler resolver configured for a Service instance MUST NOT affect the handlers on previously created proxies, or Dispatch instances.
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9.2.1.2 Handler Ordering
8
The handler chain for a binding is constructed by starting with the handler chain as returned by the HandlerResolver for the service in use and sorting its elements so that all logical handlers precede all protocol
handlers. In performing this operation, the order of handlers of any given type (logical or protocol) in the
original chain is maintained. Figure 9.3 illustrates this.
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Figure 9.3: Handler ordering, Ln and Pn represent logical and protocol handlers respectively.
Section 9.3.2 describes how the handler order relates to the order of handler execution for inbound and
outbound messages.
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9.2.1.3 javax.jws.HandlerChain annotation
15
The javax.jws.HandlerChain annotation defined by JSR-181 [13] may be used to specify in a declarative way the handler chain to use for a service.
17
When used in conunction with JAX-WS, the name element of the HandlerChain annotation, if present,
MUST have the default value (the empty string).
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19
In addition to appearing on a endpoint implementation class or a SEI, as specified by JSR-181, the handlerChain
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instances created using any of the ports on the service.
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♦ Conformance (HandlerChain annotation): An implementation MUST support using the HandlerChain
annotation on an endpoint implementation class, including a provider, on an endpoint interface and on a
generated service class.
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2
3
On the client, the HandlerChain annotation can be seen as a shorthand way of defining and installing a
handler resolver (see 9.2.1.1).
♦ Conformance (Handler resolver for a HandlerChain annotation): For a generated service class (see 2.7)
which is annotated with a HandlerChain annotation, the default handler resolver MUST return handler
chains consistent with the contents of the handler chain descriptor referenced by the HandlerChain annotation.
Figure 9.4 shows an endpoint implementation class annotated with a HandlerChain annotation.
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@WebService
@HandlerChain(file="sample_chain.xml")
public class MyService {
...
}
Figure 9.4: Use of the HandlerChain annotation
9.2.1.4 javax.xml.ws.Binding
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The Binding interface is an abstraction of a JAX-WS protocol binding (see section 6.1 for more details). As
described above, the handler chain initially configured on an instance is a snapshot of the applicable handlers
configured on the Service instance at the time of creation. Binding provides methods to manipulate the
initially configured handler chain for a specific instance.
♦ Conformance (Binding handler manipulation): Changing the handler chain on a Binding instance MUST
NOT cause any change to the handler chains configured on the Service instance used to create the
Binding instance.
9.2.2
Deployment Model
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JAX-WS defines no standard deployment model for handlers. Such a model is provided by JSR 109[14]
“Implementing Enterprise Web Services”.
9.3
12
Processing Model
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This section describes the processing model for handlers within the handler framework.
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24
Handler Lifecycle
In some cases, a JAX-WS implementation must instantiate handler classes directly, e.g. in a container
environment or when using the HandlerChain annotation. When doing so, an implementation must invoke
the handler lifecycle methods as prescribed in this section.
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If an application does its own instantiation of handlers, e.g. using a handler resolver, then the burden of
calling any handler lifecycle methods falls on the application itself. This should not be seen as inconsistent,
because handlers are logically part of the application, so their contract will be known to the application
developer.
The JAX-WS runtime system manages the lifecycle of handlers by invoking any methods of the handler
class annotated as lifecycle methods before and after dispatching requests to the handler itself.
The JAX-WS runtime system is responsible for loading the handler class and instantiating the corresponding
handler object according to the instruction contained in the applicable handler configuration file or deployment descriptor.
The lifecycle of a handler instance begins when the JAX-WS runtime system creates a new instance of the
handler class.
The runtime MUST then carry out any injections requested by the handler, typically via the javax.annotation.Resource annotation. After all the injections have been carried out, including in the case
where no injections were requested, the runtime MUST invoke the method carrying a javax.annotation.PostConstruct annotation, if present. Such a method MUST satisfy the requirements in JSR-250 [31]
for lifecycle methods (i.e. it has a void return type and takes zero arguments). The handler instance is then
ready for use.
♦ Conformance (Handler initialization): After injection has been completed, an implementation MUST
call the lifecycle method annotated with PostConstruct, if present, prior to invoking any other method
on a handler instance.
Once the handler instance is created and initialized it is placed into the Ready state. While in the Ready
state the JAX-WS runtime system may invoke other handler methods as required.
The lifecycle of a handler instance ends when the JAX-WS runtime system stops using the handler for
processing inbound or outbound messages. After taking the handler offline, a JAX-WS implementation
SHOULD invoke the lifecycle method which carries a javax.annotation.PreDestroy annotation, if
present, so as to permit the handler to clean up its resources. Such a method MUST satisfy the requirements
in JSR-250 [31] for lifecycle methods
An implementation can only release handlers after the instance they are attached to, be it a proxy, a
Dispatch object, an endpoint or some other component, e.g. a EJB object, is released. Consequently,
in non-container environments, it is impossible to call the PreDestroy method in a reliable way, and handler instance cleanup must be left to finalizer methods and regular garbage collection.
♦ Conformance (Handler destruction): In a managed environment, prior to releasing a handler instance, an
implementation MUST call the lifecycle method annotated with PreDestroy method, if present, on any
Handler instances which it instantiated.
The handler instance must release its resources and perform cleanup in the implementation of the PreDestroy
lifecycle method. After invocation of the PreDestroy method(s), the handler instance will be made available for garbage collection.
9.3.2
Handler Execution
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As described in section 9.2.1.2, a set of handlers is managed by a binding as an ordered list called a handler
chain. Unless modified by the actions of a handler (see below) normal processing involves each handler in
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the chain being invoked in turn. Each handler is passed a message context (see section 9.4) whose contents
may be manipulated by the handler.
For outbound messages handler processing starts with the first handler in the chain and proceeds in the same
order as the handler chain. For inbound messages the order of processing is reversed: processing starts with
the last handler in the chain and proceeds in the reverse order of the handler chain. E.g., consider a handler
chain that consists of six handlers H 1 . . . H6 in that order: for outbound messages handler H 1 would be
invoked first followed by H2 , H3 , . . . , and finally handler H6 ; for inbound messages H6 would be invoked
first followed by H5 , H4 , . . . , and finally H1 .
In the following discussion the terms next handler and previous handler are used. These terms are relative
to the direction of the message, table 9.1 summarizes their meaning.
Message Direction
Inbound
Outbound
Term
Next
Previous
Next
Previous
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Handler
Hi−1
Hi+1
Hi+1
Hi−1
Table 9.1: Next and previous handlers for handler H i .
Handlers may change the direction of messages and the order of handler processing by throwing an exception
or by returning false from handleMessage or handleFault. The following subsections describe each
handler method and the changes to handler chain processing they may cause.
9.3.2.1 handleMessage
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This method is called for normal message processing. Following completion of its work the handleMessage implementation can do one of the following:
Return true This indicates that normal message processing should continue. The runtime invokes handleMessage on the next handler or dispatches the message (see section 9.1.2.2) if there are no further
handlers.
Return false This indicates that normal message processing should cease. Subsequent actions depend
on whether the message exchange pattern (MEP) in use requires a response to the message currently
being processed2 or not:
Response The message direction is reversed, the runtime invokes handleMessage on the next 3
handler or dispatches the message (see section 9.1.2.2) if there are no further handlers.
No response Normal message processing stops, close is called on each previously invoked handler
in the chain, the message is dispatched (see section 9.1.2.2).
Throw ProtocolException or a subclass This indicates that normal message processing should cease.
Subsequent actions depend on whether the MEP in use requires a response to the message currently
being processed or not:
2
For a request-response MEP, if the message direction is reversed during processing of a request message then the message
becomes a response message. Subsequent handler processing takes this change into account.
3
Next in this context means the next handler taking into account the message direction reversal
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Response Normal message processing stops, fault message processing starts. The message direction
is reversed, if the message is not already a fault message then it is replaced with a fault message 4 ,
and the runtime invokes handleFault on the next 4 handler or dispatches the message (see
section 9.1.2.2) if there are no further handlers.
No response Normal message processing stops, close is called on each previously invoked handler
in the chain, the exception is dispatched (see section 9.1.2.3).
Throw any other runtime exception This indicates that normal message processing should cease. Subsequent actions depend on whether the MEP in use includes a response to the message currently being
processed or not:
Response Normal message processing stops, close is called on each previously invoked handler in
the chain, the message direction is reversed, and the exception is dispatched (see section 9.1.2.3).
No response Normal message processing stops, close is called on each previously invoked handler
in the chain, the exception is dispatched (see section 9.1.2.3).
9.3.2.2 handleFault
Return true This indicates that fault message processing should continue. The runtime invokes handleFault on the next handler or dispatches the fault message (see section 9.1.2.2) if there are no further
handlers.
Return false This indicates that fault message processing should cease. Fault message processing stops,
close is called on each previously invoked handler in the chain, the fault message is dispatched (see
section 9.1.2.2).
Throw ProtocolException or a subclass This indicates that fault message processing should cease.
Fault message processing stops, close is called on each previously invoked handler in the chain,
the exception is dispatched (see section 9.1.2.3).
Throw any other runtime exception This indicates that fault message processing should cease. Fault message processing stops, close is called on each previously invoked handler in the chain, the exception
is dispatched (see section 9.1.2.3).
9.3.2.3 close
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A handler’s close method is called at the conclusion of a message exchange pattern (MEP). It is called
just prior to the binding dispatching the final message, fault or exception of the MEP and may be used to
clean up per-MEP resources allocated by a handler. The close method is only called on handlers that were
previously invoked via either handleMessage or handleFault
♦ Conformance (Invoking close): At the conclusion of an MEP, an implementation MUST call the close
method of each handler that was previously invoked during that MEP via either handleMessage or handleFault.
♦ Conformance (Order of close invocations): Handlers are invoked in the reverse order that they appear
in the handler chain.
The handler may have already converted the message to a fault message, in which case no change is made.
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Called for fault message processing, following completion of its work the handleFault implementation
can do one of the following:
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9.3.3
Handler Implementation Considerations
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Handler instances may be pooled by a JAX-WS runtime system. All instances of a specific handler are
considered equivalent by a JAX-WS runtime system and any instance may be chosen to handle a particular
message. Different handler instances may be used to handle each message of an MEP. Different threads
may be used for each handler in a handler chain, for each message in an MEP or any combination of the
two. Handlers should not rely on thread local state to share information. Handlers should instead use the
message context, see section 9.4.
9.4
Message Context
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Handlers are invoked with a message context that provides methods to access and modify inbound and
outbound messages and to manage a set of properties.
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Different types of handler are invoked with different types of message context. Sections 9.4.1 and 9.4.2
describe MessageContext and LogicalMessageContext respectively. In addition, JAX-WS bindings
may define a message context subtype for their particular protocol binding that provides access to protocol
specific features. Section10.3 describes the message context subtype for the JAX-WS SOAP binding.
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15
javax.xml.ws.handler.MessageContext
MessageContext is the super interface for all JAX-WS message contexts. It extends Map<String,Object> with additional methods and constants to manage a set of properties that enable handlers in a
handler chain to share processing related state. For example, a handler may use the put method to insert
a property in the message context that one or more other handlers in the handler chain may subsequently
obtain via the get method.
Properties are scoped as either APPLICATION or HANDLER. All properties are available to all handlers for
an instance of an MEP on a particular endpoint. E.g., if a logical handler puts a property in the message
context, that property will also be available to any protocol handlers in the chain during the execution of an
MEP instance. APPLICATION scoped properties are also made available to client applications (see section
4.2.1) and service endpoint implementations. The defaultscope for a property is HANDLER.
♦ Conformance (Message context property scope): Properties in a message context MUST be shared across
all handler invocations for a particular instance of an MEP on any particular endpoint.
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Table 9.2 lists the set of standard MessageContext properties.
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The standard properties form a set of metadata that describes the context of a particular message. The
property values may be manipulated by client applications, service endpoint implementations, the JAX-WS
runtime or handlers deployed in a protocol binding. A JAX-WS runtime is expected to implement support
for those properties shown as mandatory and may implement support for those properties shown as optional.
Table 9.3 lists the standard MessageContext properties specific to the HTTP protocol. These properties
are only required to be present when using an HTTP-based binding.
Table 9.4 lists those properties that are specific to endpoints running inside a servlet container. These properties are only required to be present in the message context of an endpoint that is deployed inside a servlet
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Table 9.2: Standard MessageContext properties.
Type
Mandatory Description
Name
javax.xml.ws.handler.message
.outbound
Boolean
Y
Specifies the message direction: true
for outbound messages, false for inbound messages.
javax.xml.ws.binding
.attachments
Map<String,DataHandler>
Y
A map of attachments to a message. The key is a unique identifier
for the attachment. The value is a
DataHandler for the attachment data.
Bindings describe how to carry attachments with messages.
javax.xml.ws.wsdl
.description
URI
N
.service
QName
N
.port
QName
N
.interface
QName
N
.operation
QName
N
A resolvable URI that may be used to
obtain access to the WSDL for the endpoint.
The name of the service being invoked
in the WSDL.
The name of the port over which the
current message was received in the
WSDL.
The name of the interface (WSDL 2.0)
or port type (WSDL 1.1) to which the
current message belongs.
The name of the WSDL operation to
which the current message belongs.
For WSDL 2.0 this is the operation
component designator. For WSDL 1.1
the namespace is the target namespace
of the WSDL definitions element.
container and uses an HTTP-based binding.
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9.4.2
2
javax.xml.ws.handler.LogicalMessageContext
Logical handlers (see section 9.1.1) are passed a message context of type LogicalMessageContext when
invoked. LogicalMessageContext extends MessageContext with methods to obtain and modify the
message payload, it does not provide access to the protocol specific aspects of a message. A protocol binding
defines what component of a message are available via a logical message context. E.g., the SOAP binding,
see section 10.1.1.2, defines that a logical handler deployed in a SOAP binding can access the contents of
the SOAP body but not the SOAP headers whereas the XML/HTTP binding described in chapter 11 defines
that a logical handler can access the entire XML payload of a message.
The getSource() method of LogicalMessageContext MUST return null whenever the message doesn’t
contain an actual payload. A case in which this might happen is when, on the server, the endpoint implementation has thrown an exception and the protocol in use does not define a notion of payload for faults
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Table 9.3: Standard HTTP MessageContext properties.
Type
Mandatory Description
Name
javax.xml.ws.http.request
.headers
Map<String,List<String>>
Y
.method
Y
String
javax.xml.ws.http.response
.headers
Map<String,List<String>>
Y
Integer
Y
.code
Name
A map of the HTTP headers for the request message. The key is the header
name. The value is a list of values for
that header.
The HTTP method for the request message.
A map of the HTTP headers for the response message. The key is the header
name. The value is a list of values for
that header.
The HTTP response status code.
Table 9.4: Standard Servlet Container-Specific MessageContext properties.
Type
Mandatory Description
javax.xml.ws.servlet
.context
javax.servlet.ServletContext
Y
.request
javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest
Y
.response
javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse
Y
The ServletContext object belonging to the web
application that contains the
endpoint.
The HttpServletRequest
object associated with the request currently being served.
The
HttpServletResponse
.session
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Y
object associated with the
request
currently
being
served.
The HttpSession associated with the request currently being served.
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(e.g. the HTTP binding defined in chapter 11).
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9.4.3
2
Relationship to Application Contexts
Client side binding providers have methods to access contexts for outbound and inbound messages. As
described in section 4.2.1 these contexts are used to initialize a message context at the start of a message
exchange and to obtain application scoped properties from a message context at the end of a message exchange.
As described in chapter 5, service endpoint implementations may require injection of a context from which
they can access the message context for each inbound message and manipulate the corresponding applicationscoped properties.
Handlers may manipulate the values and scope of properties within the message context as desired. E.g.,
a handler in a client-side SOAP binding might introduce a header into a SOAP request message to carry
metadata from a property that originated in a BindingProvider request context; a handler in a server-side
SOAP binding might add application scoped properties to the message context from the contents of a header
in a request SOAP message that is then made available in the context available (via injection) to a service
endpoint implementation.
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Chapter 10
SOAP Binding
This chapter describes the JAX-WS SOAP binding and its extensions to the handler framework (described
in chapter 9) for SOAP message processing.
10.1
Configuration
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3
4
5
A SOAP binding instance requires SOAP specific configuration in addition to that described in section9.2.
The additional information can be configured either programmatically or using deployment metadata. The
following subsections describe each form of configuration.
10.1.1
1
Programmatic Configuration
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7
8
9
JAX-WS defines APIs for programmatic configuration of client-side SOAP bindings. Server side bindings
can be configured programmatically when using the Endpoint API (see 5.2), but are otherwise expected to
be configured using annotations or deployment metadata.
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10.1.1.1 SOAP Roles
13
SOAP 1.1[2] and SOAP 1.2[3, 4] use different terminology for the same concept: a SOAP 1.1 actor is
equivalent to a SOAP 1.2 role. This specification uses the SOAP 1.2 terminology.
An ultimate SOAP receiver always plays the following roles:
Ultimate receiver In SOAP 1.1 the ultimate receiver role is identified by omission of the actor attribute
from a SOAP header. In SOAP 1.2 the ultimate receiver role is identified by the URI http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope/role/ultimateReceiver or by omission of the role attribute from a SOAP
header.
♦ Conformance (SOAP required roles): An implementation of the SOAP binding MUST act in the following roles: next and ultimate receiver.
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Next In SOAP 1.1, the next role is identified by the URI http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/actor/next. In
SOAP 1.2, the next role is identified by the URI http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope/role/next.
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A SOAP 1.2 endpoint never plays the following role:
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None In SOAP 1.2, the none role is identified by the URI http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope/role/none.
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♦ Conformance (SOAP required roles): An implementation of the SOAP binding MUST NOT act in the
none role.
The javax.xml.ws.SOAPBinding interface is an abstraction of the JAX-WS SOAP binding. It extends
javax.xml.ws.Binding with methods to configure additional SOAP roles played by the endpoint.
♦ Conformance (Default role visibility): An implementation MUST include the required next and ultimate
receiver roles in the Set returned from SOAPBinding.getRoles.
♦ Conformance (Default role persistence): An implementation MUST add the required next and ultimate
receiver roles to the roles configured with SOAPBinding.setRoles.
♦ Conformance (None role error): An implementation MUST throw WebServiceException if a client
attempts to configure the binding to play the none role via SOAPBinding.setRoles.
10.1.1.2 SOAP Handlers
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The handler chain for a SOAP binding is configured as described in section 9.2.1. The handler chain may
contain handlers of the following types:
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Logical Logical handlers are handlers that implement javax.xml.ws.handler.LogicalHandler either directly or indirectly. Logical handlers have access to the content of the SOAP body via the
logical message context.
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SOAP SOAP handlers are handlers that implement javax.xml.ws.handler.soap.SOAPHandler.
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♦ Conformance (Incompatible handlers): An implementation MUST throw WebServiceException when,
at the time a binding provider is created, the handler chain returned by the configured HandlerResolver
contains an incompatible handler.
♦ Conformance (Incompatible handlers): Implementations MUST throw a WebServiceException when
attempting to configure an incompatible handler using Binding.setHandlerChain.
♦ Conformance (Logical handler access): An implementation MUST allow access to the contents of the
SOAP body via a logical message context.
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24
25
26
27
10.1.1.3 SOAP Headers
28
The SOAP headers understood by a handler are obtained using the getHeaders method of SOAPHandler.
29
10.1.2
30
Deployment Model
JAX-WS defines no standard deployment model for handlers. Such a model is provided by JSR 109[14]
“Implementing Enterprise Web Services”.
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32
10.2. Processing Model
10.2
Processing Model
1
The SOAP binding implements the general handler framework processing model described in section 9.3
but extends it to include SOAP specific processing as described in the following subsections.
10.2.1
SOAP mustUnderstand Processing
1. Obtain the set of SOAP roles for the current binding instance. This is returned by SOAPBinding.getRoles.
2. Obtain the set of Handlers deployed on the current binding instance. This is obtained via Binding.getHandlerChain.
3. Identify the set of header qualified names (QNames) that the binding instance understands. This is the
set of all header QNames that satisfy at least one of the following conditions:
(a) that are mapped to method parameters in the service endpoint interface;
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
(b) are members of SOAPHandler.getHeaders() for each SOAPHandler in the set obtained in
step 2;
(c) are directly supported by the binding instance.
17
18
19
4. Identify the set of must understand headers in the inbound message that are targeted at this node. This
is the set of all headers with a mustUnderstand attribute whose value is 1 or true and an actor
or role attribute whose value is in the set obtained in step 1.
5. For each header in the set obtained in step 4, the header is understood if its QName is in the set
identified in step3.
6. If every header in the set obtained in step 4 is understood, then the node understands how to process
the message. Otherwise the node does not understand how to process the message.
7. If the node does not understand how to process the message, then neither handlers nor the endpoint
are invoked and instead the binding generates a SOAP must understand exception. Subsequent actions
depend on whether the message exchange pattern (MEP) in use requires a response to the message
currently being processed or not:
Response The message direction is reversed and the binding dispatches the SOAP must understand
exception (see section 10.2.2).
No response The binding dispatches the SOAP must understand exception (see section 10.2.2).
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
Exception Handling
34
The following subsections describe SOAP specific requirements for handling exceptions thrown by handlers
and service endpoint implementations.
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3
4
The SOAP protocol binding performs the following additional processing on inbound SOAP messages prior
to the start of normal handler invocation processing (see section 9.3.2). Refer to the SOAP specification[2, 3,
4] for a normative description of the SOAP processing model. This section is not intended to supercede any
requirement stated within the SOAP specification, but rather to outline how the configuration information
described above is combined to satisfy the SOAP requirements:
10.2.2
2
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35
36
Chapter 10. SOAP Binding
10.2.2.1 Handler Exceptions
1
A binding is responsible for catching runtime exceptions thrown by handlers and following the processing
model described in section 9.3.2. A binding is responsible for converting the exception to a fault message
subject to further handler processing if the following criteria are met:
2
3
4
1. A handler throws a ProtocolException from handleMessage
5
2. The MEP in use includes a response to the message being processed
6
3. The current message is not already a fault message (the handler might have undertaken the work prior
to throwing the exception).
If the above criteria are met then the exception is converted to a SOAP fault message as follows:
• If the exception is an instance of SOAPFaultException then the fields of the contained SAAJ
SOAPFault are serialized to a new SOAP fault message, see section 10.2.2.3. The current message
is replaced by the new SOAP fault message.
• If the exception is of any other type then a new SOAP fault message is created to reflect a server class
of error for SOAP 1.1[2] or a receiver class of error for SOAP 1.2[3].
• Handler processing is resumed as described in section 9.3.2.
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
If the criteria for converting the exception to a fault message subject to further handler processing are not
met then the exception is handled as follows depending on the current message direction:
16
17
Outbound A new SOAP fault message is created to reflect a server class of error for SOAP 1.1[2] or a
receiver class of error for SOAP 1.2[3] and the message is dispatched.
19
Inbound The exception is passed to the binding provider.
20
10.2.2.2 Service Endpoint Exceptions
21
Service endpoints can throw service specific exceptions or runtime exceptions. In both cases they can
provide protocol specific information using the cause mechanism, see section 6.4.1.
A server side implementation of the SOAP binding is responsible for catching exceptions thrown by a service
endpoint implementation and, if the message exchange pattern in use includes a response to the message that
caused the exception, converting such exceptions to SOAP fault messages and invoking the handleFault
method on handlers for the fault message as described in section 9.3.2.
18
22
23
24
25
26
27
Section 10.2.2.3 describes the rules for mapping an exception to a SOAP fault.
28
10.2.2.3 Mapping Exceptions to SOAP Faults
29
When mapping an exception to a SOAP fault, the fields of the fault message are populated according to the
following rules of precedence:
• faultcode (Subcode in SOAP 1.2, Code set to env:Receiver)
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31
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10.3. SOAP Message Context
1. SOAPFaultException.getFault().getFaultCodeAsQName()1
1
2. env:Server (Subcode omitted for SOAP 1.2).
2
• faultstring (Reason/Text
3
1. SOAPFaultException.getFault().getFaultString()1
4
2. Exception.getMessage()
5
3. Exception.toString()
6
• faultactor (Role in SOAP 1.2)
7
1. SOAPFaultException.getFault().getFaultActor()1
8
2. Empty
9
• detail (Detail in SOAP 1.2)
10.3
10
1. Serialized service specific exception (see WrapperException.getFaultInfo() in section 2.5)
11
2. SOAPFaultException.getFault().getDetail()1
12
SOAP Message Context
13
SOAP handlers are passed a SOAPMessageContext when invoked. SOAPMessageContext extends
MessageContext with methods to obtain and modify the SOAP message payload.
15
10.4
16
SOAP Transport and Transfer Bindings
SOAP[2, 4] can be bound to multiple transport or transfer protocols. This section describes requirements
pertaining to the supported protocols for use with SOAP.
10.4.1
HTTP
14
17
18
19
♦ Conformance (SOAP 1.1 HTTP Binding Support): An implementation MUST support the HTTP binding of SOAP 1.1[2] and SOAP With Attachments[33] as clarified by the WS-I Basic Profile[17], WS-I
Simple SOAP Binding Profile[28] and WS-I Attachment Profile[29].
♦ Conformance (SOAP 1.2 HTTP Binding Support): An implementation MUST support the HTTP binding of SOAP 1.2[4].
20
21
22
23
24
10.4.1.1 MTOM
25
♦ Conformance (SOAP MTOM Support): An implementation MUST support MTOM[26]1 .
26
1
If the exception is a SOAPFaultException or has a cause that is a SOAPFaultException.
JAX-WS inherits the JAXB support for the SOAP MTOM[26]/XOP[27] mechanism for optimizing transmission of binary data
types, see section 2.4.
1
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SOAPBinding defines a property (in the JavaBeans sense) called MTOMEnabled that can be used to control
the use of MTOM. The getMTOMEnabled method is used to query the current value of the property. The
setMTOMEnabled method is used to change the value of the property so as to enable or disable the use of
3
MTOM.
4
♦ Conformance (MTOM on Predefined Bindings): Predefined SOAPBinding instances, i.e. those corresponding to the IDs javax.xml.ws.soap.SOAPBinding.SOAP11HTTP BINDING and javax.xml.ws.soap.SOAPBinding.SOAP12HTTP BINDING MUST support enabling/disabling MTOM support using
the setMTOMenabled method.
1
2
5
6
7
8
♦ Conformance (MTOM on Other SOAP Bindings): Other bindings that extend SOAPBinding MAY NOT
support changing the value of the MTOMEnabled property. In this case, if an application attempts to change
its value, an implementation MUST throw a WebServiceException.
10
10.4.1.2 One-way Operations
12
HTTP interactions are request-response in nature. When using HTTP as the transfer protocol for a one-way
SOAP message, implementations wait for the HTTP response even though there is no SOAP message in the
HTTP response entity body.
♦ Conformance (One-way operations): When invoking one-way operations, an implementation of the SOAP/HTTP binding MUST block until the HTTP response is received or an error occurs.
Note that completion of the HTTP request simply means that the transmission of the request is complete,
not that the request was accepted or processed.
9
11
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
10.4.1.3 Security
20
Section 4.2.1.1 defines two standard context properties (javax.xml.ws.security.auth.username and
javax.xml.ws.security.auth.password) that may be used to configure authentication information.
22
21
♦ Conformance (HTTP basic authentication support): An implementation of the SOAP/HTTP binding MUST 23
support HTTP basic authentication.
24
♦ Conformance (Authentication properties): A client side implementation MUST support use of the the
standard properties javax.xml.ws.security.auth.username and javax.xml.ws.security.auth.password to configure HTTP basic authentication.
10.4.1.4 Session Management
25
26
27
28
Section 4.2.1.1 defines a standard context property (javax.xml.ws.session.maintain) that may be
used to control whether a client side runtime will join a session initiated by a service.
30
A SOAP/HTTP binding implementation can use three HTTP mechanisms for session management:
31
Cookies To initiate a session a service includes a cookie in a message sent to a client. The client stores the
cookie and returns it in subsequest messages to the service.
URL rewriting To initiate a session a service directs a client to a new URL for subsequent interactions.
The new URL contains an encoded session identifier.
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29
32
33
34
35
10.4. SOAP Transport and Transfer Bindings
SSL The SSL session ID is used to track a session.
1
R1120 in WS-I Basic Profile 1.1[17] allows a service to use HTTP cookies. However, R1121 recommends
that a service should not rely on use of cookies for state management.
♦ Conformance (URL rewriting support): An implementation MUST support use of HTTP URL rewriting
for state management.
♦ Conformance (Cookie support): An implementation SHOULD support use of HTTP cookies for state
management.
♦ Conformance (SSL session support): An implementation MAY support use of SSL session based state
management.
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Chapter 10. SOAP Binding
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Chapter 11
1
HTTP Binding
This chapter describes the JAX-WS XML/HTTP binding. The JAX-WS XML/HTTP binding provides
“raw” XML over HTTP messaging capabilities as used in many Web services today.
11.1
Configuration
2
3
4
5
An XML/HTTP binding instance allows HTTP-specific configuration in addition to that described in section
9.2. The additional information can be configured either programmatically or using deployment metadata.
The following subsections describe each form of configuration.
7
11.1.1
9
Programmatic Configuration
6
8
JAX-WS only defines APIs for programmatic configuration of client side XML/HTTP bindings – server
side bindings are expected to be configured using deployment metadata.
11
11.1.1.1 HTTP Handlers
12
The handler chain for an XML/HTTP binding is configured as described in section 9.2.1. The handler chain
may contain handlers of the following types:
Logical Logical handlers are handlers that implement javax.xml.ws.handler.LogicalHandler either directly or indirectly. Logical handlers have access to the entire XML message via the logical
message context.
♦ Conformance (Incompatible handlers): An implementation MUST throw WebServiceException when,
at the time a binding provider is created, the handler chain returned by the configured HandlerResolver
contains an incompatible handler.
♦ Conformance (Incompatible handlers): Implementations MUST throw a WebServiceException when
attempting to configure an incompatible handler using Binding.setHandlerChain.
♦ Conformance (Logical handler access): An implementation MUST allow access to the entire XML message via a logical message context.
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10
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
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Chapter 11. HTTP Binding
11.1.2
Deployment Model
1
JAX-WS defines no standard deployment model for handlers. Such a model is provided by JSR 109[14]
“Implementing Enterprise Web Services”.
11.2
Processing Model
3
4
The XML/HTTP binding implements the general handler framework processing model described in section
9.3.
11.2.1
2
Exception Handling
5
6
7
The following subsections describe HTTP specific requirements for handling exceptions thrown by handlers
and service endpoint implementations.
11.2.1.1 Handler Exceptions
8
9
10
A binding is responsible for catching runtime exceptions thrown by handlers and following the processing
model described in section 9.3.2. A binding is responsible for converting the exception to a fault message
subject to further handler processing if the following criteria are met:
11
12
13
1. A handler throws a ProtocolException from handleMessage
14
2. The MEP in use includes a response to the message being processed
15
3. The current message is not already a fault message (the handler might have undertaken the work prior
to throwing the exception).
If the above criteria are met then the exception is converted to a HTTP response message as follows:
• If the exception is an instance of HTTPException then the HTTP response code is set according to
the value of the statusCode property. Any current XML message content is removed.
• If the exception is of any other type then the HTTP status code is set to 500 to reflect a server class of
error and any current XML message content is removed.
• Handler processing is resumed as described in section 9.3.2.
Outbound The HTTP status code is set to 500 to reflect a server class of error, any current XML message
content is removed and the message is dispatched.
Inbound The exception is passed to the binding provider.
JAX-WS 2.0
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
If the criteria for converting the exception to a fault message subject to further handler processing are not
met then the exception is handled as follows depending on the current message direction:
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16
24
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26
27
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11.3. HTTP Support
11.2.1.2 Service Endpoint Exceptions
1
Service endpoints can throw service specific exceptions or runtime exceptions. In both cases they can
provide protocol specific information using the cause mechanism, see section 6.4.1.
A server side implementation of the XML/HTTP binding is responsible for catching exceptions thrown by
a service endpoint implementation and, if the message exchange pattern in use includes a response to the
message that caused the exception, converting such exceptions to HTTP response messages and invoking
the handleFault method on handlers for the response message as described in section 9.3.2.
2
3
4
5
6
7
Section 11.2.1.3 describes the rules for mapping an exception to a HTTP status code.
8
11.2.1.3 Mapping Exceptions to a HTTP Status Code
9
When mapping an exception to a HTTP status code, the status code of the HTTP fault message is populated
according to the following rules of precedence:
10
11
1. HTTPException.getStatusCode()1
12
2. 500.
13
11.3
HTTP Support
11.3.1
One-way Operations
14
15
HTTP interactions are request-response in nature. When used for one-way messages, implementations wait
for the HTTP response even though there is no XML message in the HTTP response entity body.
♦ Conformance (One-way operations): When invoking one-way operations, an implementation of the XML/HTTP binding MUST block until the HTTP response is received or an error occurs.
Note that completion of the HTTP request simply means that the transmission of the request is complete,
not that the request was accepted or processed.
11.3.2
Security
♦ Conformance (HTTP basic authentication support): An implementation of the XML/HTTP binding MUST
support HTTP basic authentication.
♦ Conformance (Authentication properties): A client side implementation MUST support use of the the
standard properties javax.xml.ws.security.auth.username and javax.xml.ws.security.auth.password to configure HTTP basic authentication.
If the exception is a HTTPException or has a cause that is a HTTPException.
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17
18
19
20
21
22
Section 4.2.1.1 defines two standard context properties (javax.xml.ws.security.auth.username and
javax.xml.ws.security.auth.password) that may be used to configure authentication information.
1
16
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23
24
25
26
27
28
29
Chapter 11. HTTP Binding
11.3.3
Session Management
1
Section 4.2.1.1 defines a standard context property (javax.xml.ws.session.maintain) that may be
used to control whether a client side runtime will join a session initiated by a service.
3
A XML/HTTP binding implementation can use three HTTP mechanisms for session management:
4
Cookies To initiate a session a service includes a cookie in a message sent to a client. The client stores the
cokkie and returns it in subsequest messages to the service.
URL rewriting To initiate a session a service directs a client to a new URL for subsequent interactions.
The new URL contains an encoded session identifier.
SSL The SSL session ID is used to track a session.
♦ Conformance (Cookie support): An implementation SHOULD support use of HTTP cookies for state
management.
♦ Conformance (SSL session support): An implementation MAY support use of SSL session based state
management.
JAX-WS 2.0
5
6
7
8
9
♦ Conformance (URL rewriting support): An implementation MUST support use of HTTP URL rewriting
for state management.
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2
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10
11
12
13
14
15
Appendix A
Conformance Requirements
1
2
2.1
WSDL 1.1 support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
3
2.2
Customization required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
4
2.3
Annotations on generated classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
5
2.4
Definitions mapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
6
2.5
WSDL and XML Schema import directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
7
2.6
Optional WSDL extensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
8
2.7
SEI naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
9
2.8
javax.jws.WebService required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
10
2.9
Method naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
11
2.10 javax.jws.WebMethod required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
12
2.11 Transmission primitive support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
13
2.12 Using javax.jws.OneWay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
14
2.13 Using javax.jws.SOAPBinding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
15
2.14 Using javax.jws.WebParam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
16
2.15 Using javax.jws.WebResult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
17
2.16 Non-wrapped parameter naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
18
2.17 Default mapping mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
19
2.18 Disabling wrapper style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
20
2.19 Wrapped parameter naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
21
2.20 Parameter name clash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
22
2.21 Use of Holder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
23
2.22 Asynchronous mapping required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
24
2.23 Asynchronous mapping option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
25
2.24 Asynchronous method naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
26
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Appendix A. Conformance Requirements
2.25 Asynchronous parameter naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1
2.26 Failed method invocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2
2.27 Response bean naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3
2.28 Asynchronous fault reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4
2.29 Asychronous fault cause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
5
2.30 JAXB class mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
6
2.31 JAXB customization use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
7
2.32 JAXB customization clash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
8
2.33 javax.xml.ws.WebFault required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
9
2.34 Exception naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
10
2.35 Fault equivalence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
11
2.36 Fault equivalence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
12
2.37 Required WSDL extensions
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
13
2.38 Unbound message parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
14
2.39 Duplicate headers in binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
15
2.40 Duplicate headers in message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
16
2.41 Use of MIME type information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
17
2.42 MIME type mismatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
18
2.43 MIME part identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
19
2.44 Service superclass required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
20
2.45 Service class naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
21
2.46 javax.xml.ws.WebServiceClient required
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
22
2.47
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
23
2.48
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
24
2.49 Failed getPort Method
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
25
2.50 javax.xml.ws.WebEndpoint required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
26
3.1
WSDL 1.1 support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
27
3.2
Standard annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
28
3.3
Java identifier mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
29
3.4
Method name disambiguation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
30
3.5
Package name mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
31
3.6
WSDL and XML Schema import directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
32
3.7
Class mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
33
3.8
portType naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
34
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3.9
Inheritance flattening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
1
3.10 Inherited interface mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2
3.11 Operation naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3
3.12 One-way mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
4
3.13 One-way mapping errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
5
3.14 Parameter classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
6
3.15 Parameter naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
7
3.16 Result naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
8
3.17 Header mapping of parameters and results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
9
3.18 Default wrapper bean names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
10
3.19 Default wrapper bean package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
11
3.20 Wrapper element names
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
12
3.21 Wrapper bean name clash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
13
3.22 Exception naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
14
3.23 Fault bean name clash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
15
3.24 Binding selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
16
3.25 SOAP binding support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
17
3.26 SOAP binding style required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
18
3.27 Service creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
19
3.28 Port selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
20
3.29 Port binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
21
4.1
Service completeness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
22
4.2
Service Creation Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
23
4.3
Use of Executor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
24
4.4
Default Executor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
25
4.5
Message context decoupling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
26
4.6
Required BindingProvider properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
27
4.7
Optional BindingProvider properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
28
4.8
Additional context properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
29
4.9
Asynchronous response context
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
30
4.10 Proxy support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
31
4.11 Implementing BindingProvider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
32
4.12 Service.getPort failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
33
4.13 Remote Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
34
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Appendix A. Conformance Requirements
4.14 Other Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
1
4.15 Dispatch support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
2
4.16 Failed Dispatch.invoke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3
4.17 Failed Dispatch.invokeAsync . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4
4.18 Failed Dispatch.invokeOneWay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
5
4.19 Reporting asynchronous errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
6
4.20 Marshalling failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
7
4.21 Use of the Catalog
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
8
5.1
Provider support required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
9
5.2
Provider default constructor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
10
5.3
Provider implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
11
5.4
WebServiceProvider annotation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
12
5.5
Endpoint publish(String address, Object implementor) Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
13
5.6
Default Endpoint Binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
14
5.7
Other Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
15
5.8
Publishing over HTTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
16
5.9
WSDL Publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
17
5.10 Checking publishEndpoint Permission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
18
5.11 Required Metadata Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
19
5.12 Unknown Metadata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
20
5.13 Use of Executor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
21
5.14 Default Executor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
22
6.1
Read-only handler chains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
23
6.2
Concrete javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
24
6.3
Provider createAndPublishEndpoint Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
25
6.4
Concrete javax.xml.ws.spi.ServiceDelegate required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
26
6.5
Protocol specific fault generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
27
6.6
Protocol specific fault consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
28
6.7
One-way operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
29
7.1
Correctness of annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
30
7.2
Handling incorrect annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
31
7.3
JSR-181 conformance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
32
8.1
Standard binding declarations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
33
8.2
Binding language extensibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
34
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8.3
Multiple binding files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
1
9.1
Handler framework support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
2
9.2
Logical handler support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
3
9.3
Other handler support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4
9.4
Incompatible handlers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5
9.5
Incompatible handlers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6
9.6
Handler chain snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
7
9.7
HandlerChain annotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
8
9.8
Handler resolver for a HandlerChain annotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
9
9.9
Binding handler manipulation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
10
9.10 Handler initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
11
9.11 Handler destruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
12
9.12 Invoking close . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
13
9.13 Order of close invocations
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
14
9.14 Message context property scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
15
10.1 SOAP required roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
16
10.2 SOAP required roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
17
10.3 Default role visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
18
10.4 Default role persistence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
19
10.5 None role error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
20
10.6 Incompatible handlers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
21
10.7 Incompatible handlers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
22
10.8 Logical handler access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
23
10.9 SOAP 1.1 HTTP Binding Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
24
10.10SOAP 1.2 HTTP Binding Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
25
10.11SOAP MTOM Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
26
10.12MTOM on Predefined Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
27
10.13MTOM on Other SOAP Bindings
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
28
10.14One-way operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
29
10.15HTTP basic authentication support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
30
10.16Authentication properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
31
10.17URL rewriting support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
32
10.18Cookie support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
33
10.19SSL session support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
34
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11.1 Incompatible handlers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
1
11.2 Incompatible handlers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
2
11.3 Logical handler access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
3
11.4 One-way operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
4
11.5 HTTP basic authentication support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
5
11.6 Authentication properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
6
11.7 URL rewriting support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
7
11.8 Cookie support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
8
11.9 SSL session support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
9
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Appendix B
Change Log
B.1
Changes since Public Draft
1
2
3
• Changed endpoint publishing so that endpoints cannot be stopped and published againt multiple times
(section 5.2.2).
4
5
• Clarified that request and response beans do not contain properties corresponding to header parameters
(section 3.6.2.1).
7
• Clarified that criteria for bare style take only parts bound to the body into account (section 3.6.2.2).
8
• Add a create(Object implementor) to Endpoint to create an Endpoint.
6
9
• Clarified the use of INOUT param with two different MIME bindings in the input and output messages.
11
• Use of WebParam and WebResult partName.
12
• Replaced the init/destroy methods of handlers with the PostConstruct and PreDestroy annotations
from JSR-250 (section 9.3.1).
• Replaced the BeginService/EndService annotations with PostConstruct and PreDestroy from JSR-250
in endpoint implementors (section 5.2.1).
• Added WebParam.header WebResult.header usage (section 3.6) and updated WSDL SOAP HTTP
Binding section (3.9.2).
10
13
14
15
16
17
18
• Removed requirements to support additional SOAP headers mapping.
19
• Added support for DataSource as a message format for Provider and clarified the requirement for the
other supported types (section 5.1). Same thing for Dispatch (section 4.3).
21
• Clarified that LogicalMessageContext.getSource() may return null when there is no payload associated with the message (section 9.4.2).
23
• Clarified that parts bound to mime:content are treated as unlisted from the point of view of applying
the wrapper style rules (section 2.6.3).
25
• Removed the ParameterIndex annotation (chapters 3 and 7).
26
• Clarified naming rules for generated wrapper elements and their type (section 3.6.2.1).
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20
22
24
27
123
Appendix B. Change Log
• Clarified that holders should never be used for the return type of a method (section 2.3.3).
• Added effect of the BindingType annotation on the generated WSDL service (sections 3.8 and 3.10).
2
• Added condition that the wrapper elements be non-nillable to wrapper style (section 2.3.1.2).
3
• Clarified use of targetNamespace from WebService in an implementation class and an SEI based on
181 changes.
5
• Updated the usage of WebMethod exclude element from Java to WSDL mapping.
6
• Changed the algorithm for the default target namespace from java to WSDL (section 3.2).
7
• Added requirement that a provider’s constructor be public (section 5.1).
8
• Fixed some inconsistencies caused by the removal of RemoteException (e.g. in section 4.2.4).
9
• Added service delegate requirements to chapter 4.
4
10
• Added zero-argument public constructor requirement to the implementation-specific Provider SPI
class (section 6.2).
• Updated use of SOAPBinding on a per method basis in the document style case and removed editor’s
note about SOAPBinding not being allowed on methods (section 2.3.1 and 3.6.2) .
11
12
13
14
• Added portName element to @WebServiceProvider annotation.
15
• Added requirement on correctness of annotation to the beginning of chapter 7.
16
• Added requirement for conformance to the JAX-WS profile in JSR-181 (section 7.11).
17
• Clarified invocation of Handler.destroy (section 9.3.1).
18
• Added use of HandlerChain annotation (section 9.2.1.3).
19
• Updated 181 annotations (section 7.11).
20
• Added catalog facility (section 4.2.5) and clarified that it is required to be used when processing
endpoint metadata at publishing time (section 5.2.5) and annotations (chapter 7).
22
• Added WebServiceRef annotation (section 7.10).
23
• Added restrictions on metadata at the time an endpoint is published (section 5.2.7).
24
• Replaced HandlerRegistry with HandlerResolver (sections 4.2.1, 9.2.1.1, 10.1.1.2, 11.1.1.1). Fixed
handler ordering section accordingly (section 9.2.1.2).
21
25
26
• Clarified that endpoint properties override the values defined using the WebServiceProvider annotation (section 5.2.8).
28
• Removed mapping of headerfaults (sections 2.6.2.2 and 8.7.6).
29
• Split standard message context properties into multiple tables and added servlet-specific properties
(section 9.4.1.1).
31
• Added WebServiceContext (section 5.3); refactored message context section in chapter 5 so that it
applies to all kinds of endpoints.
124
1
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27
30
32
33
B.2. Changes Since Early Draft 3
• Added WebServicePermission (section 5.2.5).
1
• Added conformance requirement for one-way operations (section 6.2.2).
2
• Added BindingType annotation (section 7.9).
3
• Added requirement the provider endpoint implementation class carry a WebServiceProvider annotation (section 5.1).
• Fixed RequestWrapper and ResponseWrapper description to use that they can be applied to the methods of an SEI (sections 7.4 and 7.5).
• Fixed package name for javax.xml.ws.Provider and updated section with WebServiceProvider annotation (section 5.1).
4
5
6
7
8
9
• Added WebServiceProvider annotation in javax.xml.ws package (section 7.8).
10
• Changed Factory pattern to use javax.xml.ws.spi.Provider
11
• Removed javax.xml.ws.EndpointFactory (section 5.2).
12
• Removed javax.xml.ws.Servicefactory (section 4.1).
13
• Removed definition of message-level security annotations (section 7.1), their use (sections 4.2.2 and
6.1.1) and the corresponding message context property (in section 9.4).
15
• Removed WSDL 2.0 mapping (appendices A and B).
16
B.2
Changes Since Early Draft 3
14
17
• Added requirements on mapping @WebService-annotated Java classes to WSDL.
18
• Removed references to the RMI classes that JAX-RPC 1.1 used to denote remoteness, since their role
is now taken by annotations: java.rmi.Remote and java.rmi.RemoteException.
• Added 5.2 on the new Endpoint API.
19
20
21
• Added the following new annotation types: @RequestWrapper, @ResponseWrapper, @WebServiceClient, @WebEndpoint.
22
23
• Added the createService(Class serviceInterface) method to ServiceFactory.
24
• Renamed the Service.createPort method to Service.addPort.
25
• Added MTOMEnabled property to SOAPBinding.
26
• Removed the HTTP method getter/setter from HTTPBinding and replaced them with a new message
context property called javax.xml.ws.http.request.method.
27
28
• In section 10.2.1 clarified that SOAP headers directly supported by a binding must be treated as
understood when processing mustUnderstand attributes.
30
• Added getStackTrace to the list of getters defined on java.lang.Throwable with must not be mapped
to fault bean properties.
32
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29
31
Appendix B. Change Log
• In section 4.2.1.1, removed the requirement that an exception be thrown if the application attempts
to set an unknown or unsupported property on a binding provider, since there are no stub-specific
properties any more, only those in the request context.
1
2
3
• Changed the client API chapter to reflect the annotation-based runtime. In particular, the distinction between generated stubs and dynamic proxies disappeared, and the spec now simply talks about
proxies.
4
5
6
• Changed JAX-RPC to JAX-WS, javax.xml.rpc.xxx to javax.xml.ws.xxx. Reflected resulting changes
made to APIs.
7
8
• Added new context properties to provide access to HTTP headers and status code.
9
• Added new XML/HTTP Binding, see chapter 11.
B.3
10
Changes Since Early Draft 2
11
• Renamed ”element” attribute of the jaxws:parameter annotation to ”childParameterName” for clarity,
see sections 8.7.3 and 8.7.6.
13
• Added javax.xml.ws.ServiceMode annotation type, see section 7.1.
14
• Fixed example of external binding file to use a schema annotation, see section 8.4.
15
• Modified Dispatch so it can be used with multiple message types and either message payloads or
entire messages, see section 4.3.
17
• Modified Provider so it can be used with multiple message types and either message payloads or entire
messages, see section 5.1.
19
• Added new annotation for generated exceptions, see section 7.2.
20
• Added default Java package name to WSDL targetNamespace mapping algorithm, see section 3.2.
21
• Added ordering to properties in request and response beans for doc/lit/wrapped, see section 3.6.2.1.
22
• Clarified that SEI method should throw JAX-RPC exception with a cause of any runtime exception
thrown during local processing, see section 4.2.4.
24
• Removed requirement that SEIs MUST NOT have constants, see section 3.4.
25
• Updated document bare mapping to clarify that @WebParam and @WebResult can be used to customize the generated global element names, see section 3.6.2.2.
B.4
126
12
Changes Since Early Draft 1
16
18
23
26
27
28
• Added chapter 5 Service APIs.
29
• Added chapter ?? WSDL 2.0 to Java Mapping.
30
• Added chapter ?? Java to WSDL 2.0 Mapping.
31
• Added mapping from Java to wsdl:service and wsdl:port, see sections 3.8.1, 3.9.1 and 3.10.
32
JAX-WS 2.0
October 7, 2005
B.4. Changes Since Early Draft 1
• Fixed section 2.4 to allow use of JAXB interface based mapping.
1
• Added support for document/literal/bare mapping in Java to WSDL mapping, see section 3.6.
2
• Added conformance requirement to describe the expected behaviour when two or more faults refer to
the same global element, see section 2.5.
3
4
• Added resolution to issue regarding binding of duplicate headers, see section 2.6.2.1.
5
• Added use of JAXB ns URI to Java package name mapping, see section 2.1.
6
• Added use of JAXB package name to ns URI mapping, see section 3.2.
7
• Introduced new typographic convention to clearly mark non-normative notes.
8
• Removed references to J2EE and JNDI usage from ServiceFactory description, see section ??.
9
• Clarified relationship between TypeMappingRegistry and JAXB.
10
• Emphasized control nature of context properties, added lifecycle subsection.
11
• Clarified fixed binding requirement for proxies.
12
• Added section for SOAP proocol bindings 10.4. The HTTP subsection of this now contains much of
the mterial from the JAX-RPC 1.1 ‘Runtime Services’ chapter.
13
14
• Clarified that async methods are added to the regular sync SEI when async mapping is enabled rather
than to a separate async-only SEI, see section 2.3.4.
16
• Added support for WSDL MIME binding, see section 2.6.3.
17
15
• Clarified that fault mapping should only generate a single exception for each equivalent set of faults,
see section 2.5.
19
• Added property for message attachments.
20
• Removed element references to anonymous type as valid for wrapper style mapping (this doesn’t
prevent substitution as orignally thought), see section 2.3.1.2.
18
21
22
• Removed implementation specific methods from generated service interfaces, see section 2.7.
23
• Clarified behaviour under fault condition for asynchronous operation mapping, see section 2.3.4.5.
24
• Clarified that additional parts mapped using soapbind:header cannot be mapped to a method return
type, see section 2.3.2.
26
• Added new section to clarify mapping from exception to SOAP fault, see 10.2.2.3.
27
• Clarified meaning of other in the handler processing section, see 9.3.2.
28
• Added a section to clarify Stub use of RemoteException and JAXRPCException, see 4.2.4.
29
• Added new Core API chapter and rearranged sections into Core, Client and Server API chapters.
30
25
• Changes for context refactoring, removed message context properties that previously held request/response31
contexts on client side, added description of rules for moving between jaxws context and message 32
context boundaries.
33
October 7, 2005
JAX-WS 2.0
127
Appendix B. Change Log
• Removed requirement for Response.get to throw JAXRPCException, now throws standard java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException instead.
2
• Added security API information, see sections ?? and ??.
3
• Clarrified SOAP mustUnderstand processing, see section 10.2.1. Made it clear that the handler rather
than the HandlerInfo is authoritative wrt which protocol elements (e.g. SOAP headers) it processes.
5
• Updated exception mapping for Java to WSDL since JAXB does not envision mapping exception
classes directly, see section 3.7.
128
1
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October 7, 2005
4
6
7
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