Hardware Manual - Oracle Help Center

Tekelec EAGLE ® 5
Integrated Signaling System
Hardware Manual
910-3496-001 Revision E
March 2007
Copyright 2007 Tekelec.
All Rights Reserved
Printed in U.S.A.
Notice
Information in this documentation is subject to change without notice. Unauthorized use or copying of this
documentation can result in civil or criminal penalties.
Any export of Tekelec products is subject to the export controls of the United States and the other countries
where Tekelec has operations.
No part of this documentation may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic
or mechanical, including photocopying or recording, for any purpose without the express written
permission of an authorized representative of Tekelec.
Other product names used herein are for identification purposes only, and may be trademarks of their
respective companies.
RoHS 5/6 - As of July 1, 2006, all products that comprise new installations shipped to European Union
member countries will comply with the EU Directive 2002/95/EC "RoHS" (Restriction of Hazardous
Substances). The exemption for lead-based solder described in the Annex will be exercised. RoHS 5/6
compliant components will have unique part numbers as reflected in the associated hardware and
installation manuals.
WEEE - All products shipped to European Union member countries comply with the EU Directive
2002/96/EC, Waste Electronic and Electrical Equipment. All components that are WEEE compliant will be
appropriately marked. For more information regarding Tekelec's WEEE program, contact your sales
representative.
Trademarks
The Tekelec logo, EAGLE, G-Flex, G-Port, IP7, IP7Edge, IP7 Secure Gateway, and TALI are registered
trademarks of Tekelec. TekServer is a trademark of Tekelec. All other trademarks are the property of their
respective owners.
Patents
This product is covered by one or more of the following U.S. and foreign patents:
U.S. Patent Numbers:
5,008,929, 5,953,404, 6,167,129, 6,324,183, 6,327,350, 6,456,845, 6,606,379, 6,639,981, 6,647,113, 6,662,017,
6,735,441, 6,745,041, 6,765,990, 6,795,546, 6,819,932, 6,836,477, 6,839,423, 6,885,872, 6,901,262, 6,914,973,
6,940,866, 6,944,184, 6,954,526, 6,954,794, 6,959,076, 6,965,592, 6,967,956, 6,968,048, 6,970,542
Ordering Information
For additional copies of this document, contact your sales representative.
Table of Contents
Chapter 1. Introduction
Overview ...................................................................................... 1-2
Scope and Audience .................................................................... 1-2
Manual Organization and Conventions ................................... 1-3
Related Publications .................................................................... 1-4
Documentation Packaging, Delivery, and Updates ............. 1-11
Regulatory Compliance and Certification ............................. 1-12
Admonishments and Conventions ......................................... 1-13
Customer Care Center .............................................................. 1-14
Problem – Critical ............................................................... 1-15
Problem – Major .................................................................. 1-15
Problem – Minor ................................................................. 1-15
Response ............................................................................... 1-16
Emergency Response .......................................................... 1-16
Hardware Repair and Return .................................................. 1-17
Repair and Return Shipping Instructions ....................... 1-18
Returning a Crate ................................................................ 1-21
Acronyms .................................................................................... 1-22
Chapter 2. Systems Overview
Introduction .................................................................................. 2-2
EAGLE 5 ISS ................................................................................. 2-3
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem .................. 2-4
Communication Subsystem ................................................. 2-5
Application Subsystem ........................................................ 2-7
Timing Systems ................................................................... 2-14
Integrated Sentinel .................................................................... 2-16
Extended Services Platform ............................................... 2-18
Site Collector ........................................................................ 2-18
Flight Recorder .................................................................... 2-18
Multi-Platform Server (MPS) Systems .................................... 2-19
Embedded Operations Applications Processor ................... 2-20
OEM Products ............................................................................ 2-21
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OEM-Based Servers .............................................................2-21
OEM-Based Network Elements .........................................2-21
OEM-Based Peripheral Components ................................2-21
Chapter 3. Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Introduction ..................................................................................3-4
EAGLE 5 ISS .................................................................................3-4
IP Connectivity ......................................................................3-4
Monitoring ..............................................................................3-5
Multi-purpose Server (MPS) ......................................................3-5
Layered Design ......................................................................3-7
Hardware Components ........................................................3-7
Embedded OSS Application Processor (EOAP) ......................3-9
Hardware Baselines ...................................................................3-11
Frames ..........................................................................................3-11
Extension Frame ..................................................................3-15
Miscellaneous Frame ...........................................................3-20
OAP Frame ...........................................................................3-22
Control Frame ......................................................................3-23
Control Shelf .........................................................................3-23
Control Shelf Backplanes ....................................................3-25
Extension Shelf .....................................................................3-32
Extension Shelf Backplanes ................................................3-35
Modules .......................................................................................3-41
High Speed IMT Router .....................................................3-43
High-Speed Multiplexer Card ..........................................3-48
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card ..................................3-50
Terminal Disk Module ........................................................3-53
Time Slot Counter Synchronization ..................................3-58
Link Interface Modules .......................................................3-59
High-Capacity Application Processor-Based LIMs ........3-70
Database Communications Module .................................3-75
Database Service Module ...................................................3-77
Double-Slot EDCM ..............................................................3-78
Single-Slot EDCM and EDCM-A ......................................3-80
Signaling Transport Card ...................................................3-82
General Purpose Service Module ......................................3-82
Measurements Collection and Polling Module ...............3-82
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IPLIMx with Eight-Point Capability ................................ 3-83
Application Communications Module ............................ 3-83
Translation Service Module ............................................... 3-88
E1 Interface Backplane Module ........................................ 3-92
Configured as an E1 Card .................................................. 3-93
Configured as a Channel Card .......................................... 3-93
High-Capacity Multichannel Interface Module ............. 3-98
E5 Interface Module .......................................................... 3-104
Air Management Card ..................................................... 3-116
Fan Tray .............................................................................. 3-116
Fuse and Alarm Panels ........................................................... 3-118
Fuses ................................................................................... 3-118
Fuse and Alarm Panel
(P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) ............................... 3-119
Provision Rules for FAP Fuse Locations ....................... 3-123
Label Kit for FAP (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) ...... 3-123
Fuse Assignments ............................................................. 3-124
Holdover Clock ........................................................................ 3-127
Maintenance Interface System Card .............................. 3-129
Critical Status Indicators Card ........................................ 3-130
Stratum-3 Card .................................................................. 3-130
TOCA and TOLA Cards .................................................. 3-131
MCA Card .......................................................................... 3-132
Chapter 4. Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
OEM-Based Product Descriptions ............................................ 4-2
Extended Services Platform (ESP) Host Servers ..................... 4-2
Server Model 120 Features ................................................... 4-3
ESP Server LEDs ................................................................... 4-4
SAI/P Card ............................................................................ 4-5
8-Port Connector Box ........................................................... 4-5
OEM-Based Networking Elements ........................................... 4-6
Ethernet Hubs ........................................................................ 4-6
Routers .................................................................................... 4-7
Ethernet Switches .................................................................. 4-9
OEM-Based Peripheral Elements ............................................ 4-11
Breaker Panels ..................................................................... 4-11
Eight-Port Connector Box .................................................. 4-13
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Chapter 5. Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Sentinel Product Descriptions Overview .................................5-3
Sentinel Frames ......................................................................5-4
Site Collector Frames ............................................................5-6
Extended Services Platform (ESP) .......................................5-7
Integrated Sentinel (probe-less Solution) .................................5-7
Integrated Sentinel Hardware Overview ...........................5-8
ESP Subsystem ....................................................................5-14
ESP Subsystem Hardware Components ..........................5-14
Sentinel Probe Based Site Collector .........................................5-18
Site Collector Frames ..........................................................5-20
Site Collector Frame Hardware Components .................5-21
Sentinel Central Server Frames ................................................5-22
Sentinel Central Server Frame Hardware
Components ...................................................................5-25
Sentinel Central Server Frames Prior to Release 10.0 .....5-27
Sentinel Central Server Frames Release 10.0 ...................5-29
Sentinel Frames Common Components .................................5-30
Breaker Panels ......................................................................5-31
SAI/P Card ...........................................................................5-32
8-Port Break-Out Box ..........................................................5-33
Ethernet Interface Cards .....................................................5-33
Ethernet Switches ................................................................5-33
Routers ..................................................................................5-37
Hubs ......................................................................................5-38
Console/Alarm Servers ......................................................5-39
Chapter 6. Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Safety and Cautionary Information ...........................................6-2
Introduction ..................................................................................6-2
Location .........................................................................................6-2
Space Requirements ..............................................................6-2
Lighting ...................................................................................6-3
Building Requirements .........................................................6-3
Heating Ventilation and Air Condition Requirements ....6-4
Power Requirements .............................................................6-8
Populating the System .................................................................6-8
Link Interface Module (LIM) Requirements .....................6-8
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Cards Type Requirements for SCCP Application
with Group Ticket Voucher (TVG) .............................. 6-9
Database Communications Module (DCM) and
Double-Slot Enhanced DCM (EDCM) ....................... 6-10
Cabling DCM and Double-Slot EDCM Cards ................ 6-11
Single-Slot EDCM and EDCM-A ...................................... 6-13
Application Communications Module
Requirements ................................................................ 6-13
OAP and Embedded OAP ................................................. 6-14
Appendix A. Hardware Baselines
Baseline Tables ............................................................................ A-2
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 Through 31.6 ................................. A-3
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 Through 35.0 ................................. A-9
EAGLE 5 ISS Cable Assemblies and Adapters .................... A-16
Integrated Sentinel ESP
Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0, 11.x ............................... A-18
Integrated Sentinel ESP Expansion Frame
Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0 ...................................................... A-23
Sentinel Server Frame and Site Collector Frame
Release 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0 ........................................................ A-24
Appendix B. Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
Introduction ..................................................................................B-2
4-Port T1 Monitor Applique ......................................................B-2
4-Port E1 Monitor Applique ......................................................B-4
4-Port DS0 Monitor Applique ....................................................B-6
4-Port V.35 Monitor Applique ...................................................B-7
4-Port DSCS Monitor Applique .................................................B-8
DSCS Bridge Amplifier ...............................................................B-9
Hardware Description ..........................................................B-9
Installation ...........................................................................B-10
Part Number ........................................................................B-11
Limitations ...........................................................................B-11
Index
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List of Figures
Figure 1-1. European Directives CE Mark ................................................1-12
Figure 1-2. Combined UL Mark for the United States and Canada ......1-13
Figure 1-3. Hazardous Substances .............................................................1-13
Figure 2-1. EAGLE 5 ISS Functional Diagram ...........................................2-3
Figure 2-1. Maintenance and Administration Subsystem ........................2-5
Figure 2-2. Clock Routing ............................................................................2-15
Figure 2-3. Integrated Sentinel Block Diagram ........................................2-17
Figure 2-4. EOAP Hosts in an EAGLE 5 ISS .............................................2-20
Figure 3-1. MPS on T1000 AS/EAGLE 5 ISS Overview ............................3-6
Figure 3-1. Layered Design for MPS and Applications ............................3-7
Figure 3-2. MPS Hardware Overview .........................................................3-8
Figure 3-3. EOAP Communication ..............................................................3-9
Figure 3-4. Dual EOAP Host Configuration .............................................3-10
Figure 3-5. Frames ........................................................................................3-12
Figure 3-6. Frame End Panel with Lamp Indicators ................................3-13
Figure 3-7. Control Frame CF-00 Numbering Plan .................................3-14
Figure 3-8. Extension Frame EF-00 Numbering Plan ..............................3-16
Figure 3-9. Extension Frame EF-02 Numbering Plan ..............................3-17
Figure 3-10. Extension Frame EF-03 Numbering Plan ............................3-18
Figure 3-11. Extension Frame EF-04 Numbering Plan ............................3-19
Figure 3-12. Extension Shelf Backplane ID (P/N 850-0356-03) .............3-19
Figure 3-13. Extension Shelf Backplane ID (P/N 850-0356-04/06) ......3-20
Figure 3-14. Miscellaneous Frame ..............................................................3-21
Figure 3-15. OAPF Containing Embedded OAP Hosts ..........................3-22
Figure 3-16. Control Shelf Front, with DCM Card ..................................3-25
Figure 3-17. Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) .................3-28
Figure 3-18. Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-06) .......................3-29
Figure 3-19. Extension Shelf with LIMs .....................................................3-33
Figure 3-20. Shelves with DCM and LIM Cards in Control Frame .......3-34
Figure 3-21. Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-01/02) .............3-37
Figure 3-22. Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-03) ...................3-38
Figure 3-23. Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-04/06) .............3-39
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DRAFT
Figure 3-24. Cam-Out/Lock-In Levers on Cards .................................... 3-41
Figure 3-25. HIPR Switch Topology, Single IMT Bus. ............................ 3-44
Figure 3-26. HIPR LEDs .............................................................................. 3-46
Figure 3-27. HMUX Ring Topology ......................................................... 3-48
Figure 3-28. HMUX Side View HMUX ..................................................... 3-50
Figure 3-29. Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card ..................................... 3-52
Figure 3-30. Terminal Disk Module .......................................................... 3-54
Figure 3-31. Link Interface Module (LIM) Main Assembly ................... 3-63
Figure 3-32. Digital Signal Level-0 Applique .......................................... 3-66
Figure 3-33. Office Channel Unit Applique ............................................. 3-67
Figure 3-34. V.35 Applique ......................................................................... 3-68
Figure 3-35. Application Interface Applique ........................................... 3-69
Figure 3-36. AATM Applique (T1) ............................................................ 3-70
Figure 3-37. E1-ATM Applique .................................................................. 3-71
Figure 3-38. HCAP Main Assembly (P/N 850-0419-xx) ......................... 3-72
Figure 3-39. Multi-Port Link Interface Module (MPL)
(P/N 870-2061-01) .................................................................................. 3-73
Figure 3-40. Database Communications Module .................................... 3-76
Figure 3-41. DSMs with Memory Boards ................................................. 3-77
Figure 3-42. Double-Slot Enhanced Database Communications
Module .................................................................................................... 3-79
Figure 3-43. Single-Slot Enhanced Database Communications
Module ..................................................................................................... 3-80
Figure 3-44. Application Communications Module Main Assembly .. 3-84
Figure 3-45. Application Communications Module Ethernet
]Applique ................................................................................................. 3-85
Figure 3-46. Single-port Ethernet Transceivers, Media Access
]Unit ......................................................................................................... 3-86
Figure 3-47. Translation Service Module (P/N 870-1289-xx) ................ 3-90
Figure 3-48. Translation Service Module (P/N 870-1292-xx) ................ 3-91
Figure 3-49. E1 Card (P/N 870-1379-xx) ................................................... 3-92
Figure 3-50. E1 Interface Backplane Module (P/N 890-1037-06) .......... 3-94
Figure 3-51. E1 Backplane Module and Screws and Washers ............... 3-96
Figure 3-52. E1 Backplane Modules Patch Cables .................................. 3-96
Figure 3-53. E1/T1 Interface Backplane Module Connector
Diagram ................................................................................................... 3-97
Figure 3-54. E1 Interface Backplane Module Connections ..................... 3-98
Figure 3-55. HCMIM Module ..................................................................... 3-98
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List of Figures
Figure 3-56. Channelized HCMIM Interfaces .........................................3-100
Figure 3-57. Channel Bridging Schematic ...............................................3-101
Figure 3-58. Channelized E5-E1T1 Interfaces .........................................3-106
Figure 3-59. Channel Bridging Schematic ...............................................3-107
Figure 3-60. E5-E1T1 ...................................................................................3-109
Figure 3-61. E5-ENET .................................................................................3-113
Figure 3-62. Air Management card ..........................................................3-116
Figure 3-63. Fan Tray .................................................................................3-117
Figure 3-64. Fuse (GMT Brand Shown) ...................................................3-119
Figure 3-65. Fuse and Alarm Panel
(P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) Front ...............................................3-120
Figure 3-66. Fuse and Alarm Panel
(P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) Rear .................................................3-121
Figure 3-67. FAP, Fuse Label Kit (P/N 870-1915-02) .............................3-124
Figure 3-68. Control Frame FAP (P/N 870-0243-08 and
]P/N 870-1606-xx) .................................................................................3-125
Figure 3-69. Extension Frame FAP (P/N 870-0243-08 and
P/N 870-1606-xx) ..................................................................................3-126
Figure 3-70. Holdover Clock .....................................................................3-128
Figure 3-71. Holdover Clock ....................................................................3-128
Figure 3-72. Maintenance Interface System Card Block Diagram .......3-129
Figure 3-73. MCA-5 Card and Output Protection Matrix ....................3-132
Figure 4-1. ESP Server Front and Rear Views ............................................4-4
Figure 4-2. 8-Port Connector .........................................................................4-5
Figure 4-3. Hub Front View ..........................................................................4-6
Figure 4-4. Hub Rear View ............................................................................4-7
Figure 4-5. Front View Routers .....................................................................4-8
Figure 4-6. Rear View Isolation Router .......................................................4-8
Figure 4-7. Rear View Dial-in Router ..........................................................4-8
Figure 4-8. Ethernet Switch ...........................................................................4-9
Figure 4-9. Telect Breaker Panel Front View ............................................4-11
Figure 4-10. Telect Breaker Panel Rear View ............................................4-12
Figure 4-11. Telect Breaker Panel Alarms .................................................4-12
Figure 4-12. Eight Port Breakout Box .........................................................4-13
Figure 5-1. NOC in a Combined Probe-based and
probe-less Configuration .........................................................................5-4
Figure 5-2. Integrated Sentinel with Netra-based ESPs
Block Diagram .........................................................................................5-10
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DRAFT
Figure 5-3. Integrated Sentinel with Tekelec 1000-based
ESPs Block Diagram ............................................................................... 5-11
Figure 5-4. Integrated Sentinel Netra-based ESP Frame
Front View ............................................................................................... 5-12
Figure 5-5. Integrated Sentinel Tekelec 1000-based ESP
]Frame Front View ................................................................................. 5-13
Figure 5-6. Sentinel Netra-based ESP Rear View 1500 Links ................ 5-15
Figure 5-7. Probe Based Sentinel System Configuration ........................ 5-19
Figure 5-8. Site-Collector Frame ................................................................ 5-20
Figure 5-9. Site Collectors Connections to a Sentinel Central
Server Frame ........................................................................................... 5-24
Figure 5-10. Sentinel Server Frame Prior to Release 10.0
(First Frame) ............................................................................................ 5-25
Figure 5-11. Sentinel Central Server Frame Release 10.0
(First Frame) ............................................................................................ 5-26
Figure 5-12. Telect Breaker Panel Front View .......................................... 5-31
Figure 5-13. Telect Breaker Panel Rear View ........................................... 5-31
Figure 5-14. Telect Breaker Panel Alarms ................................................. 5-32
Figure 5-15. 8-Port Break-Out Box ............................................................. 5-33
Figure 5-16. Ethernet Switch ....................................................................... 5-34
Figure 5-17. Ethernet Switch ....................................................................... 5-36
Figure 5-18. Front View Routers ................................................................ 5-37
Figure 5-19. Rear View Dial-in Router ...................................................... 5-37
Figure 5-20. Hub Front View ...................................................................... 5-38
Figure 5-21. Hub Rear View ....................................................................... 5-38
Figure 5-22. Console/Alarm Server (CAS) .............................................. 5-39
Figure 6-1. Logic Grounding with FAP (P/N 870-0243-08) ..................... 6-6
Figure 6-2. Logic Grounding with FAP
(P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) ............................................................. 6-7
Figure 6-3. Door Grounding ......................................................................... 6-7
Figure 6-4. Database Communications Module Cabling in System ..... 6-12
Figure B-1. T1 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window ...........................B-3
Figure B-2. E1 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window ...........................B-5
Figure B-3. DS0 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window .........................B-6
Figure B-4. V.35 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window ........................B-7
Figure B-5. 4-Link DSCS Monitor Configuration Window ......................B-8
Figure B-6. DSCS Bridge Amplifier (Front View) .....................................B-9
Figure B-7. DSCS Bridge Amplifier (Rear View) .....................................B-10
Figure B-8. DSCS Bridge Amplifier Installation ......................................B-12
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List of Tables
Table 1-1. Sentinel Publications ................................................................... 1-9
Table 1-2. Basic RMA Types ....................................................................... 1-17
Table 1-3. RMA Reasons for Return .......................................................... 1-17
Table 2-1. E5-ENET Supported Protocols ................................................. 2-13
Table 3-1. EOAP Frame Fuse Assignment ................................................ 3-10
Table 3-2. Extension Shelf Equipment Specifications ............................. 3-40
Table 3-3. Card Specifications .................................................................... 3-43
Table 3-4. HIPR front panel LEDs ............................................................. 3-47
Table 3-5. HIPR Technical Specifications ................................................. 3-47
Table 3-6. HMUX Technical Specifications .............................................. 3-50
Table 3-7. MDAL Technical Specifications ............................................... 3-52
Table 3-8. TDM Technical Specifications .................................................. 3-57
Table 3-9. Hardware Requirements-Maximum Number of Links ....... 3-62
Table 3-10. LIM Card Specifications .......................................................... 3-74
Table 3-11. DCM and DSM Technical Specifications .............................. 3-78
Table 3-12. ACM Technical Specifications ............................................... 3-88
Table 3-13. E1 Card and Channel Card ..................................................... 3-93
Table 3-14. Channel Bridging E1/T1 Port Pairing ................................ 3-102
Table 3-15. Channelized HCMIM LEDs ................................................. 3-103
Table 3-16. HCMIM Technical Specifications ........................................ 3-103
Table 3-17. Channel Bridging E1/T1 Port Pairing ................................ 3-108
Table 3-18. E5-E1T1 LEDs ......................................................................... 3-110
Table 3-19. E5-E1T1 Technical Specifications ......................................... 3-110
Table 3-20. E5-ENET Supported Protocols ............................................. 3-111
Table 3-21. E5-ENET Capacities ............................................................... 3-111
Table 3-22. Thermal Alarm Conditions .................................................. 3-112
Table 3-23. Front Faceplate LED Indicators ........................................... 3-114
Table 3-24. ACT Status LED states for IPLIMx ...................................... 3-114
Table 3-25. ACT Status LED states for IPGWx ...................................... 3-114
Table 3-26. E5-ENET Technical Specifications ....................................... 3-115
Table 3-27. Fuse Color Codes of Alarm Flags ........................................ 3-119
Table 3-28. Fuse and Alarm Panel c Front Items ................................... 3-121
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Table 3-29. Fuse and Alarm Panel
(P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) Rear ................................................ 3-122
Table 3-30. Fuse and Alarm Panel
(P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) Specifications ................................ 3-122
Table 4-1. System Specifications. ................................................................. 4-3
Table 4-2. ESP Server LEDs .......................................................................... 4-4
Table 4-3. Hub LEDs ...................................................................................... 4-7
Table 4-4. Router Front LEDs ....................................................................... 4-8
Table 4-5. Router Rear LEDs ......................................................................... 4-8
Table 4-6. Ethernet Switch LEDs .................................................................. 4-9
Table 4-7. Breaker Panel LEDs ................................................................... 4-12
Table 5-1. Sentinel Frame Types and Configurations ............................... 5-5
Table 5-2. Sentinel Release Application Notes ........................................... 5-8
Table 5-3. Netra-based ESP Frame Components Release 10.x
and Higher ............................................................................................... 5-14
Table 5-4. ESP Servers 1A and 2A Release 10.0 ....................................... 5-16
Table 5-5. ESP Servers 1B and 2B through 1Q and
2Q release 10.0 ......................................................................................... 5-17
Table 5-6. Tekelec 1000-based ESP Frame Components
Release 11.0 and Higher ........................................................................ 5-18
Table 5-7. Site Collector Frame Components ........................................... 5-21
Table 5-8. Sentinel Site Collector Server A ............................................... 5-21
Table 5-9. Sentinel Site Collector Servers B and C ................................... 5-22
Table 5-10. Sentinel Central Server Frames Prior to Release 10.0 ......... 5-27
Table 5-11. Sentinel Central Server 1 Prior to Release 10.0 .................... 5-28
Table 5-12. Sentinel Central Servers 2, 3, 4 Components
Prior to Release 10.0 ............................................................................... 5-28
Table 5-13. Sentinel Central Server Frames Release 10.0 ........................ 5-29
Table 5-14. Sentinel Central Server Components Release 10.0 .............. 5-29
Table 5-15. Traffic Database Server Release 11.3 ..................................... 5-30
Table 5-16. Breaker Panel (BP) LEDs ......................................................... 5-32
Table 5-17. Ethernet Switch LEDs .............................................................. 5-35
Table 5-18. Ethernet Switch LEDs Each Port ............................................ 5-36
Table 5-19. Router Front LEDs ................................................................... 5-37
Table 5-20. Router Rear LEDs ..................................................................... 5-38
Table 5-21. Hub Front LEDs ....................................................................... 5-38
Table A-1. Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS
Release 30.0 through 31.6 ....................................................................... A-3
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List of Tables
Table A-2. Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS
Release 32.0 through 35.0 ........................................................................A-9
Table A-3. E1 Cable Assemblies ................................................................A-16
Table A-4. T1 MIM LIM Cable Assemblies ..............................................A-16
Table A-5. Terminal/Printer Cables and Adapters ................................A-17
Table A-6. Modem Cables and Adapters .................................................A-17
Table A-7. Tekelec 1000 Site Specific Cables ............................................A-17
Table A-8. ESP Frame Baseline and Required
EAGLE 5 ISS Baseline. ...........................................................................A-18
Table A-9. Integrated Sentinel ESP Frame
Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.x, 11.x ...................................................A-19
Table A-10. Integrated Sentinel ESP Expansion Frame
Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0 ..........................................................................A-23
Table A-11. Sentinel Server Frame Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0, 11.x ..........A-24
Table A-12. Site Collector Frame Releases 8.1.x and 9.0. .......................A-25
Table A-13. AC Servers Releases 8.1.x and 9.0 ........................................A-25
Table B-14. DSCS DIP Switch Settings ....................................................... B-9
Table B-15. DSCS Bridge Amplifier Part Numbers ............................... B-11
xii
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1
Introduction
Overview ...................................................................................... 1–2
Scope and Audience.................................................................... 1–2
Manual Organization and Conventions................................... 1–3
Related Publications.................................................................... 1–4
Documentation Packaging, Delivery, and Updates ............. 1–11
Regulatory Compliance and Certification ............................. 1–12
Admonishments and Conventions ......................................... 1–13
Customer Care Center .............................................................. 1–14
Problem – Critical ............................................................... 1–15
Problem – Major .................................................................. 1–15
Problem – Minor ................................................................. 1–15
Response............................................................................... 1–16
Emergency Response.......................................................... 1–16
Hardware Repair and Return .................................................. 1–17
Repair and Return Shipping Instructions ....................... 1–18
Returning a Crate................................................................ 1–21
Acronyms.................................................................................... 1–22
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
1-1
Introduction
Overview
This manual provides hardware descriptions for Tekelec signaling systems or
components based on the EAGLE 5 Integrated Signaling System (ISS) for
releases 35.0 and later. For hardware descriptions of earlier releases, contact
your sales representative.
This manual provides an overview of each system and its subsystems
including details of standard and optional hardware components. In addition,
this manual describes basic site engineering for signaling products.
Systems included in this manual are:
•
EAGLE 5 ISS Signal Transfer Point (STP)
•
Embedded Operations Support System Applications Processor (EOAP)
•
Integrated Sentinel Monitoring Systems (EAGLE 5 ISS side)
•
Multi-Purpose Server (MPS)
•
Probed Sentinel Frames
For additional information on Sentinel components that use the Tekelec 1000
Application Server, see the Tekelec 1000 Application Server Hardware Manual.
For information on ELAP application using the Tekelec 1100 Application
Server, see the Tekelec 1100 Application Server Hardware Manual.
Scope and Audience
This manual describes hardware for informational purposes; it does not
describe how to install or replace hardware.
For installation information, refer to the Installation Manual included in your
current documentation suite. For replacement procedures of existing
hardware components, refer to the Maintenance Manual included in your
current documentation suite.
For configuration and provisioning, refer to the Database Administration
Manual – Features included in your current documentation suite.
This manual is intended for customers, system planners, and personnel
requiring detailed hardware information.
1-2
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
Manual Organization and Conventions
This Hardware Manual is organized into the following chapters:
•
Chapter 1, “Introduction”—contains general information about manual
organization, the scope of this manual, its targeted audience, brief
explanations of the various systems, typical content of a Documentation
Suite delivered with each system, how to handle hardware repairs and
returns, and how to get technical assistance.
•
Chapter 2, “Systems Overview”—contains a high-level functional overview
of the EAGLE 5 ISS. EAGLE 5 ISS subsystems include Maintenance and
Administration, Communication, Application, and Embedded Operations
Support System Applications Processor (EOAP) elements. Chapter 2 also
describes an overview of OEM-based products.
•
Chapter 3, “Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS” describes frames,
shelves, and cards that make up an EAGLE 5 ISS.
•
Chapter 4, “Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products” describes
frames, shelves, and the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) parts
that make up a OEM-based product.
•
Chapter 5, “Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products” — describes
Sentinel products from release 8.0 and later. Frames and component
configurations are explained.
•
Chapter 6, “Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS” — Describes installation site
requirements, including floor plan requirements, environmental
requirements, and power requirements.
•
Appendix A, Hardware Baselines — Lists in cross-index tabular form the
hardware components that can be configured for each system software
release. The tables are divided into groups of similar systems for easier
use. Use these tables to determine if a specific hardware module or OEM
element can be configured.
•
Appendix B, Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques — This appendix provides
reference information on each 4-port monitor applique that Sentinel
supports. Also includes instructions for installing the DSCS Bridge
Amplifier.
The Hardware Manual uses the following conventions:
•
Components used only in a specific system are clearly labeled, for
example, (EAGLE 5 ISS only).
•
Components that are specific to a release are labeled with the system and
release number; for example, (EAGLE 5 ISS 27.2 or earlier).
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Introduction
Related Publications
The Hardware Manual is part of the EAGLE 5 ISS documentation set and may
refer to one or more of the following manuals:
•
The Commands Manual contains procedures for logging into or out of
the EAGLE 5 ISS, a general description of the terminals, printers, the
disk drive used on the system, and a description of all the commands
used in the system.
•
The Commands Pocket Guide is an abridged version of the Commands
Manual. It contains all commands and parameters, and it shows the
command-parameter syntax.
•
The Commands Quick Reference Guide contains an alphabetical listing of
the commands and parameters. The guide is sized to fit a shirt-pocket.
•
The Commands Error Recovery Manual contains the procedures to
resolve error message conditions generated by the commands in the
Commands Manual. These error messages are presented in numerical
order.
•
The Database Administration Manual – Features contains procedural
information required to configure the EAGLE 5 ISS to implement these
features:
— X.25 Gateway
— STP LAN
— Database Transport Access
— GSM MAP Screening
— EAGLE 5 ISS Support for Integrated Sentinel
•
The Database Administration Manual - Gateway Screening contains a
description of the Gateway Screening (GWS) feature and the
procedures necessary to configure the EAGLE 5 ISS to implement this
feature.
•
The Database Administration Manual – Global Title Translation contains
procedural information required to configure an EAGLE 5 ISS to
implement these features:
— Global Title Translation
— Enhanced Global Title Translation
— Variable Length Global Title Translation
— Interim Global Title Modification
— Intermediate GTT Load Sharing
— ANSI-ITU-China SCCP Conversion
1-4
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
•
The Database Administration Manual - IP7 Secure Gateway contains
procedural information required to configure the EAGLE 5 ISS to
implement the SS7-IP Gateway.
•
The Database Administration Manual – SEAS contains the EAGLE 5 ISS
configuration procedures that can be performed from the Signaling
Engineering and Administration Center (SEAC) or a Signaling
Network Control Center (SNCC). Each procedure includes a brief
description of the procedure, a flowchart showing the steps required, a
list of any EAGLE 5 ISS commands that may be required for the
procedure but that are not supported by SEAS, and a reference to
optional procedure-related information, which can be found in one of
these manuals:
— Database Administration Manual – Gateway Screening
— Database Administration Manual – Global Title Translation
— Database Administration Manual – SS7
•
The Database Administration Manual – SS7 contains procedural
information required to configure an EAGLE 5 ISS to implement the
SS7 protocol.
•
The Database Administration Manual – System Management contains
procedural information required to manage the EAGLE 5 ISS database
and GPLs, and to configure basic system requirements such as user
names and passwords, system-wide security requirements, and
terminal configurations.
•
The Dimensioning Guide for EPAP Advanced DB Features is used to
provide EPAP planning and dimensioning information. This manual is
used by Tekelec personnel and EAGLE 5 ISS customers to aid in the
sale, planning, implementation, deployment, and upgrade of EAGLE 5
ISS systems equipped with one of the EAGLE 5 ISS EPAP Advanced
Database (EADB) Features.
•
The ELAP Administration Manual defines the user interface to the
EAGLE 5 ISS LNP Application Processor on the MPS/ELAP platform.
The manual defines the methods for accessing the user interface,
menus, screens available to the user and describes their impact. It
provides the syntax and semantics of user input, and defines the
output the user receives, including information and error messages,
alarms, and status.
•
The EPAP Administration Manual describes how to administer the
EAGLE 5 ISS Provisioning Application Processor on the MPS/EPAP
platform. The manual defines the methods for accessing the user
interface, menus, and screens available to the user and describes their
impact. It provides the syntax and semantics of user input and defines
the output the user receives, including messages, alarms, and status.
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1-5
Introduction
•
The Feature Manual - EIR provides instructions and information on
how to install, use, and maintain the EIR feature on the Multi-Purpose
Server (MPS) platform of the EAGLE 5 ISS. The feature provides
network operators with the capability to prevent stolen or disallowed
GSM mobile handsets from accessing the network.
•
The Feature Manual - G-Flex C7 Relay provides an overview of a feature
supporting the efficient management of Home Location Registers in
various networks. This manual gives the instructions and information
on how to install, use, and maintain the G-Flex feature on the
Multi-Purpose Server (MPS) platform of the EAGLE 5 ISS.
•
The Feature Manual - G-Port provides an overview of a feature
providing the capability for mobile subscribers to change the GSM
subscription network within a portability cluster while retaining their
original MSISDNs. This manual gives the instructions and information
on how to install, use, and maintain the G-Port feature on the
Multi-Purpose Server (MPS) platform of the EAGLE 5 ISS.
•
The Feature Manual - INP provides the user with information and
instructions on how to implement, utilize, and maintain the
INAP-based Number Portability (INP) feature on the Multi-Purpose
Server (MPS) platform of the EAGLE 5 ISS.
•
The FTP-Based Table Retrieve Application (FTRA) User Guide describes
how to set up and use a PC to serve as the offline application for the
EAGLE 5 ISS FTP Retrieve and Replace feature.
•
The Hardware Manual - EAGLE 5 ISS contains hardware descriptions
and specifications of Tekelec’s signaling products. These include the
EAGLE 5 ISS, OEM-based products , Multi-Purpose Server (MPS), and
the Integrated Sentinel with Extended Services Platform (ESP)
subassembly.
The Hardware Manual provides an overview of each system and its
subsystems, details of standard and optional hardware components in
each system, and basic site engineering. Refer to this manual to obtain
a basic understanding of each type of system and its related hardware,
to locate detailed information about hardware components used in a
particular release, and to help configure a site for use with the system
hardware.
•
1-6
The Hardware Manual - Tekelec 1000 Application Server provides general
specifications and a description of the Tekelec 1000 Application Server
(T1000 AS). This manual also includes site preparation, environmental
and other requirements, procedures to physically install the T1000 AS,
and troubleshooting and repair of Field Replaceable Units (FRUs).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
•
The Hardware Manual - Tekelec 1100 Application Server provides general
specifications and a description of the Tekelec 1100 Applications
Server (T1000 AS). This manual also includes site preparation,
environmental and other requirements, procedures to physically
install the T1100 AS, and troubleshooting and repair of Field
Replaceable Units (FRUs).
•
The Installation Manual - EAGLE 5 ISS contains cabling requirements,
schematics, and procedures for installing the EAGLE 5 ISS along with
LEDs, Connectors, Cables, and Power Cords to Peripherals. Refer to
this manual to install components or the complete systems.
•
The Installation Manual - Integrated Applications provides the
installation information for integrated applications such as EPAP 4.0
or earlier (Netra-based Multi-Purpose Server (MPS) platform) and
Sentinel. The manual includes information about frame floors and
shelves, LEDs, connectors, cables, and power cords to peripherals.
Refer to this manual to install components or the complete systems.
•
The LNP Database Synchronization Manual - LSMS with EAGLE 5 ISS
describes how to keep the LNP databases at the LSMS and at the
network element (the EAGLE 5 ISS is a network element)
synchronized through the use of resynchronization, audits and
reconciles, and bulk loads. This manual is contained in both the LSMS
documentation set and in the EAGLE 5 ISS documentation set.
•
The LNP Feature Activation Guide contains procedural information
required to configure the EAGLE 5 ISS for the LNP feature and to
implement these parts of the LNP feature on the EAGLE 5 ISS:
— LNP services
— LNP options
— LNP subsystem application
— Automatic call gapping
— Triggerless LNP feature
— Increasing the LRN and NPANXX Quantities on the EAGLE 5 ISS
— Activating and Deactivating the LNP Short Message Service (SMS)
feature
•
The Maintenance Manual contains procedural information required for
maintaining the EAGLE 5 ISS and the card removal and replacement
procedures. The Maintenance Manual provides preventive and
corrective maintenance procedures used in maintaining the different
systems.
•
The Maintenance Pocket Guide is an abridged version of the
Maintenance Manual and contains all the corrective maintenance
procedures used in maintaining the EAGLE 5 ISS.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
1-7
Introduction
•
The Maintenance Emergency Recovery Pocket Guide is an abridged
version of the Maintenance Manual and contains the corrective
maintenance procedures for critical and major alarms generated on the
EAGLE 5 ISS.
•
The MPS Platform Software and Maintenance Manual - EAGLE 5 ISS with
Tekelec 1000 Application Server describes the platform software for the
Multi-Purpose Server (MPS) based on the Tekelec 1000 Application
Server (T1000 AS) and describes how to perform preventive and
corrective maintenance for the T1000 AS-based MPS. This manual
should be used with the EPAP-based applications (EIR, G-Port,
G-Flex, and INP).
•
The MPS Platform Software and Maintenance Manual - EAGLE 5 ISS with
Tekelec 1100 Application Server describes the platform software for the
Multi-Purpose Server (MPS) based on the Tekelec 1100 Application
Server (T1100 AS) and describes how to perform preventive and
corrective maintenance for the T1100 AS-based MPS. This manual
should be used with the ELAP-based application (LNP).
•
The Provisioning Database Interface Manual defines the programming
interface that populates the Provisioning Database (PDB) for the
EAGLE 5 ISS features supported on the MPS/EPAP platform. The
manual defines the provisioning messages, usage rules, and
informational and error messages of the interface. The customer uses
the PDBI interface information to write his own client application to
communicate with the MPS/EPAP platform.
•
The Previously Released Features Manual summarizes the features of
previous EAGLE, EAGLE 5 ISS and it identifies the release number of
their introduction.
•
The Release Documentation contains the following documents for a
specific release of the system:
— Feature Notice - Describes the features contained in the specified
release. The Feature Notice also provides the hardware baseline for
the specified release, describes the customer documentation set,
provides information about customer training, and explains how
to access the Customer Support website.
— Release Notice - Describes the changes made to the system during
the lifecycle of a release. The Release Notice includes Generic
Program Loads (GPLs), a list of PRs resolved in a build, and all
known PRs.
NOTE: The Release Notice is maintained solely on Tekelec’s
Customer Support site to provide you with instant access to the
most up-to-date release information.
— System Overview - Provides high-level information on SS7, system
architecture, LNP, and EOAP.
1-8
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
— Master Glossary - Contains an alphabetical listing of terms,
acronyms, and abbreviations relevant to the system.
— Master Index - Lists all index entries used throughout the
documentation set.
•
The System Manual – EOAP describes the Embedded Operations
Support System Application Processor (EOAP) and provides the user
with procedures on how to implement the EOAP, replace
EOAP-related hardware, device testing, and basic troubleshooting
information.
Table 1-1 provides a roadmap of the publications that contain information on
Sentinel features, procedures, and components. The table arranges the
documents in the following groups: general documents, software manuals,
hardware/installation manuals, and technical reference documents.
Table 1-1.
Sentinel Publications
Publication
Describes
General Documents
Sentinel Feature Guide Provides an overview of the Sentinel System and
describes each feature, component, and application of
the Sentinel System.
Feature Notice
Describes the features contained in the specified
release.
Release Notice
Describes the changes made to the system for the
specified release. Includes a report of known and
resolved problem reports. The Release Notice also
provides a list of run-time software licenses and
instructions for accessing the Tekelec Web site.
Software Manuals
Sentinel User’s
Manual
Provides procedural information intended for users
who do not have administrative privileges to the
monitoring functions of Sentinel. The following
functions are covered: Base Sentinel Server functions,
Protocol Analysis, Traffic Surveillance, Monitor Link
Status, and Event Message Reports.
Sentinel System
Provides procedures for administering and
Administrator’s Guide provisioning the Sentinel system. The manual is
divided into sections for Probed Sentinel, Probeless
Sentinel, and common components. The manual is
intended for system administrators.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
1-9
Introduction
Table 1-1.
Sentinel Publications (Continued)
Publication
Describes
Data Collection
Applications Manual
Provides an overview of the Call Detail
Records/Transaction Data Records, Usage
Measurement Data Feeds, the Mass Call Detection,
and Loop Detection applications. Describes how to
provision the above applications and how to generate
the reports that the above applications provide.
Alarms Reference and
User’s Manual
Includes introductory and overview information, lists
the various alarms generated by Sentinel, provides
system administrator configuration information,
contains detailed information about using the SAMS
graphical user interface, and describes the optional
Alarm Forwarding System.
Sentinel Hardware and Installation Manuals
EAGLE 5 ISS
Integrated
Applications
Installation Manual
Provides installation information for each system in
the Network Signaling Division.
Tekelec 1000
Application Server
Hardware Manual
Describes the Application Server hardware. The
manual is intended for personnel who install or
maintain the Application Server hardware.
Tekelec EAGLE 5 ISS
Hardware Manual
Describes each system and subsystem in the Network
Signaling Division. Includes details of the standard
and optional hardware components in each system.
Signaling/Cellular
Generic Hardware
Reference
Describes the Basic Hardware Configuration
(BHC)/SNAP shelf. The manual is intended for
personnel who install or maintain the BHC.
Technical Reference Documents
1-10
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem: Collection and Delivery
Provides an overview of the Sentinel Data Collection
Subsystem and its interface to the Service Application
Platform. This is the parent document for the Sentinel
Data Collection Subsystem. Child documents (the following four documents listed in this table) that
describe the Data Feed formats reference this parent
document for common descriptions on Theory of
Operation, Interface Descriptions, and Interface Procedures, Performance Characteristics, and Compatibility.
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
ANSI ISUP CDR
Data Feed
Describes the interface of the ANSI ISUP Data Feed to
the Service Application Platform. Also describes the
format and parameters of the ANSI ISUP CDR data
feed file.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
Table 1-1.
Sentinel Publications (Continued)
Publication
Describes
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
ITU ISUP CDR Data
Feed
Describes the interface of the ITU ISUP Data Feed to
the Service Application Platform. Also describes the
format and parameters of the ITU ISUP CDR data
feed file.
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
LIDB TDR Data Feed
Describes the interface of the LIDB Data Feed to the
Service Application Platform. Also describes the format and parameters of the LIDB TDRs data feed file.
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
Usage Measurement
Data Feed File Format
Describes the interface of the Peg Counter (Usage
Measurement) Data Feed to the Service Application
Platform. Also describes the format and parameters
of the Peg Counter (Usage Measurement) data feed
file.
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
ANSI-41 TDR Data
Feed
Describes the interface of the ANSI-41 Data Feed to
the Service Application Platform. Also describes the
format and parameters of the ANSI- 41 TDRs data
feed file.
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
GSM-MAP TDR
Data Feed
Describes the interface of the GSM-MAP Data Feed to
the Service Application Platform. Also describes the
format and parameters of the GSM-MAP TDRs data
feed file.
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
TUP CDR Data Feed
Describes the interface of the TUP Data Feed to the
Service Application Platform. Also describes the format and parameters of the TUP CDRs data feed file.
Sentinel Data Collection Subsystem:
ETSI INAP TDR Data
Feed
Describes the interface of the ETSI INAP Data Feed to
the Service Application Platform. Also describes the
format and parameters of the ETSI INAP TDRs data
feed file.
Documentation Packaging, Delivery, and Updates
Customer documentation is provided with each system and is shipped to the
sites specified by the customer. The number of documentation sets provided
are in accordance with the contractual agreements.
Customer documentation is updated whenever significant changes are made
that affect system operation or configuration. Updates may be issued in the
form of an addendum or a reissue of the relevant documentation.
The document part number is shown on the title page along with the current
revision of the document and the date of publication. The bottom of each page
contains the document’s date of publication and the document’s part number.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
1-11
Introduction
When a document is reissued, the following information changes:
•
The title page and revision number, the date of publication, and the new
software release number, if applicable.
•
The date of publication and the document part number, if applicable, on
the bottom of each page.
Regulatory Compliance and Certification
Tekelec products are tested to meet the following regulatory standards:
•
Network Equipment Building System (NEBS) level 3 as listed in Telcordia
SR-3580.
•
Applicable Telcordia Electromagnetic Compatibility and Electrical Safety
requirements in GR-1089-CORE.
•
Applicable Physical Protection requirements in GR-63-CORE.
•
Relevant directives and harmonized standards in support of the products
Compliance European (CE) mark required in Europe. Figure 1-1 shows
the mark used to indicate this compliance.
Figure 1-1.
1-12
European Directives CE Mark
•
Relevant standards in ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) directive
89/336/EEC.
•
Relevant standards in Safety directive 73/23/EEC, supported by Certified
Body (CB) Test Certificates US/5923/UL or US/5451/UL issued by the
National Certification Body as tested to IEC 60950 with national
differences for European countries
•
Underwriters Laboratories (UL) listed under UL File E200146 for USA and
c-UL for Canada. Figure 1-2 shows the mark used to indicate this
compliance.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
Combined UL Mark for the United States and Canada
Figure 1-2.
UL
C
R
US
LISTED
•
Relevent standards in SJ/T 11363-2006 for limits of certain hazardous
substances.
Figure 1-3. Hazardous Substances
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ล᭭੠㘮ড়⠽䚼ӊ
(Plastic and Polymeric parts)
㸼⼎䆹᳝↦᳝ᆇ⠽䋼೼䆹䚼ӊ᠔᳝ഛ䋼ᴤ᭭Ёⱘ৿䞣ഛ೼6-7[[[[[[[[
ƻ˖ ᷛ‫ޚ‬㾘ᅮⱘ䰤䞣㽕∖ҹϟDŽ嘅
Indicates that the concentration of the hazardous substance in all homogeneous materials in the
parts is below the relevant threshold of the SJ/T 11363-2006 standard.
㸼⼎䆹᳝↦᳝ᆇ⠽䋼㟇ᇥ೼䆹䚼ӊⱘᶤϔഛ䋼ᴤ᭭Ёⱘ৿䞣䍙ߎ6-7[[[[[[[[
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Indicates that the concentration of the hazardous substance of at least one of all homogeneous
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Admonishments and Conventions
Admonishments alert the reader and technical personnel to assure personal
safety, to minimize possible service interruptions, and to warn of the potential
for equipment damage. This manual has four admonishments, listed in
descending order of priority.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
1-13
Introduction
TOPPLE:
topple
(This icon and text indicate the possibility of personnel injury and
equipment damage.)
DANGER:
(This icon and text indicate the possibility of personnel injury.)
WARNING:
(This icon and text indicate the possibility of equipment damage
and personnel injury.)
CAUTION:
(This icon and text indicate the possibility of service
interruption.)
Customer Care Center
The Customer Care Center offers a point of contact through which customers
can receive support for problems that may be encountered during the use of
Tekelec’s products. The Customer Care Center is staffed with highly trained
engineers to provide solutions to your technical questions and issues seven
days a week, twenty-four hours a day. A variety of service programs are
available through the Customer Care Center to maximize the performance of
Tekelec products that meet and exceed customer’s needs.
To receive technical assistance, call the Customer Care Center at one of the
following locations:
•
Tekelec, USA
Phone (US and Canada) +1 888-FOR-TKLC
Phone (international) +1 919-460-2150
Fax +1-919-460-0877
Email: support@tekelec.com
•
Tekelec, Europe and UK
Phone +44 1784 467 804
Fax +44 1784 477 120
Email: ecsc@tekelec.com
Once a Customer Service Request (CSR) is issued, Technical Services, along
with the customer, determines the classification of the trouble.
Problems are reported using problem criteria, as defined in the following
sections and “TL-9000 Quality System Metrics.”]
1-14
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
Problem – Critical
Critical problems severely affect service, capacity/traffic, billing, and
maintenance capabilities and requires immediate corrective action, regardless
of time of day or day of the week, as viewed by a customer upon discussion
with the supplier. For example:
•
A loss of service that is comparable to the total loss of effective functional
capacity of an entire switching or transport system.
•
A reduction in capacity or traffic handling capacity such that expected
loads cannot be handled.
•
loss of ability to provide safety or emergency capability (for example, 911
calls).
Problem – Major
Major problems cause conditions that seriously affect system operations, or
maintenance and administration, and require immediate attention as viewed
by the customer upon discussion with the supplier. Because of a lesser
immediate or impending effect on system performance, the urgency is less
than in a critical situation. A list of possible examples follows:
•
Reduction in any capacity/traffic measurement function
•
Any loss of functional visibility and/or diagnostic capability
•
Short outage equivalent to system or subsystem outages with
accumulated duration of greater than two minutes in any 24-hour period
or that continue to repeat during longer periods
•
Repeated degradation of DS1 or higher rate spans or connections
•
Prevention of access for routine administrative activity
•
Degradation of access for maintenance or recovery operations
•
Degradation of the system’s ability to provide any required critical or
major trouble notification
•
Any significant increase in product-related customer trouble reports
•
Billing error rates that exceed specifications
•
Corruption of system or billing databases
Problem – Minor
Other problems that a customer does not view as critical or major are
considered minor. Minor problems do not significantly impair the functioning
of the system and do not significantly affect service to customers. These
problems are tolerable during system use.
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Introduction
Engineering complaints are classified as minor unless otherwise negotiated
between the customer and supplier.
Response
If a critical problem exists, emergency procedures are initiated (see
“Emergency Response”). If the problem is not critical, information regarding
the serial number of the system, Common Language Location Identifier
(CLLI), and initial problem symptoms and messages is recorded and a
primary Technical Services engineer is assigned to work the Customer Service
Request (CSR) and provide a solution to the problem. The CSR is closed when
the problem has been resolved.
Emergency Response
In the event of a critical service situation, emergency response is offered by
the Tekelec Customer Care Center.
To receive technical assistance, call the Customer Care Center at one of the
following locations:
•
Tekelec, USA
Phone (US and Canada) +1 888-FOR-TKLC
Phone (international) +1 919-460-2150
Fax +1-919-460-0877
Email: support@tekelec.com
•
Tekelec, Europe and UK
Phone +44 1784 467 804
Fax +44 1784 477 120
Email: ecsc@tekelec.com
Emergency response provides immediate coverage, automatic escalation,
and other features to ensure a rapid resolution to the problem.
1-16
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Introduction
Hardware Repair and Return
Any system components being returned for repair or replacement must be
processed through the Tekelec Return Material Authorization (RMA)
procedures. A hardware repair is defined as an item returned to Tekelec due
to a failure, with the returned item being repaired and returned to the
customer. It is essential that serial numbers are recorded correctly. RMAs
cannot be created without a valid serial number. All repair and quality
information is tracked by serial number. Table 1-2 lists the basic RMA types.
Table 1-2.
Basic RMA Types
Replacement
Type
Description
Turnaround
Priority Advance
Replacement
Customer requests the URGENT
replacement of a damaged product
Advance
Replacement
Customer request the replacement of Shipment Within 3 Business
a damaged product
Days
Repair / Return
Customer will return a damaged
product for repair
Shipment Within 5 Days After
Receipt
Expendable
A damaged part, such as a cable, is
replaced, but the Customer does not
return the damaged product
Depends on Urgency Shipment Within 3 Business
Days
Same Day Shipment
Table 1-3 lists the RMA return reasons.
Table 1-3.
RMA Reasons for Return
Reason for Return
Description
Damaged by
Environment
Product damaged by environmental phenomena such as water
damage or earthquake
Damaged in Shipment
Damaged between shipment from Tekelec and receipt at the
Customer’s installation site.
DOA – Dead on Arrival
Product is not functional when it is first installed at the
Customer’s location.
Lab Return
Products returned from lab sites.
Product Capture
Defect to be captured by Quality or Engineering (not Product
Recall).
Product Deficiency
Anything wrong with the part that doesn’t fall into another
category.
Product Recall
Products recalled by divisions for the repair of a defect or
replacement of defective products.
Return – No Product
Deficiency
Anything returned without the product being defective.
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Introduction
Repair and Return Shipping Instructions
All returned equipment, assemblies, or subassemblies must be shipped to the
Tekelec Repair and Return Facility specified by the Technical Services
engineer. The item being returned must be shipped in the original carton or in
an equivalent container assuring proper static handling procedures and with
the freight charges prepaid.
The assigned RMA number must be clearly printed on the “RMA#:” line of
the shipping label on the outside of the shipping package. If the RMA number
is not placed on the label, the return could be delayed.
Procedure- RMA
1
1-18
Obtain and confirm the following information before contacting the
Tekelec Customer Contact Center:
•
Your name:
•
Company name:
•
Call-back number:
•
Email address:
•
Which product you are calling about?
•
Site location:
•
CLLI number
•
System serial number (NT, CE, LM, DS, etc…):
•
Complete software release (e.g., 28.0.1-41.53.0):
•
Upgrade forms
WI005153
WI005154
WI005218
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
WI005219
WI005220
•
Tekelec card type: (e.g., ILA, MPL, DSM, etc.):
•
Tekelec card part number (870-####-##):
•
Associated serial number (102########):
•
Reason for return or replacement (isolated from system):
•
Full name of person the replacement card is being shipped to:
•
Shipping address:
NOTE: If possible, include associated alarms (UAMs) and a copy of the
associated output (capture file).
2
Contact the Contact Customer Contact Center and request a Return of
Material Authorization (RMA).
Reference: “Customer Care Center” on page 1-14.
3
4
If the item is a like-for-like advance replacement, the Technical Services
engineer arranges for shipment of the replacement item to the customer.
a
Wait for the replacement component to arrive.
b
Package the defective component in the box of materials you
received with your replacement. Use proper static handling
procedures.
c
Label the outside and inside of the box with your RMA number
clearly visible. Place the packing slip from the received replacements
on the inside of your box.
d
Ship the defective component to the return address listed on the
packing slip.
If the item is a repair/return, the Technical Services engineer arranges for
shipment of the replacement item to the customer.
a
Package the defective component in a suitable package for shipping.
Use proper static handling procedures.
b
Label the outside and inside of the box with your RMA number
clearly visible. Include a packing slip with all the information from
Step 1 along with the RMA number.
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Introduction
c
Ship the defective component to the following address:
TEKELEC
Attn: RMA Department
5200 Paramount Parkway
Morrisville, NC 27560
RMA#: <assigned by Tekelec>
d
1-20
Wait for the repaired component to arrive.
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Introduction
Returning a Crate
Use the following procedure to return a shipping crate and dollies to Tekelec.
Procedure — Preparing Crate and Dolly for Return to Tekelec
1. Replace the retaining brace.
2. Replace the shipping container front panel using the bolts saved
previously and arrange the return shipment by contacting:
Shipping Manager
TEKELEC
Attn: RMA Department
5200 Paramount Parkway
Morrisville, NC 27560
RMA#: <assigned by Tekelec>
3. After the frame is positioned and the dollies are removed from the frame,
the dollies are returned to the same address as the shipping container
listed above.
If the equipment is being immediately installed ship the dollies back to
Tekelec in the crate after use. After installing the equipment bolt the dollies
securely in the crate and return to Tekelec.
OR
If the equipment is not being immediately installed ship the dollies back to
Tekelec in the box supplied with the crate. After unpacking the equipment
return the crate to Tekelec and retain the box to return the dollies. After
installing the equipment remove the dollies and return to Tekelec in the
supplied box.
NOTE: It is the site supervisor’s responsibility to assure the crate and
dollies are returned to Tekelec.
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Introduction
Acronyms
A.......................................... Ampere
ACL .................................... Application processor Code Loader
ACM ................................... Applications Communications Module
AIN ..................................... Advanced Intelligent Networks. Set of standards
for advanced intelligent services
AINF................................... Application Interface Applique
ANSI................................... American National Standards Institute.
AP ....................................... Application Processor
APD .................................... Application Processor DCM bootstrap code
API...................................... Application Interface
AS ....................................... Application server
ASM.................................... Application Services Module
ATM.................................... Asynchronous Transfer Mode
BHCA ................................. Busy Hour Call Attempts
BITS .................................... Building Integrated Timing System
BM ...................................... Buss Master (Cognitronics)
BOM ................................... Bill Of Materials
BP........................................ Boot Prom
BPDCM .............................. Boot Prom DCM
Bps ...................................... Bit per second
CAP .................................... Communication & Application Processor
CAR .................................... Corrective Action Report
CE CISPR A ....................... Compliance European, Comite Internationale
Special des Perturbations Radioelectrique
(European Compliance, International Special
Committee on Radio Interference, Class A)
CDR .................................... Call Detail Record
CDU.................................... CAP Downloadable Utility
CLEI.................................... Common Language Equipment Identifier
CF........................................ Control Frame
1-22
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Introduction
CLLI ................................... Common Language Location Identifier
CNAM ............................... Calling Name Delivery Service
COTS .................................. Commercial Off-the-Shelf
CP ....................................... Communications Processor
CSR ..................................... Customer Service Request
D1G .................................... Database Communication 1 Gigabyte Expansion
Memory Module
DCM................................... Database Communications Module
DMS.................................... Disk Management Service
DRAM................................ Dynamic Random Access Memory
DS0 ..................................... Digital Signal Level-0 (64 Kbits/sec)
DS1 ..................................... Digital Signal Level-1 (1.544Mbits/sec)
DSM.................................... Database Services Module
E1 ........................................ European Digital Signal Level-1 (2.048 Mbits/sec).
EBI ...................................... Extended Bus Interface
EDCM ................................ Enhanced Database Communications Module
EF........................................ Extension Frame
EILA ................................... Enhanced Integrated LIM Applique
EMM................................... Extended Memory Management
EMP.................................... EAGLE 5 ISS Monitor Protocol
EOAM ................................ Enhanced OAM GPL
EOAP ................................. Embedded Operation Support System Applications
Processor
ESD..................................... Electro-Static Discharge
ESP...................................... Extended Services Platform
FAP ..................................... Fuse and Alarm Panel
FR........................................ Flight Recorder
FTP...................................... File Transfer Protocol
GB ....................................... GigaByte
GLS ..................................... Generic Loader Services
GPL..................................... Generic Program Load
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Introduction
GPLM ................................. GPL Management
GPSM-II ............................. General Purpose Service Module
GTT..................................... Global Title Translation
GWS.................................... GTT Gateway Screening
HCAP ................................. High-Speed Communications & Applications
Processor
HCAP-T ............................. Improved HCAP card
HCMIM.............................. High Capacity Multi-Channel Interface Module
HDLC ................................. High-Level Data Link Control
HIPR ................................... High-speed IMT Packet Router
HMUX................................ High-speed Multiplexer
IAD ..................................... Integrated Access Device
ICM..................................... IMT configuration manager task
ILA...................................... Integrated LIM-AINF module
ILDR ................................... IMT loader task
IMT ..................................... Inter-processor Message Transport
IMTC .................................. IMT Control task
IP ......................................... Internet Protocol
IP7 ....................................... Tekelec’s Internet Protocol to SS7 Interface
IPD...................................... IMT Processor DCM operational code
IPMX .................................. IMT Power and Multiplexer card
ISDN................................... Integrated Services Digital Network.
IS-NR .................................. In Service – Normal
ISR....................................... Interrupt Service Routine
ITU...................................... International Telecommunications Union
IWF ..................................... Inter-Working Function
KHz .................................... Kilo Hertz (1000 Hertz)
LAN.................................... Local Area Network.
LFS ...................................... Link Fault Sectionalization
LIM ..................................... Link Interface Module
1-24
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
LNP .................................... Local Number Portability
LIM-AINF.......................... A LIM with a software-selectable interface
LOM ................................... Lights out Management
LSMS .................................. Local Service Management System
M256................................... 256 Megabyte Memory Expansion Card
MAS.................................... Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
MASP ................................. Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
Processor
MBUS ................................. Maintenance Bus
MCAP ................................ Maintenance Communications & Applications
Processor
MDAL ................................ Maintenance, Disk, and Alarm card
MG...................................... Media Gateway
MGB ................................... Master Ground Bar
MGC................................... Media Gateway Controller
MGCP ................................ Media Gateway Controller Protocol
MIB ..................................... Maintenance Information Base utility
MIM.................................... Multi-Channel Interface Module
MPL.................................... Multi-Port LIM
MPS .................................... Multi-Purpose Server
MSU.................................... (SS7) Message Signalling Unit
MS....................................... Media Server
MTOS ................................. Multi-Tasking Operating System, Industrial
Programming Inc.
NEBS .................................. Network Equipment Building System
NOC ................................... Network Operations Center
NS ....................................... Network Server
OAM .................................. Operations, Administration, & Maintenance
OA&M ............................... Operations, Administration, & Maintenance
OAP.................................... Operations System Support/Applications Processor
OAPF.................................. Operations System Support/Applications Processor
Frame
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1-25
Introduction
OCU.................................... Office Channel Unit
OEM ................................... Original Equipment Manufacturer
OOS-MT-DSBLD .............. Out of Service –Maintenance Disabled
PMTC ................................. Peripheral Maintenance task
PSTN .................................. Public Switched Telephone Network
RAID .................................. Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks
RAM ................................... Random Access Memory
RMA ................................... Return Material Authorization
SAI/P ................................. Serial Asynchronous Interface PCI Adapter
ISS ....................................... Integrated Signaling System
SCP ..................................... Service Control Point (SS7 Network)
SCCP................................... Signal Connection Control Part
SCM .................................... System Configuration Manager
SCN .................................... Switched Circuit Network
SCSI .................................... Small Computer Systems Interface
SEAC .................................. Signaling Engineering and Administration Center
SEAS ................................... Signaling Engineering and Administration System
SG........................................ Secure Gateway
SIP....................................... Session Initiation Protocol
SS7....................................... Signaling System Seven
SSP ...................................... Service Switching Point (SS7 Network)
STC ..................................... Signaling Transport Card
STP...................................... Signal Transfer Point (SS7 Network)
STPLAN............................. Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network
T1 ........................................ The North American telecommunications standard
defining a circuit that multiplexes and switches 24
channels and operates at speeds of 1.544 Mbps
Tekelec 1000....................... Tekelec 1000 Application Server
TCU .................................... Table Creation Utility
TCP ..................................... Transport Control Protocol
TCP/IP............................... Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
1-26
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Introduction
TDM ................................... Terminal Disk Module
TEKCC ............................... Tekelec Composite Clock
TEKOS ............................... Tekelec Operating System
TMOAP.............................. Texas Micro processor chassis hosting the OAP
application
TOS486 ............................... Tekos Operating System for the 486
TOS4M ............................... Tekos Operating System for the 486 implemented
via MTOS
TSC ..................................... Time Slot Counter
TSM .................................... Translation Services Module
UAM................................... Unsolicited Alarm Output
UD1G ................................. Updated Database Communication 1 Gigabyte
Expansion Memory Module
UIM .................................... Unsolicited Information Messages
V.35 ..................................... ITU Interface Recommendation, V.35
VPN.................................... Virtual Private Network
WAN .................................. Wide Area Network
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
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Introduction
1-28
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
2
Systems Overview
Introduction ...................................................................................................... 2-2
EAGLE 5 ISS ..................................................................................................... 2-3
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem ....................................... 2-4
Communication Subsystem ..................................................................... 2-5
Application Subsystem............................................................................. 2-7
Timing Systems........................................................................................ 2-14
Integrated Sentinel ......................................................................................... 2-16
Extended Services Platform ................................................................... 2-18
Site Collector ............................................................................................ 2-18
Flight Recorder......................................................................................... 2-18
Multi-Platform Server (MPS) Systems ........................................................ 2-19
Embedded Operations Applications Processor......................................... 2-20
OEM Products ................................................................................................ 2-21
OEM-Based Servers................................................................................. 2-21
OEM-Based Network Elements............................................................. 2-21
OEM-Based Peripheral Components.................................................... 2-21
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2-1
Systems Overview
Introduction
This chapter introduces the hardware in Tekelec signaling products. The
hardware components to support its processor and feature applications
include the following:
•
EAGLE 5 Integrated Signaling System (ISS)
•
Sentinel
•
Multi-purpose Server (MPS)
•
Tekelec 1000 Application Server (T1000 AS)
•
Tekelec 1100 Application Server (T1100 AS)
•
Embedded Operations Support System Applications Processor (EOAP)
Appendix A, Hardware Baselines, in this manual lists specific hardware
(required or configurable components) by part number for each system type
and release.
NOTE: Products are described generally in this chapter and in detail
in Chapter 3, Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS and Chapter 5,
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products.
In this document, modules or components that are used only in specific
systems or releases are noted in the following syntax.
•
Components used only in EAGLE 5 ISS systems are labeled (EAGLE 5 ISS
only).
•
Components that are specific to a system and release are labeled with the
system name and release number. For example, (Sentinel 8.0 and later).
NOTE: The term “module” refers to a hardware card provisioned with
software. In some cases, EAGLE 5 ISS cards are referred to by the name
of the module in which they function, rather than the card name that
appears on the label of the card. For ordering or service purposes,
customers should use the card name and part number printed on the
card itself.
2-2
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Systems Overview
EAGLE 5 ISS
The EAGLE 5 ISS consists of the following subsystems:
•
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem (MAS)
•
Communication Subsystem (Gigabit backbone)
•
Application Subsystem
Figure 2-1provides a high-level overview of the EAGLE 5 ISS subsystems and
functions.
Figure 2-1.
EAGLE 5 ISS Functional Diagram
CUSTOMER
PROVISIONING
SYSTEM
LSMS
**EPAP and ELAP applications are
mutually exclusive on a node basis
Customer’s
WAN
Remote
EAGLE MAINTENANCE AND
ADMINISTRATION SUBSYSTEM
Shared Administration SCSI Bus
Alarm
Displays
(EPAP)** - EAGLE PROVISIONING
APPLICATION PROCESSOR
MDAL
M
P
S
M
P
S
A
B
including
2.3/4.6 GB
EXTERNAL
CLOCK
Removable Disk
Local Bus
GPSM-II
TDM
HDD
TDM
GPSM-II
HDD
A
B
EAGLE LNP APPLICATION
PROCESSOR (ELAP)**
BaseT
Memory/
Interface
*TSMs not typically deployed on
same node with DSMs for SCCP
TSM
Memory/
Interface
DSM
DSM
MASP-B
MASP-A
M
P
S
10/100
Memory
Local Bus
M
P
S
BaseT
10/100
AUXILIARY MEMORY
SUBSYSTEM (SCCP)*
Customer’s
WAN
GATEWAY SCREENING
LOADING SERVICES
Memory
TSM
Gigabit Backbone
IPSM
TCP/IP
Interface
SSEDCM
TCP/IP
Interface
MCPM
TCP/IP
Interface
IP connection
for telnet
and FTRA
10/100 BaseT
10/100 BaseT
10/100 BaseT
IP connection to IAS
IP connection for
(Integrated Application measurements
Solution)
MIM
1-8 channels
E1 or T1
8 channels per card
can be daisy chained to
support all channels
MPL
ANSI DS0
56 Kbps
8 ANSI DS0
56 Kbps LINKS
SSEDCM
TCP/IP
Interface
10/100 BaseT
Sigtran
IP LINK
LIM or
LIM-E1
DS0, V.35,
DSCS or E1
SS7 or X.25 LINKS
LIMATM
E1ATM
HCMIM
1.544Mbps
2.048Mbps
E1/T1
E1 or T1
ANSI ATM
ITU ATM
64 channels per card
HIGH SPEED LINK HIGH SPEED LINK SE-HSL
Channel Bridging
APPLICATION INTERFACE SUBSYSTEM
Chapter 3, “Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS,” explains specific
component requirements or configurations in detail.
In addition, EAGLE 5 ISS has a clock derived from the Building Integrated
Timing System (BITS). This connects to the 64KHz composite BITS signal and
distributes clock signals to the rest of the cards in the systems.
NOTE: See the section “Timing Systems” on page 2-14 for information
about High-Speed Master Timing and Time Slot Counter (TSC)
Synchronization features.
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2-3
Systems Overview
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
The Maintenance and Administration Subsystem (MAS) provides services to
other subsystems, and consists of the following:
•
The General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II)
•
Terminal Disk Module (TDM)
•
Maintenance Disk and Alarm (MDAL)
The Maintenance and Administration Subsystem Processor (MASP) function
is a logical pairing of the GPSM-II card and the TDM card. The GPSM-II card
is connected to the TDM card by means of an Extended Bus Interface (EBI)
local bus.
The MDAL card contains the removable cartridge drive and alarm logic.
There is only one MDAL card in the Maintenance and Administration
Subsystem (MAS) and it is shared between the two MASPs.
The GPSM-II and TDM card combination performs the following functions:
•
Maintenance communication—Maintenance functions poll each
application card and receives trouble reports. These are reported to the
alarm function in the MASP to generate alarms, or to the event messaging
function for output to the printer.
•
Measurements—Collection and reporting of system performance data.
•
Peripheral services—Provides access to all peripherals attached to the
system, terminals, disks, alarms, clocks, and others.
•
Alarm processing—Provides audible and visual alarms.
•
System disks—Provides for storage of application or system software.
EAGLE 5 ISS architecture provides Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT)
connectivity directly to the maintenance and administration subsystem
through the GPSM-II card. This allows the MASP to provide maintenance and
administrative communication services to application cards.
Figure 2-1, “Maintenance and Administration Subsystem,” on page 2-5 shows
relationships between different components of the maintenance and
administration subsystem.
2-4
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Systems Overview
Figure 2-1. Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
Terminal #1
Terminal #16
MASP-B
MASP-A
EBI
Local Bus
GPSM-II
TDM
Fixed
Disk
MDAL
Alarm Card
Removable
Disk
EBI
Local Bus
TDM
Fixed
Disk
GPSM-II
Shared Administration SCSI BUS
Interprocessor Message Transport
(HIPR card)
mtcsub
Communication Subsystem
The communication subsystem consists of two separate sets of buses:
•
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) buses
•
Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) buses
Small Computer System Interface Buses
There are two independent Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) buses,
one to the fixed disks on TDM cards and the other to the shared
administration SCSI bus that runs on the backplane between TDMs and the
MDAL card. Each SCSI bus has a block of memory that allows transfers from
memory to occur without delaying the application processor.
Inter-processor Message Transport
The Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) bus is the main communications
artery for all subsystems in the system. The IMT bus uses load sharing, so
messages from the various subsystems are divided evenly across both buses.
If one bus should fail, the other immediately assumes control of all messages.
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Systems Overview
IMT buses can function as a private LAN assigning internal IP addresses to
LIM cards. By addressing cards on an internal LAN, the EAGLE 5 ISS and the
Integrated Monitoring feature allows monitoring of SS7 links without external
connections. SS7 link information from the EAGLE 5 ISS LIM cards is
collected by the Signaling Transport Cards (STCs) and is transferred to
Expanded Service Platform (ESP) subassemblies. After processing in the ESP,
the link information is forwarded to a Sentinel server.
High-Speed IMT Packet Router
The High-Speed IMT Packet Router (HIPR) Module provides increased IMT
bus bandwidth and individual high-speed card/server links by introducing
switched 125 Mbps interfaces to each slot within a shelf. HIPR acts as a
gateway between the intra-shelf IMT BUS, running at 125 Mbps, and the
inter-shelf ring operating at 1.0625 Gbps. HIPR implements the HMUX
scheme of transmitting data between shelves only when necessary. The HIPR
plugs into the same slot as an HMUX.
Traffic between cards on the same shelf will be switched directly to the
destination slot and is not transmitted to any other cards in the shelf. Traffic
between shelves is not required to pass onto an intra-shelf IMT channel.
Two HIPR modules are required in shelves equipped with high-performance
LIMs, such as the High-Capacity MIM, and for interfacing to Tekelec 1000
Application Server through IMT Bridge and IMT PCI modules. HIPR requires
all other shelves to be equipped with either all HMUX cards or all HIPR cards
(shelves cannot contain a mix of HMUX and HIPR).
The HIPR programmable logic is upgradeable and reprogrammable via the
IMT inter-shelf interface. Updated images can be downloaded from the OAM
to the HIPR and stored in FLASH memory on the HIPR.
With the improved bandwidth from the switched architecture, the HIPR card
enables customers to use other higher performance cards from Tekelec such as
the High Capacity MIM.
2-6
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Systems Overview
High-Speed Multiplexer
High-Speed Multiplexer (HMUX) cards support requirements for up to 1500
links, allowing communication on IMT buses between cards, shelves and
frames. HMUX cards interface to 16 serial links, creating a ring from a series of
point to point links. Each HMUX card provides a bypass multiplexer to
maintain the ring's integrity as cards are removed and inserted into an
operational shelf.
NOTE 1: To maintain integrity of the IMT bus, each extension shelf must
contain at least one Translation Service Module (TSM) or Database
Communications Module (DCM), or Link Interface Module (LIM). If such
cards are present for the purpose of maintaining IMT bus integrity, they do
not have to be entered into the system database .
NOTE 2: Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) can be used with
the HMUX and HIPR in the EAGLE 5 ISS system with minor modifications
and the addition of adapter cable (P/N 830-0857-01). The adapter cable is not
necessary for customers not wanting high speed links.
High-Speed Multiplexer (HMUX) card replaces the IPMX card. A mixture of
HMUX and HIPR cards within one IMT ring is possible, provided HIPR is
installed on both IMT A and IMT B on a given shelf. HMUX and HIPR cards
are installed at the factory or by Tekelec Technical Support and are not
installed by customers.
Application Subsystem
The application subsystem consists of application cards. Application cards are
capable of communicating with other cards through the redundant IMT buses.
A Communications Processor (CP) on each application board provides control
of communications from the cards to the IMT buses.
Software is downloaded to application cards on initial power-up from the
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem Processors (MASP). Once
EAGLE 5 ISS is loaded, software is downloaded to cards by the Generic
Loader Services (GLS) and Operation Administration and Maintenance
(OAM).
An Application Processor (AP) receives the software load on the application
card. The type of software the AP receives depends on the function of the
application board which is determined by the provisioning of the board.
Presently, there are several types of application cards that support network
specific functions:
•
Link Interface Module (LIM)—SS7 links and X.25 links
•
Application Communication Module (ACM)—Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) interface over Ethernet for the
Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network (STPLAN) feature.
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2-7
Systems Overview
NOTE: Ethernet is a standard set of specifications for a particular type
of LAN that employs baseband signaling (single signal on a cable) and
has a transmission rate of 10/100 Mbps
•
Database Communications Module (DCM), Enhanced DCM (EDCM and
EDCM-A), Signaling Transport Card (STC)—Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) interface over Ethernet for the
Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network (STPLAN) feature.
•
Translation Service Module (TSM)—Local Number Portability
(LNP)/SCCP (GTT) only
•
Database Service Module (DSM)—EAGLE 5 ISS Provisioning Application
Processor (EPAP), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM),
EAGLE 5 ISS Local Number Portability (ELAP), and interface to Local
Service Management System (LSMS)
DSM-1G cards based on the GPSM-II card running the IPS GPL function
as card type IPSM.
•
General Purpose Service Module II (GPSM-II)— The GPSM-II provides
two 10/100Base-T Ethernet ports for LAN connections. The GPSM-II does
not require additional memory modules when provisioned as a single slot
EDCM. The GPSM-II card replaces the MCAP card.
NOTE: GPSM-II cards are installed at the factory or by Tekelec
Technical Support and are not installed by customers.
When the GPSM-II is combined with one or more Gigabytes of expansion
memory (UD1G P/N 850-0527-xx) it becomes the primary board for the
following card types. GPSM-II card functionality is primarily determined
by the GPL provisioned.
— When combined with a one Gigabyte (UD1G) expansion memory
board in a single-slot assembly and provisioned with IPS GPL, the
GPSM-II functions as card type IP Services Module (IPSM).
— The Measurements Collection and polling Module (MCPM) is derived
from EDSM-2G cards with 32 MB FSRAM and 2 GB RAM.
NOTE: The EDSM-2G card in the MCPM module is a requirement for
the FTP measurements feature. The FTP measurements feature uses the
MCPM card ethernet ports to transfer measurements information
directly to a FTP server.
2-8
•
Multi-Channel Interface Module—8 HDLC channels for E1 or T1
protocols
•
Multi-Port Link Interface Module—SS7 links
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Generic Program Loads
Application software is downloaded to individual application cards by means
of Generic Program Loads (GPLs). Hardware is defined to EAGLE 5 ISS by
means of a series of administration commands. Software is then loaded from
the fixed disk over the IMT bus directly to the cards. The type of the GPL
loaded depends on the card that is chosen.
GPLs can be any of the following:
•
SCCP —Signaling Connection Control Part. This software allows the
Translation Service Module (TSM) to be used as a memory board for
Global Title Translation (GTT). Inbound SCCP messages from Link
Interface Modules (LIMs) are sent to the TSM assigned to the LIM by
system software. SCCP software on the TSM performs the translation, and
sends messages through the IMT back to the appropriate LIM, which
routes messages to the destination. The SCCP application can run on the
TSM and DSM cards.
CAUTION: Tekelec recommends that cards running the SCCP application
be uniformly distributed in the EAGLE 5 ISS to provide a more even SCCP
load distribution. During normal operation unevenly distributed SCCP
cards in an EAGLE 5 ISS would not have any network or system impacts.
However, should a particular SCCP card database(s) become corrupted,
inconsistent, or at a different level, depending on the amount of service
provided by that card and the extent of the database issue, network impacts
can occur.
•
SLAN—Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network. This software
allows the system to support a TCP/IP interface to any external host with
ACMs and DCMs.
•
SS7—This software provides access to remote SS7 network elements.
•
GX25—This software allows the system to send and receive traffic to and
from an X.25 network, and convert the packet to an Signaling System #7
Message Signaling Unit (SS7 MSU).
•
GLS—Gateway Loading Service (GLS) software controls download of
Gateway Screening (GWS) data to Link Interface Modules (LIMs) and
TSM when necessary. This ensures a fast download of gateway screening
data when a card re-initializes.
Gateway screening data is downloaded when a card is re-initialized, when
Gateway screening is changed by database administration, or when there
is manual intervention with commands being entered at a terminal.
•
EROUTE—Ethernet Routing transfers link information messaging from
the EAGLE 5 ISS LIM cards to the Integrated Sentinel using TCP/IP and
EAGLE 5 ISS Monitor Protocol (EMP). Implemented in Signaling
Transport Cards (STC).
•
EOAM—Enhanced Operation Administration and Maintenance GPL for
GPSM-II cards.
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Systems Overview
Link Interface Module
The application subsystem provides external services, relying on the Link
Interface Module (LIM) as an interface. Each LIM provides one or two SS7
links (depending on configuration), one X.25 link, or IP links. A LIM consists
of an application card equipped with a main assembly and an applique. This
assembly provides level one and some level two functions on SS7 signaling
links.
The types of interfaces presently available through a LIM are:
•
DS0A at 56 kbps
•
OCU at 56 kbps
•
V.35 at 56 kbps and 64 kbps for SS7
•
T1-ATM at 1.544 Mbps
•
E1-ATM at 2.048 Mbps
•
E1 at 2.048 Mbps
•
T1 at 1.544 Mbps
•
TCP/IP at 10/100 MHz
•
FTP at 10/100 MHz
Application Communication Module
The Application Communication Module (ACM) is an application card
equipped with a main assembly and an Ethernet applique. It is used by the
Signaling Transfer Point Local Area Network (SLAN) feature to access a
remote host through an Ethernet LAN using TCP/IP.
The SLAN feature requires the gateway screening feature also be activated to
control which messages are copied and sent to the remote host.
Database Communications Module
The Database Communications Module (DCM) requires two slots for
mounting and must be assigned to an odd numbered slot in EAGLE 5 ISS.
NOTE: DCMs cannot be configured in any slot reserved for MASP,
MDAL, HMUX, and HIPR cards. This applies to all application cards.
DCM cards provide STP Local Area Network function, and 10/100Base-T
ethernet links to the STP. DCM cards are compatible with control shelf
backplanes (P/N 850-0330-03/04/05/06) and extension shelf backplanes
(P/N 850-0356-01/02/03/04/06). DCM cards are provisioned in pairs for
redundancy.
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Systems Overview
NOTE: Unique cabling needs restrict placement of DCM cards in EAGLE
5 ISS systems. The DCM requires a unique cable interface that is not
compatible with current LIM cables on fully wired but unequipped
shelves.
Double-slot Enhanced Database Communications Module
The double-slot Enhanced Database Communications Module (EDCM)
(P/N 870-2197-xx) requires two slots for mounting. Double-slot EDCM cards
are plug compatible with existing DCM cards and have improved
performance. Double-slot EDCM cards are compatible with control shelf
backplanes (P/N 850-0330-02/03/04/05) and extension shelf backplanes
(P/N 850-0356-01/02/03). Double-slot EDCM cards are provisioned in pairs
for redundancy. Double-slot EDCMs can be configured in any slot except
those reserved for MASP, TDM, MDAL, HMUX, and HIPR cards.
Single-slot Enhanced Database Communications Module
The single-slot EDCM (P/N 870-2372-01) and EDCM-A (P/N 870-2359-03)
require one slot for mounting and can be assigned to any slot. Single-slot
EDCM cards are plug compatible with DCM and Double-slot EDCM cards.
Single-slot EDCM cards are compatible with control shelf backplanes
(P/N 850-0330-02/03/04) and extension backplanes
(P/N 850-0356-01/02/03). Single-slot EDCM and EDCM-A cards can be
configured in any slot except those reserved for MASP, TDM, MDAL, HMUX,
and HIPR cards.
General Purpose Service Module
The General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II) (P/N 870-2360-01) has one
UD1G expansion memory module. GPSM-II cards are compatible with control
shelf backplanes (P/N 850-0330-02/03/04/05) and extension backplanes
(P/N 850-0356-01/02/03). The GPSM-II is a required replacement for the
MCAP cards to support the large system feature (up to 1500 links) in the
EAGLE 5 ISS or to support the Time Slot Counter (TSC) Synchronization and
Integrated Sentinel Monitoring features.
NOTE: HMUX, HIPR, and GPSM-II cards are installed at the factory or by
Tekelec Technical Support and are not installed by customers.
Measurements Collection and Polling Module
The Measurements Collection and polling Module (MCPM) is an EDSM-2G
card with 32 MB FSRAM and 2 GB RAM.
NOTE: The Measurements Platform IP Security feature requires
EDSM-2G MCPM cards.
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Systems Overview
NOTE: The MCPM card is a requirement for the FTP measurements
feature. The FTP measurements feature utilizes the MCPM card ethernet
ports to transfer measurements information directly to a FTP server.
Signaling Transport Card
The Signaling Transport Card (STC) is the DCM card (P/N 870-1945-xx) with
the generic program load (GPL) called EROUTE. For more information about
DCM cards see the section “Database Communications Module” on page 2-10
of this manual. The STC functions as an IP router between the IMT bus
internal to the EAGLE 5 ISS and the ethernet networks used to communicate
with the ESP servers. Refer to the Database Administration Manual – Features for
information about provisiong rules for the STC.
Database Service Module
The Database Communications Module (DCM) requires two slots for
mounting and must be assigned to an odd numbered slot. The DCM card is
used as a primary board for the Database Service Module (DSM) cards.
Its primary application, however, is in performing global title functions
required for Local Number Portability (LNP). For the EAGLE 5 ISS system to
perform LNP functions, all Signaling Connection Control Part (SCCP), which
is part of Global Title Translation (GTT), and Generic Load Services (GLS)
which is part of Gateway Screening.
Translation Services Module
The Translation Services Module (TSM) (P/N 870-1289-xx) can perform global
title operations for both Local Number Portability (LNP) and standard
non-LNP functions.
The Translation Services subsystem consists of cards of up to one GByte
capacity. Card capacity is increased by addition of 256 MByte appliques. TSM
cards in EAGLE 5 ISS systems are:
•
TSM-256 with one 256 MByte applique is P/N 870-1289-xx
•
TSM-512 with two 256 MByte appliques is P/N 870-1290-xx
•
TSM-768 with three 256 MByte appliques is P/N 870-1291-xx
•
TSM-1024 with four 256 MByte appliques is P/N 870-1292-xx
E5 Interface Module
The E5 interface module is a link interface card that utilizes an Embedded
Processor Module (EPM) with an appliqué card. The E5 card provides the
EAGLE system a high performance general purpose-processing platform in a
single-slot footprint. The E5 card is used on existing EAGLE 5 control and
extension shelves.
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Systems Overview
The EPM appliqué cards provide LIM functionality such as E1/T1 or IP. The
EPM accepts up two single-width or one double width PCI Mezzanine
appliqué card(s). The EPM assembly contains all of the necessary logic to
perform both application and communication processing of the data streams
provided by the appliqué cards such as E1/T1 or IP. All EAGLE System
interfacing to the EPM occurs through the EAGLE backplane signals and
connects to the appliqué cards through the PCI Mezzanine Card (PMC)
interface.
The types of E5 cards presently available are:
•
E5-E1T1 (P/N 870-1873-02)
•
E5-ENET (P/N 870-2212-02)
E5-E1T1 Module
The E5-E1T1 card (P/N 870-1873-02) is a single slot card providing eight trunk
terminations processing up to 32 signaling links of configurable channelized
E1 or T1 connectivity. The eight E1/T1 ports reside on backplane connectors A
and B. The E5-E1T1 supports only one SE-HSL signaling link on one of the
eight ports and it must be A.
All ports on a single board operate in the same trunk format, E1 or T1.
However, it is possible to have a mixture of trunk formats in a node with some
E5-E1T1s operating in T1 mode with others operating in E1 mode for gateway
node scenarios.
E5-ENET Module
The E5-ENET card (P/N 870-2212-02) is a single slot card providing one or
more Ethernet interfaces.
•
The E5-ENET has 2 physical 10/100 Mbps Ethernet ports.
•
The E5-ENET supports protocols as identified below:
NOTE: The E5-ENET is provisionable for IPLIMx or IPGWx, but does
not support both functions on a single card simultaneously.
Table 2-1.
E5-ENET Supported Protocols
Feature
Protocols Supported
IPLIM
SCTP, M2PA
IPGWY
SCTP, M3UA, SUA
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Systems Overview
Timing Systems
EAGLE 5 ISS uses synchronized timing systems to provide accurate reference
standards to all cards on the IMT buses.
System Clock
EAGLE 5 ISS connects to the 64KHz composite Building Integrated Time
System (BITS) clocks through two DB-15 style connectors on the backplane of
the control shelf. The two clocks are labeled primary and secondary and are
sent to both MASPs. Each MASP selects between two BITS clock signals to
provide a system clock to the rest of the EAGLE 5 ISS. The system clock is
used by Link Interface Modules (LIMs) for X.25 and Signaling System #7 (SS7)
Digital Service level-0 Applique (DS0A) signaling links, with each LIM
selecting either clock A or clock B for its own use.
EAGLE 5 ISS also distributes system clocks to all frames. All shelves, both
extension shelves and control shelves, provide “clock in” and “clock out”
connections. Clock cables from the control shelf connect to the “clock in”
connector on the top shelf of each frame. From the “clock out” connector on
the top shelf of each frame, the clock signals are connected to the “clock in”
connector of the middle shelf of the frame and from that shelf to the bottom
shelf.
Holdover Clock
An optional holdover clock can maintain clock synchronization for EAGLE 5
ISS DS0A links during brief interruptions of the Building Integrated Timing
System (BITS) clock signals. In accordance with Telcordia Technologies
GR-1244-CORE, BITS clock outages of up to 15 seconds can be tolerated.
BITS Clock Routing
BITS clock signals A and B are routed through the holdover clock and then to
the system, allowing the holdover clock to continue Stratum 3 clock signals to
the EAGLE 5 ISS (see Figure 2-2, “Clock Routing,” on page 2-15).
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Systems Overview
Figure 2-2. Clock Routing
Control Frame CF-00
optional hold-over clocks
BITS clocks
Extension Frame EF-00
Extension Frame EF-01
Control Shelf 11
A Clock 2/ B Clock 2
A Clock 1/ B Clock 1
A Clock 5/ B Clock 5
A Clock 4/ B Clock 4
A Clock 3/ B Clock 3
A Clock 0/ B Clock 0
A Clock In/ B Clock In
Extension Shelf 21
Extension Shelf 31
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
Extension Shelf 22
Extension Shelf 32
Backplane
Note: Backplane
P/N 850-0330-05
and later
has Internal Loopback.
A Clock Out/ B Clock Out
Extension Shelf 12
A Clock In/B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
Extension Shelf 23
Extension Shelf 33
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
Extension Shelf 13
A Clock In/ B Clock In
Extension Frame EF-02
Extension Frame EF-03
Extension Shelf 41
Extension Shelf 51
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
Extension Shelf 42
Extension Shelf 52
Extension Frame EF-04
Extension Shelf 61
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
A Clock Out/ B Clock
Out
Extension Shelf 43
Extension Shelf 53
A Clock In/ B Clock In
A Clock In/ B Clock In
clock_21
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Systems Overview
High-Speed Master Timing
The EAGLE 5 ISS can be configured with high-speed master timing
capabilities. High-speed master timing allows synchronization of LIM cards
at E1 or T1 rates. For more information about installing or upgrading to
high-speed timing see the section on Master Timing in the “Installation
Manual”.
Time Slot Counter Synchronization
Time Slot Counter Synchronization (TSC) Synchronization allows all cards in
the system that contain a Time Slot Counter (TSC) to synchronize with one
another. The ability to have synchronized timing between cards is used in
applications such as system wide message time stamping. “Time Slot Counter
Synchronization” on page 2-16.
Integrated Sentinel
The Integrated Sentinel product provides monitoring capabilities for up to
1024 Signaling System 7 (SS7) links. Integrated Sentinel includes network
surveillance capabilities and fault-management functions. Integrated Sentinel
is a complete network monitoring and diagnostic system that gives service
providers total visibility of and access to their SS7 networks. Integrated
Sentinel features a call detail record (CDR) generation system that uses raw
network traffic on the links to generate CDR data for use in various business
intelligence applications.
Figure 2-3 shows a block diagram of a SS7 monitoring network incorporating
the Integrated Sentinel.
The Integrated Sentinel monitors EAGLE 5 ISS STP links internally to
eliminate hardware connections such as cabling, bridge amplifiers, and patch
panels. The Integrated Sentinel can receive all acknowledged message signal
units (MSU) as well as other important information from the EAGLE 5 ISS.
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Systems Overview
Figure 2-3. Integrated Sentinel Block Diagram
TA C
i3000 shelves
i2000 shelves
Base
Sentinel
Server
(BSS)
Data
Gateway
Server
(DGS)
Sentinel
Alarm s
Management
Server
(SAMS)
Traffic
Database
Server
(TDS)
other ESP's
Customer Ethernet WAN
Customer Terminal
MRV Console
Server
Telco Line
EAGLE
STP
GPSM-II
Yellow
Network
LAN Switch
STC
MPL
SS7 Links
STC
Blue
Network
LAN Switch
IMT Bu s
LIM
LIM
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
STC
Sentinel ESP
Subsystem
First Frame
STC
Yellow Network Links
Blue Network Links
In the EAGLE 5 ISS, Signaling Transport Cards (STC) can interface to the LIM
cards on the IMT bus as a private LAN subnet. The STCs transfer the
information collected from the LIMs by ethernet links to the Extended
Services platform (ESP) of the Integrated Sentinel. Refer to “Signaling
Transport Card” on page 2-12 for more information about STCs. Prior to
Integrated Sentinel release 8.0, physical connections were required on the
signalling links to collect this information.
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Systems Overview
After processing in the ESP subsystem, the monitored link information is
forwarded through isolation routers to Sentinel servers. Refer to “Extended
Services Platform” on page 2-18 for more information about the ESP
subsystem.
Extended Services Platform
The Extended Services Platform (ESP) is the Integrated Sentinel software
bundle and the required software platform that provides the interface to the
Integrated Sentinel monitoring system. One Netra 120 or Tekelec 1000
Applications Server running the ESP application is referred to as an ESP
server. All ESP servers located at one EAGLE 5 ISS location are an ESP
subsystem. Each ESP server is considered a separate processing element with
respect to communications to the downstream Sentinel servers and therefore
needs its own IP address. As shown in Figure 2-3 on page 2-17, a single
demarcation point is provided for the Customer's network at the ESP frame's
ethernet switch.
For more information about Sentinel products and a detailed explanation of
the ESP frame see Chapter 5, Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products, in this
manual.
The Integrated Sentinel ESP subsystem interfaces to the monitored links in the
EAGLE 5 ISS STP through ethernet connections to the Signaling Transport
Cards (STC) located in the EAGLE 5 ISS STP frame. See the section “Signaling
Transport Card” on page 2-12 for information about STCs. In the EAGLE 5 ISS
the information being copied from LIM cards and sent to the ESP
subassembly is transported by TCP/IP using a custom proprietary protocol
called EAGLE 5 ISS Monitor Protocol (EMP).
Site Collector
SS7 traffic is processed by a series of processes collectively referred to as a
Sentinel Site Collector. Sentinel products monitor SS7 links by external
probe-based connections (non-integrated solution) or internal connections to
the EAGLE 5 ISS (integrated solution). A Sentinel Site Collector System
consists of user workstations, the EAGLE 5 ISS Shelves, Signaling Transfer
Points (STPs) or other SS7 Network Equipment and a Site Collector Frame.
For more information about Non-Integrated Sentinel Frames see Chapter 5,
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products in this manual.
Flight Recorder
The Tekelec Flight Recorder (FR) is responsible for maintaining a history
buffer of MSUs that can be forwarded to the Base Sentinel Server for historical
call trace. The Flight Recorder refers to a subsystem composed of hardware
and software components that comprise the platform for a particular Sentinel
site collector.
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Systems Overview
The FR prepares MSUs and forwards them to the Data Gateway Server for use
in various data collection applications. It is a multiprocessor-based probe used
to monitor TALI links carrying SS7 traffic. The flight recorder transmits MSUs
to the Base Sentinel Server for real-time link monitoring, Protocol Analysis
(PA), and call trace.
An FR connects to a Tekelec i2000 shelf to provide processing and storage for a
probed Sentinel solution. Flight Recorders are not used in the Integrated
Sentinel. The FR functions are similar to the Integrated Sentinel Extended
Services Platform (ESP) server described in the following section.
Multi-Platform Server (MPS) Systems
The MPS system can be configured as an EAGLE 5 ISS Local Number
Portability (LNP) Application Processor (ELAP) or EAGLE5 ISS Provisioning
Application Processor (EPAP) server.
The MPS provides an interface between the customer provisioning network
and the EAGLE 5 ISS DSM cards. As the customer’s data is updated, the MPS
stores the data and updates the DSM cards. An MPS is usually co-located with
an EAGLE 5 ISS. If you need to install an MPS at a distance from the EAGLE 5
ISS, contact “ Tekelec Customer Care Center” for assistance.
MPS running the EAGLE 5 ISS Provisioning Application Processor (EPAP)
software supports the GSM Flexible Numbering (G-Flex), GSM Mobile
Number Portability (G-Port), and INAP-based Number Portability (INP)
features
These features allow a subscriber to change location, service provider, or
service while keeping the same directory number and ensures that subscribers
receive the same freedom of choice for local service as they do with
long-distance service providers.
MPS running the EAGLE 5 ISS LNP Application Processor (ELAP) software
supports the LNP 228 Million Numbers Feature. The Local Number
Portability (LNP) 228 Million Numbers feature increases the number of
provisionable telephone numbers (TNs) from 18 million to 228 million. The
LNP 228 Million Numbers feature also relocates the LNP database from the
OAM (Operation Administration and Maintenance) to the MPS.
MPS on the Tekelec 1000 Application Server (T1000 AS) supports the EPAP.
The EPAP application includes the INP, G-Flex, and G-Port® . In addition to
the software application, additional third-party software may be required to
support the application. For hardware information, see the Tekelec 1000
Application Server Hardware Manual.
MPS on the Tekelec 1100 Applcation Server (T1100 AS) supports the ELAP.
The ELAP application includes support for the Local Number Portability
(LNP) 228 Million Numbers feature. For hardware information, see the Tekelec
1100 Application Server Hardware Manual.
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Systems Overview
Embedded Operations Applications Processor
The Embedded Operation Support System Applications Processor (EOAP) is
hosted in an assembly mounted in a dedicated OAP Frame (OAPF). The OAP
applications run on the EOAP host assembly. More than one EOAP host shelf
can be mounted in each OAPF. Each EOAP host shelf contains cards
provisioned to support one or two OAP systems. The
OAP application translates and converts higher layer protocols into
asynchronous serial communications. The OAP provides translation and
async/X.25 conversion as part of the optional Signaling and Engineering
Administration System (SEAS) interface for the EAGLE 5 ISS system. The
EOAP can also be used to process input from he optional Local Service
Management System (LSMS) (see Figure 2-4, “EOAP Hosts in an EAGLE 5
ISS,” on page 2-20). An EOAP host shelf communicates with the EAGLE 5 ISS
system control shelf through a serial interface port.
Figure 2-4. EOAP Hosts in an EAGLE 5 ISS
SEAS
Signaling and Engineering Administration System (SEAS)
SEAC
(Customer Site)
System
Sync
X.25
modem
Asynch
modem
Asynch
Asynch
communications
EOAP
Host-A
Serial port
Serial port
Serial port
Asynch
X.25
modem
Asynch
modem
Maintenance
center
2-20
Sync
Asynch
EOAP
Host-B
Asynch
communications
Asynch
VT 520 terminal
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Systems Overview
OEM Products
OEM-Based Servers
OEM-based products use Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) servers, network
elements, and peripheral components. Server hosts provide processing power
and database storage capacity to deliver a scalable range of application
specific services. Components can be configured redundantly to provide a
high level of reliability in processing applications. OEM-based Product
servers currently being used are:
•
Sun Netra T1 DC200 servers (Used as Extended Services Platform (ESP)
servers in the Integrated Sentinel systems).
OEM-based product capabilities are defined by specific application
requirements. Optional processing components that provide application
specific services can be integrated into OEM-based systems.
OEM-Based Network Elements
OEM-based products are configured as frame-mounted Local Area Networks
(LAN) using Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) routers, hubs, and switches.
Typically OEM-based products are configured in redundant LANs with
isolation and dial-up access IP links to customers networks.
Network components are typically configured in redundant pairs with dual
power supply systems for reliability. Network components can include:
•
Routers
•
Hubs
•
Ethernet Switches
•
Application Servers
•
Optional components
OEM-Based Peripheral Components
OEM-based products use COTS peripheral components to support the server
and network elements. Peripheral components can include:
•
Breaker panels
•
Workstations
•
Terminals
•
Switch boxes
•
Break-out boxes
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Systems Overview
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3
Hardware Descriptions —
EAGLE 5 ISS
Introduction ......................................................................................................3–4
EAGLE 5 ISS .....................................................................................................3–4
IP Connectivity ..........................................................................................3–4
Monitoring..................................................................................................3–5
Multi-purpose Server (MPS) ..........................................................................3–5
Layered Design ..........................................................................................3–7
Hardware Components ............................................................................3–7
Embedded OSS Application Processor (EOAP) ..........................................3–9
Hardware Baselines .......................................................................................3–11
Frames..............................................................................................................3–11
Extension Frame ......................................................................................3–15
Miscellaneous Frame...............................................................................3–20
OAP Frame ...............................................................................................3–22
Control Frame ..........................................................................................3–23
Control Shelf.............................................................................................3–23
Control Shelf Backplanes........................................................................3–25
Extension Shelf.........................................................................................3–32
Extension Shelf Backplanes....................................................................3–35
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Modules .......................................................................................................... 3–41
High Speed IMT Router......................................................................... 3–43
High-Speed Multiplexer Card .............................................................. 3–48
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card ..................................................... 3–50
Terminal Disk Module ........................................................................... 3–53
Time Slot Counter Synchronization ..................................................... 3–58
Link Interface Modules.......................................................................... 3–59
High-Capacity Application Processor-Based LIMs ........................... 3–70
Database Communications Module..................................................... 3–75
Database Service Module ...................................................................... 3–77
Double-Slot EDCM ................................................................................. 3–78
Single-Slot EDCM and EDCM-A.......................................................... 3–80
Signaling Transport Card....................................................................... 3–82
General Purpose Service Module ......................................................... 3–82
Measurements Collection and Polling Module.................................. 3–82
IPLIMx with Eight-Point Capability .................................................... 3–83
Application Communications Module................................................ 3–83
Translation Service Module................................................................... 3–88
E1 Interface Backplane Module ............................................................ 3–92
Configured as an E1 Card...................................................................... 3–93
Configured as a Channel Card ............................................................. 3–93
High-Capacity Multichannel Interface Module ................................. 3–98
E5 Interface Module ............................................................................. 3–104
E5-E1T1 Module.................................................................................... 3–104
E5-ENET Module...................................................................................3–111
Air Management Card ..........................................................................3–116
Fuse and Alarm Panels................................................................................3–118
Fuses ........................................................................................................3–118
Fuse and Alarm Panel (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) ..................3–119
Provision Rules for FAP Fuse Locations............................................ 3–123
3-2
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Label Kit for FAP (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) ..........................3–123
Fuse Assignments..................................................................................3–124
Holdover Clock ............................................................................................3–127
Maintenance Interface System Card ...................................................3–129
Critical Status Indicators Card.............................................................3–130
Stratum-3 Card.......................................................................................3–130
TOCA and TOLA Cards .......................................................................3–131
MCA Card ..............................................................................................3–132
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-3
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Introduction
This chapter provides detailed descriptions of the various hardware
associated with the EAGLE 5 ISS including MPS and EOAP systems. This
chapter is designed to aid personnel in configuration, planning, and replacing
components in the systems.
This chapter contains detailed descriptions of the frames, shelves, modules,
and power distribution in the systems.
EAGLE 5 ISS
EAGLE 5 ISS is a large-capacity, multi-functional, fully scalable Signaling
Transfer Point (STP). The EAGLE 5 ISS is NEBS-compliant (GR-63-CORE,
Network Equipment-Building Systems). High capacity and scalability allow
the EAGLE 5 ISS to grow from a single-shelf, 80-link STP to a multi-frame,
1500-link STP.
Due to the distributed processor design, EAGLE 5 ISS does not have a
separate central processing unit to bottleneck traffic throughput. Application
and interface cards are designed to provide plug and play type functionality
that facilitates future growth. EAGLE 5 ISS application and interface cards
generally do not have specific shelf or frame limitations, allowing you to fully
customize and define how your STP is configured. EAGLE 5 ISS also supports
a variety of interface cards to support connectivity to a wide range of network
elements. EAGLE 5 ISS provides connectivity interfaces for IP, ATM, DS0-A,
V.35, OCU, T1, and E1 protocols.
Sentinel provides a Web-based user interface that can be used to view reports
and manage most aspects of Sentinel. The interface is supported by Mozilla
(version 1.5 or later).
IP Connectivity
The EAGLE 5 ISS provides connectivity between SS7 and IP networks. It
receives and sends switched circuit network (SCN) native signaling at the
edge of the IP network. The signaling gateway function may relay, translate,
or terminate SS7 signaling in an SS7-Internet gateway. The signaling gateway
function may also be co-resident with the media gateway function to process
SCN signaling associated with line or trunk terminations controlled by the
media gateway.
3-4
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Monitoring
In EAGLE 5 ISS STP, Signaling Transport Cards (STC) monitor the activity of
Link Interface Modules (LIM) and transfer information to the Extended
Services Platform (ESP) subassembly. The ESP subassembly processes
information from monitored links and forwards the results to a Sentinel
server. See “Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products” on page 5-1 for
detailed information.
NOTE: STC cards are based on single-slot EDCM-A cards
(P/N 870-2508-02) and can be configured in any slot (except slots
reserved for GPSM-II, TDM, MDAL, HMUX, and HIPR cards).
The Integrated Sentinel solution is hosted in a Extended Services Platform
(ESP) subassembly frame.
Multi-purpose Server (MPS)
Tekelec’s Multi-purpose Server (MPS) is a hardware and software platform
that can be configured to support EAGLE STP Local Number Portability
Application Processor (ELAP) or EAGLE STP Provisioning Application
Processor (EPAP).
MPS on the Tekelec 1000 Application Server (T1000 AS) supports the EPAP.
The EPAP application includes the INP, G-Flex, and G-Port® . In addition to
the software application, additional third-party software may be required to
support the application. For hardware information, see the Tekelec 1000
Application Server Hardware Manual.
MPS on the Tekelec 1100 Applcation Server (T1100 AS) supports the ELAP.
The ELAP application includes support for the Local Number Portability
(LNP) 228 Million Numbers feature. For hardware information, see the Tekelec
1100 Application Server Hardware Manual.
Figure 3-1 on page 3-6 shows an overview of how the MPS on the T1000 AS is
used with the EAGLE 5 ISS.
The MPS provides an interface between the customer provisioning network
and the EAGLE 5 ISS DSM cards. As the customer’s data is updated, the MPS
stores the data and updates the DSM cards. An MPS is usually co-located with
an EAGLE 5 ISS.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-5
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-1.
MPS on T1000 AS/EAGLE 5 ISS Overview
Customer End
Office Equipment
Customer
Provisioning
Application
Customer
Provisioning
Stations
EPAP GUI
Terminal
Customer
Network
(Private network recommended)
MPS System 2
(Mate Servers A and B)
MPS System 1
(Mate Servers A and B)
EPAP A
EPAP A
PDBA
PDBA
EPAP B
RTDB
RTDB
PDB
MPS B
MPS A
RTDB
PDB
RTDB
MPS B
MPS A
Main
DSM
Network
Main
DSM
Network
Backup
DSM
Network
Backup
DSM
Network
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
DSM
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
RTDB
Eagle Platform
3-6
EPAP B
Eagle Platform
eagle epap
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Layered Design
MPS is based on the T1000 AS and uses a layered design (see Figures 3-1) with
defined interfaces to enable application and platform changes to be made
independently. This design provides an environment in which changes made
to platform components need not cause changes in application.
Figure 3-1. Layered Design for MPS and Applications
Application Software
MPS Platform Software
Complete MPS 4.0
Platform
TekServer Hardware
Hardware Components
This section includes a description of MPS hardware components and an
overview of the disks and file systems. Figure 3-2 "MPS Hardware Overview"
on page 3-8 illustrates the following equipment.
•
Two Breaker Panels
•
One Drip Tray
•
Four Hubs
•
Two MPS Servers
•
One 8-Port Connector Box (connects by a 40-inch cable the to Sun SAI/P
card)
•
One General Purpose Frame
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3-7
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-2. MPS Hardware Overview
DANGER: DO NOT install AC powered equipment in the MPS
frame. No commercially powered AC equipment should be used or
placed within 7 feet of -48VDC equipment. Doing so can create a shock
hazard to personnel and equipment.
3-8
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Embedded OSS Application Processor (EOAP)
The Embedded Operations Support System Application Processor (EOAP) is
a general purpose interface module that provides the STP system with a
generic platform to develop and run software for feature-specific interfaces to
the STP. These interfaces, for example, include the optional Signaling and
Engineering Administration System (SEAS).
The EOAP translates and converts higher layer protocols into asynchronous
serial communication. It communicates with the STP system through a serial
interface port. For the SEAS interface, the EOAP provides translation and
asynchronous-to-X.25 communication conversion. Refer to Figure 3-3.
Figure 3-3.
SEAS
EOAP Communication
Signaling and Engineering Administration System (SEAS)
SEAC
(Customer Site)
System
Sync
X.25
modem
Asynch
modem
Asynch
Asynch
communications
EOAP
Host-A
Serial port
Serial port
Serial port
Asynch
X.25
modem
Asynch
modem
Sync
Asynch
Maintenance
center
EOAP
Host-B
Asynch
communications
Asynch
VT 520 terminal
Each EOAP reports to the STP its general status as well as the status of its User
Application Layer (UAL), X.25 links, PVCs on those links, and Q.3
associations. The STP can then report the status of the EOAP and its
components to the user through the STP's HMI.
You can configure most aspects of the EOAP through the STP terminal. For
upgrade, debug, and maintenance functions, use a VT-520 terminal directly
connected to the EOAP.
The EOAP is a modular unit with field-replaceable components. For upgrade
purposes, the EOAP can replace an existing Texas Micro OAP.
The EOAP shelf is designed for a split system consisting of an EOAP-A and an
EOAP-B. Each EOAP system in the dual configuration consists of a processor
card, a serial interface card, a power supply card, a removable hard drive, and
a removable CD-ROM drive.
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3-9
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
A dedicated OAP Frame (OAPF) is used to house one or two EOAP host
processor assemblies. The OAPF provides –48VDC to the EOAP from its fuse
and alarm panel.
EOAP host assemblies connect to the system control shelf through two serial
interface ports that allow the system to send a reset command to the hosts.
The EOAP host is server, Ultrasparc 2I, with 300 MHz processor, and contains
the following components:
•
300 MHz Ultrasparc 2I Compact PCI Processor card with 64 MBytes of
RAM
•
Compact PCI Serial I/O Card with 4RS-232 Sync/Async Ports
•
Removable 9Gbyte SCSI Hard Drive Card
•
Removable 32X CD-ROM Drive Card
Figure 3-4. Dual EOAP Host Configuration
System A
System B
EOAP
hard drive card
P/N 870-1514-01/02/03
A
EOAP card
A
CD-ROM card
P/N 870-1515-01/03
Door
closer
Power supply
card
B
Air management
card
B
ACTIVE
ALARM
FANS ON
FAN OFF
AUTO
Eoapfrnt
Table 3-1.
FAP Part
Numbers
870-0243-09
870-1606-xx
3-10
EOAP Frame Fuse Assignment
Fuse Number
Current Capacity
Powered Item
1A
10 AMP
EOAP Host A
1B
10 AMP
EOAP Host B
19A
10 AMP
EOAP Host A
19B
10 AMP
EOAP Host B
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Hardware Baselines
Appendix A, Hardware Baselines, contains a complete listing of the hardware
available for each software release. The appendix lists configurable modules
arranged in alphabetical order indexed to system software releases. For
example, all hardware available will have a bold X where the hardware
module row crosses the release column.
Frames
The system uses standard 7-foot high, 23-inch wide frames (inside
dimension). These floor mounted frames are constructed from channel steel
and painted with electrostatic powder. Depending on the configuration, the
system uses from one to four frames to accommodate a maximum of 1500 SS7
signaling links.
NOTE 1: A heavy-duty frame with the capability to support the greater
weight of COTS equipment is shipped with all new systems. The
generic frame is no longer being shipped but is supported in the
documentation.
NOTE 2: With the large system feature, depending on configuration,
the system can accommodate up to 1024 links. The large system feature
applies to the EAGLE 5 ISS systems only.
Additional frames may be required for optional items, such as Embedded
OAP (EOAP) which are configured in OAP frames (OAPF). Cross-connect
panels, spare card storage, modems, and holdover clocks are configured in
Miscellaneous Frames (MF).
The system can use five types of frames:
•
Control Frame (CF)
•
Extension Frame (EF)
•
Miscellaneous Frame (MF)
•
Operations Support System Application Processor Frame (OAPF)
•
General Purpose Frame (GPF)
Figure 3-5 on page 3-12 shows a system with a Control Frame (CF-00) and two
Extension Frames (EF-00 and EF-01).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-11
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-5. Frames
CF-00
EF-00
EF-01
11
21
12
31
22
13
32
23
33
E
fr
30
es
am
w
BE
LA
LS
Lamp indicators can be mounted on either side of the row of frames on the
end panels (refer to Figure 3-6 on page 3-13), which show three levels of alarm
conditions:
3-12
•
Critical
•
Major
•
Minor
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-6. Frame End Panel with Lamp Indicators
Critical
Major
Minor
IT
CR
AJ
M
IN
M
Handle
l
e
n
a
m
e
p
a
0
fr
3
E
The doors on the front of each frame provide electromagnetic interference
shielding and lock in place with a screw lock. Mounted on the inside of the
doors are card locators, used to record the location of each card in a shelf and
important data regarding the application that each card provides. The shelf
backplanes are protected at the rear of the frame by removable transparent
Plexiglas panels.
The following lists the part numbers for the panels for the frames:
•
•
•
•
P/N 840-0064-01 End row panel, full depth, standard frame, NTW.
P/N 840-0089-01 End row panel, full depth, heavy-duty NTW.
P/N 870-2238-02 Extended panel, alarm side, NEBS NTW.
P/N 870-2278-02 Full depth alarm side panel, heavy-duty frame, NTW.
A Fuse and Alarm Panel (FAP), located at the top of each frame, distributes
–48VDC to all the shelves in the frame. Fuses are located on the front of the
fuse and alarm panel. For more information on the fuse and alarm panel (refer
to “Fuse and Alarm Panels” on page 3-118).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-13
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The numbering of the shelves, with the shelf identification backplane wiring,
circuit card location, and with the Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT)
address in small print at the bottom of the faceplates is shown in Figure 3-7.
The HMUX or HIPR card provides Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT)
bus continuity for all cards connected to the IMT bus.
Figure 3-7. Control Frame CF-00 Numbering Plan
Control Shelf 11
Card
location
numbers
IMT
addresses
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
2
1
1
0
3
1
1
0
4
1
1
0
5
1
1
0
6
F0 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5
1
1
1 1 0 1 1
1 1 9 1 1
0 0 1 1 1
7 8 1 1 2
1
F6 F7 0 F8 F9
MCAP TDM MCAP TDM MDAL MDAL
B
A
B
A
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
4
FA
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
7
FB
These locations are
paired entities
Extension Shelf 12
1
2
0
5
1
2
0
6
IMT
addresses 00 01 02 03 04
05
Card
location
numbers
1
2
0
1
1
2
0
2
1
2
0
3
1
2
0
4
1
2
1 1 0 1 1
2 2 9 2 2
0 0 1 1 1
7 8 2 1 2
1
06 07 0 08 09
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
4
1
2
1
5
1
2
1
6
1
2
1
7
1
2
1
8
0A 0B 0C 0D 0E 0F
Extension Shelf 13
Card
location
numbers
1
3
0
1
IMT
addresses 10
1
3
0
2
1
3
0
3
1
3
0
4
1
3
0
5
1
3
0
6
11 12 13 14 15
1
3
1 1 0 1 1
3 3 9 3 3
0 0 1 1 1
7 8 3 1 2
1
16 17
0 18 19
1
3
1
3
1
3
1
4
1A 1B
1
3
1
5
1
3
1
6
1
3
1
7
1
3
1
8
1C 1D 1E 1F
11-2-3
3-14
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Extension Frame
The Extension Frame (EF) accommodates up to three extension shelves, each
shelf is capable of supporting up to 16 Link Interface Modules (LIMs),
Multi-Port LIMs (MPLs), E1/T1 MIMs, Translation Service Modules (TSMs),
or Applique Communication Modules (ACMs), or Single-slot Enhanced
Database Communications Modules, in any combination.
The EAGLE 5 ISS systems are delivered with customer-specific locations for
the Database Communications Module (DCM) cards and DCMX cards. DCM
and DCMX cards must be inserted into odd numbered slots in EAGLE 5 ISS
systems. DCM, double-slot EDCM, single-slot EDCM and EDCM-A cards can
be configured in EAGLE 5 ISS systems
The system can have up to five Extension Frames, EF-00 to EF-04. EF-04
supports only one extension shelf. The numbering of the shelves is shown,
with the shelf identification backplane wiring, circuit card location, and the
Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) address in small print at the bottom
of the faceplate. The numbering of the card locations on the extension frames
and the IMT address is shown in Figure 3-8 on page 3-16 through Figure 3-11
on page 3-19.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-15
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-8. Extension Frame EF-00 Numbering Plan
BackPlane
P/N 850-035602 and Earlier
03 and Later
DIP switch
identification
Extension Shelf 21
Card
location
numbers
2
1
0
1
2
1
0
2
IMT
addresses 20 21
2
1
0
3
2
1
0
4
2
1
0
5
2
1
0
6
22 23 24 25
2
1
2 2 0 2 2
1 1 9 1 1
0 0 2 1 1
7 8 1 1 2
1
26 27 0 28 29
SHELF ID
2100
2
1
1
3
2
1
1
4
2
1
1
5
2
1
1
6
2
1
1
7
2
1
1
8
Card
location
numbers
2
2
0
1
2
2
0
2
2
2
0
3
2
2
0
4
2
2
0
5
2
2
0
6
IMT
addresses 30 31 32 33 34 35
Card
location
numbers
2
3
0
1
2
3
0
2
2
3
0
3
2
3
0
4
2
3
0
5
2
3
0
6
IMT
addresses 40 41 42 43 44 45
ON
LSB
SHELF
ID
BIT
MSB
00
01
02
03
GRD
DIP switch
identification
Wire wrap
identification
SHELF ID
2200
2
2
1
3
2
2
1
4
2
2
1
5
2
2
1
6
2
2
1
7
2
2
1
8
3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 3F
Extension Shelf 23
2
3
2 2 0 2 2
3 3 9 3 3
0 0 2 1 1
7 8 3 1 2
1
46 47 0 48 49
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F
Extension Shelf 22
2
2
2 2 0 2 2
2 2 9 2 2
0 0 2 1 1
7 8 2 1 2
1
36 37
0 38 39
Wire wrap
identification
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
ON
LSB
SHELF
ID
BIT
MSB
00
01
02
03
GRD
DIP switch
identification
Wire wrap
identification
SHELF ID
2300
2
3
1
3
4A
2
3
1
4
2
3
1
5
2
3
1
6
2
3
1
7
2
3
1
8
4B 4C 4D 4E 4F
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
ON
LSB
MSB
SHELF
ID
BIT
00
01
02
03
GRD
sh 21-2-3
3-16
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-9. Extension Frame EF-02 Numbering Plan
BackPlane
P/N 850-035603 and Later
02 and Earlier
Extension Shelf 41
Card
location
numbers
4
1
0
1
4
1
0
2
4
1
0
3
4
1
0
4
4
1
0
5
4
1
0
6
IMT
addresses 80 81 82 83 84 85
4
1
4 4 0 4 4
1 1 9 1 1
0 0 4 1 1
7 8 1 1 2
1
86 87
0 88 89
SHELF ID
4100
ON
4
1
1
3
4
1
1
4
4
1
1
5
4
1
1
6
4
1
1
7
4
1
1
8
Card
location
numbers
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
2
4
2
0
3
4
2
0
4
4
2
0
5
4
2
0
6
IMT
addresses 90 91 92 93 94 95
Card
location
numbers
4
3
0
1
4
3
0
2
4
3
0
3
4
3
0
4
4
3
0
5
4
3
0
6
IMT
addresses A0 A1 A2 A3 A4 A5
SHELF
ID
BIT
MSB
00
01
02
03
GRD
Wire wrap
identification
DIP switch
identification
SHELF ID
4200
ON
4
2
1
3
4
2
1
4
4
2
1
5
4
2
1
6
4
2
1
7
4
2
1
8
9A 9B 9C 9D 9E 9F
LSB
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
SHELF
ID
BIT
MSB
00
01
02
03
GRD
Wire wrap
identification
DIP switch
identification
Extension Shelf 43
4
3
4 4 0 4 4
3 3 9 3 3
0 0 4 1 1
7 8 3 1 2
1
A6 A7 0 A8 A9
LSB
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
8A 8B 8C 8D 8E 8F
Extension Shelf 42
4
2
4 4 0 4 4
2 2 9 2 2
0 0 4 1 1
7 8 2 1 2
1
96 97 0 98 99
Wire wrap
identification
DIP switch
identification
SHELF ID
4300
ON
4
3
1
3
4
3
1
4
4
3
1
5
4
3
1
6
4
3
1
7
4
3
1
8
AA AB AC AD AE AF
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
LSB
SHELF
ID
BIT
00
01
02
03
MSB
GRD
sh 41-2-3
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-17
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-10. Extension Frame EF-03 Numbering Plan
BackPlane
P/N 850-035603 and Later
02 and Earlier
DIP switch
identification
Extension Shelf 51
Card
location
numbers
IMT
addresses
5
1
0
1
5
1
0
2
5
1
0
3
5
1
0
4
5
1
0
5
5
1
0
6
B0
B1 B2 B3
B4
B5
5
1
5 5 0 5 5
1 1 9 1 1
0 0 5 1 1
7 8 1 1 2
1
B6 B7
0 B8 B9
SHELF ID
5100
ON
5
1
1
3
5
1
1
4
BA BB
5
1
1
5
5
1
1
6
5
1
1
7
Card
location
numbers
IMT
addresses
5
2
0
1
5
2
0
2
5
2
0
3
5
2
0
4
5
2
0
5
C0 C1 C2 C3 C4
5
2
0
6
C5
BC BD BE BF
Card
location
numbers
5
3
0
1
5
3
0
2
IMT
addresses D0 D1
5
3
0
3
5
3
0
4
5
3
0
5
5
3
0
6
D2 D3 D4 D5
SHELF
ID
BIT
00
01
02
03
MSB
GRD
DIP switch
identification
Wire wrap
identification
SHELF ID
5200
ON
5
2
1
3
5
2
1
4
5
2
1
5
5
2
1
6
5
2
1
7
LSB
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
5
2
1
8
CA CB CC CD CE CF
MSB
DIP switch
identification
Extension Shelf 53
5
3
5 5 0 5 5
3 3 9 3 3
0 0 5 1 1
7 8 3 1 2
1
D6 D7 0 D8 D9
LSB
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
5
1
1
8
Extension Shelf 52
5
2
5 5 0 5 5
2 2 9 2 2
0 0 5 1 1
7 8 2 1 2
1
C6 C7 0 C8 C9
Wire wrap
identification
SHELF
ID
BIT
00
01
02
03
GRD
Wire wrap
identification
SHELF ID
5300
ON
5
3
1
3
5
3
1
4
5
3
1
5
5
3
1
6
DA DB DC DD
5
3
1
7
5
3
1
8
DE DF
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
LSB
SHELF
ID
BIT
00
01
02
03
MSB
GRD
sh 51-2-3
3-18
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-11. Extension Frame EF-04 Numbering Plan
BackPlane
P/N 850-035603 and Later
02 and Earlier
6
1
0
1
Card
location
numbers
IMT
addresses
6
1
0
2
6
1
0
3
6
1
0
4
6
1
0
5
6
1
0
6
E0 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5
6
1
6 6 0 6 6
1 1 9 1 1
0 0 6 1 1
7 8 1 1 2
1
E6 E7 0 E8 E9
Wire wrap
identification
DIP switch
identification
Extension Shelf 61
SHELF ID
6100
6
1
1
3
6
1
1
4
6
1
1
5
6
1
1
6
6
1
1
7
6
1
1
8
EA EB EC ED EE EF
ON
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
LSB
SHELF
ID
BIT
MSB
00
01
02
03
GRD
sh 61
Figure 3-12. Extension Shelf Backplane ID (P/N 850-0356-03)
B POWER
PRIMARY
B POWER
SECONDARY
B FAN POWER
A FAN POWER
J1
J45
J2
J3
A POWER
A POWER
SECONDARY PRIMARY
J4
J46
A
CLK
IN
R1
J5
J6
A
CLK
OUT
R2
R3
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P14
P15
P16
P17
Port
8A
Port
7A
Port
6A
Port
5A
Port
4A
Port
3A
Port
2A
Port
1A
J20
J21
J22
J23
J24
J36
J37
J38
J39
J40
Port
9B
P13
J35
Port
10B
IPMX A
10
P12
J19
Port
11B
J8
P11
J34
J29
Port
12B
J7
P10
J18
J13
J28
Port
13B
A
IMT
IN
J33
J12
J27
Port
14B
Port
11A
A
IMT
OUT
J17
J11
J26
Port
15B
Port
9A
J32
J10
J25
Port
16B
Port
10A
J16
J9
Port
12A
J31
Port
13A
P9
J15
Port
14A
P8
J30
Port
15A
P7
J14
Port
16A
P6
Port
5B
Port
4B
Port
3B
Port
2B
Port
1B
Port
8B
Port
7B
Port
6B
P19
P20
P21
P22
P23
P24
P25
P26
P27
P28
P29
P30
8
7
6
5
J42
P18
J41
B
CLK
IN
B
CLK
OUT
P31
P32
P33
P34
4
3
2
1
R4
J43
R5
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
B
IMT
OUT
J44
IPMXB
10
B
IMT
IN
Warning:
Conducts -48VDC for the printed circuit board (HOT). Metal points on printed
circuit boards conducts -48VDC and can cause shorts, shocks, and damage if not handled properly.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
850-0356-03
3-19
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-13. Extension Shelf Backplane ID (P/N 850-0356-04/06)
B POWER B POWER
PRIMARY SECONDARY
J1
B FAN POWER
J2
J45
A POWER
A POWER
SECONDARY PRIMARY
A FAN POWER
J3
J4
J46
A
CLK
IN
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P11
P12
P13
P14
8A
7A
6A
5A
4A
P10
P15
P16
J6
P1
J5
R1
A
CLK
OUT
P17
Port
18A
Port
17A
Port
16A
Port
15A
Port
14A
Port
13A
Port
12A
A
IMT
IN
J7
J8
Port
11A
SW1
A
IMT
OUT
SW2
R3
SW3
SW4
R2
3A
2A
1A
J17
J18
J19
J20
J21
J22
J23
J24
J16
J15
J14
J13
J12
J11
J10
J9
8B
7B
6B
5B
4B
3B
2B
1B
9
P20
P21
P22
P23
P24
P25
P26
P27
P28
P29
P30
P31
P32
8
7
6
5
4
3
P33
J42
P19
J40
P18
J41
J32
Port
11B
J39
J31
Port
12B
J38
J30
Port
13B
J37
J29
Port
14B
J36
J28
Port
15B
J35
J27
Port
16B
J34
J26
Port
17B
J33
J25
Port
18B
P34
R4
J43
R5
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
J44
11 B
B
IMT
IMT
OUT
IN
IPMXA
10
2
1
850-0356-04
NOTE:
Conducts -48VDC for the printed circuit board (HOT)
Miscellaneous Frame
The Miscellaneous Frame (MF) is an optional frame that can be used to mount
holdover clocks, test equipment, jack panels, spare cards, and other
customer-specified accessories or equipment. The optional spare card storage
shelf is equipped with card guides and doors for safe storage of all system
cards.
The Miscellaneous Frame (MF) is equipped with a Fuse and Alarm Panel
(FAP) that can provide fused –48VDC to equipment mounted in the frame.
An example of a miscellaneous frame is shown in Figure 3-14.
3-20
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-14. Miscellaneous Frame
MF-01
miscellaneous frame
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-21
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
OAP Frame
The Operation Support System Application Processor Frame (OAPF) is an
optional frame for mounting the processors hosting optional Embedded
Operations Support System Applications Processors (EOAPs). This frame is
typically located next to the system’s control frame, but may be customer
engineered in other locations under special circumstances.
The OAPF is equipped with a Fuse and Alarm Panel (FAP), shown in
Figure 3-15, that provides fused –48VDC to equipment mounted in the frame.
Figure 3-15. OAPF Containing Embedded OAP Hosts
OAPF
Fuse and
Alarm Panel
A
B
EOAP front panel
CDROM
EOAP hard drive
Cooling duct
Fan switch
Fan unit
Grill
EOAPf
3-22
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Control Frame
The Control Frame (CF) is the principle frame for the system. The top shelf is
the control shelf, containing all the components of the Maintenance and
Administration Subsystem (MAS), and up to ten additional Link Interface
Modules (LIMs), Multi-Port LIMs (MPLs), E1/T1 MIMs, Integrated LIM AINF
(ILAs), Translation Service Modules (TSMs), Database Communications
Modules (DCMs) or Database Service Modules (DSM) (Both DCMs and DSMs
require two card slots), or Application Communications Modules (ACMs).
The control frame can also contain up to two extension shelves. Each
extension shelf can accommodate up to 16:
•
LIMs or Integrated LIM Applique Interface (ILA) or Enhanced Integrated
LIM Applique Interface (EILA) cards
•
Application Communications Modules (ACM)
•
Single-slot Enhanced Database Communications Modules (EDCM or
EDCM-A)
•
E5-E1T1
•
E5-ENET
Or each extension shelf can accommodate up to eight:
•
Database Communications Modules (DCMs) or Database Service Modules
(DSM) (Both DCMs and DSMs require two card slots)
•
Double-slot Enhanced Database Communications Modules (EDCM)
(requires two card slots)
With the exception of DCMs and double-slot EDCMs, all cards can be inserted
in any slot except for those locations dedicated to the HMUX, HIPR, MASP,
and MDAL cards. In EAGLE5 ISS systems and IP7 4.0 and earlier systems,
DCMs and double-slot EDCMs must be placed into odd-numbered slots, and
due to their width the adjoining even-numbered slot will be taken as well.
Control Shelf
The control shelf is divided into two parts. One part is used by the
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem (MAS) and contains the
following hardware:
•
Two Terminal Disk Modules (TDMs)
•
Two GPSM-II cards
•
One Maintenance Disk and Alarm card (MDAL)
Each TDM/GPSM-II pair makes up a Maintenance and Administration
Subsystem Processor (MASP).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-23
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Two HIPR or HMUX (EAGLE 5 ISS) cards provide Inter-processor Message
Transport (IMT) bus continuity for all cards connected to the IMT bus.
NOTE: HMUX and HIPR cards are installed at the factory or by
Tekelec Technical Support and are not installed by customers.
The remainder of the control shelf can be occupied by up to ten of the
following cards, in any combination and in any location not dedicated to an
MASP pair or HIPR card:
•
Integrated LIM AINF (ILA) or Enhanced Integrated LIM AINF (EILA)
•
Link Interface Module (LIM)
•
Multi-Port Link Interface Module (MPL)
•
E1/T1 Multi-Channel Interface Module (MIM)
•
Application Communications Module (ACM)
•
Translation Service Module (TSM)
•
Single-slot Enhanced Database Communications Module (EDCM and
EDCM-A)
Database Communications Module (DCM) and Database Service Module
(DSM) are only configured in available odd numbered slots, and requires two
card slots.
Double-Slot Enhanced DCMs can be configured in any slot where they can
physically fit. Double-Slot EDCMs require two card slots.
CAUTION: After the frame has been shipped or moved, prior to applying
power, remove all cards. Reset all cards carefully to avoid possible faulty
connections. All cards are hot swappable
The control shelf, shown in Figure 3-16 "Control Shelf Front, with DCM Card"
on page 3-25, consists of top and bottom assemblies with die-formed channel
slots to accept the top and bottom edges of the cards. The assemblies are
anchored to the sheet steel side panels which are equipped with integral
flanges for attaching the shelf to a 23-inch rack. The shelf backplane consists
of an epoxy-glass printed circuit board and associated connectors. The section
“Control Shelf Backplanes” on page 3-25 describes the control shelf backplane.
The control frame can also contain up to two extension shelves. Each
extension shelf can accommodate up to 16 Link Interface Modules (LIMs or
ILAs), Translation Service Modules (TSMs), or Application Communications
Modules (ACMs), in any combination; except for those locations dedicated to
the HMUX, HIPR (EAGLE 5 ISS), and MAS cards. All cards can be inserted in
any card location.
Database Communications Modules (DCM) are only configured in available
odd numbered slots, and require two card slots. Double-slot EDCMs can be
configured in any available slot where space allows.
3-24
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-16. Control Shelf Front, with DCM Card
02
03
TEKELEC
05
TEKELEC
06
TEKELEC
07
TEKELEC
IMT A
09 11
08
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
0123456789
TEKELEC
04
APPL
PROC
IMT A
MASP-B
MASP A
PROC TDM PROC TDM
13
14
15
16
12
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
17
TEKELEC
MDAL
18
TEKELEC
0123456789
01
5V
ALARM
IMT B
PORT A
IPMX
870-1171-XX
0123456789
0123456789
REV X
PORT B
01
02
0123456789
0123456789
5V
ALARM
CLII
SERILAZATION
01234567890
DCM
ASSEMBLY
012-3456-78
REV-X
TEKELEC
03
04
05
06
07
08
10 11
IMT B
12
13
14
15
16
17
PROC TDM PROC TDM
MASP-A
MASP-B
18
MDAL
Cards 1101 through 1108 and 1111, 1112 are user definable
Control Shelf Backplanes
This section describes the control shelf backplanes (P/N 850-0330-03/04/06),
all can be used in EAGLE 5 ISS systems.
NOTE 1: Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) can be used
with the HMUX and HIPR in the EAGLE 5 ISS system with minor
modifications and the addition of adapter cable (P/N 830-1185-01). The
adapter cable is not necessary for customers not wanting high speed
links.
NOTE 2: The clocking and fan control signals used to support
extension frames 6 and 7 are eliminated in the 850-0330-06 version and
later of the Control Shelf Backplane because those frames are no longer
supported in the EAGLE 5 ISS system.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-25
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The control shelf backplane provides connectors for the system circuit cards.
These connectors are four column High Density Interconnect (HDI) male
headers with shrouds of varying pin quantities, depending on card position.
•
EILA, ILA, LIM, MPL, E1/T1 MIM, ACM, TSM, E5-ENET, E5-E1T1, and
single-slot EDCM and EDCM-A cards can be used in slots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
8, 11, and 12.
•
HMUX and HIPR cards are connected in slots 9 and 10.
NOTE: HMUX, HIPR, and GPSM-II cards are installed at the factory
or by Tekelec Technical Support and are not installed by customers.
•
TDMs and TDM-GTIs are connected in slots 14 and 16.
•
GPSM-II cards are connected in slots 13 and 15.
•
The MDAL card is connected in slot 17 and 18.
•
The HCMIM, DCM and DSM cards, used in EAGLE 5 ISS systems, are
mounted only in available odd numbered slots 1, 3, 5, 7, and 11. The DCM
cards and DSM cards are initially provided only in the control frame of the
EAGLE 5 ISS but can be configured into extension shelves through
contractual and maintenance agreements with Tekelec.
NOTE: Double-slot EDCMs also require two slots but are not
restricted to odd slots.
The control shelf backplane provides –48VDC power and ground to all card
positions. The power is distributed into two parts, A and B. Power is brought
to the shelf from the Fuse and Alarm Panel (FAP) using two cables. The
connectors on the control shelf backplane are DB-26 high density connectors.
The power is distributed over two separate pins per power connection to
handle the current load. The current capacity of the connector pins is 1.5A per
pin for a total of 3A per pair. In the “Installation manual” tables list the shelf
location, card type, and fuse location in the fuse and alarm panel for the
control shelf backplane.
NOTE: Cards that are provisioned in redundant pairs must be on
separate power buses. This provides backup processing capabilities
with the loss of either the A or B power buses. All MASP, HMUX, and
HIPR cards are provisioned in pairs and are redundantly powered from
separate power buses.
The control shelf power connectors are designated as:
3-26
•
J1 (B Power) and J4 (A Power) on control shelf backplane
(P/N 850-0330-04)
•
J1 (B Power Primary) and J2 (B Power secondary)
J11 (A Power primary) and J10 (A Power Secondary) on control shelf
backplane (P/N 850-0330-06).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The following Figure 3-18 "Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-06)" on
page 3-29 show the layouts for the control shelf connectors.
CAUTION: Disconnect both Input and supply sources when repairs
require removal of power. This will take the system down.
NOTE 3: Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) can be used
with the HMUX and HIPR in the EAGLE 5 ISS system with minor
modifications and the addition of adapter cable (P/N 830-1185-01).
Figure 3-18 depict the various control shelf backplanes. Figure 3-17 on page
3-28 is the rear connector view of control shelf backplane
(P/N 850-0330-03/04). Figure 3-18 on page 3-29 illustrates the control shelf
backplane (P/N 850-0330-06).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-27
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
J48
PORT 6B
J33
J47
PORT 7A
PORT 7B
J32
J46
J31
J45
Primary Bits
J42
GP
02
P3
A CLK 2 J14
ROW ALM
Secondary Bits
J41
GP01 J75
R40
B CLK5 J62
P18
P2
B CLK 4 J54
LMC J40
RALM1
RALM2
RALM3
RALM4
RALM5
J5
J11
J25
J39
J53
J61
Conducts -48VDC for the printed circuit board
J74
RMC J26
P17
P1
B POWER
A CLK 4 J56
RALM0
NOTE:
3-28
A CLK 5 J63
B CLK 3 J55
B CLK 1 J13
B CLK 2 J12
J1
A CLK 3 J57
ECAMB
16
DCBA
G
A CLK 1 J15
J76
ECAMA
14
EXT ALM
J64
J43
J27
B CLK 0 J6
P32
J58
PORT10B
J29
P23
PORT 10A
P22
J44
P21
PORT 9B
J30
P4
DCBA
J73
MMI 8 J65
P19
A
IMT
OUT
J16
P7
P6
PORT9A
J 2 8
A CLK 0 J7
P31
MMI0 J17
P5
B FAN
POWER
J2
MMI 9 J66
P24
R14
PORT 8B
P8
A
IMT
IN
GND
J8
PORT 8A
B
IMT
OUT
MMI1 J18
MMI10 J67
GPSI
P12 1
P10
J3
P9
A FAN
POWER
TOP
MMI2 J19
MMI11 J68
OAPALM
P13
PORT 6A
P11
MMI3 J20
BOTTOM
J34
MMI12 J69
850-03230-03
PORT 5B
R39
PORT 5A
R38
J49
R37
J35
MMI13 J70
R36
PORT 4B
MMI14 J71
R35
PORT 4A
B CLK IN J59
R34
J50
MMI15 J72
IPMXB
10
J36
B CLKOUT J60
B
IMT
IN
PORT 3B
P14
PORT 3A
MMI5 J22
MMI4 J21
J51
P30
MMI6 J23
J9
PORT 2B
J37
P29
A CLK IN
PORT 2A
P20
J10
P28
MMI7 J24
P27
J52
A CLK OUT
P26
PORT 1B
J38
P25
PORT 1A
IPMXA
9
P16
J4
P15
A POWER
Figure 3-17. Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04)
850-0330-03 j1 j4
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
J39
PORT 7A
PORT 7B
J38
PORT 8A
J77
PORT 8B
J76
P3
J4
P1
J16
BCLK2
J3
BCLK0
J2
SECONDARY
J1
PRIMARY
J15
J13
RALM0
RALM1
J12
J14
NOTE:
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
J48
Secondary
Bits
J47
RMC
LMC
850-0330-06 pwr
R25
R24
R23
R22
P22
P21
J72
ACLK5
GP0I
J64
ACLK4
GPS1
J71
J63
J70
BCLK3
BCLK5
R13
J33
J62
BCLK4
J61
RALM4
J32
RALM2
B
IMT
OUT
P23
J74
A
IMT
OUT
J34
J73
J65
ACLK3
ROW ALM
J17
ENET 2
GNP PORT 2
J66
CUST ALM 2
J46
J60
RALM3
RALM6
J68
RALM5
OAPALM
J18
BCLK1
J5
CUST ALM 1
J49
Primary
Bits
J69
J19
ENET 1
J35
J50
PORT 12B
P19
J6
J36
PORT 12A
J51
PORT 11B
P18
P4
P5
ACLK0
J37
PORT 11A
P17
P6
J20
ACLK1
GNP PORT 1
GP02
P2
J52
P20
P7
J22
P8
J8
B FAN
POWER
J53
J78
BOTTOM
PORT 6B
ASSY 850-0330-06
PORT 6A
J79
CONTROL SHELF BACKPLANE
J54
R21
J40
R20
PORT 5B
P28
J55
PORT 5A
J80
P27
J41
P24
J24
PORT 4B
B
IMT
IN
J25
J81
J75
J26
J56
P26
J27
J42
PORT 4A
MMI 9 MMI 10 MMI 11 MMI 12 MMI 13 MMI 14 MMI 15
PORT 3B
R19
J43
PORT 3A
P29
J29
J82
MMI 8
P31
J57
PORT 2A
J83
R18
J44
J30
J28
P32
PORT 1B
J58
PORT 2B
J21
ACLK2
J7
B POWER B POWER
J59
PORT 1A
P30
J45
J31
P25
MMI 6 MMI 7
MMI 5
MMI 4
R7
R6
R5
R4
R3
R2
A
IMT
IN
P9
J23
MMI 1 MMI 2 MMI 3
R8
P14
P13
P12
P11
P10
J9
A FAN
POWER
TOP
MMI 0
R9
R10
R11
P16
P15
J11
J10
A POWER A POWER
SECONDARY PRIMARY
Figure 3-18. Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-06)
J67
RALM7
Conducts -48VDC for the printed circuit board (HOT)
3-29
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Alarm Connectors
The control shelf backplanes (P/N 850-0330-03/04 and P/N 850-0330-06)
contain eight types of alarm connectors. The connectors used are the Remote
Maintenance Center (RMC), the Local Maintenance Center (LMC), the Rack
Alarm (RALMx), the Row Alarm (ROW ALM), the OAP Alarm (OAPALM),
and the External Alarm (EXT ALM). The RMC, LMC, RALMx, OAPALM, and
ROW ALM functions use DB-15 connectors, and the EXT ALM connector uses
a DB-26 connector. The alarm connectors on the control shelf are designated
as follows:
•
Remote Maintenance Center Alarm Connector (RMC)—J26 on backplane
(P/N 850-0330-03/04) or J33 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06) provides
system alarm condition indicators to the remote maintenance center.
•
Local Maintenance Center Alarm Connector (LMC)—J40 on backplane
(P/N 850-0330-03/04) or J47 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06) provides
the system’s alarm condition indicators to the local maintenance center.
•
Rack Alarm Connectors (RALMx)— J5, J11, J25, J39, J53, and J61 on
backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) or J13, J15, J32, J46,J60, J61, J67,and J68 on
backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06). The output of the rack alarm connectors
control the alarm condition indicators on each control or extension frame
fuse and alarm panel.
•
OAP Alarm Connector (OAPALM)— J74 (P/N 850-0330-03/04) or J69 on
backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06). The OAP alarm connector controls the
alarm condition indicators on an OAP frame.
•
Row Alarm Connector (ROW ALM)— J27 on backplane
(P/N 850-0330-03/04) or J34 on backplane (P/N 850-0330-06). The row
alarm connector controls the alarm condition indicators on an end panel at
the end of a set of the frames.
•
External Alarm Connector (EXT ALM)— J28 on backplane
(P/N 850-0330-03/04). This connector is also used for alarm condition
inputs from an optional holdover clock.
•
CUST Alarm 1— J35 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06). This connector is
used for alarm condition inputs from an optional holdover clock or
customer supplied clock source. This connector is not supported at this
time.
•
CUST Alarm 2— J66 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06). This connector
provides input to the system for alarms designated by the customer. This
connector is not supported at this time.
System Clock Connectors
The control shelf backplane provides system clock output to the rest of the
system from the TDMs. Redundancy is accomplished by allowing TDM A
and TDM B to distribute clocks independently of each other. These signals are
driven to other parts of the system adhering to the RS-485 standard.
3-30
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The system clock connectors for A Clock 0 through A Clock 5 are J7, J14, J56,
J57, and J63 respectively on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) and J7, J20, J21,
J65, J64, and J72 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06).
Connectors for B Clock 0 through B Clock 5 are J6, J12, J13, J54, J55, and J62 on
backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) and J3, J18, J16, J63, J62, and J70 on
backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06).
NOTE 1: On control shelf backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06) connectors J6
(ACLK6) and J4 (BCLK6) have been modified to support the High-speed
Multiplexer (HMUX) card (EAGLE 5 ISS) which is an integral part of the
Large System feature. Control shelf backplane (P/N 850-0330-05) can not
be used with the HMUX card.
NOTE 2: Control Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) can be used
with the large system feature in the EAGLE 5 ISS system with minor
modifications and the addition of adapter cable (P/N 830-1185-01).
BITS Connectors
The system connects to the Building Integrated Timing System (BITS) clocks
using two DB-15 style connectors. The two clocks are labeled Primary and
Secondary and are supplied from the central office clock. Both clocks go to
both TDMs, where one is selected to provide the system clocks used to
provide system timing. The system is at the end of the BITS clock chain and
therefore provides termination resistors on the backplane. The BITS
connectors are designated as J41 and J42 on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04)
and J48 and J49 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06).
Serial Port Connectors
The control shelf backplane provides an interface for 16 separate serial port
connections from the TDMs. These connections provide RS-232 interfaces for
terminals, printers, and modems. The system is set up as Data Terminal
Equipment (DTE). The serial port connectors are designated as J17 through J24
and J65 through J72 on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) and J24 through J31
and J76 through J83 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06).
Interface Connectors
For slots 1 through 8, 11, and 12 on the control shelf backplane, there are two
associated DB-26 interface connectors for each slot. These provide interfacing
to the outside world in the form of Ethernet networks, SS7 links, or X.25
networks. The interface connectors are designated as J29 through J38, and J43
through J52 on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) and J36 through J45, and J50
through J59 on backplanes (P/N 850-0330-06).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-31
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
IMT Connectors
Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) connectors on the control shelf
backplane provide connections between the system shelves as part of the two
high speed IMT buses. The connections use twin-axial type connectors at J8,
J16, J58, and J64 on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) and J23, J22, J75, and J74
on backplane (P/N 850-0330-06).
Shelf Clock Connectors
Connectors for both A and B clocks are provided using 25 pin D type
connectors at J9, J10, J59, and J60 on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04). System
clock connectors are used on backplane (P/N 850-0330-06).
General Purpose Relay Connectors
Connectors J75 (GP01) and J73 (GP02) on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04)
and connectors J71 (GP01) and J5 (GP02) on backplane (P/N 850-0330-006),
provide software controlled, general purpose outputs for the system.
Currently, Generic Program (GP01) provides reset signals for any optional
OAPs that may be present in the system.
General Purpose Serial Interface Connector
Connector J76 on backplane (P/N 850-0330-03/04) and J73 on backplane
(P/N 850-0330-06), provides General Purpose Serial Interfaces (GPSI) for the
system. The GPSI also provides communications between an optional
holdover clock system and the rest of the system.
Extension Shelf
The extension shelf provides the mounting space for up to 16 Link Interface
Modules (LIMs), Multi-Port LIMs (MPLs), E1/T1 MIMs, Translation Service
Modules (TSMs), Database Communications Modules (DCMs) and Database
Service Modules (DSMs) (mounted in odd numbered slots, requiring two
slots), or Application Communications Modules (ACMs). The shelf also
contains two HMUX (EAGLE 5 ISS) cards, in card locations 9 and 10 (refer to
Figure 3-19 on page 3-33 and Figure 3-20, “Shelves with DCM and LIM Cards in
Control Frame,” on page 3-34).
NOTE: BHMUX and HIPR cards are installed at the factory or by
Tekelec Technical Support and are not installed by customers.
3-32
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-19. Extension Shelf with LIMs
HMUX
TEKELEC
03
TEKELEC
04
TEKELEC
05
TEKELEC
06
TEKELEC
07
TEKELEC
08
TEKELEC
09
TEKELEC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
5V
ALARM
13
12
TEKELEC
14
TEKELEC
15
TEKELEC
16
TEKELEC
17
TEKELEC
18
TEKELEC
TEKELEC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
APPL
PROC
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTA
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
IMTB
APPL
PROC
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT A
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
PORT B
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
0123456789
REV X
PORT A
PORT B
11
0123456789
02
0123456789
01
0123456789
0123456789
TEKELEC
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
10
11
HMUX
12
13
14
15
16
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV X
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
REV XX
5V
ALARM
17
18
contshelf x 22
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-33
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-20. Shelves with DCM and LIM Cards in Control Frame
CF00
Fuse and
Alarm Panel
P/N 870-1606-xx
TEKELEC
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Control shelf
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Optional Fan
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
DCM front panels
(distribution of DCM cards
is odd slots only,
in Eagle systems)
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Optional Fan
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Optional Fan
DCM fan frame
3-34
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The extension shelf consists of die-formed top and bottom assemblies with
die-formed channel slots to accept the top and bottom edges of the cards. The
assemblies are anchored to the side panels which are equipped with integral
flanges for attaching the shelf to a 23-inch rack in a 26-inch frame. The shelf
backplane consists of an epoxy-glass printed circuit board and associated
connectors.
The extension shelf backplane is shown in Figure 3-21 "Extension Shelf
Backplane (P/N 850-0356-01/02)" on page 3-37. Each card is equipped with a
power converter that takes the –48VDC input from the backplane and
converts it to +5VDC and/or +3VDC.
Extension Shelf Backplanes
This section discusses the technical aspects of the extension shelf backplanes
(P/N 850-0356-03/04/06) and the extension shelf backplanes
(P/N 850-0356-01/02) used in the system.
For extension shelf backplanes (P/N 850-0356-01/02) refer to Figure 3-21
"Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-01/02)" on page 3-37
For extension shelf backplanes (P/N 850-0356-03/04/06) refer to Figure 3-22
"Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-03)" on page 3-38 and Figure 3-23
"Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-04/06)" on page 3-39.
The extension shelf backplane provides connectors for 18 circuit cards. These
connectors are four column High Density Interconnect (HDI) male headers
with shrouds of varying pin quantities depending on card position. The
reverse or component side of the backplane contains DB style connectors for
interfacing to the rest of the system. The extension shelf backplane provides
shielding on all of the interface connectors to prevent Radio Frequency
Interference (RFI).
Power Distribution
CAUTION: This is a redundant system to allow service during normal
maintenance. When repairs require a total power disconnect both input
supply sources must be disconnected. This will cause service
interruption and take down the system.
The extension shelf backplane provides –48VDC power and return to all card
positions. The power is divided into parts A and B and brought to the shelf
from the Fuse and Alarm Panel (FAP) using two cables (P/N 830-0315-xx).
The power connectors on the extension shelf backplane are DB-26 high
density connectors with two pins per power connection to handle the current
load. The current capacity of the connector pins is 1.5A per pin for a total of
3A per pair. The extension shelf primary power connectors are designated as
J4 and J1, and the secondary power connection are on backplane
(P/N 850-0356-03/04/06) are J45 and J46 secondary.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-35
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
In the “Installation manual” tables list the shelf location, card type, and fuse
location in the fuse and alarm panel for the extension shelf backplane.
NOTE: Cards that are provisioned in redundant pairs must be on
separate power buses. This provides backup processing capabilities
with the loss of either A or B buses.
Interface Connectors
Behind each slot on the extension shelf backplane are two DB-26 connectors.
These provide connection to the outside world in the form of TCP/IP
networks, SS7 links, or X.25 networks. The interface connectors are
designated as J9 through J40.
System Clock Connectors
Each extension shelf receives and passes along Clock signals A (J5 and J6) and
B (J41and J42).
IMT Connectors
The extension shelf backplane provides connections for the two high speed
Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) buses. The connections use
twin-axial type connectors at J7, J8, J43, and J44.
3-36
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-21. Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-01/02)
B POWER
PRIMARY
J4
J3
J2
J1
A POWER
PRIMARY
A FAN POWER
B FAN POWER
R1
R2
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P10
P11
P12
P13
P14
A
CLK
OUT
J6
A
CLK IN
J5
P9
R3
P15
PORT
16 A
J9
PORT
15 A
J10
PORT
14 A
J11
PORT
13 A
J12
PORT
12 A
J13
PORT
11 A
J14
PORT PORT J7
10 A
9A
J15
J16
J8 PORT
8A
J17
PORT
7A
J18
PORT
8B
J33
PORT
7B
J34
PORT
6A
J19
PORT
5A
J20
PORT
4A
J21
PORT
3A
J22
P16
P17
PORT
2A
J23
PORT
1A
J24
IPMXA
9
PORT
16 B
J25
PORT
15 B
J26
PORT
14 B
J27
PORT
13 B
J28
PORT
12 B
J29
PORT
11 B
J30
PORT
10 B
J31
PORT
9B
J32
PORT
6B
J35
PORT
5B
J36
PORT
4B
J37
P26
R4
P18
P19
P20
P21
P22
P23
P24
PORT
3B
J38
P25
P27
P28
P29
P30
J43
PORT
1B
J40
B
CLK
OUT
J42
B
CLK IN
J41
P31
P32
R5
PORT
2B
J39
P33
P34
J44
B
B
IMT
IMT
IN
OUT
IPMXB
10
ASSY 850-0356- ______
REV ______
EXTENSION SHELF BACKPLANE
0356-01a
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-37
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-22. Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-03)
B POWER
PRIMARY
B POWER
SECONDARY
B FAN POWER
A FAN POWER
J1
J45
J2
J3
A POWER
A POWER
SECONDARY PRIMARY
J4
J46
A
CLK
IN
R1
J5
J6
A
CLK
OUT
R2
R3
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P16
P17
Port
8A
Port
7A
Port
6A
Port
5A
Port
4A
Port
3A
Port
2A
Port
1A
J8
J7
J21
J22
J23
J24
J36
J37
J38
J39
J40
Port
9B
J20
IPMX A
10
J35
Port
10B
P15
J19
Port
11B
P14
J34
J29
Port
12B
P13
J18
J13
J28
Port
13B
P12
J33
J12
J27
Port
14B
Port
11A
P11
J17
J11
J26
Port
15B
Port
9A
J32
J10
J25
Port
16B
Port
10A
J16
J9
Port
12A
J31
Port
13A
J15
Port
14A
J30
Port
15A
J14
Port
16A
P10
A
IMT
IN
A
IMT
OUT
Port
5B
Port
4B
Port
3B
Port
2B
Port
1B
Port
8B
Port
7B
Port
6B
P19
P20
P21
P22
P23
P24
P25
P26
P27
P28
P29
P30
8
7
6
5
J42
P18
J41
B
CLK
IN
B
CLK
OUT
P31
P32
P33
P34
4
3
2
1
R4
J43
R5
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
B
IMT
OUT
J44
IPMXB
10
B
IMT
IN
Warning:
Conducts -48VDC for the printed circuit board (HOT). Metal points on printed
circuit boards conducts -48VDC and can cause shorts, shocks, and damage if not handled properly.
3-38
850-0356-03
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-23. Extension Shelf Backplane (P/N 850-0356-04/06)
B POWER B POWER
PRIMARY SECONDARY
J1
B FAN POWER
J2
J45
A POWER
A POWER
SECONDARY PRIMARY
A FAN POWER
J3
J4
J46
A
CLK
IN
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P11
P12
P13
P14
8A
7A
6A
5A
4A
P10
P15
P16
J6
P1
J5
R1
A
CLK
OUT
P17
Port
18A
Port
17A
Port
16A
Port
15A
Port
14A
Port
13A
Port
12A
A
IMT
IN
J7
J8
Port
11A
SW1
A
IMT
OUT
SW2
R3
SW3
SW4
R2
3A
2A
1A
J17
J18
J19
J20
J21
J22
J23
J24
J16
J15
J14
J13
J12
J11
J10
J9
8B
7B
6B
5B
4B
3B
2B
1B
9
P20
P21
P22
P23
P24
P25
P26
P27
P28
P29
P30
P31
P32
8
7
6
5
4
3
P33
J40
P19
J42
P18
J41
J32
Port
11B
J39
J31
Port
12B
J38
J30
Port
13B
J37
J29
Port
14B
J36
J28
Port
15B
J35
J27
Port
16B
J34
J26
Port
17B
J33
J25
Port
18B
P34
R4
J43
R5
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
J44
11 B
B
IMT
IMT
OUT
IN
IPMXA
10
2
1
850-0356-04
NOTE:
Conducts -48VDC for the printed circuit board (HOT)
NOTE 1: The symbols indicate terminals that conduct -48VDC for the
printed circuit boards. (HOT)
NOTE 2: Refer to Figures 3-7 through 3-13 for the DIP switch setting
on the individual backplanes. The four DIP switches will all be set the
same on the individual backplane. The backplanes on different shelves
will have different settings.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-39
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Technical Specifications
A summary of the technical specifications for the shelf backplanes
(P/N 850-0356-01/02 and P/N 850-0356-03/04/06) is provided in Table 3-2.
Table 3-2.
Extension Shelf Equipment Specifications
Extension Shelf Dimensions
Height
15.75 in. (40 cm)
Width
23.00 in. (58.4 cm)
Depth
15.75 in. (40 cm)
Extension Shelf Backplane Dimensions
3-40
Height
15.405 in. (39.1 cm)
Width
21.057 in. (53.5 cm)
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Modules
The EAGLE 5 ISS frames are configured with card modules (also known as
“cards”) that provide specific functions and services. Cards are connected to
the shelf backplane through connectors located on the rear of the card.
Cam-out/lock-in levers, mounted on the front edge of the card, assist in
insertion and removal of the card. Part numbers, LEDs, and tables are also
located on the front of the cards.
NOTE: To remove a card use both hands to toggle the levers out from
the face of the card. To insert a card, align the card in the slot, push
slowly in until the connectors engage and press both levers in until they
lock the card in place. To ensure proper seating, the toggle levers must
be held in the release position until the locking tabs can engage the
upper and lower flange on the shelf. Once the locking tabs on the levers
engage the shelf plane, the levers are pressed in toward the card
faceplate, and must be flush with the faceplate when the card is
completely seated.
Figure 3-24. Cam-Out/Lock-In Levers on Cards
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-41
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The modules used in the system are:
•
High-Speed IMT Packet Router (HIPR)
NOTE 1: The HIPR card is installed by the factory or by Tekelec
Technical Support, not by the customer.
NOTE 2: Shelves must contain either HMUX or HIPR cards. A mixture
of HMUX and HIPR cards within one IMT ring is possible, provided
HIPR is installed on both IMT A and IMT B on a given shelf. HIPR
requires all other shelves be equipped with either all HMUX cards or all
HIPR cards (shelves cannot contain a mix of HMUX and HIPR).
•
High-Speed Multiplexer Card (HMUX)
NOTE: The HMUX card is installed by the factory or by Tekelec
Technical Support, not by the customer.
•
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card (MDAL)
•
Terminal Disk Module (TDM)
•
General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II)
NOTE 1: GPSM-II cards are required for the Integrated Sentinel and
Time Slot Counter (TSC) synchronization features.
NOTE 2: The GPSM-II card is installed by the factory or by Tekelec
Technical Support, not by the customer.
3-42
•
Link Interface Modules (LIM)
•
Database Communications Module (DCM) and Database Service Module
(DSM) can only be located in odd numbered slots and requires two slots.
•
Application Communications Module (ACM)
•
Translation Service Module (TSM)
•
Integrated LIM Applique Interface (ILA) or Enhanced Integrated LIM
Applique Interface (EILA)
•
Multi-Port Link Interface Module (MPL) (EAGLE 5 ISS)
•
E1/T1 Multi-Channel Interface Module (MIM) (EAGLE 5 ISS)
•
High-capacity Multi-Channel Interface Module (HCMIM)
•
E5-E1T1
•
E5-ENET
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The following table summarizes the environmental specifications common to
all EAGLE 5 ISS cards. Other technical specifications are listed with the
individual card types.
Table 3-3.
Card Specifications
Operating Environment
Operating temperature
+ 40° F to + 100° F
+ 4° C to + 37° C
Short-Term temperature
+ 23° F to + 120° F
–5° C to + 48° C (refer to Note)
Relative Humidity
Operating
Short-Term
Altitude
5% to 85%
0% to 80% (refer to Note)
–200 ft. to +13,000 ft. (–61 m to
+3962 m)
NOTE: “Short-Term” refers to a period of not more than 96
consecutive hours and a total of not more than 15 days in 1 year. For
ambient temperatures above 95° Fahrenheit, relative humidity must be
less than 80 percent. At the short-term emergency condition of 120°
Fahrenheit, the relative humidity must be below 20 percent.
High Speed IMT Router
The High Speed IMT Packet Router (HIPR, P/N 870-2574-02) interfaces and
operates with the high speed fiber channel ring and all EAGLE 5 ISS cards.
The HIPR card features a key architectural improvement over existing shelf
level switch cards such as HMUX by replacing the legacy low speed shelf ring
with a switched design. This move from an intra-shelf ring topology to an
inter-shelf switch topology gives a 16 to 1 transmission speed advantage in
that a single low speed ring circuit is being replaced with 16 individual
switched circuits. The inter-shelf ring connects the shelves together and HIPR
acts as a gateway between the intra-shelf IMT BUS, running at 125 Mbps, and
the inter-shelf fibre channel ring operating at 1.0625 Gbps.
HIPR feature overview:
•
Switched architecture.
•
Serial data transmission rate of 1.0625Gbps for shelf to shelf
communications, and 125Mbps on each of 16 switched slots.
•
Reprogrammable and upgradeable in the field via software release.
•
Fault Tolerance - Errors occurring on a switched slot do not bring down
the inter-shelf IMT ring nor affect any other switched slot on its shelf.
•
Provides easy upgrade path from HMUX ring architecture.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Switched Architecture
The inter-shelf ring connects the shelves together and HIPR acts as a gateway
between the intra-shelf IMT BUS, running at 125 Mbps, and the inter-shelf
fibre channel ring operating at 1.0625 Gbps. HIPR retains the high speed 1Gb
Fibre Channel ring as a way to ensure interoperability with HMUX equipped
shelves. After HIPR recognizes that data from the high speed ring is destined
for its shelf address, the data is immediately switched to the correct card
within the shelf rather than traversing a 125MB ring.
As shown in Figure 3-25, each HMUX-based intra-shelf ring in an EAGLE 5
ISS is replaced with one HIPR switch, which connects directly to each card in
the shelf. This change allows 16 times more bandwidth than in the
HMUX-based ring architecture. The fibre-channel inter-shelf ring is the same
as for HMUX. In a fully populated EAGLE 5 ISS with HIPR, there are two
independent IMT buses.
Figure 3-25. HIPR Switch Topology, Single IMT Bus.
125 Mbps
TAXI Interface
per slot
to individual slots
...
Shelf 0
Ring
1Gbps
Fibre Channel
Ring
HIPR
Shelf F
HMUX
to individual slots
...
HIPR
Shelf 1
Shelf 2
Ring
HMUX
HMUX
Shelf 3
Ring
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The switched interface to each card is at 125MB, the same speed that the
intra-shelf IMT bus runs at. Using this same speed for a switched interface
precludes any changes to the existing line cards. Thus, HIPR provides both a
speed improvement by switching instead of using a ring, while also
minimizes card changes for customers. This switched architecture has an
inherent reliability advantage of point to point connections within the shelf. A
ring can be broken, potentially causing all cards on the ring to be affected.
However, a switched architecture automatically isolates a problem to a
specific data path which immediately determines which card is experiencing
problems. Trouble shooting and debugging are greatly enhanced. For
example, corrupted packets can be isolated quickly because there is only a
single path per card rather the multiple paths possible in a ring.
All routing decisions are controlled by the network processor on the HIPR
card. A core processor with 6 micro-engines performs the switching function.
This software based approach will allow future upgrades without changes to
the hardware.
Upgrade Considerations
Upgrading a system to use the HIPR card is easy and straight forward. The
HIPR card is compatible with the existing HMUX card slot and can be fielded
with any version of either the control or extension backplanes compatible with
the HMUX. The HIPR card is interoperable with an HMUX in the same shelf
when performing upgrades. One bus is taken out of service and upgraded to
HIPRs and then brought back online. This upgrade cycle is repeated on the
second bus to get both busses upgraded. HIPR interfaces and operates with all
the same cards that HMUX is used with.
HIPR is required in shelves equipped with high-performance LIMs, such as
the High-Capacity MIM (HCMIM), and for interfacing to Tekelec 1000
Application Servers through IMT Bridge and IMT PCI modules. HIPR
requires all other shelves be equipped with either all HMUX cards or all HIPR
cards (shelves cannot contain a mix of HMUX and HIPR).
LEDs
Table 3-4 summarizes the use of the front-panel LEDs. Figure 3-26 shows the
front faceplate of the HIPR.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-26. HIPR LEDs
TEKELEC
ALIGN
SHELF
HIPR
870-2574-02
REV A
PROC
On the front edge of the HIPR card, there are three Light Emitting Diodes
(LED) that provides status. Each HIPR LED has a red, green, or amber
illumination state. The ALIGN LED indicates code initialization and
programming status. The SHELF LED indicates HIPR running and shelf ID
address condition. The PROC LED indicates state of the HIPR processor.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Table 3-4.
HIPR front panel LEDs
LED
HIPR State
Align
(Top)
HIPR Shelf
(Middle)
HIPR Processor
(Bottom)
No power
Off
Off
Off
Power on (cold start)
Off
Off
RED
Reset (warm start)
Off
AMBER
RED
Programming FPGA (cold start)
Off
Off
AMBER
Programming FPGA (warm start)
Off
AMBER
AMBER
Programming FPGA Complete
AMBER
AMBER
GREEN
Shelf Address Capture Timer Started
AMBER
AMBER
GREEN
Shelf Address Capture Successful
GREEN
AMBER
GREEN
RED
AMBER
GREEN
GREEN
Note 2
GREEN
Shelf Address Capture Unsuccessful
Code Running
NOTE 1: The Top and Middle LEDs are not accessible to software
until the FPGA has been programmed. So for the same point in the
HIPR bootstrap sequence, the state of these two LEDs can be different
depending on whether a warm or cold start is in progress.
NOTE 2: State depends on the address received from OAM and
written to Assigned Shelf Address Register and compared to the value
previously read from the Assigned Shelf Address Register:
RED - Does not match
GREEN -Matches
Technical Specifications
Table 3-5.
HIPR Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
310mA
Power
15W typical, 22W max.
Physical Characteristics
Height
7.7 in. (18.3 cm)
Width
1.8 in. (2 cm)
Depth
12.8 in. (32.5 cm)
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
High-Speed Multiplexer Card
The High-Speed Multiplexer (HMUX) (P/N 870-1965-xx) card, used in
EAGLE 5 ISS systems only, supports requirements for more than 1500 links.
The HMUX card requires the 850-0330-06 control shelf backplane.
NOTE 1: The HMUX card can be used with Control Shelf Backplane
(P/N 850-0330-04) in the EAGLE 5 ISS system with minor modifications
and the addition of adapter cable (P/N 830-1185-01).
NOTE 2: HMUX cards are required to support the Integrated EAGLE 5
ISS/Sentinel monitoring feature.
NOTE 3: HMUX or HIPR cards are installed at the factory or by
Tekelec Technical Support, not by the customer.
With HMUX cards, the IPMX ring topology is broken into separate ring
sections, allowing fault tolerance and higher data throughput rates. Each shelf
is a separate secondary IMT ring.
The HMUX Card acts as a gateway between the shelf's IMT ring and the
inter-shelf ring. Using the HMUX card transforms the EAGLE 5 ISS from a
single 125 Mbps ring to a centralized intra-shelf ring running at 1.0625 Gbps,
connecting a maximum of sixteen secondary, 125 Mbps shelf rings.
Figure 3-27 displays the HMUX ring topology.
Figure 3-27. HMUX Ring Topology
Shelf F
Ring
125 Mbps
Ring
Shelf N
Ring
Shelf 0
Ring
1 Gbps Ring
Shelf 7
Ring
Shelf 1
Ring
Inter-Shelf Ring
Shelf 2
Ring
Shelf 6
Ring
Shelf 3
Ring
Shelf 5
Ring
Shelf 4
Ring
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Most messages from one slot to another on the same shelf remain on that
shelf’s ring. This reduces traffic loading on the high-speed inter-shelf ring.
The inter-shelf links form a separate ring used only for inter-shelf
communications. The topology changes affect both IMT rings: IMTA and
IMTB.
HMUX Addressing
In order to communicate with the GPSM-II card, each HMUX now has its own
address in the IMT network. The active OAM selectively sends a physical
address shelf ID to each pair (A-bus, B-bus) of HMUX cards on a per-shelf
basis. The A-bus and B-bus HMUX cards for a given shelf share the same
physical address.
Physical Layout
The HMUX (EAGLE 5 ISS) is designed to plug into the existing shelf
backplane, using the same slots the IPMX cards have occupied. Figure 3-28
shows a side view of the HMUX card. Table 3-6 summarizes the technical
specifications of the HMUX card.
On the front edge of the HMUX card, there are three Light Emitting Diodes
(LED) that provides status. Each HMUX LED has a red, green, or amber
illumination state. The HMUX Alignment LED illuminates green when
complete code initialization is achieved, amber when programming is
complete, and red when failed. The HMUX Shelf identification LED
illuminates green when running and ID address matches stored address,
amber when complete code initialization is achieved and programming is
complete, and red when ID addresses do not match. The Processor health LED
illuminates red when power on reset, amber while programming, and green
when programming completes, code initialization completes, and code is
running.
On the front edge of the HMUX card, there are three Light Emitting Diodes
(LED) that provide status. The HMUX LEDs have three illumination states:
red, green, or off. The LED illuminates green when the –48VDC is supplied to
the card and +5VDC available. If –48VDC is supplied to the card and +5VDC
is not available, the LED illuminates red. If –48VDC is not supplied to the
card, the LED is off.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-28. HMUX Side View HMUX
TEKELEC
ALIGN
SHELF
HMUX
REV XX
870-1965-01
PROC
03_hmux_layout
Table 3-6.
HMUX Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
3.2A-4.5A
Power
16W typical, 22W max.
Physical Characteristics
Height
7.7 in. (18.3 cm)
Width
1.8 in. (2 cm)
Depth
12.8 in. (32.5 cm)
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card
The Maintenance Disk and Alarm (MDAL) card (P/N 870-0773-xx) is a
multi-layered circuit card that provides the system with removable cartridge
data storage, alarm processing from the currently active MASP, and an
audible alarm. A drawing of the MDAL is shown in Figure 3-29
"Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card" on page 3-52.
NOTE: Fan trays are recommended for control shelves on systems
implementing large LNP database applications (large means above 1
Gbyte) to prevent overheating of the MDAL card during long backup or
restore procedures.
The LEDs on the front faceplate indicate critical, major, and minor alarms and
card activity.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Alarm Circuits
The MDAL processes alarms generated from the active MASP and passed to
the MDAL on the alarm data bus. The alarm signals are sent as follows.
Critical, major, and minor alarms:
•
The fuse and alarm panel of each control or extension rack
•
End panel with alarm lamps
•
Local Maintenance Center (LMC)
•
Remote Maintenance Center (RMC)
•
Maintenance Disk and Alarm (MDAL) card
Audible alarm is sent to:
•
Local Maintenance Center (LMC)
•
Remote Maintenance Center (RMC)
•
Maintenance Disk and Alarm (MDAL) card
Removable Media Cartridge
The removable media cartridge is a magneto-optical disk used in the MDAL,
(P/N 870-0773-04/-05) to install and back up customer data. For larger
capacity equipment compliance and to install and back up customer data, a
5.2 Gbyte cartridge magneto-optical disk may be used in MDAL card
(P/N 870-0773-06).
Power Converter Unit
MDAL power is provided by a DC to DC converter that converts the –48VDC
supplied to the system to the +5VDC needed to power the MDAL
components.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-29. Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card
TEKELEC
CRITICAL
MAJOR
MINOR
MASP-A
MDAL
870-0773-
REV X
MASP-B
Revision
number
Serial
number
CLEI
code
03_mdal_board-layout
Part
number
Technical Specifications
The following table summarizes the technical specifications of the
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Card (MDAL).
Table 3-7.
MDAL Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
0.32 A
Power
16 watts
Physical Characteristics
3-52
Height
14.4 in. (36.6 cm)
Width
1.8 in. (2 cm)
Depth
12.8 in. (32.5 cm)
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Terminal Disk Module
The Terminal Disk Module (TDM) (P/N 870-0774-xx) provides the following
functions for the EAGLE 5 ISS:
•
Building Integrated Timing System Interfaces
•
Fuse Alarm Interface
•
External/Customer Alarm Interface
•
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Interface
•
Small Computer System Interface
•
Terminal Processor
•
Extended Bus Interface
•
Global Timing Interface
•
Hard Drive
•
Power Converter Unit
NOTE: The Time Slot Counter (TSC) synchronization capability in the
TDM, which is required for the Integrated Sentinel feature, is
implemented in TDM board (P/N 870-0774-10 and later).
NOTE: The EAGLE 5 ISS internal composite clock sourced from the
high speed clock feature of the TDM-GTI (P/N 870-0774-18) is not
available to systems with DS0 cards. Customers with DS0 links can use
BITS clocks as the TSC synchronization clock source.
The TDM is shown in Figure 3-30.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-30. Terminal Disk Module
TEKELEC
ACTIVE/
STANDBY
Serial
number
CLEI
code
TDM
870-0774-XX
REV XX
Hard Drive
Revision
number
Part
number
03_tdm_layout
Building Integrated Timing System Interfaces
The TDM provides the system’s primary and secondary interfaces to Building
Integrated Timing System (BITS) composite clocks. The interface is designed
to receive composite clock signals that meet the TA-TSY-000378 and
TA-TSY-001244 specifications. The positive and negative pulse signals from
these interfaces are recovered and used to generate 56 Khz and 8 Khz system
clock signals that are driven to the rest of the system. Frequency, pulse width,
and bipolar violations are verified for each clock interface and used to
determine which composite clock (primary or secondary) is used as the clock
source for the 56 Khz and 8 Khz system clocks. Switch-over from the primary
to secondary clock and conversely, the switch from secondary to primary
clock happens automatically when a verification failure occurs.
Fuse Alarm Interface
The TDM receives fuse alarm signals from the fuse and alarm panels of each
frame. Each fuse alarm has two connections, RxFA- and RxFA+. No alarm is
indicated with an open circuit between the connections, and an alarm is
indicated by a short circuit between the two connections.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
External/Customer Alarm Interface
The TDM provides interfacing for up to 10 external/customer alarms. Each
alarm has an individual connection along with common contacts through the
power ground provided by the control shelf backplane.
Maintenance Disk and Alarm Interface
The interface to the Maintenance Disk and Alarm Interface (MDAL) card
consists of an 8-bit bidirectional data bus, five alarm register enable signals,
and an alarm clock. The clock Logic Cell Array (LCA) is used to implement
the logic for the MDAL card interface.
Small Computer System Interface
The TDM contains two separate Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)
buses. Each bus uses an NCR 53C720 SCSI I/O processor as the SCSI bus
controller. SCSI Processor A controls the SCSI bus to the fixed disk, which is
installed on the TDM. SCSI Processor B controls the SCSI bus connected to the
removable disk, which is part of the MDAL card. Both the MASP-A TDM and
the MASP-B TDM use this SCSI bus to communicate with the removable
drive. The removable drive SCSI bus is always terminated on the MDAL card.
Terminal Processor
The TDM terminal processor interfaces 16 RS-232 terminals to the TDMs
associated General Purpose Service Module II (GPSM-II) cards. The core of the
TDM terminal processor is an 80C386XL microprocessor. Two 2698 Octal
Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter (OCTART) devices are used to
interface the 80C386XL microprocessor to the 16 serial terminal ports. The
80C386XL microprocessor receives data from the GPSM-II and transmits it to
the terminals.
Extended Bus Interface
The Extended Bus Interface (EBI) links the TDM to its associated General
Purpose Service Module II (GPSM-II), in the same Maintenance and
Administration Subsystem Processor (MASP), through the EBI host processor
bus. The purpose of the TDM is to provide additional logic, memory, and
interfacing for the GPSM-II card. The EBI bus interfaces with every function
on the TDM, either directly or indirectly.
Global Timing Interface
The EAGLE 5 ISS internal composite clock sourced from the high speed clock
feature of the TDM-GTI is not available to systems with DS0 cards. Customers
with DS0 links can use the BITS clocks as the TSC clock source.
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3-55
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The TDM Global Timing Interface (TDM-GTI) (P/N 870-0774-18) has
enhancements that generate high speed master clocks from a recovered E1/T1
clock and the optional ability to reload the clock’s Logic Cell Array (LCA)
bitfile when the mated GPSM-II is initialized.
Requirements:
1. The type of external clock introduced into the EAGLE 5 ISS must be
compatible with the EAGLE 5 ISS.
2. The location where the external clock is introduced must be recognized by
the EAGLE 5 ISS.
3. The external clock must be provisioned to communicate with the EAGLE
5 ISS.
The TDM-GTI has an additional clock feature related to TSC synchronization.
The TDM-GTI allows the TSC synchronization feature to be sourced from the
high speed clock and to be the master high speed clocking with the following
interfaces. The cards use this clock signal to generate a time stamp that is
synchronized across the system. This time stamp is required when using the
Sentinel monitoring system.
1. New Interfaces:
a. T1 framed clocking per American Standards National Institute
(ANSI)T1.101, Synchronization Interface Standards-1999 .
b. T1 unframed clocking per section 5 of ITU, Standard G.703. The
hardware supports this clock and the FE005011 will be updated to
include this clock.
c. E1 framed clocking per Section 9 of (translation from French, ITU)
Consultative Committee on International Telegraphy and Telephone,
standard G.703.
d. E1 unframed clocking per Section 13 of ITU, Standard G.703.
2. Existing Interfaces:
a. 64/8 Kilo Hertz (KHz) Return To Zero (RTZ) Composite Clock
Interface
b. E1 (2048 KHz) RS-422 Clock Interface
c. T1 (1544 KHz) RS-422 Clock Interface
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Hard Drive
The hard drive on the TDM is used to store primary and backup system
databases, measurements, and Generic Program Loads (GPLs). The hard drive
capacities are:
•
9GB (TDM 870-0774-10)
•
18GB (TDM 870-0774-11)
•
36GB (TDM-GTI 870-0774-18)
Power Converter Unit
The TDM is powered by an on-board DC to DC converter. The converter
accepts –48VDC and supplies +5VDC and +12VDC to the TDM.
Table 3-8.
TDM Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
0.46 A
Power
22 Watts
Dimensions
Height
15.0 in. (38.1 cm)
Width
1.8 in. (2 cm)
Depth
12.8 in. (32.5 cm)
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Time Slot Counter Synchronization
The Time Slot Counter (TSC) Synchronization feature is an advanced function
enabled in all LIMs. The TSC Synchronization feature does not require any
physical hardware changes to any of the boards in the EAGLE 5 ISS. TSC
Synchronization is an optional feature for the EAGLE 5 ISS that will allow all
cards in the system, which contain a Time Slot Counter, to synchronize with
one another. The ability to have synchronized timing between cards is used in
applications such as system wide message time stamping.
The TSC Synchronization feature requires the MCAP cards in slots 1113 and
1115 of the control shelf be replaced with GPSM-II cards. The TSC sync feature
also requires the associated TDM cards be updated to (P/N 870-0774-10 or
later). A typical EAGLE 5 ISS will have two TDMs installed to distribute both
the A and B system clocks. The TSC Sync feature has to be enabled on both
TDMs. The EAGLE 5 ISS must use an external BITS clock so that the system A
and B clocks remain synchronous to each other. If either of the TDMs provides
its internal clock to the system instead of the BITS clock, the A and B clocks
may drift apart and introduce skew into the system.
After the TSC Sync feature is enabled there may be skew between the A clock
and B clock TSC Reset Events. This skew must be detected and eliminated so
that cards can switch between the two clocks and stay synchronized to the rest
of the system. All cards with a TSC have a Skew Interrupt and the Skew
Count register, but the GPSM-II card is unique in that it can communicate
with the TDM and adjust the skew.
TSC Sync affects the TDM (P/N 870-0774-10 or later) and all EAGLE 5 ISS
cards that contain a Time Slot Counter. This includes:
3-58
•
E486-based and E586-based cards (ILA, EILA, ILE1, EILA-T, MCAP-256,
TSM, E586-T)
•
HCAP or HCAP-T
•
DCM, DCMX, EDCM and EDCM-A, and GPSM-II (single-slot EDCM)
•
MPL, MPL-T, and E1/T1 MIM
•
HCMIM, E5-E1T1, E5-ENET
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Link Interface Modules
After the frame has been shipped or moved, prior to applying power,
remove all cards.
Reset all cards carefully to avoid possible faulty connections.
All cards are hot swappable
The Link Interface Module (LIM) provides access to remote SS7, X.25, IP and
other network elements, such as a Signaling Control Point (SCP). The LIMs
consist of a main assembly and possibly, an interface applique board. These
appliques provide level one and some level two functionality on SS7 signaling
links. The types of LIMs presently available are:
•
LIM-DS0A is a specialized LIM that provides two Digital Signal Level 0
Applique DS0A interfaces at 56 kbps, (P/N 870-1009-xx). This module
uses a DS0A applique. (This board is no longer shipped but it does exist, in use,
in the field, replaced by the LIM-AINF which has been replaced by the Integrated
LIM Applique, ILA, and the EILA)
•
LIM-OCU is a specialized LIM that provides two Office Channel Unit
(OCU) interfaces at 56 kbps (P/N 870-1010-xx). This module uses an OCU
applique.
(This board is no longer shipped but it does exist, in use, in the field, replaced by
the LIM-AINF which has been replaced by the ILA, and the EILA))
•
LIM-V.35 is a specialized LIM that provides one V.35 interface at 56 and 64
kbps for SS7 and 4.8, 9.6, 19.2, 56, and 64 kbps for X.25, (P/N 870-1012-xx).
This module uses a V.35 applique.
(This board is no longer shipped but it does exist, in use, in the field, replaced by
the LIM-AINF which has been replaced by the ILA, and the EILA)
•
LIM, LIM-AINF provides DS0A, OCU, V.35 (software selectable),
(P/N 870-1014-xx). This module uses an AINF applique. Some versions of
this module are labeled LIM-AINF instead of LIM.
(This board is no longer shipped but it does exist, in use, in the field, replaced by
the ILA, and the EILA)
•
LIM-ILA, Integrated LIM Applique, (P/N 870-1484-xx) is an integrated
LIM-AINF equal to the same functionality of the LIM-AINF. The
difference is the ILA is a single Printed Circuit Board (PCB) without a
printed circuit board applique.
•
EILA, Enhanced Integrated LIM Applique (P/N 870-2049-xx), is an
enhanced integrated LIM-AINF equal to the same functionality of the
LIM-AINF. The difference is the larger, 586 processor, of the EILA. In
EAGLE 5 ISS release 28.0 an enhanced version of the EILA board (EILA-T)
is available.
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3-59
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
•
The Multi-Port LIM (MPL) (P/N 870-2061-xx), used in EAGLE 5 ISS
systems only, provides eight DS0 ports transporting SS7 traffic in a single
EAGLE 5 ISS card slot. Ports A and B are backward compatible with the
existing two-port LIM card. Additional ports A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3 are
DS0 interfaces only. In EAGLE 5 ISS release 28.0 an enhanced version of
the MPL board (MPL-T) is available.
The MPL card improves the functionality of SS7 routing within the
EAGLE 5 ISS by increasing the number of SS7 links the EAGLE 5 ISS can
handle for each LIM card. This allows the EAGLE 5 ISS to interact in
larger SS7 networks as well as decreasing the size of an EAGLE 5 ISS (for
example, previously 250 cards would be required to support 500 links,
now only 63 cards are required).
NOTE: Link Fault Sectionalization (LFS) logic on the MPL provides
diagnostic capabilities though network interfaces on ports A and B. LFS
tests sequentially exercise all eight ports.
•
The LIM-E1 card, (P/N 870-1379-xx), and the E1 Interface Kit,
(P/N 890-1037-06) with backplane module (P/N 850-0459-01) provides a
connection point from the system backplane to an external E1 interface.
Two E1 backplane modules are located at the rear of the extension shelf,
the upper E1 backplane module and the lower E1 backplane module. The
upper and lower backplane modules are identical.
•
The E1/T1 Multi-Channel Interface Module (MIM) (P/N 870-2198-02 and
P/N 870-2198-01), provides a dual-port (A and B), framed, channelized
connection to a customer’s network. The interface to each port is mapped
to the DS0 time-slots in the fractional E1 or T1 data streams. Each E1/T1
MIM supports a maximum of eight High-Level Data Link Control
(HDLC) channels that can be provisioned as using either E1 or T1
protocols and assigned to any unused time-slot.
NOTE: E1/T1 MIM cards do not support internal clocking. E1/T1 MIM
cards must be provided with either a composite BITS clock or the
High-Speed Master Timing clocks to function properly.
An extension port is provided to connect other boards in the EAGLE 5 ISS
shelf to the E1/T1 data stream such that all channels can be mapped (E1 =
32 channels, T1 = 24 channels). This would require four E1/T1 MIMs to
map an entire E1 link or three E1/T1 MIMs to map a T1 link. The two
ports (1 and 2) can also be put into an ADD/DROP configuration. The
E1/T1 MIM would use a fractional part of the data channel connected to
port 1 and forward the remaining channel data through port 2.
The E1/T1 MIM card requires a new cable T1 MIM LIM
(P/N 830-0894-xx) for T1 interface connections. If replacing existing MPL
cards with E1/T1 MIM cards the existing T1 interface cables
(P/N 830-0772-xx) must be connected to T1 LIM to MPL adapter cables
(P/N 830-0895-xx) or replaced with the new cable (P/N 830-0894-xx).
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The existing E1 interface cables (P/N 830-0622-xx) can continue to be used
with the new E1/T1 MIM card for E1 applications.
The E1/T1 MIM will implement the ANSI T1 standard for 1.544 MHz data
transmission and the European (ITU) E1 standard for 2.048 MHz data
transmission.
NOTE: Each E1/T1 MIM port will be capable of operation for E1 or T1
line rates but the interfaces will never be mixed on a single circuit card
(for example, one port operating at E1 rates and the other port at T1
rates). The E1/T1 MIM does not support clear-channel (no channels)
operation.
•
LIM-ATM is a specialized LIM that provides one Asynchronous Transfer
Mode over T1 Interface at 1.544 Mbps, (P/N 870-1293-xx). This module
uses an Asynchronous Transfer Mode Applique (AATM) installed on a
High Capacity Application Processor (HCAP or HCAP-T) main assembly.
•
E1-ATM LIM provides one Asynchronous Transfer Mode over E1 Interface
at 2.048 Mbps, (P/N 870-2455-01). This module uses an E1 Asynchronous
Transfer Mode Applique (E1-ATM) installed on a High Capacity
Application Processor (HCAP or HCAP-T) main assembly.
NOTE: The LIM-ATM and E1-ATM LIM appliques are not mounted
on the 486 based main assembly. See the section “High-Capacity
Application Processor-Based LIMs” on page 3-70 for more information.
Maximum Numbers of Links
A maximum of 1500 links can be configured in the EAGLE 5 ISS depending on
the hardware, software release level, and features that are installed. A mixture
of high-speed and low-speed signaling links is supported.
NOTE: If the addition of either a low-speed signaling link or a
high-speed signaling link exceeds the total number of low-speed and
high-speed signaling links allowed in the system, the ent-slk command
is rejected. The addition of a high-speed signaling link decreases the
number of low-speed signaling links that can be supported by the
system.
Table 3-9, “Hardware Requirements-Maximum Number of Links,” on page 3-62
describes the required hardware for the maximum number of links with
different configurations.
NOTE: This table lists EAGLE 5 ISS base hardware requirements
only. For complete provisioning rules and requirements, including
tables listing all link types see the Database Administration - SS7
Manual.
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LIM Main Assembly
Table 3-9.
Hardware Requirements-Maximum Number of Links
Number of Links
Required Hardware
Up to 500 Links
HMUX cards on the IMT buses
2-port LIM cards or multi-port LIM cards (MPLs)
Installed according to the provisioning rules for a
system with up to 500 links in the Database
Administration - SS7 Manual.
NOTE: A Maximum of 42
High-speed LIM cards (of
which up to 41 can be
IPLIMx cards) can be
installed
From 501-700 Links
NOTE: A Maximum 100
High-speed LIM cards (of
which up to 41 can be
IPLIMx cards) can be
installed
HMUX cards on the IMT buses
GPSM-II cards installed in card locations 1113 and 1115
TDM cards in locations 1114 and 1116
NOTE: There are only enough slots to support
500 links using just 2-port LIMs.
Enough multi-port LIMs (MPLs), P/N 870-2061-XX, to
bring the total number of signaling links above 500, up
to 700. Installed according to the provisioning rules for
a system with 700 links in the Database Administration SS7 Manual.
From 701--1500 Links
NOTE: A Maximum 115
High-speed LIM cards (of
which up to 100 can be
IPLIMx cards) can be
installed
• HMUX cards on the IMT buses
• GPSM-II, P/N 850-0622-XX cards, installed in card
locations 1113 and 1115, to run the active OAM
• TDM cards installed in card locations 1114 and 1116
NOTE: There are only enough slots to support
500 links using just 2-port LIMs.
Enough Multi-Port LIMs (MPLs), P/N 870-2061-XX,
and/or E1/T1 MIMs, P/N 870-2198-XX, to bring the
total number of signaling links to 1500.
Installed according to the provisioning rules for a
system with 1500 links in the Database Administration SS7 Manual.
Cam-out/lock-in levers, mounted on the front edge of LIM cards, (the
exception being E1) assist in the insertion and the removal of the card from
the shelf.
Figure 3-31 shows the LIM Main Assembly card.
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The main assembly portion of the LIM contains the following:
•
An 80486 applications processor
•
An 80386/80486 communications processor that provides a data
transmit/receive interface
•
An Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) interface that provides two
125 Mbps communications links that provide communications between
modules
•
–48VDC/+5VDC and –48VDC/+3VDC DC to DC power converter units
Figure 3-31. Link Interface Module (LIM) Main Assembly
870-1289-XX TSM
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Applications Processor
The Application Processor (AP) section of the LIM interfaces and controls the
operation of the interface applique. The AP’s operations are controlled by an
80486 processor and peripherals.
Communications Processor
The Communications Processor (CP) is made up of an 80386/80486
microprocessors and peripherals. The CP section of the LIM controls the flow
of transmit/receive data to and from the Inter-processor Message Transport
(IMT) buses.
In the receive direction, the CP writes a receive initialization command to the
IMT bus. The data packet is checked for the destination. If its destination is
this LIM, the format is checked and a Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) is
performed. The packet is then transferred to the CP memory by Direct
Memory Access (DMA).
In the transmit direction, the CP forwards a packet along with 2 CRC bytes,
calculated by the IMT circuitry, to the HMUX or HIPR cards (EAGLE 5 ISS)
for transmission.
The CP also controls the selection of the IMT buses, A or B. In the other
direction, the CP forwards data received from the IMT buses through the AP
to the interface port (DB15) connector on the shelf backplane.
The CP is interrupt driven. Eight levels of the interrupts initiated by the IMT,
the AP, and the MAS, are administered by a Programmable Interrupt
Controller (PIC).
Inter-processor Message Transport
Each LIM unit has two Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) interface
circuits, IMT A and IMT B. The redundant IMT buses are used to transport:
•
Generic Program Loads (GPLs) to various circuit cards
•
All SS7 and traffic between circuit cards
•
Maintenance traffic within the system
In the receive direction, a data packet is checked to see if it is destined for this
particular LIM. If it is, the packet is checked for format and a cyclic
redundancy check is performed. The packet is then transferred to the CP
memory by Direct Memory Access (DMA). If the packet is not destined for
this LIM, it is sent back onto the IMT bus towards the next module.
In the transmit direction, the Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) is calculated
for a packet and the packet is transmitted through the HIPR cards (EAGLE 5
ISS) to the IMT bus.
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Power Converter Unit
LIM power is provided by two DC to DC converters that convert the –48VDC
supplied to the system to +5VDC and +3VDC needed to power the LIM
components.
Test and Maintenance Features
Colored LEDs are mounted on the front edge of the printed circuit board as
LIM status and alarm indicators.
Digital Signal Level-0 Applique
The DS0A applique is mounted on the LIM main assembly. A 128-pin and a
60-pin connector engage two male connectors on the LIM main assembly. The
DS0A’s applique primary function is to provide the LIM with access to the
DS0 link. Figure 3-32 "Digital Signal Level-0 Applique" on page 3-66 shows
the DS0A applique.
The DS0A applique provides two 64 KHz DS0 ports. The microprocessor on
the LIM commands the ISCC to operate in the SDLC mode to transmit and
receive an SS7 data stream. The ISCC retrieves and stores SS7 messages in the
dual port memory locations on the LIM through Direct Memory Access
(DMA).
The signal clocking for the DS0A card is provided by system clocks derived
from the Building Integrated Timing System (BITS) composite clock signal.
Each DS0 interface has one balanced pair for each direction of transmission
and reception. The transmitted data from the ISCC is converted to the bipolar
data format before being transmitted to a DS0 link. The received DS0 signal is
converted to the NRZ data format before arriving at the ISCC.
The transmitted data is read from the LIM's memory into the Integrated Serial
Communications Controller (ISCC) by way of DMA, and a proper data frame,
with self-calculated CRC bits, is then transmitted. The DMA method is also
used to store good data frames to the LIM's memory.
The ISCC is programmed to assert interrupt in four situations: transmit
interrupt, external status interrupt, receive interrupt, and DMA terminal
count interrupt.
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Figure 3-32. Digital Signal Level-0 Applique
0196adso
OCU Applique
The Office Channel Unit (OCU) applique is mounted on the LIM main
assembly. The OCU applique’s primary function is to provide the LIM with
access to the OCU link. A 128-pin and a 60-pin connector engage two male
connectors on the LIM main assembly.
The OCU applique of the LIM provides two OCU ports. Each OCU port is
able to transmit and receive data on 56 kbps OCU channels.
The main components of the OCU applique are:
•
Integrated Serial Communications Controller (ISCC)
•
Office Channel Unit Logic Cell Array (OCU LCA)
•
LXT400, Level 1
•
Interfaces A and B
The ISCC works between the applications processor on the main assembly
and the OCU LCA to transmit and receive data.
The OCU LCA takes commands from the applications processor on the LIM
main assembly, controls the LXT400 Level 1 chip and the interface circuitry,
and also reports the status of the OCU link.
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The LXT400 Level 1 chip provides the following functions:
•
Single chip that includes a transmitter, receiver, and timing recovery for a
Dataphone Digital System (DDS) 4-wire telephone line
•
Transparent to coding and framing
•
Line rate configured for 56 kbps
•
Receive equalizer filters are designed to handle up to 49 db at the Nyquist
frequency for 56 kbps
•
Single master clock input frequency at 4.096 MHz
•
Digital back end loopback
The interfaces A and B consist of transformers, relays, relay-drivers, and
simplex current generation and detection circuitry. The applique provides
connection between the OCU links and the LXT400. The applique contains a
voltage converter that converts 5VDC to 15VDC and a current limiter that
limits converter output to 20 mA (15VDC).
Figure 3-33. Office Channel Unit Applique
3002aocu
V.35 Applique
The V.35 applique is mounted on the LIM main assembly. A 128-pin connector
and a 60-pin connector engage two male connectors on the LIM main
assembly. The V.35 applique’s primary function is to provide the LIM with
access to devices conforming to ITU-TSS, formerly CCITT, Recommendation
V.35.
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The V.35 applique of the LIM provides two V.35 ports that can be configured
as Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) or Data Communication Equipment
(DCE) and has an independent baud rate generator, which is configured using
system administration commands at a terminal. When configured as DTE,
Request To Send (RTS) is normally high and Data Terminal Ready (DTR) is
normally low. When configured as Data Communication Equipment (DCE),
Data Carrier Detect (DCD) Receive Line Signal Detect (RLSD) is normally
high, while Data Set Ready (DSR) and Clear To Send (CTS) are normally low.
An Integrated Serial Communications Controller (ISCC) is used as the link’s
controller. The application microprocessor on the LIM main assembly controls
the ISCC.
The LIM V.35 applique supports baud rates of 56 kbps and 64 kbps.
Figure 3-34 shows the V.35 applique.
Figure 3-34. V.35 Applique
0279av35
Application Interface Applique
The Application Interface (AINF) applique is mounted on the LIM main
assembly. A 128-pin connector and a 60-pin connector engage two male
connectors on the LIM main assembly. The AINF combines on a single
applique interfaces to DS0A, OCU, or V.35 links.
The AINF applique of the LIM provides one or two OCU, DS0A, or V.35
interfaces for SS7 links. The type of interface provided by the AINF applique
is specified by the ent-card command (refer to the Commands Manual) that is
entered during the configuration of the system.
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Figure 3-35 "Application Interface Applique" on page 3-69 shows the AINF
applique.
The main components of the AINF applique are:
•
Integrated Serial Communications Controller (ISCC)
•
Application Interface (AINF) Logic Cell Array (LCA)
•
Two DS0A interfaces
•
Two V.35 interfaces
•
Two Office Channel Unit (OCU) interfaces
•
Relays for switching between different interface types
An Integrated Serial Communications Controller (ISCC) is used as the link’s
controller. The application microprocessor on the LIM main assembly controls
the ISCC.
The transmitted data is read from the LIM's memory into the ISCC through
Direct Memory Access (DMA) and is then transmitted. The DMA method is
also used to store receive data frames to the LIM's memory.
The AINF LCA takes commands from the applications processor on the LIM
main assembly to control the interface circuitry, and also reports on the status
of the links.
The applique supports line rates of 56 kbps for DS0A, OCU, and V.35 links,
and also supports 64 kbps for V.35 links.
The signal clocking for the DS0A type interface is provided by system clocks
derived from the Building Integrated Timing System (BITS) composite clock
signal.
Figure 3-35. Application Interface Applique
0376ainf
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High-Capacity Application Processor-Based LIMs
The HCAP-T (P/N 850-0615-xx) is an improved version of the HCAP main
assembly card (P/N 850-0419-xx) that uses less power and has more on-board
memory. The HCAP-T is plug-compatible with existing HCAP cards.
LIM-ATM and LIM-E1 appliques function the same with either card.
LIM-ATM
LIM-ATM is a specialized LIM that provides one Asynchronous Transfer
Mode over T1 Interface at 1.544 Mbps. This module uses an Asynchronous
Transfer Mode Applique (AATM) installed on a High Capacity Application
Processor or HCAP-T main assembly. See “HCAP or HCAP-T Main Assembly”
on page 3-72.
The AATM applique is shown in the following figure and provides one
interface for SS7 links.
The main components of the AATM are:
•
One Transmission 1.544 MB (T1) Framer Transceiver
•
ATM User network Interface
•
AATM LCA (Asynchronous Transfer Mode Applique Logic Cell Array)
•
One Transmission 1.544 MB (T1) Interface
Figure 3-36. AATM Applique (T1)
J2
P1
J1
850-0424-02 side1
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E1-ATM
E1-ATM LIM provides one Asynchronous Transfer Mode over E1 Interface at
2.048 Mbps. This module uses an E1 Asynchronous Transfer Mode Applique
(E1-ATM) installed on a High Capacity Application Processor (HCAP or
HCAP-T) main assembly. The E1-ATM applique provides a new
communications capability on the EAGLE 5 ISS, a High Speed Link (HSL)
using ATM over E1.
The E1-ATM capability supports a single ATM Virtual Channel Connection
(VCC) at a line speed of 2.048 Mbps. To the GLS, LSL LIM, SLAN and SCCP
cards, the E1-ATM card looks and operates similar to any other LIM but has
increased data throughput. The E1-ATM can perform gateway screening, copy
and redirect, conversion and any of the other EAGLE 5 ISS features that an
ANSI LIM can perform with the exception of Link Fault Sectionalization (LFS)
which is not a requirement for E1 links.
The E1-ATM applique is based upon the ATMANSI feature, which provided
ATM communications over T1 links. The E1-ATM supports (2.048 Mbps) link
speed instead of T1 link speed (1.544 Mbps), and ITU protocol support instead
of ANSI protocols. See the following Figure 3-37 and Figure 3-38 "HCAP
Main Assembly (P/N 850-0419-xx)" on page 3-72.
The E1-ATM applique provides one interface for SS7 links.
The main components of the E1-ATM are:
•
One Transmission 2.048 MBps (E1) Framer Transceiver
•
ATM User network Interface
•
One Transmission 2.048 MBps (E1) Interface
Figure 3-37. E1-ATM Applique
J2
P1
J1
850-0424-02 side1
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HCAP or HCAP-T Main Assembly
The High-Capacity Application Processor (P/N 850-0419-xx) or HCAP-T
(P/N 850-0615-xx) provides the interface between the IMT bus and LIM-ATM
or E1-ATM appliques.
Figure 3-38. HCAP Main Assembly (P/N 850-0419-xx)
Applique mounting area
Revision
number
Part
number
870 1210 11 atm
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Multi-Port Link Interface Module (MPL)
The MPL card (P/N 870-2061-01) provides eight-port DS0 functionality in a
single card slot. The existing two-port (A and B) LIM capabilities are
supported with six additional DS0 only ports (A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3).
NOTE 1: The MPL is backward compatible with existing two-port DS0
LIMs. Attempts to provision the MPL ports as any type other than a DS0
interface will be rejected. The MPL card is used in EAGLE 5 ISS systems
only.
NOTE 2: The MPL card can be replaced with the enhanced
performance MPL-T card (P/N 870-2061-02). The MPL-T card is plug
compatible with existing MPL cards.
Figure 3-39. Multi-Port Link Interface Module (MPL) (P/N 870-2061-01)
870-2061-01mpl
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LIM Cards Technical Specifications
The technical specifications of the LIM cards are listed in Table 3-10.
Table 3-10.
LIM Card Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
0.6 A
Power
LIM-DS0 (P/N 870-1009-xx) –16 watts
LIM-OCU (P/N 870-1010-xx) –17 watts
LIM-V.35 (P/N 870-1012-xx) –20 watts
LIM, LIM-AINF (P/N 870-1014-xx) –20
watts
LIM-E1 (P/N 870-1379-01) –16 watts
E1/T1 LIM (P/N 870-2198-01) –20 watts
ATM (T1) (P/N 870-1293-xx) –14 watts
E1-ATM (P/N 870-1379-01) –14 watts
ILA (P/N 870-1484-xx) –20 watts
MPL, MPL-T(P/N 870-2061-xx) –20 watts
EILA (P/N 870-2049-01) –20 watts
Interfaces
DS0A
64 and 56 kbps
OCU
64 and 56 kbps
V.35
64 and 56 kbps
ATM (T1)
1.544 Mbps
E1 ATM
2.048 Mbps
E1
2.048 Mbps
T1
1.544 Mbps
HMUX
125 Mbps and 1 Gbps
HIPR
125 Mbps and 1 Gbps
Dimensions
Height
Length
3-74
14.4 in. (36.6 cm)
12.8 in. (32.5 cm)
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Database Communications Module
The Database Communications Module (DCM) provides the following
functions for the system:
•
Signaling Transfer Point, Local Area Network (SLAN) function
•
ISUP protocol data exchange between the IMT and the IP network
•
SS7 traffic exchange between B,C,D links and the IP network
•
Enhanced bulk download
•
When configured as a Signaling Transport Card (STC) provides TCP/IP
interfaces to the Extended Services Platform (ESP).
•
When configured as an IPLIMx provides a point to point TCP/IP
connection to be used to carry SS7 traffic over B, C and D links. This
feature will allow multiple point to point connections and not point to
multi-point connections. Point to multi-point connectivity is provided by
the SS7IPGW GPL.
The DCM card (P/N 870-1984-01) supports one to four plug-in memory
cards. The primary board DCM with the addition of memory boards and
software creates the Database Service Modules (DSMs).
The DCM card and DSM card can be mounted in the control shelf, require two
slots for mounting, and must be assigned to an odd numbered slots with the
next higher-numbered even slot left open. The DCM card and the DSM card
are compatible with control shelf backplanes (P/N 850-0330-04/06) and
extension backplanes (P/N 850-0356-04/06).
A DCM card is shown in Figure 3-40 "Database Communications Module" on
page 3-76 .
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-40. Database Communications Module
850 0520 01pcb
3-76
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Database Service Module
In the EAGLE 5 ISS system primary board DCMX (P/N 870-1984-01) plus
memory boards equal Database Service Modules (DSMs). Memory Boards are
stacked as indicated in Figure 3-41.
•
P/N 870-1984-02 DSM-1G
•
P/N 870-1984-03 DSM-2G
•
P/N 870-1984-04 DSM-3G
•
P/ N 870-1984-05 DSM-4G
Figure 3-41. DSMs with Memory Boards
Stacked Memory Boards
870 1984 xx pcb
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Table 3-11.
DCM and DSM Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
0.32A
Power
21 watts
Dimensions
Height
14.4 in. (36.6 cm)
Width
1.8 in. (2 cm)
Depth
12.8 in. (32.5 cm)
Double-Slot EDCM
The Double-Slot Enhanced Database Communications Module
(P/N 870-2197-01) is a version of the DCM that includes more main memory
and better processing performance. The double-slot EDCM can be placed in
any slot odd or even that is provisioned. Physically the next higher slot can
not be provisioned for a card because of the double-slot EDCM card width.
The following list highlights the changes embodied by the Double-Slot
EDCM:
3-78
•
An additional 16 MByte of main SRAM is added to the application
processor for a total of 32 MByte.
•
256KByte of dual port memory is used between the Application and
Communication processors rather than the 2 MByte of shared memory
of the DCM.
•
The application processor bus frequency is increased from 50 MHz to
66 MHz.
•
The application processor is the AMD K6-IIIe+, an embedded version
of the AMD K6-III high-performance processor that is used on the
DCM P/N 870-1945-xx.
•
The application processor operates at an internal clock frequency of
396 MHz.
•
A hardware assist is added such the communications processor can
copy packets simultaneously to an IMT Tx FIFO and to main memory.
•
Both Ethernet interfaces (A and B) operate at 100 MByte.
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The following elements of the Double-Slot EDCM are unchanged from the
DCM:
•
The Double-Slot EDCM requires two frame slots, just like the DCM.
•
The communication processor is unchanged.
•
The amount of communication processor main memory is unchanged
(2MB).
Figure 3-42. Double-Slot Enhanced Database Communications Module
edcm ds pcb
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Single-Slot EDCM and EDCM-A
The single-slot EDCM (P/N 870-2372-01) is a version of the EDCM which
requires only a single frame slot. It can be placed in any slot, odd or even,
which has been provisioned for DCM.
Figure 3-43. Single-Slot Enhanced Database Communications Module
TEKELEC
APPL
PROC
IMT A
IMT B
PORT A
EDCM
870-2372-01 REV XX
JTAG
PORT B
870-2372-01ssedcm
3-80
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The single-slot EDCM is the base for the following card types:
•
Signaling Transport card (STC)
•
General Purpose Service Module (GPSM-II)
•
Measurements Collection and Polling Module (MCPM)
•
IPLIMx feature with eight point capabilities
•
IPGW
EDCM-A Replacement Cards
Any EDCM cards that needs to be replaced will be replaced with EDCM-A
cards (P/N 870-2508-02). The front of the card and LEDs are the same as the
EDCM card. The following performance parameters are applicable for the
EDCM-A:
•
STC - No change from EDCM (870-2372-01)
•
STPLAN - No change from the EDCM (870-2372-01)
•
IPLIMx:
IPLIMx M2PA performance on the EDCM-A (870-2508-02) card can only
be guaranteed under the following conditions:
–
2,000 Transactions/Second (TPS)
–
Up to 4 Associations
–
Average MSU size of 140 Bytes or less.
If the number of associations or average MSU size is increased above these
limits, then performance may fall below 2,000 TPS.
•
IPGWx:
IPGWx performance on the EDCM-A (870-2508-02) card can only be
guaranteed under the following conditions:
–
M3UA and TALI only (SUA protocol is not supported)
–
1,700 TPS
–
Up to 8 Connections
–
Average MSU size of 140 Bytes or less.
If the number of connections or average MSU size is increased above these
limits, then performance may fall below 1,700 TPS.
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To maximize throughput per IPGWx card, Tekelec recommends
deployment of the same type of DCM cards within a single linkset. For
example, EDCM-A cards in a linkset with only EDCM-A cards, and
EDCM (870-2372-01/08) cards in a linkset with only EDCM cards.
EDCM-As can be deployed within the same linkset with EDCMs;
however, if EDCMs and EDCM-As are mixed in a linkset all IPGWx cards
within the linkset should be assumed to have a maximum of 1,700 TPS.
Signaling Transport Card
The Signaling Transport Card (STC) is a DCM card with an “eroute” generic
program load (GPL) installed. The STC is based on the single-slot EDCM
card. The STC card functions as an IP router between the IMT bus internal to
an EAGLE 5 ISS and the ethernet networks used to communicate with an
associated Sentinel Extended Services Platform (ESP).
NOTE: The STCs provide the IP interface between the LIM cards on
the IMT bus and the Sentinel Extended Services Platform (ESP)
subassembly.
For more information see Chapter 5, Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel
Products.
General Purpose Service Module
On the front edge of the GPSM-II card, there are five Light Emitting Diodes
(LED) that provide status. The GPSM-II LEDs have four illumination states:
red, amber, green, or off. The Application processor LED is off if -48VDC is
not supplied. The Application Processor LED is red while booting, amber
while loading, and green when the application is running. The IMT A and B
LEDs indicate whether the GPSM-II is active on the A or B buses. IMT LED
red—the card is off the bus, IMT LED amber—testing not complete, IMT LED
green—the card is active on the bus. The PORT A and PORT B LEDs are not
used in the GPSM-II.
NOTE 1: GPSM-IIs are required replacements for the MCAP cards.
The installation is done at the factory or by Tekelec Technical Support,
not by the customer.
Measurements Collection and Polling Module
The MCPM is an EDSM-2G card with 32 MB FSRAM and 2 GB RAM.
NOTE: The MCPM card is a requirement for the FTP measurements
feature. The FTP measurements feature uses the MCPM ethernet ports
to transfer measurements information directly to a FTP server.
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On the front edge of the MCPM card, there are five Light Emitting Diodes
(LED) that provide status. The MCPM LEDs have four illumination states:
red, amber, green, or off. The Application processor LED is off if -48VDC is not
supplied. The Application Processor LED is red while booting, amber while
loading, and green when the application is running. The IMT A and B LEDs
indicate whether the MCPM is active on the A or B buses. IMT LED red—the
card is off the bus, IMT LED amber—testing not complete, IMT LED
green—the card is active on the bus. The PORT A and PORT B LEDs are
illuminated green when the A or B port is active.
IPLIMx with Eight-Point Capability
The IPLIMx to eight points feature provides the ability to support up to eight
point to point TALI socket connections on an IPLIMx Single-slot EDCM card.
Both ANSI and ITU links are supported.
This feature builds upon on the previous Multipoint IPLIMx feature. The
Multipoint IPLIMx feature provided the capability of multiple point to point
connections (limited to 2) on an IPLIMx GPL. Multipoint IPLIMx capability
was implemented on DCM and double-slot EDCM cards. The IPLIMx to eight
Point feature expands the Multipoint IPLIMx capability to support eight
signaling link ports. Only SAAL/TALI signaling links are expanded. The
presence of any M3UA/SCTP signaling links on an IPLIMx card will result in
the enforcement of two signaling links maximum per IPLIMx card.
Application Communications Module
The Application Communications Module (ACM)(P/N 870-1008-xx),
provides the system with ethernet 10Base-T access to remote hosts. The ACM
consists of a 80486-based main assembly and an applique. Figure 3-44
"Application Communications Module Main Assembly" on page 3-84 shows
the ACM card main assembly.
The main assembly portion of the ACM contains the following:
•
An 80486 applications processor
•
An 80386 communications processor
•
An Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) interface that provides two
125 Mbps communications links which provide communications between
modules.
•
–48VDC/+5VDC and –48VDC/+3VDC DC to DC power converter units
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
CAUTION: It is Tekelec's recommendation that cards running the SCCP
application be uniformly distributed in the EAGLE 5 ISS to provide a more
even SCCP load distribution. During normal operation unevenly
distributed SCCP cards in an EAGLE 5 ISS would not have any network or
system impacts. However, should a particular SCCP card database(s)
become corrupted, inconsistent, or at a different level, depending on the
amount of service provided by that card and the extent of the database
issue, network impacts can occur.
Figure 3-44. Application Communications Module Main Assembly
870-1289-XX TSM
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Ethernet Applique
The Application Communications Module (ACM) Ethernet applique is
attached to the ACM main assembly and provides a communication interface
between the ACM and an external host system across an Ethernet LAN.
Figure 3-45 "Application Communications Module Ethernet Applique" on
page 3-85 shows the applique.
This Ethernet applique receives and transmits signals through a 60-pin
application connector on the main assembly. Control of the Ethernet applique
is the responsibility of the applications processor. Each ACM is connected,
through the backplane, to a single port Media Access Unit (MAU) that is
attached to the backplane interface connector for that ACM.
Each applique has a dedicated two-part memory buffer. The top 2K bytes are
used as the transmit buffer to stores packets waiting for transmission. The
remaining 62K bytes, the receive buffer, is used to receive packets.
Signal manipulation is the responsibility of an Ethernet controller and the
supporting components. These components include:
•
Ethernet controller—The Ethernet controller is an integrated local area
network controller that supports the IEEE 802.3 Carrier Sense Multiple
Access CSMA/10 Mbps protocols. This Ethernet controller equips the
buffer manager, which arbitrates data access to its dedicated 64K bytes of
Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM).
•
Ethernet Encoder/Decoder (EED)—The EED functions to provide the
encoding or decoding of the IEEE Ethernet signals. This circuit also
features collision and carrier detection.
•
Memory buffers.
•
The Ethernet applique receives +5VDC from the ACM main assembly.
A DC to DC converter produces +12V from the +5VDC to power the
MAU.
Figure 3-45. Application Communications Module Ethernet Applique
DCBA
J1
BA
J2
3003AETH
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Media Access Unit
The Media Access Unit (MAU)(P/N 804-0059-01 for 10-BASE-2 and
P/N 804-0144-01 for 10-BASE-T) used by the Application Communication
Module (ACM) is a single-port Ethernet transceiver. Each single port MAU is
connected, through an adapter (P/N 830-0425-01) to the backplane interface
connector associated with an ACM. Each single port MAU has a single BNC
or RJ45-type connector that is used to connect the system to an Ethernet
network through 10-BASE-2 or 10-BASE-T media. Refer to Figure 3-46 for an
illustration of a MAU.
Figure 3-46. Single-port Ethernet Transceivers, Media Access Unit
10-BASE-2 MAU
10-BASE-T MAU
Application Processor
The Application Processor (AP) section of the ACM interfaces and controls
the operation of the Ethernet applique.
The AP interfaces the Communication Processor (CP) to transfer interface
data to and from the IMT buses. Message transfer between the two processors
is arbitrated by a 256 kbyte dual memory port.
Communication Processor
The Communication Processor (CP) is made up of an 80386 processor and
peripherals. The CP section of the ACM controls the flow of transmit/receive
data to and from the IMT buses.
In the receive direction, the CP writes a receive initialization command to the
IMT. The data packet is checked for the destination. If its destination is this
ACM, the format is checked and a Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) is
performed. The packet is then transferred to the CP memory by Direct
Memory Access (DMA).
In the transmit direction, the CP forwards a packet along with 2 CRC bytes,
calculated by the IMT circuitry, to the HIPR (EAGLE 5 ISS only) for
transmission.
The CP also controls the selection of the IMT, A or B. In the other direction, the
CP forwards data received from the IMT through the AP to the interface port
DB15 connector on the extension shelf backplane.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The CP is interrupt driven. Eight levels of the interrupts initiated by the IMT,
the AP, and the MAS, are administered by a Programmable Interrupt
Controller (PIC).
Inter-processor Message Transport
Each Application Communication Module (ACM) unit has two
Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) interface circuits, IMT A and IMT B.
Each IMT interface circuit provides a direct access to another 125 Mbps
communications link.
In the receive direction, a data packet is checked to see if it is destined for this
particular ACM. If it is, the packet is checked for format and a cyclic
redundancy check is performed. The packet is next transferred to the CP
(80C386) memory by Direct Memory Access (DMA).
If the packet is not destined for this ACM, it is sent back onto the IMT bus
towards the next module.
In the transmit direction, the Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) is calculated
for a packet, and the packet is transmitted through the HIPR (EAGLE 5 ISS
systems only) to the Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) bus.
Power Converter Unit
ACM power is provided by two DC to DC converters that convert the
–48VDC supplied to the system to +5VDC and +3VDC needed to power the
ACM components.
Test and Maintenance Features
Colored LEDs are mounted on the front edge of the printed circuit board,
ACM status and alarm indicators.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
ACM Technical Specifications
Table 3-12 summarizes the technical specifications of the Application
Communications Module.
Table 3-12.
ACM Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
0.4 A
Power
21 watts
Interfaces
Ethernet
10 Mbps
HMUX
125 Mbps
HIPR
125 Mbps
Clock
64 and 56 kbps
Dimensions
Height
Length
14.4 in. (36.6 cm)
12.8 in. (32.5 cm)
Translation Service Module
The Translation Service Module (TSM) provides translation capability and
Global Title Translation (GTT) implementation for the Local Number
Portability (LNP) function by means of one or more identically configured
cards per STP node. If more than one TSM is provided in each shelf, they must
be powered from different fuse positions and power feeds.
The E586 and E586-T primary boards provide all logic required to support the
TSM MCAP-256 functions. The E586 functions will include:
3-88
•
An Applications Processor for MCAP applications in the EAGLE 5 ISS.
•
A Communication Processor for the high speed bus interface (IMT bus).
•
Four Expansion Memory Interfaces to allow additional memory for
applications.
•
It communicates with the MCAP (GPSM II) in the MASP by the IMT bus.
•
The TSM can plug into any LIM slot.
•
A dual port memory to allow information to be passed between the
Application and Communications Processors.
•
A boot EPROM for initialization software of both the Application and
Communications Processors.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
TSMs can have one to four M256 memory modules provisioned. Part numbers
for the TSMs are:
•
TSM with one M256 (P/N 870-1289-xx)
•
TSM with two M256 (P/N 870-1290-xx)
•
TSM with three M256 (P/N 870-1991-xx)
•
TSM with four M256 (P/N 870-1292-xx)
For an illustration of the TSM with one M256 installed refer to Figure 3-47
"Translation Service Module (P/N 870-1289-xx)" on page 3-90. For an
illustration of a TSM with four M256s installed refer to Figure 3-48
"Translation Service Module (P/N 870-1292-xx)" on page 3-91.
The main assembly portion of the TSM consists of:
•
An 80486DX5 applications processor
•
An 80386 communications processor
•
An Inter-processor Message Transport (IMT) interface that provides two
125 Mbps communications links providing communications between
modules
CAUTION: It is Tekelec's recommendation that cards running the SCCP
application be uniformly distributed in the EAGLE 5 ISS to provide a more
even SCCP load distribution. During normal operation unevenly
distributed SCCP cards in an EAGLE 5 ISS would not have any network or
system impacts. However, should a particular SCCP card database(s)
become corrupted, inconsistent, or at a different level, depending on the
amount of service provided by that card and the extent of the database
issue, network impacts can occur.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-47. Translation Service Module (P/N 870-1289-xx)
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-48. Translation Service Module (P/N 870-1292-xx)
870-1292-XX TSM
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
E1 Interface Backplane Module
This section contains a general description of the hardware necessary to
support the E1 Interface application. Systems ordered with the E1 Interface
will have this hardware installed at the factory.
The E1/Channel applique provides a physical interface to the system. The
applique terminates or distributes E1 facility signals for the purpose of
processing the SS7 signaling links carried by the E1 carrier. The applique can
be configured as an E1 card or as a channel card, as shown in Figure 3-49 "E1
Card (P/N 870-1379-xx)" on page 3-92. The implementation is configured by
way of switch settings on the applique.
Figure 3-49. E1 Card (P/N 870-1379-xx)
TEKELEC
APPL
PROC
IMTA
IMTB
PORT A
PORT B
0123456789
CLEI
code
LIM-E1
870-1210-14
REV XX
0123456789
Serial
number
Revision
number
Part
number
870 1210 14 e1
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Table 3-13 provides an overview of the functions of the E1 card and the
channel card.
Table 3-13.
E1 Card and Channel Card
Card
E1
Function
•
Connectivity of both E1 interfaces to a 120 Ohm or 75 Ohm E1
interface. An external adapter is required for the 75 Ohm
interface.
•
Processing of a total of two time slots from the E1 interfaces
•
Interface E1 port 1 through an external backplane module to
Channel cards for processing of additional time slots
•
Processing of two time slots from the E1 interface
Channel •
Interface through an external backplane module to an E1 card
to process two time slots
NOTE: Although the E1 extension backplane will work with either
control or extension shelf, it is recommended that it be installed in an
extension shelf. There may be an issue of cable congestion if it is
installed in a control shelf.
Configured as an E1 Card
Configured as an E1 card, two separate and independent E1 inputs can be
terminated on an E1/Channel card. From one or two bidirectional E1 facility
inputs, one or two bidirectional 64K bits/sec. channels are extracted and
processed as SS7 signaling links. Implemented as E1 Link Interface Modules,
up to 32 separate and independent E1 inputs can be terminated in an system
extension shelf.
Configured as a Channel Card
In an system extension shelf equipped with an E1 cabling backplane module,
an E1-configured card terminates one or two E1 inputs and connects the E1
port one input to one of eight available buses on the E1 cabling backplane
module. Other E1/Channel appliques configured as channel cards also
connected to the E1 Cabling backplane module are able to extract any two 64
Kbit/sec. signaling channels from the same E1 port one input. In this manner,
up to 31 E1 channels can be used for signaling. The 32nd channel is reserved
for E1 synchronization.
If the installation is performed on existing equipment, the hardware
consisting of the E1 Interface backplane modules and E1 patch cables can be
installed without affecting system service as long as the cables between the E1
Interface backplane module and the system backplane are not connected.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The hardware installation consists of:
•
E1 Interface backplane modules (P/N 890-1037-06)
•
E1 Interface patch cables (P/N 830-1156-02)
If the site does not require more than two E1 channels in any E1 interface, the
E1 Interface backplane modules may not need to be installed. The E1 Interface
Kit consists of E1 patch cables, two backplane modules, and attaching
hardware.
The E1 Interface backplane module in Figure 3-50 is shown as it is installed on
a system extension shelf. Notice the upper and lower backplane modules are
identical. The cable shown connects the system port B on the extension shelf
backplane module to the appropriate connectors on the E1 interface B.
Figure 3-50. E1 Interface Backplane Module (P/N 890-1037-06)
E1 interface module installed
on back of frame
Inner cable tie
bars removed
A ports
E1 interface module B
B ports
e-1
Typical patch cable
from E1 backplane
to shelf backplane
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
External Interface Descriptions
The E1 Interface backplane module provides a method for extending
individual E1 channels from the E1-configured cards to any
channel-configured cards in use.
NOTE:
The following issues regarding the E1 backplane module:
•
Only one E1 trunk can be terminated on each bus on the backplane
module.
•
When installing non-E1 cards on the shelf equipped with the E1
interface backplane module, ensure that none of the slots to be used
are cabled to the backplane module. If a non-E1 card is installed in a
slot that is connected to the E1 backplane module, all E1 cards on that
bus may fail.
The E1 backplane module is impedance-controlled for 120 Ohms and is
designed for use with RS-485 transmission characteristics.
Possible Configurations
The E1 backplane module was designed to allow the maximum number of
possible customer setups. It allows the customer to choose between several
levels of diversity and convenience. Configurations depend on the number of
cards configured as E1 cards versus the number of cards configured as
channel cards. All signals labeled “E1 input” may be one or two E1 ports
depending on the cable used.
High Level Functional Description
The E1 interface backplane module provides a connection point from the
system backplane to an external E1 interface. The backplane module is
populated with 64 high density connectors and 64 terminating resistors. For a
method of connecting the backplane module and possible configurations on
the board (refer to Figure 3-53 "E1/T1 Interface Backplane Module Connector
Diagram" on page 3-97). Notice that each row is bused together and each
column lines up with a system slot. Also note there are always two E1
backplane modules available at the rear of the system shelf. The upper and
lower backplane modules are identical. Refer to Figure 3-51 "E1 Backplane
Module and Screws and Washers" on page 3-96.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-51. E1 Backplane Module and Screws and Washers
Typical E1 backplane,
attach or detach by
screws and washers
e-1attachment
Typical E1 backplane,
attach or detach by
screws and washers
E1 is attached in the outer most screw holes
to prevent center connector interference
The E1 interface patch cables are installed in the locations specified on the
“Installers Cable Running List” in the Equipment Specification specific to this
site. The E1 Patch cables (P/N 830-1156-02) are connected to the E1 backplane
module connectors J1 through J64 and the backplane port B per your
provisioning documents. Refer to Figure 3-52 for details.
Actual cable configuration is determined by the installation and customer
requirements. Cabling for T1 is the same as the cabling for E1.
Figure 3-52. E1 Backplane Modules Patch Cables
Tie wrap cable
to bar
Detail
Upper E1
backplane
Extension shelf
backplane
See detail
e1bckpln
Tie wrap cable
to bar
Lower E1
backplane
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-53. E1/T1 Interface Backplane Module Connector Diagram
Upper E1 backplane
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
Slot 7
Slot 6
Slot 5
Slot 4
Slot 3
Slot 2
Slot 1
J1
J10
J11
J12
J13
J14
J15
J16
E1
input
E1
input
E1
input
E1
input
Port A
Port A
Port A
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
Slot 7
E
1
Port B
Port B
E
1
Port B
E
1
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
Port B
Port A
Port A
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
Port B
Port A
Port A
E
1
Port B
Port B
Port B
E
1
Port B
Port A
Port A
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
Slot 6
J60
Slot 5
E1
input
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
Slot 7
J59
J45
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
J30
J46
J61
Slot 4
J47
J62
Slot 3
E1
input
Slot 6
Slot 5
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
E
1
J32
J48
J63
Slot 2
J64
Slot 1
E1
input
Slot 4
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
J31
Slot 3
E
1
E1
input
Slot 2
Slot 1
Port A
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
J58
J44
J29
C
h
a
n
n
e
l
E
1
Port B
J57
J43
J28
Port A
J56
J42
J27
Port B
J55
J41
J26
Port A
J54
J40
J25
Port B
J53
J39
J24
Port A
J52
J38
J23
J9
Port B
J51
J37
J22
J8
Port A
J50
J36
J21
J7
Port B
J49
J35
J20
J6
Port A
J34
J19
J5
Port B
J33
J18
J4
Port A
J17
J3
Port B
J2
Slot 7
Slot 6
Slot 5
Slot 4
Slot 3
Slot 2
Slot 1
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
Slot 7
Slot 6
Slot 5
Slot 4
Slot 3
Slot 2
Slot 1
J1
J10
J11
J12
J13
J14
J15
J16
System extension shelf
J2
J17
J33
J49
J3
J18
J34
J4
J19
J35
J50
J5
J20
J36
J51
J52
J6
J21
J37
J53
J7
J22
J38
J54
J8
J23
J39
J55
J9
J24
J40
J56
J25
J41
J57
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
Lower E1 backplane
J26
J42
J58
Slot 7
J27
J43
J59
Slot 6
J28
J44
J60
Slot 5
J29
J45
J61
Slot 4
J30
J46
J62
Slot 3
J31
J47
J63
Slot 2
J32
J48
J64
Slot 1
e1 slot
When mounting E1 backplane modules, be aware the card slots are marked on
the board as J1-J16, J17-J32, J33-J48, and J49-J64 should be positioned so the E1
board card slot numbers match the shelf card slot number on both the top and
bottom boards. For this to be accomplished, the top E1 board must be turned
180 degrees from the bottom board (refer to Figure 3-54 "E1 Interface
Backplane Module Connections" on page 3-98).
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-54. E1 Interface Backplane Module Connections
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
Slot 7
Slot 6
Slot 5
Slot 4
Slot 3
Slot 2
Slot 18 Slot 17 Slot 16 Slot 15 Slot 14 Slot 13 Slot 12 Slot 11 Slot 8
Slot 7
Slot 6
Slot 5
Slot 4
Slot 3
Slot 2
Slot 1
Connectors J1-J16
Connectors J17-J32
Connectors J33-J48
Connectors J49-J64
Slot mate
Slot 1
e1dia lenns
High-Capacity Multichannel Interface Module
The High-Capacity Multichannel Interface Module (HCMIM
P/N 870-2671-01) is a dual slot card providing eight trunk terminations
processing up to 64 signaling links of configurable channelized E1 or T1
connectivity. The eight E1/T1 ports reside on backplane connectors A and B.
Figure 3-55. HCMIM Module
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
All ports on a single board operate in the same trunk format, E1 or T1.
However, it is possible to have a mixture of trunk formats in a node with some
HCMIMs operating in T1 mode with others operating in E1 mode for gateway
node scenarios.
HCMIM has the following requirements and dependencies:
•
Any shelf that contains an HCMIM module must also be equipped with
the two HIPR modules to manage the increased traffic capacity.
•
HCMIM modules require a fan tray assembly for thermal management. Be
sure to install the fan assembly 890-0001-04 before installing the HCMIM
card.
•
Any unused slots (that is, empty slots where no cards are populated) in
shelves with HCMIMs must have Air Management cards,
P/N 870-1824-02, to ensure proper air flow and fan tray efficiency.
•
Frames where HCMIMs are to be deployed must be equipped with 60
Amp power circuits. The associated FAP for the frame must accommodate
60 Amp feeds (refer to “Fuse and Alarm Panels” on page 3-118).
•
The HCMIM is a double-slot module but can only be plugged into odd
numbered slots; the module will not power-up if plugged into an even
numbered slot.
Total system signaling link capacity depends on other cards within the system
and must not exceed the provisioning limit of the EAGLE 5 ISS. Since the
HCMIM has the capacity to process a full T1 or E1 on a single card, daisy
chaining or channel card operation is not needed. Interoperation with LIM-E1
or E1/T1 MIMs operating in channel mode is not supported.
Channelized Mode
The HCMIM provides access to eight E1/T1 ports residing on backplane
connectors A and B. Each data stream consists of 24 T1 or 31 E1 DS0 signaling
links assigned in a time-division multiplex (TDM) manner. Each channel
occupies a unique timeslot in the data stream and can be selected as a local
signaling link on the interface card. Each card can select up to a total of 64
signaling links. The default configuration is 16 signaling links.
The HCMIM card’s I/O signals are routed to only the odd backplane slot.
External interfaces (the E1/T1 trunks) use both backplane interfaces of the
single backplane slot used, each terminating four E1/T1 ports (trunks). These
two backplane interfaces will be referred to in this section as interfaces A and
B. Interface A terminates E1/T1 ports 1-4, while Interface B terminates E1/T1
ports 5-8. Refer to Figure 3-56.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-56. Channelized HCMIM Interfaces
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 1
Interface A
HC-MIM
card
Up to 64
channels per
card from any
combination of
ports 1 - 8
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 2
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 3
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 4
Interface B
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 5
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 6
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 7
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 8
NOTE: All ports on a single board must operate in the same trunk
format, E1 or T1, and that the total number of channels utilized as
signaling links must not exceed the maximum allowable number in
accordance with a Feature Access Key defining total channel capacity.
Channel Bridging
Channel Bridging is the processing of signaling channels that are intermixed
on trunks with voice or data channels. The HCMIM provides Channel
Bridging which allows for better utilization of bandwidth without dedicating
entire trunks to signaling.Non-signaling channels are bridged to an adjacent
E1/T1 port for transport to other network devices. Likewise, signaling
channels are merged to non-signaling data for transmission back to the mixed
network. In this configuration, the High-speed Master Timing option can only
apply to one trunk format since only one high-speed clock rate can be
provided. Channel bridging is available only in the channelized mode.
3-100
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-57. Channel Bridging Schematic
Signaling channels
proceed through
HC-MIM and
Eagle System for
processing.
Input Port Y
Mixed Info
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
18
16
8
7
6
3
24 23 22 21 20 19 I 17 I 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 I I I 5 4 I 2 1
Non-signaling channels
are “bridged” to paired
port for retransmission to
other network elements
Output Port Y+1
Voice/data Info
“Inbound” Traffic
Signaling channels
are “merged” to
outgoing data
stream on Port Y.
Output Port Y
Mixed Info
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
3
6
7
8
16
18
# Signaling channel
#
Voice or data channel
I
Idle Patterns
1 2 X 4 5 X X X 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 X 17 X 19 20 21 22 23 24
X “Don’t Care” data
Y is any odd numbered port
“Outbound” Traffic
Input Port Y+1
Voice/data Info
NOTE: Channel Bridging is unique to the HCMIM card and is not
available on other E1 or T1 modules. Software must enable and manage
this feature.
Timeslots located on the bridging slave E1/T1 port, (timeslots that have been
dropped from the bridging master E1/T1 port), contain idle patterns provided
by the EAGLE 5 ISS. All other idle timeslots that are not dropped must contain
an idle pattern provided by the remote network elements connected to both
E1/T1 ports (bridging master and slave). Without these patterns on the idle
timeslots, instability of the E1/T1 may occur.
NOTE: Provisioning of signaling links on the bridging slave E1/T1
port is not allowed while channel bridging is activated.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Channel Bridging is implemented by pairing E1/T1 ports; this pairing limits
provisioning to odd E1/T1 ports only (1,3,5,7) when channel bridging is
enabled. The adjacent even numbered E1/T1 ports (2, 4, 6, 8) are used to allow
the original non-signaling data received on the bridging master (odd) E1/T1
port to reach downstream network elements. This is a bi-directional interface
so data is also able to enter the bridging slave E1/T1 port and leave through
the bridging master E1/T1 port. This feature may be independently selected
on E1/T1 ports 1, 3, 5, and/or 7. When selected, the bridging slave (even)
E1/T1 port would be provisioned as the pass-through E1/T1 port. On ports
operating in Channel Bridging mode, all time-slots not provisioned for
signaling are handled as active data and not overwritten by the HCMIM.
Table 3-14.
Channel Bridging E1/T1 Port Pairing
Primary E1/T1 Port
Paired E1/T1 Port
Number
Payload Contents
Number
Payload Contents
1
Signaling Processed
2
Unprocessed
3
Signaling Processed
4
Unprocessed
5
Signaling Processed
6
Unprocessed
7
Signaling Processed
8
Unprocessed
Timing
In order to use channel bridging without facility errors, both bridging master
and bridging slave E1/T1 ports must be synchronous; that is, both master and
slave must be timed off the same clock source. This synchronization may be
accomplished two ways:
•
•
The bridging master E1/T1 port may use the timing recovered from the
bridging slave E1/T1 port or visa versa.
Both the bridging master and bridging slave E1/T1 ports are using an
external clock source (the EAGLE 5 ISS’s MASTER option for the E1/T1
port provisioning).
Any other methods used for timing could cause problems on the E1/T1 trunk
and are not supported.
Alarms and LEDs
The channel bridging functionality requires no additional statistics collection
for the bridging slave E1/T1 port; however, standard statistics/measurements
are made on the bridging master E1/T1 port. Alarms for the bridging slave
E1/T1 port are limited to trunk-level synchronization and framing alarms.
Channel alarm LEDs for the bridging slave E1/T1 port are amber to indicate
the Channel Bridging mode of operation.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Three LEDs provide conventional EAGLE 5 ISS card indications of APPL Proc
operation, and IMT A and IMT B operation. Sixteen (16) LEDs, two for each
E1/T1 port are used to indicate port and channel (signaling link) status. One
LED per E1/T1 port indicates E1/T1 port Status and one LED per E1/T1 port
indicates aggregated channel status.
Table 3-15.
Channelized HCMIM LEDs
Color
Port Status LED
Aggregated Channel Status LED
Green
No alarms, port has acquired timing
and framing synchronization
All channels provisioned =ISNR
Amber
blinking
Loss of Frame Synchronization
Any channels provisioned = OOS
Amber
Remote alarm condition
Indicates port is the “reflected” port in
Channel Bridging mode of operation.
Applies only to “even” numbered ports
Red
blinking
Loss of signal and remaining errors
All channels provisioned = OOS
Red
Port not provisioned
No channels are provisioned
Technical Specifications
Table 3-16.
HCMIM Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
1.3A-1.55A
Power
65W typical, 70W max.
Physical Characteristics
Height
14.43 in. (36.65 cm)
Width
2.06 in. (5.23 cm)
Depth
12.80 in. (32.51 cm)
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
HCMIM Cable
The cable designed for the HCMIM card is the T1 MIM LIM
P/N 830-0948-XX. When upgrading from a E1/T1 MIM to an HCMIM, a cable
adapter is not required. However, if you are replacing a MPL with an
HCMIM, a port adapter is required.
NOTE: There will be a 830-0948-XX cable terminated on the odd
shelves A and B backplane interfaces. Each cable provides four E1/T1
ports.
E5 Interface Module
The E5 interface module (card) is a link interface card that utilizes an
Embedded Processor Module (EPM) with an appliqué card. The E5 card
provides the EAGLE system a high performance general purpose-processing
platform in a single-slot footprint. The E5 card is used on existing EAGLE 5
control and extension shelves.
The EPM appliqué cards provide LIM functionality such as E1/T1 or IP. The
EPM accepts up two single-width or one double width PCI Mezzanine
appliqué card(s). The EPM assembly contains all of the necessary logic to
perform both application and communication processing of the data streams
provided by the appliqué cards such as E1/T1 or IP. All EAGLE System
interfacing to the EPM occurs through the EAGLE backplane signals and
connects to the appliqué cards through the PCI Mezzanine Card (PMC)
interface.
The types of E5 cards presently available are:
•
E5-E1T1 (P/N 870-1873-02)
•
E5-ENET (P/N 870-2212-02)
E5-E1T1 Module
The E5-E1T1 card (P/N 870-1873-02) is a single slot card providing eight trunk
terminations processing up to 32 signaling links of configurable channelized
E1 or T1 connectivity. The eight E1/T1 ports reside on backplane connectors A
and B. The E5-E1T1 supports only one SE-HSL signaling link on one of the
eight ports and it must be A.
All ports on a single board operate in the same trunk format, E1 or T1.
However, it is possible to have a mixture of trunk formats in a node with some
E5-E1T1s operating in T1 mode with others operating in E1 mode for gateway
node scenarios.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The E5-E1T1 has the following requirements and dependencies:
•
Requires HIPR to be active on both IMT buses in the shelf where the
E5-E1T1 will reside.
NOTE: HIPR in one bus and HMUX in the other bus for that shelf is
not a supported configuration and will be treated as no HIPR cards
being present in the shelf.
•
The E5-E1T1 will not support channel cards as it uses all connections on
the backplane.
•
E5 modules do not require a fan tray assembly for thermal management.
•
The E5-E1T1 is a single-slot module that can be used in any slot that a LIM
can be configured.
Total system signaling link capacity depends on other cards within the system
and must not exceed the provisioning limit of the EAGLE system. Since the
E5-E1T1 has the capacity to process a full T1 or E1 on a single card, daisy
chaining or channel card operation is not needed. Interoperation with LIM-E1
or E1/T1 MIMs operating in channel mode is not supported.
The maximum provisionable links for the E5-E1T1 will be 32 links. If the
E5-E1T1 has more than 32 links provisioned, it will auto-inhibit. The fan
feature is ignored for the E5-E1T1.
Channelized Mode
The E5-E1T1 provides access to eight E1/T1 ports residing on backplane
connectors A and B. Each data stream consists of 24 T1 or 31 E1 DS0 signaling
links assigned in a time-division multiplex (TDM) manner. Each channel
occupies a unique timeslot in the data stream and can be selected as a local
signaling link on the interface card. Each card can select up to a total of 64
signaling links. The default configuration is 16 signaling links.
External interfaces (the E1/T1 trunks) use both backplane interfaces of the
single backplane slot used, each terminating four E1/T1 ports (trunks). These
two backplane interfaces will be referred to in this section as interfaces A and
B. Interface A terminates E1/T1 ports 1-4, while Interface B terminates E1/T1
ports 5-8. Refer to Figure 3-58.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-58. Channelized E5-E1T1 Interfaces
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 1
Interface A
E5-E1T1
card
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 2
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 3
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 4
Up to 32
channels per
card from any
combination of
ports 1 - 8
Interface B
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 5
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 6
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 7
E1/T1 (send)
E1/T1
E1/T1 (receive) Port 8
NOTE: All ports on a single board must operate in the same trunk
format, E1 or T1, and that the total number of channels utilized as
signaling links must not exceed the maximum allowable number in
accordance with a Feature Access Key defining total channel capacity.
Channel Bridging
Channel Bridging is the processing of signaling channels that are intermixed
on trunks with voice or data channels. The HCMIM provides Channel
Bridging which allows for better utilization of bandwidth without dedicating
entire trunks to signaling. Non-signaling channels are bridged to an adjacent
E1/T1 port for transport to other network devices. Likewise, signaling
channels are merged to non-signaling data for transmission back to the mixed
network.
In this configuration, the High-speed Master Timing option can only apply to
one trunk format since only one high-speed clock rate can be provided.
Channel bridging is available only in the channelized mode. Refer to
Figure 3-59.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-59. Channel Bridging Schematic
Signaling channels proceed
through E1/T1-MIM and
Eagle System for processing
Input Port
Mixed
24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
18
16
8
7
6
3
24 23 22 21 20 19 I 17 I 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 I I I 5 4 I 2 1
Non - signaling channels
are bridged to paired
port for retransmission to
other network elements
“Inbound” Traffic
Output Port
Voice/data
Signaling channels
are merged to
outgoing data
stream on Port Y.
Output Port
Mixed
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
3
6
7
8
16
18
# Signaling channel
#
Voice or data channel
I
Idle Patterns
1 2 X 4 5 X X X 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 X 17 X 19 20 21 22 23 24
X “Don’t Care” data
Y is any odd numbered
“Outbound” Traffic
Input Port
Voice/data
Timeslots located on the bridging slave E1/T1 port, (timeslots that have been
dropped from the bridging master E1/T1 port), contain idle patterns provided
by the EAGLE. All other idle timeslots that are not dropped must contain an
idle pattern provided by the remote network elements connected to both
E1/T1 ports (bridging master and slave). Without these patterns on the idle
timeslots, instability of the E1/T1 may occur.
NOTE: Provisioning of signaling links on the bridging slave E1/T1
port is not allowed while channel bridging is activated.
Channel Bridging is implemented by pairing E1/T1 ports; this pairing limits
provisioning to odd E1/T1 ports only (1,3,5,7) when channel bridging is
enabled. The adjacent even numbered E1/T1 ports (2, 4, 6, 8) are used to allow
the original non-signaling data received on the bridging master (odd) E1/T1
port to reach downstream network elements. This is a bi-directional interface
so data is also able to enter the bridging slave E1/T1 port and leave through
the bridging master E1/T1 port. This feature may be independently selected
on E1/T1 ports 1, 3, 5, and/or 7. When selected, the bridging slave (even)
E1/T1 port would be provisioned as the pass-through E1/T1 port. On ports
operating in Channel Bridging mode, all time-slots not provisioned for
signaling are handled as active data and not overwritten by the E5-E1T1.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Table 3-17.
Channel Bridging E1/T1 Port Pairing
Primary E1/T1 Port
Paired E1/T1 Port
Number
Payload Contents
Number
Payload Contents
1
Signaling Processed
2
Unprocessed
3
Signaling Processed
4
Unprocessed
5
Signaling Processed
6
Unprocessed
7
Signaling Processed
8
Unprocessed
Timing
In order to use channel bridging without facility errors, both bridging master
and bridging slave E1/T1 ports must be synchronous; that is, both master and
slave must be timed off the same clock source. This synchronization may be
accomplished two ways:
•
•
The bridging master E1/T1 port may use the timing recovered from the
bridging slave E1/T1 port or visa versa.
Both the bridging master and bridging slave E1/T1 ports are using an
external clock source (the EAGLE’s MASTER option for the E1/T1 port
provisioning).
Any other methods used for timing could cause problems on the E1/T1 trunk
and are not supported.
Alarms and LEDs
The channel bridging functionality requires no additional statistics collection
for the bridging slave E1/T1 port; however, standard statistics/measurements
are made on the bridging master E1/T1 port. Alarms for the bridging slave
E1/T1 port are limited to trunk-level synchronization and framing alarms.
Channel alarm LEDs for the bridging slave E1/T1 port are amber to indicate
the Channel Bridging mode of operation.
Three LEDs provide conventional EAGLE card indications of APPL Proc
operation, and IMT A and IMT B operation. Up to sixteen (16) LEDs, two for
each E1/T1 port, are used to indicate port and channel (signaling link) status.
One LED per E1/T1 port indicates E1/T1 port Status and one LED per E1/T1
port indicates aggregated channel status. See Figure 3-60.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-60. E5-E1T1
TEKELEC
APPL
PROC
IMT A
IMT B
RS-232
PORT LINK
0
1
2
A
3
PORT LINK
0
1
2
B
E5-E1T1
870-1873-02
REV A
3
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3-109
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Table 3-18.
E5-E1T1 LEDs
Aggregated Channel
Status LED
Color
Port Status LED
Green
No alarms, port has
acquired timing and
framing
synchronization
All channels provisioned
=IS-NR
Amber
blinking
Loss of Frame
Synchronization
Any channels
provisioned = OOS
Amber
Remote alarm
condition
Indicates port is the
“reflected” port in
Channel Bridging mode
of operation. Applies
only to “even” numbered
ports
Red
blinking
Loss of signal and
remaining errors
All channels provisioned
= OOS
Red
Port not provisioned
No channels are
provisioned
Technical Specifications
Table 3-19.
E5-E1T1 Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
646mA
Power
26W
Physical Characteristics
3-110
Height
14.43 in. (36.65 cm)
Width
2.06 in. (5.23 cm)
Depth
12.80 in. (32.51 cm)
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
E5-ENET Module
The E5-ENET card (P/N 870-2212-02) is a single slot card providing one or
more Ethernet interfaces. The E5-ENET card has the following requirements
and dependencies:
•
The E5-ENET has 2 physical 10/100 Mbps Ethernet ports.
•
The E5-ENET supports protocols as identified below:
NOTE: The E5-ENET is provisionable for IPLIMx or IPGWx, but does
not support both functions on a single card simultaneously.
Table 3-20.
Table 3-21.
E5-ENET Supported Protocols
Feature
Protocols Supported
IPLIM
SCTP, M2PA
IPGWY
SCTP, M3UA, SUA
E5-ENET Capacities
Parameter
E5-ENET cards per node
SCTP entities per E5-ENET module
IPLIM
IPGWY
100
64
16 SCTP/IP
Associations
50 SCTP
Connections
The maximum possible connections is (100*16) + (64*50) = 4800. EAGLE
currently supports 4000 in the link table.
•
Requires HIPR to be active on both IMT buses in the shelf where the
E5-ENET will reside.
NOTE: HIPR in one bus and HMUX in the other bus for that shelf is
not a supported configuration and will be treated as no HIPR cards
being present in the shelf.
•
An adapter cable per Ethernet port. See “Interface Cable Differences” on
page 3-115.
•
Maximum number of cards per shelf is 10 for the control shelf and 16 for
the extension shelf.
•
Mix of E5-ENET/HCMIM on a shelf can be any up to shelf and power
capacity. Note: It is not recommended that customers mix SS-EDCM and
DCM cards with E5-ENET cards within a linkset due to differences in
performance and N+1 redundancy.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
•
The E5-ENET platform does not preserve memory across boots (no
"dual-port memory"). As a result the connection manager client mode
flags are not stored. There is no post-mortem data beyond what is
provided with ATH obit data.
Thermal Management
The E5-ENET includes thermal management and alarming provisions to
protect the card from damage if environmental conditions hinder thermal
stability. Table 3-22 identifies the appropriate responses.
Table 3-22.
Thermal Alarm Conditions
Board Temperature
Actions
Temp1 Exceeded
Major alarm raised
Temp2 Exceeded
Critical alarm raised; failover initiated,
traffic rerouted
Temperature abated
Normal operation restored
Thermtrip - shutdown
temperature exceeded
CPU shuts down automatically. Card
must be reseated to restore operation
once temperature returns to normal
operating conditions
Configurable SCTP Buffers
The default SCTP buffer configuration for connections is 16k bytes for IPGWx
and 200k bytes for IPLIMx. When a previous release is upgraded to the
current release supporting this feature, the IPAPSOCK database table will
insert this value into the table since no value will exist. The OAM database
code will have to be modified to accommodate the upgrade table change.
There is a minimum and maximum SCTP buffer configuration per connection
(8192 bytes and 3.125Mbytes, respectively). The card maximum is
3.125Mbytes, so if a connection has that size buffer configuration, there can be
only 1 connection on the card. Conversely, if each connection had 8192 byte
buffers, all 16 or 50 connections could be supported with memory to spare.
LED Indicators
The E5-ENET includes three front panel indicators (LEDs) for APPL Proc
operation, IMT A, and IMT B status. In addition, four front panel LED
Link/Activity indicators (two for each IP port used). The Link indicator will
illuminate Green when the interface is connected to an active Ethernet device
and OFF when not connected. The Activity indicator will be GREEN when
the IP signaling links are active and synchronized and RED otherwise. See
Figure 3-61.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-61. E5-ENET
TEKELEC
APPL
PROC
IMT A
IMT B
RS-232
ACT LINK
0
1
A
ACT LINK
0
1
E5-ENET
870-2212-02
REV A
B
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Table 3-23.
Front Faceplate LED Indicators
LED
ACT
LINK
RED
Signaling links inactive,
or 1 or more active links
are out-of-service
N/A
GREEN
All active links are
in-service
Ethernet signal detected
OFF
Card nonfunctional
No Ethernet signal
detected
Table 3-24.
ACT Status LED states for IPLIMx
IPLIMx SLK States (Port A or Port B)
ACT Status LED
None configured
Red
All are OOS-MT-DSBLD
Red
None are OOS-MT and at least one is IS-NR
or IS-ANR
Green
At least 1 is OOS-MT
Table 3-25.
ACT Status LED states for IPGWx
IPGWx SLK PST
3-114
Red
ACT Status LED
A0
B0
None configured (card must be
inhibited)
Red
Red
OOS-MT-DSBLD
Red
Green
IS-NR or IS-ANR
Green
Green
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Interface Cable Differences
The Ethernet cable pinouts differ between the E5-ENET card and the
DCM/SSEDCM cards.
•
Adapter P/N 830-1103-02 is required for each E5-ENET interface used
when using the existing DCM cable (P/N 830-0978-xx). The adapter is
connected between the backplane connector and the existing DCM cable
for the card..
•
Adapter P/N 830-1102-02 is required for installation of the E5-ENETwhen
the DCM cable is replaced with an RJ-45 CAT-5E cable (P/N 830-0724-xx).
The adapter is connected to the backplane and the RJ-45 CAT 5E cable is
connected from the other side of the adapter to a switch, or a hub, or a
patch panel (same place the DCM cable was terminated).
If the card inserted into the slot does not match the backplane connector, the
interface will not function.
Technical Specifications
Table 3-26.
E5-ENET Technical Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
-48VDC
Current
712mA-736mA
Power
29.2W typical, 30.2W max.
Physical Characteristics
Height
14.43 in. (36.65 cm)
Width
2.06 in. (5.23 cm)
Depth
12.80 in. (32.51 cm)
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Air Management Card
The Air Management (P/N 870-1824-02) card is an unpowered filler card used
to ensure efficient air flow in shelves equipped with fans. Air Management
cards are required in all empty slots in the shelf above the 890-0001-04 fan
assembly used with HCMIM cards.
Figure 3-62. Air Management card
Fan Tray
The EAGLE 5 ISS fan tray P/N 890-0001-04 contains three -48V fans that
provide a redundant airflow for thermal management of the shelf. The
EAGLE 5 ISS fan tray is powered by –48 VDC, at a fused rating of 3A. It has
redundant power inputs (A and B). Each input is provided by a DB-9, keyed,
positive locking connector. The contacts have 30 micro-inches of gold plating.
NOTE: Shelves with HCMIM cards are required to be cooled by fan
tray P/N 890-0001-04.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-63. Fan Tray
Fan Filter
Filter Tab
Fan Card
Replaceable Fans
Failover is governed by a fan controller card on the fan tray. The fan tray will
provide adequate airflow if there is a single fan failure or during replacement
of one of the three fans while the EAGLE 5 ISS fan tray is operational. The
control card bracket provides mounting for the control PCB
(P/N 850-0703-01). The control PCB inserts into the front face of the fan tray
on card guides mounted to the left side wall, and is intended to be a field
replaceable item.
The EAGLE 5 ISS fan tray is designed to be field installable, with mounting
brackets, in both a Tekelec Heavy Duty frame and a standard frame. There is
one disposable air filter in the assembly (P/N 551-0032-01). The filters should
be changed once a month.
The EAGLE 5 ISS fan tray is designed to be compliant to Bellcore Standards
GR-63-CORE, GR-78-CORE, and GR-1089-CORE when mounted in a Tekelec
Heavy Duty Frame or standard frame. The EAGLE 5 ISS fan tray is also
designed to be UL and CE compliant. The EAGLE 5 ISS fan tray is designed to
operate in a Central Office environment with continuous operation at -5C to
50C and 5% to 90% RH in compliance with GR-63-CORE.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Fuse and Alarm Panels
The Fuse and Alarm Panel (FAP) provides protected distribution of –48VDC
power to the shelves in the frame. Allowing for the full population of a frame
and for the failure of one primary supply, new installations of Control and
Extension frames require two 60A feeds. Frames with EOAPs require 30A.
The FAP is installed at the top of the frame and uses two cables to bring A and
B power to the frame. The FAP contains two separate circuits, A and B.
Current flows from the input terminals to the fuse bus. Protection is provided
by fuses placed in fuse holders on the front panel. When a fuse is installed in a
fuse holder, the circuit is completed to the output connector.
WARNING: Existing frames that are fused at 40 amps may be upgraded to
support 60 amps with a FAP upgrade kit. Frames that contain HC-MIMs
must be upgraded to support 60 amps. Customers do not perform a FAP
upgrade; these upgrades are performed by Tekelec personnel.
WARNING: The FAP P/N 870-1606-02 Revs A-B can be upgraded to FAP
P/N 870-1606-02 Rev C with FAP upgrade kit P/N 870-1831-01. The FAP
P/N 870-2320-01 Revs A-I can be upgraded to FAP P/N 870-2320-01 Rev J
with FAP upgrade kit P/N 870-1831-02.
CAUTION: All personnel associated with the installation of this system
must adhere to all safety precautions and protection equipment required to
avoid the possibility of injury to personnel, service degradation, and/or
service interruption.
CAUTION: This is a redundant system to allow service during normal
maintenance. When repairs require a total power disconnect, both input
supply sources must be disconnected. This will cause service interruption
and take down the system.
Fuses
The fuse and alarm panel uses GMT-type fuses of different amperage ratings
(refer to Table 3-27) for individual circuit protection. If a frame circuit fuse is
blown the alarm is indicated by an LED on the front panel and a small colored
flag on the fuse shows the fuse that has failed (refer to Figure 3-64). Refer to
the Maintenance Manual for procedures on replacing fuses and the FAP
assembly.
CAUTION: Always use a fuse of the same type and amperage rating
when replacing a failed fuse.
3-118
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-64. Fuse (GMT Brand Shown)
)
flag
blown position
ready position
fuse
element
Table 3-27.
Fuse Color Codes of Alarm Flags
Fuse Amp
Fuse Flag Color
Fuse Amp
Fuse Flag Color
0.18A
0.2A
0.25A
0.33A
0.375A
0.5A
0.65A
0.75A
1A
1.33A
1.5A
Orange-Red
Black-Red
Violet
Yellow-Green
White-Green
Red
Black
Brown
Gray
White
White-Yellow
2A
2.5A
3A
3.5A
4A
5A
7.5A
10A
12A
15A
Orange
White-Orange
Blue
White-Blue
White -Brown
Green
Black-White
Red-White
Yellow-Green
Red-Blue
Fuse and Alarm Panel (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx)
The FAP P/N 870-1606-xx can be installed in standard frames. The FAP
P/N 870-2320-xx can be installed in heavy duty frames.
The FAP contains an alarm board, two diode boards, and a jumper board.
These boards are located at the front center of the FAP. The fuse holders are to
the left and right of these boards as shown in Figure 3-65.
The alarm board contains a FUSE LED to indicate a failed fuse (for either bus
A or B) and LEDs to indicate Critical, Major, and Minor alarms generated by
the system that are applicable to that frame which the FAP is installed.
There are two diode boards in the FAP, one for bus A and one for bus B. Each
diode board contains power diodes and circuitry which allow one bus to pick
up the entire load when there is a loss of input power on the other bus. An
LED indicates the input power state to the FAP. The LED is green when input
power is applied to that bus of the FAP and is red when there is no input
power to that bus of the FAP.
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The Maintenance (Jumper) board allows the removal of one or both diode
boards without taking down the system. The Jumper board has two
connectors and a connector plug. During normal operation, the connector
plug is seated on the first connector. For maintenance operation, the jumper
board has to be removed and the connector plug moved to the second
connector. In the maintenance position, the connector plug connects both A
and B power feeds to the fuse panels so one or both diode boards can be safely
removed. The OP/MAINT LED is green when the Jumper board is in normal
operational mode and is red when in the maintenance mode of operation.
Refer to the Maintenance Manual for additional information to place the FAP
into Maintenance Mode of operation.
An unlit LED indicates a failed LED or no power to the FAP.
Figure 3-65 and Table 3-28 describes the front panel configuration of the fuse
and alarm panel (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx).
Figure 3-65. Fuse and Alarm Panel (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) Front
Faceplate Screw holes
Faceplate Screw holes
PWR TEST
POINT
POS
CRITICAL
MAJOR
PWR ALARM A
OP/MAINT
PWR TEST
POINT
NEG
FAP_DB_A
PWR TEST
POINT
POS
PWR ALARM B
MINOR
FUSE
FAP_JB
FAP_AB
PWR TEST
POINT
NEG
FAP_DB_B
FUSE BANK B
FUSE BANK A
TEKELEC
fap frnt
A-side
Part number
Bar code
Serialization number
3-120
Frontview
Fuse location labels
B-side
Fuse location labels
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Fuse and Alarm Panel c Front Items
Table 3-28.
Fuse Panel Item
Description
Fuse Positions
Two groups of 20 GMT fuses
PWR ALARM
LED indicator for A or B diode board input
power
• Green - input power applied
• Red - no input power to board
OP/MAINT
LED indicator for mode of operation
• Green - normal
• Red - maintenance
FUSE
LED indicator for fuse fail alarm
• Green - normal
• Red - blown fuse
CRITICAL
LED indicator for frame critical alarm
MAJOR
LED indicator for frame major alarm
MINOR
LED indicator for frame minor alarm
Figures 3-66 and Table 3-29 describes the rear panel configuration of fuse and
alarm panel (P/N 870-1606-xx). Refer to the Installation Manual for cabling
connection information.
Figure 3-66. Fuse and Alarm Panel (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) Rear
Upper cable 830-0315-04
Upper cable 830-0315-04
Mid cable 830-0315-05
Mid cable 830-0315-05
Low cable 830-0315-06
ALARM INTERFACE
Low cable 830-0315-06
-48V
-48V
B
A
-48V
B
A
12 18 19 20
-48V
12 18 19 20
RET
RET
LOGIC
GND
12 18 19 20
P1
P2
Return
12 18 19 20
P1
P3
12 18 19 20
Fuse position
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Chassis
ground
P2
P3
LOGIC
GND
12 18 19 20
Fuse position
3-121
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Table 3-29.
Fuse and Alarm Panel
(P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx) Rear
Fuse Panel Item
Description
Input Terminal Block A
Logic Ground, Return, and Input for power
source A
Input Terminal Block B
Logic Ground, Return, and Input for power
source B
Output Terminal Block A
–48VDC, Chassis Ground, and RTN for Fuse
location 12, 18, 19, and 20 for side A.
These are miscellaneous extra capacity fuses
refer to “Provision Rules for FAP Fuse Locations”
on page 3-123
Output Terminal Block B
–48VDC, Chassis Ground, and RTN for Fuse
location 12, 18, 19, and 20 for side B.
These are miscellaneous extra capacity fuses
refer to “Provision Rules for FAP Fuse Locations”
on page 3-123
–48VDC, Chassis Ground, 26-pin “D” connectors, P1, P2, and P3 for A-side
and RTN Outputs A
outputs.
–48VDC, Chassis Ground, 26-pin “D” connectors, P1, P2, and P3 for B-side
and RTN Outputs B
outputs.
Table 3-30.
Fuse and Alarm Panel (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx)
Specifications
Power Requirements
Voltage
–48VDC
Current Capacity
40 amp “A” or “B” for P/N 870-1606-01
40 amp “A” or “B” for P/N 870-1606-02 Rev A and B
40 amp “A” or “B” for P/N 870-2320-01 Rev A through H
60 amp “A” or “B” for P/N 870-1606-02 Rev C
60 amp “A” or “B” for P/N 870-2320-01 Rev J
Power Dissipation
8 W, no fuse load
Dimensions
Height
Width
Depth
3-122
3 inches (7.6 cm)
17 inches (43.2 cm)
10.25 inches (26 cm)
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Provision Rules for FAP Fuse Locations
These provisioning rules for fuse placement apply to FAPs P/N 870-1606-xx
and P/N 870-2320-xx.
•
Maximum fuse size 3 amp for Fuse one through Fuse 18 when P1, P2, or
P3 are used for power output
•
P2 cannot be used if the Terminal Strip (output) position 12 is used
•
P3 cannot be used if the Terminal Strip (output) position 18 is used
•
Fuse maximum of 15 amp for fuse positions 12, 18, 19, and 20, all other
fuse positions are 3 amp
NOTE: For fuse locations 12, 18, 19, and 20, the fuse maximum is 10
amp when adjacent locations are used.
•
Power feed must originate from the same power source
•
Fuse and Alarm Panel, Jumper Board (P/N 870-1641-01) fuse size on
boards 40 amp per side for P/N 870-1606-02 Rev A and B, and for
P/N 870-2320-03 Rev A through I. Fuse size on boards 60 amp per side for
P/N 870-1606-02 Rev C and 870-2320-03 Rev J.
•
Fuse and Alarm Panel, Jumper board in maintenance mode must be less
than 40 amp per distributed output side.
Label Kit for FAP (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx)
Label Kit (P/N 870-1915-02) contains large sheets of die-cut stick-on labels for
the appropriate frames. There are three large sheets of die-cut, stick-on labels:
•
Sheet (P/N 658-0604-01) is for FUSE BANK A, CONTROL FRAME
through EF-04
•
Sheet (P/N 658-0604-02) is for FUSE BANK B, CONTROL FRAME
through EF-04
•
Sheet (P/N 658-0604-03) is for MISC FRAME
Also included in the Label Kit (P/N 870-1915-02) are smaller die-cut stick-on
labels for different fuses relating to different amps and individual pieces of
site-specific equipment; these are to be pressed into fuse OPEN spaces.
Procedure – Faceplate Labels
1. Peel the individual die-cut label that designates a specific frame from one
of the three large die-cut sheets of labels.
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3-123
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
2.
Press the sticky side of the label into the silk screened area on the front of
the faceplate of the Fuse and Alarm Panel (P/N 870-1606-xx) for the
specific frame (refer to Figure 3-67 "FAP, Fuse Label Kit
(P/N 870-1915-02)" on page 3-124). The left side of the faceplate is marked
A and the right side of the faceplate is marked B.
3. The label designates CONTROL FRAME or EF-00 through EF-04. There
are also labels for the MISC FRAME.
The labels must be pressed into place on the front faceplate of the correct
frame.
Figure 3-67. FAP, Fuse Label Kit (P/N 870-1915-02)
Stick on label from
Label Kit P/N 870-1915-01
Stick on label from
Label Kit P/N 870-1915-01
FUSE BANK A
FUSE BANK B
FAP_DB_A
FAP_JB FAP_AB FAP_DB_B
TEKELEC
fap-lable frnt
Front view
Fuse Assignments
Refer to the Installation Manual, “Fuse and Card Locations” section for
information on the fuse assignments for the Control Frame, CF-00 and five
Extension Frames, EF-00 through EF-04.
The power distribution for the control frame and the extension frame are
shown in the following figures:
3-124
•
Control frame, Figure 3-68, “Control Frame FAP (P/N 870-0243-08 and
P/N 870-1606-xx),” on page 3-125
•
Extension frame, Figure 3-69 "Extension Frame FAP (P/N 870-0243-08
and P/N 870-1606-xx)" on page 3-126
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-68. Control Frame FAP (P/N 870-0243-08 and P/N 870-1606-xx)
CF Power Distribution
B BATT
To GND Window
L GND
A BATT
Misc
1
1 20
10
Misc
10
B FAP A
GND
GND
MASP-B
slots
15-16
MDAL
slot 17
20
MASP-A slots IPMX-A slots
7-8
slots
11-12 slot 9
13-14
slots
5-6
slots
3-4
Control
Shelf
IPMX-B
slot 10
GND
GND
slots
17-18
slots
15-16
slots
13-14
slots
11-12
IPMX-A
slot 9
slots
7-8
slots
5-6
slots
3-4
GND
GND
slots
15-16
slots
1-2
Extension
Shelf
IPMX-B
slot 10
slots
17-18
slots
1-2
slots
13-14
slots
11-12
IPMX-A
slot 9
IPMX-B
slot 10
slots
7-8
slots
5-6
slots
3-4
slots
1-2
Extension
Shelf
cf powdist 22
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-125
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-69. Extension Frame FAP (P/N 870-0243-08 and P/N 870-1606-xx)
EF Power Distribution
B BATT
To GND Window
L GND
A BATT
Misc
1
Misc
1 20
10
10
B FAP A
GND
GND
Slots
17-18
Slots
15-16
Slots
13-14
Slots IPMX-A Slots
7-8
11-12 slot 9
Slots
5-6
Slots
13-14
Slots
11-12
IPMX-A
slot 9
Slots
7-8
Slots
5-6
Slots
3-4
GND
GND
Slots
15-16
Slots
1-2
Extension
Shelf
IPMX-B
slot 10
Slots
17-18
Slots
1-2
GND
GND
Slots
15-16
Slots
3-4
Extension
shelf
IPMX-B
slot 10
Slots
17-18
20
Slots
13-14
Slots
11-12
IPMX-A
slot 9
IPMX-B
slot 10
Slots
7-8
Slots
5-6
Slots
3-4
Slots
1-2
Extension
Shelf
ef powdist
3-126
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Holdover Clock
The holdover clock (refer to Figure 3-70 "Holdover Clock" on page 3-128) is an
optional device that can maintain clock synchronization for system Digital
Signal Level-0 Applique (DS0A) links during brief (up to 15 seconds) Building
Integrated Timing System (BITS) clock signal outages. This follows Telcordia
Technology requirements as specified in GR-1244-CORE.
The holdover clock is connected to the BITS clock source in the system. The
BITS clock inputs to the system through the control shelf. The device is located
in, and receives –48VDC power from, a miscellaneous frame (refer to Figure
3-71 "Holdover Clock" on page 3-128).
Connections from the holdover clock to the system control shelf consist of two
clock cables and a cable to signal holdover clock alarm conditions to other
parts of the system.
The holdover clock contains the following:
•
Maintenance Interface System (MIS) (P/N 804-0175-01) card system alarm
interface which provides alarms output to the system control shelf.
•
Two Critical Status Indicators (CI) (P/N 804-0165-01) cards for clock
inputs A and B.
•
Two Signal Transfer, Stratum-3 (ST-3) (P/N 804-0173-01) cards for clocks A
and B.
•
Three Timing Output Composite Clock Automatic (TOCA)
(P/N 804-0166-01) cards, clock outputs (TO1 and TO2) for A and B
through the system control shelf.
NOTE: The TOCA cards my be replaced with TOLA cards. For wiring
information on TOLA cards see the Installation Manual.
•
One Matrix Controller Automatic-5 (MCA)(P/N 804-0251-01) card
controls the output protection switch matrix just above the Data Carrier
Detect (DCD) DCD-523 shelf card slots.
The outputs of the TOCA cards are connected to a wire-wrap panel mounted
on top of the holdover clock. The clock inputs on the system’s control shelf are
connected to the holdover clock wire-wrap panel.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-127
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 3-70. Holdover Clock
MCA card
MIS card
-48V A
5A
-48V B
5A
OUTPUT
TO1
DIGITAL CLOCK DISTRIBUTOR
DCD–523
CI
CI
ST3
BLANK
ST3
TO2
TO3
TOCA TOCA
TO4
TO5
TO6
SPARE
TO7
TO8
TO9 TO10
BLANK
HS1
HS2
TOCA MCA-5
TOCA
MIS
hocklrnt.eps
CI cards
ST3 cards
TOCA cards
Hot spares
TOCA card
positions
Optional
TOCA cards
Figure 3-71. Holdover Clock
MF-00
CF-00
Primary and secondary
BITS clocks
Control shelf
Holdover clock alarms
BITS clock
source
Holdover clock
holdover sysblk.eps
3-128
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
Maintenance Interface System Card
The Maintenance Interface System (MIS)(P/N 804-0175-01) card provides
local and remote command and control for the holdover clock. The MIS card is
installed in the far right slot of the holdover clock shelf (refer to Figure 3-72
"Maintenance Interface System Card Block Diagram" on page 3-129 for an MIS
card block diagram).
The MIS provides Data Carrier Detect (DCD) alarm summary with office and
remote alarm relay closures and status indicators, as well as remote RS-232
communication.
Output alarms from the Timing Output Composite Clock Automatic (TOCA)
cards, input reference alarms from the clock inputs, and failure alarms from
any card in the shelf are sent to the MIS card. Status indications including
clock loss and port alarms are also monitored by the MIS card.
Depending on which alarms are received, the MIS activates audible and visual
alarm and Status Indicator (SI) outputs. An additional set of status leads on
the back enables either a major, minor, or critical alarm in the event of the
failure of a battery or blown fuse.
NOTE: Major, minor, and critical alarm leads have both Normally
Open (NO) and Normally Closed (NC) dry relay contacts. Major, minor,
and critical status indicators have NO relay contacts only. All other
Status Indicators are open-collector outputs between the SI lead and
battery return.
Alarm battery supply is not required for the system. When DC power is lost to
the shelf, the normally open relays close, initiating an office alarm (refer to
Figure 3-72).
Figure 3-72. Maintenance Interface System Card Block Diagram
POWER AND FUSE
MONITOR
MINOR
ACO
MAJOR CRITICAL
FROM
ALARM CARD
IN EXPANSION
SHELF
RS-232 PORT 1
EXPANSION
COMM PORT
MICROPROCESSOR
RS-232 PORT 2
LOCAL COMM
RS-232 PORT 3
ACO
SWITCH
FROM
SHELF CARDS
ALARM LOGIC
AND
TIMERS
EVENT LOG
AUDIBLE (NO/NC)
VISUAL (NO/NC)
STATUS INDICATORS
CRITICAL (NO/NC)
mis block
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-129
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
A front-panel Alarm Cut Off (ACO) push button, when pressed, silences the
audible alarm and lights the ACO lamp. The ACO push buttons on all shelves
in the system have the same effect. An external lead on the shelf backplane is
provided for remote ACO operation.
The status of the shelf is available at the front panel lamps. A Major, Minor, or
Critical lamp lights to indicate that one of those alarms exists on the shelf. The
Fail lamp lights to indicate the MIS card has failed. The Alarm Cut Off (ACO)
lamp lights when the ACO push button, is pressed to silence an audible
alarm, before the alarm is cleared.
Critical Status Indicators Card
Two Card Indicator (CI)(P/N 804-0165-01) cards, provide input signal
redundancy. Each CI card uses one Common Channel (CC) or one Digital
Signal Level 1 (DS1) input as its timing reference. A switch on the CI card
selects the type of input and the framing format, if DS1, of the input timing
signal. Front panel lamps (CC and DS1) show which type of input is present.
Under normal operating conditions, CI A drives clock card A, and CI B drives
clock card B. Both input reference signals are simultaneously monitored, and
if an input fails, the clock card automatically switches to the other CI card,
which then supplies both clock cards until the failed reference is restored. The
SOURCE ACTIVE lamp on the front panel indicates which CI card is on-line.
The CI card contains a source control circuit that causes the card to switch to
the redundant CI card if the primary card, defined as the card currently in
operation, fails.
Transfer between CI cards can be manually initiated by pressing the
front-panel XFR switch on either CI card.
Switching activity between CI A and CI B will not cause the timing outputs to
transmit phase hits, as the phase information of the active signal is transferred
to the redundant CI card before switching. A Phase Locked Crystal Oscillator
(PLXO) keeps the CI output stable while the transfer takes place. The PLXO
also removes any phase jitter from the incoming signal before it passes the
reference to the Timing Output Composite Clock Automatic (TOCA) cards.
If both CI cards fail, the clock cards go into holdover mode, and the system
automatically uses the active clock card.
Stratum-3 Card
The Signal Transfer, Stratum-3 (ST-3) (P/N 804-0173-01) clock card provides
timing signals at Stratum-3 accuracy to the TOCA cards. Select logic on each
TOCA card automatically chooses the input timing signal of the highest
priority.
3-130
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Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
The ST-3 card is based on Phase Lock Loop (PLL) filtering and VXCO
technology. The ST-3 is a relatively wide-bandwidth, fast-tracking clock that
provides the necessary jitter attenuations and holdover stability. The PLL
output is compared to a Temperature-Compensated Oscillator (TCXO), and
an offset is generated to phase lock to the clock input, A or B.
If an input source is unavailable or has failed, the circuit goes into clock
holdover mode at the frequency of the last valid input. If the holdover clock is
started without an input reference, the ST-3 maintains accuracy at a
predetermined rate.
If both ST-3 cards fail, a major system alarm is issued and the TOCA cards use
the output of the clock input cards.
A phase build out circuit between the two clock input cards, A and B, and
each ST-3 clock prevents transients from being transmitted to the Timing
Output (TOCA) cards when there is a transfer between the two ST-3 cards.
TOCA and TOLA Cards
A Timing Output Composite Clock Automatic (TOCA)(P/N 804-0166-01)
card, provides 10 composite clock timing outputs. There is a third TOCA card
in the hot spare slot.
A source select circuit obtains the timing signal from either ST-3 clock card A
or B. If no input timing signals are present, the TOCA card turns off both its
ST-3 and INPUT lamps, lights the FAIL lamp, and mutes the outputs.
A Phase Lock Loop (PLL) circuit reconstitutes the internal timing signal. The
reconstituted Computer and Communications (CC) timing signal is then
applied to each port driver and sent through an impedance matching
transformer.
The outputs are fed to the interface panel.
If the TOCA card fails or the output monitor determines that one to five
output drivers have failed or are shorted, the front panel PORT ALM lamp
lights, and a minor alarm is generated.
Whenever manual or automatic protection switching takes place, the
TOCA cards automatically transfer option switch settings to the hot spare,
TOCA card.
NOTE: An OEM purchased Timing Output Logic Automatic (TOLA)
can be used as a composite clock source. The output cable connections
are different from the TOCA card pin outs. See the Installation Manual
for instructions about cabling both the TOCA and TOLA clock outputs.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
3-131
Hardware Descriptions — EAGLE 5 ISS
MCA Card
The Matrix Controller Automatic-5 card (MCA)(P/N 804-0251-01) controls
the output protection switch matrix just above the holdover shelf and card
slots on the hold over clock. It monitors the protection matrix push-button for
activation. The MCA card requires the presence of at least one Hot Spare (HS)
TOCA card in the slots provided immediately to the left of the MCA. Each
holdover clock shelf contains slots for two hot spare TOCA cards.
The MCA card monitors the protection matrix for activation and the TO cards
for port and fail alarms. When an active TO card indicates a failure or is
removed, the MCA activates the relays and lamps in the protection matrix
and switches in the appropriate hot spare TOCA card, if installed.
To ensure that a hot spare TOCA card cannot be accidentally placed in service
or accidentally taken out of service, activating the hot spare TOCA card
requires that the MCA detect a timing output failure or the front panel be
pressed in the correct sequence. In addition, no switch occurs if the MCA card
is physically removed from the shelf.
NOTE: The MCA-5 can only switch from one TOCA to a hot spare
TOCA at a time. There are six different TOCA card types and two hot
spare TOCA slots per shelf.
Figure 3-73. MCA-5 Card and Output Protection Matrix
TO OUTPUT
(1 of 10)
Data Carrier Detect
(DCD)
DCD-523 OUTPUT
PORT
ALM
1
2
Processor
Control
Timing output
3
4
5
Holdover shelf
Timing output
6
AUTO
OUTPUT RELAY MATRIX
SWITCH
7
8
9
MANUAL
10
FAIL
AUTO
e30 mca-5 output matrix
3-132
MCA-5 CARD
MAN
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
4
Hardware Descriptions —
OEM-Based Products
OEM-Based Product Descriptions .................................................................4–2
Extended Services Platform (ESP) Host Servers..........................................4–2
Server Model 120 Features .......................................................................4–3
ESP Server LEDs ........................................................................................4–4
SAI/P Card.................................................................................................4–5
8-Port Connector Box ................................................................................4–5
OEM-Based Networking Elements ...............................................................4–6
Ethernet Hubs ............................................................................................4–6
Routers ........................................................................................................4–7
Ethernet Switches ......................................................................................4–9
OEM-Based Peripheral Elements.................................................................4–11
Breaker Panels..........................................................................................4–11
Eight-Port Connector Box.......................................................................4–13
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
OEM-Based Product Descriptions
Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)-based products use Common
Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components configured in a Tekelec standard or
heavy-duty frame. Systems are configured at Tekelec for NEBS compliance
and typically have redundant components for reliability and maintainability.
OEM-based products support application specific services that interact with
the SS7 and IP networks.
NOTE: Elements used in OEM-based products have components
configured by Tekelec to conform to Network Equipment-Building
System (NEBS) generic equipment requirements.
topple
TOPPLE DANGER: Systems with slide shelf mounted equipment must
also be anchored to the overhead cable racks. Before beginning installation,
ensure the frame is properly secured to the floor and overhead cable racks
to prevent the frame from tipping over when the server slide shelves are
extended.
Extended Services Platform (ESP) Host Servers
This section describes the parts of the ESP server nodes. An ESP server can
monitor a maximum of 32 SS7 links. ESP server nodes are populated in an
N + 1 configuration for redundancy to a maximum of 17 in an ESP
subassembly frame. ESP server nodes are rack mounted in heavy-duty
frames.
The ESP server node is a one-processor device and has no frame buffer, audio
capability, mouse port, or keyboard port. The console ports and Ethernet
ports are the primary interfaces of model 120 server.
The server node provides the following:
4-2
•
High performance processor.
•
Modular internal design.
•
High performance disk, system, memory and I/O subsystems.
•
High performance Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI)/Serial
Asynchronous Interface connection I/O (8 port break-out box).
•
Redundant hot swap power supply units.
•
Powered by redundant –48VDC supplies.
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Server Model 120 Features
The server primary board contains the Central Processing Unit (CPU)
module, memory, system control Application-Specific Integrated Circuits
(ASICs) and I/O ASICs.
Table 4-1.
System Specifications.
Server Node Specifications
Dimensions and
Weight
Height
Width
Depth
Weight (unpackaged but
fully configured)
CPU
Processor type
Clock rate
CPUs provided
Cache on module
Memory
Size
Memory type
Storage (Internal)
Bus
Disks
CD-ROM
I/O Architecture
PCI Interface/Serial
Asynchronous Interface
connection
Serial ports
I/O ports
Operating System
44.0 mm (1.73 in.)
437.2 mm (17.21 in.)
487.4 mm (19.19 in.)
10kg (22 lbs.)
UltraSPARC-II
650 MHz
One Processors
(NEBS level 3 compliant)
256 Kbyte Internal
4 GB maximum
PC133 standard Registered DIMMs
66 MB/second UltraSCSI
Two 3.5x1-in. disks (36GB); disk bays are front
accessible and support hot-plug
644 MB Slim line CD-ROM drive; 24X speed or
DVD-ROM
See Note:
Two RS-232C/RS-423 serial ports (RJ45)
Expansion Serial port interface.
Two Ultra-SCSI port
Two standard 10/100BASE-T ports
Solaris 8
NOTE: ESP server 1A (top server) has an expansion serial board
connected by cable to the serial break-out box. ESP server 1B through
1-Q are accessible only though the standard Ethernet ports and serial
ports.
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Figure 4-1. ESP Server Front and Rear Views
Server Label
Power Fault
On
Server Label
Front View
A
A
sentinel server
CD-ROM
Serial port
Optional PCI card
A
Ethernet
8 Port
Server Label
ports
connector
Rear View
Red
-48
Black
RTN
123
Power switch
(ON/Standby)
A
1
A
A LOM
0
1
0
1
B SERIAL
Power A
Power B
Grounding
studs
Serial port
B
Link 0
LED
SCSI port
Link 1
LED
Power A
Rear View
Server Label
Serial port
A
Ethernet
ports
Fault
LED
B-Q
A LOM
#
1
Power
LED
USB ports
0
0
1
1
B SERIAL
Power B
Power switch
(ON/Standby)
Serial port
B
Grounding
studs
Link 0
LED
USB ports
Link 1
SCSI port
LED
Fault
LED
Power
LED
ESP Server LEDs
The following table lists the LED indicators of the ESP servers. The LEDs are
located on the front and back of the ESP servers.
Table 4-2.
Location
4-4
ESP Server LEDs
LED Name
Color
Description
Front and
Rear Panel
Power
Green
Power feed available and
Standby/on switch ON
Front and
Rear Panel
Fault
Yellow
• ON Operating system stopped
• OFF No faults detected
• Blinking — Fault detected
Rear Panel
Link
Activity
Green
One LED for each standard IP
interface (two)
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
SAI/P Card
The Sun SAI/P card (Serial Asynchronous Interface PCI Adapter) is used with
the 8-Port Connector Box to provide eight programmable ports for low-speed
devices for 50 bps to 115,200 bps transmission for the ESP subsystem. This
module is installed in the expansion slot in ESP server 1A only.
8-Port Connector Box
The 8-Port Connector Box segments the output of the Sun SAI/P card into
eight ports for the ESP subsystem. This box connects to the Sun SAI/P card
with a 78-pin plug on a 40-inch cable in ESP server 1A only. Figure 4-2 shows
the details of the Connector Box.
Figure 4-2. 8-Port Connector
8 Port Breakout Box
Viewed from back of frame
8 Port Breakout Box
sentinel breakout box
78 pin connector
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
OEM-Based Networking Elements
This section describes the common networking elements that can be used in
OEM-based products. Networking elements of OEM-based products provide
the connections and communications links for interworking between the SS7
networks, local customer networks, and the Internet.
NOTE: Some OEM-based products do not use all of the networking
components, for example, the MPS systems. Use Appendix A, Hardware
Baselines, to determine the specific components that can be configured
in system releases.
Common networking components described in this section include:
•
“Ethernet Hubs” on page 4-6
•
“Routers” on page 4-7
•
“Ethernet Switches” on page 4-9
•
“OEM-Based Peripheral Elements” on page 4-11
Ethernet Hubs
The following section provides an overview of the Ethernet hubs used in
OEM-based products. The hubs cross-connect the components in OEM-based
products functioning as an internal Local Area Network (LAN). The hubs
support domain-switched dual-speeds and a maximum of sixteen RJ45 ports
each. The chip technology enables hubs to identify and accept either 100
Mbps or 10 Mbps LAN interfaces on a per-port basis. Figures 4-3 and 4-4
show the front and rear views of a hub.
Figures 4-3 and 4-4 show the front and rear views of the hub.
Figure 4-3. Hub Front View
Ethernet Hub
PWR
BR
LX/RX
COL 10
PORT 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
COL 100
4-6
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Figure 4-4. Hub Rear View
Power feeds
+A -A -B +B
DSM connection
ON
1X
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13 14
15
16
OFF
Ground
Power Switch
Table 4-3 describes the LEDs located on the front of the hubs.
Table 4-3.
LED
Hub LEDs
Color
Description
PWR
Green
Lights whenever the power is applied
COL 10
Red
Intermittent blink during a 10Mbps domain
collision
COL 100
Red
Intermittent blink during a 100Mbps domain
collision
BR
Green
Lights whenever the bridge module is installed
100/AUTO
(Per Port)
Green
• Lights whenever speed is 100 Mbps
• Unlit whenever speed is 10 Mbps
• Blinks whenever a link is not connected or when
auto-negotiating
LK/RX
(Per Port)
Green
• Lights steadily whenever port is operational
• Blinks whenever port is receiving data
Routers
The routers used in OEM-based products are configured by Tekelec for NEBS
compliancy. Two types can be configured; isolation routers and dial-in routers.
NOTE: Some OEM-based products do not use routers, for example,
the MPS systems. Use Appendix A, Hardware Baselines, to determine
the specific components that can be configured in system releases.
The isolation routers provide 10/100Mbps communications between the
customer LAN or dedicated network and the IP7 Front End, hubs, and host
servers. The dial-in router allows remote dial-up access to the internal
ASi 4000 SCP LAN. Figure 4-5 shows the front view of the routers and Table
4-4 describes the LED indicator functions on the front of the router.
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Figure 4-5. Front View Routers
Cisco 2600 SERIES
POWER
RPS
ACTIVITY
cisco router
Table 4-4.
Router Front LEDs
LED
Description
PWR
Indicates when power is present to the router and the
power switch is in the ON position.
RPS
(Always OFF)
Off when the redundant power supply is not present.
On redundant power supply is present and functional.
Activity
Off-No network activity
Blink-Network activity
Figures 4-6 and 4-7 show rear views of the Isolation and Dial-In routers. Link
(LNK) and activity (ACT) LEDs are located near each ethernet port at the rear
of the routers. Table 4-5 describes the LED indicators on the rear of the
routers.
Figure 4-6. Rear View Isolation Router
Figure 4-7. Rear View Dial-in Router
Table 4-5.
LED
4-8
Router Rear LEDs
Description
LNK
Indicates link is established to far end connection.
ACT
Blink-indicates data activity on the link.
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Ethernet Switches
The following section provides an overview of the Ethernet LAN switches
used in some OEM products. The ethernet switches cross-connect the
components in the frames functioning as an internal Local Area Network
(LAN). The switches support 24 auto-sensing 10/100Mbps ports each.
Figure 4-8 illustrates the front and rear of the Ethernet switch.
Figure 4-8. Ethernet Switch
Table 4-6 describes the LEDs located on the front of the switches.
Table 4-6.
Ethernet Switch LEDs
LED
Description
System
Green-Indicates when power is present to the switch and
the power switch is in the ON position.
Amber-Indicates power is present but system is not
functioning properly
1 and 2
Indicates expansion boards WS-X2932-XL are installed and
functioning LED 1 (Left board) LED 2 (Right board)
RPS
(Always OFF)
Off when the redundant power supply is not present.
Redudant power supply is not configured
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Table 4-6.
Ethernet Switch LEDs (Continued)
LED
Description
Pressing the MODE switch on the front of the WS-C2924-XL-EN changes the
per-port LED indications to the following.
STAT (port
status) Default
Off-No link.
Solid green-Link present.
Flashing green-Activity. Port is transmitting or receiving
data.
Alternating green/amber-Link fault. Error frames can
affect connectivity, and errors such as excessive collisions,
CRC errors, and alignment and jabber errors are monitored
for a link-fault indication.
Solid amber-Port is not forwarding. Port was disabled by
management or an address violation or was blocked by
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP).
NOTE: After a port is reconfigured, the port LED can
remain amber for up to 30 seconds as STP checks the
switch for possible loops.
4-10
UTL
(utilization)
Green-The LEDs display backplane utilization on a
logarithmic scuffle all port LEDs are green, the switch is
using 50 percent or more of its total bandwidth capacity. If
the right-most LED is amber, the switch is using less than
50 percent of its total bandwidth. If the LED to the left of the
right-most LED is amber, the switch is using less than 25
percent of its total capacity, and so on.
FDUP
(port
full-duplex)
Off-Port is operating in half duplex.
Green-Port is operating in full duplex.
100 (port
speed)
Off-Port is operating at 10 Mbps.
Green-Port is operating at 100 Mbps.
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
OEM-Based Peripheral Elements
Peripheral elements used in the OEM-based products are common
components required to provide service functionality. Peripheral components
described in this section are:
•
“Breaker Panels” on page 4-11
•
“Eight-Port Connector Box” on page 4-13
•
“8-Port Connector Box” on page 4-5
Breaker Panels
The following section describes the components of the Telect Breaker Panels
(BP) used in OEM-based products. The BPs provide the following features:
•
Dual-feed power inputs (Input A and Input B) to each breaker panel,
totalling four breakers for the system. (30-amp domestic or 32-amp
international)
•
Maximum of fourteen breakers each breaker panel
•
Breaker panels accept circuit breakers up to 20 ampere rating
•
Visual A and B input power alarms with single remote dry contact
indicator
•
Replaceable alarm card
NOTE: The drip tray, located under the breaker panels, is designed to
assure compliance with NEBS, UL, and CE safety requirements, aiding
damage control in the event of a fire. See Figure 4-9 for the location of
the breaker panel drip tray.
Figure 4-9 shows the details of the front view of the breaker panel
Figure 4-9. Telect Breaker Panel Front View
Breakers A1-A7
1
2
3
4
5
Breakers B1-B7
6
1
7
A
BREAKER ALARM
ALARM RESET
INPUT
BREAKER
A
B
POWER
ON
A
2
3
4
5
6
7
B
B
FRONT VIEW
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Figure 4-10 shows the rear details of the breaker panel.
Figure 4-10. Telect Breaker Panel Rear View
Input
Breaker
Input
Power B
Ground
Input
Breaker
Output connectors
BATT
RTN
B
Output connectors
BATT
BATT1
RTN
RTN
7
1
1
Input
Power A
7
7
A
1
7
BATT
RTN
NO C NC NC C NO
Fuse Alarm Power Fail
NOTE: When breakers trip to the half-way position as a result of an
overload they must be switched completely OFF then ON to reset.
Figure 4-11 provides details of the alarm panel on the Telect Breaker Panel.
Figure 4-11. Telect Breaker Panel Alarms
BREAKER ALARM
ALARM RESET
INPUT
BREAKER
A
B
POWER
ON
A
B
FRONT VIEW
Table 4-7 lists the status LEDs on the Telect Breaker Panel.
Table 4-7.
LED
Breaker Panel LEDs
Color
Description
Power On A
Green
Lights whenever Side A is receiving input power
(LED will remain lit even if the input breaker has
tripped)
Power On B
Green
Lights whenever Side B is receiving input power
(LED will remain lit even if the input breaker has
tripped)
Breaker
Alarm
Red
Lights whenever an output circuit breaker has
tripped or turned off
Input
Green
Breaker A/B
Lights whenever Side A/B is receiving input power
(Not lit if input breaker is tripped)
NOTE: If all breakers are not turned on, the alarm LED will light. To
turn off the alarm LED, press RESET and the alarm LED will reset and
turn off.
4-12
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
Eight-Port Connector Box
This sections shows the Eight-Port Connector Box used in the Sentinel and
AXi systems.
Figure 4-12. Eight Port Breakout Box
8 Port Breakout Box
Viewed from back of frame
8 Port Breakout Box
sentinel breakout box
78 pin connector
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Hardware Descriptions — OEM-Based Products
4-14
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5
Hardware Descriptions —
Sentinel Products
Sentinel Product Descriptions Overview .....................................................5–3
Sentinel Frames..........................................................................................5–4
Site Collector Frames ................................................................................5–6
Extended Services Platform (ESP)...........................................................5–7
Integrated Sentinel (probe-less Solution) .....................................................5–7
Integrated Sentinel Hardware Overview...............................................5–8
ESP Subsystem .........................................................................................5–14
ESP Subsystem Hardware Components ..............................................5–14
Sentinel Probe Based Site Collector .............................................................5–18
Site Collector Frames ..............................................................................5–20
Site Collector Frame Hardware Components .....................................5–21
Sentinel Central Server Frames....................................................................5–22
Sentinel Central Server Frame Hardware Components ....................5–25
Sentinel Central Server Frames Prior to Release 10.0.........................5–27
Sentinel Central Server Frames Release 10.0 .......................................5–29
Sentinel Frames Common Components .....................................................5–30
Breaker Panels..........................................................................................5–31
SAI/P Card...............................................................................................5–32
8-Port Break-Out Box ..............................................................................5–33
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Ethernet Interface Cards ........................................................................ 5–33
Ethernet Switches.................................................................................... 5–33
Routers...................................................................................................... 5–37
Hubs.......................................................................................................... 5–38
Console/Alarm Servers ......................................................................... 5–39
5-2
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Sentinel Product Descriptions Overview
This chapter documents Sentinel hardware products from Sentinel Release 8.1
and later. Sentinel products use some commercial off-the-shelf components
and Tekelec proprietary products configured in heavy-duty frames.
Some of the hardware server components are based upon the Tekelec 1000
Applications Server (Tekelec 1000 APS) introduced with Sentinel Release 11.x.
For information on Sentinel components that are based on the Tekelec 1000
platform, including assembly drawings, interconnect diagrams, and
installation instructions, see the Tekelec 1000 Applications Server Hardware
Manual.
A Sentinel system is comprised of two major system components: distributed
site collectors located at remote sites and centralized servers located at the
Network Operations Center (NOC). Site collectors are for remote
deployments within a carrier's switching offices. For a probe-based
configuration, one or more Probe and server systems are deployed at remote
sites as site collectors. For the probe-less (Integrated) configuration, EAGLE 5
ISS and the ESP servers are the site collectors. Typically, Sentinel includes a
Base System Server, Alarm Server and optional Traffic Database Server as well
as one or more Data Gateway Servers in the NOC. User workstations are
typically located either in the NOC or in a Technical Assistance Center (TAC).
The Site Collectors are connected to the NOC via the customer WAN.
The Sentinel system can simultaneously support both probe-based and
probe-less configurations. In a combined probe-based and probe-less
configuration, the same NOC can be used to simultaneously monitor MSU
data sent by an EAGLE 5 ISS or via the probes as shown in the Figure 5-1 on
page 5-4.
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Figure 5-1. NOC in a Combined Probe-based and probe-less Configuration
REMOTE SITE COLLECTORS
NETWORK
Base
System
Server
Probe
LAN
SS7 links
(NOC) CENTRAL COLLECTORS
Server
ESP
Servers
Alarm
Server
WAN
EAGLE
LAN
L
I
M
IMT
S
T
C
SS7 links
Data
Gateway
Server
ESP
Server
Traffic
Database
Server
Sentinel Frames
Sentinel systems are mounted in standard seven-foot high, 23-inch wide
frames. Sentinel frames typically are configured with dual breaker panels and
are cabled with redundant power busses for reliability. Sentinel products
support application specific services that monitor SS7 network links. For
information on unpacking and installation of Sentinel frames see the
Installation Manual and Tekelec 1000 Applications Server Hardware Manual
included in this documentation set.
The defined types of Sentinel Frame configurations include:
5-4
•
Sentinel Servers (e.g. BSS, AS, DGS, TDS)
•
i2000/FR Site Collector
•
Flight Recorder
•
Extended Services Platform (ESP)
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-1.
Sentinel Frame Types and Configurations
Sentinel Frame Type
Configuration Details
Sentinel Central Server
Frame
This frame contains the centralized Sentinel
Servers including:
• one or more Base Sentinel Servers
• one or more Data Gateway Servers.
• one Alarm Server (only one per system)
• one Traffic Database Server (only one per
system)
The Sentinel central server frame described
in this manual operates in conjunction with
Sentinel site collectors.
NOTE 1: Multiple Base Sentinel
Servers are supported with Sentinel
Release 10.0.
NOTE 2: Multiple frames are
supported (for example, in cases where
there are multiple BSS and DGS
servers).
For a detailed description refer to “Sentinel
Central Server Frames” on page 5-22
i2000 Frame
This frame contains i2000 probes without
Flight Recorder servers. This frame
configuration depends on the equipage of
an associated Flight Recorder Frame.
Flight Recorder Frame
This frame contains Flight Recorder servers
and associated network gear required to
connect the site collector to the Sentinel
central server complex across the WAN.
This frame configuration is supplanted
with the combined i2000/FR frame
configuration.
Combined i2000/FR Site
Collector Frame
This frame contains the i2000 probe
shelves, Netra Flight Recorder, and
associated network gear required to
connect the site collector to the Sentinel
central server complex across the WAN.
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-1.
Sentinel Frame Types and Configurations (Continued)
Sentinel Frame Type
Configuration Details
Sun Netra ESP Subsystem
Frame
This frame configuration contains the Sun
Netra based Extended Services Platform
(ESP) servers that provide the process and
storage functions for this type of site
collector. Each Netra Server can handle 32
equivalent low speed links of MSU data for
processing and storage. Data acquisition is
supported by the system transport cards
(STC) that are equipped in the EAGLE 5 ISS
and connect to the ESP Subsystem via a
redundant LAN. This frame also contains
associated network gear required to
connect the site collector to the Sentinel
central server complex across the
LAN/WAN.
Tekelec 1000 ESP Subsystem
Frame
This frame configuration contains the
Tekelec 1000 based Extended Services
Platform (ESP) servers that provide the
process and storage functions for this type
of site collector. Each Tekelec 1000 can
handle 128 equivalent low speed links of
MSU data for processing and storage. Data
acquisition is supported by the system
transport cards (STC) that are equipped in
the EAGLE 5 ISS and connect to the ESP
Subsystem via a redundant LAN. This
frame also contains associated network
gear required to connect the site collector to
the Sentinel central server complex across
the LAN/WAN.
Site Collector Frames
SS7 MSU traffic is processed at a remote site by hardware that is collectively
referred to as a Sentinel site collector. Site collectors can be a single i2000 shelf
monitoring and processing a small number of SS7 low-speed links (LSL) or an
Integrated (probe-less) site collector that scales to larger system
configurations with multiple frames monitoring up to 1500 low-speed link
equivalents.
Sentinel integrates both probed and probe-less architecture into a single
coherent network monitoring system. Flexible configurations are designed to
meet customer link monitoring requirements. Site collectors ensure that
monitored SS7 link data is transported, processed, and forwarded to central
Sentinel Servers for further processing and presentation.
5-6
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
All Sentinel site collectors consist of the following three basic functional
components:
•
Data Acquisition - External probe-based connections to SS7 links using
monitoring shelves (non-integrated solution) or internal connections to
the EAGLE 5 ISS (integrated solution).
•
LAN/WAN Transport - Connects all components of a Sentinel site
collector, routers, ethernet switches, hubs, and servers.
•
Processing and Storage - Site collector servers process monitored SS7 link
information and message signalling units (MSU), storing data and
forwarding to Base Sentinel Servers.
Flight Recorders
The Flight Recorder (FR) server provides the extended processing and storage
server functions for a probe based site collector in conjunction with the i2000
probe shelf. The Flight Recorder server connects to one or more i2000 probe
shelves via LAN to provide processing and storage. Refer to the section,
“Sentinel Probe Based Site Collector” on page 5-18 for a complete description.
NOTE: See the Signaling/Cellular Generic Hardware Reference
Manual (P/N 910-2277-01) for i2000 product information.
Extended Services Platform (ESP)
For the integrated (probe-less) site collector there are two different frame
configurations; one with Sun Netra servers and the other with Tekelec 1000
servers. For a complete description of the Netra-based ESP frame refer to the
section, “Integrated Sentinel (probe-less Solution)” on page 5-7. For Tekelec
1000-based Sentinel hardware, refer to the Tekelec 1000 Applications Server
Hardware Manual. For additional information about EAGLE 5 ISS hardware
components required for the Integrated Sentinel solution refer to the sections
“Integrated Sentinel” on page 2-16 and Chapter 3, Hardware Descriptions —
EAGLE 5 ISS, of this manual.
Integrated Sentinel (probe-less Solution)
The Integrated Sentinel feature with the Extended Services Platform (ESP)
provides a probe-less site collector solution for monitoring EAGLE 5 ISS
low-speed links and high-speed ATM links without using external probes.
The feature eliminates the need for cabling and some hardware to monitor the
EAGLE 5 ISS SS7 links. It also enables the EAGLE 5 ISS links to be presented
in Integrated Sentinel in familiar terms as they are provisioned in the EAGLE
5 ISS. Link information is passed from the EAGLE 5 ISS to Sentinel via
Signaling Transport Cards (STC) in the EAGLE 5 ISS.
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Integrated Sentinel Hardware Overview
In Integrated Sentinel, site collector processing and storage tasks are hosted
on ESP servers, providing all of the relevant site collector functions for data
processing and storage of collected SS7 data. Integrated Sentinel ESP servers
are connected to an associated EAGLE 5 ISS using redundant LAN interfaces.
The internal local area network (LAN) traffic is isolated to keep monitored
data separate from the customer’s wide area network (WAN).
The EAGLE 5 ISS monitors SS7 links internally (probe-less), at the LIM, and
connects to ESP LAN interfaces using the dual-port Signaling Transport Card
(STC). The STC card acts as a router to route TCP/IP traffic from EAGLE 5 ISS
ports to ESP servers.
Table 5-2.
5-8
Sentinel Release Application Notes
Sentinel Release
Note
Sentinel Release 9.0
The Sentinel Server Frame was introduced
containing up to four Netra 20s configured as
Sentinel servers. A Sentinel Server Frame can
be configured with one to four servers to
support:
• Alarm Server
• Base Sentinel Server
• Data Gateway Server
• Traffic Database Server
For more information about Sentinel Server
Frames see“Sentinel Central Server Frames” on
page 5-22.
Sentinel Release 10.0
For Netra-based ESPs, a maximum of two ESP
frames can be configured. A maximum of 1024
links can be monitored with two Netra-based
ESP frames.
Remote Dial-up access is configured in the
first ESP frame with a Cisco modem card in
the Yellow router.
For remote access to Netra ESP servers in the
ESP subsystem access is provided by the
addition of a modem card to the yellow
router. The NetGear RM356 Modem router is
no longer configured in systems but is
supported for older system configurations.
For more information refer to “Netra-based
ESP Frame Components Release 10.0” on
page 5-14.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-2.
Sentinel Release Application Notes
Sentinel Release
Note
Sentinel Release 11.0
The Tekelec 1000 based ESP Subsystem was
introduced.
Tekelec 1000 based ESPs can be configured
with a maximum of two ESP frames to
provide the capability of monitoring 1152 SS7
equivalent low-speed links.
Dial-up access is configured in the first ESP
frame with a modem in the MRV console
server.
For more information on Tekelec 1000 based
ESPs, see the "Tekelec 1000 Applications
Server Hardware Manual."
Sentinel Release 11.3
Beginning in Sentinel 11.3, the TDS can be
Tekelec 1000 based. For more information
about Sentinel Server Frames see “Sentinel
Central Server Frames” on page 5-22.
Figure 5-2 shows a block diagram of connections between an EAGLE 5 ISS
and the ESP subsystem and between the ESP subsystem and the Sentinel
central servers in the probe-less Integrated Sentinel solution.
Figure 5-3 shows a block diagram of connections between an EAGLE 5 ISS
and the Tekelec 1000 based ESP subsystem and between the ESP subsystem
and the Sentinel servers in the probe-less Integrated Sentinel solution.
Figure 5-4, “Integrated Sentinel Netra-based ESP Frame Front View,” on page 5-12
and Figure 5-5, “Integrated Sentinel Tekelec 1000-based ESP Frame Front View,”
on page 5-13 shows the component locations for a single ESP frame.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-9
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Figure 5-2. Integrated Sentinel with Netra-based ESPs Block Diagram
TAC
i3000 shelves
i2000 shelves
Base
Sentinel
Server
(BSS)
Data
Gateway
Server
(DGS)
Sentinel
Alarms
Management
Server
(SAMS)
Traffic
Database
Server
(TDS)
other ESP’s
Customer Ethernet WAN
Yellow
Isolation
Router
Dial-up Modem
Access
EAGLE
STP
GPSM-II
Yellow
Network
LAN Switch
STC
Low Speed SS7 Links
Blue
Isolation
Router
MPL
STC
Blue
Network
LAN Switch
IMT Bus
LIM
LIM
STC
Sentinel ESP
Subsystem
First Frame
STC
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
Yellow Network Links
Blue Network Links
5-10
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Figure 5-3. Integrated Sentinel with Tekelec 1000-based ESPs Block Diagram
TA C
i3000 shelves
i2000 shelves
Base
Sentinel
Server
(BSS)
Data
Gateway
Server
(DGS)
Sentinel
Alarm s
Management
Server
(SAMS)
Traffic
Database
Server
(TDS)
other ESP's
Customer Ethernet WAN
Customer Terminal
MRV Console
Server
Telco Line
EAGLE
STP
GPSM-II
Yellow
Network
LAN Switch
STC
MPL
SS7 Links
STC
Blue
Network
LAN Switch
IMT Bu s
LIM
LIM
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
ESP
STC
Sentinel ESP
Subsystem
First Frame
STC
Yellow Network Links
Blue Network Links
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-11
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Figure 5-4. Integrated Sentinel Netra-based ESP Frame Front View
Circuit
breakers
Drip pan
Breakout box
Ethernet Switch Yellow -1
Ethernet Switch Blue -1
Ethernet Switch Yellow -2
Ethernet Switch BLue -2
Router Yellow
Router Blue
Server 1A
A
A
B
C
B
C
D
E
D
E
F
G
H
F
Mounting
brackets for
(17) ESP Servers
Server 1Q
G
H
I
J
K
L
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
M
P
Q
O
P
N
Q
ne
nti
se
l fr
t
on
Front View
5-12
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Figure 5-5. Integrated Sentinel Tekelec 1000-based ESP Frame Front View
CONSERV
All ESP servers are configured for industry-standard Network Time Protocol
(NTP) and synchronize with the system NTP server. The NTP server is
typically the primary Base Sentinel Server (BSS).
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-13
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
ESP Subsystem
ESP servers in the Integrated Sentinel are provisioned in an n+1 configuration
for redundancy. The n+1 backup ESP server does not monitor any EAGLE 5
ISS ports during normal operation. The backup ESP server can be configured
to replace any failed server. A major alarm will be raised when an Integrated
Sentinel ESP server fails.All ESP servers plus the LAN equipment located at
one EAGLE 5 ISS location are collectively called an “ESP Subsystem.”
The ESP subsystem supports multiple frames. The server installed at the top
of the first frame is referred to as ESP 1A; the next lower server is ESP 1B, then
ESP 1C continuing down to the final server. Labeling of ESP servers in the 2nd
frame of an ESP subsystem begins with ESP 2A.
ESP Subsystem Hardware Components
The following sections describes ESP Subsystem hardware.
Netra-based ESP Frame Components Release 10.0
For Netra-based ESPs starting with Release 10.0, ESP servers in the first frame
are designated from 1A through 1Q. ESP servers in the second frame are
designated 2A through 2Q. See Figure 5-6, “Sentinel Netra-based ESP Rear View
1500 Links,” on page 5-15 shows the component locations of all three frames.
Table 5-3 lists the components configured in each frame for Sentinel release
10.0. See Table 5-4 on page 5-16 and Table 5-5 on page 5-17 for individual ESP
server components for release 10.0.
NOTE: While Netra-based ESP Subsystem hardware design was
completed to be able to handle a third frame, the three frame (1500 link)
configuration has not yet been tested by Tekelec Product Verification.
Table 5-3.
5-14
Netra-based ESP Frame Components Release 10.x and Higher
Component
Quantity
First Frame
Quantity Three
Frame System
Frame Assembly
One
Two
Breaker Panels
Two
Four
Routers
NOTE: Dial-up modem
access card is in the Yellow
router.
Two
Two - Only
required in first
frame
24-Port DC ENET Switches
Two or Four
Eight
Maximum
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Netra-based ESP Frame Components Release 10.x and Higher
Table 5-3.
Quantity
First Frame
Component
Quantity Three
Frame System
Two additional switches are required for ESP servers L though Q.
Additional Gigabyte interface cards are also required, see
Figure 5-16, “Ethernet Switch,” on page 5-34 for requirements.
ESP Servers 1A, 2A, and 3A
(With PCI card)
One
Two
ESP Servers 1B through 1Q, 2B
through 2Q (Without PCI card)
One to 16
32 Maximum
Figure 5-6. Sentinel Netra-based ESP Rear View 1500 Links
Extended Services
Platform
(ESP) first frame
Extended Services
Platform
(ESP) second frame
Breakers
DRIP TRAY
8 port
Breakout
box
Ethernet
Switches
Modem Access
Routers
(first frame
only)
ESP
servers
DRIP TRAY
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
BREAKOUT BOX
BREAKOUT BOX
Yellow SWITCH 1-1
Yellow SWITCH 2-1
Blue SWITCH 1-1
Blue SWITCH 2-1
Yellow SWITCH 1-2
Yellow SWITCH 2-2
Blue SWITCH 1-2
Blue SWITCH 2-2
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
Yellow ROUTER
Blue ROUTER
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
1G
1H
1I
1J
1K
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
2G
2H
2I
2J
2K
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
ESP
servers
1L
1M
1N
1O
1P
1Q
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
2L
2M
2N
2O
2P
2Q
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
SERVER
DISTRIBUTION PANEL
5-15
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
ESP servers have specific configurations determined by the location in the
frame, Table 5-4 lists components for servers in locations 1A or 2A.
Table 5-4.
ESP Servers 1A and 2A Release 10.0
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 120
1x 650-MHz UltraSPARC-IIi CPU w/512-KB
eCache, 1x512-MB Memory,
1x 36-GB 10000 UltraSCSI Disk,
2x 10/100 Mbit Ethernet,
2x USB Ports, UltraSCSI Port,
Removable System Config Card,
19-in Rackmount Kit, Solaris 8 & LomLite2
DC Power Supply
(2x 512-MB DIMM) PC133 ECC
Reg/Buffered Memory Expansion
PC133 ECC DIMM, Reg/Buffered
HARD DISK 36.4 GB NEBS USCSI
CDROM DRIVE
PCI SERIAL ASYNCHRONOUS
INTERFACE
ADAPTER CARD (INCLUDES 8 PORT
DB-25 BREAKOUT BOX) ASSY and cable
ESP servers have specific configurations determined by the location in the
frame. Table 5-5 lists components for servers in locations 1B through 1Q
(Frame 1) and 2B through 2Q (Frame 2).
5-16
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-5.
ESP Servers 1B and 2B through 1Q and 2Q release 10.0
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 120
1x 650-MHz UltraSPARC-IIi CPU w/512-KB
eCache, 1x512-MB Memory,
1x 36-GB 10000 UltraSCSI Disk,
2x 10/100 Mbit Ethernet,
2x USB Ports, UltraSCSI Port,
Removable System Config Card,
19-in Rackmount Kit, Solaris 8 & LomLite2
DC Power Supply
(2x 512-MB DIMM) PC133 ECC Reg/Buffered
Memory Expansion
PC133 ECC DIMM, Reg/Buffered
HARD DISK 36.4 GB NEBS USCSI
CDROM DRIVE
Integrated Sentinel Tekelec 1000-based ESP Frame Components Release
11.0
Beginning with Sentinel Release 11.0, ESP servers can be Tekelec 1000-based
or Netra-based. ESP servers in the first frame are designated from 1A through
1E. ESP servers in the second frame are designated 2A through 2E. For more
details on the Tekelec 1000-based Frame assemblies, including interconnect
diagrams, see the TekServer Platform Services Hardware Manaul.
NOTE 1: Starting with Sentinel Release 11.0, new installations of
integrated Sentinel ESPs are configured with Tekelec 1000 hardware.
However, extensions for existing site collectors with Netra-based ESP
servers are still supported.
NOTE 2: While Tekelec 1000-based ESP Subsystem hardware design
was completed to be able to handle a third frame, the three frame (1500
link) configuration has not yet been tested by Tekelec Product
Verification.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-17
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-6.
Higher
Tekelec 1000-based ESP Frame Components Release 11.0 and
Component
Quantity
First Frame
Quantity Two
Frame System
Frame Assembly
One
Two
Breaker Panels
Two
Four
MRV Console Servers (including
RAS modem)
One
Two
24-Port DC ENET Switches
Two
Four
Tekelec 1000 ESP Servers 1A and
2A
(With 2 Port Ethernet card and 4
port serial expansion card)
One
Two
ESP Servers 1B through 1E, 2B
through 2E (with 2 port Ethernet
Card)
One to Four
Eight
Maximum
Sentinel Probe Based Site Collector
See Figure 5-7 "Probe Based Sentinel System Configuration" on page 5-19 for
an overview of the probe based Sentinel solution using the combined
i2000/FR Site Collector Frame.
The i2000/FR probe based Site Collector frames consist of the following
hardware components:
•
Breaker Panels
•
Hubs
•
Flight Recorders (Netra 120 servers)
•
i2000 probes
See Figure 5-8 for the location of the components in the Site Collector frame.
NOTE 1: For more information about the i2000 shelf refer to the
Signaling/Cellular Generic Hardware Reference Manual (P/N
910-2277-01). This manual is included with this Documentation suite.
NOTE 2: The i2000 shelf (P/N 890-1028-02) described in this document
is -48 VDC powered. Some i2000 shelves documented in the
Signaling/Cellular Generic Hardware Reference Manual were AC
powered.
5-18
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Various types of link interface module (LIM) cards are available for different
probe shelves. For information about link interface modules (LIM) in the i2000
see Chapter B, Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques, in this manual.
Figure 5-7. Probe Based Sentinel System Configuration
Site Collector Frame
Sentinel Server Frame
Ethernet Switch
Console Server
Customer
WAN
Ethernet Switch
Flight Recorder A
Flight Recorder B
Optional
Flight Recorder C
Optional
SS7 Network
i 2000 C
Optional
Server
(Optional) Server 4
Server
(Optional) Server 3
SS7
Server 2
Server
i 2000 B
Optional
SS7
Server 1
Server
SS7
i 2000 A
Supported Sentinel Server Types:
Required Servers
Base Sentinel Server
(BSS)
Sentinel Alarm Management System Server (SAMS)
STP Probe
Any
SS7 Network
Element:
SCP
SSP
STP
MSC-wireless
VLR -wireless
HLR-wireless
Optional Servers
Traffic Database Server
Data Gateway Server
(TDS)
(DGS)
STP
TALI
Customer
WAN
i3000
Internet Protocol (IP)
High Speed Links
LAN
Switch
STP
IP
Network
SCP
TALI
Low Speed Links
sentinel d
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-19
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Site Collector Frames
The frame configuration for a combined i2000/FR probe based site collector
was introduced with Sentinel Release 9.0. Along with this change the Flight
Recorder (FR) hardware selected was the same Netra 120 used in the
integrated Sentinel configuration. This Netra based FR borrowed specific
functionalities from the Netra ESP server design for the processing, database,
and site collector storage functions. For the i2000/FR probe based site
collector, the i2000 probe shelf provides the data acquisition function via a
direct physical tap of the external SS7 links connecting to the STP. Link taps
are typically made at the DSX panel. For the case of E1, T1, or DSCS taps that
are some distance from the i2000 probe shelf a bridge amplifier may be used
to provide a "non-intrusive" tap of the SS7 link.
Figure 5-8 on page 5-20 describes the frame layout for the i2000/FR Site
Collector frame.
Figure 5-8. Site-Collector Frame
Circuit Breaker
Breakout Box and
Cable Part of SAI/P Card
Flight Recorder A
Circuit Breaker
Drip Tray
Hub
Flight Recorder A (Netra 120)
Flight Recorder B (Netra 120) (Optional)
Flight Recorder C (Netra 120) (Optional)
i2000 Shelf C (Optional)
i2000 Shelf B (Optional)
i2000 Shelf A
sentinel site collector
5-20
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Site Collector Frame Hardware Components
Table 5-7, “Site Collector Frame Components,” on page 5-21 lists the components
configured in the Site Collector frames.
Table 5-7.
Site Collector Frame Components
Component
Quantity/Each
Frame
Frame Assembly
One
Breaker Panel
Two
Hub
One
i2000 Shelf
One to Three
Flight Recorder A (Netra 120)
(With PCI card) see Table 5-8 on
page 5-21
One
Flight Recorder B and C
(Netra 120)
(Without PCI card)
see Table 5-9 on page 5-24
One or Two
Sentinel Site Collector Frame servers have specific configurations determined
by the location in the frame, Table 5-8 lists components for host server A, and
Table 5-9 on page 5-22 lists components for host servers B and C.
Table 5-8.
Sentinel Site Collector Server A
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 120
1x 650-MHz UltraSPARC-IIi CPU w/512-KB
eCache, 1x512-MB Memory,
1x 36-GB 10000 UltraSCSI Disk,
2x 10/100 Mbit Ethernet,
2x USB Ports, UltraSCSI Port,
Removable System Config Card,
19-in Rackmount Kit, Solaris 8 & LomLite2
DC Power Supply
(1x 1024-MB DIMM) PC133 ECC Reg/Buffered
Memory Expansion 1GB
PC133 ECC DIMM, Reg/Buffered
Hard Disk 36.4 GB NEBS USCSI
CDROM Drive
PCI Serial Asynchronous Interface
Adapter Card (includes 8 Port
DB-25 Breakout Box) Assembly with cable
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-21
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-9.
Sentinel Site Collector Servers B and C
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 120
1x 650-MHz UltraSPARC-IIi CPU w/512-KB
eCache, 1x512-MB Memory,
1x 36-GB 10000 UltraSCSI Disk,
2x 10/100 Mbit Ethernet,
2x USB Ports, UltraSCSI Port,
Removable System Config Card,
19-in Rackmount Kit, Solaris 8 & LomLite
DC Power Supply
(1x 1024-MB DIMM) PC133 ECC Reg/Buffered
Memory Expansion 1GB
PC133 ECC DIMM, Reg/Buffered
HARD DISK 36.4 GB NEBS USCSI
CDROM DRIVE
Sentinel Central Server Frames
The Sentinel Central Server Frame, typically located at the Network
Operations Center (NOC) or other central location, is configured with one to
four servers. The Sentinel Central Server Frame contains the following:
• one or more Base Sentinel Servers (BSS)
• one or more Data Gateway Servers (DGS)
• one Sentinel Alarm Management System (SAMS) server (only one per
system)
• one Traffic Database Server (only one per system)
The BSS, SAMS, and DGS are supported by Netra 20 servers. More than one
Sentinel Central Server Frame can be equipped in the system to support
additional BSS.
For releases prior to Sentinel Release 11.3 the Traffic Database Server used the
Oracle database and was supported on older legacy server hardware. Starting
with Release 11.3 the TDS is supported on the DC powered Tekelec 1000
server. No AC configuration is supported. See the Tekelec 1000 Applications
Server Hardware Manual for more information on Tekelec 1000-based TDS.
5-22
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Figure 5-9, on page 5-24 illustrates all types of Sentinel site collectors and the
interconnections through the customer’s WAN to a Sentinel server frame. The
block diagram shown in Figure 5-9 depicts system configuration with the
possible site collector configurations and the connections between the
monitored SS7 links, site collectors, and a Sentinel server frame.
NOTE: In all of the site collector configurations except the probe-less
connections in the “Integrated Solution” the probe connections are
physically tapped to SS7 links. In the “Integrated Solution” the probed
link data acquisition is handled by the EAGLE 5 ISS.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-23
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Figure 5-9. Site Collectors Connections to a Sentinel Central Server Frame
Sentinel Server Frame
Customer
Site Collector Frame
WAN
Ethernet Switch
Console Server
Ethernet Switch
Flight Recorder A
Server
(Optional) Server 4
Server
(Optional) Server 3
Flight Recorder B
Flight Recorder C
SS7 Links
i 2000 C
Optional
Server
i 2000 B
Optional
i 2000 A
Server
Server 2
Server 1
Supported Sentinel Server Types:
Required Servers
Base Sentinel Server
(BSS)
Sentinel Alarm Management System Server (SAMS)
Optional Servers
Traffic Database Server
Data Gateway Server
(TDS)
(DGS)
Integrated Solution 500 Links
ESP Frame
EAGLE STP
ESP Frame
CF00
SS7 Links
010203040506070809 11 12131415161718
)
)
Control
Shelf
010203040506070810 11 12131415161718
010203040506070809 11 12131415161718
Extension
Shelf
010203040506070810 11 12131415161718
010203040506070809 11 12131415161718
Extension
Shelf
010203040506070810 11 12131415161718
5-24
Ethernet
Switches
To STC
Cards in
STP
)
Ethernet
Switches
)
Routers
Routers
1A
1B
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
1G
1H
1I
1J
1K
1C
1D
1E
1F
1G
1H
1I
1J
1K
1L
1M
1L
1M
1N
1O
1P
1Q
1N
1O
1P
1Q
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Sentinel Central Server Frame Hardware Components
Sentinel central server frames can be configured with one to four servers as
shown in the following figures. Figure 5-10 illustrates the Sentinel server
frames configuration prior to release 10.0.
Figure 5-10. Sentinel Server Frame Prior to Release 10.0 (First Frame)
Breaker Panel
Breaker Panel
Hub
Server 4
(Optional)
Server 3
(Optional)
Server 2
Server 1
SAI/P Card
Break-Out Box
Server Frame Front
Server Frame Rear
Supported Sentinel Server Types:
Base Sentinel Server
(BSS)
Sentinel Alarm management Server (SAMS)
Data Gateway Server
Traffic Database Server
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
(DGS)
(TDS)
5-25
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Several changes were made to the Sentinel sever frames in release 10.0. The
hub component for the internal LAN was changed to an ethernet switch. Also
the external remote access server (RAS) function was replaced with a
console/alarm (CAS) server configured in the frame. The CAS provides
interconnectivity to all frame components and dial-up modem service access
to the frame. Release 10.0 changes are listed in Table 5-14, “Sentinel Central
Server Components Release 10.0,” on page 5-29.
Figure 5-11. Sentinel Central Server Frame Release 10.0 (First Frame)
Breaker Panel
Breaker Panel
Ethernet Switch
Console/Alarm
Server
Server 4
(Optional)
Server 3
(Optional)
Server 2
Server 1
Server Frame Front
Server Frame Rear
Supported Sentinel Server Types:
Base Sentinel Server
Sentinel Alarm management Server
Traffic Database Server
Data Gateway Server
5-26
(BSS)
(SAMS)
(TDS)
(DGS)
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Sentinel Central Server Frames Prior to Release 10.0
Table 5-10 lists the components that can be configured in the Sentinel central
server frame prior to release 10.0.
Table 5-10.
Sentinel Central Server Frames Prior to Release 10.0
Component
Quantity/Each
Frame
Frame Assembly
One
Breaker Panels
Two
Hub
One
Server 1
(With SAI/P card) see Table 5-11
on page 5-28
One
Servers 2, 3, and 4 (Without
SAI/P card)
see Table 5-12 on page 5-28.
Zero to Three
Remote Access Server (RAS)
Not configured
in frame
In Sentinel central server frames prior to release 10.0, servers have specific
configurations determined by the location in the frame. Table 5-11 lists the
components specific to server number 1.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-27
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-11.
Sentinel Central Server 1 Prior to Release 10.0
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 20
DC Power
1x 900-MHz UltraSPARC-III CPU w/8MB
eCache,
NOTE: One processor card standard
for TDS, DGS, and BSS servers.
Additional processor card required
for SAMS server.
2GB (4x512-MB) DIMMS Memory
Expansion
HARD DISK 73 GB NEBS Hot Swap
Capability
Single Fast Ethernet, PCI
DVD/ROM DRIVE
SERIAL ASYNCHRONOUS INTERFACE
PCI (SAI/P) ADAPTER CARD
(INCLUDES 8 PORT DB-25 BREAKOUT
BOX) ASSY and cable
Table 5-12.
Sentinel Central Servers 2, 3, 4 Components Prior to Release 10.0
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 20
DC Power
1x 900-MHz UltraSPARC-III CPU w/8MB
eCache,
NOTE: One processor card standard
for TDS, DGS, and BSS servers.
Additional processor card required for
SAMS server.
2GB (4x512-MB) DIMMS Memory
Expansion
HARD DISK 73 GB NEBS USCSI
Single Fast Ethernet, PCI
DVD/ROM DRIVE
5-28
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Sentinel Central Server Frames Release 10.0
Table 5-13 lists the components that can be configured in all Sentinel central
server frames in release 10.0.
Table 5-13.
Sentinel Central Server Frames Release 10.0
Component
Quantity/Each
Frame
Frame Assembly
One
Breaker Panel
Two
Console/Alarm Server (CAS)
One
Ethernet Switch
One
Netra 20 Servers
One to Four
Beginning in Sentinel release 10.0 all servers in Sentinel Central Server frames
are configured with the components listed in Table 5-14.
Table 5-14.
Sentinel Central Server Components Release 10.0
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 20
DC Power
2x 1200-MHz UltraSPARC-III CPU
w/8MB eCache,
NOTE: Two processor cards
standard.
2GB (4x512-MB) DIMMS Memory
Expansion
Two Hard Disks 73 GB NEBS with Hot
Swap Capability
Single Fast Ethernet, PCI
DVD ROM DRIVE
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
5-29
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-14.
Sentinel Central Server Components Release 10.0 (Continued)
Server
Sub-Component Description
Netra 20
DC Power
2x 1200-MHz UltraSPARC-III CPU
w/8MB eCache,
NOTE: Two processor cards
standard.
2GB (4x512-MB) DIMMS Memory
Expansion
Two Hard Disks 73 GB NEBS with Hot
Swap Capability
Single Fast Ethernet, PCI
DVD ROM DRIVE
Table 5-15.
Traffic Database Server Release 11.3
Server
Sub-component Description
Tekelec 1000
DC Power
NOTE: See Tekelec 1000
Applications Server Hardware
Manual for details
Sentinel Frames Common Components
This section describes the common components that can be used in
Sentinel-based products.
Common components described in this section include:
5-30
•
Breaker Panels
•
Serial Interface cards
•
Breakout Boxes
•
Ethernet Switches
•
Routers
•
Hubs
•
Console Servers
•
Link Interface Cards (Monitoring)
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Breaker Panels
The following section describes the components of the Telect
Breaker Panels (BP) used in Sentinel products. The BPs provide the following
features:
•
Dual-feed power inputs (Input A and Input B) to each breaker panel,
totalling four breakers for the system. (40-amp domestic or 32-amp
international)
•
Maximum of fourteen breakers each breaker panel
•
Visual A and B input power alarms with single remote dry contact
indicator
•
Replaceable alarm card (Hot swappable with power ON at the frame)
The drip tray, located under the breaker panels, is designed to assure
compliance with NEBS, UL, and CE safety requirements, aiding damage
control in the event of a fire. Figure 5-12 "Telect Breaker Panel Front View" on
page 5-31 shows the details of the front view of the breaker panel.
NOTE: A Breaker is labeled with the component designation that is
powered by it. Components are typically redundantly powered from
both the A and B buses. Breakers on both buses must be turned OFF
before removing this type of component.
Figure 5-12. Telect Breaker Panel Front View
Breakers A1-A7
1
2
3
4
5
Breakers B1-B7
6
1
7
BREAKER ALARM
ALARM RESET
A
INPUT
BREAKER
A
B
2
3
4
5
6
POWER
ON
A
7
B
B
FRONT VIEW
Figure 5-13 shows details of the rear of the breaker panel.
Figure 5-13. Telect Breaker Panel Rear View
Input
Breaker
Input
Power B
Ground
Input
Breaker
Output connectors
BATT
RTN
B
1
1
Output connectors
BATT
BATT1
RTN
RTN
7
7
Input
Power A
1
7
A
7
BATT
RTN
NO C NC NC C NO
Fuse Alarm Power Fail
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
NOTE: When breakers trip to the half-way position as a result of an
overload they must be switched completely OFF then ON to reset.
Figure 5-14 shows details of the alarm panel on the Telect Breaker Panel.
Figure 5-14. Telect Breaker Panel Alarms
BREAKER ALARM
ALARM RESET
INPUT
BREAKER
A
B
POWER
ON
A
B
FRONT VIEW
Table 5-17 on page 5-36 lists the status LEDs on the Telect Breaker Panel
Table 5-16.
Breaker Panel (BP) LEDs
LED
Color
Description
Power On A
Green
Lights whenever Side A is receiving input power
(LED will remain lit even if the input breaker has
tripped)
Power On B
Green
Lights whenever Side B is receiving input power
(LED will remain lit even if the input breaker has
tripped)
Breaker
Alarm
Red
Lights whenever an output circuit breaker has
tripped or turned off
Input
Green
Breaker A/B
Lights whenever Side A/B is receiving input power
(Not lit if input breaker is tripped)
NOTE: If all breakers are not turned on, the alarm LED will light. To
turn off the alarm LED, press RESET and the alarm LED will reset and
turn off.
SAI/P Card
The SAI/P card (Serial Asynchronous Interface PCI Adapter) is used with the
8-Port Break-Out Box to provide eight programmable ports for low-speed
devices for 50 bps to 115,200 bps transmission for the subsystem.
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
8-Port Break-Out Box
The 8-Port Break-Out Box segments the output of the SAI/P card into eight
DB-25 ports for the Sentinel subsystem. This box connects to the SAI/P card
with a 78-pin plug on a 40-inch cable. See Figure 5-15 "8-Port Break-Out Box"
on page 5-33 for a view of the Break-Out Box.
Ethernet Interface Cards
Provide interfaces to local area networks (LAN) connecting servers, routers,
ethernet switches, and hubs internally and to other frames or networks.
Ethernet cards support 10/100 Mbyte connections.
Figure 5-15. 8-Port Break-Out Box
8 Port Breakout Box
Viewed from back of frame
8 Port Breakout Box
sentinel breakout box
78 pin connector
Ethernet Switches
The following section provides an overview of the Ethernet LAN switches
used in some Sentinel products. The ethernet switches cross-connect the
components in the frames functioning as an internal LAN. The switches
support 24 auto-sensing 10/100Mbps ports each.
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Cisco 2900 Ethernet Switches
See Figure 5-16 and refer to Table 5-17 on page 5-35 for definitions of the
LEDs. Four configurations are shown with the optional Gigabit ethernet cards
installed. These yellow and blue switch 2 cards are configured when
additional optional servers are installed in the frame.
Figure 5-16. Ethernet Switch
Yellow Switch 1
Ethernet Switch Front
SYSTEM
Optional GBIT Interface
Required when ESP Servers
L through Q Configured
Card slot 1
RPS
1000 Base T
2
1
STAT UTL FDUP
1X 2X 3X 4X 5X 6X 7X 8X
9X 10X 11X 12X 13X 14X 15X 16X 17X 18X 19X 20X 21X 22X 23X 24X
MODE
Blue Switch 1
Ethernet Switch Front
SYSTEM
Ports 1X 24X
Optional GBIT Interface
Required when ESP Servers
L through Q Configured
Card slot 1
RPS
1
1000 Base T
2
STAT UTL FDUP
1X 2X 3X 4X 5X 6X 7X 8X
9X 10X 11X 12X 13X 14X 15X 16X 17X 18X 19X 20X 21X 22X 23X 24X
MODE
Ports 1X 24X
Yellow switch 2
Ethernet Switch Front
SYSTEM
Optional GBIT Interface
Required when ESP Servers
L through Q Configured
Card slot 2
RPS
1000 Base T
2
1
STAT UTL FDUP
1X 2X 3X 4X 5X 6X 7X 8X
9X 10X 11X 12X 13X 14X 15X 16X 17X 18X 19X 20X 21X 22X 23X 24X
MODE
Ports 1X 24X
Blue switch 2
Ethernet Switch Front
SYSTEM
Optional GBIT Interface
Required when ESP Servers
L through Q Configured
Card slot 2
RPS
1000 Base T
2
1
STAT UTL FDUP
1X 2X 3X 4X 5X 6X 7X 8X
9X 10X 11X 12X 13X 14X 15X 16X 17X 18X 19X 20X 21X 22X 23X 24X
MODE
Ports 1X 24X
Ethernet Switch Rear
CONSOLE
sentinel ether switch 1
Chassis gnd
A power 48VDC
A power return
B power 48VDC
B power return
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-17 describes the LEDs located on the front of the switches.
Table 5-17.
Ethernet Switch LEDs
LED
Description
System
Green-Indicates when power is present to the switch and
the power switch is in the ON position.
Amber-Indicates power is present but system is not
functioning properly.
1 and 2
Indicates expansion boards WS-X2932-XL are installed and
functioning LED 1 (Left board) LED 2 (Right board).
RPS
(Always OFF)
Off when the redundant power supply is not present.
Redundant power supply is not configured.
Pressing the MODE switch on the front of the WS-C2924-XL-EN changes the
per-port LED indications to the following.
STAT (port
status) Default
Off-No link.
Solid green-Link present.
Flashing green-Activity. Port is transmitting or receiving
data.
Alternating green/amber-Link fault. Error frames can
affect connectivity, and errors such as excessive collisions,
CRC errors, and alignment and jabber errors are monitored
for a link-fault indication.
Solid amber-Port is not forwarding. Port was disabled by
management or an address violation or was blocked by
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP).
NOTE: After a port is reconfigured, the port LED can
remain amber for up to 30 seconds as the STP checks
the switch for possible loops.
UTL
(utilization)
Green-The LEDs display backplane utilization on a
logarithmic shuffle all port LEDs are green, the switch is
using 50 percent or more of its total bandwidth capacity. If
the right-most LED is amber, the switch is using less than
50 percent of its total bandwidth. If the LED to the left of the
right-most LED is amber, the switch is using less than 25
percent of its total capacity, and so on.
FDUP
(port
full-duplex)
Off-Port is operating in half duplex.
Green-Port is operating in full duplex.
100 (port
speed)
Off-Port is operating at 10 Mbps.
Green-Port is operating at 100 Mbps.
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Garrettcom Ethernet Switch
Ethernet Switch with 24 RJ-45 ports, each auto-sensing for 10Mbps/100Mbps
FDX/HDX operation. Optional fiber ports may be configured. Each RJ-45 port
is switched and provides a full-speed traffic domain with non-blocking
performance. LEDs are located in the front of the switch, power input and
port connections are in the rear. See Figure 5-17, “Ethernet Switch,” on
page 5-36 and reference Table 5-18, “Ethernet Switch LEDs Each Port,” on
page 5-36.
Figure 5-17. Ethernet Switch
Rear View detail
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
Ethernet RJ-45
18 20
22
24
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
1X
Uplink
19
21
23
Chassis GND
ON
OFF
Fan vents
+A -A -B +B
B power return
B power -48VDC
A power -48VDC
A power return
Power
Col/FDX
Link/Act
100M
1X
Col/FDX
Link/Act
100M
sen 10 ssf switch 24 prt
Front View detail
Table 5-18.
5-36
Ethernet Switch LEDs Each Port
LED
Description
LNK/ACT
Link active - ON for Link with no traffic, blinking indicates
port is transmitting and receiving.
FDX/COL
ON = Full-Duplex Mode
BLINKING = Half-Duplex Collision
100/10
ON = 100 Mbps speed
OFF = 10 Mbps
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Routers
The routers used in Sentinel products are configured by Tekelec for NEBS
compliancy.
The isolation routers provide 10/100Mbps communications between the
customer LAN or dedicated network and the Sentinel servers. The dial-in
router allows remote dial-up access to the internal Sentinel LAN. Figure 5-18
shows the front view of the routers and Table 5-19 describes the LED indicator
functions on the front of the router. Also see Figure 5-19, “Rear View Dial-in
Router,” on page 5-37 for the location of the modem connection and Table 5-20
for rear LED information.
Figure 5-18. Front View Routers
POWER
RPS
ACTIVITY
cisco router
Table 5-19.
Router Front LEDs
LED
Description
PWR
Indicates when power is present to the router and the
power switch is in the ON position.
RPS
(Always OFF)
Off when the redundant power supply is not present.
On redundant power supply is present and functional.
Activity
Off-No network activity
Blink-Network activity
Figure 5-19. Rear View Dial-in Router
Serial Modem Port
CONSOLE
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Table 5-20.
Router Rear LEDs
LED
Description
LNK
Indicates link is established to far end connection.
ACT
Blink-indicates data activity on the link.
Hubs
The following section provides an overview of the Ethernet hubs used in
Sentinel products. The hubs cross-connect the components in Sentinel frames
functioning as an internal Local Area Network (LAN). The hubs support self
sensing dual-speeds and a maximum of sixteen RJ-45 ports each. The chip
technology enables hubs to identify and accept either 100 Mbps or 10 Mbps
LAN interfaces on a per-port basis. See Figure 5-20 "Hub Front View" on page
5-38 and Figure 5-21 "Hub Rear View" on page 5-38.
Figure 5-20. Hub Front View
Ethernet Hub
BR
PWR
LX/RX
COL 10
PORT 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
COL 100
Figure 5-21. Hub Rear View
Power feeds
+A -A -B +B
DSM connection
ON
1X
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13 14
15
16
OFF
Ground
Power Switch
Table 5-21 describes the LEDs located on the front of the hubs.
Table 5-21.
5-38
Hub Front LEDs
LED
Color
Description
PWR
Green
Lights whenever the power is applied
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Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
Hub Front LEDs
Table 5-21.
LED
Color
Description
COL 10
Red
Intermittent blink during a10MB domain collision
COL 100
Red
Intermittent blink during a100MB domain collision
BR
Green
Lights whenever the bridge module is installed
100/AUTO
(Per Port)
Green
• Lights whenever speed is 100 Mbps
• Unlit whenever speed is 10 Mbps
• Blinks whenever a link is not connected or when
auto-negotiating
LK/RX
(Per Port)
Green
• Lights steadily whenever port is operational
• Blinks whenever port is receiving data
Console/Alarm Servers
Beginning in Sentinel release 10.0 the MRV Communications LX-4008S
console/alarm server (CAS) with eight serial ports and an internal V.90
modem is configured with Sentinel server frames. The CAS connects all
Sentinel servers and breaker panel alarm connections that was previously
connected by the SAI/P card in the first server and the connected breakout
box. The CAS also provide dial-up service access to the components in the
Sentinel server frames. See Figure 5-22 for front and rear views of the CAS.
Figure 5-22. Console/Alarm Server (CAS)
Console Server Front
FLT OK
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
sen 10 ssf console server
Front Panel LEDs
Console Server Rear
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Modem port
TELCO
LINE
RCV
Console Server Terminal Bock
LINK
100
DIAG
10/100 ETHNT
DIAG Port (Port 0)
10/100
Interface
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
100 Mbps
LED
5-39
Hardware Descriptions — Sentinel Products
5-40
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6
Site Engineering —
EAGLE 5 ISS
Safety and Cautionary Information...............................................................6–2
Introduction ......................................................................................................6–2
Location .............................................................................................................6–2
Space Requirements ..................................................................................6–2
Lighting.......................................................................................................6–3
Building Requirements .............................................................................6–3
Heating Ventilation and Air Condition Requirements ........................6–4
Power Requirements .................................................................................6–8
Populating the System.....................................................................................6–8
Link Interface Module (LIM) Requirements..........................................6–8
Database Communications Module (DCM) and
Double-Slot Enhanced DCM (EDCM) ...............................................6–10
Cabling DCM and Double-Slot EDCM Cards.....................................6–11
Single-Slot EDCM and EDCM-A ..........................................................6–13
Application Communications Module Requirements .......................6–13
OAP and Embedded OAP .....................................................................6–14
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Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Safety and Cautionary Information
DANGER: At least two people are required to safely move and position
the frames.
DANGER: No commercially AC powered equipment may be used or
placed within 7 ft. of –48VDC equipment. This may create a shock or
current loop that can be severely hazardous to personnel and equipment.
topple
TOPPLE: Frames with sliding shelves must be securely anchored to the
floor and overhead frame racks. Extending a shelf without correctly
anchoring the frame can cause it to topple, endangering personnel and
damaging equipment.
Introduction
This chapter contains procedures for preparing the site for the installation of
Tekelec signaling products and is intended for use by personnel involved in
planning and executing an installation. This chapter also provides power,
environmental, and floor plan requirements relating to that installation.
This chapter covers only those areas unique to Tekelec systems and does not
cover common telecommunications installation requirements.
Location
The system is designed to be installed and operated in a central office
environment.
Local fire protection codes must be satisfied in the equipment room where the
system is to be located.
Space Requirements
This system equipment is housed in 7 foot high, 23 inch wide, floor
supported, unequal flange upright frames. Separator panels, and end panels
add to the width of multiple frame systems.
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Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
The floor area taken up by this system is:
•
1 frame = 30 inches wide by 22 inches deep = 660 square inches (4.6 square
feet)
•
2 frames = 62 inches wide by 22 inches deep = 1364 square inches (9.5
square feet)
•
3 frames = 94 inches wide by 22 inches deep = 2068 square inches (14.4
square feet)
•
4 frames = 126 inches wide by 22 inches deep = 2772 square inches (19.3
square feet)
•
5 frames = 158 inches wide by 22 inches deep = 3476 square inches (24.1
square feet)
•
6 frames = 190 inches wide by 22 inches deep = 4180 square inches (29
square feet)
The number of frames required for an installation is described in the Initial
Sales Order for that site. The number of frames is determined by the space
required by the module population of the system and optional items such as
OAPs and holdover clocks. See the Planning Guide, STP, LNP, and LSMS for
information on populating the system.
When planning the installation, be sure to take into account spare module
storage, modems, terminals, printers, cross connect panels, and all other items
that might require space in a system.
Lighting
Adequate lighting should be provided in the room where the equipment is to
be located. Lighting fixtures must be far enough from the equipment and
cables to prevent heat damage and to allow safe access to equipment and
cables.
Building Requirements
The building requirements for this system are standard telephony industry
requirements for equipment installation.
The building must provide a clear, uncluttered route between the
loading/receiving dock and the planned system location. In order to move the
equipment to the proper location, recommended hall clearance is at least 4.5
feet (1.4 meters) wide by 8 feet (2.4 meters) tall.
Four foot, (1.2 meter) side aisles should be used to allow maneuvering frames
into place and provide ample work space around the equipment.
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Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
The room selected for system installation should be large enough so the
system frames can be at least 2.5 feet (76 cm) from the walls for front and rear
access and at least 12 inches (31 cm) for side access.
Earthquake Resistance
All of the configurations are designed to assure the system remains
operational during and after an earthquake, even when the system is located
on the upper floors of a zone 4 central office.
Environmental Requirements
The environmental conditions for the system must be maintained to the
following ambient temperature and humidity specifications:
•
Normal operating temperature — +41° F to +104° F, (+5° C to +40° C)
•
Short-term temperature range — +23°F to +122° F, (-5° C to +50° C)
•
Maximum rate of temperature change — 15° F, (8° C)/hour
•
Normal operating relative humidity — 5% to 85%
•
Short-term relative humidity — 5% to 90% (not to exceed 0.024 kg of water
per kg of dry air)
•
Altitude — 200 feet (60 meters) below to 13,000 feet (3,900 meters) above
sea level
NOTE 1: Short-term is a period of not more than 96 consecutive hours
and a total of not more than 15 days in one year.
NOTE 2: Ambient is to conditions at a location 1.5 m (59 in) above the
floor and 400 mm (15.8 in) in front of equipment.
Heating Ventilation and Air Condition Requirements
To maintain the required temperature range, Heating, Ventilation, and Air
Conditioning (HVAC) equipment should have the capacity to compensate for
up to 1230 BTUs/hr for each installed system shelf.
The required HVAC capacity to compensate for a miscellaneous frame varies
depending on the customer previously installed equipment. To calculate
needed HVAC capacity, determine the wattage of the installed equipment and
use the following formula: watts x 3.413 = BTUs/hr.
6-4
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Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Floor Loading
It is recommended the floor or raised sub-flooring have a distributed load
capacity of no less than 100 pounds per square foot (453 kg/m2). The floor
loading is determined by using the following equation:
Total equipment weight/floor area = distributed floor capacity.
Following are the maximum weights of Tekelec frames:
•
Maximum weight of EAGLE 5 ISS Control or Extension frames: 850 lbs
(386 kg).
•
Maximum weight of a two T1000/T1100 server frame (for example, the
MPS frame), including AC and DC LSMS frames: 600 lbs (273 kg).
•
Maximum weight of the EOAP frame: 450 lbs (205 kg).
•
Maximum weight of an application frame with up to six T1000/T1100
servers: 925 lbs (421 kg).
See “Space Requirements” on page 6-2 for the floor area of the combined
system.
Grounding
The system operates as a digital isolated ground plane system in a central
office environment and requires a single connection to the central office
ground window. The system’s ground bars and ground cables must provide
the sole grounding connection between the entire system and the central office
grounding.
The system uses three types of grounding paths:
•
Battery return
•
Frame/chassis ground
•
Logic ground
Non-oxidizing grease will be applied to all lugs terminated on a copper,
system ground bar (see Figure 6-1).
The power return grounding path is the return path for all –48VDC loads in
the system. This path is isolated from other system grounds and connects to
the rest of the central office through the –48VDC return connections located on
the Fuse and Alarm Panel (FAP) of each frame.
The frame/chassis ground path provides a low impedance connection for all
metal parts of the entire system, including the frame, doors, card cages, and
end panels. Each frame/chassis connection within the system lineup
terminates to the frame and connects to the main ground bar by way of Htaps,
#6 American Wire Gauge (AWG) to 1/0 cable.
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6-5
Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
The logic ground path provides a common voltage reference point between all
circuit boards of an system. Each connection terminates to the system ground
bar on the control frame.
The frame/chassis and logic ground paths are both noncurrent carrying
paths.
WARNING: The power (-48 VDC) and return connections of FAP
(P/N 870-0243-08) and (P/N 870-1606-xx) are physically reversed at the input
terminal, See Figure 6-1 and Figure 6-2 for wiring information.
Figure 6-1. Logic Grounding with FAP (P/N 870-0243-08)
Control Frame (CF-00)
rear view
Nonoxidizing grease should be put on all
power and ground transmissions
(nonoxidizing grease is not necessary on
tin plated ground bars)
Control Frame (CF)
Fuse Alarm Panel
logic ground
connection to the
system ground bar
Frame to
ground cable by
way of H-tap to
site main ground bar
System Logic
Ground Connection
To Office Master
Ground Bar (MGB)
Logic Ground Bar
Logcic Ground
connections
from other FAPs
Control Frame (CF)
Fuse Alarm Panel
logic ground
connection to the
system ground bar
-48VDC from
central office
power
-48VDC return
from central
office power
FAP 870-0243-08
Control shelf backplane
6-6
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Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 6-2. Logic Grounding with FAP (P/N 870-1606-xx/870-2320-xx)
-48V
-48V
B
A
-48V
12 18 19 20
RET
LOGIC
GND
P1
P2
ALARM INTERFACE
B
A
RET
12 1819 20
Return
12 1819 20
12 1819 20
Chassis
ground
12 1819 20
P3
TORQUE TO
25 IN-LBS
-48V
12 18 19 20
P1
P2
LOGIC
GND
P3
TORQUE TO
25 IN-LBS
fap frnt rear 1606
B-side
Rearview
Fuse position
numbers
A-side
Fuse position
numbers
The doors installed are grounded to the frame through a double lug ground
wire (see Figure 6-3) and through a screw-down latch.
Figure 6-3. Door Grounding
Door ground
d
n
u
ro
r
g
o
o
0
d
3
E
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6-7
Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Power Requirements
Each frame requires that power be provided from two fuses/breakers at
–48VDC. Additional peripherals that require alternating current (for example
but not limited to, terminals, printers, and modems) must be compatible with
the system and have a separate ground from the frames.
Each frame is divided into A and B power buses. In the event of loss of power
on one of the buses, the other bus must be able to supply current for the entire
frame. Therefore, each bus requires wiring sized to handle up to the
maximum amps at –48VDC, with a maximum voltage drop of 0.6 volts. To
meet this specification you must:
•
For new installations of Control and Extension Frames (as of Release
34.0) use 60 amp breakers (see note), the EOAP Frames use 30 amp
breakers, the ELAP frames use 30 amp and 60 amp breakers, and the
EPAP frames use 30 amp breakers. Local Alarms for the Frame’s
Power Distribution System are provided at each frame.
NOTE: Existing frames that are fused at 40 amps can be upgraded to
support 60 amps with a FAP upgrade kit. 60 amps is required for frames
that contain HC-MIMs.
•
Use #6, two-hole, #10 Bolt, 5/8" on center lug with windows
(P/N 502-0085-01) for fuse and alarm panel connectors.
NOTE: If breakers are tripped by an overload, they must be switched
completely OFF and then ON to reset.
Populating the System
The number of frames, shelves, and modules needed to populate the system
can be determined using the following procedures.
Link Interface Module (LIM) Requirements
Procedure – Link Interface Module Requirements
Total the following items to determine LIM requirements; any fractional items
should be rounded up to the next whole number.
6-8
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Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Low-Speed Link Interface module (LSLIM):
•
SS7 DSOA links/2
•
SS7 OCU links/2
•
SS7 V.35 links/2
•
E1 links/2
•
X.25 DSOA links
•
X.25 OCU links
---------------------------+1 ILA +1= total LIM requirements
High Speed Link Interface Module (HSLIM):
•
SS7 ATM/T1 links
---------------------------+1= total LIM requirements
Cards Type Requirements for SCCP Application with Group Ticket Voucher (TVG)
Group Ticket Voucher (TVG) allows the EAGLE 5 ISS to assign transactions to
available resources. With TVG, EAGLE 5 ISS provisioning for SCCP cards is
defined on a transactions per second (TPS) basis, where the desired TPS of the
system will be determined by the amount of TSM and DSM cards configured.
For example, if the user needs 10,000 TPS (regardless of the number of links)
12 (10,000/850) TSM cards or six (10,000 / 1700) DSM cards should be
configured. TPS values for individual LIM card types are.
•
53 TPS for low-speed links
•
480 TPS for ATM links
•
1000 TPS for IPMLIM links
The number of TVG requests that can be made per card is a function of the
number of cards in the system, and decreases as the number of active cards
increase. It is approximately 1/(Nx10-6) for N cards. For a system with 250
cards, it is limited to about 3300 TVG requests/second. With the introduction
of the MPL card, in a non-HMUX system, there cannot be more than 131 cards
(MPL, SCCP, and SLAN) in the system.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
6-9
Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
CAUTION: It is Tekelec's recommendation that cards running the SCCP
application be uniformly distributed in the EAGLE 5 ISS to provide a more
even SCCP load distribution. During normal operation unevenly
distributed SCCP cards in an EAGLE 5 ISS would not have any network or
system impacts. However, should a particular SCCP card database(s)
become corrupted, inconsistent, or at a different level, depending on the
amount of service provided by that card and the extent of the database
issue, network impacts can occur.
NOTE: The MPL card improves the functionality of SS7 routing
within the EAGLE5 ISS by increasing the number of SS7 links the
EAGLE 5 ISS can handle for each LIM card. This allows the EAGLE 5
ISS to interact in larger SS7 networks as well as decreasing the size of
an EAGLE 5 ISS (for example, previously 250 cards would be required
to support 500 links, now only 63 MPL cards are required).
Database Communications Module (DCM) and Double-Slot Enhanced DCM (EDCM)
The Database Communications Module (DCM) (P/N 870-1671-xx or
P/N 870-1945-01) can be used in EAGLE 5 ISS or IP7 GW systems). The
Double Slot EDCM (P/N 870-2197-01) is used in IP7 SG release 4.0 systems
and later. Both cards provide the following functions for the systems:
•
Signaling Transfer Point, Local Area Network (SLAN) function, port to
DCM or Double Slot EDCM
•
Enhanced Bulk Download
NOTE: The DCM card requires two slots for mounting and must be
assigned to an odd numbered slot with the next even slot left open on
EAGLE 5 ISS systems.
The DCM card is compatible with EAGLE 5 ISS control shelf backplanes
P/N 850-0330-03/04/05/06 and extension backplanes
P/N 850-0356-01/02/03/04/06. The Double-Slot EDCM is compatible with
IP7 SG control shelf backplanes P/N 850-0330-03/04/05 and extension shelf
backplanes P/N 850-0356-01/02/03. These cards are provisioned in pairs for
redundancy with mated pairs mounted in shelves. Size places some
restrictions on the placement of DCM or Double-Slot EDCM cards.
The DCM cards require a unique cable interface that is not compatible with
current LIM cables on a fully wired but unequipped shelf. The location of the
DCM cards must be to odd numbered slots, requiring two slots with the next
higher-numbered even slots left open.
6-10
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Cabling DCM and Double-Slot EDCM Cards
The DCM and EDCM support only Category 5 (100-Ohm) shielded twisted
pair cables. In order to meet Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) requirements,
the DCM or Double-Slot EDCM may require a point-to-point connection or a
connection to a hub/router. This must be identified to the customer who may
be preparing the location. See Figure 6-4 "Database Communications Module
Cabling in System" on page 6-12, for cable types and part numbers.
The maximum cable length has not been determined but will be less than 100
meters.
Three specific DCM cables are required:
•
Customer patch panel “straight through” (P/N 830-0788-xx)
•
Customer patch panel “crossover” (P/N 830-0789-xx)
•
100-BASE TX interface to unterminated (P/N 830-0711-xx)
Hardware
The systems support a maximum of six DCMs or Double-Slot EDCMs for
Internet Protocol Link Interface Module (IP LIM) application.
If more than one DCM or Double-Slot EDCM is provisioned, each must be
powered from different fuse positions and distributed evenly among “A” and
“B” power feeds.
CAUTION: In EAGLE 5 ISS systems care must be taken to be sure the
DCM card is inserted into the correct odd numbered slots. In IP7 SG
systems there is no slot provisioning requirements. Cards may be
provisioned in any slot where they physically fit except for the HMUX
and MAS dedicated card slots.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
6-11
Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Figure 6-4. Database Communications Module Cabling in System
Control shelf
DCM connections
RJ-45
P/N 830-0788-xx
P/N 830-0789-xx
RJ-45
P/N 830-0711-xx
Unterminated
Control Frame
(CF-00) (rear view)
DCM cable frame
6-12
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
Single-Slot EDCM and EDCM-A
The Single-Slot Enhanced Data Communications Module EDCM
(P/N 870-2372-01) and EDCM-A (P/N 870-2508-02) require only a single
frame slot. It can be placed into any slot, odd or even, which has been
provisioned for an Enhanced Data Communications Module (EDCM).
Otherwise it duplicates the performance of the Double-Slot EDCM.
NOTE: Cards may be provisioned in any slot where they physically fit
except for the HMUX and MAS dedicated card slots.
The following cards can be configured from the single-slot EDCM and have
these provisioning requirements:
•
Signaling Transport Cards (STC) can be provisioned in any slot to support
the Integrated Sentinel. Only three STC cards may be provisioned on each
shelf.
•
General Purpose Service Modules (GPSM-II) cards can be provisioned in
card slots (1113 and 1115).
•
Measurements Collection and Polling Modules (MCPM) can be
provisioned an any slot.
Application Communications Module Requirements
Procedure – Application Communications Module Requirements
1. If the Signal Transfer Point (STP), Local Area Network (SLAN) feature is
not required for this system, no ACMs are needed.
2. If the Signal Transfer Point (STP), Local Area Network (SLAN) feature is
required for this system, one ACM is required for each 30 LIMs in the
system (refer to the previous procedure) plus one spare ACM.
(LIMs) /30 round up to next whole number +1=ACM needed in a system.
Procedure – Translations Services Module for Local Number Portability
Each Translations Service Module (TSM) is capable of 850 translations per
second for up to 16 LIMs. For reliability, the number of TSMs equipped should
be “N + 1,” where “N” represents at least one TSM for each 16 LIMs, or at
most 25 TSMs to achieve a full 20 (400 translations per second) per system
node.
To calculate N (number of TSMs):
1. Calculate the number of TSMs per 16 LIMs and add one.
2. Calculate the number of TSMs per 2 LIM ATMs and add one.
3. Choose whichever number is the greater of the two calculations (N+1)
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
6-13
Site Engineering — EAGLE 5 ISS
OAP and Embedded OAP
These rules apply to populating the OAP or EOAP for Local Number
Portability (LNP):
6-14
•
For LNP, two OAPs or a dual EOAP is required and can be installed in
the same OAP frame
•
If an OAP frame with two OAPS already exists for Signaling
Engineering and Administration System (SEAS), then it will be used
for LNP
•
If an OAP frame with only one OAP or EOAP already exists for SEAS,
then one additional OAP or EOAP will be required for LNP
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A
Hardware Baselines
Baseline Tables ............................................................................ A–2
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 Through 31.6 ................................. A–3
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 Through 35.0 ................................. A–9
EAGLE 5 ISS Cable Assemblies and Adapters .................... A–16
Integrated Sentinel ESP
Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0, 11.x ................................A–18
Integrated Sentinel ESP Expansion Frame
Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0 ........................................................A–23
Sentinel Server Frame and Site Collector Frame
Release 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0 .......................................................... A–24
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-1
Hardware Baselines
Baseline Tables
The following tables list the configurable hardware components for each
release. A bold X in a table cell indicates the component listed on the left is
valid for the release indicated at the top of the column. To obtain
configuration information about hardware and release compatibility for each
release use:
•
Eagle 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6 in Table A-1, “Hardware Baseline
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6,” on page A-3
•
Eagle 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 34.0 in Table A-2, “Hardware Baseline
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 35.0,” on page A-9
•
EAGLE 5 ISS Cable Assemblies and Adapters:
•
–
Table A-3, “E1 Cable Assemblies,” on page A-16
–
Table A-4, “T1 MIM LIM Cable Assemblies,” on page A-16
–
Table A-5, “Terminal/Printer Cables and Adapters,” on page A-17
–
Table A-6, “Modem Cables and Adapters,” on page A-17
–
Table A-7, “Tekelec 1000 Site Specific Cables,” on page A-17
Sentinel systems use the following:
–
Table A-8, “ESP Frame Baseline and Required EAGLE 5 ISS Baseline.,” on
page A-18
–
Table A-9, “Integrated Sentinel ESP Frame Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0,
10.x, 11.x,” on page A-19
–
Table A-10, “Integrated Sentinel ESP Expansion Frame Releases 8.1.x, 9.0,
10.0,” on page A-23
–
Table A-11, “Sentinel Server Frame Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0, 11.x,” on
page A-24
–
Table A-12, “Site Collector Frame Releases 8.1.x and 9.0.,” on page A-25
–
Table A-13, “AC Servers Releases 8.1.x and 9.0,” on page A-25.
NOTE: Exceptions, additions, and clarifications to the following
tables are by superscript numeric notation relating to the listed notes
located at the end of each table. For example, a table cell with X1,2 would
indicate that notes 1 and 2 are applicable to that component being
configurable in that release.
A-2
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 Through 31.6
Table A-1.
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6 (Sheet 1 of 6)
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
30.0
30.1
31.0
31.3
31.6
ACM
870-1008-02
D
X
X
X
X
X
ACM
870-1008-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
ACM
870-1008-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
ACM
870-1008-05
A
X
X
X
X
X
ASM
870-1011-02
D
X
X
X
X
ASM
870-1011-03
A
X
X
X
X
ASM
870-1011-04
B
X
X
X
X
ASM
870-1011-05
B
X
X
X
X
ASM
870-1011-06
A
X
X
X
X
ASM
870-1011-07
A
X
X
X
X
Air Management Card
870-1824-02
A
CTRL SHELF
870-0775-03
E
X1
X1
X1
X1
X14
CTRL SHELF
870-2321-08
A
X2
X2
X2,7
X2,7
X2,7
CTRL SHELF
870-2321-04
A
X2,7
X2,7
X2,7
CTRL SHELF
870-2377-02
A
X3
X3
X3,7
X3,7
X3,7
DCM
870-1671-02
B
X
X
X
X
DCM
870-1671-04
A
X
X
X
X
DCM
870-1945-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
DCM
870-1945-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
DCM
870-1945-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
DCMX
870-1984-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
DSM, (1) GB MEM
870-1984-02
A3
X
X
X
X
X
DSM, (1) GB MEM
870-1984-08
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
X21
DSM, (1) GB MEM
870-1984-15
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
DSM, (1) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-3
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6 (Sheet 2 of 6)
Table A-1.
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
30.0
30.1
31.0
31.3
31.6
DSM, (1) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-06
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
X21
DSM, (1) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-13
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
DSM, (2) GB MEM
870-1984-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
DSM, (2) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-03
E
X
X
X
X
DSM, (3) GB MEM
870-1984-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
DSM, (4) GB MEM
870-1984-05
A
X
X
X
X
X
DSM, (4) GB MEM
870-1984-06
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
X21
DSM, (4) GB MEM
870-1984-13
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-01
G
X
X
X
X
X
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-03
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
X21
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-07
A
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
E1-ATM
870-2455-01
B
X8
X8
X8
X8
X
E1-ATM
870-2455-02
B
X
X
X
E1-ATM
870-2455-05
A
E5-E1T1
870-1873-02
A
E5-ENET
870-2212-02
A
EDCM
(Single-slot)
870-2372-01
EDCM
(Single-slot)
X22
X22
X22
X22
X22
E
X
X
X
X
X
870-2372-13
A
X22,25
X22,25
X22,25
X22,25
X22,25
EDCM-A
(Single-slot)
870-2508-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
EDSM-2G
(MCPM)
870-2372-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
EDSM-2G
(MCPM)
870-2372-07
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
X21
A-4
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6 (Sheet 3 of 6)
Table A-1.
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
30.0
30.1
31.0
31.3
31.6
EDSM-2G
(MCPM)
870-2372-13
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
EILA
870-2049-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
EILA w/DIMM
870-2049-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-02
C5
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-03
D
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-06
A
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-07
A
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-08
A
X
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-11
A
X
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-2378-02
A
X
X
X5
X5
X5
FAP
870-1606-01
A
X
X
X
FAP
870-1606-02
A
FAP
870-1606-02
C
FAP
870-2320-03
A
FAP
870-1823-01
A
FAP
870-2320-03
J
FAP- CF/EF
870-0243-08
FAP- MISC
X4
X4
X4
X4
X4
X5
X5
X5
X5
X5
C
X
X
X
X
X
870-0243-09
C
X
X
X
X
X
GPSM-II
870-2360-01
E
X11
X11
X11
X11
X11
GPSM-II
870-2360-05
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
X21
GPSM-II
870-2360-06
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
HCMIM
870-2671-01
P
HCMIM
870-2671-03
B
HIPR
870-2574-02
D
HMUX
870-1965-03
A
X12
X12
X12
X12
X12
LIM-AINF
870-1014-01
D
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-5
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6 (Sheet 4 of 6)
Table A-1.
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
30.0
30.1
31.0
31.3
31.6
LIM-AINF
870-1014-03
B
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-05
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-06
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-05
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-06
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-ATM
(1) 4Mb RAM
870-1293-02
A
X8
X8
X8
X8
X8
LIM-ATM
(2) 4Mb RAM
870-1293-03
A
X8
X8
X8
X8
X8
LIM-ATM
870-1293-06
A
X9
X9
X9
X9
X9
LIM-ATM
870-1293-07
A
X9
X9
X9
X9
X9
LIM-ATM
870-1293-08
A
X9
X9
LIM-ATM
870-1293-13
A
X9,23
X9,23
LIM-DS0
870-1009-02
D
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1009-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1009-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1485-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1485-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1485-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-E1
870-1379-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-ILA
870-1484-01
E
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-ILA
870-1484-02
C
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1010-03
D
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1010-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
A-6
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6 (Sheet 5 of 6)
Table A-1.
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
30.0
30.1
31.0
31.3
31.6
LIM-OCU
870-1010-05
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1486-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1486-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1486-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1012-02
D
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1012-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1012-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1487-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1487-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1487-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-04
B
X
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-05
A
X
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-06
A
X
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-09
A
X
X
X
MPL
870-2061-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
MPL
870-2061-03
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
X21
MPL
870-2061-06
A
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
MPL-T
870-2061-02
C
X
X
X
X
X
TDM-10
870-0774-10
A
X6,7,13
X6,7,13
X6,7,13
X6,7,13
X6,7,13
TDM-11
870-0774-11
A
X13
X13
X13
X13
X13
TDM-15
870-0774-18
A
X13
X13
X13
X13
X13
TSM-256
870-1289-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-256
870-1289-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-256
870-1289-06
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-512
870-1290-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-512
870-1290-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-512
870-1290-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-768
870-1291-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-7
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 30.0 through 31.6 (Sheet 6 of 6)
Table A-1.
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
30.0
30.1
31.0
31.3
31.6
TSM-768
870-1291-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-768
870-1291-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-1024
870-1292-02
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-1024
870-1292-03
A
X
X
X
X
X
TSM-1024
870-1292-04
A
X
X
X
X
X
Dual EOAP
890-1050-01
K
X
X
X
X
X
Dual GR376 EOAP
890-1050-02
G
X
X
X
X
X
Single EOAP
890-1050-03
H
X
X
X
X
X
FAN ASSY
890-1038-01
D
X
X
X
X
X
FAN ASSY
890-0001-01
A
FAN ASSY
890-0001-04
A
KIT, E1
890-1037-06
A
X
X
X
X
X
KIT, HLDOVR CLK ASSY
890-1013-01
A
X
X
X
X
X
MPS in Heavy Duty Frame
890-1801-02
E
X
X
X
X
MPS DC Frame
890-1843-03
C
Tekelec 1000
870-2640-03
F
X
X
X
Tekelec 1100
870-2754-04
P
MPS Netra-toTekelec 1000 Field
Upgrade Kit
870-2735-02
A
X
X
X
MPS RAM and CPU
Upgrade Kit (two for each
frame)
870-2669-02
A
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1277-03
H
X
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1277-04
G
X
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1374-03
E
X
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1374-04
E
X
MPSW / 1 GB RAM
890-1374-05
A
X
MPSW / 2 GB RAM
890-1374-06
A
X
A-8
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 Through 35.0
Table A-2.
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 35.0 (Sheet 1 of 6)
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
32.0
33.0
34.0
35.0
ACM
870-1008-02
D
X
X
X
X
ACM
870-1008-03
A
X
X
X
X
ACM
870-1008-04
A
X
X
X
X
ACM
870-1008-05
A
X
X
X
X
ASM
870-1011-02
D
ASM
870-1011-03
A
ASM
870-1011-04
B
ASM
870-1011-05
B
ASM
870-1011-06
A
ASM
870-1011-07
A
Air Management Card
870-1824-02
A
X18
X18
X18
CTRL SHELF
870-0775-03
E
X14
X14
X14
X14
CTRL SHELF
870-2321-08
A
X2,7
X2,7
X2,7
X2,7
CTRL SHELF
870-2321-04
A
X2,7
X2,7
X2,7
X2,7
CTRL SHELF
870-2377-02
A
X3,7
X3,7
X3,7
X3,7
DCM
870-1671-02
B
DCM
870-1671-04
A
DCM
870-1945-01
A
X
X
X
X
DCM
870-1945-02
A
X
X
X
X
DCM
870-1945-03
A
X
X
X
X
DCMX
870-1984-01
A
X
X
X
X
DSM, (1) GB MEM
870-1984-02
A3
X
X
X
X
DSM, (1) GB MEM
870-1984-08
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
DSM, (1) GB MEM
870-1984-15
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
DSM, (1) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-02
A
X
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-9
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 35.0 (Sheet 2 of 6)
Table A-2.
NAME
A-10
PART
NUMBER
REV
32.0
33.0
34.0
35.0
DSM, (1) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-06
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
DSM, (1) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-13
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
DSM, (2) GB MEM
870-1984-03
A
X
X
X
X
DSM, (2) GB
GPSM-II Based
870-2371-03
E
DSM, (3) GB MEM
870-1984-04
A
X
DSM, (4) GB MEM
870-1984-05
A
X
X
X
X
DSM, (4) GB MEM
870-1984-06
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
DSM, (4) GB MEM
870-1984-13
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-01
G
X
X
X
X
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-02
A
X
X
X
X
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-03
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
E1/T1 MIM
870-2198-07
A
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
E1-ATM
870-2455-01
B
X
X
X
X
E1-ATM
870-2455-02
B
X
X
X
X
E1-ATM
870-2455-05
A
X22
X22
X22
X22
E5-E1T1
870-1873-02
A
X24
E5-ENET
870-2212-02
A
X24
EDCM
(Single-slot)
870-2372-01
E
X
X
X
X
EDCM
(Single-slot)
870-2372-13
A
X22,25
X22,25
X22,25
X22,25
EDCM-A
(Single-slot)
870-2508-02
A
X
X
X
X
EDSM-2G
(MCPM)
870-2372-03
A
X
X
X
X
EDSM-2G
(MCPM)
870-2372-07
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 35.0 (Sheet 3 of 6)
Table A-2.
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
32.0
33.0
34.0
35.0
EDSM-2G
(MCPM)
870-2372-13
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
EILA
870-2049-01
A
X
X
X
X
EILA w/DIMM
870-2049-02
A
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-02
C5
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-03
D
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-06
A
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-07
A
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-08
A
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-0776-11
A
X
X
X
X
EXTN SHELF
870-2378-02
A
X5
X5
X5
X5
FAP
870-1606-01
A
X
X
X
X
FAP
870-1606-02
A
X4
X4
X4
X4
FAP
870-1606-02
C
X16
X16
X16
FAP
870-2320-03
A
X5
X5
X5
FAP
870-1823-01
A
X
X
X
FAP
870-2320-03
J
X15
X15
X15
FAP- CF/EF
870-0243-08
C
X
X
X
X
FAP- MISC
870-0243-09
C
X
X
X
X
GPSM-II
870-2360-01
E
X11
X11
X11
X11
GPSM-II
870-2360-05
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
GPSM-II
870-2360-06
A
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
X21,22
HCMIM
870-2671-01
P
X17
X17
X17
HCMIM
870-2671-03
B
X17
X17
X17
HIPR
870-2574-02
D
X
X
X
HMUX
870-1965-03
A
X12
X12
X12
X12
LIM-AINF
870-1014-01
D
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-02
A
X
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
X5
A-11
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 35.0 (Sheet 4 of 6)
Table A-2.
NAME
A-12
PART
NUMBER
REV
32.0
33.0
34.0
35.0
LIM-AINF
870-1014-03
B
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-04
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-05
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1014-06
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-01
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-02
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-03
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-04
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-05
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-AINF
870-1488-06
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-ATM
(1) 4Mb RAM
870-1293-02
A
X8
X8
X8
X8
LIM-ATM
(2) 4Mb RAM
870-1293-03
A
X8
X8
X8
X8
LIM-ATM
870-1293-06
A
X9
X9
X9
X9
LIM-ATM
870-1293-07
A
X9
X9
X9
X9
LIM-ATM
870-1293-08
A
X9
X9
X9
X9
LIM-ATM
870-1293-13
A
X9,23
X9,23
X9,23
X9,23
LIM-DS0
870-1009-02
D
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1009-03
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1009-04
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1485-01
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1485-02
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-DS0
870-1485-03
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-E1
870-1379-01
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-ILA
870-1484-01
E
X
X
X
X
LIM-ILA
870-1484-02
C
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1010-03
D
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1010-04
A
X
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 35.0 (Sheet 5 of 6)
Table A-2.
NAME
PART
NUMBER
REV
32.0
33.0
34.0
35.0
LIM-OCU
870-1010-05
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1486-02
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1486-03
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-OCU
870-1486-04
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1012-02
D
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1012-03
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1012-04
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1487-01
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1487-02
A
X
X
X
X
LIM-V.35
870-1487-03
A
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-04
B
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-05
A
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-06
A
X
X
X
X
MDAL
870-0773-09
A
X
X
X
X
MPL
870-2061-01
A
X
X
X
X
MPL
870-2061-03
A
X21
X21
X21
X21
MPL
870-2061-06
A
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
X21,23
MPL-T
870-2061-02
C
X
X
X
X
TDM-10
870-0774-10
A
X6,7,13
X6,7,13
X6,7,13
X6,7,13
TDM-11
870-0774-11
A
X13
X13
X13
X13
TDM-15
870-0774-18
A
X13
X13
X13
X13
TSM-256
870-1289-02
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-256
870-1289-03
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-256
870-1289-06
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-512
870-1290-02
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-512
870-1290-03
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-512
870-1290-04
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-768
870-1291-02
A
X
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-13
Hardware Baselines
Hardware Baseline EAGLE 5 ISS Release 32.0 through 35.0 (Sheet 6 of 6)
Table A-2.
NAME
A-14
PART
NUMBER
REV
32.0
33.0
34.0
35.0
TSM-768
870-1291-03
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-768
870-1291-04
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-1024
870-1292-02
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-1024
870-1292-03
A
X
X
X
X
TSM-1024
870-1292-04
A
X
X
X
X
Dual EOAP
890-1050-01
K
X
X
X
X
Dual GR376 EOAP
890-1050-02
G
X
X
Single EOAP
890-1050-03
H
X
X
X
X
FAN ASSY
890-1038-01
D
X
X
X
X
FAN ASSY
890-0001-01
A
X19
X19
X19
FAN ASSY
890-0001-04
A
X19
X19
X19
KIT, E1
890-1037-06
A
X
X
X
X
KIT, HLDOVR CLK ASSY
890-1013-01
A
X
X
X
X
MPS in Heavy Duty Frame
890-1801-02
E
X
X
X
X
MPS DC Frame
890-1843-03
C
X
X
Tekelec 1000
870-2640-03
F
X
X
Tekelec 1100
870-2754-04
P
X20
X20
MPS Netra-toTekelec 1000 Field
Upgrade Kit
870-2735-02
A
X
X
X
X
MPS RAM and CPU
Upgrade Kit (two for each
frame)
870-2669-02
A
X
X
X
X
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1277-03
H
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1277-04
G
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1374-03
E
MPSW O/RAIDS
890-1374-04
E
MPSW / 1 GB RAM
890-1374-05
A
MPSW / 2 GB RAM
890-1374-06
A
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
NOTE 1: Control shelf P/N 870-0775-03 with backplane
P/N 850-0330-04 can be used with minor modifications and addition of
adapter cable P/N 830-1185-01.
NOTE 2: Control shelf P/N 870-2321-08 with backplane
P/N 850-0330-06 can be used with HMUX cards in Tekelec standard
frames.
NOTE 3: Control shelf P/N 870-2377-02 with backplane
P/N 850-0330-06 can be used in Tekelec heavy-duty frames.
NOTE 4: Required for Tekelec standard frames. Rev. C required for
HCMIM shelves.
NOTE 5: Required for Tekelec heavy-duty frames. Rev. J required for
HCMIM shelves.
NOTE 6:
Required for Master Timing Feature (T1 clocking).
NOTE 7:
Required for HMUX cards.
NOTE 8:
Uses HCAP (P/N 850-0419-xx) main assembly board
NOTE 9:
Uses HCAP-T (P/N 850-0615-xx) main assembly boards
NOTE 10:
Does not support E1 Master Timing
NOTE 11: Beginning with EAGLE 5 ISS Software Release 30.0 all
MCAP cards must be replaced by GPSM-II cards (P/N 870-2360-01).
GPSM-II cards are installed at the factory or by Tekelec Technical
Support and are not installed by customers.
NOTE 12: Beginning with EAGLE 5 ISS Software Release 30.0 all
IPMX cards must be replaced by High-Speed Multiplexer (HMUX)
cards (P/N 870-1965-03). Beginning with EAGLE 5 ISS software release
33.0, all IPMX cards must be replaced by either HMUX cards or
High-Speed IMT Router (HIPR) Cards (P/N 870-2574-02). A mixture of
HMUX and HIPR cards within one IMT ring is possible, provided HIPR
is installed on both IMT A and IMT B on a given shelf. HMUX and
HIPR cards are installed at the factory or by Tekelec Technical Support
and are not installed by customers.
NOTE 13: Beginning with EAGLE 5 ISS Software Release 30.0
Terminal Disk Module (TDM) cards must be P/N 870-0774-10 and later.
NOTE 14: NEBS will support HMUX with minor modifications and
cable 830-1185-01. NEBS will support Master Timing with adapter
830-1183-01.
NOTE 15: 60 Amp FAP required for Tekelec Heavy-duty frames that
contain shelves with HCMIM modules.
NOTE 16: 60 Amp FAP required for standard frames that contain
shelves with HCMIM modules.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-15
Hardware Baselines
NOTE 17: Requires two HIPR modules for each shelf containing
HCMIM, and requires fan tray 890-0001-04.
NOTE 18:
modules.
Required in all empty slots in shelves that contain HCMIM
NOTE 19: Required for shelves that contain HCMIM modules.
NOTE 20: Required for ELAP 4.0
NOTE 21: Has K6 II processor.
NOTE 22: Has COMM processor adapter.
NOTE 23: Has PQFP processor.
NOTE 24: Requires HIPR 870-2574-02.
NOTE 25: Has K6 III processor.
EAGLE 5 ISS Cable Assemblies and Adapters
E1 Cable Assemblies
Table A-3.
Tekelec P/N
Description
830-1233-XX
E1 Dual TX/RX, XX ft., NTW
830-1256-XX
E1 Patch, D26M to D26M, 120 OHM, XX ft., NTW
Table A-4.
A-16
T1 MIM LIM Cable Assemblies
Tekelec P/N
Description
830-0894-XX
T1 MIM Lim, XX ft., DB26M/unterminated, NTW
830-0895-01
T1 MIM Lim to MPL Cable Adapter, NTW
830-1198-01
T1 LIm to MPL Cable Adapter
830-1197-XX
T1 MIM Lim XX ft. Unterminated
830-1185-01
Adapter A Clk in HMUX
830-1183-01
DB-25M to DB-25F and DB-15F Y Clk / HS Timing
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Terminal/Printer Cables and Adapters
Table A-5.
Tekelec Cable P/N
Necessary Adapter
830-0394-XX
830-1153-02
Table A-6.
Modem Cables and Adapters
Tekelec Cable P/N
Necessary Adapter
830-0394-XX
830-1153-03
830-1154-XX
830-1153-04
Table A-7.
Tekelec 1000 Site Specific Cables
Tekelec P/N
Description
830-1201-XX
Optional DB9F/DB25M Serial w/Flow Control
830-1177-XX
DB26-RJ45 Site Specific Straight Through Cable
830-1178-XX
DB26-RJ45 Site Specific Crossover Cable
830-1204-XX
DB26-RJ45 Site Specific Straight Through Cable Non Shielded
830-1205-XX
DB26-RJ45 Site Specific Crossover Cable - Non
Shielded
830-1202-XX
DB9/DB25 M/M Site Specific Null Modem
Serial Cable
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-17
Hardware Baselines
Integrated Sentinel ESP Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0, 11.x
In addition to the following Integrated Sentinel ESP Frame release
information, the baseline for an Integrated Sentinel ESP release also requires
a specific minimum baseline EAGLE 5 ISS release.
Table A-8.
ESP Frame Baseline and Required EAGLE 5 ISS Baseline.
ESP Frame Baseline
Minimum Required EAGLE 5 ISS
Baseline
ESP 8.0
EAGLE 5 ISS 28.0
ESP 8.1
EAGLE 5 ISS 28.2
ESP 9.0
EAGLE 5 ISS 28.2
ESP ATM and EAGLE 5 ISS Time
Stamping
EAGLE 5 ISS 28.1
ESP 10.0 and higher
EAGLE 5 ISS 28.2
The following notes apply to Tables A-9, A-10, A-11, A-12, and A-13.
NOTE 1:
Two (2) per Base System.
NOTE 2:
One (1) per NETRA T1.
NOTE 3:
Two (2) per NETRA T1.
NOTE 4:
One (1) per Breaker Panel.
NOTE 5: One (1) installed in Server, provides 8-port breakout box for
alarms and console access.
NOTE 6: Contains four (4) CISCO 1000BASE Network Cards. The
base system switches will require one (1) in each base switch and one
(1) in each of the expansion switches.
NOTE 7: Expansion I2000 shelf (950-1003-02) maximum is three (3) per
frame; one (1) in the Base System and configurable up to two (2)
additional I2000 DC shelves.
NOTE 8: One (1) supplied with Base System; configurable up to three
(3) additional servers for a maximum of four (4).
NOTE 9: Contains two (2) 24-port DC ENET Switch and two (2) 1000
base T network cards. Required when installing the 12th server in any
frame.
NOTE 10: Frame assembly includes cables for maximum
configuration and circuit breaker only. Maximum four (4) servers, one
(1) switch, and one (1) console server ordered separately.
NOTE 11: Configuration is four (4) maximum, none supplied with
base frame assembly.
A-18
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Table A-9.
Assembly
Integrated Sentinel ESP Frame Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.x, 11.x
SubAssembly
Description
8.0
8.1
8.1.x
9.0
10.x
11.x
Sentinel Base System
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X1
804-1573-01
NETRA, T1 DC200, 256MB, 1 X 18 GB
X1
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X2
X2
X2
X2
X2
X2
804-1282-01
Drive Fixed Disk, Internal, SCSI, 18.2 GB
X2
804-1576-01
NETRA, T1 512MB KIT
X3
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
804-1423-02
Breaker Panel
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X4
804-1199-01
Router, 2 Ethernet Ports
X1
809-0065-01
Remote Access Server
X
X2
X2
X2
X2
Sentinel Base System, First Frame
X
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X1
X1
804-1573-03
Server, SUN, NETRA 120 1X650MHz
1X512MB 1X36GB
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X2
X2
X2
X2
890-1516-01
890-1516-02
Sentinel Base System
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X1
804-1573-02
NETRA, T1 DC200, 256MB, 1 X 500MHz
CPU
X1
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X2
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, SCSI, 36.4 GB (QTY 2)
X3
804-1576-01
NETRA, T1 512MB KIT
X3
804-1576-02
Memory Module, 256MB, PC133 ECC
DIMM
X2
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
804-1423-02
Breaker Panel
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X4
804-1199-01
Router, 2 Ethernet Ports
X1
809-0065-01
Remote Access Server
X
890-1516-03
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-19
Hardware Baselines
Table A-9.
Assembly
Integrated Sentinel ESP Frame Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.x, 11.x (Continued)
SubAssembly
Description
804-1312-02
8.1.x
9.0
Drive Hard Disk, SCSI, 36.4 GB (QTY 2)
X
X
804-1576-01
or
804-1576-03
512MB (QTY 2)
or
1024MB (QTY 1)
X
X
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
X5
804-1423-02
Breaker Panel
X1
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X4
X4
804-1199-01
Router, 2 Ethernet Ports
X1
X1
809-0065-01
Remote Access Server
X
X
Router, Modem Assembly
X
X
Modem Card (809-0065-01 RAS is
end-of-life. Replacement is this card
installed in the blue router.)
X
X
870-2739-01
804-1836-01
890-1516-06
890-1832-01
A-20
8.0
8.1
10.x
11.x
Sentinel Base System, First Frame
X
X
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X1
X1
X1
804-1573-03
Server, SUN, NETRA 120 1X650MHz
1X512MB 1X36GB
X
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X2
X2
X2
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, SCSI, 36.4 GB
X
X
X
804-1576-01
or
804-1576-03
512MB (QTY 2)
or
1024MB (QTY 1)
X
X
X
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
804-1423-02
Breaker Panel
X1
X1
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X4
X4
X4
804-1199-01
Router, 2 Ethernet Ports
X1
X1
X1
804-1836-01
Modem Card, 1-Port Analog CISCO Router
X
X
X
890-1832-02
Sentinel Base System, First Tekelec 1000
Frame
X
870-2758-03
24-Port DC ENET Switchmen
X
870-2640-03
Server, Tekelec 1000 AS
X
870-2706-01
Dual Port Ethernet PCI Interface (1 per
Tekelec 1000)
X
870-2721-05
250 GB Drive Hard Disk
X
870-2733-02
2GB SDRAM (1 per Tekelec 1000)
X
870-2708-02
PCI Serial Interface Adapter Card (1 per
Tekelec 1000)
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Table A-9.
Assembly
Integrated Sentinel ESP Frame Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.x, 11.x (Continued)
SubAssembly
Description
870-2742-02
8 Port Console Server (1 per ESP Frame)
X
804-1706-01
Mounting Kit (1 per ESP Frame)
X
890-1516-04
8.0
8.1
8.1.x
9.0
10.x
11.x
Sentinel Base System, Second Frame
X
X
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X1
X1
X1
804-1579-01
1000BASET,Uplink, GB, CISCO Switch
X1
X1
X1
804-1573-03
Server, SUN, NETRA 120 1X650MHz
1X512MB 1X36GB
X
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X2
X2
X2
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, SCSI, 36.4 GB
X
X
X
804-1576-01
or
804-1576-03
512MB (QTY 2)
or
1024MB (QTY 1)
X
X
X
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
Sentinel Base System, Third Frame
X
X
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X1
X1
X1
804-1579-01
1000BASET,Uplink, GB, CISCO Switch
X1
X1
X1
804-1573-03
Server, SUN, NETRA 120 1X650MHz
1X512MB 1X36GB
X
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X2
X2
X2
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, SCSI, 36.4 GB
X
X
X
804-1576-01
or
804-1576-03
512MB (QTY 2)
or
1024MB (QTY 1)
X
X
X
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
804-1423-02
Breaker Panel
X1
X1
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X4
X4
X4
890-1516-05
860-0456-01
Assembly Kit, Switch, Expansion
X
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X1
X1
804-1579-01
1000BASET,Uplink, GB, CISCO Switch
X6
X6
Assembly Kit, NETRA, T1 DC200,
Expansion
X
804-1573-01
NETRA, T1 DC200, 256MB, 1 X 18 GB
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X2
804-1282-01
Drive Fixed Disk, Internal, SCSI, 18.2 GB
X2
870-2439-01
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-21
Hardware Baselines
Table A-9.
Assembly
Integrated Sentinel ESP Frame Releases 8.0, 8.1, 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.x, 11.x (Continued)
SubAssembly
Description
8.0
804-1576-01
NETRA, T1 512MB KIT (QTY 2)
X
Assembly Kit, NETRA, T1 DC200,
Expansion
X
804-1573-02
NETRA, T1 DC200, 256MB, 1 X 500MHz
CPU (QTY 2)
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, USCSI, 36.4 GB (QTY 2)
X
804-1576-01
NETRA, T1 512MB KIT (QTY 2)
X
804-1576-02
Memory Module, 256MB, PC133 ECC
DIMM
X
870-2439-03
A-22
8.1
8.1.x
9.0
10.x
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
11.x
Hardware Baselines
Integrated Sentinel ESP Expansion Frame Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0
Table A-10. Integrated Sentinel ESP Expansion Frame Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0
Assembly
SubAssembly
8.1.x
9.0
10.0
Kit, ESP Interframe Expansion, Sentinel
X
X
X
804-1578-01
24-Port DC ENET Switch, CISCO, NEBS
X9
X9
X9
804-1579-01
1000BASET,Uplink, GB, CISCO Switch
X6
X6
X6
Kit, 2nd and 3rd ESP Interframe Expansion, Sentinel
X
X
X
X6
X6
870-0117-01
870-0118-01
804-1579-01
870-2655-05
Description
1000BASET,Uplink, GB, CISCO Switch
Server (NETRA 120), Expansion
X
X
X
804-1573-03
Server, SUN, NETRA 120 1X650MHz 1X512MB
1X36GB
X
X
X
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, USCSI, 36.4 GB
X
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X
X
X
804-1576-01
or
804-1576-03
512MB (QTY 2)
or
1024MB (QTY 1)
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-23
Hardware Baselines
Sentinel Server Frame and Site Collector Frame Release 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0
Table A-11. Sentinel Server Frame Releases 8.1.x, 9.0, 10.0, 11.x
Assembly
SubAssembly
8.1.x
9.0
Final Server Frame Assembly
X
X
804-1695-01
Base System, NETRA 20, DC Power
X8
X8
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, SCSI, 36.4 GB (QTY 2)
X
X
804-1696-01
CPU 900 MHz (One per server, Alarm Server requires 2)
X
X
804-1697-01
2GB (4 x 512MB DIMM)
X
X
804-1601-02
Disk Drive, 73GB (QTY 2 per server)
X
X
804-1585-01
Single Ethernet Card (QTY 1 per server)
X
X
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
X5
804-1423-06
Circuit breaker
X1
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X1
X1
890-1774-01
Description
10.0
11.x
Assembly, Final Server
X10
X10
X10
804-1423-06
Circuit breaker
X1
X1
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X1
X1
X1
X11
X11
X11
890-1774-02
870-2656-01
Netra 20 Expansion Server
X
X
804-1695-01
Base System, NETRA 20, DC Power
X8
X8
804-1696-01
CPU 900 MHz (One per server, Alarm Server requires 2)
X
X
804-1697-01
2GB (4 x 512MB DIMM)
X
X
804-1601-02
Disk Drive, 73GB (QTY 2 per server)
X
X
804-1585-01
Single Ethernet Card (QTY 1 per server)
X
X
870-2656-02
Netra 20 Server
X
804-1695-05
Server, SUN, NETRA 20 2X1200MHz 4X512MB 2X73GB
804-1545-01
Drive 14X Max/10X Min DVD-ROM (Netra Server)
X
X
X
804-1585-01
Single Ethernet Card (QTY 1 per server)
X
X
X
870-2640-03
Tekelec 1000 Traffic Database Server
804-1696-01
CPU 900 MHz (One per server, Alarm Server requires 2)
870-2441-01
24-Port ENET GarrettCom Switch (One required per
frame, not supplied with base frame assembly)
X
X
X
ENET Switch, 24-Port
X
X
X
Console Server, 8-Port (One required per frame
assembly)
X
X
X
Console Server, MRVLX 8 port with Modem DC power
X
X
X
804-1580-01
870-2742-02
804-1808-03
A-24
X
X
X
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Hardware Baselines
Table A-12. Site Collector Frame Releases 8.1.x and 9.0.
Assembly
SubAssembly
8.1.x
9.0
Assembly, Final Flight Recorder Frame
X
X
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, USCSI, 36.4 GB
X
X
804-1573-03
Server, SUN, NETRA 120 1X650MHz 1X512MB 1X36GB
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X
X
804-1576-01
NETRA, T1 512MB KIT (QTY 2)
X
X
804-1426-01
PCI Serial ASYNC Interface Adapter Card
X5
X5
804-1198-01
10/100 Switching DC Hub with Bridge
X
X
955-1003-02
I200 Snap Shelf DC power with power supply
X
X
950-2150-01
Power Supply, 48V DC Snap
804-1423-05
Circuit breaker
X1
X1
804-1489-01
Breaker Panel Alarm Card
X1
X1
Expansion, Flight Recorder
X
X
804-1573-03
Server, SUN, NETRA 120 1X650MHz 1X512MB 1X36GB
X
X
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, USCSI, 36.4 GB
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X
X
804-1576-01
NETRA, T1 512MB KIT (QTY 2)
X
X
I2000 Snap Shelf DC power wish power supply
X7
X7
Power Supply, 48V DC Snap
X7
X7
8.1.x
9.0
Server, SUN, V120 1X650MHz 2X36GB Disks 1536MB MEM
CDROM AC Power Cord
X
X
804-1172-02
Power cord, SUN North America to IEC 6.6FT
X
X
804-1312-02
Drive Hard Disk, USCSI, 36.4 GB
X
X
804-1575-01
NETRA, T1 CD ROM Drive
X
X
804-1576-01
NETRA, T1 512MB KIT (QTY 2)
X
X
804-1772-02
Server, SUN V120 1X650MHz 1X512MB 1X36GB
X
X
890-1772-01
870-2655-05
955-1003-02
950-2150-01
Description
Table A-13. AC Servers Releases 8.1.x and 9.0
Assembly
SubAssembly
870-2692-01
Description
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
A-25
Hardware Baselines
A-26
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
B
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor
Appliques
Introduction ..................................................................................................... B–2
4-Port T1 Monitor Applique .......................................................................... B–2
4-Port E1 Monitor Applique .......................................................................... B–4
4-Port DS0 Monitor Applique ....................................................................... B–6
4-Port V.35 Monitor Applique ....................................................................... B–7
4-Port DSCS Monitor Applique .................................................................... B–8
DSCS Bridge Amplifier .................................................................................. B–9
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
B-1
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
Introduction
This appendix provides reference information on each 4-port monitor
applique that Sentinel supports:
•
4-Port T1 Monitor Applique
•
4-Port E1 Monitor Applique
•
4-Port DS0 Monitor Applique
•
4-Port V.35 Monitor Applique
•
4-Port DSCS Monitor Applique
Hardware options on an applique can be set using shelf configuration
software, as described in the section Configuring a Sentinel Shelf in Chapter 3,
Configuring and Administering Sentinel of the Sentinel 9.0 User’s Manual
P/N 910-4377.
This chapter includes instructions for installing the DSCS Bridge Amplifier.
4-Port T1 Monitor Applique
The 4-Port T1 Monitor applique (part number 850-0463-02) increases the
monitoring link density offered by a single shelf from 16 links to 64 links per
single 23” shelf (P/N 955-2002-01) or per Signaling Node Application
Platform (SNAP). The applique allows monitoring of T1 spans in the
following configurations:
•
Four T1 spans each with a single signaling channel
•
A single T1 span with a maximum of four signaling channels
•
A single T1 span monitoring two signaling channels and two other T1
spans monitoring one signaling channel each
•
A single T1 span monitoring three signaling channels and a single T1 span
monitoring one signaling channel
•
Two T1 spans monitoring two signaling channels each
NOTE: The monitored T1 span can be located up to a maximum of 500 ft.
from the shelf.
Each monitoring port within the 4-Port T1 Monitor applique provides
non-intrusive high impedance bidirectional monitoring for T1 (100 Ohm)
links. All hardware options on the T1 Monitor applique can be set using shelf
configuration software. See Figure B-1 for an example of the 4-Link T1
Monitor Configuration window.
B-2
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
Figure B-1. T1 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window
Use the two slider bars on the T1 4-Link Monitor Configuration Screen to map
the physical T1 span and channel selection to the link A,B,C, or D.
Each T1 span has various configuration parameters that you may set with the
toggle buttons shown in Figure B-1. They are described briefly in the
following paragraphs.
Zero Suppression: AMI or B8ZS. B8ZS is Binary (or Bipolar) Eight Zero
Suppression. A data transmission format used to solve certain bandwidth
signaling problems. B8ZS coding enables interface equipment to recognize an
all zeroes condition in a data byte. The equipment substitutes a B8ZS code for
the all-zero byte; the code contains intentional violations of the AMI format.
The violation is sent across the network. It contains sufficient ones to allow the
system to remain in synchronization. The destination CSU replaces the code
with the all-zeroes byte.
AMI is a formatting code for T1/E1 transmissions over twisted-pair copper
cable. T1 transmissions are in bipolar form. AMI represents a zero (or space)
by the absence of a voltage; a one (or mark) is represented by a positive or
negative pulse, depending on whether the preceding one was negative or
positive; that is, marks are inverted on an alternating basis.
Framing: Selects the framing option, 193S or 193E. With 193S framing, a
superframe is made up of 12 frames. With a 193E framing, a superframe is
made up of 24 frames.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
B-3
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
Gain Selection: 0db or +20db. When set to 0db, the connection to the
monitored T1 span is assumed to be made via a direct connection to the T1
span. When set to +20db, the connection to the monitored T1 span is assumed
to be made using a patch panel with 20db of attenuation at the monitor
position (for example, 470 Ω resistors in series with tip/ring).
NOTE: Spans originating from another LIC (for example, port B of
LIC 1 daisy-chained into port A of LIC 2) are considered a direct
connection; therefore, set the Gain Selection to 0db.
4-Port E1 Monitor Applique
The 4-Port E1 Monitor appliques (part number 850-0463-01) increase the
monitoring link density offered by a single shelf from 16 links to 64 links per
single 23” shelf (P/N 955-2002-01) or per Signaling Node Application
Platform (SNAP). The applique allows monitoring E1 spans in the following
configurations:
•
Four E1 spans each with a single signaling channel
•
A single E1 span with a maximum of four signaling channels
•
A single E1 span monitoring two signaling channels and two other E1
spans monitoring one signaling channel each
•
A single E1 span monitoring three signaling channels and a single E1 span
monitoring one signaling channel
•
Two E1 spans monitoring two signaling channels each
NOTE: The monitored E1 span can be located up to a maximum of 500 ft.
from the shelf.
Each monitoring port within the 4-Port E1 Monitor applique provides
non-intrusive high impedance bidirectional monitoring for E1 (75 and 120
Ohm) links. All hardware options on the applique can be set using shelf
configuration software. See Figure B-2 for an example of the 4-Link E1
Monitor Configuration window.
B-4
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
Figure B-2. E1 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window
Use the two slider bars on the E1 4-Link Monitor Configuration Screen to map
the physical E1 span and channel selection to the link A,B,C, or D.
Each E1 span has various configuration parameters that may be set with the
toggle buttons shown in Figure B-2.
Zero Suppression: HDB3 or AMI
CRC4 Framing: Enabled or Disabled
Signaling: CAS or CCS. Channel Associated Signaling (CAS) or Common
Channel Signaling (CCS).
RX Termination: 120/75 Ohm. Selects the type of E1 span monitored.
Gain Selection: 0db or +20db. When set to 0db, the connection to the
monitored E1 span is assumed to be made via a direct connection to the E1
span. When set to +20db, the connection to the monitored E1 span is assumed
to be made using a patch panel with 20db of attenuation (for example, 470 Ω
resistors in series with tip/ring).
NOTE: Spans originating from another LIC (for example, port B of LIC
1 daisy-chained into port A of LIC 2) are considered a direct connection;
therefore, set the Gain Selection to 0db.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
B-5
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
4-Port DS0 Monitor Applique
The 4-Port DS0 Monitor applique (part number 850-0481-01) increases the
monitoring link density offered by a single shelf from 16 links to 64 links per
single 23” shelf (P/N 955-2002-01) or per Signaling Node Application
Platform (SNAP). The applique allows monitoring DS0 spans in the following
configuration:
•
Four DS0 spans each providing a single signaling channel
Each monitoring port within the 4-Port DS0 Monitor applique provides
non-intrusive high impedance bidirectional monitoring for DS0 links. All
hardware options on the applique can be set using shelf configuration
software. See Figure B-3 for an example of the 4-Link DS0 Monitor
Configuration window.
Figure B-3. DS0 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window
Each DS0 span has various configuration parameters that may be set with the
toggle buttons shown in Figure B-3.
Bit Rate: 56K or 64K. This selection determines if the clock used to capture
data from the DS0 signaling link is the 56Kbs or 64Kbs clock generated on the
clock card.
Gain Selection: 0db or +20db. When set to 0db, the connection to the
monitored DS0 span is assumed to be made using a direct connection to the
span. When set to +20db, the connection to the monitored span is assumed to
be made using a patch panel with 20db of attenuation (e.g. 470 Ω resistors in
series with tip/ring).
NOTE: Spans originating from another LIC (for example, port B of
LIC 1 daisy-chained into port A of LIC 2) are considered a direct
connection; therefore, set the Gain Selection to 0db.
B-6
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
4-Port V.35 Monitor Applique
The 4-Port V.35 Monitor applique enables the receive only monitoring of
protocol messages on up to four bi-directional signaling links, without
adversely affecting the signaling links. The system uses this applique to
provide the electrical interface to the V.35 SS7 links. Each of the eight
incoming V.35 data and clock lines are received using the line interface section
of the applique.
The 4-Port V.35 Monitor applique (part number 850-0530-01) increases the
monitoring link density offered by a single shelf from 16 links to 64 links per
single 23” shelf (P/N 955-2002-01) or per Signaling Node Application
Platform (SNAP). The applique allows monitoring V.35 spans in the following
configuration:
•
Four V.35 spans each providing a single signaling channel
•
Automatic support for bit rates from 64Kbs down to 2.4 Kbs
Each monitoring port within the 4-Port V.35 Monitor applique provides
non-intrusive high impedance bidirectional monitoring for V.35 links. For the
4-Port V.35 Monitor applique, read the bit rate from the shelf as shown in
Figure B-4.
NOTE: You cannot edit the information in the V.35 4-Link Monitor
Configuration Window.
See Figure B-4 for an example of the 4-Link V.35 Monitor Configuration
window.
Figure B-4. V.35 4-Link Monitor Configuration Window
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
B-7
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
4-Port DSCS Monitor Applique
The 4-Port DSCS Monitor applique provides an electrical and physical
interface for up to 4 DSCS links. DB25 connectors on the rear of the MGTS
shelf provide the mechanical interface to the DSCS links. The 4-Port DSCS
Monitor applique uses the “A” and “B” DB25 connector ports of the ALICE
LIC as the interface to four duplex ports per DB25 connector. Each duplex
port requires four signals on the DB25 connector.
4-Port DSCS Monitor applique configuration options include the following:
•
The 4-Port DSCS Monitor applique supports up to four bidirectional
channels operating at a maximum of 56 Kbits/sec with 0 - 100% message
signal unit occupancy
•
The Sentinel shelf must be within 35 feet of the monitored link
See Figure B-5 for an example of the 4-Link DSCS Monitor Configuration
window.
Figure B-5. 4-Link DSCS Monitor Configuration Window
The cable connections for the DSCS Monitor applique are the same as for the
T1, E1, and DS0 Monitor appliques. Please refer to Appendix A of the
Signaling/Cellular Generic Hardware Reference manual for information on the
cable connections.
The Digital Signal Customer Service (DSCS) interface supports the
non-intrusive monitoring of switching events. This interface requires:
B-8
•
One 4-port DSCS Monitor Applique for each four links monitored
•
One 16-port DSCS Bridge Amplifier (described in the following section)
for every four DSCS Monitor Appliques
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
DSCS Bridge Amplifier
The DSCS Bridge Amplifier is a hardware device used with a monitoring
system to create a monitor bridge and amplify the link signals. A monitor
bridge is necessary to isolate the monitored link from the monitoring system.
The amplification is necessary to allow the Sentinel shelf to be in excess of the
standard 35-foot limitation and up to 1500 feet from the DSCS Bridge
Amplifier.
The DSCS Bridge Amplifier features are as follows:
•
Can be installed into a standard 19-inch or 23-inch shelf
•
Uses -48 VDC power
•
16 bidirectional ports are available for amplification
Hardware Description
The front of the DSCS Bridge Amplifier contains LEDs to provide information
about the amplifier activity and a Reset push button. Figure B-6 shows a front
view of the Bridge Amplifier. The PWR LED (power indicator) indicates
power is on.
Figure B-6. DSCS Bridge Amplifier (Front View)
Power Indicator
Activity Indicator
East Ports
Dip Switches
Reset Buttons
West Ports
Ports 1 through 16
The DSCS Bridge Amplifier has 4-bit DIP switches located on the front of the
unit (see Figure B-6). Use these 4-bit DIP switches to set the DSCS bit rate
according to the following table.
NOTE:
Only the 64 Kbits/sec rate is available at this time.
DSCS DIP Switch Settings
Table B-14.
Sw1
Off
NOTE:
Sw2
On
Sw3
On
Sw4
Off
Data Rate
64.0 Kbits/sec
Switch up = OFF and Switch down = On.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
B-9
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
The rear of the DSCS Bridge Amplifier supports the power inputs and port
accessibility shown in Figure B-7. A DC 2 terminal barrier strip, chassis
ground screw, and a fuse are located on the right side of the back of the
amplifier.
Figure B-7. DSCS Bridge Amplifier (Rear View)
Mounting brackets
Inputs from links
(monitored links)
Output to monitoring
equipment (monitor)
Ground
Power inputs
The link inputs are on the left and they are labeled “To Links.” The monitor
outputs to the monitoring equipment are on the right rear and they are
labeled “To MON.” Each link incorporates a Transmit and Receive Tip and
Ring pair. Because the terms transmit and receive depend on the perspective,
and each pair is monitored the same way, the terms East and West are used to
signify the direction.
East pairs are wire-wrapped to Tip (labeled “T”) and Ring (labeled “R”) pins
on top of the rear of the amplifier. West pairs are wire-wrapped to the Tip and
Ring pins on the bottom. See Figure B-7 for a rear view of the amplifier.
Figure B-7 also shows the mounting brackets used to mount the Bridge
Amplifier in the 23-inch rack.
Installation
The DSCS Bridge Amplifier can be mounted in a standard 19-inch or 23-inch
shelf. Mounting holes are located on each side of the amplifier. Use the
following procedure to make all the connections and configure the amplifier
for first use.
Procedure — Install DSCS Bridge Amplifier
1
B-10
Make sure the mounting brackets are properly attached to fit your rack
configuration. The DSCS Bridge Amplifier accommodates either a 19- or
23-inch shelf
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
2
Use the mounting holes located on either side of the DSCS Bridge
Amplifier to rack mount the amplifier.
3
Connect monitored links of the device(s) under test (DUT) to the
appropriate wire-wrap pins on the rear panel of the amplifier. The inputs
are on the left rear and are labeled “To Links.”
4
Connect the monitoring equipment inputs to the appropriate wire-wrap
pins on the rear panel of the amplifier. The monitor outputs to the
monitoring equipment are on the right rear and are labeled “To MON.”
5
Connect a safety ground wire to the ground (GND) screw on the rear
panel.
6
Connect the DC power cable to the power inputs.
Part Number
Use the following part numbers to order:
Table B-15.
DSCS Bridge Amplifier Part Numbers
Part Number
977-2019-04
Description
DSCS Bridge Amplifier
Limitations
The following limitations apply to the DSCS Bridge Amplifier installation:
•
The cable lengths connecting the Bridge Amplifier and the monitored and
monitoring equipment must adhere to the following conditions. Also, see
Figure B-8.
— x3 must be less than or equal to 9 feet . . . AND
— x1 + x4 must be less than 2000 feet . . . AND
— x2 + x4 must be less than 2000 feet
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
B-11
Sentinel 4-Port Monitor Appliques
Figure B-8. DSCS Bridge Amplifier Installation
x1
x2
tap location
Monitored
equipment
(West)
x3
Monitored
equipment
(East)
9 feet or less
Bridge
Amplifier
x4
Monitoring
equipment
Legend:
x1 - distance (ft.) between West monitored equipment and Bridge Amplifier tap location
x2 - distance (ft.) between East monitored equipment and Bridge Amplifier tap location
x3 - distance (ft.) from tap location to Bridge Amplifier
•
B-12
When using the DSCS monitor amplifier with a 4 port DSCS applique, the
applique must be set to 0db gain for correct operation.
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Index
4-port DS0 monitor applique B-6
4-port DSCS monitor applique B-8
4-port E1 monitor applique B-4
4-port T1 monitor applique B-2
4-port V.35 monitor applique B-7
840-0064-01 3-13
840-0089-01 3-13
870-2238-01 3-13
870-2278-01 3-13
870-2508-01 3-5
890-0001-04 3-116
8-Port Connector Box
description 4-5
A
ACM 3-26, 3-42, 3-85
alarm connectors 3-30
Alarms Reference and User’s Manual 1-10
Application Communication Module 2-10
Application Communication Module (ACM)
3-24
application communication module (ACM)
3-83
Application Communications Modules
(ACMs) 3-24
Application Interface (AINF) 3-69
Application Processor (AP) 3-64
application service module (ASM) 3-23
Application Subsystem 2-7
appliques
4-port DS0 monitor B-6
4-port DSCS monitor B-8
4-port E1 monitor B-4
4-port T1 monitor B-2
4-port V.35 monitor B-7
B
BITS connectors 3-31
box, 8-Port Connector
see 8-Port Connector Box
Breaker panels 4-11
Bridge Amplifier B-9
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Building Integrated Timing System (BITS)
3-31, 3-65, 3-69
building requirements 6-3
C
card
SAI/P 4-5
CD-ROM 3-10
Clear To Send (CTS) 3-68
Clock
HCMIM 3-102, 3-108
Clock A 3-36
Common Language Location Identifier 1-16
Communication Module (ACM) 3-15
Communication Subsystem 2-5
Communications Processor (CP) 3-64
communications processor (CP) 3-86
compliance, regulatory 1-12
Connector Box, 8-Port
see 8-Port Connector Box
Control Frame (CF) 3-11
control frame (CF) 3-23
control shelf backplane 3-25
Critical Alarm 3-12
Customer Assistance 1-14
Customer Service Report 1-16
Customer Service Request 1-14
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) 3-86
D
Data Collection Applications Manual 1-10
Data Communication Equipment (DCE)
3-68
Data Communications Module 3-24
Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) 3-31, 3-68
Data Terminal Ready (DTR) 3-68
Database Communications Module 2-10
Database Communications Module (DCM)
3-15
Database Service Module 2-12
DCM 3-23, 3-24, 3-25, 3-26, 3-32, 3-42, 6-10
DIP switch settings B-9
Direct Memory Access (DMA) 3-69, 3-86
Index-1
Index
Documentation Packaging, Delivery, and
Updates 1-11
documents
Alarms Reference and User’s Manual
1-10
Data Collection Applications Manual
1-10
Feature Notice 1-9
hardware and installation 1-10
list of Sentinel 1-9
Release Notice 1-9
System Administrator’s Guide 1-9
technical reference documents 1-10
User’s Manual 1-9
DS0 4-link monitor configuration window
B-6
DS0 monitor applique B-6
DS0A 3-69
DSCS bridge amplifier
description B-9
DIP switch settings B-9
front view B-9
installing B-10
limitations B-11
part number B-11
rear view B-10
DSM 3-26, 3-42
E
E1 3-24, 3-26, 3-93, 3-94, 3-97
E1 4-link Monitor Configuration window
B-5
E1 backplane 3-95, 3-97
E1 monitor applique B-4
E5-E1T1 3-26
E5-ENET 3-26
EAGLE 5 Integrated Signaling System 2-3
Eagle STP 3-4
earthquake resistance 6-4
EBI 3-55
EDCM 3-24, 3-78
EDCM-A 3-5, 3-81
Eight-Port Connector Box 4-13
EILA 3-23, 3-24, 3-26, 3-42
Embedded Operations Applications
Processor 2-20
emergency response 1-16
Index-2
end panels 3-13
environmental requirements 6-4
ESP 4-2
ESP Servers 5-14
ESP Subsystem Hardware Components 5-14
ethernet applique 3-85
EXT ALM 3-30
Extended Services Platform Host Servers 4-2
Extension Frame (EF) 3-11, 3-15
extension frame (EF) 3-15
extension shelf 3-32
extension shelf backplane 3-35
External Alarm (EXT ALM) 3-30
external alarm connector 3-30
External/Customer Alarm Interface 3-55
F
Fan Tray 3-116
Feature Guide
documents
Feature Guide 1-9
Feature Notice 1-9
floor loading 6-5
front view
hub 4-6
Fuse Alarm Interface 3-54
Fuse and Alarm Panel 3-120
Fuse and Alarm Panel (FAP) 3-13, 3-20,
3-26, 3-35
fuse and alarm panel P/N 804-0007-06
3-119, 3-124
G
General Purpose Frame (GPF) 3-11
General Purpose Relay Connectors 3-32
General Purpose Serial Interface Connector
3-32
GP01 3-32
GP02 3-32
GPSI 3-32
grounding 6-5
H
Hard Disk Drive 3-57
Hardware and Installation Manuals 1-10
hardware descriptions -i, 4-1
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Index
Hardware Repair and Return 1-17
hardware return 1-17
hardware, MPS
overview 3-8
hardware, MPS system configuration 3-7
HCMIM 3-98, 3-99
dependencies 3-99
description 3-98
requirements 3-99
timing 3-102, 3-108
High Density Interconnect (HDI) 3-26, 3-35
High speed IMT packet router 3-43
High-Capacity Multichannel Interface
Module 3-98
High-Speed Master Timing 2-16
High-Speed Multiplexer 2-7
HIPR 3-43
HMUX 3-42, 3-48
holdover clock 3-127
hub
description 4-6, 4-9
front LEDs 4-7, 4-9
front view 4-6
rear view 4-7
Introduction 1-1, 2-2
L
Label Kit 3-123
LAN 4-6, 4-9
layered design 3-7
LCA (Logic Cell Array) 3-66
LEDs
hub front 4-7, 4-9
lighting 6-3
LIM 3-26
LIM-AINF 3-59
LIM-ATM- 3-61, 3-70
LIM-V.35 3-59
Link 3-24
Link Interface Module 2-10
link interface module (LIM) 3-24
Link Interface Modules (LIMs) 3-15
Local Maintenance Center (LMC) 3-30
local maintenance center (LMC) alarm
connector 3-30
Logic Cell Array (LCA) 3-69
M
I
I/O connectors 3-31, 3-36
ILA 3-23, 3-24, 3-26, 3-42, 3-59
IMT 3-14, 3-24, 3-32, 3-36
IMT connectors 3-32, 3-36
IMT interface circuits 3-64
Installation Manuals 1-10
Integrated LIM Appliques (ILAs) 3-23
Integrated Sentinel 2-16, 5-7
Integrated Sentinel Hardware Overview 5-8
Integrated Serial Communications
Controller (ISCC) 3-65, 3-66, 3-68,
3-69
Interface 3-92
interface
SAI/P card 4-5
Inter-processor Message Transport 2-5
Interprocessor Message Transport 3-87
Interprocessor Message Transport (IMT)
3-14, 3-15, 3-63
interprocessor message transport (IMT)
interface 3-83, 3-89
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
2-4
Maintenance and Administration Subsystem
(MAS) 3-23
maintenance disk and alarm card (MDAL)
3-50
Maintenance Interface System (MIS) 3-129
Major Alarm 3-12
manual
organization 3-49
manuals
Alarms Reference and User’s Manual
1-10
Data Collection Applications Manual
1-10
Feature Guide 1-9
Feature Notice 1-9
hardware and installation manuals 1-10
list of Sentinel 1-9
Release Notice 1-9
System Administrator’s Guide 1-9
technical reference documents 1-10
User’s Manual 1-9
Index-3
Index
MAS 3-23
MASP 3-23
Matrix Controller Automatic 3-132
MAU 3-86
Maximum weight 6-5
MCA 3-132
MDAL 3-23, 3-26, 3-42
Measurements Platform IP Security 2-11
Media Access Unit 3-86
Media Access Unit (MAU) 3-85
Minor Alarm 3-12
MIS 3-127
Miscellaneous Frame (MF) 3-11
miscellaneous frame (MF) 3-20
mounting bracket
8-Port Connector Box 3-8
MPL 3-26, 3-42
MPS
overview
layered design 3-7
system hardware configuration 3-7
MPS hardware
overview 3-8
MPS Server
serial ports SAI/P card 4-5
MPS system
Ethernet hub description 4-6, 4-9
Multi 3-24
Multi-Platform Server (MPS) Systems 2-19
O
OAP 3-30
OAP Alarm (OAPALM) 3-30
OAPALM 3-30
OCU 3-69
OEM-Based Network Elements 2-21
OEM-Based Peripheral Components 2-21
OEM-Based Servers 2-21
Office Channel Unit (OCU) 3-66
Operations Support System Application
Processor frame (OAPF) 3-11
operations system support applications
processor frame (OAPF) 3-22
Overview 1-2, 3-48
Overview Sentinel Products 5-3
Index-4
P
P/N 830-0425-01 3-86
P/N 850-0330-03 3-25, 3-27, 3-30, 3-31, 3-48
P/N 850-0356-03 Extension Shelf Back Plane
3-19, 3-20
P/N 870-1008-xx 3-83
P/N 870-1606-01 3-119
P/N 890-1037-01 3-94
PCI cards
SAI/P 4-5
PLXO 3-130
ports
8-Port Connector Box, serial 4-5
SAI/P card 4-5
Power Converter Unit 3-57, 3-65, 3-87
Power Distribution 3-35
power requirements 6-8
Problem-Major 1-15
Problem-Minor 1-15
Probless Solution 5-7
probless Solution 5-7
publications, Sentinel 1-9
R
Rack Alarm (RALMx) 3-30
rack and row alarm connector 3-30
Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) 3-35
rear view
hub 4-7
regulatory compliance 1-12
Related Publications 1-4
Release Notice 1-9
remote maintenance center (RMC) alarm
connector 3-30
Request To Send (RTS) 3-68
Response 1-16
return shipment 1-21
Returning a Crate 1-21
routers 4-7
Row Alarm (ROW ALM) 3-30
ROW ALM 3-30
RS-485 3-95
S
SAI/P card
description 4-5
SAP
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Index
technical reference documents 1-10
Scope and Audience 1-2, 3-49
Sentinel Frames 5-4
Sentinel Products 5-1
Sentinel publications 1-9
serial port connectors 3-31
serial ports
8-Port Connector Box 4-5
SAI/P card 4-5
Shelf Clock Connectors 3-32
Signaling Transfer Point, Local Area
Network (SLAN) 6-10
Signaling/Cellular Generic Hardware
Reference 1-10
Site Collector Frames 5-6
site engineering 6-1
Small Computer System Interface Buses 2-5
space requirements 6-3
spare card storage shelf 3-20
Status Indicators (SI) 3-129
Stratum-3 (ST3) 3-127, 3-130
System Administrator’s Guide 1-9
System Clock 2-14
system clock connectors 3-30, 3-36
T
T1 4-link monitor configuration window B-3
T1 monitor applique B-2
T-1000 5-3
TDM 3-23, 3-26, 3-42
TDM technical specifications 3-57
Technical Reference Documents 1-10
Technical Services 1-14
Tekelec 1000 Applications Server 5-3
Tekelec Signaling Products Hardware
Manual 1-10
Tekelec Signaling Products Integrated
Applications Installation Manual
1-10
Tekelec Technical Services 1-16
Terminal Processor 3-55
Test and Maintenance Features 3-87
Time Slot Counter Synchronization 2-16
Timing 3-102, 3-108
Timing Systems Eagle STP/IP7 SG 2-14
TOCA 3-127, 3-130, 3-131
TOCA Card 3-131
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
Transaction Services Module (TSM) 3-88
Translation 3-24
Translation Service Module (TSM) 3-24
Translation Service Modules (TSMs) 3-15,
3-23, 3-32
Translation Services Module 2-12
TSM 3-26, 3-42
TXCO 3-131
U
User’s Manual 1-9
V
V.35 3-69
V.35 4-link monitor configuration window
B-7
V.35 applique 3-67, 3-68
V.35 monitor applique B-7
VCXO 3-131
view
hub front 4-6
hub rear 4-7
W
weights 6-5
Index-5
Index
Index-6
910-3496-001 Revision E, March 2007
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