public display of contextually relevant and useful information for co

Technical Disclosure Commons
Defensive Publications Series
April 02, 2015
PUBLIC DISPLAY OF CONTEXTUALLY
RELEVANT AND USEFUL INFORMATION
FOR CO-LOCATED DEVICES
Alexander Faaborg
Follow this and additional works at: http://www.tdcommons.org/dpubs_series
Recommended Citation
Faaborg, Alexander, "PUBLIC DISPLAY OF CONTEXTUALLY RELEVANT AND USEFUL INFORMATION FOR COLOCATED DEVICES", Technical Disclosure Commons, (April 02, 2015)
http://www.tdcommons.org/dpubs_series/49
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
This Article is brought to you for free and open access by Technical Disclosure Commons. It has been accepted for inclusion in Defensive Publications
Series by an authorized administrator of Technical Disclosure Commons.
Faaborg: PUBLIC DISPLAY OF CONTEXTUALLY RELEVANT AND USEFUL INFORMATION FO
PUBLIC DISPLAY OF CONTEXTUALLY RELEVANT AND USEFUL
INFORMATION FOR CO-LOCATED DEVICES
ABSTRACT
A computing system is described that aggregates information collected from a group of
mobile devices that happen to be co-located and in the presence of an output device, such as a
display. The system identifies similarities shared across the users of the group and based on the
shared interests, obtains contextually relevant and useful information that will likely be
appreciated by each of the users in the group. The system then configures the output device to
present the contextually relevant and useful information for consumption by the group at just the
right time. The system described herein has many applications including for use in conjunction
with smart billboards, smart home devices, intelligent displays (e.g., for home or office
environment), and other intelligent, contextually aware software applications and media
presentation applications.
BACKGROUND
Some systems aggregate and make use of contextual information associated with
individual computing devices to improve the experiences that individual users have when
interacting with the devices, often times by providing tailored information to the user and/or by
making a user interface more personal and contextually relevant for the user. For example, some
systems may identify patterns and develop rules, based on contextual information collected from
various mobile phones, tablets, wearables, and other individual computing devices, for inferring
preferences and habits of individual users. These systems may use the knowledge that the
system “learns” about an individual user to provide personalized recommendations, alerts, or
other snippets of information for the user to consume, at just the right time and/or place, from his
or her own, individual device.
Other systems have found ways to provide contextually relevant information to the
masses by providing information that is appropriate for the general public at the current time
and/or place. For instance, some systems provide information at public displays or via public
address systems that the systems may deem to be relevant for the location of the display and/or
public address system, for the current time. However, the information typically provided for
public consumption by these systems may be generic to the public at large, and not necessarily
Published by Technical Disclosure Commons, 2015
2
Defensive Publications Series, Art. 49 [2015]
be of interest or useful to the people that are actually viewing and/or listening to the information
at the time that the systems presents the information.
DESCRIPTION
In general, this disclosure describes a system that aggregates information collected from a
group of devices that are located at or near an output device, and presents, via the output device,
useful information to users of the group, that is both contextual relevant and likely of interest to
the entire group of users. For example, the system may detect the presence of a group of mobile
devices at or near a display or other type of “shared” output device. With permission from each
of the users of the group of mobile devices, the system may cull some basic and anonymous
information from the each of the devices, about each of the users and/or each of the respective
devices. The system then combines and analyzes the information received from each of the
devices and causes the shared output device to present some useful information that the system
determines to be not only contextually relevant for the current time and location of the shared
output device, but also is likely to be of interest to the users of the group, at the current time.
Accordingly, people or companies may utilize the system by installing shared output devices in
high-traffic areas (e.g., entryways, lobbies, hallways, highways, street corners, billboards, or
other places) so as to alert passersby about various types of contextually relevant and useful
information that is likely to be of interest to them.
In this way the system may “learn” about a group of users to provide recommendations,
alerts, or other snippets of information for the group to consume, at just the right time and/or
place, from a shared output device. The system is able to provide information for public
consumption that is tailored to the group of people that more likely to be viewing and/or listening
to the information at the time that the systems presents the information. The system described
herein has many applications. For example, those applications related to intelligent, context
aware software, smart home devices, and intelligent displays (e.g., for home or office
environment) could all benefit from use of the system described herein.
Throughout the disclosure, examples are described where devices and systems analyze
information (e.g., locations, movements, calendars, communications, etc.) associated with users
of the devices and systems only if the devices and systems receive explicit permission from the
users to analyze the information. For example, in situations discussed below in which a mobile
device, an output device, and/or information server system collects and aggregates contextual
http://www.tdcommons.org/dpubs_series/49
3
Faaborg: PUBLIC DISPLAY OF CONTEXTUALLY RELEVANT AND USEFUL INFORMATION FO
information and interests associated with a user, the user may be provided with an opportunity to
control whether the devices and/or systems can collect and make use of the information, and to
dictate how the devices and systems present information to the user. Additionally, certain data
may be treated in one or more ways before the devices and systems store or use the information
so that any personally-identifiable information is removed before storage or use. As such, the
individual users maintain control over how information is collected about the user and how the
information is used by the device and/or system.
Consider the example system 1 shown in FIG. 1 which is configured to present
information in accordance with the techniques described herein. System 1 includes information
server system 20 in communication, via network 30, with output device 12 and a group of mobile
devices 10A–10N (collectively, “devices 10”). Although information server system 20 and
output device 12 are shown in FIG. 1 as being separate entities, output device 12 may include
part or all of the components and capabilities associated with information server system 20 that
are described herein.
INFORMAITON
SERVER SYSTEM
20
1
INFO. AGGREGATION
MODULE
22
RECOMMENDATION
MODULE
24
NETWORK
30
12
10A
10N
10B
2
FIG. 1
Published by Technical Disclosure Commons, 2015
4
Defensive Publications Series, Art. 49 [2015]
FIG. 1 illustrates output device 12 and devices 10 as being collocated at or near the same
location 2. In some instances, location 2 represents a commercial building, a private home, or
other physical structure. In some examples, location 2 represents an outdoor location on a street,
shopping mall, or any other location in or around a private or public venue. In other examples,
location 2 represents a lobby, a break room, a kitchen, or other location at a company or in a
home.
In any case, by being collocated at location 2, each of devices 10 (and presumably each
of the individual users of devices 10 is regarded as being within a suitable distance of the
location of output device 12 such that the users of devices 10 can view, listen to, or otherwise
consume information presented by output device 12. People or companies may install output
device 12 in a place such as an entryway, lobby, or other high-traffic area to alert people who are
frequently in the presence of output device 12 with contextually relevant and useful information.
Network 30 represents a combination of any one or more public or private
communication networks, for instance, television broadcast networks, cable or satellite networks,
cellular networks, Wi-Fi networks, broadband networks, and/or other type of network for
transmitting data (e.g., telecommunications and/or media data) between various computing
devices, systems, and other communications and media equipment. Output device 12, devices
10, and information server system 20, may each send and receive data across network 30 using
any suitable communication techniques.
Devices 10 represent any type of individual, mobile computing device that is associated
with a user and configured to communicate on a network. Examples of devices 10 include
mobile phones, tablet computers, wearable devices (e.g., computerized eyewear, wristwatches,
and fitness trackers), laptop computers, and automobiles. Devices 10 can be personal, corporate,
or government owned devices. In some examples, devices 10 may be shared assets of multiple
users (e.g., with multiple logins, etc.) however each of devices 10 is configured to provide an
individual user experience for a single user at a time. Devices 10 communicate with network
30. As users interact with each of devices 10, each of devices 10 obtains personal information
about that particular user (e.g., location information, calendar information, web search
information, communication information, or other information associated with the user). In
some examples, with explicit permission from a respective user, each of devices 10 may build a
profile of that respective user based on the personal information obtained from the user
http://www.tdcommons.org/dpubs_series/49
5
Faaborg: PUBLIC DISPLAY OF CONTEXTUALLY RELEVANT AND USEFUL INFORMATION FO
interactions with the device. Each profile may define one or more interests of the user, a home
location of the user, a work location, and other personal and defining characteristics of the user.
Output device 12 is any type of network connected, media output device that is capable
of providing contextually relevant and useful information to a group of users. Examples of
output device 12 include any type of display, a smart home device (e.g., a thermostat, a media
center, an automation system, or any other type of smart home device), a movie theatre projector
or screen, a stationary or mobile electronic billboard, an audio (e.g., public address) system, a
scoreboard at a sports venue, or any other type of device that is configured to simultaneously
present information to a group of people both in public and private group settings. In some
examples, output device 12 simply receives, via network 30 from information server system 20,
contextually relevant and useful information for presentation to the users of mobile devices 10.
In other examples, output device 12 includes some or all of the capability of information server
system 20 that are described herein for collecting and aggregating information from mobile
devices 10 and generating the contextually relevant and useful information for presentation to the
users of mobile devices 10.
Information server system 20 communicates via network 30 with output device 12 and
mobile devices 10 for generating contextually relevant and useful information that output device
12 presents to the users of mobile devices 10. Information server system 20 is bifurcated into
two main parts: information aggregation module 22 and recommendation module 24.
Information aggregation module 22 identifies a context and a shared interest of a group of
devices and recommendation module finds contextually relevant and useful information related
to the shared interest.
Information aggregation module 22 uses various types of “co-presence” techniques to
determine when mobile devices 10 are near or in the presence of output device 12. For example,
by using GPS tracking or polling for signals emitted from mobile devices 10, module 22 can
determine when each of mobile devices 10 is located at location 2. In some examples, output
device 12 may use similar techniques to identify nearby devices and alert information server
system 10 to the presence of mobile devices 10.
When module 22 determines that mobile devices 10 are at location 12 and in the presence
of output device 12, module 22 may cause information server system 20 to communicate with
mobile devices 10 to anonymously obtain, from each of devices 10, some basic information
Published by Technical Disclosure Commons, 2015
6
Defensive Publications Series, Art. 49 [2015]
about each of the users of devices 10 to determine a shared interest associated with the users of
devices 10. For instance, module 22 may obtain general demographical information (e.g.,
approximate age, gender, and the like) information about a sports teams the user is interested
in, a town that the user lives in with a broad granularity, and any other topics that the user
is interested in that are known to be common. After module 22 aggregates the data collected
from devices 10, module 22 may apply one or more rules or machine learning algorithms to the
collected data to “learn” shared interests that are common to the group of users.
In some examples, module 22 may apply one or more “commonality thresholds” to the
aggregated data and to filter the interest and identify those interests that are shared between more
or fewer individual users of the group. For example, the individual interests that module 22
learns about each individual user of devices 10 might be embarrassing if shared with the group
(e.g., where devices 10 represent devices of a group of co-workers with one user being interested
in a competitor’s stock ticker). Therefore, certain interests would have to have a high threshold
for commonality amongst the group before information related to the interest was ever presented
by output device 12. In cases where output device 12 is in a home or more private setting where
the group of users of devices 10 may already be aware of any individual interests, the
commonality thresholds would potentially be less, and module 22 may identify group interests as
those that are more personal. For example, interests that appear on a calendar of events of
multiple people in the home, traffic to multiple work places, or birthdays of friends of people in
the family. However even with lower commonality thresholds, some interest (e.g., web search
topics) might even be suppressed in such a semi-public environment unless the commonality is
shared amongst everyone in the group (e.g., everyone in the group had searched for the same
topic).
Module 22 may further process and analyze contextual information (e.g., respective
locations, direction, speed, velocity, orientation, etc.) obtained by information server system 20
from devices 10 and based on the contextual information, define a context specifying the state or
physical operating environment of the group of devices 10. For example, module 22 may
generate a context of devices 10 that specifies one or more characteristics associated with the
users of devices 10 and their physical surroundings at a particular time (e.g., location, address,
and/or type of place, building, etc., weather conditions, traffic conditions, calendar information,
meeting information, event information, etc.).
http://www.tdcommons.org/dpubs_series/49
7
Faaborg: PUBLIC DISPLAY OF CONTEXTUALLY RELEVANT AND USEFUL INFORMATION FO
After module 22 identifies a common interest, and a context, module 24 finds
contextually relevant and useful information, related to the shared interest and context, and
outputs the information to output device 12 for presentation to the group. For example, module
24 may provide recommendations, alerts, or other snippets of information for the group to
consume, at just the right time and/or place, from output device 12.
For instance, in a work place or public setting, module 22 may provide traffic information
on major highways to towns where many employees live, scores for a local team that most
people follow, stock price for a company’s ticker symbol that most people have searched, news
results about a news topic that nearly everyone has been searching, election results for a local
election, sports scores for a local team, as long as countless examples of other types of
information.
In a more private setting, module 22 may provide information from a shared calendar,
information about a child’s school, weather information for distant relatives, flight or weather
information about an upcoming family vacation, and all sorts of other types of contextually
relevant and useful information.
In this way, information server system 20 is able to provide more useful information, at
output device 12, for “public” consumption. The information is tailored to the users of devices
10, which represent the group of people that are more likely to be viewing and/or listening to the
information at the time that output device 12 presents the information.
Published by Technical Disclosure Commons, 2015
8
Download PDF
Similar pages