Cooking & Canning With The
PRESSURE COOKER/CANNER
The professional quality deluxe cast
aluminum Pressure Cooker/Canners with
the exclusive “Metal-To-Metal” seal.
INSTRUCTIONS & RECIPES
DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED IN THE USA
77L3
CAUTION! READ THESE IMPORTANT SAFEGUARDS!
When using pressure cookers,
basic safety precautions should
always be followed to reduce the
risk of personal injury or property
damage:
1. Read all the instructions.
2. Close supervision is necessary
when the pressure cooker/
canner is used near children.
3. Always make sure that the
pressure regulator weight vent
pipe opening is clean and you
can see through it.
4. Do not put the pressure cooker
into a heated oven.
5. Move the pressure cooker
under pressure with extreme
care. Do not touch hot
surfaces. Use handles and
pot holders.
6. Do not use the pressure
cooker/canner for other than
intended use.
7. This appliance cooks under
pressure. Scalding may result
from inappropriate use of the
pressure cooker. Make sure
that the cooker is properly
closed before applying heat.
8. Never force open the pressure
cooker. Do not open before
making sure that its internal
pressure has completely
dropped.
9. Never use your pressure
cooker without adding water.
This would seriously damage
it.
10. Do not fill the cooker beyond
2⁄ of its capacity. However,
3
when cooking foods which
expand during cooking,
such as rice or dehydrated
vegetables, do not fill the
cooker to more than 1⁄2 of its
capacity.
11. Do not cook foods such as
applesauce, cranberries, pearl
barley, oatmeal or other
cereals, rice, split peas,
noodles, macaroni, rhubarb,
spaghetti or soup mixes
containing dry beans or peas.
These foods tend to foam,
froth, and sputter, and may
block the pressure release
device (steam vent). (For
cooking dry beans and peas,
reference page 49)
12. Use the appropriate heat
source(s) according to the
instructions for use.
13. After cooking meat with a skin
(e.g. chicken) which may swell
under the effect of pressure,
do not prick the meat while
the skin is swollen; you might
be scalded.
14. Never use the pressure cooker
in its pressurized mode for
deep or shallow frying of food
(broasting).
15. Do not tamper with any of the
safety systems beyond the
maintenance
instructions
specified in the instructions
for use.
16. Only use manufacturer’s spare
parts in accordance with the
relevant model.
17. Never loosen wing nuts until
the steam pressure gauge
reads zero and you have
allowed
any
remaining
pressure to escape by
removing the pressure
regulator weight.
18. Do not subject your cooker/
canner to sudden extreme
temperature changes as this
will cause expansion or
contraction which can crack
a cast aluminum utensil. Do
not move a cooker from a
cold storage area directly onto
a hot flame or element. Do
not add cold water to
cooker/canner which has
boiled dry and is still hot. Do
not cool a hot cooker/canner
suddenly by pouring cold
water on it or wrapping cold
wet towels around it.
19. When normal operating
pressure is reached, turn the
heat down so all the liquid,
which creates steam, does
not vent out.
20. Be sure that wing nuts are
assembled and fastened
properly before each use.
Cracked, broken or charred
wing nuts should and must
be replaced. The No. 64
phenolic wing nut should be
threaded into the No. 54 clamp
bolt four (4) complete revolutions before bringing assembly
into the hold down position.
When all the wing nuts are in
hold down position, tighten
all evenly.
21. ALL AMERICAN pressure
cooker/canners are NOT
recommended for use on glass
top ranges without first
checking with your manufacturer. Our models 930 and
941 are too heavy and could
cause damage to your range/
DO NOT slide the pressure
canner over a glass range
surface as it could scratch
and damage it.
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS.
1
Cooking And Canning With Heavy Cast Aluminum
ALL AMERICAN Pressure Cooker/Canner
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Important Safeguards...........................................................................................................................................................1
Warranty.................................................................................................................................................Tear-off Reply Cards
Table of Contents..................................................................................................................................................................2
Model Information................................................................................................................................................................3
Warning Labels ....................................................................................................................................................................4
About the ALL AMERICAN Pressure Cooker.........................................................................................................................5
Important Safety Precautions ...............................................................................................................................................9
Getting Acquainted with the Parts..................................................................................................................................6 & 7
Parts Diagram ......................................................................................................................................................................8
Before Using Your Cooker/Canner for the First Time ............................................................................................................9
Putting the Cover On ............................................................................................................................................................9
Caring for Your Cooker .................................................................................................................................................10 -12
Storing Your Pressure Cooker ............................................................................................................................................12
Canning Terms ...................................................................................................................................................................13
Safety Tips for Home Canning ............................................................................................................................................14
Causes of Spoilage .............................................................................................................................................................14
Canning Terms ...................................................................................................................................................................15
Packing Cans or Jars .................................................................................................................................................16 & 17
Storing Cans and Jars ........................................................................................................................................................16
Labeling Cans and Jars ......................................................................................................................................................16
Directions for Using Glass Jars..................................................................................................................................17 & 18
Directions for Using Tin Cans.............................................................................................................................................18
Reducing Pressure .............................................................................................................................................................21
Removing a “Stuck” Cover (due to vacuum) ......................................................................................................................21
Canning Instructions ..........................................................................................................................................................20
Preparing Fruit for Canning ..........................................................................................................................................22-25
Preparing Tomatoes and Tomato Products for Canning ...............................................................................................26 -28
Spaghetti Sauces .......................................................................................................................................................29 & 30
Preparing Poultry, Red Meats and Seafoods for Canning.............................................................................................31 - 35
Preparing Vegetables for Canning................................................................................................................................36 - 42
Questions and Answers on Home Canning ................................................................................................................43 & 44
Basic Cooking Instructions ........................................................................................................................................45 & 46
Cooking in the Pressure Cooker.................................................................................................................................47 & 48
Pressure Cooking Dry Beans ..............................................................................................................................................49
Tables and Charts ...............................................................................................................................................................50
Repair Parts List.................................................................................................................................................................51
Parts Illustrations ...............................................................................................................................................................52
Index ..................................................................................................................................................................................53
ALL AMERICAN Automatic Master Sealer ..........................................................................................................................54
CAUTION!
READ THIS BOOKLET BEFORE USING. IMPROPER USE MAY RESULT IN SCALDING INJURY. DO NOT OPEN COOKER/CANNER
UNTIL ALL PRESSURE IS RELEASED AND GAUGE IS AT ZERO. DO NOT OVERFILL UNIT. BE SURE TO READ AND UNDERSTAND
ALL OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE USING COOKER. READ THE IMPORTANT SAFEGUARDS ON PAGE ONE (1).
2
ALL AMERICAN HEAVY CAST ALUMINUM PRESSURE COOKER/CANNER LIMITED
WARRANTY
This quality pressure cooker/canner is designed and manufactured to provide many years of satisfactory performance
under normal use. Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry pledges to the original owner that should there be any defects in
material or workmanship during the first year after purchase, we will repair or replace it at our option. This pledge does
not apply to damage caused by shipping. To obtain service under the warranty:
1. Call the Customer Service Department to obtain a Return Authorization Number. Items returned without a Return
Authorization Number will be refused.
2. Return pressure cooker/canner, postage prepaid, with sales receipt, Return Authorization Number and a description of
the claimed defect to:
Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Co., Inc.
Consumer Products Division
1931 South 14th Street
Manitowoc, WI 54220
IMPORTANT — PLEASE READ
Any alterations, modifications or changes of any type made to the pressure cooker/canner or to any component thereof
will void this warranty.
We want you to obtain maximum performance from using this quality pressure cooker/canner, and we ask that you take
the time to read and follow the operating instructions. Failure to follow instructions, damage caused by improper
replacement parts, abuse, or misuse will void this pledge. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also
have other rights which vary from state to state.
DIMENSIONS, WEIGHTS AND CAPACITIES OF ALL AMERICAN PRESSURE COOKERS
MODEL
LIQUID CAPACITY (Qts.)
910
915
921
925
930
941
10 1⁄2
151⁄2
211⁄2
25
30
411⁄2
Inside Diameter, Inches
10 3⁄8
12 5⁄8
125⁄8
12 5⁄8
12 5⁄8
151⁄4
Inside Height, Inches
5
7 ⁄8
7 ⁄2
10 ⁄2
11 ⁄2
14
133⁄4
Shipping Weight, lbs.
16
21
24
25
30
39
1
1
1
*Will Hold Approximately:
Pint Jars
7
10
19
19
19
32
Quart Jars
4
7
7
7
14
19
No. 1 Cans
14
22
35
36
44
73
No. 2 Cans
7
12
18
20
25
36
No. 3 Cans
3
5
10
10
10
21
No. 10 Cans
1
1
1
2
2
6
*Please note: Jar counts are based on the Standard Mason Jar. Capacities are approximate and may vary with the brand of jar.
Record your model number here:
3
SAFETY WARNING LABELS
The heat resistant warning label pictured below is located on the top of your pressure cooker/canner.
Please refer to the drawing below for location placement of safety warning label. Please DO NOT REMOVE
this warning label. In the event that your pressure cooker/canner ever requires replacement labels, please
contact the manufacturer and a new replacement label will be promptly sent out to you free of charge.
4
ABOUT THE ALL AMERICAN PRESSURE COOKER/CANNER
The ALL AMERICAN PRESSURE
COOKER/CANNER offers the busy
cook many money-saving
advantages:
Safe canning. Pressure cooking
provides the only safe method for
canning non-acid foods such as
vegetables, fish, meat and poultry.
It is perfect for canning in tin cans
as well as in glass jars.
Saves time and energy. The
pressure cooker prepares foods in
a fraction of the time required by
other cooking methods.
Saves money. Budget cuts of
meat are quickly cooked to juicy
tenderness in the pressure cooker.
The high temperature and pressure
makes meat tender and flavorful
Healthier. Foods cook quickly in a
without the use of chemical tenderminimum amount of liquid, helping
izers.
foods retain flavor and healthy
nutrients.
Saves clean-up. Since food flavors
do not mingle in live steam, several
foods may be prepared in the
cooker at the same time without
mixing flavors.
OTHER CANNING/COOKING RESOURCES & INFORMATION
• County University/Extension Office
• Extension Agent / Home Economist (Check local phone book for number or call information)
• Library - Books under Canning, Food Preservation, Home Canning
• Bookstores – Books under Canning, Food Preservation, Home Canning
INTERNET SEARCH
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON HOME CANNING, PLEASE VISIT THE FOLLOWING WEBSITES:
• UW Georgia: www.uga.edu/nchfp (National Center for Home Food Preservation)
• UW Pennsylvania: www.foodsafety.psu.edu/preserve.html
• UW Wisconsin: www.foodsafety.wisc.edu/preservation.html
• www.homecanning.com
DVD’s FEATURING OUR ALL AMERICAN PRESSURE COOKER/CANNER
PART NO. 313 DVD – 1 HOUR 49 MINUTES, “AT HOME CANNING”
At Home Canning shows you safe and easy methods of canning at home. This DVD demonstrates everything
you need to know to start water bath canning and pressure canning in your very own kitchen. It shows you
how to cook up a variety of foods and meals for you and your family to enjoy.
PART NO. 814 DVD – 10 ½ MINUTES, “BASIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS”
This DVD does what the title says…it gives you the basic information about the various parts of the pressure
cooker/canner in a clear, concise language enabling you to quickly learn what the various parts are and how
they are used. This DVD is included with all models of the ALL AMERICAN cooker/canner. It can also be
viewed online at www.aa-cd.co under the video tab.
5
GETTING ACQUAINTED
1. Pressure Dial Gauge: Easy to read pressure gauge lets you
know when the internal pressure is down to zero and the
cooker/canner is safe to open.
Part #72
2. Side Handles: Use the side handles when lifting the pressure
cooker. Models 930 & 941 have larger handles attached to
body.
Part #405
(Model 930& 941)
3. Top Handle: The top handle is used to place or remove the
cover on to, or off of the bottom only. Never lift the entire
cooker by using the top handle.
Part #76-09 w/screws
4. Wing Nuts: The cover is secured with large, stay-cool phenolic
wing nuts. These will require lubrication from time to time.
(Please see page 8)
Part #64
5. Clamp Bolts: Threaded aluminum bolts that attach to the wing
nuts, and help to hold the cover down tight.
Part #54
6. Automatic Pressure Control: This is made up of the round
selective pressure regulator weight and the vent pipe. The
vent pipe is attached to the cover and the pressure regulator
weight sits on top of the vent pipe.
Part #68
6
7. Vent Pipe: The vent pipe is the primary pressure relief valve
and is attached to the cover, the pressure regulator weight fits
on top of it.
Part #69
8. Overpressure Plug: This safety device will automatically vent
steam if the vent pipe becomes clogged. Please see page 12.
Part #2040
9. Canning/Cooking Rack: Used to keep the jars away from
direct heat, and to keep jar layers separate in the bigger
models.
Part #111 & 151
10. Retaining Bayonet Clamps: Three safety lugs catch the
bottom and secure it into place as an added safety feature.
(not shown on diagram)
Part #78
11. Metal-to-metal Seal: This means you never need to replace a
broken, cracked or hardened gasket. The exclusive metal-to-metal
seal improves with use if properly cared for and lubricated.
(Please see page 10)
12. Cover: Extra heavy, high-grade cast aluminum. Holds the
gauge, pressure regulator weight, and overpressure plug.
(Shown on page 8)
13. Bottom: Extra heavy, high-grade cast aluminum heats quickly,
wears well, cleans easily, and will not rust. The collar has
double thickness edges for extra safety and durability. (Shown
on page 8)
7
PARTS DIAGRAM
SIDE HANDLE SAFETY IMPORTANT NOTICE!
Only use the side handles to lift the pressure cooker. This applies to the pressure cooker when it is
empty or contains items. NEVER use the top handle to lift the complete unit. The top handle is
used to remove the cover only.
1
3
6
12
2
8
7
4
5
11
11
9
(need to add rack in illustration)
13
REPLACEMENT PARTS – WHERE TO ORDER
ALL AMERICAN cooker/canner parts are available from online retailers or they can be ordered directly
from Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry Co.
Call our Customer Service at 920-682-8627, E-mail customerrelations@wafco.com, or go to
www.aa-cd.co to find an online retailer.
8
BEFORE USING THE COOKER/CANNER FOR THE FIRST TIME
1. Read all important safeguards located on the inside of the front cover.
2. Hand wash the cover and bottom with hot, soapy water to remove any manufacturing oils. Do not
submerge the dial gauge in water. Rinse all parts with warm water and dry. Note: Do not put pressure
cooker canner in dishwasher.
3. Apply a thin film of olive oil (preferred) or petroleum jelly onto the beveled
edge of the bottom where the cover touches. (See Diagram A) Use just
enough to wet the edge. (also see page 10, Metal-to-Metal Seal)
4. To help understand the operation of the pressure cooker/canner, do a trial
run by pouring 2-3” of water into the cooker/canner after you have
lubricated the sealing surface, and follow the step-by-step instructions
on page 20, starting with step 5. This will help familiarize you with the
metal-to-metal seal, tightening the cover down using the wing nuts, and
the proper jiggling of the pressure regulator weight. For actual usage of the
canner, follow the complete instructions beginning on page 20 for pressure
canning and on page 45 for pressure cooking.
Diagram A
5. Go to www.aa-cd.co and click “VIDEO” for a demonstration video of how to use your cooker/canner. Also,
see page 5 for DVD’s.
PUTTING THE COVER ON
The cover of your pressure cooker/canner is designed to seal tightly without the use of a rubber gasket. The
metal surfaces where the cover and cooker meet are beveled to produce the exclusive metal-to-metal seal.
As a result, the cover will wobble slightly when placed on the bottom before the wing
nuts are fully fastened. When the cover is properly seated, there is a small even
gap all the way around between the cover and the bottom. To secure the cover,
read the following:
1. Using the cover handle, set cover on top of cooker/canner bottom so the
arrow on the cover is a little to the right of the notch mark on the bottom.
(See Diagram B)
2. Using the handle, turn the cover clockwise to line up the arrow on the cover with
the notch mark on the cooker/canner bottom. This will engage the bayonet clamps
under the lugs. (See Diagram C)
Diagram B
3. Grasp two opposite wing nuts, one in each hand, and flip them up above the
cover into the notches. (You may need to loosen the wing nuts by turning them
counter clockwise in order to get them to fit over the cover.)
4. Gradually and evenly tighten those two opposite wing nuts down by turning
them clockwise. At that point, make sure the gap between the cover and
bottom is even under those two wing nuts by getting an eye level view of the
gap. Never tighten just one wing nut at a time.
If the gap is not even under the two opposite wing nuts, loosen the side that is low
and tighten the side that is high until the gap is even.
Diagram C
5. Repeat steps 3-5 until all the wing nuts are secured.
6. Turn each wing nut one more time to assure they are snug. Hand-tighten only. Do not use a wrench or
any other tool.
7. Double check the gap between the cover and bottom to make sure it is even all the way around. If it is not,
you will need to undo the wing nuts and repeat the above steps.
9
CARING FOR YOUR COOKER/CANNER
READ BEFORE USING PRESSURE COOKER/CANNER
For your own safety and to avoid damaging the cooker/canner, please read these instructions carefully
before using.
Metal-to-Metal Seal
Before using your cooker/canner, you must lubricate the metal-to-metal seal area with olive oil. If olive oil is
not available, you may use Vaseline. We do not recommend using cooking oil because
there are so many different grades that some simply gum-up and do not work
very well. Apply a thin film of lubricant to the edge inside the cooker where
the inside wall begins to bevel out see Diagram D below. Use just enough
lubricant to wet the edge, but not enough to actually see it.
It is also important to periodically wipe off the metal-to-metal seal with a
clean towel to remove any build-up of foreign material trapped in the
lubricant. You may use a red 3M brand Scotch Brite pad, the red color only.
You can also use an SOS scrubbing pad. With pad, clean bottom seal using
a horizontal motion around the circumference to remove any build-up of
hardened lubricant. Do not use a vertical or small circular motion and avoid hard
scrubbing of the metal-to-metal seal to prevent damage. After this is complete, wash
the seal with hot soapy water, rinse, dry, and lubricate the metal-to-metal seal.
Diagram D
Wing Nut/Clamp Bolt
From time to time, place a small amount of lubricant on the threads of the
phenolic wing nut. You can unscrew the wing nut and put the lubricant inside
the threaded opening or on the clamp bolt and screw the wing nut back on.
Vaseline or olive oil works well in this instance. Also lubricate the metal
surface at the base of the wing nut where the bottom of the wing nut comes
in contact with the aluminum surface of the pressure cooker lid (see Diagram
E below). Wipe away excess lubricant. This will help the wing nuts turn more
easily and hold the cover securely to the cooker/canner, preventing steam leaks.
Diagram E
Keep Safety Openings Clear
It is important to inspect the openings of the vent pipe, and the pressure dial gauge regularly to make sure
steam can pass through them.
Before each use, hold the cover up to the light and look through the vent pipe (see
Diagram F). If the vent pipe is blocked, excess pressure cannot be released
through it. Pressure may then build to unsafe levels. Pressure will continue
to build until the overpressure plug is forced out of its cover opening.
Therefore, if it is blocked or partially blocked, clean the vent pipe by inserting
the #75 cleaning rod, a piece of wire, or a pipe cleaner
in the vent pipe and run it gently in and out to be
sure the opening is clear and unobstructed. Rinse
with hot water.
Diagram F
#75 cleaning rod
10
Testing Steam Pressure Gauge
ALL AMERICAN pressure cooker canners are weighted-gauge canners. The pressure dial gauge is supplied
as a reference only for when the unit is pressurized and timing for canning may roughly begin, or when the
pressure has dropped to zero and the lid may be safely removed. The accuracy of your pressure dial gauge is
+/- 2 pounds.
To test if the pressure dial gauge is functioning properly, compare the dial gauge to the regulator weight
when heating the unit. If the gauge is within +/- 2 psi of what you have the regulator weight set at when it
jiggles, the gauge is fine and doesn’t need to be replaced. If the gauge is more than +/- 2 psi of what the
regulator weight is set at when it jiggles, the gauge should be replaced.
Use Adequate Liquid/Water
It is critical to understand the importance of having enough water in the cooker when in use. During cooking
or canning, you should use 2 to 3 inches of hot water in the bottom of the canner before you place the filled
jars on the rack. Water level must be maintained during the canning process. Check the water level between
batches. Please read the recipes or canning instructions. You must never allow the pressure cooker to boil
dry. If there is not enough water in the pressure cooker and it boils dry, the unit will be ruined, cannot be
repaired, and must be replaced.
Filling Cooker
The pressure cooker/canner should never be more than 2⁄3 full when cooking foods like soups or stews.
When cooking foods which expand, please refer to number 11 on page 1 for foods you should never cook.
Otherwise, fill the cooker only 1⁄2 full. Half full means the pot is 1⁄2 full of the food and water combined,
resulting in never occupying more than half of the total volume of the cooker.
Excess Pressure
The pressure regulator weight is designed to release excess steam at 18 pounds of pressure. However, if the
vent pipe becomes clogged inside with food or grease buildup, it will not function. If the steam pressure
gauge registers in the black CAUTION range and the pressure regulator weight has not automatically
released pressure, do the following at once:
1) Turn off the heat source. Do not move the pressure cooker.
2) Allow the cooker to stand until cold to the touch (this may take an hour or more). Only then is it safe to
remove the cover, and only remove cover after the gauge reads at ZERO.
3) Clean the vent pipe and the pressure dial gauge passage as described on page 10. You may purchase a
new vent pipe from the factory if needed.
Temperature Fluctuation
Do not subject your cooker to sudden extreme temperature changes as this will cause expansion or
contraction which can crack cast aluminum. Do not move a pressure cooker from a cold storage area directly
onto a hot flame. Do not add cold water to a pressure cooker which has boiled dry and is still hot. Do not cool
a hot pressure cooker suddenly by pouring cold water on it or wrapping cold wet cloths around it.
Opening Safely
Be sure the pressure gauge has dropped to zero and that you have removed the pressure regulator weight
before loosening the wing nuts. When removing cover, raise the farthest edge first to protect face and
arms from steam.
Dropping the Pressure Cooker
If you ever drop your pressure cooker, it must be examined for damage. If it is dropped on a hard surface,
call for a Return Authorization number and return the unit to Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry with a note
explaining that the unit was dropped and that you would like it examined. We will check it thoroughly,
including the pressure regulator weight and steam pressure gauge, and notify you of our findings and the
repair charges.
11
Discoloration and Pitting
Discoloration of aluminum inside from hard water minerals is harmless. It can be removed by boiling a
solution of one tablespoon vinegar or two level tablespoons cream of tartar in a quart of water, or by
scrubbing with aluminum cleaner or soap impregnated steel wool cleaning pad.
Pitting is caused by the interaction of aluminum with other metals in the presence of moisture. This can be
prevented by washing, rinsing and drying the unit thoroughly after every use. Remember: do not put in
dishwasher. Always store the pressure cooker in a dry area when not in use. While pitting is not injurious to
health, if pitting becomes present and you detect it in the metal, then we recommend that the unit be returned
to the factory for examination. Do not use the unit if pitting is present until it is determined the extent of
damage caused by pitting.
Storage
The cover should be stored separately from the bottom or upside down on the bottom to allow air circulation.
Always be sure the cover and bottom are thoroughly dried to protect against pitting and corrosion. Protect
the metal-to-metal seal from being struck or dented.
Overpressure Plug
The overpressure plug releases if the vent pipe becomes blocked and the cooker/canner develops too much
pressure. This is a protection that permits excess pressure to be released safely. If you follow directions for
using the unit properly, the plug will probably never release.
A small amount of steam or moisture may be visible around the overpressure plug as the pressure is starting
to build inside the unit. It is normal for the overpressure plug to leak steam until approximately 5 pounds is
shown on the pressure gauge. If leakage continues beyond that point, the cause may be:
1) The overpressure plug needs replacing if it is worn, cracked or hard. We recommend that you replace the
overpressure plug every 12 months, or before if it becomes hard or deformed. Never reuse a blown
overpressure plug.
2) Built-up food or grease may be in the opening. We recommend that the opening in the cover where the
overpressure plug fits be cleaned with hot soapy water and a small brush at least once every month
during periods of use to maintain a clean opening. This cleaning/inspection is in addition to normal
cleaning performed after using the unit.
TO REMOVE THE OVERPRESSURE PLUG: From the underside of the cover, pull the plug out of its opening
using your fingers. After cleaning, reinsert the overpressure plug by pushing the round top side of the
overpressure plug into the opening from the underside of the cover. When the overpressure plug is correctly
in position, the indented portion will be visible when the underside is viewed. Check that the round top of
plug and top lip are fully through the opening so that the top lip is not folded under. (There is a video that
shows how to do this at www.aa-cd.co)
12
CANNING TERMS
Acid Foods
Fruits, acidified tomatoes, pickles, relishes, chutneys, jams, jellies and preserves are acid foods – those
foods with enough natural acid or enough additional acid (lemon juice or vinegar) to result in a pH of 4.6 or
lower. Acid foods may be safely canned using a hot water bath method.
Botulism
A deadly form of food poisoning caused by toxins produced by the growth of botulinus spores. For more on
botulism and how to prevent it, see page 15.
Buckling
This term applies to cans in which one or both ends have been permanently distorted by excess pressure in
the can. Slack filling (more liquid than solid food), sealing at too low a temperature, or too sudden of a
release of pressure after cooking can all cause buckling.
Raw-Pack Method
Filling hot jars with raw, unheated food prior to processing.
Hot-Pack Method
Filling hot jars with hot precooked food before processing.
Hot Water Bath
The canning method used to process acid foods.
Headspace
The distance between the food in the jar/can and the cover of the jar/can. Leave at least ½ -inch headspace to
most canned foods. Failure to leave headspace may cause bulging of the cans due to over filling.
Low-Acid Foods
Foods with little natural acid which have a pH above 4.6. This includes meats, poultry, seafood, milk,
vegetables and some varieties of tomatoes. Low-acid foods must be processed in a pressure canner.
Swell
Swell is the commercial term given to cans whose ends have been distended or swelled by the gas which has
been generated by spoilage of the food in the can. Any can with ends swelled out should be thrown away as
it is not fit for use, unless the can was filled too full or was not sealed while hot. See “Headspace.”
Vacuum
Vacuum as it applies to cans refers to a lower pressure within the container than on the outside. This higher
pressure on the outside causes the ends of the cans to be held in a concave position. Vacuum is obtained by
sealing the cans while they are hot. The condensation of the vapor in the headspace and the contraction of
the gases and contents of the can upon cooling produce a partial vacuum in the can. Proper vacuum may be
obtained by thorough pre-heating or exhausting just previous to closing. A can with a vacuum – that is, with
the ends properly pulled in – is considered to contain good food. If the products start to spoil, gas is
generated which releases the vacuum and causes the ends of the can to bulge.
13
SAFETY TIPS FOR HOME CANNING
Home food preservation must be done with care to protect the quality and safety of the food. Jars or cans
containing low-acid foods such as vegetables, meats, poultry and seafood must always be processed under
pressure to prevent spoilage or food poisoning. The bacteria which cause botulism, a severe and potentially
fatal form of food poisoning, are not killed by using the hot water bath canning process. Low-acid foods
must be processed under pressure at a temperature of 240°F (115.5°C) for the full recommended period of
time.
To ensure the safety of the food you process at home, follow these precautions:
• Use only fresh food products.
• Keep all work surfaces, food and equipment clean.
• Make sure the pressure canner is in good working condition and that the pressure dial gauge is reading
accurately.
• Pack and close food containers correctly.
• Process food at the recommended time and pressure.
• Test seals after cooling containers.
• Store canned foods in a cool, dry place.
SOME CAUSES OF SPOILAGE
Fermentation
Any bulged can or can with a loose seal should be considered suspicious. Bulging is due to carbon dioxide
gas produced from fermentation, although other bad smelling gases may be mixed with it. Fermentation
results from under cooking or from the introduction of air through a leak. The product will smell sour, appear
soft and discolored, and have an offensive odor.
Flat Sour
There is nothing about the outside appearance of a can to suggest flat sour spoilage. Flat sour food is
typically soft and mushy, although it may sometimes appear firm. Flat sour foods smell and taste sour, a
result of organisms (thermopiles) which develop best at lukewarm temperatures. To avoid flat sour spoilage,
follow thorough processing times and temperatures, and work quickly while canning to avoid holding foods
at lukewarm temperature.
Corn, peas, green beans, greens and asparagus are prone to flat sour spoilage. To avoid flat sour, follow
these tips:
• Can only fresh products. The flat-sour germs may develop before the product is canned and all the
cooking in the world won’t destroy the sour flavor after it has developed. Two hours from the garden to
jar is a good rule of thumb.
• Don’t let pre-heated or scalded products stand at lukewarm temperature. Get them into the can quickly
and have them as hot as possible when they’re put into the cans.
• Have the water boiling to avoid waiting too long for the temperature to come up after the cans are
packed in the cooker.
• Don’t try to can too much in one cooking.
• Keep burner at a relatively high temperature.
• Don’t let jars or cans stand after being packed or before putting them into the cooker.
• Don’t pack jars or cans too tightly; this ensures the heat will get to the center.
• Cool quickly. Don’t stack jars or cans while cooling.
• Store in a cool place.
14
Botulism
This rarely occurs alone in canned food but is found in connection with other spoilage. A rank cheesy odor is
typical of botulism in its well-developed stage. Discard without tasting all canned foods which show any
signs of spoilage. This will minimize the risk of botulism poisoning, although the presence of this spoilage
cannot always be determined by the appearance or odor of the food.
CHECK PRODUCT BEFORE EATING
All canned foods should be carefully inspected before use. As an added safety precaution, boil low-acid
foods in an open pan before eating. (Boil meats, poultry, seafood, corn and spinach for 20 minutes; other
vegetables, 10 minutes.) This will destroy the botulism toxin, should any be present.
To ensure the safety of home-canned fish, insert a meat thermometer in the can or jar with the tip at the
center of the fish. Cover loosely with foil and heat in a 350°F (180°C) oven until the thermometer registers
185°F (85°C). Let container stand at room temperature for 30 minutes until temperature is uniform
throughout.
Don’t ever taste food you suspect to be spoiled. Never take a chance on slightly off food. Discard it.
DETECTING SPOILAGE
Immediately destroy any canned product you suspect has spoiled. Dispose of it where it won’t be eaten by
humans or animals. Discard the product if:
• The ends of the can are bulged or the seal on the jar is broken (test each can or jar by pressing the ends
or lid; they should not bulge or snap back)
• The product contains gas bubbles or foam, or liquid squirts out when can or jar is opened
• Product looks soft, mushy, slimy, moldy or, in the case of meat, off-color
• Product smells spoiled when boiled (heat brings out the characteristic odor of spoiled food)
ACID OR LOW-ACID FOODS
Foods are considered either acid or low-acid, each of which requires a different canning method.
• Acid foods, which include most fruits, tomatoes acidified with bottled lemon juice or citric acid, pickles,
relishes, chutneys, jams, jellies and preserves, may be safely processed using either a hot water bath or
a pressure canner. (Figs are low-acid fruit, but if acidified before canning, they may be safely processed
in a hot water bath.)
• Low-acid foods, such as meats, poultry, seafood, milk and vegetables must be processed in a pressure
canner. Pressure canning is the only safe method for canning low-acid foods such as meats, poultry,
seafood and vegetables according to the United States Department of Agriculture.
15
PACKING CANS OR JARS
Canning Jars
Mason-type jars specifically designed for home canning are best. Commercial mayonnaise jars may not seal
and may break, and should never be used in a pressure canner.
Canning jars come in a variety of sizes from half-pint jars to half-gallon jars. Pints and quarts are the most
commonly used sizes. Processing times have not been developed for many foods in half-pint, 12-ounce or
one and one-half pint jars. If the recipe does not specify processing in one of these jars; process half-pint and
12-ounce jars for the same time as pints. Half-gallon canning jars are recommended only for very acid juices.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture does not provide pressure canning timetables for half-gallon jars.
Two Packing Methods
The hot-pack method is preferred for most foods, especially acid foods that are processed in a hot water
bath. Bring food to a boil and simmer for a few minutes. Pack food loosely into hot jars along with any hot
liquid as the recipe requires. Hot-packing shrinks food, removes air from its tissue, helps keep it from
floating in jars, and lengthens a product’s shelf life.
The raw-pack method requires packing unheated prepared food tightly into hot jars, then covering the food
with hot liquid. Raw-packing is more likely to result in floating food than hot-packing. Air may be trapped in
both the food and the jars, causing food to discolor during storage.
Thermometer
Use a thermometer when canning meats or when instructions call for removing or exhausting air from cans
or jars. With cans, the lid should not be placed on top until the contents are heated to at least 170°F (77°C).
This is the minimum temperature needed to exhaust air properly so that a partial vacuum forms inside the
can upon cooling.
Labeling Cans and Jars
Wipe off containers after they are cool. When labeling cans, use paste on selvage ends of the label, keeping it
off of the tin, as this sometimes causes rust. Label with the date and contents of the container, particularly if
some batches were packed differently – without salt, for example. If you canned more than one lot in one
day, add a lot number.
Storing Cans and Jars
Screw bands are not needed on stored jars. They can be removed easily after jars are cooled. When removed,
washed, dried, and stored in a dry area, screw bands may be used many times. If left on stored jars, they
become difficult to remove, often rust, and may not work properly again. Store cans and jars in a cool, dry
place. Exposure to heat, freezing temperatures or light decreases the quality and shelf life of canned food.
Freezing may damage the seal so that spoilage begins. In an unheated storage area, cover jars and cans with
a clean blanket, or wrap them in newspapers.
For best eating quality and nutritive value, use canned goods within one year.
16
DIRECTIONS WHEN USING GLASS JARS
1) Inspect jars for chips in the rim and hairline cracks and discard damaged ones.
2) Inspect metal rings and discard any with dents or rust.
3) Wash jars, metal screw bands and lids in hot soapy water then rinse.
4) Place jars upside down on a clean, dry cloth or leave them in the dishwasher until needed.
5) Some metal lids with sealing compound may need to be boiled or held in boiling water for a few minutes
before use. Follow manufacturer’s directions.
6) Do not reuse flat metal lids.
Recommended Jars and Lids
Regular and wide-mouth Mason-type, threaded, home-canning jars with self-sealing lids are the best choice.
With careful use and handling, Mason jars may be reused many times, requiring only new lids each time.
When jars and lids are used properly, jar seals and vacuums are excellent and jar breakage is rare.
Jar Cleaning
Before every use, wash empty jars in hot water with detergent and rinse well by hand, or wash in a
dishwasher. Un-rinsed detergents may cause unnatural flavors and colors. These washing methods do not
sterilize jars. Scale or hard water films on jars are easily removed by soaking jars several hours in a solution
containing 1 cup of vinegar (5 percent acidity) per gallon of water.
Sterilization of Empty Jars
All jams, jellies, and pickled products processed less than 10 minutes should be filled into sterile empty jars.
To sterilize empty jars, put them right side up on the rack in a boiling-water canner. Fill the canner and jars
with hot (not boiling) water to 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Boil 10 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000
ft. At higher elevations, boil 1 additional minute for each additional 1,000 ft. elevation. Remove and drain hot
sterilized jars one at a time. Save the hot water for processing filled jars. Fill jars with food, add lids, and
tighten screw bands.
Empty jars used for vegetables, meats, and fruits to be processed in a pressure canner need not be presterilized. It is also unnecessary to presterilize jars for fruits, tomatoes, and pickled or fermented foods that
will be processed 10 minutes or longer in a boiling-water canner.
Lid Selection, Preparation and Use
The common self-sealing lid consists of a flat metal lid held in place by a metal screw band during
processing. The flat lid is crimped around its bottom edge to form a trough, which is filled with a colored
gasket compound. When jars are processed, the lid gasket softens and flows slightly to cover the jar-sealing
surface, yet allows air to escape from the jar. The gasket then forms an airtight seal as the jar cools. Gaskets
in unused lids work well for at least 5 years from date of manufacture. The gasket compound in older unused
lids may fail to seal on jars.
Buy only the quantity of lids you will use in a year. To ensure a good seal, carefully follow the manufacturer's
directions in preparing lids for use. Examine all metal lids carefully. Do not use lids that are old, dented, or
deformed. Also, do not use lids that have gaps or other defects in the sealing gasket.
After filling jars with food, release air bubbles by inserting a flat plastic (not metal) spatula between the food
and the jar. Slowly turn the jar and move the spatula up and down to allow air bubbles to escape. Adjust the
headspace and then clean the jar rim (sealing surface) with a dampened paper towel. Place the lid, gasket
down, onto the cleaned jar-sealing surface. Uncleaned jar-sealing surfaces may cause seal failures.
17
Fit the metal screw band over the flat lid. Follow the manufacturer's guidelines enclosed with or on the box
for tightening the jar lids properly. Do not retighten lids after processing jars. As jars cool, the contents in the
jar contract; pulling the self-sealing lid firmly against the jar to form a high vacuum.
If rings are too loose, liquid may escape from jars during processing, and seals may fail. If rings are too tight,
air cannot vent during processing, and food will discolor during storage. Over tightening also may cause lids
to buckle and jars to break, especially with raw-packed, pressure-processed food.
Checking the Seal
Jars with flat metal lids are sealed if the lid has popped down in the center, the lid does not move when
pressed down, and tapping the center of the lid with a spoon gives a clear ringing sound. A dull sound,
however, does not always indicate a poor seal.
Poor Seals
If a jar or can is not sealed, refrigerate contents and use or reprocess within 24 hours of the original
processing. Process for the full time recommended. Quality of the food will not be as good after
reprocessing.
Do not open and refill jars that have lost liquid during processing. Loss of liquid does not cause food to spoil;
however, opening would contaminate the sterile contents.
DIRECTIONS WHEN USING TIN CANS
For general home canning, plain finish “R" enamel cans are used. “R" enamel cans have an inside coating of
enamel intended primarily for the preservation of color in certain products. “C" enamel cans are used by
commercial canners for certain products, and are not ordinarily available to the home canner. Follow
instructions in each recipe as to the type of can to use, and unless otherwise stated in recipe, use plain cans.
Lids And Can Sealers
Lids are furnished with either a paper gasket or with a semi-vulcanized rubber gasket called Gold Seal. Both
lids are satisfactory providing the sealer roll has been adjusted to that particular cover. The paper gasket
cover will stand a little looser adjustment than will the rubber compound cover.
Inspect cans, lids and gaskets to be sure they are perfect. Discard cans that are badly bent, dented or rusty.
Discard lids with damaged gaskets. Wash cans in clean hot water just before use. Drain upside down. Do not
wash lids, as washing may damage the gaskets. If lids have become soiled, rinse them with clean water or
wipe with a damp cloth when ready to place on cans.
Check to see that your can sealer is in good working order. Test by sealing a can containing a small amount
of water. Submerge the sealed can in boiling water for a few seconds. If air bubbles rise from around the can,
the seam is not tight. Readjust.
Exhaust Excess Air
Exhaust or drive out the excess air in the can by heating the contents to a minimum of 170°F (77°C). The
product may already be that temperature if the hot-pack method is being used. Place open cans in pot; add
boiling water to within 2" of the top of cans. Boil until the temperature of the food in the center of the can
reads at least 170°F. This may take more than an hour if the raw-pack method is used.
Wipe off the rim of the can, place lid on can and seal at once, before the contents of the can cool.
Check to see the seaming rolls of your sealer are properly adjusted before sealing cans. For safety’s sake, test
a few cans from each batch for leaks by plunging hot cans into cold water. Air bubbles indicate an imperfect
seal.
18
Cooling Cans After Processing
Tin cans should be removed from the cooker immediately after processing and placed in cold water. This
stops the cooking and prevents discoloration of food. Change water frequently for fast cooling. Remove cans
from water while they are still warm so they will air dry. To allow for air circulation, do not stack cans directly
on top of one another.
A variety of canning problems can be traced to delayed cooling, such as flat sour in asparagus, beans, corn,
spinach and peas; flavor and color deterioration in fruits and tomatoes; scorched flavor in tomatoes, corn,
and sweet potatoes; and darkening of corn and kraut.
Testing The Seal
Check containers for leaks when thoroughly cool – about 12 hours. Examine seams and seals carefully on all
cans. Can ends should be almost flat, with a slight inward curve. Occasionally, a can packed too full will
bulge at the ends. Set it aside and use it within a few days so it doesn’t get mistaken for a can that has bulged
from spoilage during storage.
19
CANNING INSTRUCTIONS
IMPORTANT: Read carefully. Do not attempt to use your canner before reading these instructions.
Follow these step-by-step instructions for pressure canning in your canner. Prepare food according to the
directions in specific recipe.
1) Check metal-to-metal seal for lubrication, and that the vent pipe is clear. (See page 10) (Caring for your
cooker section)
2) Pour 2-3” of water in cooker.
3) Place rack in bottom of the pressure cooker with the rim facing down when using pans, canning jars or
tin cans. Never allow these containers to stand directly on the bottom of the cooker.
4) Place sealed cans or closed jars on rack in pressure cooker. Stagger the top layer if there are two layers
of jars, using a rack between layers. (Note: Model 910 and 915 come with only one rack.)
5) Secure the lid to the cooker/canner using the instructions on page 9.
6) Place cooker/canner over heat source on high heat until a steady column of
steam escapes from the vent pipe for 10 minutes before placing the pressure
regulator weight on vent pipe.
7) If your recipe calls for cooking at 15 pounds, set pressure regulator weight
over vent pipe at the hole marked with the number 15. If only 10 pounds
pressure is required, place the hole marked with the number 10 over the
vent pipe. (See Diagram G)
Diagram G
8) Start counting your processing time from the first jiggle or rock of the pressure regulator weight.
9) Adjust the heat until the pressure regulator weight jiggles only one to four times per minute. Never turn
up the heat to the point that a constant flow of steam is escaping, thereby causing the pressure regulator
weight to be constantly in the “up” position. (Watch the video demonstration at www.aa-cd.co)
10) Experience with the pressure regulator weight will teach you what setting on your stove will maintain the
proper pressure and how long it takes before the pressure regulator weight jiggles or rocks. This will
depend on which size pressure cooker/canner you have and how much food you are canning.
11) If steam escapes in a steady stream after you’ve reduced the heat, nudge the pressure regulator weight
to set it properly.
12) When the food has cooked at the proper pressure for the correct period of time, turn off the heat source.
13) Read page 21 for reducing the pressure and removing the cover.
20
Reducing Pressure
WARNING: Steam escaping from the vent pipe can scald or burn you and the pressure regulator weight may
be hot. Protect your hand with a pot holder or mitt.
When cooking is completed and heat is off, reduce pressure as follows:
• After canning in glass jars, turn heat off and permit cooker to cool gradually until the pressure dial gauge
drops to zero. Remove the pressure regulator weight with a hot pad. Wait 2 minutes, and then unfasten
cover by turning wing nuts counter-clockwise until the bolts are able to be flipped down. Remove the
cover, raising farthest edge first to protect face and arms from steam.
• After canning in tin cans, turn heat off and release pressure as quickly as possible by removing the
pressure regulator weight with a hot pad. Wait 2 minutes; unfasten cover by turning wing nuts counterclockwise until the bolt is able to be flipped down. Remove the cover, raising farthest edge first to
protect face and arms from steam.
• DO NOT put cold cloths or water on the cooker to hasten cooling. Forced cooling may result in food
spoilage and may crack the aluminum.
• DO NOT move the pressure cooker until the pressure is completely reduced and pressure dial gauge
reads ZERO.
• DO NOT loosen the wing nuts until the pressure dial gauge reads zero, and the remaining pressure has
been exhausted by carefully removing the pressure regulator weight and you have waited 2 minutes
• When the pressure regulator weight is left on a long time after the pressure has been reduced to zero, a
vacuum may form inside the cooker making the cover difficult to remove. To avoid a vacuum, you must
remove the pressure regulator weight from the vent pipe as soon as the pressure dial gauge indicator
reaches ZERO p.s.i. and then remove the cover after waiting 2 minutes. The longer you wait without
removing the pressure regulator weight, the more vacuum will form, pulling the cover tighter and tighter
to the bottom.
• Another reason that a cover sticks to the bottom is that the metal-to-metal seal has been permitted to
build up a coating of lubrication or the seal was not lubricated at all. Please refer to page 10 for cleaning
metal-to-metal seal.
Removing a “Stuck” Cover (due to vacuum)
• In the event that a vacuum forms, use a large standard screwdriver to pry the cover loose. Place the end
of the screwdriver at an angle between the cover and bottom near a wing nut assembly. Do not go
straight in with the screwdriver or you will damage the metal-to-metal seal. Gently pry upward using the
screwdriver as a lever. Continue to pry upward at each wing nut assembly area uniformly so that the
cover is raised evenly. In most cases, the cover should come off rather quickly. If you need further
assistance, please call factory.
21
PREPARING FRUIT FOR CANNING
SYRUP
Adding syrup to canned fruit helps to retain its flavor, color, and shape. It does not prevent spoilage of these
foods and is not really necessary. Fruit can be preserved in juice or water. Measure sugar and liquid (usually
water or fruit juice) into saucepan. Bring to a boil and pour over raw fruits in jars. For hot packs, bring water
and sugar to boil, add fruit, reheat to boil, and fill into jars immediately. About 1 cup syrup is usually needed
for one quart of fruit.
Note: Mild-flavored honey or light corn syrups may be used to replace up to half the table sugar. See table
below for ratios.
Syrup Type
Very Light
Light
Medium
Heavy
Corn Syrup
Honey
Sweetener
1 cup
1 cup
Cups Sugar
1 1⁄4
2 1⁄4
3 1⁄4
4 1⁄4
11⁄2
1
Cups Water
51⁄2
5 1⁄4
5
4 1⁄4
3
4
Cups Yielded
6
61⁄2
7
7
6
5
APPLESAUCE
An average of 3 pounds per quart is needed. Select apples that are sweet, juicy, and crisp. For a tart flavor,
add 1 to 2 pounds of tart apples to each 3 pounds of sweeter fruit. Wash, peel and core apples. If desired,
slice apples into water containing ascorbic acid (3 grams per 1 gallon of cold water) to prevent browning.
Place drained slices in an 8-10 quart pot. Add ½ cup water. Stir occasionally to prevent burning, heat
quickly until tender (5 to 20 minutes, depending on maturity and variety). Press through a sieve or food mill,
or skip the pressing step if you prefer chunk-style sauce. Sauce may be packed without sugar. If desired, add
1
/8 cup sugar per quart of sauce. Taste and add more, if preferred. Reheat sauce to boiling. Fill jars with hot
sauce, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Applesauce
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints
8 min
Quarts
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
5 lb
10 lb
APPLES – SLICED
An average of 23⁄4 pounds per quart is needed. Select apples that are juicy, crispy, and preferably both sweet
and tart. Wash, peel, and core apples. If desired, slice apples into water containing ascorbic acid (3 grams
per 1 gallon of cold water) to prevent browning. Raw packs make poor quality products. Place drained slices
in large saucepan and add 1 pint water or very light, light, or medium syrup per 5 pounds of sliced apples.
Boil 5 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Fill jars with hot sliced apples and hot syrup or
water, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Apples –Sliced
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints or Quarts
8 min
22
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
APRICOTS
An average of 2 1⁄4 pounds is needed per quart. Select firm, well-colored mature fruit of ideal quality for
eating fresh. Follow directions for peaches. The boiling water dip and removal of skin process is optional.
Wash fruit if skins are not removed; use either hot or raw pack and the same process time. (See page 24
under peaches for process time)
BERRIES – WHOLE
Blackberries, blueberries, currants, dewberries, elderberries, gooseberries, huckle-berries, loganberries,
mulberries, raspberries.
An average of 1½ pounds per quart is needed. Choose ripe, sweet berries with uniform color. Wash 1 or 2
quarts of berries at a time. Drain, cap, and stem if necessary. For gooseberries, snip off heads and tails with
scissors. Prepare and boil preferred syrup if desired. Add ½ cup syrup, juice, or water to each clean jar.
Hot Pack – For blueberries, currants, elderberries, gooseberries, and huckleberries. Heat berries in boiling
water for 30 seconds and drain. Fill jars and cover with hot juice, leaving ½-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Fill jars with any of the raw berries, shaking down gently while filling. Cover with hot syrup,
juice, or water, leaving ½-inch headspace.
Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Berries – Whole
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints or Quarts
8 min
Raw
Pints
8 min
Raw
Quarts
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
5 lb
10 lb
5 lb
10 lb
CHERRIES –WHOLE (Sweet or Sour)
An average of 2½ pounds per quart is needed. Select bright, uniformly colored cherries that are mature ( of
ideal quality for eating fresh or cooking). Stem and wash cherries. Remove pits if desired. If pitted, place
cherries in water containing ascorbic acid (3 grams per 1 gallon of cold water) to prevent browning and to
prevent stem-end discoloration. If canned unpitted, prick skins on opposite sides with a clean needle to
prevent splitting. Cherries may be canned in water, apple juice, white grape juice, or syrup. If syrup is
desired, select and prepare preferred type as directed on page 22.
Hot Pack – In a large saucepan add ½ cup water, juice, or syrup for each quart of drained fruit and bring to
boil. Fill jars with cherries and cooking liquid, leaving ½-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Add ½ cup hot water, juice, or syrup to each jar. Fill jars with drained cherries, shaking down
gently as you fill. Add more hot liquid, leaving ½-inch headspace.
Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Cherries – Whole
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints
8 min
Hot
Quarts
10 min
Raw
Pints or Quarts
10 min
23
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
5 lb
10 lb
5 lb
10 lb
FRUIT PUREES (of any fruit except figs and tomatoes)
Stem, wash, drain, peel, and remove pits if necessary. Measure fruit into large saucepan, crushing slightly if
desired. Add 1 cup hot water for each quart of fruit. Cook slowly until fruit is soft, stirring frequently. Press
through sieve or food mill. If desired for flavor, add sugar to taste. Reheat pulp to boil, or until sugar
dissolves if added. Fill hot into clean jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Fruit Purees
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints or Quars
8 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
GRAPEFRUIT AND ORANGE SLICES
An average of about 2 pounds is needed per quart. Select firm, mature, sweet fruit of ideal quality for eating
fresh. The flavor of orange sections is best if the sections are canned with equal parts of grapefruit.
Grapefruit may be canned without oranges. Sections may be packed in your choice of water, citrus juice, or
syrup.
Wash and peel fruit and remove white tissue to prevent a bitter taste. If you use syrup, prepare a very light,
light, or medium syrup and bring to boil. Fill jars with sections and water, juice, or hot syrup, leaving ½-inch
headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Grapefruit & Orange Slices
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints or Quarts
8 min
Raw
Pints
8 min
Raw
Quarts
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
5 lb
10 lb
5 lb
10 lb
NECTARINES – HALVED OR SLICED
An average of 2½ pounds is needed per quart. Chose ripe, mature fruit of ideal quality for eating fresh or
cooking. Follow directions for peaches except do not dip in hot water or remove skins. Wash fruit and use
either hot or raw pack and the same process time. (use table below for peaches)
PEACHES – HALVED OR SLICED
An average of 2½ pounds is needed per quart. Choose ripe, mature fruit of ideal quality for eating fresh or
cooking. Dip fruit in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds until skins loosen. Dip quickly in cold water and slip
off skins. Cut in half, remove pits and slice if desired. To prevent darkening, keep peeled fruit in an ascorbic
acid solution (3 grams per 1 gallon of cold water). Prepare and boil a very light, light, or medium syrup,
according to directions on page 22 or pack peaches in water, apple juice, or white grape juice. Raw packs
make poor quality peaches.
Hot Pack – In a large saucepan place drained fruit in syrup, water, or juice and bring to boil. Fill jars with hot
fruit and cooking liquid, leaving ½-inch headspace. Place halves in layers, cut side down.
Raw Pack – Fill jars with raw fruit, cut side down, and add hot water, juice or syrup, leaving
½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Peaches, Nectarines & Apricots
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot and Raw
Pints or Quarts
10 min
24
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
PEARS – HALVED
An average of 2½ pounds is needed per quart. Choose ripe, mature fruit of ideal quality for eating fresh or
cooking. Wash and peel pears. Cut lengthwise in halves and remove core. A melon baller or metal
measuring spoon is suitable for coring pears. To prevent discoloration, keep pears in an ascorbic acid
solution, (3 grams per 1 gallon of cold water). Prepare a very light, light, or medium syrup or pack pears in
apple juice, white grape juice, or water. Raw packs make poor quality pears. Boil drained pears 5 minutes in
syrup, juice, or water. Fill jars with hot fruit and cooling liquid, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and
process.
Process time for Pears – Halved
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints or Quarts
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
PLUMS – HALVED OR WHOLE
An average of 2 pounds is needed per quart. Select deep-colored, mature fruit of ideal quality for eating fresh
or cooking. Plums may be packed in water or syrup. Stem and wash plums. To can whole, prick skins on
two sides of plums with fork to prevent splitting. Freestone varieties may be halved and pitted. If you use
syrup, prepare very light, light, or medium syrup according to directions on page 22.
Hot Pack – Add plums to water or hot syrup and boil 2 minutes. Cover saucepan and let stand 20 to 30
minutes. Fill jars with hot plums and cooking liquid or syrup, leaving ½-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Fill jars with raw plums, packing firmly. Add hot water or syrup leaving ½-inch headspace.
Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Plums – Halved or Whole
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot and Raw
Pints or Quarts
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
RHUBARB – STEWED
An average of 1½ pounds is needed per quart. Select young, tender, well-colored stalks from the spring or
late fall crop. Trim off leaves. Wash stalks and cut into ½-inch to 1-inch pieces. In a large saucepan add ½
cup sugar for each quart of fruit. Let stand until juice appears. Heat gently to boiling. Fill jars without delay,
leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Rhubarb – Stewed
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints or Quarts
8 min
25
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
PREPARING TOMATOES AND TOMATO PRODUCTS FOR CANNING
Select only disease-free, preferably vine-ripened, firm fruit for canning. Caution: Do not can tomatoes from
dead or frost-killed vines. Green tomatoes are more acidic than ripened fruit and can be canned safely
with any of the following recommendations.
Acidification: To ensure safe acidity in whole, crushed, or juiced tomatoes, add two tablespoons of bottled
lemon juice or ½ teaspoon of citric acid per quart of tomatoes. For pints, use one tablespoon bottled lemon
juice or ¼ teaspoon citric acid. Acid can be added directly to the jars before filling with product. Add sugar
to offset acid taste, if desired. Four tablespoons of a 5 percent acidity vinegar per quart may be used instead
of lemon juice or citric acid. However, vinegar may cause undesirable flavor changes.
Recommendation: Use of a pressure canner will result in higher quality and more nutritious canned tomato
products.
TOMATO JUICE
An average of 3¼ pounds is needed per quart. Wash, remove stems, and trim off bruised or discolored
portions. To prevent juice from separating, quickly cut about 1 pound of fruit into quarters and put directly
into saucepan. Heat immediately to boiling while crushing. Continue to slowly add and crush freshly cut
tomato quarters to the boiling mixture. Make sure the mixture boils constantly and vigorously while you add
the remaining tomatoes. Simmer 5 minutes after you add all pieces.
If you are not concerned about juice separation, simply slice or quarter tomatoes into a large saucepan.
Crush, heat, and simmer for 5 minutes before juicing.
Press both types of heated juice through a sieve or food mill to remove skins and seeds. Add bottled lemon
juice or citric acid to jars. See acidification instructions above. Heat juice again to boiling. Add 1 teaspoon
of salt per quart to the jars, if desired. Fill jars with hot tomato juice, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids
and process.
Process time for Tomato Juice
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
20 min
Hot
Pints or Quarts
15 min
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
10 lb
15 lb
15 lb
Not Recommended
TOMATO JUICE AND VEGETABLE JUICE BLEND
An average of 22 pounds of tomatoes is needed per canner load of 7 quarts. Not more than 3 cups of other
vegetables may be added for each 22 pounds of tomatoes.
Crush and simmer tomatoes as for making tomato juice, see above. Add no more than 3 cups of any
combination finely chopped celery, onions, carrots, and peppers for each 22 pounds of tomatoes. Simmer
mixture 20 minutes. Press hot cooked tomatoes and vegetables through a sieve or food mill to remove skins
and seeds. Add bottled lemon juice or citric acid to jars. See acidification directions above. Add 1 teaspoon
of salt per quart to the jars, if desired. Reheat tomato-vegetable juice blend to boiling and fill immediately
into jars, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Tomato and Vegetable Juice Blend
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
20 min
Pints or Quarts
15 min
Hot
10 min
26
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
10 lb
15 lb
15 lb
Not Recommended
TOMATOES – CRUSHED (with no added liquid)
A high-quality product, ideally suited for use in soups, stews, and casseroles. An average of 23⁄4 pounds is
needed per quart. Wash tomatoes and dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until skins split. Then dip
in cold water, slip off skins, and remove cores. Trim off any bruised or discolored portions and quarter.
Heat 1⁄6 of the quarters quickly in a large pot, crushing them with a wooden mallet or spoon as they are added
to the pot. This will exude juice. Continue heating the tomatoes, stirring to prevent burning. Once the
tomatoes are boiling, gradually add remaining quartered tomatoes, stirring constantly. These remaining
tomatoes do not need to be crushed. They will soften with heating and stirring. Continue until all tomatoes
are added. Then boil gently 5 minutes. Add bottled lemon juice or citric acid to jars. See acidification
directions on page 26. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jars, if desired. Fill jars immediately with hot
tomatoes, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Crushed Tomatoes
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
20 min
Pints or Quarts
15 min
Hot
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
10 lb
15 lb
15 lb
Not Recommended
STANDARD TOMATO SAUCE
For thin sauce, an average of 5 pounds is needed per quart. For thick sauce, an average of 6½ pounds is
needed per quart. Prepare and press as for making tomato juice, see page 26. Simmer in large-diameter
saucepan until sauce reaches desired consistency. Boil until volume is reduced by about one-third for thin
sauce, or by one-half for thick sauce. Add bottled lemon juice or citric acid to jars. See acidification
directions on page 26. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jars, if desired. Fill jars, leaving ¼-inch
headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Standard Tomato Sauce
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
20 min
Pints or Quarts
15 min
Hot
10 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
10 lb
15 lb
15 lb
Not Recommended
TOMATOES – WHOLE OR HALVED (packed in water)
An average of 3 pounds is needed per quart. Wash tomatoes. Dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or
until skins split; then dip in cold water. Slip off skins and remove cores. Leave whole or halve. Add bottled
lemon juice or citric acid to jars. See acidification directions on page 26. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart
to the jars, if desired. For hot pack products, add enough water to cover the tomatoes and boil them gently
for 5 minutes. Fill jars with hot tomatoes or with raw peeled tomatoes. Add the hot cooking liquid to the
hot pack, or hot water for raw pack to cover, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Water-Packed Tomatoes
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
15 min
Pintsor
orQuarts
Quarts
10 min
Hot and Raw
Pints
1 min
27
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
10 lb
15 lb
15 lb
Not Recommended
TOMATOES – WHOLE OR HALVED (packed in tomato juice)
An average of 3 pounds is needed per quart. Wash tomatoes. Dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or
until skins split, then dip in cold water. Slip off skins and remove cores. Leave whole or halve. Add bottled
lemon juice or citric acid to jars. See acidification instructions on page 26. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per
quart to the jars, if desired.
Raw Pack – Heat tomato juice in a saucepan. Fill jars with raw tomatoes, leaving ½-inch headspace. Cover
tomatoes in the jars with hot tomato juice, leaving ½-inch headspace.
Hot Pack – Put tomatoes in a large saucepan and add enough tomato juice to completely cover them. Boil
tomatoes and juice gently for 5 minutes. Fill jars with hot tomatoes, leaving ½-inch headspace. Add hot
tomato juice to the jars to cover the tomatoes, leaving ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Juice and Whole Tomatoes
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
40 min
Pintsor
orQuarts
Quarts
25 min
Hot and Raw
Pints
15 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
10 lb
15 lb
15 lb
Not Recommended
TOMATOES – WHOLE OR HALVED (packed raw without added liquid)
An average of 3 pounds is needed per quart. Wash tomatoes. Dip in boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or
until skins split, then dip in cold water. Slip off skins and remove cores. Leave whole or halve. Add bottled
lemon juice or citric acid to jars. See acidification instructions on page 26. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per
quart to the jars, if desired. Fill jars with raw tomatoes, leaving ½-inch headspace. Press tomatoes in the
jars until spaces between them fill with juice. Leave ½-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Tomatoes w/o Added Liquid
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
40 min
Pints
25 min
Raw
PintsororQuarts
Quarts
15 min
28
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
5 lb
10 lb
10 lb
15 lb
15 lb
Not Recommended
SPAGHETTI SAUCES
SPAGHETTI SAUCE WITHOUT MEAT
30 lbs tomatoes
1 cup chopped onions
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup chopped celery or green pepper
1 lb fresh mushrooms, sliced (optional)
41⁄2 tsp salt
2 tbsp oregano
4 tbsp minced parsley
2 tsp black pepper
¼ cup brown sugar
¼ cup vegetable oil
Makes about 9 pints
Caution: Do not increase the proportion of onions, peppers, or mushrooms. Wash tomatoes and dip in
boiling water for 30 to 60 seconds or until skins split. Dip in cold water and slip off skins. Remove cores and
quarter tomatoes. Boil 20 minutes, uncovered, in large saucepan. Put through food mill or sieve. Sauté
onions, garlic, celery or peppers, and mushrooms (if desired) in vegetable oil until tender. Combine sautéed
vegetables and tomatoes and add remainder of spices, salt, and sugar. Bring to a boil. Simmer, uncovered,
until thick enough for serving. At this time the initial volume will have been reduced by nearly one-half. Stir
frequently to avoid burning. Fill jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Spaghetti Sauce w/o Meat
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
20 min
Hot
Quarts
25 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
29
15 lb
SPAGHETTI SAUCE WITH MEAT
30 lbs tomatoes
21⁄2 lbs ground beef or sausage
1 cup chopped onions
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup chopped celery or green pepper
1 lb fresh mushrooms, sliced (optional)
41⁄2 tsp salt
2 tbsp oregano
4 tbsp minced parsley
2 tsp black pepper
¼ cup brown sugar
Makes about 9 pints
To prepare tomatoes, follow directions for Spaghetti Sauce Without Meat, page 29. Saute beef or sausage
until brown. Add garlic, onion, celery or green pepper, and mushrooms, if desired. Cook until vegetables are
tender. Combine with tomato pulp in large saucepan. Add spices, salt, and sugar. Bring to a boil. Simmer,
uncovered, until thick enough for serving. At this time initial volume will have been reduced by nearly
one-half. Stir frequently to avoid burning. Fill jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Spaghetti Sauce With Meat
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
60 min
Hot
Quarts
70 min
30
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
PREPARING POULTRY, RED MEATS AND SEAFOODS FOR CANNING
Directions for canning cut-up meat applies to beef, veal, pork, lamb, mutton, and meat from large game
animals. Use only good quality meat. It is essential to use absolutely fresh meat from animals that are
healthy and have been butchered and handled in a sanitary manner.
If meat must be held longer than a few days, freeze it. Store frozen meat at temperatures of O°F (-18°C) or
lower until canning time. Cut or saw frozen meat into pieces of desired size. If frozen meat is thawed before
canning, thaw it in a refrigerator at a temperature of 40°F (4°C) or lower until most of the ice crystals have
disappeared.
When canning meat, take special care to keep all utensils and equipment as clean as possible. Scrub pans,
knives and kitchen tools in hot soapy water and rinse well with boiling water.
Tender cuts of meat can be canned in large pieces; less tender cuts and small pieces are good candidates for
stew meat or ground meat. Bones are good for soups. Meat can be raw- packed or cooked and hot-packed as
plain or rolled roasts, steaks, soups and stews, meat loaf, hash, chili or mincemeat.
To prepare broth, place bony pieces in saucepan and cover with cold water. Simmer until meat is tender.
Discard fat. Add boiling broth to jars packed with precooked meat and poultry.
Do not use flour on meat or in gravy when it is to be canned. The flour forms a coating of starch that makes
sterilization difficult. For thick gravy, add flour after jar or can is opened for use.
Always pack liver separately, as it will flavor everything else in the container.
CHICKEN OR RABBIT
Procedure: Choose freshly killed and dressed, healthy animals. Large chickens are more flavorful than
fryers. Dressed chicken should be chilled for 6 to 12 hours before canning. Dressed rabbits should be
soaked 1 hour in water containing 1 tablespoon of salt per quart, and then rinsed. Remove excess fat. Cut
the chicken or rabbit into suitable sizes for canning. Can with or without bones.
Hot Pack – Boil, steam, or bake meat until about two-thirds done. Add 1 teaspoon salt per quart to the jar, if
desired. Fill hot jars with pieces and hot broth, leaving 11⁄4 -inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Add 1 teaspoon salt per quart, if desired. Fill hot jars loosely with raw meat pieces, leaving
11⁄4 -inch headspace. Do not add liquid. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Chicken or Rabbit
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
75 min
Without Bones:
Hot and Raw
Quarts
90 min
Pints
65 min
With Bones:
Hot and Raw
Quarts
75 min
31
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
GROUND OR CHOPPED MEAT (Bear, Beef, Lamb, Pork, Sausage, Veal, Venison)
Procedure: Choose fresh, chilled meat. With venison, add one part high-quality pork fat to three or four
parts venison before grinding. Use freshly made sausage, seasoned with salt and cayenne pepper (sage may
cause a bitter off-flavor). Shape chopped meat into patties or balls or cut cased sausage into 3 to 4 inch
links. Cook until lightly browned. Ground meat may be sautéed without shaping. Remove excess fat. Fill
hot jars with pieces. Add boiling meat broth, tomato juice or water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add
1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jars, if desired. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Ground or Chopped Meat
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
75 min
Hot
Quarts
90 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
STRIPS, CUBES OR CHUNKS OF MEAT (Bear, Beef, Lamb, Pork, Sausage, Veal, Venison)
Procedure: Choose quality chilled meat. Remove excess fat. Soak strong-flavored wild meats for 1 hour in
brine water containing 1 tablespoon of salt per quart. Rinse. Remove large bones.
Hot Pack – Precook meat until rare by roasting, stewing, or browning in a small amount of fat. Add
1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill hot jars with pieces and add boiling broth, meat
drippings, water, or tomato juice (especially with wild game), leaving 1-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill hot jars with raw meat pieces, leaving
1-inch headspace. Do not add liquid. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Strips, Cubes or Chunks of Meat
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
75 min
Hot and Raw
Quarts
90 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
MEAT STOCK (BROTH)
Beef: Saw or crack fresh trimmed beef bones to enhance extraction of flavor. Rinse bones and place in a
large stockpot or kettle, cover bones with water, add pot cover and simmer 3 to 4 hours. Remove bones,
cool broth, and pick off meat. Skim off fat, add meat removed from bones to broth, and reheat to boiling. Fill
hot jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process..
Chicken or turkey: Place large carcass bones in a large stockpot, add enough water to cover bones, cover
pot, and simmer 30 to 45 minutes or until meat can be easily stripped from bones. Remove bones and
pieces, cool broth, strip meat, discard excess fat, and return meat to broth. Reheat to boiling and fill hot jars,
leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust and process.
Process time for Meat Stock
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
20 min
Hot
Quarts
25 min
32
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
CHILE CON CARNE
3 cups dried pinto or red kidney beans
51⁄2 cups water
5 tsp salt (separated)
3 lbs ground beef
11⁄2 cups chopped onions
1 cup chopped peppers of your choice (optional)
1 tsp black pepper
3 to 6 tbsp chili powder
2 qts crushed or whole tomatoes
Makes about 9 pints
Procedure: Wash beans thoroughly and place them in a 2 qt. saucepan. Add cold water to a level of 2 to 3
inches above the beans and soak 12 to 18 hours. Drain and discard water. Combine beans with 51⁄2 cups of
fresh water and 2 teaspoons salt. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes. Drain and discard
water. Brown ground beef, chopped onions, and peppers, if desired, in a skillet. Drain off fat and add 3
teaspoons salt, pepper, chili powder, tomatoes and drained cooked beans. Simmer 5 minutes. Caution: Do
not thicken. Fill hot jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Chile Con Carne
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints
75 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
CLAMS (Whole or minced)
Procedure: Keep clams live on ice until ready to can. Scrub shells thoroughly and rinse, steam 5 minutes,
and open. Remove clam meat. Collect and save clam juice. Wash clam meat in water containing 1 teaspoon
of salt per quart. Rinse and cover clam meat with boiling water containing 2 tablespoons of lemon juice or ½
teaspoon of citric acid per gallon. Boil 2 minutes and drain. To make mince clams, grind clams with a meat
grinder or food processor. Fill hot jars loosely with pieces and add hot clam juice and boiling water if needed,
leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Style of Pack
Hot
Process time for Clams
Jar Size
Process Time
Half-pints
60 min
Pints
70 min
33
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
KING AND DUNGENESS CRAB MEAT (It is recommended that blue crab meat be frozen for best quality)
Procedure: Keep live crabs on ice until ready to can. Wash crabs thoroughly, using several changes of cold
water. Simmer crabs 20 minutes in water containing ¼ cup of lemon juice and 2 tablespoons of salt (or up to
1 cup of salt, if desired) per gallon. Cool in cold water, drain, remove back shell, then remove meat from
body and claws. Soak meat 2 minutes in cold water containing 2 cups of lemon juice or 4 cups of white
vinegar, and 2 tablespoons of salt (or up to 1 cup of salt, if desired) per gallon. Drain and squeeze meat to
remove excess moisture. Fill hot half-pint jars with 6 ounces of meat and hot pint jars with 12 ounces,
leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1⁄2 teaspoon of citric acid or 2 tablespoons of lemon juice to each half-pint
jar, or 1 teaspoon of citric acid or 4 tablespoons of lemon juice per pint jar. Add hot water, leaving 1-inch
headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for King and Dungeness Crab Meat
Jar Size
Process Time
Half-pints
70 min
Pints
80 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
FISH (Blue, mackerel, salmon, steelhead, trout, and other fatty fish except tuna)
Caution: Eviscerate fish within 2 hours after they are caught. Keep cleaned fish on ice until ready to can.
Note: Glass-like crystals of magnesium ammonium phosphate sometimes form in canned salmon. There is
no way for the home canner to prevent these crystals from forming, but they usually dissolve when heated
and are safe to eat. Adjust lids and process.
Procedure: Remove head, tail, fins, and scales. Wash and remove all blood. Split fish lengthwise, if desired.
Cut cleaned fish into 31⁄2 -inch lengths. Fill hot pint jars, skin side next to glass, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Add 1 teaspoon of salt per pint, if desired. Do not add liquids. Adjust lids and process.
Style of Pack
Raw
Process time for Fish
Jar Size
Pints
Process Time
100 min
34
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
SMOKED FISH (Salmon, rockfish and flatfish (sole, cod, flounder) and other fish)
Caution: Safe processing times for other smoked seafood have not been determined. Those products
should be frozen. Smoking of fish should be done by tested methods. Lightly smoked fish is
recommended for canning. However, because it has not yet been cooked, do not taste lightly smoked
fish before canning.
Follow these recommended canning instructions carefully. Use a 16 quart or larger pressure canner for
this procedure; do not use smaller pressure canners. Safe processing times haven’t been determined.
Do not use quart jars or tin cans. Half-pints could be safely processed for the same length of time as
pints, but the quality of the product may be less acceptable.
Procedure: If smoked fish has been frozen, thaw in the refrigerator until no ice crystals remain before
canning. If not done prior to smoking, cut fish into pieces that will fit vertically into pint canning jars, leaving
1-inch headspace. Measure 4 quarts (16 cups) of cool tap water and pour into the pressure canner. (Note:
The water level probably will reach the screw bands of pints jars.) Do not decrease the amount of water or
heat the water before processing begins. Pack smoked fish vertically into hot jars, leaving 1-inch
headspace between the pieces and the top of the jar. The fish may be packed either loosely or tightly. Clean
jar rims with a clean, damp paper towel. Do not add liquid to the jars. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Smoked Fish
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
110 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
TUNA
Tuna may be canned either precooked or raw. Precooking removes most of the strong-flavored oils. The
strong flavor of dark tuna flesh affects the delicate flavor of white flesh. Many people prefer not to can dark
flesh. It may be used as pet food.
Note: Glass-like crystals of magnesium ammonium phosphate sometimes form in canned tuna. There is no
way for the home canner to prevent these crystals from forming, but they usually dissolve when heated and
are safe to eat.
Procedure: Keep tuna on ice until ready to can. Remove viscera and wash fish well in cold water. Allow
blood to drain from stomach cavity. Place fish belly down on a rack or metal tray in the bottom of a large
baking pan. Cut tuna in half crosswise, if necessary. Precook fish by baking at 250°F for 21⁄2 to 4 hours
(depending on size) or at 350°F for 1 hour. The fish may also be cooked in a steamer for 2 to 4 hours. If a
thermometer is used, cook to a 165° to 175°F internal temperature. Refrigerate cooked fish overnight to firm
the meat. Peel off the skin with a knife, removing blood vessels and any discolored flesh. Cut meat away
from bones; cut out and discard all bones, fin bases, and dark flesh. Quarter. Cut quarters crosswise into
lengths suitable for half-pint or pint jars. Fill into hot jars, pressing down gently to make a solid pack. Tuna
may be packed in water or oil, whichever is preferred. Add water or oil to jars, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Add 1⁄2 teaspoon of salt per half-pint or 1 teaspoon of salt per pint, if desired. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Tuna
Jar Size
Process Time
Half-pints or Pints
100 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
35
PREPARING VEGETABLES FOR CANNING
ASPARAGUS – SPEARS OR PIECES
An average of 31⁄2 pounds per quart is needed. Use tender, tight-tipped spears, 4 -6 inches long. Wash
asparagus and trim off tough scales. Break off tough stems and wash again. Cut into 1-inch pieces or can
whole.
Hot Pack – Cover asparagus with boiling water. Boil 2 or 3 minutes. Loosely fill hot jars with hot asparagus,
leaving 1-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Fill hot jars with raw asparagus, packing as tightly as possible without crushing, leaving 1-inch
headspace.
Add ½ teaspoon salt to each pint jar, 1 teaspoon of salt to each quart jar, if desired. Ladle boiling water,
leaving 1-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Asparagus
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
30 min
Hot and Raw
Quarts
40 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
BEANS OR PEAS – SHELLED, DRIED (All varieties)
An average of 3⁄4 pounds is needed per quart. Select mature, dry seeds. Sort out and discard discolored
seeds. Place dried beans or peas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak 12 to 18 hours in a cool place.
Drain water. To quickly hydrate beans, you may cover sorted and washed beans with boiling water in a
saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove water and boil 30 minutes. Add ½ teaspoon of salt per pint or 1 teaspoon
per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill hot jars with beans or peas and cooking water, leaving 1-inch head space.
Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Beans or Peas
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
75 min
Hot
Quarts
90 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
BEANS, DRY, WITH TOMATO OR MOLASSES SAUCE
An average of ¾ pounds is needed per quart. Select mature, dry seeds. Sort out and discard discolored
seeds. Sort and wash dry beans. Add 3 cups of water for each cup of dried beans or peas. Boil 2 minutes,
remove from heat and soak 1 hour and drain. Heat to boiling in fresh water, and save liquid for making
sauce. Make your choice of the following sauces:
Tomato Sauce – Either mix 1 quart tomato juice, 3 tablespoons sugar, 2 teaspoons salt, 1 tablespoon
chopped onion, and ¼ teaspoon each of ground cloves, allspice, mace, and cayenne pepper; or mix 1 cup
tomato ketchup with 3 cups of cooking liquid from beans and heat to boiling.
Molasses Sauce – Mix 4 cups water or cooking liquid from beans, 3 tablespoons dark molasses,
1 tablespoon vinegar, 2 teaspoons salt, and ¾ teaspoon powdered dry mustard. Heat to boiling.
Fill hot jars three-fourths full with hot beans. Add a ¾-inch cube of pork, ham, or bacon to each jar, if
desired. Fill jars with heated sauce, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Beans w/ Tomato or Molasses Sauce
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
65 min
Hot
Quarts
75 min
36
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
BEANS, SNAP AND ITALIAN- PIECES (Green and wax)
An average of 2 pounds is needed per quart; an average of 1 pound is needed per pint. Select filled but
tender, crisp pods. Remove and discard diseased and rusty pods. Wash beans and trim ends. Leave whole
or cut or snap into 1-inch pieces.
Hot Pack – Cover beans with boiling water; boil 5 minutes. Fill hot jars loosely, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Fill hot jars tightly with raw beans, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of canning salt per
quart to the jar, if desired. Add boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Snap and Italian Beans
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
20 min
Hot and Raw
Quarts
25 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
BEANS, FRESH LIMA – SHELLED
An average of 4 pounds is needed per quart. Select well-filled pods with green seeds. Discard insectdamaged and diseased seeds. Shell beans and wash thoroughly.
Hot Pack – Cover beans with boiling water and heat to boil. Fill hot jars loosely, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Fill hot jars with raw beans. Do not press or shake down.
Small beans – leave 1-inch of headspace for pints and 11⁄2 -inches for quarts.
Large beans – leave 1-inch of headspace for pints and 11⁄4 -inches for quarts.
Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Add boiling water, leaving the same headspaces listed
above. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Lima Beans
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot and Raw
Pints
Quarts
40 min
50 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
10 lb
37
15 lb
15 lb
BEETS
An average of 3 pounds is needed per quart. Beets with a diameter of 1 to 2 inches are preferred for whole
packs. Beets larger than 3 inches in diameter are often fibrous. Trim off beet top, leaving an inch of stem
and roots to reduce bleeding of color. Scrub well. Cover with boiling water. Boil until skins slip off easily;
about 15 to 25 minutes depending on size. Cool, remove skins, and trim off stems and roots. Leave baby
beets whole. Cut medium or large beets in to 1⁄2 inch cubes or slices. Halve or quarter very large slices. Add
1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill hot jars with hot beets and fresh hot water, leaving
1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Style of Pack
Hot
Process time for Beets
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
30 min
Quarts
35 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
CARROTS – SLICED OR DICED
An average of 21⁄2 pounds is needed per quart. Select small carrots, preferably 1 to 11⁄4 inches in diameter.
Larger carrots are often too fibrous. Wash, peel, and rewash carrots. Slice or dice.
Hot Pack – Cover with boiling water; bring to boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Fill hot jars, leaving 1-inch of
headspace.
Raw Pack – Fill hot jars tightly with raw carrots, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Add hot cooking liquid or water, leaving 1-inch
headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Style of Pack
Hot and Raw
Process time for Carrots
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
25 min
Quarts
30 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
CORN – CREAM STYLE
An average of 21⁄4 pounds is needed per pint. Select ears containing slightly immature kernels, or of ideal
quality for eating fresh. Husk corn, remove silk, and wash ears. Blanch ears 4 minutes in boiling water. Cut
corn from cob at about the center of kernel. Scrape remaining corn from cobs with a table knife.
Hot Pack – To each quart of corn and scrapings, add two cups of boiling water. Heat to boiling. Add ½
teaspoon salt to each jar, if desired. Fill hot pint jar with hot corn mixture, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Process time for Cream Style Corn
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Hot
Pints
85 min
38
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
CORN – WHOLE KERNEL
An average of 41⁄2 pounds is needed per quart. Select ears containing slightly immature kernels or of ideal
quality for eating fresh. Canning of some sweeter varieties or too immature kernels may cause browning.
Can a small amount, check color and flavor before canning large quantities. Husk corn, remove silk, and
wash. Blanch 3 minutes in boiling water. Cut corn from cob at about three-fourths the depth of kernel. Do
not scrape cob.
Hot Pack – To each clean quart of kernels in a saucepan, add 1 cup of hot water, heat to boiling and simmer 5
minutes. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill hot jars with corn and cooking liquid,
leaving 1-inch headspace.
Raw Pack – Fill hot jars with raw kernels, leaving 1-inch headspace. Do not shake or press down. Add
1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired.
Add fresh boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Whole Kernel Corn
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
55 min
Hot and Raw
Quarts
85 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
OKRA
An average of 11⁄2 pounds is needed per quart. Select young tender pods. Remove and discard diseased and
rust-spotted pods. Wash pods and trim ends. Leave whole or cut into 1-inch pieces. Cover with hot water
in a saucepan, boil 2 minutes and drain. Fill hot jars with hot okra and cooking liquid, leaving 1-inch
headspace. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Adjust lids and process.
Style of Pack
Hot
Process time for Okra
Jar Size
Pints
Quarts
Process Time
25 min
40 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
PEAS, GREEN OR ENGLISH – SHELLED
It is recommended that sugar snap and Chinese edible pods be frozen for best quality.
An average of 41⁄2 pounds is needed per quart. Select filled pods containing young, tender sweet seeds.
Discard diseased pods. Shell and wash peas. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired.
Hot Pack – Cover with boiling water. Bring to boil in a saucepan, and boil 2 minutes. Fill hot jars loosely with
hot peas, and add cooking liquid, leaving 1-inch of headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Raw Pack – Fill hot jars tightly with raw peas, adding boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Do not shake
or press down peas. Adjust lids and process.
Style of Pack
Hot and Raw
Process time for Peas
Jar Size
Pints or Quarts
Process Time
40 min
39
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
PEPPERS (Hot or sweet, including chilies, jalapeno, and pimento)
An average of 1 pound is needed per pint. Select firm yellow, green, or red peppers. Do not use soft of
diseased peppers. Select your favorite pepper(s). Caution: If you choose hot peppers, wear plastic gloves
while handling them or wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before touching your face. Small
peppers may be left whole. Large peppers may be quartered. Remove cores and seeds. Slash two or four
slits in each pepper, and either blanch in boiling water or blister using one of the following methods:
Oven or broiler method: Place peppers in a hot oven (400° F) or broiler for 6-8 minutes until skins blister.
Range-top method: Cover hot burner, either gas or electric, with heavy wire mesh. Place peppers on burner
for several minutes until skins blister.
Allow peppers to cool. Place in a pan and cover with a damp cloth. This will make peeling the peppers
easier. After several minutes, peel each pepper. Flatten whole peppers. Add ½ teaspoon of salt to each pint
jar, if desired. Fill hot jars loosely with peppers and add fresh boiled water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust
lids and process.
Style of Pack
Hot
Process time for Peppers
Jar Size
Process Time
Half-pints or Pints
35 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
POTATOES, SWEET – PIECES OR WHOLE
It is not recommended to dry pack sweet potatoes. An average of 2½ pounds is needed per quart. Choose
small to medium-sized potatoes. They should be mature and not too fibrous. Can within 1 to 2 months after
harvest. Wash potatoes and boil or steam until partially soft (15 to 20 minutes). Remove skins. Cut
medium potatoes, if needed, so that pieces are uniform in size. Caution: Do not mash or puree pieces. Fill
hot jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Add 1 teaspoon salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Cover with your
choice of fresh boiling water or syrup, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Sweet Potatoes
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
65 min
Hot
Quarts
90 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
POTATOES, WHITE – CUBED OR WHOLE
An average of 5 pounds is needed per quart. Select small to medium-size mature potatoes of ideal quality for
cooking. Tubers stored below 45° F may discolor when canned. Choose potatoes 1 to 2 inches in diameter
if they are to be packed whole. Wash and peel potatoes. Place in ascorbic acid solution to prevent darkening
use (3 grams per 1 gallon of cold water). If desired, cut into ½ - inch cubes. Drain. Cook 2 minutes in
boiling water and drain again. For whole potatoes, boil 10 minutes and drain, Add 1 teaspoon of salt per
quart to the jar, if desired. Fill hot jars with hot potatoes and fresh hot water, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Adjust lids and process.
Process time for White Potatoes
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
35 min
Hot
Quarts
40 min
40
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
PUMPKINS AND WINTER SQUASH – CUBED
An average of 21⁄4 pounds is needed per quart. Pumpkins and squash should have a hard rind and stringless,
mature pulp of ideal quality for cooking fresh. Small size pumpkins (sugar or pie varieties) make better
products. Wash, remove seeds, cut into 1-inch wide slices, and peel. Cut flesh into cubes. Boil 2 minutes in
water. Caution: Do not mash or puree. Fill hot jars with cubes and cooking liquid, leaving 1-inch
headspace. Adjust lids and process. For making pies, drain jars and strain or sieve cubes.
Process time for Pumpkin and Winter Squash
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
55 min
Hot
Quarts
90 min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
SOUPS (Vegetable, dried bean or pea, meat, poultry, or seafood)
Select, wash, and prepare vegetables, meat, and seafood as described for the specific foods. Cover meat
with water and cook until tender. Cool meat and remove bones. Cook vegetables. For each cup of dried
beans or peas, add 3 cups of water, boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak 1 hour, and heat to boil. Drain
and combine with meat broth, tomatoes, or water to cover. Boil 5 minutes. Caution: Do not thicken. Salt to
taste, if desired. Fill hot jars halfway with solid mixture. Add remaining liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace.
Adjust lids and process.
Style of Pack
Hot
Process time for Soups
Jar Size
Pints
Quarts
Process Time
60* min
75* min
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
*Caution: Process 100 minutes if soup contains seafood.
SPINACH AND OTHER GREENS
An average of 4 pounds is needed per quart. Can only freshly harvested greens. Discard any wilted,
discolored, diseased, or insect-damaged leaves. Leaves should be tender and attractive in color. Wash only
small amounts of greens at one time. Drain water and continue rinsing until water is clear and free of grit.
Cut out tough stems and midribs. Place 1 pound of greens at a time in cheesecloth bag or blancher basket
and steam 3 to 5 minutes or until well wilted. Add ½ teaspoon of salt to each quart jar, if desired. Fill hot jars
loosely with greens and add fresh boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Spinach and Other Greens
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
70 min
Hot
Quarts
90 min
41
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
SUCCOTASH
15 lbs unhusked sweet corn or 3 qts cut whole kernels
14 lbs mature green podded lima beans or 4 qts shelled lima beans
2 qts crushed or whole tomatoes (optional)
Yield: 7 quarts
Hot Pack – Combine all prepared vegetables in a large kettle with enough water to cover the pieces. Add
1 teaspoon salt to each quart jar, if desired. Boil gently 5 minutes and fill hot jars with pieces and cooking
liquid, leaving 1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Raw Pack – Fill hot jars with equal parts of all prepared vegetables, leaving 1-inch headspace. Do not shake
or press down pieces. Add 1 teaspoon salt to each quart jar, if desired. Add fresh boiling water, leaving
1-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process.
Process time for Succotash
Style of Pack
Jar Size
Process Time
Pints
60 min
Hot and Raw
Quarts
85 min
42
Weight Setting at Altitudes of
0-1,000 ft
Above 1,000 ft
10 lb
15 lb
10 lb
15 lb
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON HOME CANNING
Q. Why is the cooking liquid used for packing
Q. Why does canned fruit sometimes float in jars?
some vegetables and boiling water for others?
A. Cooking liquid is recommended for packing most
vegetables because it may contain minerals and
vitamins dissolved out of the food. Boiling water is
recommended when cooking liquid is dark, gritty, or
strong-flavored, and it may be used if there isn’t
enough cooking liquid.
A. Fruit may float because the pack is too loose or
the syrup too heavy. It’s also possible that air in the
tissues of the fruit has not all been forced out during
heating and processing.
Q. Why does my food turn moldy after processing?
A. Mold can only form in the presence of air.
Therefore, jars are not sealed if mold is present.
Processing time is the same whether hot cooking
liquid or boiling water is used for packing.
Q. What makes canned foods change color?
A. Darkening of foods at the tops of jars may be
caused by oxidation due to air in the jars or by too
little heating or processing to destroy enzymes.
Over-processing may cause discoloration of foods
throughout the containers.
Q. Why is liquid sometimes lost from glass jars
during processing?
A. Loss of liquid may be due to a number of things:
1) Cooking food too short a time to drive out the air
that is in it before packing it in the jars.
Pink and blue colors sometimes seen in canned
pears, apples and peaches are caused by chemical
changes in the coloring matter of the fruit.
2) Packing jars too full.
3) Leaving air bubbles in the jars.
4) Not keeping pressure steady in a pressure canner.
Iron and copper from utensils used in preparing
foods, or from the water in some localities, may
cause brown, black and gray colors in some foods.
Corn turns brown during processing when too high
a temperature is used. The high temperature causes
a caramelization of the sugar in corn. It may also be
caused by some chemical, such as iron, in the water
used in canning.
5) Lowering pressure too suddenly at the end of the
processing period.
6) Food is packed to tightly.
7) Food is processed at too high a temperature.
8) Leakage of steam between lid and bottom of
pressure cooker.
When canned corn turns brown, the discoloring
may be due to the variety of corn, the state of
ripeness, or over-processing. A common cause of
highly colored foods fading is the dissolving of
coloring materials by the packing liquid. The use of
plain tin cans will cause some foods to lose color.
Q. Should liquid lost during processing be replaced?
A. No, never open a jar and refill with liquid – this
would let in bacteria, and you’d need to process
again. Loss of liquid does not cause food to spoil,
although the food above the liquid may darken.
Q. Is it safe to eat discolored canned foods??
A. The color changes noted above do not mean the
food is unsafe to eat. However, spoilage may also
cause color changes. Any canned food that has an
unusual color should be examined carefully before
use.
Q. What causes cloudy liquid in canned fruits and
vegetables?
A. Cloudy liquid may be a sign of spoilage. It may
also be caused by the minerals in hard water or by
starch from overripe vegetables.
Q. How can you tell whether food with cloudy
Q. Why does the underside of metal lids sometimes
discolor?
A. Natural compounds in some foods corrode the
metal and make a brown or black deposit on the
underside of the lid. This deposit is harmless and
doesn’t mean that the food in the jar is unsafe to eat.
liquid is spoiled?
A. Boil the food and note the odor. Do not taste or
use any food having an off odor.
43
Q. Why do jars not seal properly?
Q. What causes the lids to buckle?
A. Jars that do not seal may be due to a number of
things:
A. Buckling lids may be due to a number of things:
1) This problem may be caused by tightening the jar
rings too tightly before processing the jars.
During processing, the flexible metal lid permits
the jar to exhaust air, and rings that are too tight
will not allow the air to escape during processing.
1) Incomplete sterilization; failure to follow exact
timetables and recipes.
2) Failure to wipe sealing edge of jar clean before
placing lid on jar.
3) Food, seeds or grease lodged between lid and jar.
2) Not following the correct preheating process for
the brand of lids used.
4) Clamps not properly adjusted on lightening or
bail-type jars.
3) Filling the jars too full.
4) Using the raw-pack method for starchy vegetables.
5) Jars which are nicked or cracked or have sharp
sealing edges.
5) A steam leak from the pressure canner lid.
6) Band screwed down too loosely before processing
on Mason jar and two-piece metal lid.
6) Cooling the pressure canner with water or cool
air.
7) Turning jars upside down while jars are cooling
and sealing.
7) Using a jar with a mouth that is too large for the
lid (such as a mayonnaise jar).
Q. When canned or frozen fruits are bought in
Q. What causes the jars to break?
large containers, is it possible to can them in
smaller containers?
A. Any canned or frozen fruit may be heated
through, packed, and processed the same length of
time as recommended for freshly prepared food.
This canned food may be of lower quality than if it
had been canned when fresh.
A. Breakage of jars may be due to a number of
things:
1) Jars are too tight in pressure cooker.
2) Not using standard jars.
3) Jars improperly tightened.
4) Not placing jars on rack (jars touching the
bottom of canner).
Q. Is it safe to leave food in tin cans after
opening?
A. Yes, but like fresh cooked food, food in tin cans
needs to be covered and kept in a refrigerator or
other cold place.
5) Over filling jars or packed too solidly.
Q. When processing food, is it necessary to have
the pressure cooker filled with jars?
A. It is economical to process at one time as many
jars as the cooker will hold, for it saves time and
fuel. But if you do not have enough jars to fill the
cooker, a smaller number may be successfully
processed.
8) Fluctuation of pressure during processing; be
sure to maintain a steady pressure.
6) Sudden temperature change between jars and
water in unit.
7) Jars have invisible hairline cracks.
Q. If a jar does not seal and must be reprocessed,
does it have to be processed the full length of
time?
A. Just what should be done with the unsealed jar
will depend upon the cause. If the cap or lid is at
fault and the product is a fruit, simply replace the
cap or lid with new one and process until product
reaches boiling point. If it is a vegetable or meat, it
should be reprocessed approximately one-fourth to
one-third the regular processing period. If the jar is
defective, any product would require repacking. It is
doubtful if this will be profitable since the reprocessing
would need to be of approximately the same length
as a normal period for that particular food. Few
foods will stand up under such treatment.
Q. Is it possible to process two layers of jars in
cooker at one time?
A. Yes, providing the model you have has sufficient
room for two layers of jars. Use the rack between
layers of jars.
44
BASIC COOKING INSTRUCTIONS
Check Metal-to-Metal Seal for Lubrication and check to make sure vent pipe is clear. (See page 10)
Place Food and Water Inside
Place 2 to 3 inches of water (or the amount called for in the recipe or canning instructions) in bottom of
cooker. Always place a rack in bottom of the pressure cooker with the rim facing down when using pans,
canning jars, or tin cans. Never allow these containers to stand directly on the bottom of the cooker. The rack
is also useful for holding meat or vegetables out of the water while cooking.
Place Cover On Cooker
Place cover on cooker bottom so that arrow on cover aligns with the notch mark on the bottom. Gradually
and evenly tighten two opposite wing nuts at the same time, maintaining the same size gap around the entire
unit where the cover meets the bottom. Never tighten just one wing nut at a time. (See page 9)
Using Cooker
1. Set the pressure regulator weight over vent pipe, aligning the weight so that the hole corresponding to the
desired pressure is directly over the vent pipe.
2. Place pressure cooker over heat source, and when the pressure regulator weight begins to jiggle and
sputter, adjust the heat until it jiggles only one to four times each minute. The pressure regulator weight
will jiggle or rock when the pressure is reached. NEVER TURN UP THE HEAT TO THE POINT THAT A
CONSTANT FLOW OF STEAM IS ESCAPING, THEREBY CAUSING THE PRESSURE REGULATOR WEIGHT
TO BE CONSTANTLY IN THE “UP” POSITION. REDUCE THE HEAT SO THAT THE PRESSURE REGULATOR
WEIGHT ONLY JIGGLES AND SPUTTERS FROM ONE TO FOUR TIMES A MINUTE.
Experience with the pressure regulator weight will teach you what setting on your stove will maintain the
proper pressure and how long it takes to bring the pressure cooker to the point where the pressure
regulator weight jiggles or rocks. This will depend on which size pressure cooker you have and how
much food your are cooking.
The pressure regulator
weight lets you select
one of three pressure
settings.
Pressure
5 lbs.
10 lbs.
15 lbs.
Cooking Temperature
228° F
109.0°C
240° F
115.5°C
250° F
121.0°C
When the pressure cooker reaches the
proper temperature, the pressure regulator
weight will jiggle audibly, and you can see
the steam being released. The pressure will
be automatically maintained for proper
pressure cooking. The pressure regulator
weight itself never requires adjustment or
testing for accuracy.
Please understand that there will not be an exact
correlation between the pressure shown on the gauge
to the corresponding pressure setting on the pressure
regulator weight. For example, even though you have
set the pressure regulator weight at 10 lbs., the gauge
may show a range during the cooking process of 8 to
12 lbs. Do not expect the gauge to always show the
exact pressure setting as the pressure regulator weight,
as the pressure is changing within the unit as the
pressure regulator weight jiggles and sputters, which
is simply a process of constantly building up and
releasing pressure to maintain the setting on the
pressure regulator weight.
Even in the situation where the gauge is not registering
correctly for any reason, you can be assured that the
unit will still operate at the pressure regulator weight
setting. The basic reason that our pressure cooker
retains the gauge is to provide additional information
as to the pressure and temperature within the unit, but
you can be assured that the unit is functioning at the
pressure regulator weight setting.
45
Try to keep the pressure as steady as possible by regulating the amount of heat applied to the cooker. At no
time should the pressure be allowed to rise above 15 P.S.I. Excess pressure should be decreased by
turning heat down. Remember, it is the amount of heat applied to the unit that regulates the pressure.
3. To count your cooking time, begin from the first jiggle or rock of the pressure regulator weight, and when
the food has cooked to proper pressure for the correct period of time, turn off the heat.
Reduce Pressure
WARNING: Steam escaping from the vent pipe can scald or burn you and the pressure regulator weight may
be hot. Protect your hand with a pot holder or mitt.
When cooking is completed and heat is off, reduce pressure as follows:
• After most normal cooking, permit cooker to cool until steam pressure gauge reads zero.
• After cooking soup, cereals, or any food that might boil over in the pans, turn heat off and permit cooker to
cool.
Do not put cold cloths or water on the cooker to hasten cooling. This may crack the aluminum.
Do not move the pressure cooker until the pressure is completely reduced.
Opening Cooker Safely
CAUTION: Never loosen wing nuts until the steam pressure gauge registers zero, and you have allowed any
remaining pressure to escape by carefully removing the selective pressure regulator weight.
Remove cover, raising farthest edge first to protect face and arms from steam.
When the pressure regulator weight is left on, a vacuum may form inside the cooker making the cover
difficult to remove. To avoid a vacuum, which will cause the cover to be drawn to the bottom very tightly, you
must remove the pressure regulator weight from the vent pipe as soon as the pressure gauge indicator
reaches zero P.S.I. and then remove the cover. The longer you wait without removing the pressure regulator
weight, the more vacuum will form, pulling the cover tighter and tighter to the bottom.
Another reason that a cover sticks to the bottom is that the metal-to-metal seal has been permitted to build
up a coating of foreign material such as dried grease, lubricating oil, etc. Please refer to page 10 under the
section “Metal-to-Metal Seal, Cleaning and Maintenance” for complete instructions.
46
COOKING IN THE PRESSURE COOKER
Meat
When cooking meats, place empty cooker on stove to heat. Put fat in bottom of cooker and sear meat on all
sides to seal in juices. Add 1⁄2 -inch water to bottom of cooker (or the amount called for in the recipe), and
cook for time given in timetable or recipe. Follow instructions under Basic Cooking Instructions, page 47.
The length of cooking period for meats depends on the amount and distribution of the fat on the meat, the
amount of bone, toughness, size, thickness of cut, and the position of the meat in the cooker. Rolled roasts
require a longer cooking time per pound than unboned roasts, and short, chunky roasts require longer
cooking time than long, flat ones. Due to the difference in surface area of small roasts up to 3 or 4 pounds,
they require a longer cooking time per pound than larger roasts. Consequently, it is possible to give only
general rules regarding average cooking time for meats. Average times are about 8 to 10 minutes per pound
for rare, and at least 12 to 15 minutes per pound for well done. With a little experimenting, you will be able to
regulate the cooking time according to a particular cut of meat.
MEAT TIMETABLE
Beef
Cook At 15 Pounds Pressure
Rump or chuck roast..............................................................................................12 to 15 min. per lb.
Corned beef............................................................................................................12 to 15 min. per lb.
Ground meat loaf......................................................................................................8 to 10 min. per lb.
Pot roast, thin...........................................................................................................8 to 10 min. per lb.
Pot roast, thick .......................................................................................................10 to 12 min. per lb.
Fresh tongue .....................................................................................................................35 to 45 min.
Tongue, smoked or cured...........................................................................................................60 min.
Round steak, 1" thick..................................................................................................................15 min.
Stew meat cubes ...............................................................................................................15 to 20 min.
Hearts ...............................................................................................................................15 to 20 min.
Lamb or Mutton
Shoulder roasts......................................................................................................10 to 12 min. per lb.
Stew cubes.................................................................................................................................15 min.
Pork
Fresh ham ..............................................................................................................12 to 15 min. per lb.
Loin roasts .............................................................................................................10 to 12 min. per lb.
Shoulder roasts......................................................................................................12 to 15 min. per lb.
Pork chops, 1" thick ...................................................................................................................10 min.
Pork steak, 1" thick.....................................................................................................................10 min.
Pork shanks ......................................................................................................................20 to 30 min.
Spareribs
Spareribs....................................................................................................................................15 min.
47
Vegetables
Prepare vegetables in the usual manner and season. Pour about 1⁄2 -inch of water in the bottom of the cooker.
Place vegetables on rack or in a metal pan resting on the rack.
For best color and texture, when done cooking, turn the heat off, allow pressure to reach zero, remove the
regulator weight, then remove the cover, raising the farthest edge first to protect face and arms from steam.
Do not allow the vegetables to remain in the cooker once the pressure is down to zero.
VEGETABLE TIME TABLE
COOKING TIME (Minutes)
Vegetable
Preparation
At 15 Pounds Pressure
Asparagus ...............................Clean and wash. Use pan .............................................................. 1-3
Beans, green or wax ................Wash and cut................................................................................ 2-3
Beets .......................................Wash, leaving root and 2" of stem on. Cook.
Peel and dice. Season with salt, butter, pepper
and a little vinegar and sugar ...........................New 12-18; Old 15 -20
Brussels Sprouts .....................Wash .................................................................................................2
Cabbage ..................................Quarter and season with salt .............................................................8
Carrots ....................................Slice, put in pan. Season......................................Sliced 2; Whole 3 -4
Cauliflower ..............................Soak head 1⁄2 hour in cold salt water. Divide sections. Place in Pan ..1-2
Celery ......................................Wash and dice ...............................................................................2 -3
Corn-on-the-cob......................Clean and place on rack.................................................................3-5
Hominy ............................................................................................................................................30
Onions .....................................Place in pan. Season ..............................................Sliced 3; Whole 10
Parsnips ..................................Wash. Cook on rack ...............................................Sliced 3; Whole 10
Peas ........................................Shell and wash...............................................................................2-3
Potatoes, Irish .........................Peel and place in pan.................................................................10 -20
Potatoes, scalloped..........................................................................................................................10
Potatoes, sweet .......................Wash, peel, quarter or halve, cook on rack .................................8 -10
Pumpkin or Winter Squash......Wash and remove seeds. Break in pieces and place in pan........10-12
Rutabagas ...............................Peel and wash ..................................................Sliced 5; Quartered 12
Spinach, Swiss Chard..............Wash thoroughly in several waters....................................................2
Turnips ....................................Slice or dice. Use pan. Season with slat and a little sugar .............4 -5
48
PRESSURE COOKING DRY BEANS AND PEAS
1) Never fill the canner over 1⁄2 full (this includes beans, ingredients and water)
2) Add 1 tablespoon vegetable oil for cooking
3) Allow pressure to drop of its own accord
Soaking Beans and Peas
Soaking is strongly recommended for all beans and peas, except lentils and black-eyed peas, for even
cooking and to remove water-soluble, gas-producing starches. Soaking can be done using the traditional or
the quick-soak method.
Traditional Method
Clean and rinse beans; cover with three times as much water as beans. Soak 4 to 8 hours. Drain.
Quick Method
Clean and rinse beans; cover with three times as much water as beans. Bring beans to a boil and boil 2
minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 1 to 2 hours. Drain.
Cooking Beans and Peas
After soaking, rinse beans and remove any loose skins. Place beans in pressure canner. Add fresh water to
just cover the beans and add 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Close cover securely. Place pressure regulator
weight on the vent pipe at the 15lb. setting and cook according to the times in the timetable below. For more
firm beans for salads and side dishes and when cooking less than 2 cups of beans or peas, use the shorter
time. For soups and stews, use the longer time. After cooking is complete, allow pressure to drop of its
own accord.
DRY BEANS AND PEAS TIMETABLE
Soak beans and peas, except lentils and black-eyed peas, according to information above. Add
1 tablespoonful vegetable oil to cooking liquid. DO NOT COOK SPLIT PEAS.
FOR DRY BEANS AND PEAS, DO NOT FILL CANNER OVER 1⁄2 FULL!
BEANS AND PEAS
COOKING TIME
MINUTES
Adzuki ....................................................................................................................................1-3
Anasazi ..................................................................................................................................1-3
Black Beans ............................................................................................................................2-4
Black-eyed Peas......................................................................................................................2-4 *
+Chickpeas (garbanzo) ............................................................................................................7-10
Great Northern Beans ..............................................................................................................2-5
Kidney Beans ..........................................................................................................................1-3
Lentils (brown, green) ............................................................................................................3-5 *
+Lima Beans (large)..................................................................................................................0-1
+Lima Beans (baby)..................................................................................................................1-3
Navy Beans (pea)....................................................................................................................1-3
Peas (whole yellow, green)......................................................................................................6-9
Pinto Beans ............................................................................................................................3-6
Red Beans ..............................................................................................................................3-6
Soy Beans (beige) ..................................................................................................................8-11
*Cooking time is for unsoaked beans
+Add 1⁄2 to 1 teaspoon salt to soaking and cooking water to keep bean skins intact
49
TABLES AND CHARTS
NUMBER OF CANS PER BUSHEL
WEIGHT
NO. 2 CANS
NO. 3 CANS
PER BUSHEL
(PINTS)
(QUARTS)
1 bushel of Windfall apples ............................50 lbs............................30 ..................................20
Cranberries ....................................................33 lbs............................— ..................................—
Standard peaches...........................................48 lbs............................25 ..................................18
Pears..............................................................50 lbs............................45 ..................................30
Plums.............................................................60 lbs............................45 ..................................30
Blackberries.......................................................—..............................50 ..................................30
Windfall oranges (whole) ...............................50 lbs............................35 ..................................22
Tomatoes .......................................................56 lbs............................22 ..................................15
Shelled lima beans.............................................—..............................50 ..................................30
String beans...................................................24 lbs............................30 ..................................20
Sweet corn ........................................................—..............................16 ..................................—
Shelled peas ......................................................—..............................45 ..................................25
Sweet potatoes...............................................50 lbs............................30 ..................................20
STEAM PRESSURE OBTAINED IN PRESSURE
CANNERS AND CORRESPONDING DEGREES
OF TEMPERATURE
POUNDS OF
PRESSURE
3
5
10
15
20
25
DEGREES
FAHRENHEIT
220
228
240
250
259
267
BOILING POINT OF WATER AT DIFFERENT
ALTITUDES ABOVE SEA LEVEL
ALTITUDE
FEET
1,025
2,063
3,115
4,169
5,225
6,304
7,381
8,481
9,031
DEGREES
CENTIGRADE
104.5
109.0
115.5
121.0
126.0
130.5
BOILING POINT
FAHRENHEIT CENTIGRADE
210
99.0
208
98.0
206
97.0
204
96.0
202
94.4
200
93.0
197
92.0
196
91.0
195
90.5
Show Weights On Labels
Suggested weight of contents to be used on labels to comply with the various state and national pure food
laws. The following weights allow for reasonable tolerance. Cans which are reasonably well-filled will weigh
more than weights expressed.
VEGETABLES
FRUITS
SIZE CAN
Apples
2
3
Blackberries 2
3
Grapefruit
2
21⁄2
Peaches
2
3
Pears
2
3
LBS.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
OZS.
2
14
3
1
4
13
3
1
3
1
50
SIZE CAN
LBS.
OZS.
Asparagus
2
1
3
Beans, String
2
1
3
Beets
2
1
4
Corn
2
1
4
Peas
2
1
4
Tomatoes
3
2
1
2
1
3
ALL-AMERICAN PRESSURE COOKER/CANNER PARTS LIST
EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 1, 2014
ORDER BY PART NUMBER AND DESCRIPTION
PART NO. DESCRIPTION
Bottom only (Specify size; not shown)
Cover only (Specify size; not shown)
54
Clamp Bolt (630000)
55
Pin for Clamp Bolt (630010)
64
Phenolic Wing Nut (630020)
65
Control Valve (No longer available – Replaced by Part Nos. 68 and 69)
68
Pressure Regulator Weight (Z000122)
69
Vent Pipe for Pressure Regulator Weight (Z000131)
72
Geared Steam Gauge, includes lens, fits all sizes (Z000127)
73
Lens for Steam Gauge, replacement, not shown (670050)
74
Instruction and Recipe Book (610500)
75
Cleaning Rod for Vent Pipe (650060)
76
Bakelite Top Handle (No longer available – Replaced by Part No. 76-09RM)
76-09 RM Replacement for item number 76, old style bakelite top handle; includes screws
76-09
New Style Phenolic Top Handle; includes screws (see picture next page)(Z000187)
77-09
Screw for 76-09 Phenolic Top Handle (630077)
78
Retaining Bayonet Clamp (630090)
79
Retaining Bayonet Clamp Screw (670020)
111
Rack (9½" diameter) for No. 910 Cooker (630110)
151
Rack (11½" diameter) for Nos. 915, 921, 925, and 930 Cookers (630120)
184
Cross Bar Set for use with pudding pan for Nos. 915, 921, 925 and 930 Cookers (630360)
253
Pudding Pan for Nos. 915, 921, 925 and 930 Cookers (630370)
405
Side Handle, complete, for Nos. 930 and 941 (630230)
2040
Overpressure Plug for Pressure Cookers, black (Z000124)
2072
Wire Canning Rack fits No. 941 Cooker only, dia. 123⁄4", not shown (630150)
313 DVD “At Home Canning”, 1 hour 49 minutes
814 DVD “Basic Operating Instructions”, 10 ½ minutes
NOTE: • Model No. 915 Pressure Cooker was formerly called Model No. 7
• Canning baskets are no longer available.
• The Cross Bar Set is only used when stacking pudding pans.
• Parts will fit all sizes unless specified.
If you would like to order parts please telephone or email Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry.
WISCONSIN ALUMINUM FOUNDRY
Consumer Products Division • 1931 South 14th Street • P.O. Box 246 • Manitowoc, Wisconsin 54221-0246
TEL: 920-682-8627 • FAX: 920-682-4090 • email: customerrelations@wafco.com • web: www.allamerican-chefsdesign.com
51
PARTS ILLUSTRATIONS (Not to Scale)
54
55
64
69
72
74
76 –No Longer Available
If you require a replacement for
#76, then order #76-09 RM
76-09 RM w/screws
(Replacement for #76)
78
79
253
405
75
76-09 w/screws
111 & 151
2040
52
68
77-09
184
2072
INDEX
Acid Foods......................13, 15
Altitude Tables ......................49
Apples ..................................22
Applesauce ...........................22
Apricots................................23
Asparagus ............................36
Beans ..............................36-37
Beef.................................32-33
Beef, roast ............................32
Beets ....................................38
Berries..................................23
Black-eyed Peas ...............1, 48
Black Bean Soup...................41
Blanch ..................................40
Botulism ...............................15
Brine.....................................32
Broth ....................................32
Bushel, Cans per...................49
Canning Instructions ............20
Canning Recipes .............22-42
Canning Tables .....................49
Canning Terms .....................13
Cans................................18-19
Can Sealers ..........................54
Canning Problems...........19-22
Care of Cooker......................10
Carrots .................................38
Cherries................................23
Chicken.................................31
Chili Con Carne.....................33
Citric Acid .............................26
Clams ...................................33
Cooking Recipes .............22-42
Cooking Resources.................5
Cooking Instructions .......45-47
Cooking Tables .....................49
Cooling .................................19
Corn ................................38-39
Crab Meat .............................34
Directions, Use of Cooker .......9
Duck .....................................31
Exhausting............................18
Filling Cooker........................11
Fish, canning...................34-35
Fowl, canning .......................31
Fowl, cooking .......................31
Fruits, canning ................22-25
Fruit Juices......................24-26
Gauge, Steam Pressure ..........6
Grapefruit /Orange................24
Greens..................................41
Half-gallon jars .....................16
Half-pint jars.........................16
Headspace............................13
Hot Fill or Hot-Pack ........13, 16
Hot Water Bath .....................13
Jars ......................................17
Lamb ....................................47
Lemon Juice .........................13
Lima Beans...........................37
Lids .................................17-18
Meat, canning.......................31
Meat, cooking.......................47
Metal-to-Metal Seal ...........9-10
Nectarines ............................24
Opening Cooker....................46
Okra......................................39
Overpressure Plug............7, 12
Parts Diagrams.......................8
Parts List..............6, 7, 51 & 52
Peaches................................24
Pears ....................................25
Peas, green.................1, 39, 48
Peppers ................................40
Plums, Prunes ......................25
Pork......................................47
Potatoes ...............................40
53
Poultry Canning....................31
Pressure Regulator Weight...20
Pumpkin ...............................41
Putting Cover ON..............9, 45
Questions and Answers...43-44
Rabbit...................................31
Raw-Pack .............................16
Reducing Pressure .........21, 46
Rhubarb ...............................25
Safety Tips For Canning........14
Safety Tips For Operating
inside front cover...............14
Seafood Canning ..................31
Seafood Cooking .............33-35
Sealing Cans and Jars .....17-18
Soups ...................................41
Spaghetti Sauces ............29-30
Spareribs..............................47
Spinach ................................41
Spoilage..........................14-15
Squash .................................11
Steps in Canning .............18-20
Steam Pressure Gauge .....6, 11
Storing .................................16
Stuck Cover, removing .........21
Succotash.............................42
Syrup....................................22
Tables and Charts .................49
Thermometer........................16
Tomato Juice ........................26
Tomatoes ........................27-28
Vegetables, canning .......36-42
Vegetables, cooking..............47
Vegetable Soup.....................41
Vent Pipe ..............................10
Water Pack ...........................16
Winter Squash......................41
DVD’s ...............................5, 51
ALL AMERICAN AUTOMATIC CAN SEALERS
AMERICA’S LEADING QUALITY AUTOMATIC CAN SEALER. A SIZE FOR EVERY NEED.
ALL AMERICAN Can Sealers are designed for use by Commercial Canners, Custom Canners,
Laboratories, Gift Packaging Centers, Breweries and Home Canners.
Prices on equipment for sealing the 202, 208, 300, 211 (No.1), 307 (No.2), 401 (No.2 1/2), 404 (no.3)
and 502 (No.5) are available upon request. Our sealers can handle a variety of can sizes. If you are
uncertain of the exact size of a particular can or if your can has a pull-ring/pull-tab or if it is a composite
can, we will require at least six sample cans and lids in order to determine if one of our can sealers will seal
your sample can. Please send sample cans, along with a cover letter, to the address below.
The Master Can Sealer frame is made of die cast aluminum. Perfectly cast and accurately machined, it’s built
for a lifetime of service.
The Master Can Sealer is simple and easy to operate. It’s easily adjusted for different sizes of cans, making it
economical to own and operate.
ALL MODELS SUITABLE FOR COMMERCIAL AND SEMI-COMMERCIAL USE
Model 225
Automatic Master Can Sealer
Equipped to Seal No.2 or No. 3 Cans
Shipping Info: 14¨ x 11¨ x 11¨ Wgt: 13 lbs
Model 225F
Automatic Fly-Wheel Can Sealer
Equipped to Seal No.2 or No. 3 Cans
Shipping Info: 16¨ x 15¨ x 14¨ Wgt: 22 lbs
Model EL-12253-110V
Automatic Portable Electric Sealer
Equipped to Seal No.2 or No. 3 Cans
Shipping Info: 23¨ x 13¨ x 19¨ Wgt: 42 lbs
Senior Automatic Sealers
Model 1502 Equipped to Seal Nos. 10 & 12 Cans
Shipping Info: 15¨ x 15¨ x 21¨ Wgt: 26 lbs
Model 7502 Equipped to Seal Nos. 2 or 3 Cans
and 10 & 12 Cans
Shipping Info: 15¨ x 15¨ x 21¨ Wgt: 28 lbs
The Electric Can Sealer will seal approximately
150 cans per hour. The low mounted motor
eliminates vibration. Pulley guard included.
MANUFACTURED IN THE U.S.A. BY WISCONSIN ALUMINUM FOUNDRY CO., INC.
1931 SOUTH 14TH ST., P.O. BOX 246, MANITOWOC, WISCONSIN 54221-0246
TEL: (920) 682-8627 / FAX: (920) 682-4090
email: customerrelations@wafco.com website: allamerican-chefsdesign.com
54
W
isconsin Aluminum Foundry also manufactures Chef’sDesign, fine
quality cast aluminum cookware. This professional weight cookware
Cast Aluminum Covered Roasters
Heavy cast aluminum roaster
and cover with eye-catching
highly polished exterior. Premium
non-stick interior. Flat roasting
rack included.
3 sizes available:
131/2", 161/2" and 18"
ensures superb heat absorption and conduction. Food cooks evenly and
at lower temperatures. Each piece is coated with satiny-smooth nonstick finish, making clean-up fast and easy. Chef’sDesign Cookware is
the ultimate in quality, design and convenience. Add the crisp, clean,
contemporary styling of Chef’sDesign Cookware to your kitchen today.
Ribbed Rangetop Griddle
This ribbed griddle turns ordinary
rangetops into an indoor grill. Grills
meat, poultry, seafood and vegetables.
A deep groove around the edge of the
pan drains away excess fats and oils
for healthier cooking.
Heavy Aluminum French Roasters
Heavy aluminum roasters with
unique stainless steel rack. Based
on a traditional French design
these roasters are a modern update
with high sides, triple riveted
handles that are the right size for
oven mitts and non-stick interior.
Polished exteriors suitable for
serving.
3 sizes available:
141/2", 161/2" and 18"
Model 3540
Dimensions 10 3/8" x 187/8"
The Ultimate Griddle
A huge griddle. Turns all
rangetops into the ultimate nonstick griddle, perfect for eggs,
bacon, sandwiches, pancakes,
vegetables and meats. Grooved
edge drains fats and oils, which
collect in large corner wells—
not in your food.
Model 6050
Dimensions 11" x 191/2"
Side-By-Side Griddle
Combine a ribbed grilling
surface with a flat griddle, and
you have a complete meal,
preparation center. The world's
finest non-stick surface assures
easy clean-up.
Model 6040
Dimensions
103/4" x 20"
Lasagna Pan Plus
If you only had one pan for
baking, this would be it.
This deep-dish pan offers
true versatility. It’s perfect
for everything from lasagna
and casseroles to roasts
and hams.
Model 6260
Dimensions
10" x 12" x 3"
Gourmet Specialty Pan & Buffet Server
This elegant Gourmet
Specialty Pan is a buffet
serving tray and also a
superior griddle. A large
12" griddle surface is
perfect for sautéing, searing
and browning.
Model 2360
Dimensions 12" x 8" x 6”
In addition to non-stick cookware, Chef’s Design also offers
these other premium kitchen products:
Stainless Steel Pressure Cookers
Chef‘sDesign Stainless Steel
Pressure Cookers are premium
models crafted of the finest 18/10
stainless steel for durability,
safety and ease of cleaning. The
bottoms are made with an
aluminum/steel "sandwich" for
superior heat conductivity.
Finished with an attractive mirrorlike finish, these pressure cookers work equally well on gas, traditional
electric, ceramic electric and induction stove tops. Chef’sDesign
Pressure Cookers also include a tempered glass cover that converts the
cooker to a traditional sauce pan. Ten year limited warranty.
Models D4.5, D6, D8, D10
4.5 Liter, 6 Liter, 8.5 Liter, 10.3 Liter Sizes
The Essential 3-Piece Cookware Set
This high-quality 3-piece Gourmet Griddle, Grill Pan and Grill Press
set features a large 12"x12" cooking area coated with ETERNA,® the
world's longest-lasting nonstick for fast and easy cleanup. Suitable for
all heat sources: induction, gas, electric, ceramic and halogen.
Model 2123
Dimensions 12" x 12"
If you are unable to locate these fine products in your local stores,
please contact our factory for further information.
WISCONSIN ALUMINUM FOUNDRY CO., INC.
Consumer Products Division
P.O. BOX 246
MANITOWOC, WISCONSIN 54221-0246
TEL: (920) 682-8627 / FAX: (920) 682-4090
email: customerrelations@wafco.com website: allamerican-chefsdesign.com
07/16 - 10M
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