Operator’s Manual
14221-1200-2010
Rev. D, Oct/14
UNITY® XG-100M Mobile Radio
With CH-100 Control Head
Full-Spectrum Multiband Radio
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
MANUAL REVISION HISTORY
REV.
DATE
A
B
C
D
Oct/11
Mar/12
Jan/13
May/14
Oct/14
REASON FOR CHANGE
Initial release.
Added information on using noise cancellation.
Updated to include R3A features.
Included manual channel entry, TA indication, and protected keys.
Added Voice Annunciation and Channel Preset buttons. Updated scan and Talkaround sections.
Harris Corporation, Public Safety and Professional Communications (PSPC) Business continually evaluates its technical publications for
completeness, technical accuracy, and organization. You can assist in this process by submitting your comments and suggestions to the
following:
Harris Corporation
fax your comments to: 1-434-455-6851
PSPC Business
or
Technical Publications
e-mail us at: PSPC_TechPubs@harris.com
221 Jefferson Ridge Parkway
Lynchburg, VA 24501
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
This product was developed using GEOTRANS, a product of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and U.S. Army Engineering
Research and Development Center. Use of this software does not indicate endorsement or approval of the product by the Secretary of
Defense or the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.
This device made under license under one or more of the following US patents: 4,590,473; 4,636,791; 5,148,482; 5,185,796; 5,271,017;
5,377,229; 4,716,407; 4,972,460; 5,502,767; 5,146,697; 5,164,986; 5,185,795.
The Advanced Multi-Band Excitation implementation 2 (AMBE+2) voice coding Technology embodied in this product is protected by
intellectual property rights including patent rights, copyrights and trade secrets of Digital Voice Systems, Inc. This voice coding
Technology is licensed solely for use within this Communications Equipment. The user of this Technology is explicitly prohibited from
attempting to extract, remove, decompile, reverse engineer, or disassemble the Object Code, or in any other way convert the Object Code
into a human-readable form. U.S. Patent Nos. #5,870,405, #5,826,222, #5,754,974, #5,701,390, #5,715,365, #5,649,050, #5,630,011,
#5,581,656, #5,517,511, #5,491,772, #5,247,579, #5,226,084 and #5,195,166.
CREDITS
Harris, assuredcommunications, VIDA, EDACS, NetworkFirst, and OpenSky are registered trademarks of Harris Corporation.
Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG, Inc.
Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola, Inc.
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
AMBE is a registered trademark and IMBE, AMBE+, and AMBE+2 are trademarks of Digital Voice Systems, Inc.
All brand and product names are trademarks, registered trademarks, or service marks of their respective holders.
NOTICE!
The material contained herein is subject to U.S. export approval. No export or re-export is permitted without written approval from the U.S.
Government. Rated: EAR99; in accordance with U.S. Dept. of Commerce regulations 15CFR774, Export Administration Regulations.
Information and descriptions contained herein are the property of Harris Corporation. Such information and descriptions may not be copied
or reproduced by any means, or disseminated or distributed without the express prior written permission of Harris Corporation, PSPC
Business, 221 Jefferson Ridge Parkway, Lynchburg, VA 24501.
Repairs to this equipment should be made only by an authorized service technician or facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs,
alterations or substitutions of recommended parts made by the user to this equipment not approved by the manufacturer could void the
user's authority to operate the equipment in addition to the manufacturer's warranty.
This product conforms to the European Union WEEE Directive 2012/19/EU. Do not dispose of this product in a public
landfill. Take it to a recycling center at the end of its life.
This manual is published by Harris Corporation without any warranty. Improvements and changes to this manual necessitated by typographical errors,
inaccuracies of current information, or improvements to programs and/or equipment, may be made by Harris Corporation at any time and without notice.
Such changes will be incorporated into new editions of this manual. No part of this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, for any purpose, without the express written permission of Harris Corporation.
Copyright © 2011-2014, Harris Corporation.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
Page
1.
SAFETY SYMBOL CONVENTIONS .......................................................................................... 6
2.
RF ENERGY EXPOSURE INFORMATION .............................................................................. 7
2.1
RF ENERGY EXPOSURE AWARENESS, CONTROL INFORMATION, AND
OPERATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR FCC OCCUPATIONAL USE
REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................. 7
2.1.1
Federal Communications Commission Regulations ............................................ 7
2.2
COMPLIANCE WITH RF EXPOSURE STANDARDS ...................................................... 8
2.2.1
Mobile Antennas (Vehicle Installations) .............................................................. 8
2.2.2
Approved Accessories .......................................................................................... 9
2.2.3
Contact Information ........................................................................................... 10
2.3
REGULATORY APPROVALS .......................................................................................... 10
2.3.1
Part 15 ................................................................................................................ 10
2.3.2
Industry Canada.................................................................................................. 10
3.
OPERATION SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS..................................................................... 11
3.1
TRANSMITTER HAZARDS .............................................................................................. 11
3.2
SAFE DRIVING RECOMMENDATIONS......................................................................... 11
4.
OPERATING RULES AND REGULATIONS........................................................................... 12
5.
INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 13
6.
BASIC OPERATION .................................................................................................................... 14
6.1
PROGRAMMING ............................................................................................................... 14
6.2
XG-100M CONTROLS ....................................................................................................... 14
6.3
DISPLAY ............................................................................................................................. 15
6.4
STATUS MESSAGES ......................................................................................................... 16
6.5
ALERT TONES ................................................................................................................... 17
6.6
BEFORE FIRST USE .......................................................................................................... 17
6.7
POWER ON AND SET VOLUME ..................................................................................... 17
6.8
CHANNEL PRESETS ......................................................................................................... 18
6.9
NOISE CANCELLATION .................................................................................................. 18
6.9.1
Enable Noise Cancellation ................................................................................. 18
6.9.2
Using Noise Cancellation ................................................................................... 19
6.9.3
The Effect of Distance from the Microphone..................................................... 19
6.9.4
Voice Microphone and Control Head Microphone Locations ........................... 19
6.10 TURN ENCRYPTION ON OR OFF ................................................................................... 20
6.11 USER INTERFACE PRIVILEGE LEVEL ......................................................................... 20
6.12 SELECT CHANNEL ........................................................................................................... 21
6.12.1
Select from Channel List .................................................................................... 21
6.12.2
Manually Enter Channel Number....................................................................... 21
6.13 SELECT A ZONE/SYSTEM USING MENUS................................................................... 22
6.14 VOICE ANNUNCIATION .................................................................................................. 23
6.15 USE TALKAROUND TO BYPASS REPEATER (ANALOG AND P25
CONVENTIONAL) ............................................................................................................. 24
6.16 INDIVIDUAL CALLS ........................................................................................................ 26
6.16.1
Transmit an Individual Call................................................................................ 26
6.16.2
Receiving an Individual Call .............................................................................. 26
6.17 GROUP CALLS................................................................................................................... 27
3
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.18
6.19
6.20
6.21
6.22
6.23
6.24
6.25
6.26
6.27
6.28
6.29
7.
4
CALL ALERT (PAGE) - P25 TRUNKED ONLY .............................................................. 28
6.18.1
Send Alert........................................................................................................... 28
6.18.2
Receive Alert ...................................................................................................... 29
TELEPHONE INTERCONNECT ....................................................................................... 29
DTMF................................................................................................................................... 30
SCAN OPERATION ........................................................................................................... 31
6.21.1
Start Scan............................................................................................................ 31
6.21.2
Stop Scan ............................................................................................................ 32
6.21.3
Nuisance Delete.................................................................................................. 33
VIEW GPS INFORMATION .............................................................................................. 34
EMERGENCY OPERATION ............................................................................................. 35
6.23.1
Declaring an Emergency Call............................................................................. 35
6.23.2
Receiving an Emergency Call ............................................................................ 35
6.23.3
Stealth Emergency.............................................................................................. 36
ENCRYPTION BAR ........................................................................................................... 36
MDC-1200 (CONVENTIONAL ONLY) ............................................................................ 36
LIGHTS AND SIRENS ....................................................................................................... 37
PUBLIC ADDRESS (PA).................................................................................................... 37
SHORTCUT MENU ............................................................................................................ 38
VEHICULAR REPEATER OPERATION .......................................................................... 38
ADVANCED OPERATIONS ....................................................................................................... 39
7.1
ENCRYPTION .................................................................................................................... 39
7.1.1
Create Keys Using Harris Key Admin ............................................................... 39
7.1.2
Load encryption Keys ........................................................................................ 39
7.1.3
Zeroize All from Radio ...................................................................................... 41
7.1.4
Protected Keys.................................................................................................... 42
7.2
GLOBAL ENCRYPTION ................................................................................................... 42
7.3
SELECT KEYSET ............................................................................................................... 43
7.4
OTAR CONFIGURATION ................................................................................................. 44
7.5
ACTIVATE/VIEW MISSION PLAN ................................................................................. 44
7.6
USER-DEFINED ZONES/SYSTEMS ................................................................................ 45
7.6.1
Command Tactical Zone .................................................................................... 45
7.6.2
Mixed System/Zone ........................................................................................... 46
7.7
CH INFORMATION MENU............................................................................................... 47
7.8
EDIT CHANNEL (ANALOG AND P25 CONVENTIONAL ONLY) ............................... 47
7.9
SETTINGS MENU .............................................................................................................. 48
7.9.1
Audio Settings .................................................................................................... 49
7.9.2
Display Settings.................................................................................................. 50
7.9.3
GPS Settings ....................................................................................................... 50
7.9.4
Bluetooth ............................................................................................................ 51
7.9.5
Clock Settings .................................................................................................... 53
7.10 SET UP SCAN ..................................................................................................................... 54
7.10.1
Home, Priority 1, and Priority 2 Channels ......................................................... 54
7.10.2
Trunked/Conventional Scanning ........................................................................ 55
7.10.3
Vote Scan (Analog and P25 Conventional Only)............................................... 55
7.10.4
Set or Remove Priority 1 and Priority 2 Channels ............................................. 56
7.10.5
Wide Area System Scan (P25 Trunked Only).................................................... 56
7.11 MESSAGE MENU .............................................................................................................. 57
7.11.1
Radio Status........................................................................................................ 57
7.11.2
Radio Message ................................................................................................... 58
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
7.12
7.13
7.14
7.11.3
Radio TextLink (P25 Trunked Only) ................................................................. 59
7.11.4
Faults/Alerts ....................................................................................................... 61
UTILITIES MENU .............................................................................................................. 62
OTAP ................................................................................................................................... 63
PPP/SLIP .............................................................................................................................. 63
8.
REFERENCE................................................................................................................................. 64
8.1
MARINE FREQUENCIES .................................................................................................. 64
8.2
ACCESSORIES ................................................................................................................... 70
9.
GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................... 71
10. BASIC TROUBLESHOOTING ................................................................................................... 74
10.1 ERROR MESSAGES........................................................................................................... 74
10.2 OTAR ERRORS/INFORMATION ..................................................................................... 75
11. CUSTOMER SERVICE ............................................................................................................... 76
11.1 CUSTOMER CARE ............................................................................................................ 76
11.2 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE .............................................................................................. 76
12. WARRANTY ................................................................................................................................. 77
APPENDIX A - PPP/SLIP CONNECTION ....................................................................................... 78
FIGURES
Page
Figure 6-1: Conventional Display ........................................................................................................... 15
Figure 6-2: P25 Trunked Display ............................................................................................................ 15
Figure 6-3: No Channel Presets ............................................................................................................... 18
Figure 6-4: Four Channel Presets ............................................................................................................ 18
Figure 6-5: Noise Microphone ................................................................................................................ 20
Figure 6-6: Voice Microphone ................................................................................................................ 20
Figure 6-7: User Interface Privilege ........................................................................................................ 20
TABLES
Page
Table 2-1 Recommended Minimum Safe Lateral Distance from a Transmitting Antenna Connected
to a Unity XG-100M Mobile Radio................................................................................................... 8
Table 6-1: XG-100M Controls and Connectors ...................................................................................... 14
Table 6-2: Icons ....................................................................................................................................... 15
Table 6-3: Status Messages ..................................................................................................................... 16
Table 6-4: Alert Tones............................................................................................................................. 17
Table 6-5: Encryption Bar Indications .................................................................................................... 36
Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies ................................................................................................................ 64
Table 8-2: Options and Accessories for the Unity XG-100M Mobile Radios ........................................ 70
Table 8-3: Options and Accessories for the CH-100 Control Head ........................................................ 70
5
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
1.
SAFETY SYMBOL CONVENTIONS
The following conventions are used to alert the user to general safety precautions that must be observed
during all phases of operation, service, and repair of this product. Failure to comply with these
precautions or with specific warnings elsewhere violates safety standards of design, manufacture, and
intended use of the product. Harris assumes no liability for the customer's failure to comply with these
standards.
WARNING
CAUTION
The WARNING symbol calls attention to a procedure, practice, or the like,
which, if not correctly performed or adhered to, could result in personal injury.
Do not proceed beyond a WARNING symbol until the conditions identified are
fully understood or met.
The CAUTION symbol calls attention to an operating procedure, practice, or the like,
which, if not performed correctly or adhered to, could result in a risk of danger,
damage to the equipment, or severely degrade the equipment performance.
The NOTE symbol calls attention to supplemental information, which may improve
system performance or clarify a process or procedure.
NOTE
The ESD symbol calls attention to procedures, practices, or the like, which could
expose equipment to the effects of Electro-Static Discharge. Proper precautions must
be taken to prevent ESD when handling circuit modules.
6
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
2.
RF ENERGY EXPOSURE INFORMATION
2.1
RF ENERGY EXPOSURE AWARENESS, CONTROL INFORMATION,
AND OPERATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR FCC OCCUPATIONAL USE
REQUIREMENTS
Before using your mobile two-way radio, read this important RF energy awareness and control
information and operational instructions to ensure compliance with the FCC’s RF exposure
guidelines.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Harris could void the user's authority
to operate the equipment.
CAUTION
NOTE
This radio is intended for use in occupational/controlled conditions, where users have full
knowledge of their exposure and can exercise control over their exposure to meet FCC
limits. This radio device is NOT authorized for general population, consumer, or any
other use.
This two-way radio uses electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency (RF) spectrum to provide
communications between two or more users over a distance. It uses RF energy or radio waves to send and
receive calls. RF energy is one form of electromagnetic energy. Other forms include, but are not limited
to, electric power, sunlight, and x-rays. RF energy, however, should not be confused with these other
forms of electromagnetic energy, which, when used improperly, can cause biological damage. Very high
levels of x-rays, for example, can damage tissues and genetic material.
Experts in science, engineering, medicine, health, and industry work with organizations to develop
standards for exposure to RF energy. These standards provide recommended levels of RF exposure for
both workers and the general public. These recommended RF exposure levels include substantial margins
of protection. All two-way radios marketed in North America are designed, manufactured, and tested to
ensure they meet government established RF exposure levels. In addition, manufacturers also recommend
specific operating instructions to users of two-way radios. These instructions are important because they
inform users about RF energy exposure and provide simple procedures on how to control it. Please refer
to the following websites for more information on what RF energy exposure is and how to control your
exposure to assure compliance with established RF exposure limits.
http://www.fcc.gov/oet/rfsafety/rf-faqs.html
http://www.osha.gov./SLTC/radiofrequencyradiation/index.html
2.1.1
Federal Communications Commission Regulations
Your Harris Unity mobile two-way radio is designed and tested to comply with the FCC RF energy
exposure limits for mobile two-way radios before it can be marketed in the United States. When two-way
radios are used as a consequence of employment, the FCC requires users to be fully aware of and able to
control their exposure to meet occupational requirements. Exposure awareness can be facilitated by the
use of a label directing users to specific user awareness information. Your Harris Unity two-way radio has
an RF exposure product label. Also, your Unity Mobile Installation and Operator’s Manuals include
information and operating instructions required to control your RF exposure and to satisfy compliance
requirements.
7
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
2.2
COMPLIANCE WITH RF EXPOSURE STANDARDS
Your Harris Unity mobile two-way radio is designed and tested to comply with a number of national and
international standards and guidelines (listed below) regarding human exposure to RF electromagnetic
energy. This radio complies with the IEEE and ICNIRP exposure limits for occupational/controlled RF
exposure environment at duty factors of up to 50% talk-50% listen and is authorized by the FCC for
occupational use. In terms of measuring RF energy for compliance with the FCC exposure guidelines,
your radio antenna radiates measurable RF energy only while it is transmitting (talking), not when it is
receiving (listening) or in standby mode.
Your Harris Unity mobile two-way radio complies with the following RF energy exposure standards and
guidelines:
•
United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Code of Federal Regulations; 47 CFR §§
2 sub-part J.
•
American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
C95.1-2005.
•
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) C95.1-2005.
•
IC standard RSS-102, Issue 2, 2005: “Spectrum Management and Telecommunications Radio
Standards Specification. Radiofrequency Exposure Compliance of Radiocommunication Apparatus
(All Frequency Bands).
CAUTION
2.2.1
Table 2-1 lists the recommended minimum lateral distance for a controlled environment
and for unaware bystanders in an uncontrolled environment, from transmitting types of
antennas (i.e., monopoles over a ground plane, or dipoles) at rated radio power for
mobile radios installed in a vehicle. Transmit only when unaware bystanders are at least
the uncontrolled recommended minimum lateral distance away from the transmitting
antenna.
Mobile Antennas (Vehicle Installations)
Table 2-1 Recommended Minimum Safe Lateral Distance from a
Transmitting Antenna Connected to a Unity XG-100M Mobile Radio
RF BAND
ANTENNA
PART NUMBERS
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM LATERAL HUMAN BODY DISTANCE
FROM TRANSMITTING ANTENNA
CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT
UNCONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT
28.3 inches
(72 centimeters)
63.0 inches
(160 centimeters)
AN-125001-002 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-004 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
VHF
AN-125001-006 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-008 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-002 (mount) with
12099-0330-01 (element)
AN-125001-004 (mount) with
12099-0330-01 (element)
8
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
ANTENNA
PART NUMBERS
RF BAND
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM LATERAL HUMAN BODY DISTANCE
FROM TRANSMITTING ANTENNA
CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT
UNCONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT
24.4 inches
(62 centimeters)
54.3 inches
(138 centimeters)
33.9 inches
86 cm
75.6 inches
192 cm
7.9 inches
(20 centimeters)
19.7 inches
(50 centimeters)
7.9 inches
(20 centimeters)
24 inches
(61 centimeters)
AN-125001-002 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-004 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-006 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
UHF
AN-125001-008 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-002 (mount) with
12099-0330-01 (element)
AN-125001-004 (mount) with
12099-0330-01 (element)
AN-125001-002 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-004 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
700/800 MHz
AN-125001-006 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-008 (mount) with
12099-0310-01 (element)
AN-125001-002 (mount) with
12099-0330-01 (element)
AN-125001-004 (mount) with
12099-0330-01 (element)
*
Install the radio’s antenna in the center of the vehicle’s roof. These mobile antenna installation guidelines
are limited to metal body motor vehicles or vehicles with appropriate ground planes. The antenna
installation should additionally be in accordance with the following:
•
The requirements of the antenna manufacturer/supplier included with the antenna.
•
Instructions in the Unity Mobile Radio Installation Manual, including minimum antenna cable
lengths.
•
The installation manual providing specific information of how to install the antennas to facilitate
recommended operating distances to all potentially exposed persons.
Use only the Harris approved/supplied antenna(s) or approved replacement antenna. Unauthorized
antennas, modifications, or attachments could damage the radio and may violate FCC regulations.
2.2.2
Approved Accessories
This radio has been tested and meets the FCC RF guidelines when used with the Harris accessories
supplied or designated for use with this product. Use of other accessories may not ensure compliance with
the FCC’s RF exposure guidelines, and may violate FCC regulations.
For a list of approved accessories refer to Section 8.2, the Products and Services Catalog, or contact
Harris at 1-800-368-3277.
9
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
2.2.3
Contact Information
For additional information on exposure requirements or other information, contact Harris at 1-800-5287711 or at www.pspc.harris.com.
2.3
REGULATORY APPROVALS
2.3.1
Part 15
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
1. This device may not cause harmful interference, and
2. This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
2.3.2
Industry Canada
This device complies with Industry Canada license-exempt RSS standard(s). Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause interference, and (2) this device must accept any
interference, including interference that may cause undesired operation of the device.
Le présent appareil est conforme aux CNR d'Industrie Canada applicables aux appareils radio exempts de
licence. L'exploitation est autorisée aux deux conditions suivantes : (1) l'appareil ne doit pas produire de
brouillage, et (2) l'utilisateur de l'appareil doit accepter tout brouillage radioélectrique subi, même si le
brouillage est susceptible d'en compromettre le fonctionnement.
10
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
3.
OPERATION SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS
3.1
TRANSMITTER HAZARDS
WARNING
•
The operator of any mobile radio should be aware of certain hazards common to
the operation of vehicular radio transmitters. A list of several possible hazards is
given:
Explosive Atmospheres – Just as it is dangerous to fuel a vehicle with the motor running, similar
hazards exist when operating a mobile radio. Be sure to turn the radio off while fueling a vehicle. Do
not carry containers of fuel in the trunk of a vehicle if the radio is mounted in the trunk.
Areas with potentially explosive atmosphere are often, but not always, clearly marked. Turn OFF
your radio when in any area with a potentially explosive atmosphere. It is rare, but not impossible that
the radio or its accessories could generate sparks.
3.2
•
Interference to Vehicular Electronics Systems – Electronic fuel injection systems, electronic antiskid braking systems, electronic cruise control systems, etc., are typical electronic systems that can
malfunction due to the lack of protection from radio frequency energy present when transmitting. If
the vehicle contains such equipment, consult the dealer and enlist their aid in determining the
expected performance of electronic circuits when the radio is transmitting.
•
Electric Blasting Caps – To prevent accidental detonation of electric blasting caps, DO NOT use
two-way radios within 1000 feet (305 meters) of blasting operations. Always obey the “Turn off
Two-Way Radios” signs posted where electric blasting caps are being used. (OSHA Standard: 1926900)
•
Liquefied Petroleum (LP) Gas Powered Vehicles – Mobile radio installations in vehicles powered
by liquefied petroleum gas with the LP gas container in the trunk or other sealed-off space within the
interior of the vehicle must conform to the National Fire Protection Association standard NFPA 58
requiring:
 The LP gas container and its fittings.
 Outside filling connections shall be used for the LP gas container.
 The LP gas container shall be vented to the outside of the vehicle.
SAFE DRIVING RECOMMENDATIONS
(Recommended by AAA)
•
Read the literature on the safe operation of the radio.
•
Keep both hands on the steering wheel and the microphone in its hanger whenever the vehicle is in
motion.
•
Place calls only when the vehicle is stopped.
•
When talking from a moving vehicle is unavoidable, drive in the slower lane. Keep conversations
brief.
•
If a conversation requires taking notes or complex thought, stop the vehicle in a safe place and
continue the call.
•
Whenever using a mobile radio, exercise caution.
11
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
4.
OPERATING RULES AND REGULATIONS
Two-way FM radio systems must be operated in accordance with the rules and regulations of the local,
regional, or national government.
In the United States, the Unity mobile radio must be operated in accordance with the rules and regulations
of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). As an operator of two-way radio equipment, you
must be thoroughly familiar with the rules that apply to your particular type of radio operation. Following
these rules helps eliminate confusion, assures the most efficient use of the existing radio channels, and
results in a smoothly functioning radio network.
When using your two-way radio, remember these rules:
•
It is a violation of FCC rules to interrupt any distress or emergency message. As your radio operates
in much the same way as a telephone “party line,” always listen to make sure that the channel is clear
before transmitting. Emergency calls have priority over all other messages. If someone is sending an
emergency message – such as reporting a fire or asking for help in an accident – KEEP OFF THE
AIR!
•
The use of profane or obscene language is prohibited by Federal law.
•
It is against the law to send false call letters or false distress or emergency messages. The FCC
requires that you keep conversations brief and confine them to business. To save time, use coded
messages whenever possible.
•
Using your radio to send personal messages (except in an emergency) is a violation of FCC rules.
You may send only those messages that are essential for the operation of your business.
•
It is against Federal law to repeat or otherwise make known anything you overhear on your radio.
Conversations between others sharing your channel must be regarded as confidential.
•
The FCC requires that you identify yourself at certain specific times by means of your call letters.
Refer to the rules that apply to your particular type of operation for the proper procedure.
•
No changes or adjustments shall be made to the equipment except by an authorized or certified
electronics technician.
NOTE
Under U.S. law, operation of an unlicensed radio transmitter within the jurisdiction of
the United States may be punishable by a fine of up to $10,000, imprisonment for up to
two (2) years, or both.
The following conditions tend to reduce the effective range of two-way radios and should be avoided
whenever possible:
12
•
Operating the radio in areas of low terrain, or while under power lines or bridges.
•
Obstructions such as mountains and buildings.
•
In areas where transmission or reception is poor, some improvement can be obtained by moving a few
yards in another direction or moving to a higher elevation.
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
5.
INTRODUCTION
Your XG-100M provides full-spectrum multiband coverage:
•
30 to 50 MHz, VHF Low (Receive only)
•
136 to 174 MHz, VHF High (5 – 50 W)
•
380 to 520 MHz, UHF-Low, UHF-High (5 – 50 W)
•
762 to 805 MHz, 700 MHz (2 – 30 W)
•
805 to 870 MHz, 800 MHz (2 – 35 W)
The XG-100M has the following capabilities:
Project 25 (P25) Conventional
P25 Trunking
Analog FM
Advanced Encryption Standard, 256-bit (AES-256)
Digital Encryption Standard Output Feedback Digital Encryption Standard Cipher Feedback
(DES-OFB) Encryption
(DES-CFB) Encryption
Global Positioning System (GPS)
Bluetooth®
P25 Trunking Over The Air Rekey (OTAR)
Preemptive Priority Scanning
Global Common Key References (CKR)
Vote Scan
PA Mode
Lights and Sirens
Telephone Interconnect Calls (P25 Trunked Only)
Status/Message (P25 Trunked and Conventional)
MDC-1200 Encode
Programmable Minimum Volume
P25 Trunked Conventional Scan
Mixed System Zones
Channel Guard
Command Tactical Zones
Call Alert
SLIP/PPP (P25 Trunked Only)
DTMF
Bluetooth Emergency
Feature Management (Using Radio Personality Manager [RPM] R11A or later)
For optional accessories, refer to Section 8.2. Additional accessories may have been added since
publication of this manual; contact Harris for more information.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.
BASIC OPERATION
6.1
PROGRAMMING
Radio Personality Manager (RPM) R11A or later is used for programming of the XG-100M. With RPM,
you can fully program the XG-100M using a USB cable (type A male to mini-type B).
6.2
XG-100M CONTROLS
The XG-100M features a full color touch screen display for easy access to all radio features and
functions. To select an item, simply touch the desired area of the screen with your finger.
Never touch the screen with any metal or sharp objects, as this can damage the screen!
CAUTION
Table 6-1: XG-100M Controls and Connectors
POWER ON/OFF
VOLUME CONTROL
NOISE MICROPHONE
GROUP/CHANNEL
SELECTION
Used in conjunction with a handheld microphone and Harris’ built-in noise suppression.
Selects the available groups or channels.
MICROPHONE
CONNECTOR
Connection for hand-held, hands-free, speaker-mic, or headset.
HOME BUTTON
Toggles through three available main screens or allows you to quickly navigate back to the main
screen from a submenu. Can also be configured in RPM to go to a home channel (press and
hold for approximately one second).
EMERGENCY BUTTON
USB Interface
14
Turn knob clockwise to power on the radio and increase volume.
Turn counter-clockwise to decrease volume and power off the radio. Minimum volume levels
may be programmed into the radio to prevent missed calls due to a low volume setting.
Declares an emergency.
Connection for Programming cable.
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.3
DISPLAY
The main display appears after power up or after exiting from the menus. While on the main display,
press the
button to change its appearance.
To select an item, touch the desired area of the screen with your finger.
Accesses the
Main Menu.
Toggles Scan
on and off.
Accesses the
Shortcuts Menu.
Toggles Talkaround
on and off.
Toggles the display
between Day and
Night modes.
Select the desired
monitor mode.
Channel presets.
Figure 6-1: Conventional Display
Toggles Scan
on and off.
Accesses the
Main Menu.
Drops a received
Group Call.
Accesses the
Shortcuts Menu.
Toggles the display
between Day and
Night modes.
Opens the
CALL menu.
Channel presets.
Figure 6-2: P25 Trunked Display
Table 6-2 describes the various icons displayed by the radio. A description of these icons can also be
viewed via the Utility Menu. See Section 7.12 for more information.
Table 6-2: Icons
ICON
DESCRIPTION
ICON
DESCRIPTION
Trunked Signal Strength
Bluetooth On
TX Forward Power
Bluetooth Paired
Receive Signal Strength
Secure Traffic
Channel Idle
Global Encryption
Transmitting Encrypted
GPS Tracking
Failsoft
Monitor On
Nuisance Channel
OTAR Disabled
Receiving Data
OTAR Registered
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
ICON
DESCRIPTION
ICON
DESCRIPTION
Transmitting Data
OTAR Registering
Virtual Site
OTAR Rekeying
Vote Scanning
Talkaround Enabled
Scanning Enabled
Transmit Power
Alert(s) Present
RX Only
Emergency
VDOC
Noise Cancellation Enabled
6.4
STATUS MESSAGES
During radio operation, various radio Status Messages may be displayed. The messages are described in
Table 6-3.
Table 6-3: Status Messages
MESSAGE
16
DESCRIPTION
PTT DENIED
P25 Trunked only - Indicates the radio or talkgroup is not authorized to operate on the
selected system and/or talkgroup.
CALL QUEUED
P25 Trunked only - Indicates the system has placed the call in a request queue.
SYSTEM BUSY
P25 Trunked only - Indicates the system is busy, no channels are currently available, the
queue is full, or an individual call is being attempted to a radio that is currently
transmitting.
SCANNING
Indicates the radio is scanning.
TX EMERGENCY
P25 modes only - Indicates an emergency call is being transmitted.
RX EMERGENCY
P25 modes only - Indicates an emergency call is being received. If programmed via RPM,
the radio will display the unit name or unit ID.
WIDE AREA SCAN
P25 Trunked only - Indicates the radio has entered the Wide Area Scan mode to search
for a new system (if enabled through programming).
INVALID TALKGROUP
P25 Trunked only - Indicates the current talkgroup is not valid for the current system. This
could happen if the site denies registration due to an unrecognized talkgroup ID.
INVALID UNIT
P25 Trunked only – Indicates the current unit is not valid for the current system.
REGISTERING
P25 Trunked only - Displayed when the radio is performing a registration/affiliation on a
P25 trunking site.
CONTROL CHANNEL
SCAN
P25 Trunked only - Indicates the control channel is lost and the radio has entered the
Control Channel Scan mode to search for the control channel (usually out of range
indication).
BAND SCANNING
P25 Trunked only - This message is only displayed if the P25T system is configured for
"EnhancedCC" mode of operation. When the radio cannot find a Control Channel in either
the trunked frequency set or the list of discovered adjacencies, the radio is able to perform
a full spectrum frequency scan to find a new Control Channel.
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.5
ALERT TONES
Table 6-4 describes the alert tones that may be played by radio.
Table 6-4: Alert Tones
TONE
SOUND/DURATION
Ready To Talk Tone
Unencrypted (Analog FM
or P25 digital)
After a PTT is pressed, this control enables the radio to
produce an audible indication (tone) for you to begin
speaking into the microphone.
1000 Hz for 25 ms
Ready to Talk Tone
Encrypted P25 digital
After a PTT is pressed, this control enables the radio to
produce an audible indication (tone) for you to begin
speaking into the microphone.
1200 Hz tone for 25 ms
PTT Denied
PTT not possible. Momentary tone is present:
•
Receive only
•
PTT button disabled
•
Emergency button disabled
•
Emergency not supported for current channel
•
Clear transmit denied
544 Hz tone for 75 ms
Maximum transmit
duration expires
Maximum transmit duration is exceeded.
5 beeps and then a 544 Hz
tone for 75 ms
Emergency Call
Received
Radio is receiving an emergency call or priority call.
600 Hz tone for 250 ms and
1800 Hz tone for 250 ms
Radio fails to find a local control channel.
Programmable via RPM:
• Disabled (no tone)
• Slow (tone every 15s)
• Medium (tone every 10s)
• Fast (tone every 5s)
Out of Range
6.6
DESCRIPTION
BEFORE FIRST USE
Make sure the XG-100M has:
6.7
•
Mission plan and radio programmed using the RPM
•
Encryption keys loaded if using encrypted channels
•
Mission plan activated
POWER ON AND SET VOLUME
The power switch and volume control are within the same control. Turn
XG-100M and to set to desired volume level.
clockwise to power on
Minimum volume levels may be programmed into the radio to prevent missed calls
due to a low volume setting.
NOTE
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.8
CHANNEL PRESETS
Channel preset buttons are available on the standard size screen. Press and hold one of the four buttons at
the bottom of the main display (Figure 6-3) to save the currently selected channel as a preset. Press this
button to quickly return to the preset channel.
Presets cannot be erased; they can only be programmed with a new value. Channel
presets are lost when a new personality is activated.
NOTE
Figure 6-3: No Channel Presets
6.9
Figure 6-4: Four Channel Presets
NOISE CANCELLATION
The XG-100M features Harris’ proprietary noise suppression capability that provides clear and crisp
voice quality in high-noise environments in any mode, including analog and digital communications.
The XG-100M has two microphones; one located on the chorded microphone (Voice Microphone) and
one on the front of the control head (Noise Microphone). The Voice Microphone operates as the input
microphone for your voice. The Noise Microphone on the control head is used to pick up the surrounding
noise when noise cancellation is turned on. The control head should be mounted such that its Noise
Microphone element is unobstructed and exposed to the same ambient environment as your voice.
6.9.1
Enable Noise Cancellation
To enable noise cancellation:
1. From the main display, select the MAIN MENU.
2. Select SETTINGS.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
3. Select AUDIO SETTINGS.
4. Select NOISE CANCELLATION to toggle noise cancellation
ENABLED or DISABLED. The
icon is displayed in the top of
the display when noise cancellation is enabled.
6.9.2
Using Noise Cancellation
When using the noise cancellation feature, observe the following:
•
Verify the NOISE CANCELLATION setting is enabled (see Section 6.9.1).
•
Talk within two (2) inches of the Voice Microphone.
•
Speak clearly, loudly, and with authority.
•
Ensure that both the Voice Microphone and the control head’s Noise Microphone are not covered or
obstructed.
•
In very noisy environments, it is okay to yell into the radio. The radio can handle very loud input
levels.
6.9.3
The Effect of Distance from the Microphone
Unlike a normal microphone system, noise cancellation makes the level of your voice diminish quickly as
you move the Voice Microphone away from your mouth. In essence, the radio starts to see your voice as
surrounding noise. Whereas you may be comfortable speaking up to a foot away from the Voice
Microphone on a normal radio, noise cancellation requires that you keep the Voice Microphone close to
your mouth. It is recommended that you hold the Voice Microphone within 2” of your mouth when
speaking.
6.9.4
Voice Microphone and Control Head Microphone Locations
The Voice Microphone is located on the front of the mic as shown in Figure 6-6. The Noise Microphone
on the control head is located on the left of the control head between the volume and channel knobs
(Figure 6-5). Every effort should be made to not obstruct either element during radio transmissions.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
Figure 6-5: Noise Microphone
Figure 6-6: Voice Microphone
6.10 TURN ENCRYPTION ON OR OFF
Select MAIN MENU  SECURITY  ENCRYPTION to toggle encryption on and off.
Or
1. Select SHORTCUTS from the main display.
2. Select ENCRYPTION to toggle encryption on and off.
• A key appears on the display when encryption is enabled. The channel must also be programmed
to be encrypted.
• When encryption is turned on and you use any channel not configured for encryption, the radio
allows PTT. The signal is transmitted unencrypted.
• Channels configured for Global Encryption display a Global Encryption icon instead of key icon
(Section 7.1.4) if Global Encryption is enabled.
• Radios configured with Encryption Mode Forced On will have the Encryption menu item grayed
out with the state always ENABLED.
6.11 USER INTERFACE PRIVILEGE LEVEL
Depending on radio programming, some of the menu options described in this manual may not be
available. The following table details the menus available for the different levels of User Interface
Privilege:
Figure 6-7: User Interface Privilege
20
FULL ACCESS
LIMITED ACCESS
RESTRICTED ACCESS
Audio Settings:
Noise Cancellation
Master Volume Control
External Speaker
External Speaker Volume
MRU Volume
Accessory Power
Touch Screen Tone

















GPS Settings

Clock Settings


Bluetooth Settings


View Group List


Edit Group List



14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
FULL ACCESS
LIMITED ACCESS
RESTRICTED ACCESS
View Zone List



Edit Zone List



Zeroize

Keyset Changeover



Global Encryption

Global Key

Program Menu only in Active Mission Plan

P25 Test Selection on Utility Menu


6.12 SELECT CHANNEL
6.12.1 Select from Channel List
1. From the main display, select the channel name.
2. Select the desired channel from the list.
6.12.2 Manually Enter Channel Number
To manually enter a channel:
1. From the main display, select SHORTCUTS.
2. Select ENTER CHANNEL NUMBER.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
3. Enter the channel number and select OK.
Entering a number greater than the maximum number of entries in the selected zone will select the last
channel. From the radio’s perspective, channels entered in this manner are not treated any differently
from channels selected by the channel knob; for example, the scan list will be adjusted to add the channel
(and make it P1 if applicable), emergencies will go out on the entered channel, etc. The only invalid
channel is 0; if channel 0 is entered, the radio plays a NAK tone.
Physically moving the channel knob or changing the system causes the radio to select
the channel in respect to the manually entered channel.
NOTE
6.13 SELECT A ZONE/SYSTEM USING MENUS
A zone/system is a group of channels that can be programmed by agency or geographical region. For
example, a zone/system could be for fire, police, New York, Los Angeles, etc.
1. From the main display, select the zone/system name.
2. Select the desired zone/system from the list.
If
is selected, a screen appears allowing you to view the channels
in the zone/system. Selecting a channel from the list will take you to
that channel.
A mission plan could have up to 512 zones/systems.
Or
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
2. Select ZONES.
3. Select the desired zone/system from the list.
If
is selected, a screen appears allowing you to view the channels
in the zone/system. Selecting a channel from the list will take you to
that channel.
A mission plan could have up to 512 zones/systems.
6.14 VOICE ANNUNCIATION
When enabled via programming, the Voice Annunciation feature provides audible feedback for various
radio operations. The radio can be programmed to play an audio message for any or all of the following.
This message can be a pre-recorded (canned) message or a user-recorded message.
•
Zone changes
•
Channel changes
•
System changes
•
Encryption On/Off
•
Monitor On/Off
•
Noise Cancellation On/Off
•
Scan On/Off
•
Talkaround On/Off
•
Tx Disabled On/Off
For more information on configuring the radio for Voice Annunciation, refer to the Voice Annunciation
Feature manual 14221-7200-6110.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.15 USE TALKAROUND TO BYPASS REPEATER (ANALOG AND P25
CONVENTIONAL)
You can bypass the repeater system to communicate directly with other radios on your current channel’s
receive frequency. This is useful if you are out of range of a repeater or if a repeater is busy. You will
need to be in range of the other radio.
1. From the main display, press and hold TALKAROUND for one
second to toggle talkaround on.
2. A tone sounds, the Talkaround icon
appears and the
TALKAROUND button color is inverted from the home screen
color. Calls are now made on the receive frequency until you
disable Talkaround mode. Press and hold this button again to turn
Talkaround off.
Power cycling the radio does not disable Talkaround.
NOTE
Or
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select CALL.
3. Select TALKAROUND MODE to enable Talkaround mode.
24
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
4. The
icon appears and the TALKAROUND button color is
inverted from the home screen color. Calls are now made on the
receive frequency until you disable Talkaround mode.
Power cycling the radio does not disable Talkaround.
NOTE
If the Talkaround Indication feature is enabled in RPM, the radio will play a unique grant tone when a call
is placed on a simplex channel or when Talkaround has been enabled on a duplex channel. This feature
applies to both Analog and P25 Conventional systems. It optionally allows the radio to also play the
same tone when it receives a call while operating in simplex or Talkaround. If configured, the radio
plays the tone at the selected volume level.
The tone will not play on systems configured for MDC or Type 99.
NOTE
Talkaround Indication can be specified for each individual Analog and P25 Conventional system
configured in personality. The following options can be selected, and apply only when the radio is on a
simplex channel or when Talkaround has been enabled by the user:
•
Disabled: (This is the default option.) When this option is selected, the radio plays the standard grant
tone when a call is placed. The radio does not play a tone when a call is received.
•
Transmit Only: When this option is selected, the radio plays a different “Talkaround” grant tone when
a call is placed. The radio does not play a tone when a call is received.
•
Transmit & Receive: When this option is selected, the radio plays a different “Talkaround” grant tone
when a call is placed, and at the beginning of a received call.
NOTE
In the radio personality, the “Alert Tone” parameter needs to be enabled for each
channel on the Conventional Frequency Set. The “Ready To Talk Tone” parameter
must also be enabled for the Talkaround Indication tone to be played when the radio is
keyed.
25
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.16 INDIVIDUAL CALLS
An individual call is used to make a call to one radio as opposed to a group of radios. An individual call
can only be made on a digital channel.
6.16.1 Transmit an Individual Call
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select CALL.
3. Select INDIVIDUAL CALL.
4. Select the unit to call.
5. Press PTT to make the call.
6.16.2 Receiving an Individual Call
1. When receiving an Individual Call, the radio displays the calling
radio’s name or Unit ID in the green RX banner and under PTT
TO CALL.
2. Press the PTT button to respond. The amount of time the radio will
remain in the Individual Call with no activity is programmable via
RPM.
26
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
3. The radio rings and indicates a missed call if you do not respond to
an incoming Individual Call. The ring sounds continuously until
you press PTT to answer the call, select the missed call indication
to clear, or power cycle the radio.
6.17 GROUP CALLS
A talkgroup is a group of radios that you would want to have private conversations with. These groups
could be divided into areas such as state, region, county, or large special events. A group call can only be
made on digital channels. On the receiving radio, the calling station name appears in the activity area.
1. From the main display, select the current talkgroup.
2. Select the desired talkgroup. After selecting the new talkgroup, the
radio returns to the main display.
3. Press PTT to make the call.
P25 Trunked Only: Press DROP CALL to drop or terminate any
group call that the radio receives
Or
1. From the main display, MAIN MENU.
2. Select CALL.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
3. Select CHANGE TALKGROUP.
4. Select the talkgroup from the list. After selecting the new
talkgroup, the radio returns to the main display.
5. Press PTT to make the call.
6.18 CALL ALERT (PAGE) - P25 TRUNKED ONLY
6.18.1 Send Alert
1. From the main display, MAIN MENU.
2. Select CALL.
3. Select CALL ALERT.
4. Select the desired unit from the list.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
5. Press PTT to send the page.
6.18.2 Receive Alert
When receiving a Call Alert, the radio displays the calling radio’s
name or Unit ID.
6.19 TELEPHONE INTERCONNECT
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select CALL.
3. Select PHONE CALL.
4. Select SYSTEM LISTING to select from a list of preprogrammed numbers for the active system, select USER
LISTING to select from a list of user-defined numbers for all
systems, or select DIRECT DIAL to enter the number directly.
Direct Dial entry can have up to 31 characters (0-9, *, #, or a
space; the space correlates to a pause.)
5. Press PTT to initiate the phone call.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.20 DTMF
The XG-100M supports the transmission of DTMF tones over the air and supports playing received
DTMF tones.
DTMF tones will only play if the current system is programmed for DTMF (part of
general System configuration).
NOTE
To access the DTMF keypad:
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select CALL.
3. Select DTMF KEYPAD.
4. Press and hold PTT while entering the number sequence from the
keypad.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.21 SCAN OPERATION
6.21.1 Start Scan
This procedure assumes that the scan list has been added and is not in active scan. Refer to Section 7.10
for scan setup or Section 6.21.2 for stopping scan. Refer to Section 7.10.1.1, Section 7.10.1.2, and Section
7.10.1.3 for home and priority channel descriptions.
1. From the main display, press and hold START SCAN for one
second.
2. A tone sounds, START SCAN text changes to red STOP SCAN,
and the SCAN button color inverts from the home screen color.
Or
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SCAN.
3. Select START SCAN. A tone sounds, the START SCAN button
text changes to red STOP SCAN, and the SCAN button color
inverts from the home screen color.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.21.2 Stop Scan
Perform the following to stop an active scan:
1. From the main display, press and hold STOP SCAN for
approximately one second.
2. The STOP SCAN text changes to START SCAN, and the SCAN
button color returns to normal.
Or
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SCAN.
3. Select STOP SCAN. The STOP SCAN button text changes to
START SCAN, and the SCAN button color returns to normal.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.21.3 Nuisance Delete
A channel can temporarily be deleted from the scan list. The currently selected channel, Priority 1, and
Priority 2 channels cannot be nuisance deleted.
Nuisance delete can only be performed on the active scan list.
NOTE
1. From the main display, select SHORTCUTS.
2. Select NUISANCE DELETE.
NOTE: If the radio is not currently scanning, NUISANCE DELETE is
grayed out.
Or
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SCAN.
3. Select SCAN LISTS.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
4. Select the desired channel. A pop is displayed. Select
NUISANCE.
NOTE: The currently selected channel, Priority 1, and Priority 2
channels cannot be nuisance deleted.
6.22 VIEW GPS INFORMATION
Using an external GPS antenna, you can view your position and satellite information. GPS requires an
unobstructed view of the sky and the signal is greatly diminished inside buildings, tunnels, heavily
forested areas, etc. GPS may not work at all under some materials, especially metal.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select GPS.
You can observe GPS status:
34
•
DISABLED - GPS is disabled via programming.
•
TRACKING - GPS has acquired satellite signal. GPS time
appears on top of display.
•
SEARCHING - GPS has not acquired.
•
LAST KNOWN POS - Radio was tracking and then lost GPS
signal. The information displayed is from the last known position.
3. Select
to view satellite information.
4. Select
to exit GPS screens.
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.23 EMERGENCY OPERATION
The XG-100M can be programmed to enable emergency mode. Unit name displays on dispatcher console
if an emergency signal is received from another XG-100M on a digital channel.
6.23.1 Declaring an Emergency Call
1. Press and hold the emergency button on the front of the control
head or hand-held controller. The length of time to hold the button
is configured in RPM.
•
For digital channels, the radio transmits the talkgroup or radio
ID to the dispatch console and receiving radio.
•
The radio can be programmed to have a dedicated emergency
channel, which can get activated from analog or digital
channels.
•
The radio can also be programmed to send an Emergency
Alarm in addition to or in place of the emergency call (P25
modes).
•
The radio will go through transmit and receive cycles if
configured. Speak into the microphone while the radio is
transmitting or press PTT to talk.
2. To exit emergency, power cycle the radio or select EXIT
EMERGENCY from the CALL menu.
6.23.2 Receiving an Emergency Call
When receiving an Emergency Call, an alert beep sounds (if tones are enabled) and an emergency
indication is displayed.
Depending on options selected in RPM, the unit ID or unit name may
be displayed.
While the emergency display is active, press PTT to respond to the
emergency caller.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.23.3 Stealth Emergency
The radio can be programmed with the following emergency behavior:
•
•
•
No audio indications when declaring an emergency.
Or
No visual indications when declaring an emergency.
Or
No audio and no visual indications when declaring an emergency.
During stealth mode, the radio will not receive any type of call. Once the user presses the PTT button, the
radio display and audio returns to normal.
6.24 ENCRYPTION BAR
The encryption bar is shown in Table 6-5. Encryption keys must be loaded (Section 7.1.2) for these
indications to be displayed.
Table 6-5: Encryption Bar Indications
DISPLAY
DESCRIPTION
This is an example of a key name of an AES and a DES key being
transmitted or received.
Encryption key assigned to channel was not found.
This message appears on receive radios. Encryption key assigned to
channel was not used on transmitting radio. The green receive bar toggles
between the unit and talkgroup being received.
6.25 MDC-1200 (CONVENTIONAL ONLY)
MDC-1200 is a legacy in-band signaling protocol that provides the radio with the ability to transmit and
receive a unique PTT ID. This PTT ID can be decoded by receiving radios and displayed as a
hexadecimal number or an alias string. In addition, MDC-1200 provides radios with the ability to transmit
emergency status to a console.
Refer to the MDC-1200 Feature Manual, 14221-7200-6000, for complete instructions on configuring and
using this feature.
If MDC signaling on PTT press is enabled in RPM, the radio transmits an MDC PTT ID message when
PTT is pressed. If the Sidetone option is enabled in RPM, the radio plays a Ready-to-Talk (RTT) tone
after the MDC pre-signaling has been transmitted.
If MDC signaling on PTT release is enabled (in RPM), the radio transmits post-call MDC signaling when
PTT is released.
36
•
IF STE is enabled (in RPM), the MDC post-call signaling is transmitted after STE is sent.
•
MDC post-call signaling is also sent when there is a radio unkey due to Carrier Control Timeout
(CCT). Normal CCT alert tones occur prior to unkey.
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
6.26 LIGHTS AND SIRENS
The lights and sirens feature allows you to activate the siren/light combination defined for the
corresponding button. The siren and light functions are programmable via RPM for any combination of
siren and lights.
The Lights and Sirens feature requires an external lights and sirens controller.
NOTE
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select LIGHTS.
3. Select the desired option. The options available depend on radio
programming.
6.27 PUBLIC ADDRESS (PA)
To turn Public Address (PA) feature on/off and adjust the volume of the PA speaker:
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select PA.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
3. Select PA ENABLED to disable PA or select PA DISABLED to
enable PA.
4. Use (+) or (-) to set the volume.
6.28 SHORTCUT MENU
1. From the main display, select SHORTCUTS.
2. Select the desired task:
•
DISPLAY LOCKOUT – Locks the touch screen display. To
unlock, press the
button.
•
NUISANCE DELETE – Nuisance delete. This is grayed out
if not scanning or if the radio has declared an emergency.
•
ENCRYPTION – Enables or disables encryption.
•
DISPLAY ZONE NAME - Enable or disables the display of
the Zone name on the main display.
•
ENTER CHANNEL NUMBER – Allows you to manually
enter a channel number.
6.29 VEHICULAR REPEATER OPERATION
Refer to the VRS7000 Series Operator Manual (MM-018336-001) for detailed instructions on using the
XG-100M as part of the Vehicular Repeater System.
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7.
ADVANCED OPERATIONS
7.1
ENCRYPTION
7.1.1
Create Keys Using Harris Key Admin
Refer to the following documentation for advanced programming and setup instructions:
•
Harris OTAR Overview Manual - MM-008069-001
•
Network Key Manager Installation and Configuration Manual - MM-008070-001
•
Harris UAS Key Management Application Manual - MM-008068-001
•
Harris Key Manager Key Admin Overview and Operation Manual - MM1000019423
•
Harris Key Manager Key Loader Overview and Operation Manual - MM1000019424
•
Motorola® KVL 3000 Plus Key Variable Loader (KVL) User's Guide
•
Motorola KVL 4000 Key Variable Loader (KVL) User's Guide
If using Key Manager to create and load keys, ensure that you have version R5A or
later installed. Versions prior to R5A do not support the Unity radio.
NOTE
Harris Key Admin is part of the Harris Key Manager and is for use by the Crypto Officer (CO). The CO
creates a Master Set of keys from which a Distribution Set is produced. Using the Key Admin software,
the CO can save keys into Distribution key files for technicians to use in radios.
1. Select Start  Programs  Harris Key Manager  Harris Key Admin.
2. Select New Master Set, Open, or Import from Security Device. Refer to the Key Admin online
help for more information on creating keys.
3. When finished, create a Distribution Key File. A Distribution Key File is used with the Key Loader to
load key sets into the radio and cannot be edited. Refer to the Key Admin online help for more
information on creating the Distribution Key File.
7.1.2
7.1.2.1
Load encryption Keys
Load UKEKS with Key Loader and RPM (for OTAR-Enabled Systems)
UKEKs are loaded into Harris OTAR radios using the Key Loader application. Key Loader is a part of
Key Manager.
To load encryption keys:
1. Obtain the UKEK file and Storage Location Number (SLN) Binding Report information from the
Crypto Officer (CO).
Both AES and DES UKEKs can be contained within the same UKEK file
NOTE
2. If not already on, power-up the PC that has RPM and the Key Loader applications installed on it, and
start Windows®.
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3. Connect the radio to the PC using a USB cable (type A male to mini-type B).
NOTE
The Unity drivers must be installed before UKEKs can be loaded into the radio. The Unity
drivers may be found on the Key Loader CD (“unity setup.exe”) or on the Key Admin CD
(“unity setup.exe”).
4. Load the UKEK file from the Crypto Officer onto the PC.
5. Run the RPM application and setup the radio’s Mission Plan according the SLN Binding Report
information.
6. Setup the talk groups and the SLN mappings (Talk Group ID to SLN). This includes mapping SLNs
to the “System” keys (PSTN, All Call, etc.).
7. Select Options  P25 OTAR Options and set the following:
a. The OTAR Message Number Period (MNP) as defined by the System Administrator.
b. The radio’s Individual RSI (from the SLN Bindings Report).
c. The KMF’s RSI (from the SLN Bindings Report).
8. Program the Mission Plan to the radio.
9. Run the Key Loader application.
10. Open the UKEK file loaded in step 4.
11. Select the Target Device type and click the Load button.
12. The Key Loader reads the target device’s identifying information, retrieves a UKEK of the proper
algorithm type from the UKEK file, and downloads the UKEK to the target device at the proper SLN
and keyset with the proper key ID.
13. Click the Finish button to exit the Key Loader application. New UKEKs have are loaded and the
radio is now ready to accept TEKs via OTAR with the trunked radio network.
7.1.2.2
Load Keys Using Harris Key Loader
Harris Key Loader is part of Harris Key Manager and can be used by the Crypto Officer or Technician to
load the keys into the Unity radio.
Refer to the Harris Key Loader online help if additional information is required when performing this
procedure.
1. Connect the radio to the PC using a USB cable (CH-100) or serial cable (MRU).
2. Power on the radio, if not already.
3. On the radio, select MAIN MENU  SECURITY  HARRIS KEYFILL (SERIAL PORT).
4. On the PC, select Start  Programs  Harris Key Manager  Harris Key Loader.
5. At the Key Loader Welcome screen, click Next.
6. Select Load a Distribution Set into one or more devices.
7. Click Next.
8. Browse to the Key File and enter the password.
9. Click Next to validate the password and continue. If the password is incorrect, the screen will display
an error message.
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10. Select USB from the drop-down and click Next.
11. Select the Unity radio from the drop-down and click Load.
12. Click Finish.
7.1.2.3
Load Keys Using Motorola KVL Device
Type 3 Digital Encryption Standard Output Feedback (DES-OFB) and Advanced Encryption Standard,
256-bit (AES-256), encryption methods are supported. The Type 3 Encryption keys are loaded via a
Motorola KVL 3000 Plus device using Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA)/Project 25 (P25)
key fill device protocol. Make sure that valid keys have been created and stored in the KVL Device
before proceeding.
1. Power on the KVL Device.
2. Connect the KVL Device to XG-100M using cable 12099-0410-A1.
NOTE
Once the KVL 3000 Plus is connected, a keyset is established whether the keys are
loaded or not. You will need to zeroize to bring the XG-100M to a fully zeroized state
(Section 7.1.3).
3. At the radio, select MAIN MENU  SECURITY  OTHER KEYFILL. The KEYFILL
SCREEN is displayed. The radio can now accept keys from the KVL.
7.1.3
Zeroize All from Radio
It may be necessary to remove the keys because of compromise or expiration.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SECURITY.
3. Select ZEROIZE KEYS.
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4. Select YES if you want to remove the keys and keysets.
7.1.4
Protected Keys
The Protected Keys feature transfers P25 Voice Keys, from Harris Key Loader to the radio, that have
been wrapped (AES) or encrypted (DES) with Key Protection Keys (KPKs). KPKs are nothing more than
unprotected Key Encryption Keys (KEKs). The KPKs need to be loaded into the radio before the
Protected Keys are loaded. Once loaded into the radio, the KPKs will be used to unwrap (AES) or decrypt
(DES) the Protected Keys.
The radio must be placed into the key loading mode (see Section 7.1.2.2) in order to accept the KPKs and
P25 Voice Keys.
7.2
GLOBAL ENCRYPTION
When Global Encryption is enabled on the radio, Global Key is used for all encrypted transmissions until:
•
Global Encryption is disabled.
•
A new mission fill is activated.
•
The active keyset is changed.
•
The system is changed.
Global Encryption behavior is available on all channels that support encrypted communications.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SECURITY.
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3. Select GLOBAL ENCRYPTION to toggle to ENABLED.
4. Select GLOBAL KEY.
5. Select the desired global key. The numbered keys are assigned in
RPM.
6. The global key icon
7.3
is displayed on the main display.
SELECT KEYSET
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SECURITY.
3. Select ACTIVE KEYSET to toggle to the inactive keyset.
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7.4
OTAR CONFIGURATION
OTAR is the over the air rekeying from a KMF and must be enabled for the digital only channel using
RPM. For OTAR operation, the appropriate KEKs must be loaded into the radio using the Harris Key
Loader or a KVL 3000.
The KMF Configuration must include the RSI of the KMF and the appropriate Message Number Period.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SECURITY.
3. Select OTAR to toggle between ENABLED or DISABLED.
4. Select OTAR REKEY to request that the KMF updates the keys in
the radio.
7.5
ACTIVATE/VIEW MISSION PLAN
Mission plans contain radio programming information such as frequencies, channels, stations, and talk
groups. Up to 10 different mission plans can be stored in the radio, but only one can be activated at a
time.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select PROGRAM.
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3. Select a mission plan to open a popup with the options
ACTIVATE PLAN, VIEW PLAN INFO, or CANCEL.
4.
indicates the active mission plan.
If a plan is activated, the radio displays series of screens indicating
status. When complete, the radio returns to the main display.
You cannot activate a plan when the radio is
transmitting an emergency.
NOTE
A MISSION PLAN FAILED message may be displayed for errors
such as invalid syntax in the fill or some other invalid parameter.
7.6
USER-DEFINED ZONES/SYSTEMS
7.6.1
Command Tactical Zone
The Command Tactical Zone is defined “on-the-fly” at the radio.
A Command Tactical Zone is reset when a Mission Plan is activated.
NOTE
To create or edit a Command Tactical Zone:
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select ZONES.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
3. Select
next to <USER-DEFINED>.
•
Select EDIT ZONE to create/edit a Command Tactical Zone.
•
Select VIEW ZONE to view the groups and/or channels
included in the Command Tactical Zone.
•
Select RENAME ZONE to rename the Command Tactical
Zone (up to 16 characters are allowed).
•
Select CLEAR ZONE to clear an existing Command Tactical
Zone. You cannot clear a zone if it is active.
4. From the EDIT menu, select the system.
5. Select the desired channel/group. Select
7.6.2
Mixed System/Zone
Mixed System Zones are defined in RPM and cannot be edited on the radio. If a Mixed System Zone is
not configured in RPM, it will not appear on the radio. Up to 50 Mixed System Zones can be defined.
On the ZONE/SYSTEMS screen, mixed Systems/Zones are indicated
by the
46
icon.
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7.7
CH INFORMATION MENU
The Channel Information (CHANNEL INFO) menu displays information about the currently selected
channel. Note that the information displayed varies between conventional and trunked systems.
1. From the main display, select the channel to display the channel
information.
2. Additional settings can be found by scrolling down.
7.8
EDIT CHANNEL (ANALOG AND P25 CONVENTIONAL ONLY)
Channels can be edited from the Channel Information (CH INFO) menu display if enabled via
programming. Most of the displayed channel parameters can be modified here. Channel edits persist
across a power cycle. Loading a mission plan clears any channel edits. Available parameters vary
depending on whether the channel is a digital or analog channel.
1. From the main display, select the channel to display the channel
information.
2. Select EDIT CHAN.
3. Enter the password programmed via RPM.
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14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
4. Edit parameters as necessary. Refer to Maintenance Manual
14221-1200-5000 for a full description of the available parameters.
7.9
SETTINGS MENU
The settings menu allows you to change global radio settings such as audio, display, GPS, Bluetooth,
clock, and battery settings.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SETTINGS.
Refer to the Section 7.9.1 for more information on the available
settings.
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7.9.1
Audio Settings
Set audio settings such as noise cancellation, master vol. control, external speaker, external speaker
volume, MRU Volume, accessory power, touch screen tones.
1. From the Settings Menu, select AUDIO SETTINGS.
2. Select and change settings as desired:
•
NOISE CANCELLATION - Enable or disable noise
cancellation. Noise cancellation reduces background noise
during transmit.
•
EXTERNAL SPEAKER - Enable or disable the external
speaker.
•
MRU VOLUME – Adjust the radio volume.
•
TOUCH SCREEN TONE – When enabled, a tone sounds
when an option is selected from the touch screen.
•
MASTER VOL CONTROL – Enable or disable the master
volume control. When enabled, it allows remote control heads
to control the volume of the speaker attached to the back of the
MRU. When disabled, the volume knob on a remote mount
control head only controls the volume of the speaker attached
to the control head.
•
EXT. SPEAKER VOL – Adjust the external speaker volume.
•
ACCESSORY POWER – Turn accessory power on or off.
In front mount configurations, MASTER VOL
CONTROL and MRU VOLUME are not available.
NOTE
3. Use
to exit menu.
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7.9.2
Display Settings
1. From the Settings Menu, select DISPLAY SETTINGS.
2. Select and change settings as desired.
7.9.3
GPS Settings
1. From the Settings Menu, select GPS SETTINGS.
2. Select and change settings as desired:
50
•
LINEAR UNITS - Set unit of measurement of displayed
linear units: STATUTE, METRIC, or NAUTICAL.
•
ANGULAR UNITS - Set unit of measurement of displayed
angular units: CARDINAL, DEGREES, or MILS.
•
POSITION FORMAT- Set format of displayed position
information: Latitude/Longitude Degrees Minutes Seconds
(LAT/LONG DMS), LAT/LONG DM, Military Grid
Reference System (MGRS), or Universal Transverse Mercator
(UTM).
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7.9.4
Bluetooth
Bluetooth settings only appear if enabled in RPM.
1. From the Settings Menu, select BLUETOOTH SETTINGS.
2. Select ENABLED to toggle between YES (enabled) and NO
(disabled).
3. Select PAIRED DEVICES to view all Bluetooth devices currently
paired with the radio.
4. Select
devices.
to delete a device. Select
to delete all paired
5. Select FIND DEVICE. This is used to pair the radio with another
Bluetooth device.
6. Make sure device being paired is powered on and has discovery
mode enabled to pair the device with the XG-100M.
7. Select the desired device.
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For Bluetooth 2.0 devices, a pin code screen appears.
8. Enter pin code.
9. Select OK.
For Bluetooth 2.1 devices, an accept/deny screen appears.
10. Select ACCEPT.
You will also need to accept the passkey on the
Bluetooth 2.1 device.
NOTE
A message appears when pairing is complete.
11. Select OK. The paired device is then displayed under the paired
devices list.
Names containing extended ASCII characters may not
display correctly
NOTE
12. Select FRIENDLY NAME. This is the Bluetooth name assigned
to the radio. The friendly name programmed by RPM will
overwrite this setting.
13. Enter the name from the keypad displayed on the touch screen and
select DONE when finished.
14. Select DISCOVERABLE to turn on discovery mode so other
Bluetooth devices can discover the XG-100M.
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15. Select OK. Discovery mode will be enabled for two minutes.
16. The DISCOVERABLE menu item turns red for the two minutes
that Discovery mode is enabled.
7.9.5
Clock Settings
1. From the Settings Menu, select CLOCK SETTINGS.
2. Select the setting to change.
•
DISPLAY TIME - Set 12 or 24 hour time display format.
•
TIME ZONE - Set time zone relative to Universal Time
Coordinated (UTC).
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7.10 SET UP SCAN
These procedures are used to set up the scan list, home channels, and priority channels. Refer to 6.18.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select SCAN.
3. Refer to the information in Sections 7.10.1 through 7.10.5.
When using Preemptive Priority Scan, the frequencies in the list need to be unique.
NOTE
7.10.1 Home, Priority 1, and Priority 2 Channels
7.10.1.1 Home Channel
This is the channel you transmit on by default when you press PTT while the radio is actively scanning
and is not responding to a just received call. Responding to a call the radio just received while scanning is
called hang time. If hang time is set to 0 in RPM, the radio always transmits on the home channel in scan.
7.10.1.2 Priority 1 Channel
This channel will be scanned more often than other channels in the list and will be scanned in between
every other channel in the scan list. An example scan sequence would be P1 (priority 1), C2, P1, C3, P1,
C4, etc. Also, the priority channel will be scanned even while actively receiving on a non-priority
channel. For example, if the radio is actively receiving on C3 and activity is detected on P1, the radio will
drop C3 and switch to P1.
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7.10.1.3 Priority 2 Channel
This channel will also be scanned more often than others. An example scan sequence would be P1, C2,
P1, C3, P1, C4, P2, C5, P1, C6, P1, C7, P1, C8, P2, C9 etc. Also, this channel will be scanned even while
actively receiving on a non-priority channel. For example, if the radio is actively receiving on C3 and
activity is detected on P2, the radio will drop C3 and switch to P2. Additionally, activity on P1 preempts
P2, but P2 cannot preempt P1.
7.10.2 Trunked/Conventional Scanning
Trunked/conventional scanning adds the ability to scan multiple conventional and P25 conventional
channels while still maintaining P25 trunked radio operation. In essence, the radio is able to scan a
conventional scan list while still receiving a P25 trunked control channel and receiving P25 trunked calls.
Selection of which conventional scan list is associated with a given trunked system is done in RPM and
cannot be changed on the radio. However, a user with sufficient UI privilege level (see Section 6.11) is
allowed to edit the scan list members (both trunked groups and conventional channels on the selected
Conventional Priority System). As the number of conventional channels being scanned increases, the
time between scanning each channel increases (roughly 250 milliseconds per channel), with the
consequent increase in the number of calls that will late-enter. In order to avoid missing calls, it is
recommended to keep the number of conventional channels being scanned to eight (8) or fewer.
The trunking site must have roaming set to Enhanced CC.
NOTE
7.10.3 Vote Scan (Analog and P25 Conventional Only)
If Vote Scan is enabled via RPM, the radio automatically selects the strongest signal ensuring that the best
audio quality is delivered to the user. If Vote Scan is enabled, the radio is always scanning. You cannot
stop scanning, start normal scanning, or monitor the channel. There is an icon in the upper status bar
indicating that the radio is Vote Scanning.
If Talkaround is enabled, Vote Scan is turned off.
NOTE
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7.10.4 Set or Remove Priority 1 and Priority 2 Channels
Priority channels are scanned more often than non-priority channels. Note that P1 can be configured via
RPM as “Keypad,” “Fixed,” or “Selected.”
P2 can be configured via RPM as “Keypad” or “Fixed.”
Zone scan configuration screens are shown below. Group scan configuration is similar.
1. Enter Set up Scan (see Section 7.10) and select GROUP LIST or
ZONE LIST.
2. Select
next to the name of the scan list.
3. Select the desired channel.
4. Select SET PRIORITY 1, SET PRIORITY 2, DELETE
CHANNEL, NUISANCE or CANCEL.
7.10.5 Wide Area System Scan (P25 Trunked Only)
Wide Area System Scan (WASCAN) causes the radio to roam across mobile systems when the currently
selected system's control channel is lost. The radio will scan the control channels of other systems.
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
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2. Select SCAN.
3. Select SITE ROAMING to enable or disable Wide Area System
Scan.
7.11 MESSAGE MENU
7.11.1 Radio Status
The status feature is used to send a particular status condition to the site without making a voice call.
There can be up to 10 status conditions programmed into the radio. For each status defined, there is an ID
and an alphanumeric name. The ID is sent to the site and the alphanumeric name appears on the radio
display when the ID corresponds with the information programmed at the site.
1. At main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select MESSAGES.
3. Select RADIO STATUS.
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4. Select desired message. The
icon changes to an arrow to
indicate active status after the status has been sent and is
acknowledged by the site.
7.11.2 Radio Message
The message feature is used to send a particular message to the site without making a voice call. There
can be up to 10 messages programmed into the radio. For each message defined, there is an ID and an
alphanumeric name. The ID is sent to the site and the alphanumeric name appears on the radio display
when the ID corresponds with the information programmed at the site.
1. At main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select MESSAGES.
3. Select RADIO MESSAGE.
4. Select the desired message. The
icon changes to an arrow to
indicate active status after the message has been sent and is
acknowledged by the site.
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7.11.3 Radio TextLink (P25 Trunked Only)
Radio TextLink provides short text messaging functionality for radios. Because of the difficulty of
entering text messages on a radio, predefined "canned" messages and predefined replies can be stored in
the radio. To facilitate sending messages where information must be provided at send time, text message
forms will also be stored in the radio. A form contains up to four (4) text prompts, for which the operator
enters alphanumeric values before sending the message.
7.11.3.1 Radio TextLink Messages
1. At main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select MESSAGES.
3. Select TEXTLINK MSGS.
4. Select the desired message.
5. Select SEND to send the message, or select CHANGE CALLEE
to change message destination.
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7.11.3.2 Radio TextLink Forms
Form messages are displayed and stored in the radio as a message in which each field to be filled is
indicated by a question mark (?) followed by one or more asterisks(*). The number of asterisks indicates
the maximum number of alphanumeric characters allowed for that field.
1. At main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select MESSAGES.
3. Select TEXTLINK FORMS.
4. Select the desired form.
5. Enter text into blank field(s) (up to 8 alpha-numeric characters).
6. Select SEND to send the message. Select CHANGE CALLEE to
change the message destination.
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7.11.3.3 View Received Messages
When the
icon appears on main display, there are Radio TextLink messages waiting to be read.
1. At main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select MESSAGES.
3. Select RX TXTLNK MSGS.
7.11.4 Faults/Alerts
If the alert icon
is displayed on the main display, you can view details about the alert from the
MESSAGES MENU:
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select MESSAGES.
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3. Select FAULTS/ALERTS.
4. Observe messages in display.
deletes the selected message.
deletes all messages.
NOTE: The alert icon goes away when you go to the message display
(unless a new fault occurs).
7.12 UTILITIES MENU
1. From the main display, select MAIN MENU.
2. Select UTILITIES.
3. Select RADIO INFO to view radio information such as software
and firmware revisions.
4. Observe the RADIO INFO display.
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5. Select FEATURE INFO to view the features enabled on the
radio.
6. Select SERIAL PORT MODE to specify ASCII or MDT.
7. Select ICON GLOSSARY to view descriptions of the icons
displayed by the radio.
8. Select TESTS. Note that this option is only available when
enabled via programming and requires a password to access the
available tests. From this screen, you can select a pattern test or
IBER (modulation) test to run. Refer to Maintenance Manual
14221-1200-5000 for more information.
9. Select RSSI. Enable or Disable DISPLAY RSSI. When enabled,
RSSI is displayed on the RSSI screen and in the bottom right
corner of the main display.
7.13 OTAP
Radios with R3A and later software support Over-the-Air-Programming (OTAP) via ProFile Manager.
RPM creates, modifies and stores personality information while ProFile Manager delivers the personality
over the network to the desired radios. ProFile Manager also contains the ability to read personality
information over-the-air and save the files, so that RPM can modify the information if necessary.
Interrupt the programming process, if necessary, by depressing the Push-to-Talk (PTT) button or
declaring an emergency. Once a radio personality update is successfully completed, the radio
automatically resets itself, switches to the new personality, and returns to normal operation.
For more information on using ProFile Manager, refer to software release notes AE/LZT 123 3263/1.
7.14 PPP/SLIP
The radio can be configured to act as a Mobile Data Terminal (MDT). An MDT is essentially a portable
computer capable of transmitting data messages via an RF communications link. Refer to Appendix A for
instructions on how to setup PPP and SLIP connections between the radio and a Mobile Data Peripheral
(MDP).
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8.
REFERENCE
8.1
MARINE FREQUENCIES
Refer to Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies for a list of maritime frequencies per United States Coast Guard
(USCG), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Canadian Department
Fisheries and Oceans, August 2009:
•
United States (US)
•
International (Intl)
•
Canada (CA)
Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies
CHANNEL
US
INTL
1
CA
1
1a
CHANNEL USAGE
T: 156.05
R: 160.65
T: 160.65
R: 156.05
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.05
T/R:
156.05
US: Port Operations and Commercial, Vessel Traffic Service (VTS). New
Orleans/Lower Mississippi area.
2
2
T: 156.10
R: 160.70
T: 160.70
R: 156.10
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
3
3
T: 156.15
R: 160.75
T: 160.75
R: 156.15
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T: 156.20
R: 160.80
T: 160.80
R: 156.20
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.20
T/R:
156.20
Canada: Department Fisheries Ocean (DFO)/Canadian Coast Guard only in
British Columbia coast area. Commercial fishing in east coast area
T: 156.25
R: 160.85
T: 160.85
R: 156.25
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
5a
T/R:
156.25
T/R:
156.25
US: Port Operations or VTS in Houston, New Orleans and Seattle areas.
6
T/R:
156.30
T/R:
156.30
US: Intership Safety
International: Intership
Canada: May be used for search and rescue communications between ships
and aircraft.
T: 156.35
R: 160.95
T: 160.95
R: 156.35
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
7a
T/R:
156.35
T/R:
156.35
US: Commercial
4
4a
5
5a
6
FREQUENCY
SHIP
SHORE
(MHZ)
(MHZ)
6
7
7a
8
8
8
T/R:
156.40
T/R:
156.40
US: Commercial (Intership only)
International: Intership
Canada: Also assigned for intership in the Lake Winnipeg area.
9
9
9
T/R:
156.45
T/R:
156.45
US: Boater Calling. Commercial and Non-Commercial.
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: Commercial - British Columbia coast area.
May be used to communicate with aircraft and helicopters in predominantly
maritime support operations.
64
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies
CHANNEL
US
INTL
CA
FREQUENCY
SHIP
SHORE
(MHZ)
(MHZ)
CHANNEL USAGE
10
10
10
T/R:
156.50
T/R:
156.50
US: Commercial
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: Commercial - British Columbia coast area.
May also be used for communications with aircraft engaged in coordinated
search and rescue and antipollution operations.
11
11
11
T/R:
156.55
T/R:
156.55
US: Commercial. VTS in selected areas.
International: Port Operations
Canada: VTS - British Columbia coast area.
Also used for pilotage purposes.
12
12
12
T/R:
156.60
T/R:
156.60
US: Port Operations. VTS in selected areas.
International: Port Operations
Canada: VTS - British Columbia coast area.
Also used for pilotage purposes.
13
13
13
T/R:
156.65
T/R:
156.65
US: Intership Navigation Safety (Bridge-to-bridge). Ships >20m length
maintain a listening watch on this channel in US waters.
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: VTS - British Columbia coast area.
Also used for pilotage purposes.
14
14
14
T/R:
156.70
T/R:
156.70
US: Port Operations. VTS in selected areas.
International: Port Operations
Canada: VTS - British Columbia coast area.
Also used for pilotage purposes.
15
15
15
T/R:
156.75
T/R:
156.75
US: Environmental (Receive only). Used by Class C Emergency PositionIndicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs).
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: Port operations and Ship Movement - British Columbia coast area.
All operations limited to 1-watt maximum power. May also be used for onboard communications.
16
16
16
T/R:
156.80
T/R:
156.80
US: International Distress, Safety and Calling. Ships required to carry radio,
US Coast Guard (USCG), and most coast stations maintain a listening watch
on this channel.
International: International Distress, Safety and Calling
Canada: International Distress, Safety and Calling
17
17
17
T/R:
156.85
T/R:
156.85
US: State Control
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: Port operations and Ship Movement - British Columbia coast area.
All operations limited to 1 watt maximum power. May also be used for onboard communications.
T: 156.90
R: 161.50
T: 161.50
R: 156.90
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.90
T/R:
156.90
US: Commercial
Canada: Towing - British Columbia coast area.
T: 156.95
R: 161.55*
T: 161.55*
R: 156.95
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.95
T/R:
156.95
US: Commercial
Canada: DFO/Canadian Coast Guard. Pacific Pilots - British Columbia coast
area.
18
18a
18a
19
19a
19a
65
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies
CHANNEL
US
20
INTL
20
CA
20
T: 161.60
R: 157.00
US: Port Operations (Duplex)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
Canada: Port operations only with 1 watt maximum power.
T/R:
157.00
T/R:
157.00
US: Port Operations
T: 157.05
R: 161.65*
T: 161.65*
R: 157.05
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
21a
T/R:
157.05
T/R:
157.05
US: US Coast Guard only
Canada: DFO/Canadian Coast Guard only.
21b
--
T/R:
161.65
T: 157.10
R: 161.70
T: 161.70
R: 157.10
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
22a
T/R:
157.10
T/R:
157.10
US: Coast Guard Liaison and Maritime Safety Information Broadcasts.
Broadcasts announced on channel 16.
Canada: For communications between Canadian Coast Guard and nonCanadian Coast Guard stations only.
23
T: 157.15
R: 161.75
T: 161.75
R: 157.15
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
157.15
T/R:
157.15
US: US Coast Guard only
23b
--
T/R:
161.75
Canada: Continuous Marine Broadcast (CMB) service.
21
22
22a
23
CHANNEL USAGE
T: 157.00
R: 161.60
20a
21a
FREQUENCY
SHIP
SHORE
(MHZ)
(MHZ)
23a
24
24
24
T: 157.20
R: 161.80
T: 161.80
R: 157.20
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
25
25
25
T: 157.25
R: 161.85
T: 161.85
R: 157.25
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
Canada: Also assigned for operations in the Lake Winnipeg area.
25b
T/R:
161.85
26
26
26
T: 157.30
R: 161.90
T: 161.90
R: 157.30
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
27
27
27
T: 157.35
R: 161.95
T: 161.95
R: 157.35
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
28
28
28
T: 157.40
R: 162.00
T: 162.00
R: 157.40
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
28b
--
T/R:
162.00
Canada: Continuous Marine Broadcast (CMB) service.
60
T: 156.025
R: 160.625
T: 160.625
R: 156.025
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T: 156.075
R: 160.675
T: 160.675
R: 156.075
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.075
T/R:
156.075
Canada: DFO/Canadian Coast Guard only in British Columbia coast area.
60
61
61a
66
61a
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies
CHANNEL
US
INTL
CA
62
T: 160.725
R: 156.125
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.125
T/R:
156.125
Canada: DFO/Canadian Coast Guard only in British Columbia coast area.
T: 156.175
R: 160.775
T: 160.775
R: 156.175
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
63a
T/R:
156.175
T/R:
156.175
US: Port Operations and Commercial, VTS. New Orleans/Lower Mississippi
area.
Canada: Tow Boats - British Columbia coast area.
64
T: 156.225
R: 160.825
T: 160.825
R: 156.225
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
64a
T/R:
156.225
T/R:
156.225
Canada: Commercial fishing only.
T: 156.275
R: 160.875
T: 160.875
R: 156.225
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.275
T/R:
156.275
US: Port Operations
Canada: Search and rescue and antipollution operations on the Great Lakes.
Towing on the Pacific Coast. Port operations only in the St. Lawrence River
areas with 1 watt maximum power. Intership in inland Manitoba,
Saskatchewan, and Alberta areas.
T: 156.325
R: 160.925
T: 160.925
R: 156.325
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
66a
T/R:
156.325
T/R:
156.325
US: Port Operations
Canada: Port operations only in the St. Lawrence River/Great Lakes areas
with 1 watt maximum power. 1 watt marina channel - British Columbia coast
area.
63
64
64a
65
65a
65a
66
66a
CHANNEL USAGE
T: 156.125
R: 160.725
62a
63a
FREQUENCY
SHIP
SHORE
(MHZ)
(MHZ)
67
67
67
T/R:
156.375
T/R:
156.375
US: Commercial. Used for Bridge-to-bridge communications in lower Miss.
River. Intership only.
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: May also be used for communications with aircraft engaged in
coordinated search and rescue and antipollution operations. Commercial
fishing only in east coast and inland Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
areas. Pleasure craft - British Columbia coast area.
68
68
68
T/R:
156.425
T/R:
156.425
US: Non-Commercial
International: Port Operations
Canada: For marinas, yacht clubs and pleasure craft.
69
69
69
T/R:
156.475
T/R:
156.475
US: Non-Commercial
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: Commercial fishing only - east coast area.
Pleasure craft - British Columbia coast area.
70
70
70
T/R:
156.525
T/R:
156.525
US: Digital Selective Calling (voice communications not allowed)
International: Digital selective calling for distress, safety and calling
Canada: Digital selective calling for distress, safety and calling
71
71
71
T/R:
156.575
T/R:
156.575
US: Non-Commercial
International: Port Operations
Canada: Ship Movement - British Columbia coast area.Marinas and yacht
clubs - east coast and on Lake Winnipeg.
67
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies
CHANNEL
US
INTL
CA
FREQUENCY
SHIP
SHORE
(MHZ)
(MHZ)
CHANNEL USAGE
72
72
72
T/R:
156.625
T/R:
156.625
US: Non-Commercial (Intership only)
International: Intership
Canada: May be used to communicate with aircraft and helicopters in
predominantly maritime support operations.
Pleasure craft - British Columbia coast area
73
73
73
T/R:
156.675
T/R:
156.675
US: Port Operations
International: Intership, Port Operations
Canada: May also be used for communications with aircraft engaged in
coordinated search and rescue and antipollution operations. Commercial
fishing only in east coast and inland Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta
areas.
74
74
74
T/R:
156.725
T/R:
156.725
US: Port Operations
International: Port Operations
Canada: VTS and Ship Movement British Columbia coast area.
75
75
75
T/R:
156.775
T/R:
156.775
International: Port Operations
Canada: Simplex port operation, ship movement and navigation related
communication only.
1 watt maximum.
76
76
76
T/R:
156.825
T/R:
156.825
International: Port Operations
Canada: Simplex port operation, ship movement and navigation related
communication only.
1 watt maximum.
77
77
77
T/R:
156.875
T/R:
156.875
US: Port Operations (Intership only)
International: Intership
Canada: Pilotage - British Columbia coast area; 25 watts. Port operations only
in the St. Lawrence River/Great Lakes areas with 1 watt maximum power.
T: 156.925
R: 161.525
T: 161.525
R: 156.925
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.925
T/R:
156.925
US: Non-Commercial
Canada: Fishing Industry - British Columbia coast area.
T: 156.975
R: 161.575
T: 161.575
R: 156.975
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
156.975
T/R:
156.975
US: Commercial. Non-Commercial in Great Lakes only
Canada: Fishing Industry - British Columbia coast area.
T: 157.025
R: 161.625
T: 161.625
R: 157.025
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
157.025
T/R:
157.025
US: Commercial. Non-Commercial in Great Lakes only
Canada: Fishing Industry - British Columbia coast area.
T: 157.075
R: 161.675
T: 161.675
R: 157.075
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
157.075
T/R:
157.075
US: US Government only - Environmental protection operations
Canada: DFO/Canadian Coast Guard use only.
T: 157.125
R: 161.725
T: 161.725
R: 157.125
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
T/R:
157.125
T/R:
157.125
US: US. Government only
Canada: DFO/Canadian Coast Guard use only.
78
78a
78a
79
79a
79a
80
80a
80a
81
81a
81a
82
82a
68
82a
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
Table 8-1: Marine Frequencies
CHANNEL
US
INTL
CA
83
83a
FREQUENCY
SHIP
SHORE
(MHZ)
(MHZ)
CHANNEL USAGE
T: 157.175
R: 161.775
T: 161.775
R: 157.175
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
83a
T/R:
157.175
T/R:
157.175
US: US Coast Guard only
Canada: DFO/Canadian Coast Guard and other Government agencies.
83b
--
T/R:
161.775
84
84
84
T: 157.225
R: 161.825
T: 161.825
R: 157.225
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
85
85
85
T: 157.275
R: 161.875
T: 161.875
R: 157.275
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
86
86
86
T: 157.325
R: 161.925
T: 161.925
R: 157.325
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
International: Public Correspondence, Port Operations
87
87
87
T: 157.375
R: 161.975
T: 161.975
R: 157.375
US: Automatic Identification System duplex repeater
International: Port Operations
Canada: Port operation and ship movement - east coast area.
Pleasure craft - British Columbia coast area.
T/R:
157.375
T/R:
157.375
US: Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
87b
T/R:
161.975
T/R:
161.975
Canada: Automatic Ship Identification and Surveillance System.
88
T: 157.425
R: 162.025
T: 162.025
R: 157.425
US: Commercial, Intership only.
International: Port Operations
Canada: Port operation and ship movement - British Columbia coast area.
T/R:
157.425
T/R:
157.425
US: Commercial, Intership only.
Canada: Automatic Ship Identification and Surveillance System.
T/R:
162.025
T/R:
162.025
87a
88
88a
88b
WX1
WX1
R: 162.55
WX2
WX2
R: 162.4
WX3
WX3
R: 162.475
WX4
R: 162.425
WX5
R: 162.45
WX6
R: 162.5
WX7
R: 162.525
69
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
8.2
ACCESSORIES
Only use Harris approved accessories. Contact Harris for requirements not contained in this list:
Table 8-2: Options and Accessories for the Unity XG-100M Mobile Radios
PART NUMBER
AN-125001-002
AN-125001-004
AN-125001-006
AN-125001-008
AN-025187-001
AN-025187-003
CA-012349-001
CA-013671-020
CN-014756
DESCRIPTION
Standard Rooftop Antenna Mount
Thick Rooftop Antenna Mount
GPS Combo Rooftop Antenna Mount
Magnetic Antenna Mount
GPS Antenna, Roof-Mount
GPS Antenna, Magnet Mount
Option Cable
Serial Data Cable (20 feet)
RF Connector
Table 8-3: Options and Accessories for the CH-100 Control Head
PART NUMBER
CA-009562-006
CA-009562-030
CA-009562-090
CA-009562-250
MAMROS0075-N1210
MAMROS0075-N1220
MAMROS0075-R1210
MAMROS0075-R1220
MACDOS0012
12099-1501-01
MACDOS0013-CN004
FS24473
MC-101616-041
MC-103334-041
MC-103334-051
344A4678P1
CD-014027-001
MACDOS0010
12082-0681-01
70
DESCRIPTION
CAN Cable; 6 feet, Right-Angle-to-Straight Connectors
CAN Cable; 30 feet, Right-Angle-to-Straight Connectors
CAN Cable; 90 feet, Right-Angle-to-Straight Connectors
CAN Cable; 250 feet, Right-Angle-to-Straight Connectors
DC Power Cable; 12-AWG, 10-Foot, Straight Connector
DC Power Cable; 12-AWG, 20-Foot, Straight Connector
DC Power Cable; 12-AWG, 10-Foot, Right-Angle Connector
DC Power Cable; 12-AWG, 20-Foot, Right-Angle Connector
Control Head Gimbal Mounting Pedestal Kit (Includes Gimbal Mounting Pedestal
and (4) #8-32 Pan-Head Screws)
Pedestal Mounting Kit for Control Head
Speaker Kit
Vehicle Fuse and T-Tap Kit
Standard Microphone
DTMF Microphone
Noise-Canceling Microphone
Microphone Hanger
CAN Terminator; Straight Body
CAN Terminator; Right-Angle Body
Bluetooth Speaker Microphone
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
9.
GLOSSARY
-AAES
AES-256
AMBE+2
ANSI
ASCII
Advanced Encryption Standard
Advanced Encryption Standard, 256-bit
Advanced Multi-Band Excitation implementation 2
American National Standards Institute
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
-B-C-
C
CA
CDCSS
CH INFO
CKR
CMB
CTCSS
Celsius
Canada
Continuous Digital Coded Squelch System
Channel Information
Common Key References
Continuous Marine Broadcast
Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System
-D-
DES
DES-OFB
DFO
DMS
Digital Encryption Standard
Digital Encryption Standard Output Feedback
Department Fisheries Ocean
Degrees Minutes Seconds
-E-
EPIRB
Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacons
-F-
F
FCC
FM
Fahrenheit
Federal Communications Commission
Frequency Modulation
-G-
GHz
GEOTRANS
GPS
Giga (109) Hertz
Geographic Translator
Global Positioning System
-H-
Hz
HKL
Hertz
Harris Key Loader
-I-
ID
IEEE
INTL
Identification
Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers
International
-J-
71
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
-KKEK
kHz
KID
KMF
KMS
KS
KVL
Key Encryption Key
kilo (103) Hertz
Key Identification
Key Management Facility
Key Management System
Key Set
Key Variable Loader (Motorola KVL 3000 Plus)
-L-
LAT/LONG DMS
LED
Latitude/Longitude Degrees Minutes Seconds
Light Emitting Diode
-M-
MHz
mm
MRU
ms
Megahertz
Millimeter
Mobile Radio Unit
milli (10-3) seconds
-N-
NAC
NOAA
Network Access Code
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
-O-
OET
OTAR
Office of Engineering and Technology
Over-The-Air Rekey
-P-
P25
POS
PRI
PTT
Project 25
Position
Priority (Channel)
Push-to-Talk
-Q-R-
RF
RPM
RSI
RSM
RX
Radio Frequency
Radio Personality Manager
Radio Set Identifier
Remote Speaker Microphone
Receive
-S-
SMA
Subminiature version A
-T-
TIA
TX
72
Telecommunications Industry Association
Transmit
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
-UUHF
UKEK
US
USCG
UTC
UTM
Ultra High Frequency
Unique Key Encryption Key
United States
United States Coast Guard
Universal Time Coordinated
Universal Transverse Mercator
-V-
VDC
VHF
VTS
Volts, Direct Current
Very High Frequency
Vessel Traffic Service
-W-
WEEE
Waste from Electric and Electronic Equipment
-X-Y-Z-
73
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
10. BASIC TROUBLESHOOTING
10.1 ERROR MESSAGES
This section provides a list of error messages, as well as possible causes and solutions.
SCREEN
TEXT
REASON
DELETE NOT
ALLOWED
Nuisance delete not allowed on
current channel.
Requires new Mission Plan
configuration (either
Limited/Programmable scan lists
or Keypad P1/P2 channels).
EMERGENCY ACTIVE
SCAN DISABLED
Cannot scan when transmitting an
emergency.
Exit emergency to start scanning.
OTAR REKEY FAILED
OTAR ZEROIZE
FAILED
Attempt OTAR operation again.
Self-explanatory
NO OTAR KEK
LOADED
Top Level Display
Bluetooth Pairing
Screen
Channel Edit Screen
Mission Plan List
Screen
74
RESOLUTION
Attempt OTAR operation again.
Load valid KEK before attempting
OTAR.
INVALID OTAR
KEYSETS
OTAR configuration failed because
keysets were improperly configured.
Zeroize keys and reload KEK(s)
before attempting OTAR.
INVALID KEYSTORE
ZEROIZE NEEDED
Corrupt key database.
Zeroize database.
SYNTH OUT OF LOCK
DSP synthesizer out of lock.
Channel will reselect
automatically to attempt to obtain
synth lock.
SYNTH OUT OF LOCK
POWER CYCLE RADIO
DSP synthesizer out of lock - unable
to restore by reselecting channel.
Unable to obtain synthesizer lock.
Power cycle radio and contact
Harris if problem persists.
VERSION MISMATCH
Displayed if there is a software
version mismatch between the control
head and the MRU.
Update the software in one or
both devices using RPM.
PAIRING FAILED
Bluetooth pairing failed.
Ensure device is discoverable
and attempt to re-pair the device.
PIN CODE MUST
HAVE AT LEAST 4
DIGITS
The PIN entered is too short.
Enter at least four digits.
EDIT FAILED
Unable to modify P25 Channel.
Power cycle and try again-contact Harris if problem persists.
INVALID RX
FREQUENCY
Entered Rx frequency is invalid.
Ensure frequency follows band
spacing rules.
INVALID TX
FREQUENCY
Entered Tx frequency is invalid.
Ensure frequency follows band
spacing rules.
INVALID CODE
Code entered is not a valid CDCSS
code.
Ensure code is valid.
EMERGENCY ACTIVE
FILL DISABLED
Cannot activate mission plans when
transmitting an emergency.
Exit emergency to activate a new
mission plan.
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
SCREEN
TEXT
REASON
RESOLUTION
INSTALL NOT
ALLOWED
Error during install process.
Transfer the file again and
reattempt install. Contact Harris if
problem persists.
EXTRACTION FAILED
Extraction of compressed file failed.
Transfer file again and reattempt
install. Contact Harris if problem
persists.
REMOVE FAILED
Removal of existing software failed
Attempt to install again and
contact Harris if problem persists.
PLAN FAILED
Mission plan activation failed.
Use RPM to ensure plan validity.
Contact Harris if failures persist.
ZEROIZE FAILED
DSP could not zeroize
DSP problem — power cycle the
radio and contact Harris if
problem persists.
NO KEYS TO ZEROIZE
Key database empty.
Nothing to zeroize.
Utilities Menu
INCORRECT
PASSWORD
Maintenance password invalid.
Enter a valid maintenance
password.
Channel Info Screen
INCORRECT
PASSWORD
Channel edit password invalid.
Enter valid channel edit
password.
Install Operations
Mission Plan In
Progress Screen
Security Menu
10.2 OTAR ERRORS/INFORMATION
WORKAROUNDS:
1. Zeroize.
2. Load proper KEK from the Motorola KVL or Harris Key Loader.
IF RADIO INDICATES:
1. INVALID KEYSTORE ZEROIZE NEEDED:
This occurs if the radio’s keys were loaded by the Harris Key Loader followed by an attempt to load
UKEKs with the Key Loader or keys with the Motorola KVL. Fix by performing workaround 1,
followed by 2.
2. NO UKEK – Displayed during a zeroize performed from the radio or a zeroize initiated from the
KMF.
- Fix by performing workaround 2.
3. Zeroize Complete – KMF has zeroized the radio.
- Fix by performing workaround 2.
4. Gray OTAR Icon (no red slash) – OTAR has not registered with tower (Conventional or Trunked
system).
- Fix by verifying proper frequencies.
- If the radio is turned to the OTAR channel out of range of a conventional tower, and then comes
in range after 3 minutes, fix by issuing an OTAR. Rekey, leaving and re-enter the OTAR channel.
5. Green OTAR Icon – OTAR is registered, all is well.
- If update fails, verify you are in range of the tower and the KEK is correct.
6. Blue OTAR Icon – OTAR is attempting to rekey.
- If rekey fails, verify you are in range of the tower and the KEK is correct.
75
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
11. CUSTOMER SERVICE
11.1 CUSTOMER CARE
If any part of the system equipment is damaged on arrival, contact the shipper to conduct an inspection
and prepare a damage report. Save the shipping container and all packing materials until the inspection
and the damage report are completed. In addition, contact the Customer Care center to make
arrangements for replacement equipment. Do not return any part of the shipment until you receive
detailed instructions from a Harris representative.
Contact the Customer Care center at http://www.pspc.harris.com/CustomerService or:
North America:
Phone Number:
1-800-368-3277
Fax Number:
1-321-409-4393
E-mail:
PSPC_CustomerFocus@harris.com
International:
Phone Number:
1-434-455-6403
Fax Number:
1-321-409-4394
E-mail:
PSPC_InternationalCustomerFocus@harris.com
11.2 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
The Technical Assistance Center's (TAC) resources are available to help with overall system operation,
maintenance, upgrades and product support. TAC is the point of contact when answers are needed to
technical questions.
Product specialists, with detailed knowledge of product operation, maintenance and repair provide
technical support via a toll-free (in North America) telephone number. Support is also available through
mail, fax and e-mail.
For more information about technical assistance services, contact your sales representative, or call the
Technical Assistance Center at:
76
North America:
1-800-528-7711
International:
1-434-385-2400
Fax:
1-434-455-6712
E-mail:
PSPC_tac@harris.com
14221-1200-2010, Rev. D
12. WARRANTY
Please register this product within 10 days of purchase. Registration validates the warranty coverage, and
enables Harris to contact you in case of any safety notifications issued for this product.
Registration can be made on-line at the Customer Care center webpage:
http://www.pspc.harris.com/Service/Customerservice.aspx.
While on the webpage, please review the applicable battery and/or product warranty literature.
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APPENDIX A - PPP/SLIP CONNECTION
A.1
OVERALL CONFIGURATION
This appendix describes how to setup PPP and SLIP connections between a Unity mobile radio acting as
a Mobile Data Terminal (MDT) and a Mobile Data Peripheral (MDP). The MDP in Figure A-1 is a
Windows XP machine. This example is used throughout the configuration, but is only intended as a
guide. It is important to realize that all IP addresses are site/configuration specific. Prior to configuring
the MDT or the MDP, the system administrator should provide configuration specifics.
Figure A-1: Example of PPP/SLIP Configuration
•
MDP PPP IP Address – There are two types of configuration for the MDP’s IP address, dynamically
assigned by PPP or statically assigned within the MDP’s PPP configuration settings:
 Dynamic via PPP (shown in Figure A-1) - When using PPP’s dynamic IP address assignment, the
radio will assign its own RF IP address to the MDP. Outbound IP data from the site will be
processed by the radio if the port matches the ports within the radio’s services (Radio Textlink,
OTAR, OTAP, etc.). All other outbound IP data from the site is forwarded to the MDP. Inbound
IP data from the MDP will be processed by the radio if the MDP uses the radio’s PPP IP address;
otherwise, it will be forwarded to the site.
 Static – The MDP software allows the configuration of a static IP address to the MDP. While this
provides more configurability, routing of traffic to the MDP from the site must be configured
within the site’s routers.
•
Unity MDT’s PPP IP – This is typically a nonce IP address (shown in Figure A-1) to allow the MDP
to address the radio explicitly (i.e., ping).
•
Unity MDT’s RF IP – This IP address is how the site addresses the radio and must match
configuration at the site.
Other IP addresses in the figure above are beyond the scope of this configuration document and are
provided for the purpose of the configuration example only.
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A.2
RADIO CONFIGURATION
1. Use RPM to configure Unity MDT services, PPP IP address, and RF IP address.
2. Within Data Options  Data Interfaces tab, enable MDT and configure the MDT’s PPP address:
Enable MDT Services
Unity MDT’s PPP IP
Address
MDT Modem
Configuration
3. Within the Data Options, Data Transport tab, configure the MDT’s RF IP 1.
Unity MDT’s RF
IP Address
1
If the MDP will be configured to have the radio provide the IP address (dynamic PPP IP address assignment), it is important
to set the RF IP Address even if the site will dynamically assign it. Otherwise, the radio will fail PPP negotiation until the
radio has registered with the site.
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A.3
MDP PPP CONFIGURATION (WINDOWS XP)
A.3.1
Windows XP Modem Configuration
The following configures a modem that will be used for the PPP connection on a Windows XP Mobile
Data Peripheral.
1. Open the Control Panel (StartSettingsControl Panel).
2. Select Phone and Modem Options.
3. Choose Modems tab.
4. Select Add button.
5. Choose “Don’t detect my modem; I will select it from a list.”
6. Choose Next >.
7. Choose the [Standard Modem Types] that corresponds the speed of the radio as configured in the
RPM. For a 19200 bps connection, choose Standard 19200 bps Modem. By choosing a modem
speed faster than the over-the-air bit rate removes the overhead incurred by PPP layer framing.
8. Choose Next >.
9. Choose the port the radio is connected to.
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10. Choose Next >.
11. Windows will install the driver. Click Finish when completed.
A.3.2
Windows XP Dial-Up Connection
The following configures a dial up connection to use the Windows XP Mobile Data Peripheral’s modem.
1. Open the Control Panel (StartSettingsControl Panel).
2. Open Network Connections.
3. Choose FileNew Connection.
4. When the wizard starts, choose Next >.
5. Choose Connect to the network at my workplace.
If this is the only data connection for this machine, choose Connect to the Internet
instead.
NOTE
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6. Choose Next >.
7. Choose Dial-up connection.
8. Choose Next >.
9. Choose a Name for the connection. This is for informational purposes only and is the name that the
connection will use within the Network Connection window. In this particular case, the radio name
and the IP address assigned to that radio has been chosen as an indicator (XG-100M 10.1.101.209).
10. Choose Next >.
11. Choose a non-empty phone number for the connection.
12. Choose Next >.
13. Choose Do not use my smart card.
14. Choose Next >.
15. Choose Anyone’s use.
16. Choose Next >.
17. Choose Finish.
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18. The following dialog is displayed:
19. Choose either Cancel or Properties. If Properties is chosen, proceed with Section A.3.3,
Configuring a PPP Dial-up Connection, step 3.
A.3.3
A.3.3.1
Windows XP PPP or SLIP Configuration
Configuring a PPP Dial-up Connection
PPP connection is preferred over SLIP in most windows configurations as it allows for
dynamic address assignment from the radio as well as frame validation.
NOTE
1. Open the Control Panel (StartSettingsControl Panel).
2. Select the Dial-up connection that was just created.
3. Select FileProperties, and specify any “Phone number” 2.
2
It is important to specify a “Phone number” or XP will not start the connection process.
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Any phone
number will do.
4. Choose Configure. Verify that settings and baud rate match the RPM configuration for the radio.
5. Choose OK.
6. Choose the Options tab.
7. Deselect Prompt for name and password, certificate, etc. Deselect Prompt for phone number.
Choose Idle time before hanging up: to be never. Select Redial if line is dropped.
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8. Choose the Security tab and verify the settings shown on the following screen.
9. Choose the Networking tab.
10. Choose the Type of dial-up server I am calling: to be PPP: Windows 95/98/NT4/2000, Internet.
Deselect Client for Microsoft Networks.
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11. Choose Settings located beneath the PPP:Windows 95/98/NT 4/2000, Internet selection.
12. Uncheck all options.
13. Choose OK. The previous Networking tab properties window will be accessible again.
14. Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).
15. Choose Properties.
Dynamic
or
Use Unity MDT’s
RF IP Address
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16. Select Obtain an IP address automatically unless the radio will be defining its own IP address. If
this is specified, it must match the PPP/SLIP address within RPM (often defaulted to:
199.81.106.100). Check with the system administrator regarding specifying a static IP address.
17. Choose Advanced.
18. Deselect Use default gateway on remote network and deselect Use IP header compression.
19. Choose OK. The DNS and WINS tabs remain unchanged.
20. Choose OK to accept the IP address and advanced settings.
21. Choose OK to accept the Network Connections Properties.
A.3.3.2
Configuring a SLIP Dial-up Connection
1. Follow PPP connection setup through step 8.
2. Choose the Networking tab.
3. Select “Type of dial-up server I am calling:” to be SLIP: Unix Connection.
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4. Since SLIP does not allow dynamic address assignment, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and
choose Properties.
Unity MDT’s RF
IP Address
5. Specify the IP address after consulting with the system administrator.
6. Choose OK.
7. Choose OK.
A.3.4
Windows XP Route Configuration Notes
1. After the PPP has connected run the following commands:
NOTE
88
The italicized IP address (i.e., 10.1.100.209) is the radio’s RF IP address as
configured in RPM and the site. The bold IP address (i.e., 199.81.106.0) is a
submask built off of the radio’s PPP IP address.
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a. route add 199.81.106.0 MASK 255.255.255.0 10.1.100.209 /p
b. ping 199.81.106.100 -n 1
2. Description of commands:
a. This route addition allows access to GPS over PPP. The RPM defaults to this nonce IP address.
If RPM specifies something different, this will need to be updated. The “/p” makes the IP
address permanent.
b. The ping should work.
89
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