EMu Documentation
How to use EMu
Document Version 1.1
EMu Version 4.1
www.kesoftware.com
© 2013 KE Software. All rights reserved.
Contents
SECTION 1
SECTION 2
SECTION 3
SECTION 4
SECTION 5
About this course
1
For the trainer
2
Welcome
3
About KE Software
So what is EMu?
Several ways to perform the same task
Typographical conventions
Getting Help when you need it
EMuUsers Forum
Support
4
6
7
8
9
9
10
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
11
How to log in to EMu
How to log in to a group
The Command Centre
How to open, move and close modules
The module window
Elements of a module window
Finding your way around a module
How to locate fields
How EMu changes dynamically as you work: Tab Switching
Lookup Lists
How to use a Lookup List
Lookup List shortcuts
Lookup List hierarchies
Adding a value to a Lookup List
How to clean up a Lookup List
13
17
18
21
23
26
28
33
40
42
44
45
47
48
49
The EMu Help
51
Finding Help when you need it
How to use the EMu Help
The What's this button
Field Level Help
52
53
55
56
Searching, browsing and displaying
59
The most frequently used search commands
A basic search
Displaying and browsing the results of your search
Additional basic search exercises
Boolean operators
AND
OR
NOT
Combining Boolean operators in more than one field
How to make use of Boolean operators
How to perform an Additional Search
Additional Exercise
60
61
65
70
71
74
74
74
75
76
78
81
SECTION 6
SECTION 7
SECTION 8
SECTION 9
Text searches
A phrase search
Stemming
Phonetic retrieval
Pattern matching and the wildcard search
Common wildcard searches
Wildcard searches
Range searches
Proximity searching
How to search attached documents
Some other EMu search functions
Also Search
Show Search function
Default values: search
List Views
How to create a List View
Additional Exercises
82
82
84
85
86
87
88
89
91
93
94
94
95
97
99
102
108
How to delete and discard records
109
Current and selected records
How to discard the current or selected records
Inverting a selection and a first look at grouping records
Additional Exercise
110
113
118
121
How to add, save, edit and link records
123
Default values: new record
How to add a record and how to save it
How to edit a record
How to attach records to each other
Attachment terminology
Attaching records with the Attach button
Attaching records by drag and drop
Additional attachments exercise
Searching an attachment field
Reverse attachments
124
125
129
130
132
133
135
136
137
138
How to sort and group
141
Sorting Records
How to sort records with an existing sort
How to specify your own sort criteria and save the sort
How to sort records with an Ad-hoc sort
How to edit a saved sort
Automatic sorting of search results
Grouping Records
Static and Dynamic groups
Using the Tools>Group menu options
Using the Groups module
142
143
146
151
152
154
156
157
159
170
The Ditto utility
175
How to use the Ditto utility
Update on Save
Ditto
176
178
179
How to add a Ditto record to the Ditto box permanently
180
Reports
183
How to run a report
How to create a report in Microsoft Excel (without the need
for visual basic code!)
How to create an Excel report with cut and paste
185
IMu showcase
195
Visualisation tools
IMu Tours
Geo-referencing and Mapping
IMu Web
196
197
198
200
SECTION 12
Answers
201
SECTION 13
Keyboard Shortcuts
205
Index
207
SECTION 10
SECTION 11
187
188
About this course
SECTION 1
About this course
This course is broadly self-paced with assistance provided by a trainer:
1.
2.
3.
The trainer will introduce the course and each section in turn.
Following the trainer's introduction of a section, trainees should carefully read any
preliminary text in a section and then proceed with the exercise(s), seeking
assistance as necessary.
At the end of each section the trainer will discuss the exercises and clarify any
issues before proceeding to the next section.
Answers to exercise questions are provided (page 201) so that you can
confirm that you're on the right track: when you have attempted an
exercise, check your answers and if your answer doesn't match that
provided, please attempt the question again or ask assistance from your
trainer.
Although there are no dependencies between sections in this course and any section can
be taken out of sequence, it is recommended that sections are taken in sequence as the
course builds on knowledge and skills progressively from one section to the next.
Throughout the course you will find notes such as this one pointing to
additional information in the EMu Help. It is not necessary to access this
additional information in order to complete the course, however it is
included here for your reference as you will find it useful when you're back
at work and looking to build on your EMu knowledge.
You will cover a lot of material in this course and it is not expected that you will remember
exactly how to do everything that you work through over the next two days. You will
however walk away with a familiarity with EMu, an understanding of what it is possible to
do and where to look to remind yourself how to perform a task.
One final observation before we begin. The purpose of this course is to teach you how to
use EMu and not how to manage your organisation's collection as each organisation has
its own processes for doing so. By the end of the course however you should be
sufficiently able to work with EMu to implement your organisation's business processes,
whatever they may be.
Page 1
About this course
For the trainer
Please note:
•
•
•
•
•
•
This course has been designed for up to ten trainees per training session only
(Train1 to Train10).
Ensure that a fresh copy of the data is installed at the start of the course.
As trainees complete an exercise, confirm that each trainee has completed it
correctly.
Ensure that trainees can print a report to a printer.
Ensure that trainees have access to Microsoft Excel.
The final section of this course is a demonstration of IMu. It is recommended that
you are familiar with the demo site and IMu functionality.
Page 2
Welcome
SECTION 2
Welcome
Welcome to KE Software's How to use EMu training course. This course is intended for
newcomers to EMu and will provide you with the knowledge, skills and confidence to start
using EMu to manage your organisation's collection.
We believe that a Collection Management System is not simply for recording details of
objects and have designed EMu to hold all of the information, knowledge, media and
history that an organisation generates about its objects. If there is a downside to this, it is
that to the uninitiated EMu can be daunting because it is capable of doing so very much.
You will find that for the vast majority of day to day tasks EMu is relatively easy to use
however. Through close collaboration with collections professionals from around the
world, EMu has been designed over two decades to be as intuitive as possible by
reflecting real-world practices and work-flows.
The key to becoming confident with any sophisticated software solution is familiarity and
this training course aims to provide that familiarity through gently guided exposure to
EMu in the form of hands-on exercises. The paradigm is learning through doing. It is not
the aim of this course to test you, but to teach you.
In this course you will learn how to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Access EMu
Use EMu's extensive Help system to find answers to many of your EMu questions
Search for records
Display records and navigate from one record to another
Add and edit records
Link records
Group and sort records
Copy data in fields, tabs or entire records to add to another record
Run reports
Page 3
Welcome
About KE Software
KE Software is a private company founded in 1986 but its birth can be traced back to
1983 with the formation of the Systems Development Group within the University of
Melbourne. Consisting of University IT graduates, this group performed research into
high speed retrieval algorithms and the development of general purpose information
management tools. With growing commercial interest in their work, the three key
members of the Systems Development Group left the University in 1986 to form KE. They
remain executive directors and full time employees of KE to this day.
KE's early research efforts evolved into revolutionary and award-winning database
technology and the development of vertical market applications for two industry sectors:
Vitalware for the Vital Statistics sector and EMu for the Museum sector. Both systems
have been adopted widely and Vitalware is now the world’s leading vital statistics registry
system (VSRS) for Registries of Births, Deaths and Marriages, with more installations
than any other VSRS in the world; and EMu is the world’s leading museum management
system, managing more specimens and artefacts (totalling around half a billion) and with
more end users than any other vendor’s software. EMu has been installed in
approximately 200 sites across thirteen countries throughout Australasia, North America,
Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, including the three largest museums in the
world.
KE has a track record of working with museum collections around the world, from the
small to the very largest. We are proud of our extensive client base and believe it
confirms our technology and the service that we provide. Some of our more prominent
clients include the world’s largest and most prestigious museums:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Page 4
National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution
American Museum of Natural History
Natural History Museum (London)
Field Museum of Natural History
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
New York Botanical Gardens
Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
Henry Ford Museum
Australian Museum
Museum Victoria (Australia)
National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution
Canadian Museum of Civilization
National Museum of Australia
National Gallery of Australia
Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
Fondation Cartier pour l'art contemporain
Royal Academy of Music (London)
Supreme Council of Antiquities, Egypt
Qatar Museums Authority
Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage
United States Navy History Center
Welcome
EMu is the mature, robust and secure museum management system it is today as a
result of KE’s close partnership with industry experts and stakeholders over 25 years.
Developing EMu and working hand-in-hand with its clients have given KE an unequalled
understanding of the museum industry. This expertise is not only reflected in EMu, it
permeates all of KE’s services. KE’s involvement with its clients extends far beyond the
provision of software systems. KE has been at the forefront of the industry in terms of its
development, and an active contributor to the evolution of systems and processes within
the museum framework.
Page 5
Welcome
So what is EMu?
KE Software’s Electronic Museum collection management system, EMu, is the world's
premier Collections Management System (CMS) for natural history museums, cultural
history museums, art museums, herbaria, botanic gardens, archives and special
collections. EMu is engineered to manage all types of collections from the small to the
very large.
It is our belief that a CMS isn’t just for recording objects but that it should hold all of the
information, knowledge and history that a museum generates about its objects. EMu has
been designed to manage all aspects of your collection from accessioning and
deaccessioning through to exhibitions, incoming and outgoing loans, shipments, location
tracking and internal movements, conservation, valuations, insurance and indemnity,
and much more. To assist museums to maintain strong collection management policies
the implementation of these processes in EMu is compliant with the popular MDA
SPECTRUM standard for museum documentation.
Documenting and managing a collection can involve a vast amount of information about
objects, people and organisations, events, administration and much more. In EMu this
diverse but related information is stored in purpose designed modules.
The core of EMu is the Catalogue module which records information about items owned
by, or at some time in the care of, an institution. EMu has been designed to manage
multiple disciplines within the one collection and can readily support the broad range of
disciplines, from art to zoology, that is characteristic of many museums. All of your items
can be documented in the EMu Catalogue: with all data collected in the one Catalogue
however, the entire collection is easily searchable.
Surrounding the Catalogue module is a suite of modules that supports all museum
collection management functions. These can be grouped into two main categories:
Catalogue
Support
modules
These contain information that supplements a record in the Catalogue.
The Parties module, which records details about the people and
organisations with a connection to an institution's collection, and the
Multimedia module, which holds images, video and audio resources,
are examples of Catalogue Support modules.
Collection
Management
modules
These hold information used in the management of objects in your
collection. The Locations module, which records storage and display
locations in your institution, and the Insurance module are examples of
Collection Management modules.
Sharing the information and knowledge that you accumulate within EMu is critical to your
mission. Whether sharing with others in your organisation, visitors to your collection
online or in the flesh, or with other organisations, EMu has a solution in IMu. IMu, or
Internet Museum, is EMu's toolset for publishing and distributing your content on the
Internet or your Intranet, for use on desktop computers, in-house kiosks, on mobile
devices and other platforms. EMu's fully integrated web interface allows you to choose
which components of your collection to publish online and then manages the process for
you. Users and the general public are able to search for narratives, objects and related
information such as multimedia resources and artists’ biographies. Basic (keyword),
advanced and structured searching are enabled. Records returned by a search can be
displayed in lists, as a series of thumbnail images (contact sheet) or in detail.
Implemented using standard web technologies, the EMu web interface can be integrated
easily into any existing website. It is highly configurable onsite and is provided with a rich
suite of tools, allowing almost any form of web interface to be configured.
Page 6
Welcome
Several ways to perform the same task
One of the first things that will strike you about working with EMu is that there are often
several ways to perform the same task. For example, to create a new record in the
Parties module, you could:
•
•
•
Click the New Record
button in a module Tool bar
-ORSelect File>New Record from a module Menu bar
-ORUse the keyboard shortcut, Ctrl+N
As we use standard shortcuts available in many Windows applications, you will
probably already be familiar with many keyboard shortcuts available in EMu
(Ctrl+N for new, Ctrl+S to save, Ctrl+F to find, etc.). If in doubt, you can always
find the shortcut for a command beside its menu entry:
To avoid overloading you with detail as far as possible, this documentation will assume
that you are using a mouse to click a button or select a menu entry and it will not list every
way to perform the same task, but keep in mind that there are other ways to do things that
may suit you better. You will find these described in the EMu Help.
For your reference we've included a list of common keyboard shortcuts (page 205).
Page 7
Welcome
Typographical conventions
Format
Type of Information
Angled bracket (>)
The angled bracket is used as a shorthand to represent step-by-step
procedures.
It is used in such statements as:
1. Select File>New in the Menu bar.
In this case you would:
1. Select File in the Menu bar.
A File menu displays.
2. Select New in the File menu.
Bold
Bold is used to emphasise on-screen items and objects that you must
select (using your mouse, for instance), such as menu options, buttons,
or items in a list.
It is used in such statements as:
1. To access help, select the Help button in the Command
Centre.
Italics
Field names are in italics (except when you are asked to select one, in
which case it is Bold).
Key+KEY
This is used to indicate key combinations, such as Alt+F or Ctrl+N.
It is used in such statements as:
1. Select File>New in the Menu bar
-ORUse the keyboard shortcut, Ctrl+N.
In this case you could use the mouse to click File in the Menu bar and
then click New; or you could press the Ctrl key and the N key together
on your keyboard.
Monospace
Monospace is used to highlight any information that you need to enter
(type / key) into a field.
It is used in such statements as:
1. Enter Smith in Last: (Person Details).
In this case you would place the cursor in the Last: (Person Details)
field, and type in Smith.
Page 8
Welcome
Getting Help when you need it
Getting Help when you are working in EMu is often only a mouse click away:
•
•
•
Click
in the Command Centre to open the EMu Help
-ORSelect Help>Contents & Index from a module Menu bar to open the EMu Help
-ORClick the What's This?
button located in the top right corner of a module
window and then click a field, menu or any object anywhere on a module window:
•
If you click a field, the Field Level Help will open with a description of the field
and its purpose (as well as more advanced information about the field).
•
If you click a menu item, an object (e.g. the Search button) on a module tab,
even in many cases somewhere on the tab itself (other than in a field), the
EMu Help will open to a page that describes the purpose and / or use of the
object / tab clicked.
The EMu Help should be the first place you look for assistance when working with EMu
as it is a comprehensive source of information about EMu. For that reason we'll look at
the Help in some detail before tackling EMu itself (page 51).
EMuUsers Forum
The EMuUsers Forum is an online venue for EMu users worldwide to share ideas and
offer each other advice and assistance with using EMu. The Forum currently has about
800 members, some very active, others casual readers of the many posts. If you have a
question about EMu, you will find someone with the answer on the EMuUsers Forum.
You can access the EMuUsers Forum at:
http://www.kesoftware.com/emuusers-forum.html
If you would like to post a question or respond to someone else's post, you will first need
to create an account with the Forum.
Page 9
Welcome
Support
If the EMu Help doesn't have an answer to your question, you can always contact the KE
Software Support team.
The KE Help Desk in each KE office is available, at a minimum, between 09:00 and 17:00
local time Monday to Friday (excluding local public holidays); however, as all support
staff in each geographical region have access to all support queues, actual support is up
to 24 hours per workday.
Customers can contact KE Support by sending an email directly to:
•
•
•
Support (North American & Caribbean Users):
support@kesoftware.com
Support (European Users):
support@man.kesoftware.com
Support (Asia/Pacific Users):
support@mel.kesoftware.com
Some larger clients are able to enter a ticket directly in the KE Help Desk application via
http://support.kesoftware.com/
Email is automatically copied to designated Support staff "watchers" able to assist in
solving the problem.
Page 10
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
SECTION 3
Accessing EMu and finding your way
around
To start using EMu you need to log in with a username and password. But before we do
so, it will be useful to understand something about the EMu security system.
Your username is the key to what you can and can't see and do within EMu. Every user is
assigned to one or more groups and each group is assigned permissions that determine:
•
•
•
•
Which modules can be accessed by the group.
Which tabs in a module are visible to the group.
Which fields on a tab are accessible to the group.
What operations the group members can perform, e.g. add records, delete records,
search and replace, and so on.
What does this mean in practice?
Consider a museum with both a Natural History and a Cultural History collection. In EMu
all collection objects are recorded in the one Catalogue, but staff working in the Natural
History department clearly have different needs to those working in the Cultural History
department. With group permissions it's possible to tailor EMu so that when Natural
History users and Cultural History users log in, they are presented with different sets of
modules, tabs and fields that reflect their needs.
This example really doesn't do justice to the subtlety of EMu's system of permissions
however: within the Cultural History department there may be numerous sub groups,
such as Ethnology, Anthropology, Archaeology and Science & Technology. Each of
these in turn may have a tailored set of modules, tabs and fields specified by the
permissions assigned to their group.
Permissions don't only affect what you view when you log in, but also what you can and
can't do in EMu. Permissions are assigned to groups in an administration module called
the EMu Registry, and include the following:
Page 11
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Permissions:
This permission allows you to:
daDefaults
Define sets of default values and change the set of default values currently
used.
daDelete
Delete records from the module.
daDesign
Create new reports.
daDisplay
Display records from the module.
daDittoAll
Use the Edit>Ditto>All Fields (Shift+F9) option.
daEdit
Edit records in the module.
daEditHelp
Edit the field level help description.
daEditQuery
Edit the search criteria of the previously run search in TexQL format.
See the Show Search function (page 95).
daExport
Use the Export Schedules facility.
daImport
Use the Import tool.
daInsert
Add new records to the module.
daMerge
Use the Merge Records tool.
daQuery
Search the module.
daRecall
Use the Record Recall facility.
daReplace
Use the Global Replace tool and the Merge Records tool; perform global
edits.
daReport
Generate reports.
daSecurity
Edit Record Level Security permissions.
daTemplates
Create a Record Template in a module.
All users need to be able to search a module (daQuery) and display records
(daDisplay), but probably only Admin or Power users would be given access to global
replace (daReplace), record import (daImport) or record recall functionality (daRecall).
A group is a set of access permissions shared by one or more users. It is
also possible to set permissions on a per user basis (that is they apply to a
specific user) or a system wide basis (they apply to everyone), although
best practice is to assign permissions at a group level.
Page 12
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to log in to EMu
In order to start using EMu you need to log in with a username and password. You also
need to know the name of the server that hosts EMu and the database you're connecting
to.
For this course, all of these details will be provided by your trainer.
1.
Double-click the EMu
shortcut icon on the computer desktop
-ORSelect Start>Programs>KE EMu (Art).
The EMu Login box displays:
With the exception of the password value, the EMu Login box recalls the
values last entered in each field (at the current computer) and typically you
will find that the Host, User and Service fields are already complete. If you
weren't the last person to log in to EMu at the current computer, you may
need to change any one of these values. Typically however, if you are the
only user to log in at a particular computer, you'll only ever need to enter
your password.
2.
3.
4.
5.
In the Host field, enter the name of the server on which EMu is hosted.
This value is unlikely to change once it has been entered.
Enter your username in the User field.
For this course your username will be similar to Train1.
Enter your password in the Password field.
For this course your password will be the same as your username.
Enter the name of the EMu service in the Service field.
Your institution may have a number of services with each one pointing to a
separate database. As well as having a live service (the master database which
you use on a daily basis), it's not uncommon to have a test service which is used to
test any updates to EMu before applying the update to the live service. There may
even be a training service on which trainees can be let loose without risk to the
master database.
Page 13
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
When complete, the Login box will appear similar to:
6.
Page 14
Select
.
The EMu Command Centre displays:
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Only the modules you are authorised to access will appear in the Command
Centre. As was mentioned, different users and groups have access to different sets
of modules depending on their role. On this course you have access to almost the
entire range of modules available to a Cultural History institution, including the
Registry, Admin, Exports, Schedules, and so on. Unless you are an Admin or
Power user back in the real world, you are unlikely to see all of these modules.
Before we go any further, let's see how to log out of EMu. You can:
7.
Select
in the Command Centre
Page 15
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
-ORSelect
in the top right corner of the Command Centre.
If you had made changes to a record and not saved it, the following warning
message would display:
In this case you would select:
•
to save the changes and exit EMu.
•
to exit EMu without saving the changes.
to return to EMu.
Log back in to EMu.
Note that all values except for Password are recalled by the Login box.
•
8.
Page 16
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to log in to a group
When users have more than one role within an organisation, they can be assigned to
more than one group, each with a different set of permissions. For example, a museum
may have groups set up for curators and loans officers, each group with a set of
permissions that reflects the tasks and responsibilities performed by its members: not
everyone should be able to authorise loans, so the permissions to do so are assigned to
a Loans Officer group. A staff member assigned to the Curator group may also be
responsible for loans however, and in this case the user can be assigned to both groups.
When a user is a member of more than one group, the Login box will display an additional
drop list with a list of the groups to which the user belongs:
In this case, the user can select a group from the Group drop list when logging in to EMu.
Once you have logged in, it is possible to change groups at any time without logging out
first. Search the EMu help for How to work with multiple groups in EMu for details.
Page 17
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
The Command Centre
The Command Centre is your central point of access to the modules you have been
authorised to use. It also provides the means to exit EMu and a way to access the EMu
Help.
Typically the Command Centre displays as a vertical column of buttons (as shown),
however you can, if you prefer, display it horizontally across the screen. Let's try that
now:
1.
Page 18
Right-click the Command Centre and select Options from the context menu that
displays:
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
The Options box displays:
2.
The Options box provides numerous ways to customise EMu (details can be found
by searching the EMu Help for System and interface options).
Select the Command Centre tab:
3.
Select the Horizontal radio button and click
.
Page 19
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
4.
5.
6.
The Command Centre displays across the top of your screen.
Return the Command Centre to its vertical position.
On the Command Centre tab of the Options box, select one of the other radio
buttons under the Buttons heading.
Return the Command Centre to its original state.
You use the Command Centre to:
•
Open one or more modules. You open a module by clicking its button in the
Command Centre.
•
Get assistance with EMu by clicking
•
Exit EMu by clicking
.
in the top right corner of the Command Centre or clicking
.
If the Command Centre has a large number of buttons (and / or you have a
small monitor!), it is possible that it won't fit on your screen. In this case
arrows will display at the top
and bottom
of the Command Centre. Click an arrow head to
reveal any modules that are currently off-screen.
Page 20
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to open, move and close modules
Let's open a module:
1.
Click
in the Command Centre.
The Parties module opens and displays in Search mode - the current screen mode
is always indicated in the Title bar and in the Status bar:
Screen mode simply refers to the module's current mode of operation and it is
always identified in these two places. There are four screen modes:
•
In Search mode we search for records. This is the default mode when a
module is opened.
•
When we've run a search and records have been returned, the screen mode
changes automatically to Display mode. In this mode we browse and display
records.
•
If we begin to modify a record in Display mode, the mode changes
automatically to Edit mode. Saving the record returns the module to Display
mode.
•
When we add a new record, the module enters New mode.
More details can be found by searching the EMu Help for screen modes.
Now that the module is open there are a number of things we can do from here. We
can:
•
Search the Parties module by entering search terms in one or more fields and
clicking
in the Tool bar.
Page 21
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
If there are no search terms displaying anywhere in the module, clicking
in the Tool bar will return all records in the module.
•
Retrieve records previously saved as a group (page 156).
Add a new record (page 125) by clicking New
.
You'll learn how to do all of these in this course.
Move the Parties module from one side of your monitor to another:
2.1. Place the cursor over the module's blue Title bar:
•
2.
3.
4.
5.
2.2. Hold down the left mouse button.
2.3. Drag the module to a new location.
Select Window>New>Parties from the Parties module Menu bar.
A second Parties module opens in Search mode and is labelled Parties (2) Search.
Try opening another Parties module by clicking
in the
Command Centre.
No new Parties module opens.
This time hold down the Ctrl button on your keyboard as you click
in the Command Centre.
Another instance of the Parties module opens.
In order to open a second, third, nth copy of a module, either use the
Windows>New>[module name] method
-ORPress Ctrl as you click the module's button in the Command Centre.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Page 22
Close the Parties (3) module window by clicking
in the top right corner of the
module window.
Close the Parties (2) module window by selecting File>Close from the module
Menu bar
Close all the remaining module windows by clicking
the Command Centre.
Log back in to EMu.
in the top right corner of
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
The module window
Let's take a look at a module window by viewing the Parties module in Details View. As
the name suggests, in Details View you are able to view the full details of a record:
1.
Open the Parties module:
You'll see that "Person" is already entered in the Party Type field. This is a default
value and it will display whenever the Parties module is opened. Any field can have
a default value.
You'll find details about Party Types and default values in the EMu Help
(search separately for Party Types and Default Values).
When in Search mode, values entered in fields are search terms: when the search
is run, records that match the search terms will be returned.
2.
Click
in the Tool bar.
A search is run in the Parties module looking for all records that have a value of
Person in the Party Type field.
Note that the module is now in Display mode.
When you first run a search in a module, the results will display in List View (note
that the List View
button is depressed in the Tool bar):
Page 23
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
3.
Click
in the Tool bar to display results in Details View:
If we were to run a search now, results would display in Details View.
Records will display in List View when a search is first run in a module; for
any subsequent search, records will be displayed with whatever view was
last used.
4.
Page 24
Click Previous Search
in the Tool bar.
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
We'll look at the difference between the Previous Search
and New Search
buttons in more detail later, but as an overview: clicking Previous Search
returns you to Search mode and keeps any search terms previously entered;
clicking New Search
returns you to Search mode and clears any search
terms you previously entered (but keeps any default values).
5.
6.
Run a search by clicking
in the Tool bar.
As you last viewed a record in Details View, records are displayed in Details View
when the search is run.
Close the Parties module.
Page 25
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Elements of a module window
A module is like many other windows you'll be familiar with from a Windows environment,
with familiar elements such as a Title bar, Menu bar, Tool bar and Status bar. You'll also
find Summary data and a Tabs bar. Most elements of a module window display at all
times: the Title, Menu, Tool and Status bars are always available. Tabs and Summary
data only display when a record is open in Details View:
Take a moment to read through the description of each of these labelled elements:
Page 26
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Element
Description
Title bar
Located at the top of a window, the Title bar names the module and the current
screen mode.
In the previous screenshot, the Title bar indicates that this is the Parties module
and it is in Display mode.
The Title bar also contains the Minimise, Maximise or Restore, and Close
buttons.
Menu bar
The Menu bar is located beneath the Title bar and contains a horizontal list of
menu labels. Select a menu label to display a drop list of options. Then select
an option from the drop list to perform its action.
Keyboard shortcuts are available for many menu options.
Tool bar
The Tool bar contains shortcut buttons for commonly used menu options. Click
a Tool bar button to perform its action.
Which buttons are available in the Tool bar will depend on the current screen
mode, that is, whether you are searching, adding a new record, displaying
records or editing a record.
Place the cursor over a button in the Tool bar and a description of the
button's action will display in a label.
A button that is greyed out is unavailable because its function is not currently
relevant (for instance, if no changes have been made to a record, the Save
button will be greyed out).
Summary
Data
A summary of a record displays here. The information shown is drawn from one
or more of the module's fields.
The Summary Data field only displays when a record is open in Details View.
Tabs
A module is made up of a number of tabs (pages), each one recording different
details.
Select a tab to open that page.
Tabs only display when a record is open in Details View.
Status bar
The Status bar indicates:
•
The current screen mode.
A module has four possible screen modes: Search, Display, New,
Edit.
•
Summary information relevant to the current screen mode (such as
the number of records returned by a search).
•
User
The username of the user currently logged into EMu.
•
Group
Users can belong to more than one group. This indicates the active
group of the user, i.e. the group they were logged in as when they
opened the module.
•
Service
The identifier for the environment (database) that the current user is
logged in to (this may be a number, e.g. 20005 or a name, e.g.
emuarttrain).
Page 27
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Finding your way around a module
Each module has a number of tabs. Think of a tab as a page, with each page used for
recording different information. You access a page by either:
•
•
Clicking its tab in the Tabs bar
-ORSelecting its name from the Tabs menu in the Menu bar (e.g. Tabs>Biography).
In this example, the Parties module is open to the Biography page (notice that the
Biography tab is highlighted). A tab consists of one or more fields, each with a descriptive
label, and possibly a button or two:
Related fields are grouped together under a heading. On the Biography tab there are four
groups of fields:
•
•
•
•
Birth/Death Details
Period of Activity
Heritage
Movement Details
Each group consists of one or more fields. Each field has a descriptive label. For
example, the Period of Activity group consists of three fields:
•
•
•
Commenced
Completed
Notes
As the same field name can display on different tabs (there are several Notes fields on
various tabs in the Parties module, for instance), we identify fields using both the field and
group name, e.g. Nationality: (Heritage). This refers to the Nationality field, which is in the
Heritage group of fields (you can see this in the screenshot above).
Page 28
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to move about within a module window
There are several ways to make your way around a module window. We'll try some of
them out:
1.
2.
Open the Parties module.
When you open a module, it typically opens:
•
On the module's first page, the Person tab in this case
-AND•
With focus on the tab label itself (when you select a tab or field it is said to
have focus). Note the dotted border around the Person tab label. It currently
has focus.
The simplest way to move to a field is to click it:
Click the Primary: (Language) field.
The cursor displays in the field and commences flashing. You could now key in a
search term or you could click the Lookup List
button beside the field to select
a value from the list. While we're here, we'll try that now.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Click the Lookup List
button beside the Primary: (Language) field.
The Lookup Selection box displays with a list of values for this field.
Double-click Arabic in the Lookup Selection box.
The search term now displays in the Primary: (Language) field.
Another way to move around a module window is to use the Tab key on your
keyboard. Press the Tab key.
Focus shifts from the Primary: (Language) field to the Dialect: (Language) field.
Keep pressing the Tab key until the Title: (Person Details) field has focus.
Notice that focus shifts from one field to the next until Source of Information has
focus and then the tab label receives focus before moving back to the first field on
the tab.
With focus on the Title: (Person Details) field, you could key in search terms or you
could use the Lookup List to enter a pre-defined search term. Rather than using the
mouse to click the Lookup List
using the keyboard shortcut, F12.
8.
button, this time access the Lookup List by
If a field has focus and there is a Lookup List
button beside the field, pressing
F12 will display the field's Lookup Selection box.
Use the Up and Down arrow keys on your keyboard until Mr is highlighted and
press the Enter key on your keyboard.
The search term displays in the Title: (Person Details) field.
Alternatively, just double-click the term you are after in the Lookup
Selection box.
9.
This time hold down the Shift key at the same time that you press Tab.
Focus shifts back one field at a time.
Page 29
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
If you find using the keyboard to be more efficient than using the mouse,
the option clearly exists to do so. As you become more familiar with EMu,
you may find that in many instances using the keyboard is more efficient
than clicking buttons as there's no need to take your hands off the
keyboard and reach for a mouse: you could enter search terms and
immediately hit Ctrl+F for instance to run a search. More than likely you'll
settle for a combination of mouse and keyboard.
Page 30
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to move from one tab to another
Just as you can move from field to field on a tab using the mouse and / or keyboard, you
can use either method to move from one tab to another:
1.
Open another instance of the Parties module.
You can select Window>New>Parties from the menu bar of any open module
window
-ORYou could hold down the Ctrl key and click
Centre.
in the Command
It's only ever necessary to hold down Ctrl when clicking a module button
in the Command Centre when opening a 2nd, 3rd, nth instance of a
module.
7.
As always, when a module is first opened, focus is given to the tab label, in this
case the Person tab.
There are a number of ways we can move from one tab to another. The most
obvious is simply to use the mouse and click the tab we wish to display. But first, as
the tab label already has focus, we'll use the keyboard:
Press the Right arrow key on your keyboard.
The Organisation tab displays. Keep pressing the Right arrow until the Admin tab
displays, then press the Left arrow key to return to the Person tab.
Another way to move to a different tab is to use the Menu bar.
Select Tabs>Biography from the Menu bar.
The Biography tab displays.
All available tabs are listed under the Tabs menu.
Yet another way to move to a tab is to use a keyboard shortcut:
Select Ctrl+Shift+N.
The Notes tab displays.
The keyboard shortcut for a tab is Ctrl+Shift+[leading letter of the tab].
If there are several tabs with the same leading letter, keep selecting the key
combination until the desired tab displays. Try it: press Ctrl+Shift+A (hold
Ctrl+Shift and repeatedly press A). There are four tab labels that begin with the
letter A. Keep selecting Ctrl+Shift+A to cycle through all four.
Select Ctrl+Shift+A until the Admin tab displays.
Finally, and most obviously, you can use the mouse to select a tab: go ahead and
click the Biography tab label.
Often there are more tabs in a module than can be displayed in the Tabs bar at any
8.
time. If the navigation arrows
appear in the Tabs bar, click the left or right
arrow to cycle through the list of available tabs. When the tab you require appears,
click it in order to display it. Try it: click the left arrow until the Person tab appears
and then click the Person tab label to display the page.
Exit from EMu.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Page 31
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Working with a module window: Putting it all together
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Log in to EMu.
Because EMu recalls the last settings used to log in, and as you were the last
person to log in to EMu at this computer, all you should need to do is enter your
password.
Open the Parties module.
Open the Multimedia module.
Move the Multimedia module so that you can see both module windows at the
same time.
Close the Multimedia module.
From the Command Centre, open a second Parties module.
When clicking a module button in the Command Centre, what keyboard key do you
need to press at the same time to open another instance of a module?
__________
Note the difference between the labels in the Title bars: Parties (1) and Parties (2).
The second Parties module is open to the Person tab - the first tab in the Tabs bar.
Without using the mouse, move to the Multimedia tab in the Parties module.
What key(s) can you press to move from one tab to another?
_______________________________________________________________
On the Multimedia tab move to the Creator field without using the mouse.
What key do you use to move from one field with focus to another?
__________
Without using the mouse, move back to the Title field.
What key combination do you press to move back from one field to another?
____________________
Note how each field in turn has a border as it gets focus. Type your name. When a
field has focus, typing at the keyboard enters text into that field.
Return to the Person tab by selecting Person from the Tabs menu.
Use the mouse to open the Biography tab.
Click the Place of Birth: (Birth Details) field and type in the city or town of your
birth.
Close the Parties (2) module window.
In conclusion, there are several ways to move from one tab to another or one field to
another. None of them is the right or wrong way to navigate a module and we've simply
exposed you to all of them. You decide which best suits you.
Page 32
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to locate fields
As you have seen, EMu modules can have multiple tabs and each tab can have multiple
fields. How then do you locate a field if you don't know which tab it is on?
EMu provides several ways to help you locate the information you need, starting with the
logical grouping of fields on tabs laid out in a sequence that closely matches a typical
workflow.
Two other methods are:
•
•
The Find a Field utility
Shortcuts View
Find a Field utility
EMu's Find a Field utility provides a quick way to locate any field in a module and move
directly to it.
In this exercise we'll first locate the Department: (Organisation Details) field.
1.
2.
If it's not already open, open the Parties module.
From the Menu bar, select Edit>Find a Field
-ORUse the keyboard shortcut, F3.
The Find a Field box displays. All fields in the module are listed alphabetically, with
the group name shown in brackets, along with the tab on which they are located.
The first field is highlighted:
3.
Start typing Department in the Field text box.
The highlight moves to the closest match, in this case Department: (Department).
Page 33
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
When you're looking for a field you may find that the same field name is
used in several places in the same module. You can identify the correct
field by considering the group name in brackets after the field name and /
or the Tab on which the field is located.
7.
In this case we want the Department: (Organisation Details) field which is listed
after Department: (Department). You could keep entering characters until
Department: (Organisation Details) is highlighted or you could click the Down arrow
in the Vertical Scroll bar to display the field.
Double-click Department: (Organisation Details) (or if the field is highlighted, you
could press Enter on your keyboard).
The Organisation tab displays and the Department field has focus (you could begin
typing search terms into the field).
In the Multimedia module, locate the Inserted By: (Insertion Details) field.
On what tab does it display? __________________________
In the Groups module, locate Operation: (Audit Trail).
When the field is highlighted in the Find a Field box, hit Enter.
On what tab does it display? __________________________
In the Catalogue module, locate Medium: (Technique and Material).
8.
When the field is highlighted in the Find a Field box, click
On what tab does it display? __________________________
Close all modules.
4.
5.
6.
Page 34
.
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to use Shortcuts View
As we've seen, each of EMu's modules can have multiple tabs and each tab can have
multiple fields. To assist you to locate and move to fields, EMu provides the Find a Field
utility. It may have occurred to you, however, that it would be convenient and efficient to
somehow bookmark fields that you need access to regularly so that it's quick and easy to
move about a module.
Shortcuts View does just that.
1.
2.
In the Parties module, select View>Shortcuts Settings>Show Shortcuts in the
Menu bar.
A Shortcuts panel displays on the left hand side of the module window with a list of
fields:
It is possible to define multiple Shortcuts Views within the same module, each view
comprising a different group of fields (this can be useful depending on the task you
need to perform).
By default, the last Shortcuts View used will display when you select
View>Shortcuts Settings>Show Shortcuts in the Menu bar. We'll learn how to
select a different Shortcuts View in a moment.
To move from one shortcut field to another, simply double-click it in the Shortcuts
pane. Double-click the Date of Birth field in the Shortcuts pane.
If the Date of Birth field does not display in the Shortcuts pane, jump to
Question 7 and learn how to select a different Shortcuts View (you'll want
to select the Person Party Shortcut View).
The Biography tab opens and focus is given to the Date of Birth: (Birth Details)
field.
A Shortcuts View can include fields from any tab in the module.
3.
Double-click the Party Type shortcut to return to the first tab.
Page 35
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
4.
Select
in the Tool bar.
This runs a search for all Parties record in which Party Type is Person.
As you can see in the screenshot above, the Party Type field has a default
value of Person: it is a default value because whenever you open the
Parties module, the Party Type field will always contain the value Person.
If you wanted to search for records in which Party Type was
Organisation, you'd simply select Organisation from the Party Type
Lookup List instead.
5.
If it is not already selected, click the Details View
button in the Tool bar.
As the name suggests, this displays full details of a record, in contrast to
List View
search.
which presents a summary list of records returned by a
Note that the Shortcut pane includes two columns, Field and Value. For each field
listed in the Shortcut pane, the value in the current record is displayed.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Page 36
Click
in the Tool bar to navigate to the next record returned by your search.
Keep clicking the arrow to move through several records.
As you can see, a Shortcuts View can be a useful way to view key details across
multiple tabs in a record.
To select a different Shortcut View, select View>Shortcuts Settings>Choose
Shortcuts in the Menu bar.
The Shortcuts box displays with a list of Shortcut Views available to you:
The Shortcut View currently selected is highlighted (this is the Shortcut View that
will display when you select View>Shortcuts Settings>Show Shortcuts in the
Menu bar).
Double-click the SummaryData Shortcuts View.
The group of fields (or field in this case) defined for this Shortcuts View displays in
the Shortcut pane.
Choose the Person Party Shortcuts View again.
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Next we'll learn how to create your own Shortcuts View.
Page 37
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to create your own Shortcuts View
The existing Shortcuts Views may not suit your needs, but it's a fairly simple matter to
create your own:
1.
Select View>Shortcuts Settings>Choose Shortcuts in the Menu bar.
The Shortcuts box displays:
2.
Click
.
The Shortcut Properties box displays:
3.
Enter a descriptive name for your Shortcuts View in the top text field.
Page 38
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
4.
5.
For this exercise call it Shortcuts View (Train1), where Train1 is your
username.
Double-click the following fields in the Fields list to add them to the Order list:
•
City/Town: (Physical Address)
•
City/Town: (Postal Address)
•
Country: (Physical Address)
•
Country: (Postal Address)
•
Dialect: (Language)
•
Ethnicity: (Heritage)
•
First: (Person Details)
•
Last: (Person Details)
Reorder the list as follows by selecting a field in the Order list and clicking
or
.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
First: (Person Details)
Last: (Person Details)
Ethnicity: (Heritage)
Dialect: (Language)
City/Town: (Physical Address)
Country: (Physical Address)
City/Town: (Postal Address)
Country: (Postal Address)
6.
Click
to finalise your Shortcuts View.
Your new Shortcuts View is added to the Shortcuts box:
7.
Double-click your new Shortcuts View.
Your Shortcuts View now displays in the Shortcut pane.
For now we'll close the Shortcuts pane. Select View>Shortcuts Settings>Show
Shortcuts in the Menu bar again. This removes the tick from beside Show
Shortcuts in the Menu and hides the Shortcuts pane.
Close the Parties module (do not save any changes when asked).
8.
9.
Page 39
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How EMu changes dynamically as you work: Tab Switching
As we've seen (page 11), it's possible to tailor the functionality, modules, tabs and even
fields available to a user through setting group permissions: what is made available to
each user and group when they log in to EMu will depend on their role and discipline
within the organisation.
Once you have logged in, the tailoring of EMu continues dynamically as you make
choices while working with a module. EMu uses a method called Tab Switching to tailor
the user interface dynamically as you enter values in certain fields, hiding and displaying
tabs based on values entered in certain fields.
A good example of a Tab Switching field is the Party Type: (Party Details) field in the
Parties module:
1.
Open three copies of the Parties module.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Page 40
In the Parties (1) module window create a new record by selecting
in the Tool
bar.
Note that the label in the Title bar changes from Parties (1) Search to Parties (1)
New. The Status bar (along the bottom of the module window) also indicates that
this window is now in New Mode.
In the Parties (2) module window create a new record by selecting File>New
Record from the Menu bar.
In the Parties (3) module window create a new record by using the keyboard
shortcut, Ctrl+N.
Be sure that the Parties (3) module is the active module before you use the
keyboard shortcut (click the Parties (3) module - the Title bar will be a deeper blue
than the other two modules, which will appear faded).
Move the three module windows so that you can see as much of them all as
possible.
Select Organisation from the Party Type: (Party Details) drop list in Parties (2).
Select Collaboration from the Party Type: (Party Details) drop list in Parties (3).
Compare the three module windows.
The information we need to capture for each of these Party Types is different, and
therefore the tabs and fields available for each of them are different.
Close all three module windows and select
like to save your changes?".
Open the Catalogue module.
when asked "Would you
On the Summary tab, click
beside the Object Type field.
The Lookup Selection box displays with a list of acceptable values for this field.
We'll look at Lookup Lists in detail later (page 42).
Double-click Frame.
The tabs that are available are dynamically modified to display only those relevant
to Frames.
Select other values from the Object Type Lookup List to observe Tab Switching in
operation.
Close the Catalogue module.
Create a new record in the Bibliography module.
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
15.
16.
Select different values from the Type: (Publication Details) field and observe how
the main tab changes to reflect the information requirements of each publication
type.
Close any open modules.
Page 41
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Lookup Lists
A Lookup List is a list of values that have been keyed into a field (the list is generated
dynamically from values keyed into the field) or which are available for use in a field (the
list is constructed manually or pre-loaded with values). A Lookup List can be used to
enter a value in a field when running a search, when adding or editing a record.
You access a Lookup List by either:
•
•
Page 42
Clicking
beside a field:
-ORPressing F12 when the cursor is in a field that has a Lookup List.
A list of values for the field displays. The Lookup Selection box below is for the Title:
(Person Details) field in the Parties module. As you can see it holds an alphabetical
list of titles:
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Things to know about Lookup Lists:
1.
2.
Each Lookup List is assigned permissions which determine whether or not you can
add values to the list and, if so, whether you will be prompted to confirm any new
value you've added. Some Lookup Lists are read-only and you can only select
values from them; others will allow you to add a new value.
Values in a Lookup List can be:
•
Persistent
They remain in the Lookup List even if not used in any record. For example,
suburb, county and country names may exist in a Lookup List, even if there
are no records that currently use these values.
•
Hidden
They are visible in Search mode (which means you can search for them) but
not in New mode (you can't add them to a record). A Lookup List value might
be hidden if an organisation changed its name, for instance: you would need
to be able to search for records that use the old name, but you should no
longer be able to use the organisation's old name when referring to the
organisation.
Lookup Lists should be used whenever they are available as they have a number of
useful qualities. Making use of a Lookup List:
•
•
•
Reduces your need to type.
Ensures consistent spelling of terms / values entered in fields.
Helps you select the correct terminology, e.g. when running a search in the Roles
field the correct term may be Sales assistant not Salesman. Sales assistant
would be found in the Lookup List, Salesman would not.
Page 43
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to use a Lookup List
In this exercise we search for a Parties record for Museum of New Zealand Te Papa
Tongarewa.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Page 44
Open the Parties module.
First we need to change the Party Type from Person to Organisation as we're
looking for the Parties record for an organisation (not someone who works for the
organisation).
On the Person tab, click
beside the Party Type field.
The Lookup Selection box displays with a list of permissible values for this field.
The first value in the list is highlighted.
Double-click Organisation.
The Lookup Selection box closes and the Party Type field is populated with
"Organisation".
The Party Type Lookup List is read-only - you cannot enter new values in this field
but must select an existing value. This ensures that only approved values are
included in the list.
Use the Find a Field utility (page 33) to locate the Organisation: (Organisation
Details) field.
Before we learn some shortcuts when using a Lookup List, we'll do things the long
way. Click
beside Organisation: (Organisation Details).
The Lookup Selection box displays with an alphabetical list of organisation names.
This Lookup List is built from values entered into the Organisation: (Organisation
Details) field in Parties records. When a record is added to the Parties module for
an Organisation, its name is added to this Lookup List.
Scroll through the list until you find Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
and double-click the entry.
The Lookup Selection box closes and the Organisation: (Organisation Details) field
is populated with "Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa".
Click
in the Tool bar to run the search.
One record is returned by your search.
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Lookup List shortcuts
As you saw in the last exercise, a Lookup List can contain many entries, so you'll be
pleased to know that there are a number of things you can do to locate an entry in a
Lookup List more quickly than scrolling through a long list.
1.
In the Parties module, click
in the Tool bar.
This will return you to Search mode, clearing any search terms you added
previously.
Note that the default value in the Party Type field is not cleared however.
To clear all search terms from every field in a module, including default
values, you would select Edit>Clear All from the Menu bar.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Select Organisation from the Party Type Lookup List.
First we'll filter the Organisation: (Organisation Details) Lookup List.
Enter m in the Organisation: (Organisation Details) field.
Press F12.
The Lookup Selection box displays and the list of values has been filtered to only
those that begin with m.
Close the Lookup Selection box.
This time enter museum in the Organisation: (Organisation Details) field before
pressing F12.
The Lookup Selection box displays and the list of values has been filtered to entries
beginning with museum.
The more characters you key in before accessing the Lookup List, the fewer entries
will be listed.
Close the Lookup Selection box.
Select Edit>Clear from the Menu bar.
This option essentially returns a module to its default search state: any search
terms you added are cleared and any field with a changed default value reverts to
its default state. In this case, Party Type reverts from Organisation to Person.
This time, select Edit>Clear All from the Menu bar.
This clears all search terms, including default values.
Click
beside the Organisation: (Organisation Details) field.
The Lookup Selection box displays with the first entry in the list highlighted.
Start keying museum in the Look For field of the Lookup Selection box.
As you enter characters the highlight moves to the closest match in the list.
Keep entering characters until Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa is
highlighted in the list.
What minimum characters do you need to enter in order for Museum of New
Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa to be highlighted in the list?
When the required entry is highlighted in the list:
Press Enter
-ORClick
-ORDouble-click the value you are after.
Page 45
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
The value selected from the Lookup List displays in the field.
Page 46
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Lookup List hierarchies
Lookup Lists for different fields can be linked together to form a logical relationship, e.g.
Country / State / Town so that when a value is entered in one of the fields (Country for
instance), the values in the other fields are automatically filtered (only states and towns
for the Country selected are listed in the linked State and Town Lookup Lists).
A field that is linked in a Lookup List hierarchy can also be set to have auto fill properties.
In this case a field will automatically be populated with an appropriate value when a value
is entered in another field in the same hierarchy. For example, if a city is associated with
a state, when the city name is entered in the City field, the appropriate State is
automatically entered into the State field.
We'll take a look at this in operation in the Parties module:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
On the Address tab, open the State/Province: (Address) Lookup List and scroll
through the list of values.
The Lookup List holds the names of states / provinces from a variety of countries.
Close the Lookup Selection box.
Select Australia from the Country: (Address) Lookup List.
View the State/Province: (Address) Lookup List.
Only States in Australia are now listed.
Close the Lookup Selection box and create a new Parties record by clicking
in
the Tool bar.
On the Address tab, enter 3053 in the Postal/Zip Code: (Physical Address) field.
Press the Tab key on your keyboard (this moves you out of the current field into the
next field).
The City/Town, State/Province, Postal/Zip Code and Country fields each have
Lookup Lists linked together in a hierarchy. 3053 is the postcode for the suburb of
Carlton in the State of Victoria, Australia and when you enter the postcode, the
other Lookup Lists fields are automatically updated with the appropriate (linked)
value.
Click
in the Tool bar to discard this record and click
whether you'd like to save your changes.
when asked
Page 47
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
Adding a value to a Lookup List
Lookup Lists are set by your System Administrator to be either:
•
•
Read-only: you must use a value already in the list and cannot add a new value to
the list.
-ORRead-write (with or without a prompt): you can add a value and you will be asked to
confirm the addition of a new value to the list or the value will be added
automatically to the list.
You can only add a value to a Lookup List if:
1.
2.
The Lookup List is set to read-write.
You are in New or Edit mode. You cannot add a value in Search mode.
Let's try this:
1.
Create a new Parties record by using the keyboard shortcut, Ctrl+N.
2.
to save the record.
Enter Lord in Title: (Person Details) and click
A box displays asking whether you want to save the value to the Lookup List:
3.
Click
.
The Title: (Person Details) Lookup List is read-write, which means that you are
permitted to add new values to it.
4.
5.
6.
Cancel the new record by clicking
in the Tool bar.
Create a new record in the Bibliography module.
Enter your name in Reference Type: (Reference Details) on the Book tab and save
the record.
A warning message displays indicating that the Lookup List is read-only and you
must select a value from the list.
7.
Click
and cancel the new record.
For more details, search the EMu Help for Add a value to a Lookup List.
Page 48
Accessing EMu and finding your way around
How to clean up a Lookup List
When a Lookup List is built from values entered in a field it is possible that values in the
list will be misspelled or in other ways inaccurate. In this case it will be necessary to clean
up the Lookup List. As this can require the use of Global Replace functionality, which is
beyond the scope of this course, only an overview will be provided here (Global Replace
is covered in the Advanced Use of EMu training course as well as the EMu Help).
1.
2.
3.
Check whether the value to be removed is being used in any record (perform a
search for the value).
If it is, correct every instance of the incorrect value manually or use Global Replace
functionality to replace every instance of the incorrect value.
Search for the value in the Lookup Lists module and ensure that it is not set to
Persistent.
Page 49
The EMu Help
SECTION 4
The EMu Help
You've been introduced to EMu, but before you start learning how to make use of it, now
is a good opportunity to become familiar with the EMu Help.
The EMu Help is extensive and contains answers to the vast majority of questions you
will have as you work with EMu: if you have a question, much time can be saved by using
the Help rather than waiting for an answer from a colleague or even a reply from KE
Support. In many instances, KE Support may refer you to the EMu Help in any case as it
contains documented, step by step instructions.
When you are working in EMu there are several ways to access the Help:
•
•
Select
in the Command Centre
-ORSelect Help>Contents & Index from a module Menu bar
Both of these options will open the EMu Help to its first page, from where you can search
for an answer.
EMu also includes a Context Sensitive Help option which will open the Help to a specific
page. The What's this
button is located on the far right of a module's Tool bar. If
you click
and then click an object (a button, menu, etc.) on the module window, the
EMu Help will open to a page that describes the object clicked. We'll look at this in more
detail later.
If you click
and then click a field, the Field Level Help will display
rather than the EMu Help. The Field Level Help provides a description of
the purpose of a field, as well as more advanced information about the
field. We look at Field Level Help later (page 56).
Page 51
The EMu Help
Finding Help when you need it
Finding the information you need when you need it can be a problem with any large Help
system. Obviously (and unfortunately) this tends to be more of a problem for those who
are new to a system and need the most help as they are unfamiliar with the system and
its terminology.
We have attempted to make it easier to locate a specific topic in the EMu Help through:
•
•
•
•
Page 52
The organisation of content
Content in the Help is organised in logical categories so that browsing the Contents
list should allow you to locate what you're after even if you don't know the exact
terminology.
Duplication of content
Where content is relevant to more than one section of the Help, it is repeated in
each relevant section. For example, the topic Automatic sorting of search results
will be found in the section on searching and the section on sorting as it is relevant
to both searching and sorting. Whichever way you approach the topic (with a
question about searching or sorting) you should be able to locate this topic.
An FAQ section
A collection of FAQs that will take you directly to the relevant section in the Help.
Index and cross-reference
The Help has a comprehensive index and cross-referencing between topics to
assist with discovery of content.
The EMu Help
How to use the EMu Help
Let's take a look at the EMu Help:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Click
in the Command Centre to open the Help:
The three tabs in the left hand column give access to the Content, Index and
Search.
On the Contents tab, take a look at what is available under About EMu Help, in
particular the sub-sections EMu Help>How to access the EMu Help and The EMu
Help window.
Take a look at the Contents tab. As a user of EMu the sections you will find most
relevant are Working with EMu modules and fields and Working with EMu records.
Expand these sections to see what is included and how content is organised.
Now that you have some idea about how content is organised in the Help, browse
the Contents tab to locate information about the Movements module.
How many sub-topics are there to the section about the Movements module?
________
Now browse the Contents tab to locate information about how you would run a
search to find punctuation.
What is the Context ID of the topic How do I search for punctuation? (the Context ID
is located at the bottom right corner of the topic)? __________
Page 53
The EMu Help
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Browse the Contents tab to locate the topic Automatic sorting of search results.
What is the Context ID of the topic? __________
If you located the topic Automatic sorting of search results in the Search section, try
locating it in the Sort section (and vice versa).
This is the same topic but as it is relevant to both areas, it has been placed in both.
Locate the FAQ section in the Help and browse it.
Here you'll find a collection of FAQs that will take you directly to the relevant section
in the Help.
This time use the FAQ section to find out about automatic sorting of search results.
Select the Search tab.
The only things worth stressing here are the checkbox options at the bottom of the
Search tab, each of which will filter search results:
Let's locate the topic on how to set default values.
Enter how to set default values in the text box, don't select a checkbox
(uncheck any box with a tick) and click
A long list of results is returned.
12.
13.
Page 54
Click the Search titles only checkbox and click
This narrows the result set considerably.
Close the EMu Help.
.
again.
The EMu Help
The What's this button
EMu also includes a Context Sensitive Help option which will open the Help to a specific
page. The What's This
button is located on the far right of a module Tool bar. If you
click
and then click an object (button, menu, etc.) on the module window, the EMu
Help will open to a page that describes the object clicked:
1.
Open the Parties module:
The EMu Help will open to the How to run a search topic.
The What's This button can be used to get information on many (though not all) objects:
buttons, menus, sub-menus, a module itself.
Another use of the What's This button is to get information about fields. We'll look at that
next.
Page 55
The EMu Help
Field Level Help
Another source of help built in to EMu is the Field Level Help. Field Level Help, which is
available for every field in every module, includes the following details:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A field description
The (back-end) name of the module in which the field is located
The field's (back-end) Column name
Its Type (e.g. Text) and Kind (e.g. Atom)
It's Lookup Name and Lookup Level
Groups able to view the field
For the moment, we're only interested in the field description, although as you become a
more advanced user of EMu you will probably want to know about the other details
available.
1.
Open the Parties module if it is not already open.
Another way to access the Field Level Help for a field is to place the cursor
in the field and use the keyboard shortcut, F1.
A Field Level Help window displays with a description of the purpose of the field:
Page 56
The EMu Help
This description is maintained in the Field Help module and can be tailored to your
institution's needs.
You'd access the more advanced details mentioned above by selecting
.
2.
Finally, in the EMu Help search for How to add related information and read
about ways to extend the Help.
When you run a search, the search terms are highlighted in blue in the topics
returned by the search. To remove the blue highlight (which can be distracting),
select Options>Refresh.
Page 57
Searching, browsing and displaying
SECTION 5
Searching, browsing and displaying
Searching for records, browsing the results of your search and displaying records go
hand in hand, and in this section we'll look at all three together.
The most frequent task you're likely to perform with EMu is searching for records. It's no
accident that when you first open a module in EMu it displays in Search mode: unless you
are adding new records, you'll want to be locating existing records for any number of
purposes:
•
•
•
•
•
You may be looking for information about an object.
You may be looking for the object itself and are checking its Catalogue record for its
physical location.
You may need to update one or more records - perhaps the physical object has
been relocated and you need to update the object's record; perhaps details of an
Insurance policy covering objects in your collection have changed.
You may need to run a condition check report.
Perhaps you're in the early stages of planning an exhibition and are identifying
objects to be exhibited.
In each of these cases, and many more, you first need to locate records. In this section
we'll learn how to do that, starting with the most basic search and moving on to more
sophisticated ways to locate records.
In a similar way to Search Engines such as Google, EMu implements a
fast retrieval search mechanism that significantly speeds up searching by
running your query across the database indexes in the first instance rather
than across the raw data. While this results in a significantly faster search,
it is possible (although rare), that the search results contain "false
matches" - records which appeared to match the search query but which
do not. As soon as you commence viewing the records, EMu examines
the returned records and eliminates any false matches, so you will never
in fact see a false match record. What does this mean in practice? When
you run your search, the Status bar may indicate, for instance, that 4
records were returned by the search. As soon as you start navigating
through the records however, the Status bar may update the total to 3,
eliminating a record which was assumed to match the query.
Page 59
Searching, browsing and displaying
The most frequently used search
commands
Menu bar
Tool
bar
Keyboard
shortcut
Description
File>Search
Ctrl+F
Run a search.
File>New Search
Alt+F+E
Return to Search mode, clearing all values
from fields except for default search values.
File>Previous
Search
Alt+F+R
Return to Search mode, keeping any values
that were entered in the last search.
Edit>Clear
Edit>Clear All
Page 60
Clear any values you entered in fields (fields
with default values are returned to their default
state).
Shift+Del
Clear values from all fields, including any
default values (though not from read-only
fields).
Searching, browsing and displaying
A basic search
Searches are not case sensitive. For a case sensitive search use an
equals sign (=) before the search term, e.g. =Business will match
Business but not business.
We'll start with a very simple search:
1.
Open the Parties module:
As you can see, when you open a module it is in Search mode and, in the case of
the Parties module, there is a default value in the Party Type field:
•
A default value is a value that displays in a field by default whenever a
module is opened (Search mode) or a new record is created (New mode).
•
A default value is specified as a convenience because it is the most likely
value to be entered in a field by users performing a search or creating a new
record.
•
Default values are not mandatory values: you can delete them or change
them to suit your needs.
2.
Click
in the Tool bar.
Every record in the Parties module where Party Type = Person is returned:
Page 61
Searching, browsing and displaying
Note the following about this module window:
•
The screen mode is now Display (note the Title and Status bar): in Display
mode we view details of the records.
•
When you run your first search in a module, the Display mode used by default
is List View. In this view, records are listed in a table with one or more fields
displaying in columns.
•
The number of records returned by the search is indicated in the Status bar.
Note the number of records returned by your search: _______________
3.
Click Previous Search
in the Tool bar to return to Search mode.
This returns the module to Search mode, keeping any search terms that were used
in the previous search.
The Previous Search
option can be useful if your search returned
too many or too few records and you need to refine the search. Click
, modify your search terms and run the search again.
4.
Let's change the default value and run a search. Click
beside the Party Type
field and double-click Organisation in the Lookup Selection box.
5.
Click
to run the search.
Note the number of records returned by your search: _______________
6.
Click Previous Search
in the Tool bar.
In this case the module returns to Search mode and keeps the value you previously
entered in the Party Type field.
7.
Run the search again and then click New Search
in the Tool bar.
Note that the Parties module returns to Search mode in its default state: any values
you entered are cleared and default values display.
Page 62
Searching, browsing and displaying
8.
9.
10.
11.
Select Edit>Clear All from the Menu bar.
This time, even the default value is cleared. Edit>Clear All will remove any values
you have entered as well as any default values.
What is the keyboard shortcut for Edit>Clear All? _______________ (Hint:
keyboard shortcuts are often listed beside the relevant Menu entry).
Select Person from the Party Type Lookup List.
Enter adams in the Last: (Person Details) field:
Run the search using the keyboard shortcut, Ctrl+F.
A search is run using all search terms entered in any field in the module. In this
case the search terms are the default value Person in the Party Type field and
adams in Last: (Person Details), and any record with these values in these fields will
be returned by the search. Note: in order to be returned by the search, a record
must have each of these values in the specified fields. As you'd expect, far fewer
records are returned this time:
Page 63
Searching, browsing and displaying
Each search term you enter will further reduce the number of records returned by a
search.
12.
13.
Click Previous Search
in the Tool bar.
Enter john in First: (Person Details) and run the search.
This time a single record is returned.
If we run a search and:
•
•
•
There are no search terms entered in any fields in a module, every record in the
module will be returned.
There is a search term entered in one field, every record with that value in the
specified field will be returned.
There are search terms entered in several fields in the module, only records with all
of the specified values in the specified fields will be returned.
The more search terms you add, the fewer records will be returned by your search.
Page 64
Searching, browsing and displaying
Displaying and browsing the results of
your search
As you've seen, when you open a module it is in Search mode:
When you first run a search:
•
•
•
The Screen mode changes from Search to Display mode (note the Title and Status
bars).
The results of your search are returned in a list. This is called the List View.
The first record in the list is highlighted (there is a faint dotted border around it) - this
highlighted record is known as the Current Record.
Page 65
Searching, browsing and displaying
In Display mode, additional buttons are included in the Tool bar:
Buttons
Description
Display views
These options control how results are displayed. Results can be
displayed in:
Icon
Label
List View
Search results are presented in a list.
List View displays a subset of fields in a table
format (a column for each field included in the
List View).
It is possible to create your own List Views,
each with its own set of fields, and to select
which List View to use to display records. See
List Views (page 99) for details.
The Status bar indicates the total number of
results returned by a search.
Details View
Displays full record details.
The Status bar indicates the number of the
currently displayed record in relation to the
total number of records returned by a search,
e.g. record 3 of 3 or record 1 of 5.
Page View
Displays record details using any XSLT
based report. The report may include images
and hyperlinks.
Contact
Displays the thumbnail image of a graphic
Sheet Views associated with a record.
Page 66
Searching, browsing and displaying
Buttons
Description
Navigation
These buttons control movement through the search results, moving
backwards and forwards from one record to the next or from first to last
record in the result set.
Changing how the results of your search are displayed is a simple matter of selecting one
of the Record display view buttons in the Tool bar.
By default, the results of a search are displayed in List View the first time
you run a search in a session. Subsequently the results of a search will
display in the last view selected. In other words, if you change the view
from List View to Details View and run another search, the results will then
be displayed in Details View.
Let's run a simple search and browse the results:
1.
2.
In the Parties module, run a search for all records with a Party Type of Person.
The Parties module shifts from Search mode to Display mode and all matching
records are returned in List View:
Note that the List View button in the Tool bar is depressed, indicating that it is
selected.
The first record in the List View is highlighted (there is a faint dotted border around
it).
Click
to move to the next record in the list.
Click
a few more times and note the highlight moving from one record to the
next as the Current record changes.
3.
Click
to return to the first record in the list.
Page 67
Searching, browsing and displaying
4.
Click
in the Tool bar to change to Details View. In this view, full record details
are available:
The Status bar indicates the number of the Current record in relation to the
total number of records returned by a search, e.g. record 3 of 3 or record 1
of 1964.
5.
Click
to move to the next record in the list.
Click
a few more times to move from one record to the next.
6.
Click
to move to the last record in the list.
7.
Return to List View by clicking
in the Tool bar.
As expected, in List View the last record is highlighted, indicating that it is the
Current record.
8.
Click
in the Tool bar to view the Current record in Page View.
Page View is EMu's fully customisable record display view. The layout and look of
the page, including which fields display, are specified by creating and modifying the
Page View style sheet. EMu is installed with a single Default Page View which
includes fields common to all modules.
More details about setting up your own Page Views can be found in the EMu Help
by searching for Page View.
In the Multimedia module, search for all records with a MIME Type: (Resource
Information) of Image.
9.
10.
Page 68
Select
in the Tool bar.
In Contact Sheet View, the thumbnail of an image associated with each record is
displayed.
Searching, browsing and displaying
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Select the second thumbnail by clicking it once and view its full details by clicking
in the Tool bar (you could double-click the label below the Thumbnail image).
Return to Contact Sheet View and this time double-click the Thumbnail image
itself.
The application associated with the image type opens and displays the image.
Close the application displaying the image.
In the Multimedia module, move the cursor over the top row of images - note that
summary details about the image display in the Status bar at the bottom of the
module window.
Close the Multimedia module.
Page 69
Searching, browsing and displaying
Additional basic search exercises
1.
We wish to locate the record for an artist by the name of Margaret Browne. Search
the Parties module for records where:
•
Party Type is Person.
•
Last: (Person Details) is Browne
•
First: (Person Details) is Margaret
One record is returned by your search.
2.
View the record in Details View by clicking
in the Tool bar.
In Details View we have access to all details in a record.
Select the Roles tab.
Hmm. It seems that this might not be the Margaret Browne we're after. This person
is not an Artist.
Perhaps the surname of the artist we're looking for is Brown not Browne?
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Click
in the Tool bar to return to Search mode without losing the search terms
you entered previously.
Change Last: (Person Details) to Brown and run the search again.
Check the Roles tab now.
Click
in the Tool bar to return the Parties module to its default Search state.
Any search terms you entered are cleared.
We wish to locate the record for artist Grace Smith, born 1892 in Neutral Bay,
Australia. Search for a Parties record where:
•
Party Type is Person
•
Last: (Person Details) is Smith
•
Date of Birth: (Birth Details) is 1892 (use the Find a Field utility to locate this
field)
•
Place of Birth: (Birth Details) is Neutral Bay
What year did Grace Smith die? ___________
Search terms can be entered in any field on any tab in a module.
8.
9.
10.
Page 70
How many records are there for people who work for Oxford University Press?
___________
Who works for National Gallery of Australia in a Conservator role?
______________________
Close any open modules.
Searching, browsing and displaying
Boolean operators
For our purposes, the Boolean operators are commonly understood to be AND, OR and
NOT and they are used to combine search terms when querying a database.
In fact you have already made use of a Boolean operation: when you enter search terms
in more than one field in a module you are making use of the Boolean AND operator: if you
specify Term1 in one field and Term2 in another and run the search, only records that
have Term1 AND Term2 in the specified fields will be returned by the search. For example,
if you enter John in a First Name field and Wood in a Surname field, only records for John
Wood will be returned by the search. Your search results will not include records where
First Name is John and Surname is Smith for instance.
In this section of the course, when we refer to the use of Boolean operators we are
referring to the combination of search terms in the same field. Exactly what we mean by
this will become clearer when we look at concrete examples in a moment.
First though, the theory: the green (light) areas in the illustrations below indicate the types
of record that will result from a search using each operator:
Page 71
Searching, browsing and displaying
A search in a field for Rock AND Roll will find all
records containing both the word Rock and the word
Roll in the specified field.
It will find items about rock and roll music for
instance. It might also find records that contain both
words in a different context, such as As hard as he
tried, he couldn't roll the rock away from the cave
entrance.
It will not find records in which the word Rock appears
without the word Roll (and vice versa).
Using our other example of John Wood, a search for
John AND Wood will only return records for John
Wood. This search will not return records for John
Smith or Peter Wood.
A search for Rock OR Roll will find all records that
contain either the word Rock or the word Roll.
Obviously if a record includes both words, it will be
returned by the search (but it only matters that one of
the words is located).
Using our John Wood example, a search for John OR
Wood will return records for John Wood, but it will in
fact return records for anyone with a first name of
John and a surname of Wood, including John Smith
and Peter Wood. Technically it only matters that the
record for John Wood contains one of the search
terms.
72
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
A search for Rock NOT Roll will find records that
contain the word Rock but not the word Roll. That is,
any record that includes the word Roll will not be
returned.
Using our John Wood example, a search for John
NOT Wood will return records for anyone with a first
name of John as long as the surname is not Wood. It
will return a record for John Smith but not for John
Wood.
The operators AND and NOT generally decrease the number of records found by a search and the operator OR increases the number of records
found. Therefore:
•
•
•
If you find too many records on your topic, add another search term with the AND operator.
If you find too many records on an unrelated topic, use the NOT operator to eliminate a term.
If you find too few records on your topic, add another search term using the OR operator.
If you wish to attempt the following examples, search the Notes field in the Catalogue module.
How to edit in a single language
73
Searching, browsing and displaying
AND
In EMu, if two or more terms are entered on the same line in a field, the Boolean AND
operator applies.
As with search tools such as Google, you do not actually need to type in the word AND in
EMu in order to make use of the Boolean AND operator:
In this example, records containing the two words winter and exhibition anywhere,
and in any order, in the Notes field will be found.
You are not limited to two search terms in an AND search, i.e. you could
enter winter exhibition Europe and all three terms would need to be
present in the field being searched.
OR
If two or more terms are entered on different lines in a field, the Boolean operator OR
applies. Again, note that you do not actually need to key in the word OR in order to make
use of the Boolean OR operator:
In this example, records that contain one or the other of these terms in the Notes field are
found.
You are not limited to two search terms in an OR search. Simply enter one
term per line.
NOT
If an exclamation mark ! is entered before a search term, the Boolean operator NOT
applies. In this example, if a record contains the word winter in the Notes field, it will not
be returned by this search:
In the following example the search will return any record that contains the word
exhibition in the Notes field but not if it also includes the word winter.
74
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Combining Boolean operators in more than one field
As we have seen, searching in EMu allows you to enter search terms in any field in a
module. When search terms are entered in two or more fields, the Boolean AND operator
is implicit: that is, all of the specified search terms must be found in a record if it is to be
returned by the search.
Entering more than one search term into a field also makes use of Boolean operators.
If we wanted to locate records where a person's first name was John or Joan and the
surname was Allan but not Allen, we could perform the following search:
•
•
•
1.
2.
3.
The search terms in First: (Person Details) make use of a Boolean OR operator: the
first name must be john OR joan.
The search terms in Last: (Person Details) make use of a Boolean NOT operator:
the surname must be allan but NOT allen.
A Boolean AND operator is implicit for all three search terms. In order to be returned
by this search, a record must have:
•
Person in the Party Type field
AND
•
john OR joan in First: (Person Details)
AND
•
allan but NOT allen in Last: (Person Details)
Try this search.
You should find only two results.
Return to the previous search without losing the search terms entered.
Change the search term in Last: (Person Details) in order to search for records
where surname is Allan OR Allen.
How many results do you find?___________
How to edit in a single language
75
Searching, browsing and displaying
How to make use of Boolean operators
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Open the Catalogue module.
Note that there is a default value of Object in Object Type.
Enter william in the Main Title: (Title) field.
Run the search.
4 records should be returned by this search.
Select New Search
to return to Search mode, clearing any previously
entered search terms.
Search the Catalogue module for all records with the word portrait in Main Title:
(Title).
11 records should be returned by this search.
Next we'll search the Catalogue module for all items with the words portrait AND
william in the title.
Select Previous Search
from the Tool bar to return to Search mode, keeping
any previously entered Search terms.
Enter william beside portrait in the Main Title: (Title) field:
Run the search.
Only 3 records contain both words somewhere in the title. We can illustrate the
result as:
11 titles contain the word portrait
•
4 titles contain the word william
•
Only 3 titles contain both portrait AND william
From this we can deduce that:
•
8 titles contain the word portrait but not william
•
1 title contains the word william but not portrait
Search for Catalogue records that include the words portrait OR william in the
Main Title: (Title) field:
•
9.
76
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
12 records contain either the word portrait or william somewhere in the title:
8 titles contain the word portrait but not william
•
1 title contains the word william but not portrait
•
3 titles contain both words (although only one of them is necessary in order
for a record to be returned by this search)
Search for Catalogue records that include the word portrait but not william in
the title.
•
10.
As we'd now expect, 8 records are returned by this search:
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
Although 11 records contain the word portrait somewhere in the title, 3 of them
also contain the word william.
Return to Search mode, clearing all previous search terms you entered.
Locate the Notes (Notes) field and locate all records with the word hand in the field.
How many results do you find? ___________
How many records have the word puppet in the Notes (Notes) field? ___________
How many records have both words in the Notes (Notes) field? ___________
How many records have the word hand OR puppet in the Notes (Notes) field?
___________
How many records have the word puppet but not hand in the Notes (Notes) field?
___________
How to edit in a single language
77
Searching, browsing and displaying
How to perform an Additional Search
Another way of making use of Boolean operators is to use EMu's Additional Search
functionality. As you'll see, this can be an effective method to filter search results
progressively.
First the theory:
1.
2.
3.
78
Run a search.
From the Menu bar, select File>Additional Search and select one of the
relationship options:
When you select one of these options, the module returns to Search Mode BUT
retains the results from your previous search. You specify new search terms and
depending on the Additional Search option you selected, records will be added to
or removed from your previous result set:
•
Merge (OR) - the results of both searches are combined.
•
Intersect (AND) - only records that match the criteria from both searches are
displayed.
•
Subtract (NOT) - records that include the term(s) specified in the second
search are removed from the first set of records.
You can run as many Additional Searches as required, increasing or decreasing
your result set as you go.
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Now we'll run a search and make use of the Additional Search functionality.
1.
2.
3.
4.
In the Parties module, run a search for all records with a Party Type of Person.
In List View the total number of records returned by a search is listed in the Status
bar. In this case there are 1964 records returned by your search.
This last search specified a single search term of Person in the Party Type field.
In fact, we really want records for people who work at Oxford University Press.
We have already specified one of the search terms we need (Person), but we
clearly need to add another one.
Select File>Additional Search>Intersect (AND) from the Menu bar.
Note that the Status bar indicates that the previous records are being held.
On the Organisation tab, select Oxford University Press from the Organisation:
(Organisation Details) Lookup List.
As you've seen (page 44), there are several ways to quickly locate Oxford
University Press in the Lookup List (you could for instance enter Oxf in the field
and press F12).
Run the Search.
The additional search is run and only Parties records where Party Type is Person
AND Organisation: (Organisation Details) is Oxford University Press are
returned in the result set:
We need to broaden our search to include anyone who works at the Victorian
5.
6.
Arts Centre.
This time select File>Additional Search>Merge (OR) from the Menu bar.
Once again the module returns to Search mode and the previous result set is held.
Use the Lookup List to enter Victorian Arts Centre in Organisation:
(Organisation Details) and then run the search.
The additional search is run and only Parties records where Party Type is set to
Person AND Organisation: (Organisation Details) is set to Oxford University
Press OR Victorian Arts Centre are returned in the result set:
How to edit in a single language
79
Searching, browsing and displaying
7.
8.
80
It seems that we don't actually need the Oxford University Press records any
longer.
Select File>Additional Search>Subtract (Not) from the Menu bar.
Use the Lookup List to enter Oxford University Press in Organisation:
(Organisation Details) and then run the search.
Only records for Person Parties records who work at the Victorian Arts Centre
remain in the result set.
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Additional Exercise
1.
2.
How many Person parties are located in Australia? ___________
Use an Additional Search option to find out how many are in Australia or in New
Zealand: ___________
How to edit in a single language
81
Searching, browsing and displaying
Text searches
EMu provides a variety of techniques to assist with searching for words and phrases in
text fields.
A phrase search
A phrase is one or more words adjacent to each other, e.g. business systems.
As we've seen, when we place words together in a field, a Boolean AND search is
performed on the field. But a Boolean AND search will locate any record in which the
words specified appear somewhere - anywhere - in the field.
For instance, if we entered business systems in a Notes field and ran a search, any
record that contains the two words in any order anywhere in the field will be returned:
•
•
The two words do not need to be side by side or in the same context (business
could appear in one paragraph, systems could appear in another).
The two words do not need to be in the same order as specified in the search field
(the word systems could appear anywhere in the Notes field before the word
business).
A record with the following sentence would be returned by this search: "There are many
systems in our business..."
If we want to search for an exact phrase, we need to surround the phrase with quotation
marks:
When we run this search, only records that contain the phrase exactly as it appears
between the quotation marks will be returned.
A record with the sentence "There are many systems in our business..." would not
be returned by this phrase search, but a record with the sentence "Many business
systems have been documented by..." would be returned by this search.
A phrase search is far more precise than a Boolean AND search in which the two words
can appear anywhere and in any order in a field.
A phrase search is not case sensitive by default. For a case sensitive
search use an equals sign (=) before the phrase, e.g. ="Business
system" will match Business system but not business system.
82
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
1.
2.
3.
In the Catalogue module, search the Notes field on the Notes tab for national
gallery.
How many results do you find? ___________
View the Notes tab in Details view. Note that the words you searched for are
highlighted in red.
Now search the same field for "national gallery".
How many results do you find? ___________
See the note about False Matches (page 59) if the number of results
changes as you start viewing the results.
4.
5.
6.
7.
View the Notes tab in Details view and note that the words national and gallery
are no longer highlighted in red unless they appear exactly as national gallery.
This time we'll do a case sensitive search. Enter ="national gallery" in the
Notes field.
There should be no matching results as the lower case phrase national gallery
does not appear in the Notes field of any record.
Run the search again, but this time change the first letters of each word to upper
case.
If we search the Notes field for the exact phrase "National Gallery of Australia", how
many results now? ___________
As you can see, a phrase search is a very precise way of locating a record. The trick of
course is to know what phrase to look for. If the phrase you enter between quotations
marks is not used exactly as you have entered it, you will not find the record(s) you are
after. If you don't find the record(s) you are after, you could remove the quotation marks
and start searching for the key words in your phrase, adding or removing words to
decrease or increase the number of results.
1.
2.
Search the Notes: (Notes) field for "black and white checked scarf".
No results are returned but you're fairly sure the record you're after includes the
description you entered.
You need to make the search less precise. Remove the speech marks and this
time search for black white scarf.
One record is returned. The exact phrase was "black & white checked scarf".
How to edit in a single language
83
Searching, browsing and displaying
Stemming
Stemming allows you to find records that contain variations of a search term, e.g. its
plural, adjective, verb version.
Unlike a phrase search, which provides precise results, stemming is an
approximation and is useful when you are uncertain of the term for which
to search. The stemming algorithm is complex and may yield unexpected
results along with the results you are after.
To use stemming, simply type a ~ (tilde) directly before the search term.
The following table shows examples of searches that use stemming and terms that will
be picked up by the search:
Search term
Will find records containing the following:
~system
system, systems, systematic, systematics, systemless, systematically,
systematise, systemic, systemise
~view
view, viewer, viewing, viewable, viewfinder, viewgraph, viewless,
viewpoint
~bracket
bracket, bracketed, bracketing
1.
2.
3.
In the Multimedia module, search Description: (Resource Information) for ~paint.
How many results do you find? ___________
In Details View, browse the results and make a note of the variations of the word
paint returned by this search:
______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________
______________________
Search the Main Title: (Title Details) field in the Catalogue module for:
•
~work
What variations do you find?
____________________________________________
•
~lady
What variations do you find?
____________________________________________
84
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Phonetic retrieval
Phonetic retrieval locates records that contain terms that sound like the search term.
Unlike a phrase search, which provides precise results, phonetic retrieval
is an approximation and is useful when you are uncertain of the term for
which to search. As we'll see in the exercise below, the phonetic retrieval
algorithm is complex and may yield unexpected results along with the
results you are after.
A phonetic search uses the @ symbol. The following table shows examples of searches
that use phonetic retrieval and terms that will be picked up by the search:
Search term
Matching terms
@krystal
crystal, krystal
@color
colour, color
@smith
smith, smyth, smythe
1.
Search the Last: (Person Details) field in the Parties module for:
•
@allan
What variations do you find?
____________________________________________
•
@kay
What variations do you find?
____________________________________________
•
@reed
What variations do you find?
____________________________________________
How to edit in a single language
85
Searching, browsing and displaying
Pattern matching and the wildcard
search
The wildcard is one of the most useful search tools at your disposal. A wildcard is a
special character that substitutes for one or more characters in your search term or
directs EMu to use the search term in a particular way. With pattern matching it is
possible to:
•
•
Substitute one or more wildcard characters for one or more letters in a search term.
Specify that a search term appears at the beginning or end of a field.
There are four main wildcard characters and they can be used alone and in combination:
Wildcard
Use
Examples
*
Substitutes zero or more characters at
its position in a search term.
appl* would match apple, application,
?
Substitutes for any single character at
its position in a search term.
appl? would match apply and apple
^
Place at the beginning of a search term
to specify that the term must display at
the start of the field.
^Hospital would match Hospital for
$
Place at the end of a search term to
specify that the term must display at
the end of the field.
Organi?ation$ will match Funeral
applied, etc.
edit* would match edit, edits, edited,
etc.
(but not apples).
organi?e would match organise and
organize.
Patriots, and Hospital for Abandoned
Animals (but not Patriots Hospital or
Chicago Hospital).
Directors Organisation and Funeral
Directors Organization (but not
Organisation of Funeral Directors).
It is possible to search for punctuation, including wildcard characters.
Search the EMu Help for search for punctuation for details.
86
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Common wildcard searches
Wildcard Description
^term$
This will only return records that have
the single word term in the search field,
i.e. term must be the start and end of
the value in a field.
Note that the ^$ combination will not
locate empty fields (this combination is
only used in a Global Replace - which
we look at in the Advanced use of EMu
training course).
*
This will return records with something
(anything) in the search field.
!*
This will return records with nothing in
the search field.
!* says "search this field for NOT
anything", i.e. nothing.
*term*
Is useful when you are unsure of the
search term's spelling.
+
Use in an attachment field to return
records that have an attachment.
!+
Use in an attachment field to return
records that do NOT have an
attachment.
How to edit in a single language
Example
^Life$ would only match records with
the title Life but not records with the title
Life of Brian.
*ose* will match Joseph, Yoseph,
Josef, Yosef, etc.
87
Searching, browsing and displaying
Wildcard searches
1.
In the Catalogue module search Main Title: (Title) for:
•
•
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
88
cloak
This returns two results, both with the word cloak somewhere in the title.
^cloak$
This returns a single result in which the word cloak appears alone in the
field.
In a phonetic search we performed earlier in the Parties module, we looked for
@reed. This returned a number of results, some of which we'd expect and several
that were unexpected (Rodway, for instance).
If we were sure that the name we were searching for was Reed, Read or Reid, we
could use the ? wildcard.
Search the Last: (Person Details) field in the Parties module for re?d.
Note the combinations returned this time:
____________________________________________
The ? wildcard substitutes for any single letter in its place (the ? must appear in the
same position as the letter being substituted).
We need to search the Parties module for organisations with Theatre or Theater
in the name.
3.1. In the Parties module, select Organisation from the Party Type Lookup List.
3.2. Search for theat* in the Organisation: (Organisation Details) field.
This certainly locates both Theatre and Theater but it also returns records
with Theatrical in the name.
3.3. If we only want to locate records with Theatre or Theater in the name, what
would our search term be? _______________
How many records are returned by this search? _______________
We need to locate a Parties record for a person with the last name of Brown,
Browne or Browning (we're unsure which it is).
What single search term would be guaranteed to capture all three possibilities?
_______________
How many records are returned by this search? _______________
To specify that a word appears at the start of the field, we use the ^ symbol. For
instance, we only want to search for organisations whose name begins with
Melbourne (Melbourne Chorale, rather than University of Melbourne, for instance):
5.1. In the Parties module, select Organisation from the Party Type Lookup List.
5.2. Search for ^melbourne in the Organisation: (Organisation Details) field.
How many records are returned by this search? _______________
What search term would we use to locate organisations whose name ends with
Melbourne (University of Melbourne rather than Melbourne Chorale, for instance)?
_______________
How many records are returned by this search? _______________
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Range searches
Fields that hold numeric values, dates, time, even latitude / longitude data can be
searched for a range of values (from 1 to 100, or between 1 January 1994 and 1 January
2005, for instance).
Relational operators (>, >=, <, <=) are used to specify the lower, upper, or lower and
upper limit of the date, time or number for which you are searching.
Alphanumeric data is handled differently to numerical data (date fields can
take alphanumeric data; and values in latitude and longitude fields are by
their nature alphanumeric, i.e. 51 39 00 N). Whenever you use
alphanumeric data in a range search (or more precisely, when there are
spaces in the search term), the value must be enclosed in double quotes
(e.g. "51 39 00 N" or "1 January 1970").
The following table lists the operators and how they are used:
Operator Description
Example
>
Finds records greater than the
specified date or number.
>"2 Apr 1999" will find records after
<
Finds records less than
specified date or number.
the
<"2 Apr 1999" will find records
>=
Finds records greater than or equal
to the specified date or number.
>="2 Apr 1999" will find records
<=
Finds records less than or equal to
the specified date or number.
<="2 Apr 1999" will find records
2 April 1999.
>890 will find records greater than
890.
before 2 April 1999.
<890 will find records less than 890.
after or from 2 April 1999.
>=890 will find records greater than
or equal to 890.
before or equal to 2 April 1999.
<=890 will find records less than or
equal to 890.
It is unnecessary to use an equals sign (=) to find a specific date or number.
It is possible to specify an upper and lower limit by combining range search terms. For
example >=30 <=50 will find all records from 30 to 50 inclusive.
How to edit in a single language
89
Searching, browsing and displaying
1.
2.
3.
4.
First, we'll search for items with an Accession Date on or after 1 January 1950.
1.1. In the Catalogue module locate the Accession Date: (Accession Details)
field.
There are three Accession Date: (Accession Details) fields on three different
tabs. These are in fact the same field repeated in different locations as they
are useful in each location. When a value is entered in any one of these
fields, it is replicated in the other fields.
1.2. Type >=1/1/1950
1.3. Check out the first 3 tabs and note that the search term you entered is
replicated in the 3 locations.
1.4. Run the search.
Any record with an Accession Date of 1/1/1950 or after is returned by this search.
How many records are returned by this search? _______________
What is the search term to locate items with an Accession Date on or after 1
January 1950 (i.e. use the alphanumeric date)?
______________________________
You can abbreviate January to Jan.
Run the search to check that you have the same number of results as for question
1.
The equals (=) sign is implicit (and therefore unnecessary) when we want to search
for a specific date.
For instance:
3.1. In the Accession Date: (Accession Details) field, type 6 June 1995 and run
the search.
Why didn't this search work?
3.2. Correct the search term and run it again.
3.3. What is the Accession No. for the record returned by this search?
_______________
You can specify a lower and upper limit for a range. Search for all items in the
Catalogue with an Accession Date in the 1980s.
4.1. In the Accession Date: (Accession Details) field, type >=1/1/1980
<1/1/1990
Assuming a date format of dd/mm/yyyy, you could also search for
>=1/1/1980 <=31/12/1989.
5.
90
How many records are returned by this search? _______________
What is the search term to locate items with an Accession Date some time in the
first decade of the twentieth century? _______________
How many records are returned by this search? _______________
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Proximity searching
Proximity searches allow you to search for two words in a text field and specify how many
words, sentences or paragraphs separate them. The assumption of this search is that the
proximity of two words to each other suggests their association with each other.
Recall an earlier search we performed for business systems. In order to return results
specific to business systems we use quotation marks around the two words - as you'll
recall, this search, "business systems" will only return records where the search term
appears exactly as it does between the quotation marks.
If we didn't use quotation marks around the search term business systems we'd be
performing a Boolean AND search in which any record with the two words anywhere in
the search field will be returned. Such records may not be about business systems at all,
but may simply mention the word business in one paragraph and the word systems in
another.
If we were searching for records about business systems, a search for "business
systems" may not in fact return all relevant records. A record may describe business
systems without using the exact phrase, e.g. "a business can have many systems..."
A proximity search, which is useful in fields with large bodies of text, would locate such a
record.
Proximity searches take the form of:
'(term1 term2) modifier operator number unit'
To construct a proximity search:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Type two search terms in a field, e.g. business systems
Enclose the two terms within brackets, i.e. (business systems)
If required, type a modifier, e.g. after, near.
The modifier is either after, meaning the second term must come after the first
term, or near, meaning the second term could be before or after the first term (this
is the default and in fact does not need to be entered).
Type a relational operator (i.e. <, <=, >, >=, =) and a number or range to indicate
the proximity or proximity range of each term to the other, e.g. (business
systems) <= 5
Type the unit of proximity by which to search, e.g. words, sentences or
paragraphs, e.g. (business systems) <= 5 words will find records where the
search terms business and systems are equal to or less than five words apart.
The unit of proximity can be abbreviated to the first letter of the word, e.g.
w for word, s for sentence, p for paragraph.
6.
Surround the search phrase with single quotes, e.g.:
'(business systems) <= 5 w'
How to edit in a single language
91
Searching, browsing and displaying
Let's say we want to find a narrative about a giant sea spider.
1.
92
First we'll perform a Boolean AND search for giant spider in the Narrative:
(Narrative Details) field in the Narratives module.
This locates two records, only one of which is relevant (let's assume that our
database is much larger and many more records are returned by the search!). The
record for the Upland Moa mentions "spider web of underground passages" in one
sentence and "extinct giant eagles" several sentences later.
A Proximity search should locate the record we are after:
1.1. Construct a proximity search for the two words, specifying that they appear
within 3 words of each other, and that spider comes after giant:
'(giant spider) <=3 w'
1.2. Run the search.
One record is returned, which you'll find refers to giant sea spiders.
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
How to search attached documents
The Multimedia module is a repository for your digital media assets, including images,
video and audio files, as well as documents. Any record in the Multimedia module can be
linked to one or more records in any other module.
The text of text based documents stored in the Multimedia module can also be searched.
For example, if an object in the Catalogue undergoes conservation, the staff member
undertaking the conservation work might provide detailed notes in an MS Word
document about the work done. This document can be stored in the Multimedia module
and attached to the relevant Conservation record. From the Multimedia module it is
possible to search the text of attached documents in order to locate the Multimedia
record for the text based document.
In this exercise we search for a document that discusses artist Elizabeth Durack's time in
the Kimberley region of Australia:
1.
2.
Locate the Document Text: (Attached Documents) field in the Multimedia module.
Enter Kimberley in the field and run the search.
One record is returned for an MS Word document with a biography of Elizabeth
Durack:
3.
Double-click the blue DOC icon to open the document.
You'll find Kimberley mentioned throughout the Word document.
How to edit in a single language
93
Searching, browsing and displaying
Some other EMu search functions
Also Search
The Also Search function works in the background when you're running a search and it
doesn't actually require you to do anything more than enter search terms and run your
search as you've been doing!
The Also Search function is configured by your EMu Administrator in the EMu Registry
and involves specifying any additional fields that should be searched using the search
terms entered in a particular field. For example, when you enter a search term in the First:
(Person Details) field in the Parties module, the Also Search function can be configured
to search the Other Names: (Person Details) field for that same value.
Details for how to configure Also Search are provided in the EMu Help (search titles only
for Also Search function).
1.
2.
3.
94
In the Parties module, enter Ged in the First: (Person Details) field.
Run the search.
One result is found. Note that the value in First: (Person Details) is Gerard, not Ged,
but that Other Names: (Person Details) does include the Ged value.
Do not close the module.
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Show Search function
How useful you'll find this next function will depend on your role and technical proficiency.
Some users find it to be an invaluable tool for diagnosing problems with a search or
fine-tuning a search; others never look at it. Here we'll expose you to it so that you'll be
aware of it for future reference.
The Show Search function allows users with the required permissions to view and edit
the Query statement for a search in its native TexQL format.
1.
2.
Click
in the Tool bar to return to Search mode and retain the search term(s)
you entered previously.
Select File>Show All Searches from the Menu bar.
The Edit Search box displays with the TexQL statement for the current search:
The back-end name for a field is used in TexQL statements - even so, you can
clearly see that when a search of First: (Person Details) is run (aka NamFirst), the
Other Names: (Person Details) field (NamOtherNames) is also searched.
If required, you could edit the code.
3.
Click
.
The search runs.
As you will have noted, there are three Show Search options under the File menu. You
will find details about the difference between:
•
File>Show Search
•
File>Show Attach Search
•
File>Show All Searches
by searching the EMu Help for Additional Search functions.
How to edit in a single language
95
Searching, browsing and displaying
Access to the Show Search function is a permission that must be set for a
user in the EMu Registry.
96
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
Default values: search
Earlier in this course you were introduced to default values: values which display in fields
whenever, for instance, you open a module in Search mode. In the training client we're
using, there's a default search value of Person in the Party Type field for instance:
whenever you open the Parties module, the module is ready to search for records where
Party Type = Person:
In many organisations, the vast majority of searches of the Parties module are for records
where Party Type = Person, so to speed things up, a default value has been specified. Of
course, if you need to search for a record where Party Type = Organisation, you simply
change the Party Type value accordingly.
If you run a search and then click New Search
to return to Search
mode, clearing any search terms you entered previously, only search
terms that you entered will be cleared: any default values will remain.
If you want to remove all search terms, including default values, select
Edit>Clear All from the Menu bar.
As different groups within an organisation have different needs, it's possible to set
different default values for individual users and groups: Group A almost always searches
for records where Party Type = Person; Group B almost always searches for records
where Party Type = Organisation. EMu can be configured so that when each group
opens the Parties module in Search mode, the appropriate default value displays for
them.
Furthermore, different sets of default values can be specified for a module, which can be
useful if various tasks you undertake involve repeated searches with a base set of search
terms.
Next, we'll change which set of default values is used:
How to edit in a single language
97
Searching, browsing and displaying
1.
2.
3.
In the Parties module in Search Mode, select Edit>Default Values>Change from
the Menu bar.
The Default box displays:
The currently selected set of default values is selected, Person Party in this case.
Double-click the Organisation Party set of default values.
The default values specified in this set display:
From now on, whenever the Parties module is opened in Search mode, the
Organisation Party set of default values will be used.
Change the set of default values back to the Person Party set.
Details about how to set default values can be found in the EMu Help by
searching for How to set default values.
98
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
List Views
In List View the records returned by your search are presented using a subset of the
fields in the record. Each EMu module can have a variety of List Views, each one
presenting the records using a different subset of fields. Each List View can display one
or more fields and can be shared with other EMu users or groups.
You can select a List View you created previously or someone else's List View if you've
been given access to it. You can also create a List View and make it available to other
users.
First we'll learn how to change the List View:
1.
2.
Run a search for all records in the Parties module where Party Type = Person.
Ensure that records display in List View:
This List View comprises a single column displaying each record's summary data
(which, in the Parties module comprises first name, last name, and organisation).
We'll select another List View that has been set up to list each of these values (and
more) in separate columns.
Select View>List Settings>Choose List from the Menu bar.
The Fields box displays and the current List View is highlighted (Summary Data in
this example):
How to edit in a single language
99
Searching, browsing and displaying
3.
Double-click Organisation and Role.
The records are displayed using the selected List View:
When you change the List View in a module, the selected view becomes
the default List View the next time a search is run.
At least one advantage of the Organisation and Role List View over the Summary
Data List View is probably obvious: the records can be sorted on any one or more
of the columns (we could sort by Surname, Organisation or Role for instance). We'll
look at how to do this later (page 142).
Another important use of List Views is reporting: it is possible to specify which fields
to display and then to copy and paste records returned by your search directly into
MS Excel (page 187).
100
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
4.
While it's possible that there will already be a List View with the columns you need,
you may need to design your own List View to display the fields you need for your
report. We'll look at how to create a List View in a moment.
Change the List View back to the Summary Data List View.
How to edit in a single language
101
Searching, browsing and displaying
How to create a List View
1.
2.
3.
4.
102
Run a search for all records in the Parties module where Party Type = Person and
Country: (Address) = Australia.
Select the Name: Last, First, Middle List View.
As useful as this List View is, it doesn't contain all the fields we'd like. What we need
is a list of names and addresses. As well as these fields then, we'd also like a List
View that includes:
•
Street: (Physical Address)
•
City/Town: (Physical Address)
•
State/Province: (Physical Address)
•
Postal/Zip Code: (Physical Address)
Select View>List Settings>Choose List from the Menu bar.
The Fields box displays:
Select
or
.
The Field Properties box displays:
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
5.
6.
Give the List View a descriptive name in the first text box. In this case enter Names
and Addresses (Train1), where Train1 is your login name.
Scroll through the Fields list until you find Last: (Person Details) and double-click
the field.
Last: (Person Details) is added to the Columns list:
How to edit in a single language
103
Searching, browsing and displaying
7.
104
Add the following fields in this order (for no other reason than we can then practice
adjusting their position in the Columns list):
•
City/Town: (Physical Address)
•
First: (Person Details)
•
Middle: (Person Details)
•
State/Province: (Physical Address)
•
Street: (Physical Address)
•
Postal/Zip Code: (Physical Address)
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
8.
9.
10.
11.
Select First: (Person Details) in the Columns list and click
once to move the
field up one position in the Columns list.
Adjust the position of the remaining fields until they are in this order:
•
Last: (Person Details)
•
First: (Person Details)
•
Middle: (Person Details)
•
Street: (Physical Address)
•
City/Town: (Physical Address)
•
State/Province: (Physical Address)
•
Postal/Zip Code: (Physical Address)
Each field is a column in the List View and will display in the order in which it is
listed here.
We'll give everyone access to this new List View.
Select the Security tab.
Double-click Everyone in the list of Names.
Everyone is added to the Access list. As you might expect, this allows everyone to
use your List View.
12.
Click
13.
Click
in the Fields box.
Because we created this new List View after we ran a search, the search results
now display using the newly created List View:
How to edit in a single language
.
105
Searching, browsing and displaying
14.
15.
106
Finally we'll adjust the column widths to better present the data and then save the
settings.
Place the cursor over the edge between two column headings. The resize cursor
appears:
Hold down the mouse button, drag the column to a desirable width and release the
mouse button:
How to edit in a single language
Searching, browsing and displaying
16.
Select View>List Settings>Save List Settings.
Next time you use this List View the column widths will be as you have set them.
You can only save the changed column settings if you are the owner
(creator) of the List View.
How to edit in a single language
107
Searching, browsing and displaying
Additional Exercises
1.
How many records are there for Person Parties with the last name Warren?
2.
Which Tool bar button would you now select to start a new search, clearing the
previously entered search criteria? (Place the cursor over the button to display its
name) ____________________
Select this button.
On the Person tab, are all fields empty? If not, why not?
__________________________________________________
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
108
__________
__________________________________________________
Run a new search to find all Person Parties with a Cash Management role.
How many records are returned by this search? __________
Use the Additional Search function to filter this last result so that only people
located in Great Britain remain. Is this an AND, OR or NOT search? __________
How many records are returned by this additional search? __________
Use the Additional Search function to exclude the record for Sebastian Kazinsky.
Is this an AND, OR or NOT search? __________
How many records match the search criteria now? __________
Return to Search mode, clearing any search terms you entered.
This time perform a single search for all Person parties with a Cash Management
role who are located in Great Britain, who do not have a surname of Kazinsky.
You should only have two records returned by this search.
In the Parties module run a search for all Parties whose first name sounds like
Allan but which excludes Alanna and Alwyn.
How many records are returned? __________
How would you specify a search to determine how many Person Parties have a
Last name beginning with Cra? __________
How many records are returned? __________
Find all Organisation Parties with a name ending in Centre, excluding the Antique
Centre.
What is your search term? ____________________
How many records are returned by this search? __________
How many items in the Catalogue have an Accession Date in the 1980s? Use
alphanumerics in your search terms (i.e. 1 January 1980 not 1/1/1980).
__________
Search the Parties module for all Person Party Types.
Create a List view which lists the records by:
•
Last name
•
First name
•
Title
15.1. Call it Last Name (Train1), where Train1 is your login name, and save it.
How to edit in a single language
How to delete and discard records
SECTION 6
How to delete and discard records
Deleting and discarding records have very different consequences:
•
•
When a record is deleted, it is permanently removed from the database.
When a record is discarded, it is removed from the current result set or group of
records. Discarded records are not removed from the database.
There are many scenarios in which you will want to discard or delete one or more
records:
•
•
You wish to run a report about newly acquired objects in your Catalogue. First you
run a search specifying a time frame within which objects were acquired but on
checking the results of your search you find that one or more records returned are
not required for your immediate purposes. In this case you would discard the
superfluous records.
Discarding records simply removes them from the group of records you are working
with, but keeps them in the database. If you ran the same search again, you would
find the records you discarded back in the result set of your search.
On the other hand, you might find that two records are duplicates. After you have
decided which record to keep, you will want to remove the obsolete record from the
database (first ensuring that any links to the obsolete record now point to the record
you are keeping). A deleted record is removed from the database.
Only users with the daDelete permission can delete records.
The Merge tool is used to shift any attachments made to an obsolete
records to the master record. In order to protect the relationships between
records, it is not possible to delete a record which has links to another
record. Use of the Merge tool is covered in the Advanced use of EMu
training course.
It is possible to delete or discard the current record or to select one or more records to
delete or discard. Before we delete or discard any records, we'll learn the difference
between the current and selected record and how to select records.
Page 109
How to delete and discard records
Current and selected records
Many actions we wish to perform, such as deleting, discarding and reporting, can be
performed on either the current record or selected record(s). It is only possible to have
one current record at a time, but many records can be selected at one time.
Current record
In Details and Page View the current record is simply the record being viewed:
In List and Contact Sheet View, the current record is highlighted with a faint dotted
border:
Page 110
How to delete and discard records
If we wanted to discard the current record, we could select File>Discard>Current
Record from the Menu bar and this record would be discarded.
Selected records
In Details View a selected record displays with a solid blue highlight in the Summary bar:
In List and Contact Sheet View, a selected record is highlighted with a solid blue
highlight:
Page 111
How to delete and discard records
If we wanted to discard these selected records, we could select File>Discard>Selected
Records from the Menu bar.
How then do we select records?
Page 112
How to delete and discard records
How to discard the current or selected records
In the following exercises, be sure to Discard records and not to Delete
them! Although you won't delete records in the following exercises, the
technique is the same as for discarding records - the effect however is
dramatically different: deleted records are removed from the database,
which is why the permission to delete records is typically limited to
administrators and power users.
1.
2.
In the Parties module, run a search for all Person parties and view the results in List
View:
Note that the first record has a faint border around it, indicating that it is the current
record.
Discard the current record by selecting File>Discard>Current Record from the
Menu bar.
A warning message displays:
Be sure that the message states Discard not Delete!
3.
4.
Click
to discard the record.
The record is removed from the result set (but not the database).
Run the search again and you will find the record you discarded listed.
Page 113
How to delete and discard records
5.
6.
Click
in the Tool bar to view the full record details for the current record.
Discard the current record again.
The record displaying is now the current record.
7.
Click
to navigate to the next record and then click
to return to List View.
Note that the faint border surrounds the second record in the list, indicating that it is
the current record.
Click any row in the List View and note that it becomes the current record.
Next we'll select a block of records (4 to 10) in List View.
Click the row number of the first record in the block, 4 in this case.
Press the Shift key and click anywhere in the row of the last record in the block,
10 in this case:
8.
9.
10.
11.
Page 114
Now we'll add records 1, 12 and 15 to the selection.
Press the Ctrl key and click each of the additional records in turn:
How to delete and discard records
If you make a mistake and need to clear the selection, select
Select>Clear Selection from the Menu bar.
12.
We could now perform any number of actions on these selected records from
running a report to discarding them. We'll discard them.
Select File>Discard>Selected Records from the Menu bar.
As before a warning message displays, but this time indicating the number of
records to be discarded:
13.
Select
to discard the records.
Page 115
How to delete and discard records
Selecting records in Details View
In Details View we select records using a combination of Keyboard keys (or Menu
options):
Menu bar
Keyboard
shortcut
Description
Select>Select Current
Record
F8
Selects the current record.
Select>Add Current Record Ctrl+F8
To Selection
Select>All Records in
Results
Shift+F8
Adds the current record to the records
already selected.
Selects all records.
Select>Invert Selection
Inverts the selection, i.e. records
previously selected are unselected and
records previously not selected become
selected.
Select>Clear Selection
All records are unselected.
1.
2.
Click
in the Tool bar to view the records in Details View.
Press the F8 key.
The Summary bar of the current record has a solid blue highlight, indicating that it
has been selected.
3.
Navigate away from this record (use the Navigation arrows
Tool bar) and return to it: the highlight remains.
4.
Click
to return to List View.
Note that the record you selected is highlighted in List View too.
Return to Details View and move to the next record.
Press Ctrl+F8 to add this record to your selected records.
5.
6.
in the
If you only press F8, the current record will be selected but the previous
record you selected will be unselected. Once one record has been
selected using F8, you must use Ctrl+F8 to add additional records to the
selection.
7.
8.
Page 116
Click
twice to move two records and add this record to the selection.
Repeat Step 7 and then view your records in List View to confirm that the records
are indeed selected:
How to delete and discard records
9.
In either List View or Details View, discard the selected records.
Page 117
How to delete and discard records
Inverting a selection and a first look at grouping records
If we have a large number of records to select, it may be more efficient to select the
records we don't want and then invert the selection. We'll do that in this exercise and then
take a quick look at how to group records - we look at grouping in detail on page (page
141).
1.
In the Bibliography module, search for all Book records by selecting Book from the
Type: (Publication Details) Lookup List.
2.
Select
to view the records in Details View.
Most of the books don't have an ISBN listed and we want to select all of them in
order to save them as a group. As there are many more records without ISBNs than
records with ISBNs, we'll select the records with ISBNs and then invert the
selection.
Locate the first record with an ISBN (the ISBN field is located on the Book tab in the
Book Details group of fields) and press F8 to select it.
Click through the records until you find the next record with an ISBN and press
Ctrl+F8 to add it to the selection.
Navigate through all the records and add all remaining records with ISBNs to the
selection.
In List View you can easily see how many are selected (there should be three
records selected). You might want to maximise the module window.
We are actually interested in records without ISBNs, so we need to invert the
selection.
Select Select>Invert Selection from the Menu bar.
The selection highlight switches from the records with ISBNs to those without
ISBNs.
Note that the number of records selected is indicated in the Status bar.
There are many things we could do to a group of selected records from discarding
them to running a report on them. In this exercise we'll take a first look at grouping
them.
Select Tools>Group>Selected Records from the Menu bar.
The Save Group box displays:
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Page 118
How to delete and discard records
8.
Click
.
The Group Properties box displays:
9.
Enter a descriptive name in the top text box. For this exercise, name the group
Missing ISBNs (Train1), where Train1 is your username.
Page 119
How to delete and discard records
10.
Click
(and click
if asked to add the group to the Group
Name Lookup List).
Your group is added to the Save Group box.
11.
Click
12.
13.
Click
in the Tool bar to return to Search mode.
Your group can be retrieved any time by selecting Tools>Group>Retrieve Group
and selecting your group from the list.
to close the box.
We could have achieved the same result by discarding the three records
with ISBNs and then grouping the remaining records.
Note that the Type of this group is Static. We examine this in detail later (page 141) so a
quick explanation will do for now. As the name suggests, the membership of a Static
group does not change (unless we manually add or remove records from the group): any
time the group is retrieved, the same records will be listed (a Static group remembers the
IRNs of the records saved in the group). In this example, we are adding 40 records to the
group (books without ISBNs) and when we retrieved the group, the same 40 records
were returned.
The other Type of group is a Dynamic group. This does not record the IRN of a record but
instead remembers the search criteria used to list it. In other words, if we search for
records without ISBNs, we can save the search criteria (books without ISBNs) as a group
and any time we retrieve this Dynamic group, only records without ISBNs will be listed.
When we first save this group there will be 40 records listed. If we add an ISBN to one of
the records and then retrieve the group, there will be 39 records in the group.
Page 120
How to delete and discard records
Additional Exercise
Using the Parties module:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Search for all Person parties from New Zealand.
How many records are returned? _______
Return to Search mode without losing the previous search terms and change the
country to Australia. Run the search.
How many records are returned? _______
In List View, discard records 1 to 10 (inclusive), 12, 15, 20 to 34 (inclusive).
It might help to maximise the module window.
Be sure to discard the records, not to delete them!
How many records remain in the record set? _______
Run an Additional Search so that any person parties from New Zealand are added
to the search results (that is the party will either be from Australia or New Zealand).
How many records are returned? _______
Change the List View from Summary Data to Name: Last, First, Middle (or vice
versa).
Run a new search (clearing all previously entered search terms) and locate all
records for person parties from Australia.
How many records are returned? _______
Run an Additional Search so that only records for Person Parties who live in the
state of Victoria are listed (enter VIC in the State/Province: (Address) field).
How many records are returned? _______
Page 121
How to add, save, edit and link records
SECTION 7
How to add, save, edit and link
records
New records are added when:
•
•
•
•
•
•
an object is accessioned (in the Accession Lots module) and then
when the object is added to the collection (in the Catalogue).
If the object undergoes conservation, a record is added to the Conservation
module.
If the object is loaned to another institution, a Loans recorded is added and the
object's Catalogue record is linked to the Loans record.
An Insurance record is added for a new insurance policy that covers the object, and
again, the object's Catalogue record is linked to the Insurance record.
If the object had a creator, you'd link the creator's Parties record to the object's
Catalogue record, and so on.
If details were to change for the insurance policy, for example, you'd need to edit the
Insurance record.
In this section we'll learn how to add, save and edit records. Later we'll see how easy it is
to link records together.
Page 123
How to add, save, edit and link records
Default values: new record
In Searching, browsing and displaying (page 59), we look at default search values:
values which display in fields whenever you open a module in Search mode. In many
organisations, the majority of searches of the Parties module are for records where Party
Type = Person, so to speed things up, a default value has been specified.
Default values can also be set when adding new records. If you were adding a batch of
Parties records for individuals, a default value of Party Type = Person could be specified
so that any time a new Parties record is created, this value will already be specified for
you.
As with Search default values:
•
•
Different sets of default values can be specified and selected as required.
Any default value can be changed as required.
Details about how to specify default values can be found in the EMu Help
by searching for How to set default values.
Page 124
How to add, save, edit and link records
How to add a record and how to save it
First we'll add a record to the Parties module for an artist. We'll use your details:
1.
Create a new record in the Parties module by clicking
in the Tool bar.
The module is now in New mode - note that the Title bar and Status bar indicate the
mode.
A default value of Person has been specified for Party Type. If you were adding a
new record for an Organisation, you'd simply change this value by selecting
Organisation from the Party Type drop list.
When a new record is created in any module, a unique Internal Record Number
(IRN) is assigned to that record. In Details View a record's IRN displays in the top
right corner of the module window:
2.
As with running a search you can click a button, use a menu option or keyboard
shortcut to add a new record.
What is the keyboard shortcut for adding a new record:
_____________________________________
Complete the Person Details information:
3.1. Select a title from the Title drop list.
3.2. Enter your name (First, Middle, Last).
3.
Page 125
How to add, save, edit and link records
Some fields undergo validation as you enter information. Validation
ensures that data entered into a field is appropriate for that field (a date is
entered in a date field for instance). If you enter invalid data, you will
receive a warning when you attempt to move to another field and will need
to correct the information before moving on. Validation will also occur
when a record is saved. If invalid data is entered into a field, you will be
unable to save the record until valid data is entered. More detail about
record validation is available in the EMu Help.
4.
Assuming that your primary language is English, type eng in Primary: (Language)
and click the field's Lookup List button
.
The field should be populated with English.
When you enter one or more letters in a Lookup List field before activating
the list, the list of values is filtered to values beginning with the letters you
entered. If there is only one value in the list that shares the same letters, it
is automatically entered in the field.
5.
On the Roles tab select Artist from the Roles Lookup List.
Be sure to use Lookup Lists whenever they are available to ensure as far
as possible that the data you enter is consistent with existing data. If there
is no information in a field's Lookup List, type the relevant information
directly into the field. If the Lookup List field is read-write, the value you
entered will be added to the Lookup List. If it is read-only, you will not be
able to add a value and you will be required to use an existing value in the
Lookup List.
6.
On the Address tab complete the Physical Address details.
Don't forget that some Lookup Lists can be part of a hierarchy of values:
entering a value in one field will filter the values in other Lookup Lists in the
same hierarchy. Good examples of this are the Address fields on the
Address tab. For example, if you enter the name of a country in Country:
(Physical Address), the other Lookup List fields in the Physical Address
group will be filtered to cities, states and postal codes relevant to that
country.
7.
Click
in the Tool bar to save the record.
The record undergoes validation. If you entered new data in a field with a
Lookup List, a warning message will display asking whether you want to
add the new value to the list. Check that the value is correct and if so,
select
.
If you've made a mistake (spelt it incorrectly, for instance), select
again.
Page 126
and correct the mistake before attempting to save the record
How to add, save, edit and link records
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Validation does not guarantee that the data you have entered is accurate. It does
guarantee that:
•
The data you enter into a field is appropriate for that field, i.e. you've entered
a date in a date field.
•
Mandatory fields have been completed. If you've missed a mandatory field,
you'll be prompted to go back and complete it.
•
You cannot add a value to a read-only Lookup List. If you have entered a
value into a read-only Lookup List field and that value is not already in the
Lookup List, you will be prompted to go back and select an existing value.
Only after the record passes validation is it added to the database.
What is the keyboard shortcut for saving a record?
_____________________________________
Click
in the Title bar to close the Parties module.
Create a new record in the Catalogue module. This will be for a painting.
Note that there are several default values, including Object in Object Type: (Object
Details).
You will see that some fields have a background colour. It is possible to specify
background colours to highlight certain fields, mandatory fields for example. In this
case mandatory fields are highlighted in yellow (Object Status and Object
Category); the other highlighted fields are not mandatory (you do not need to
complete them in order to save the record); instead the highlight indicates that
details should be provided where possible.
On the Summary tab, select Work of Art from the Object Category: (Object
Details) Lookup List.
As the name suggests, Date Created: (Creation Details) holds the creation date of
the item recorded in this Catalogue record. The item was created exactly one year
ago so we'll use the Ctrl+; keyboard shortcut to enter today's date and then edit
the date.
Page 127
How to add, save, edit and link records
12.1. Click the Date Created: (Creation Details) field so that the cursor is in the
field.
12.2. Press Ctrl and ; together.
This is a very useful keyboard shortcut for entering today's date.
12.3. Edit the date so that it is exactly one year ago and press Tab to leave the field.
Date fields such as this can take a range (1/12/2011 - 1/12/2012) or
circa (c. 2012) date, as well as an exact date.
13.
14.
15.
16.
Page 128
The other two date fields are auto-completed by EMu when you leave the
field.
Enter the title for the painting in Main Title: (Title). For this exercise enter Painting
One by Train1, where Train1 is your username.
This very basic information will do for our purposes as it is not our aim to teach you
what details to record for an object (or any record in any module) but to teach you
how to create a new record. Each organisation has its own requirements for
creating records and which fields you are required to complete will depend very
much on your organisation's business processes.
Save the record.
Create another Catalogue record for Painting Two by Train1, where Train1 is
your username. All other details are the same as the previous record.
Close the Catalogue module.
How to add, save, edit and link records
How to edit a record
If the details of an existing record change, you'll need to edit the record. When you edit a
record it becomes read-only for everyone else. If another user tries to edit the record you
are editing, they will receive an error message similar to the following:
We'll edit your Parties record:
1.
The first thing to do is locate the record to be edited. Search the Parties module for
your Parties record (page 125).
Only one record should be returned by the search (unless there is a record for
someone else with the same name).
2.
View the full details of the record by clicking
in the Tool bar.
If more than one record was returned by your search, identify which Parties record
is for you.
In Other Names: (Personal Details) enter Train1, where Train1 is your username.
3.
As soon as you start changing the record, the module automatically enters
Edit mode.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Your address has changed and will need to be updated on the Address tab
(change it to whatever address you like).
On the Biography tab, add birth details to the Birth/Death Details group of fields.
Save the record.
The record undergoes validation and only after it passes is it added to the
database. If your record fails to pass validation, you will be prompted to go back
and modify it.
Close the Parties module.
Page 129
How to add, save, edit and link records
How to attach records to each other
In EMu the information about your collection is stored in various modules, each specific
to the type of information recorded. For example, the Catalogue module records details
about the objects in your collection; the Parties module stores information about people
and organisations involved with your collection in any way.
Where records in different modules relate to each other, they are linked together through
a process called Attachment.
For example, let's say you have a Painting in your collection:
1.
2.
3.
You would record details about the painting itself in the Catalogue module.
You would record details about the artist (biographical, contact details, etc.) in the
Parties module.
You would then attach (link) the two records together.
An item recorded in the Catalogue module might attach to:
•
A record in the Accession Lots module which specifies the acquisition source
and method for the item.
•
Any number of Parties record (for the creator of the item, a donor / vendor,
conservator, valuer, etc.).
•
Other Catalogue records if this item is related to other items (in a parent/child
relationship for instance - search for parent/child in the EMu Help for
details).
•
An Insurance record.
•
A Rights record.
•
A Locations record.
•
An Events record if the item is involved in an event (exhibition, etc.).
•
And so on.
Records are linked together using attachment fields. These fields are easily identified by
the Attachment
and View Attachment
buttons beside them. In the following
screenshot, the Creator's Name: (Creator Details) field is an attachment field. The View
Attachment
the field:
Page 130
button is greyed out because there is currently no attachment made in
How to add, save, edit and link records
There are two methods you can use to link records together:
•
•
Using the Attach
button
-ORUsing the drag and drop method
We'll look at both methods.
Page 131
How to add, save, edit and link records
Attachment terminology
First a quick overview of the attachment theory and terminology:
Term
Definition
Attachment
A link between a record in a module and a record in the same or
another module. For example, the Bibliography module records
details about a journal article. The Parties module records details
about the author of the article. The Authors/Contributors: Name
(Journal Details) field in the Bibliography module would be linked
to the author's record in the Parties module.
Primary and Target
module / record
In this example the Bibliography module is the Primary module.
The Parties module is the Target module. Most modules can be
both Primary and Target modules (simultaneously).
For instance, the Bibliography is the Primary module when it
makes a link to the Parties module; it is the Target module when a
record in the Catalogue module (using the Bibliography field on
the References tab) links to one of its records.
Reverse
Attachment
The term Reverse Attachment simply means following an
attachment back from the Target to the Primary record.
From the Primary record it is a simple matter to navigate to a
record that it has linked to by clicking the View Attachment
button beside an attachment field.
It is also possible to navigate from a Target record back to any
record that linked to it.
In the example above an attachment is made from the
Bibliography module to the Parties module. The direction of the
link is Primary to Target or Bibliography to Parties.
The link can be followed back from the Parties record to the
Bibliography record, that is the attachment can be navigated in
reverse.
Page 132
How to add, save, edit and link records
Attaching records with the Attach button
Earlier in this section you created three records:
•
•
•
A Catalogue record for Painting One by Train1, where Train1 is your username.
A Catalogue record for Painting Two by Train1, where Train1 is your username.
A Parties record for the artist (yourself) who created the two paintings.
Now we'll link the records.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
In the Catalogue module search for the record for Painting One by Train1, where
Train1 is your username.
Use the Find a Field tool to locate the Creator's Name: (Creator Details) field (page
33).
On which two tabs does this field appear?
_______________________________
_______________________________
One of these tabs holds summary details from a number of other tabs. Details can
be entered in either instance of the field. In this example, details could be entered in
the Creator's Name: (Creator Details) field on either tab.
Click the Creator's Name: (Creator Details) field so that the cursor is in the field.
Click
beside the Creator Details group of fields.
The module linked to this field displays, the Parties module in this case.
As you are the creator of Painting One by Train1, where Train1 is your
username, search for your Parties record (page 125).
Recall that you entered your username in the Other Names: (Person
Details) field of your Parties record (page 129). When you search for a
name in the Parties module, an Also Search (page 94) is performed of the
Other Names: (Person Details) field.
7.
View the record in Details View to ensure you have the correct record.
8.
In the Parties record, click the Attach
button in the Tool bar.
The Parties module closes and Summary Data from the Parties record fills the
Creator's Name: (Creator Details) field. The two records are now linked together.
Save the record.
Note that:
•
The Summary Data for this Catalogue record now includes details of the
item's creator.
9.
The View Details
button is no longer greyed out.
It's a simple matter now to view full details of the attached record: click the View
•
10.
Details
button.
The module linked to this field opens and displays the attached record.
We'll remove the attachment and then do it again in a slightly different way:
1.
2.
To remove the attachment, simply delete the value in the Creator's Name: (Creator
Details) field and save the record.
Note the change to the Summary Data.
This time enter Train1, where Train1 is your username, in the Creator's Name:
(Creator Details) field and press Tab.
Page 133
How to add, save, edit and link records
A search is made of the Target module, Parties in this case, and if only one match
is found, the attachment is made automatically.
If more than one match is found (as should be the case in this exercise), the Target
module will open and display all possible matches. When you've identified the
correct match (in this case the Parties record you created earlier), click the Attach
3.
Page 134
button in the Tool bar to make the link.
Save the record.
How to add, save, edit and link records
Attaching records by drag and drop
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Search for the record for Painting Two by Train1, where Train1 is your
username, in the Catalogue module.
Make sure you can see the Creator's Name: (Creator Details) field.
Open the Parties module and search for your Parties record (page 125).
View the record in Details View to ensure you have the correct Parties record.
Click the Drag Current Record
button in the Tool bar of the Parties module
and hold the mouse button down.
Drag the cursor over to the Creator's Name: (Creator Details) field and then release
the mouse button:
Summary data from the Parties record fills the Creator's Name: (Creator Details)
field. The two records are now linked together.
Save the Catalogue record and close all open modules.
Page 135
How to add, save, edit and link records
Additional attachments exercise
In this exercise you'll create a Bibliography record for an article about Painting One by
Train1, where Train1 is your username, and attach it to a record for the author of the
article in the Parties module and to the Catalogue record for the object.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Page 136
Create a record in the Bibliography module.
Select Article from the Type: (Publication Details) drop list.
The article's title is Understanding Painting One by Train1, where Train1 is
your username. Record this in Title: (Article Details).
The author of the article is Michael Bogdanov. Use the Attach button beside
Authors/Contributors: (Article Details) to attach this Bibliography record
to the author's Parties record (you could enter Bogdanov into the field first before
clicking
).
Use the Lookup List to enter Author in Role: (Article Details).
The Publication Date was exactly six months ago. Use the keyboard shortcut to
enter today's date and then edit the date.
Save the Bibliography record.
Locate the record in the Catalogue module for Painting One by Train1, where
Train1 is your username.
Use the Drag and Drop method to attach the Bibliography record to the Catalogue
record using the Bibliographic References: (Literary References) field.
Save the Catalogue record.
Close all open modules.
How to add, save, edit and link records
Searching an attachment field
When records have been attached, it is possible to search for the record in the Primary
module using details from the attached record in the Target module. See Attachment
terminology (page 132) if you need a refresher about Primary and Target modules.
For example, you could search the Catalogue module for items created by Train1,
where Train1 is your username:
1.
2.
Locate the Name: (Creator Details) field in the Catalogue module and run a search
for Train1, where Train1 is your username.
Two records should be returned.
Search the Bibliography for articles written by Michael Bogdanov. Use the Name:
(Authors/Contributors) field.
The following wildcards are useful for searching attachment fields:
Wildcard
Description
+
Use in an attachment field to return records that have one or more
attachments.
!+
Use in an attachment field to return records that do NOT have an
attachment.
For more details about running a search using an attachment field, search
the EMu Help for Run a search using an attachment field.
Page 137
How to add, save, edit and link records
Reverse attachments
In the last exercise we found an article in the Bibliography module by searching for the
author's name - in other words, we searched the Primary module using details from the
Target module. This is simple and intuitive because the Bibliography record includes a
field, Name: (Authors/Contributors), precisely for recording the author's name.
We could for instance locate an object by searching the Bibliographic References:
(Literary References) field in the Catalogue module for an article called Understanding
Painting One by Train1.
But what if we wanted to know what object(s) an article relates to?
1.
2.
Locate the Bibliography record for the article called Understanding Painting One
by Train1, where Train1 is your username, and check the tabs to see if you can
find a reference to the Catalogue module.
There doesn't appear to be one. When a Bibliography record is linked to a
Catalogue record, the attachment is made from the Catalogue record.
How then can we search for objects about which the current article has been
written?
Click View>Show Attachments from the Menu bar
-ORUse the keyboard shortcut, F4.
If the current record is attached to another record, another tab displays called
Objects. This is called a Reverse Attachment tab and it lists all records that the
current record has been attached to.
This works for all modules except the Parties module due to the incalculable number of
attachments that can be made to and from the Parties module. As we'll see next,
however, there is another way to identify which records a record has been linked to.
1.
Page 138
In the Bibliography record, select View>Attachments>Current Record.
The Attachments box displays:
How to add, save, edit and link records
2.
3.
Every module that the current record can attach to is listed on the left. If the icon
beside the module name is , then the current record has not been attached to a
record in that module. If the icon beside the module name is , then the current
record has been attached to that module. The column on the right lists the fields in
the module which can attach to the current record. The Refs column indicates
exactly how many records in the module the current record attaches to using a
particular field.
To display the records which attach to the current record:
2.1. Click the module label with a ; in this case click Catalogue.
2.2. Click a field label where Refs is not 0; in this case click Bibliographic
References: (Literary References).
2.3. Click
.
The module which attaches to the current record displays and lists the attached
records.
Close all open modules.
Page 139
How to sort and group
SECTION 8
How to sort and group
In Searching, browsing and displaying (page 59) we look at how to search the records in
your EMu database and how to display the records returned by your search in List View.
A List View can include any fields in a module and, as we'll learn in this section, it is
possible to sort the records returned by your search on any and all fields. The criteria you
use to sort records can be saved and re-used at any time.
You can sort your records in any of EMu's display views, not just List View.
We use List View in these exercises as it is more obviously useful to sort
records in a tabular view and, as we learn in How to create a report (page
187), it is possible from List View to copy and paste your data into MS
Excel, creating reports very easily. Being able to sort the data before
copying and pasting it in MS Excel can be useful.
As well as sorting records, it is possible to:
•
•
Save the records returned by your search as a group. This is known as a Static
group as the records saved in the group do not change unless you manually add or
discard records from the group. A Static group holds the unique IRN of each record
in the group.
Save the search criteria used in your search. This is known as a Dynamic group as
the records returned when you retrieve the group may be different each time
depending on changes to the data in your records. A Dynamic group holds the
search terms used to return a set of records.
Once you have saved records or search criteria as a group, you can access the group at
any time.
Page 141
How to sort and group
Sorting Records
The results returned by your search can be sorted on any and all fields in a module. You
can select a pre-defined sort or can specify exactly how a group of search results will be
sorted. You can save the sort criteria you specify for re-use.
It is possible to:
•
•
•
•
•
Page 142
Sort records on multiple fields, e.g. by Last name and then First name.
Sort in ascending or descending order (e.g. A to Z, Z to A).
Create your own sort and save it for re-use.
Assign permissions to other users to use your sort.
Specify that a sort will run automatically following a search.
How to sort and group
How to sort records with an existing sort
1.
2.
Run a search in the Parties module where Party Type = Person.
In List View select View>List Settings>Choose List and select the Name: Last,
First, Middle List View.
The records are listed using three name fields - Last, First and Middle in that order:
We will sort these records in alphabetical order by Last: (Person Details) using a
pre-defined sort.
3.
Click
in the Tool bar to sort the records.
The Sort box displays with a list of pre-defined sorts similar to:
4.
Double-click Surname.
A message displays asking whether you want a summary of the sort terms.
5.
Select
to view the summary.
Page 143
How to sort and group
It's not always necessary to view the Summary Results but there are times
when you may find it useful.
The Sorting dialogue displays as the records are sorted:
When the sort has completed, the Summary Results window displays a summary
of the records that have been sorted:
The Summary Results window displays a summary of the records that have been
sorted. It is used to:
•
Check that you specified the correct sort fields and sort order.
•
View and print a summary report of the sorted records.
•
Navigate to a selected record. Each field value in the Summary Results
window is linked to its record. If you click a value, its record will display as the
current record when you close the Summary Results box.
6.
Page 144
Click
to return to the list of results, which is now sorted alphabetically
by Last: (Person Details):
How to sort and group
Page 145
How to sort and group
How to specify your own sort criteria and save the sort
If there isn't a sort already defined that meets your needs, you'll want to create your own.
You have the choice of creating an Ad-hoc sort if you don't think you'll need to re-use the
sort, or you can save your sort to the Sort box for re-use. Saving the sort is useful when a
sort includes multiple fields and requires some time and effort to set up.
1.
Run a search in the Parties module where Party Type = Person.
2.
Click
in the Tool bar to sort the records.
The Sort box displays with a list of pre-defined sorts:
3.
Select
.
The Sort Properties box displays:
Page 146
How to sort and group
4.
In the text box give the sort a descriptive name.
Our sort will sort records by first name, so call it First Name (Train1), where
Train1 is your username.
We will sort records by First name and then Last name so we need to add both
fields to the Order list.
The order in which fields are listed in the Order list determines the order in which
records are sorted. If the Order list includes two fields, Last name followed by First
name, records will be sorted by Last name and then by First name, e.g.:
•
•
•
•
•
5.
6.
Anderson, Peter
Anderson, Tom
Anderson, Wendy
Boyle, Andrew
Boyle, Evelyn
For the purposes of demonstrating how to change the sort order we'll add Last:
(Person Details) to the Order list first.
Scroll through the Fields list until you find Last: (Person Details) and double-click
the field to add it to the Order list.
Locate First: (Person Details) and add it to the list:
Page 147
How to sort and group
We want to sort our records by First name and then Last name so we need to move
First: (Person Details) to the top of the Order list.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Select First: (Person Details) in the Order list and click
to move the field to
the top of the list.
Click the Options tab to view available sort options. See Sort Options for details
(page 149).
We won't change these options in this case, but read through the options so you're
aware of what you can do if need be.
Click the Security tab.
Here we specify who else can access the Sort. We'll give everyone access to the
sort.
Double-click Everyone in the Names list to add it to the Access list.
11.
We're done, so click
to add your new sort to the Sort box from where it
can be accessed by anyone else.
12.
Click
to close the Sort box and run your sort (click
when
asked to view the sort summary).
The records are sorted using your new Sort. Scroll through the list to confirm this is
the case.
A List View with two fields, First: (Person Details) followed by Last: (Person Details)
would be useful - create one and view your newly sorted records.
13.
Page 148
How to sort and group
Sort Options
Sort
Comparison
Description
Word based
Sort disregards all punctuation and white spaces (more than the
one space between words). For example:
Traveler’s
will be sorted as
Full text
Travelers Inn
Sort includes all punctuation and white spaces. For example:
Traveler’s
Inn
Traveler’s
Inn
Traveler’s
Inn
will be sorted as
Compress white
space
Inn
Sort includes punctuation but disregards all white space (with the
exception of a single space between words). For example:
will be sorted as
Traveler’s Inn
Page 149
How to sort and group
Select one or more of these sort options by clicking in the corresponding
checkbox:
Case sensitive
Sort is sensitive to upper and lower case. For example:
Melbourne gallery
will be sorted separately to
Melbourne Gallery
Tables order
insensitive
Values in a multi-value field will be sorted alphabetically regardless
of the order in which they display.
For example, one record has the following values in the Roles field
in this order:
Collection Manager, Curator, Internet Administrator
Another record has the same values in the Roles field but in a
different order:
Internet Administrator, Collection Manager, Curator
If Tables order insensitive is selected (checked/ticked), the
values in this field will be sorted in alphabetical order before the
main sort, resulting in both records being displayed in the same sort
order.
Empty sorts low
If this option is selected, all empty records will be placed at the start
of the sort rather than at the end.
e not equal to ê
Values that include diacritics will be sorted separately to those that
do not.
For example, entrée will be sorted separately to entree.
Summary
Tables as text
All values that display in a multi-value field will be considered one
value in the Summary Results window.
For example, three values - Collection Manager, Curator,
Internet Administrator - display in the Roles field. If this sort
option is selected, the three values will be considered as one and
display as one value in the following format:
Collection Manager
Curator
Internet Administrator
Thus the number of values in the Summary Results window will
match the number of records.
If this sort option is not selected, each value in a multi-value field will
display as a separate value in the sorted display. One value will be
Collection Manager, a second value Curator and a third
Internet Administrator. Thus there may be many more values
in the Summary Results window than there are records.
Display sort text
Page 150
Displays the text in the Summary Results display in the format in
which it will be sorted, e.g. punctuation included, white space
disregarded, case sensitive, etc.
How to sort and group
How to sort records with an Ad-hoc sort
When there isn't a Sort already defined that meets your needs and you don't need to save
the criteria for re-use, you'd use an Ad-hoc sort.
Let's say you want to sort Parties records by Last name and then by First.
1.
Select Tools>Ad-hoc Sort from the Menu bar.
The Sort Properties box displays.
When you have performed at least one Ad-hoc Sort by selecting
Tools>Ad-hoc Sort, you can then also click
Ad-hoc Sort from the Sort box and then click
Properties box.
2.
to view the Sort
If there is a field already listed in the Order list that you don't need in your Ad-hoc
Sort, select it and click
3.
in the Tool bar, select
.
If you don't need any of the fields listed in the Order list, click
.
Add Last: (Person Details) and First: (Person Details) to the Order list.
If required, you'd now change the direction of the sort (from alphabetical to reverse
alphabetical) and select any sort options on the Options tab.
4.
Select
to close the Sort Properties box and run your Ad-hoc sort.
5.
Click
when asked to view the sort summary.
The records are sorted using your new Sort.
Page 151
How to sort and group
How to edit a saved sort
It is possible to edit an existing sort by adding or removing fields or changing the order of
existing fields.
You can only edit your own saved sort.
You need to have run a search before you edit an existing sort.
1.
Run a search in the Parties module where Party Type = Person.
2.
Select
in the Tool bar.
The Sort box displays with a list of available sorts.
Select First Name (Train1), where Train1 is your username, by clicking it once
(do not double-click it as this will run the sort).
3.
4.
5.
Select
to display the properties of the sort.
The Sort Properties box displays.
Modify the sort as required.
In this case, add Middle: (Person Details) as the last field on which to sort:
You could now change the direction of the sort (from alphabetical to reverse
alphabetical) and select any sort options on the Options tab as required.
6.
Select
7.
Click
Page 152
to close the Sort Properties box and run the sort.
when asked to view the sort summary.
How to sort and group
The records are sorted using your new Sort (you may want to select the Name:
Last, First, Middle List View in order to view the results of your sort).
Page 153
How to sort and group
Automatic sorting of search results
It's possible to specify that a sort runs automatically after a search has been run. In this
exercise we'll specify that your sort - First Name (Train1), where Train1 is your
username - will run after every search of the Parties module.
Access to the Sort box is only possible in Display mode (a search has
been run or records have been retrieved from a group).
1.
Run a search in the Parties module where Party Type = Person.
2.
Click
in the Tool bar to sort the records.
The Sort box displays with a list of pre-defined sorts:
3.
Select First Name (Train1), where Train1 is your username and click
the Sort dialogue Tool bar.
The sort you selected will be highlighted with bold (similar to this):
4.
Select
Page 154
to close the Sort box.
in
How to sort and group
5.
Click
in the Tool bar to run a fresh search and search for all records where
Party Type = Person.
The search is run and a sort automatically commenced. While the sort is running,
the Sorting box displays, allowing you to abort the sort at any time by clicking
in the Sorting box.
To turn off the Auto-sort after search:
1.
Click
in the Tool bar.
2.
Select the sort that is highlighted with bold and click
in the Sort dialogue Tool
bar to toggle off the automatic sort.
In the Sort box, the bold highlight is removed from the sort:
Page 155
How to sort and group
Grouping Records
When you've run a search you may want to save the group of records returned so that
you can access them again; or you may want to save the search criteria you used to
generate the records returned by your search (especially if the search is quite involved).
When you've run a search you can save the returned group of records, known as a Static
group. In this case whenever you access the Static group, the same records will be
displayed unless you manually add or discard records from the group.
Or you can save the search criteria that generated the group of records, known as a
Dynamic group. In this case it is possible that the records returned will be different every
time the group is accessed.
When you first create a group, only you have access to it. Your name
displays as the owner of the group in the Owner column in the Save Group
box. However, you can give other users permission to open and view your
saved groups.
Groups can be created and managed using two methods:
•
•
From within the source module for the records that make up the group, using the
Tools>Group menu options.
Using the Groups module.
Certain group management tasks, such as setting some Record Level
Security permissions and managing Query type groups can only be
undertaken using the Groups module.
Page 156
How to sort and group
Static and Dynamic groups
In this example there are two groups with the same name, Person Parties with a
surname beginning with A:
•
A Static group
The first one listed is a Static group. You can tell this by the
icon beside the
group name and the number of records (72) in the Records column. Any time you
select this group, the same 72 records will be retrieved (which is why it is called a
Static group).
It is possible to change which records are in a group, but you must manually add or
remove records from the Static group.
A Static group holds the unique Internal Record Number of each record in
the group.
•
An example of a Static group is a number of objects grouped together during the
preliminary stages of planning for an exhibition.
A Dynamic group
The second of the two groups is a Dynamic group. You can tell this by the
icon
beside the group name and Unknown in the Records column. A Dynamic group
doesn't hold a specific set of records but instead holds the search criteria used to
return a set of records. In this example the Dynamic group holds two search
criteria: Party Type = Person and Last: (Person Details) = a*
Any time you retrieve this group, all records which match these two search criteria
will be retrieved. You can see why it is called a Dynamic group and why the number
of records is Unknown: until the group is retrieved, there's no knowing exactly how
many records are in the group.
An example of a Dynamic group is a group set up to regularly review the number
and type of objects that have been assigned to a specific discipline or species.
Page 157
How to sort and group
What would happen if we added a new record to the Parties module for a Person with a
surname beginning with A?
•
•
Page 158
When we retrieve the Static group, 72 records will be displayed. Any time we
retrieve this group, the same 72 records will be displayed.
When we retrieve the Dynamic group, 73 records will be displayed. Any time we
retrieve this group, any record that matches the search criteria Party Type =
Person and Last: (Person Details) = a* will be displayed.
How to sort and group
Using the Tools>Group menu options
How to group records: Static group
A Static group is a specific set of records: any time a Static group is retrieved, the same
group of records is displayed. It is possible to change which records are in a Static group,
but you must manually add or remove records from the group.
1.
2.
3.
In the Parties module, search for all Person Parties from Australia (use the
Country: (Address) field).
Select Tools>Group>All Records in Results from the Menu bar.
The Save Group box displays:
Select
.
The Group Properties box displays:
Page 159
How to sort and group
4.
5.
6.
Note that the icon beside the top Title field indicates that this is a Static group.
In the Title field give your group a descriptive name, e.g. Australian Parties
(Train1), where Train1 is your username.
You can add a more verbose description in the Description field. Enter Person
Parties located in Australia.
We'll give all other users permission to access the group. Select the Security tab
and double-click Everyone in the Names list.
7.
Click
.
A message will display asking whether you want to add the group to the Group
Name Lookup List.
8.
Click
.
The new Static group displays in the Save Group box.
Note the number of records listed in the Records column and the
icon beside
the name, identifying this as a Static group. Any time this group is retrieved, this
same group of records will be displayed.
9.
Select
10.
11.
Select
in the Tool bar to return to Search mode.
Select Tools>Group>Retrieve Group from the Menu bar.
The Restore Group box displays:
Page 160
to exit the Save Group box.
How to sort and group
12.
Double-click the name of your new group in the list (or select the name of the group
and then click
).
The group of records displays.
Page 161
How to sort and group
How to add records to a Static group
To add records to an existing Static group we first locate the records we want to add to
the group.
In this exercise we'll add any Person Parties from New Zealand to our group.
1.
2.
Search for any Person Parties from New Zealand (use the Country: (Address)
field).
It is possible to add to an existing group:
•
The current record (click Tools>Group>Current Record).
•
Selected records by selecting one or more records first (click
Tools>Group>Selected Record).
•
All records listed (click Tools>Group>All Records in Results).
We'll add all records returned by our search to our group.
Select Tools>Group>All Records in Results to add all records returned by our
search to our group.
The Save Group box displays:
3.
Select the Static group to which you want to add the records by clicking it once
(don't double-click it). In this case select Australian Parties (Train1), where
Train1 is your username.
4.
Click
.
is enabled when a Static group is selected, and is disabled
when a Dynamic group is selected. Why? We can add records to a Static
group as a Static group holds the IRNs of records, but a Dynamic group
doesn't hold records, it holds search criteria (any Person Parties located
in Australia for instance). If we want to change the records in a Dynamic
group, we change the search criteria of the group (any Person Parties
located in Australia OR New Zealand for instance). We'll do this later.
A message displays indicating how many records were added to the group and the
number of duplicates that were discarded (only one copy of a record can be saved
in a group):
Page 162
How to sort and group
5.
Click
.
The message closes and the number of records in the Records columns is
updated:
6.
We'll need to edit the name of this group, so select your group and click
to
display the Group Properties box.
Change the title of your group to Australian and New Zealand Parties
(Train1), where Train1 is your username.
Update the description too.
7.
8.
9.
Click
when you're done and click
to exit the Save Group
box.
Now this group can be retrieved to list Parties located in Australia or New Zealand.
Page 163
How to sort and group
How to replace the records in a static group
To replace the records in a Static group with a new set of records we first locate the
records with which we want to replace the group.
1.
2.
3.
Search for any Person Parties from Great Britain (use the Country: (Address)
field).
It is possible to replace an existing group with:
•
The current record (click Tools>Group>Current Record).
•
Selected records by selecting one or more records first (click
Tools>Group>Selected Record).
•
All records listed (click Tools>Group>All Records in Results).
Select Tools>Group>All Records in Results to replace an existing group with all
records returned by your search.
The Save Group box displays.
Select the Static group that you want to replace by clicking it once (don't
double-click it). In this case click Australian and New Zealand Parties (Train1),
where Train1 is your username.
4.
Select
.
A warning message displays asking you to confirm that you wish to replace the
records in the Static group.
5.
Click
to proceed.
The records in the existing group are replaced with the records in your current
search and the number of records displaying in the Records column is updated:
6.
Edit the title and description of your Static group and save the group. Name the
group British Parties (Train1), where Train1 is your username.
Page 164
How to sort and group
How to group records: Dynamic group
A Dynamic group doesn't hold the IRNs of a set of records but instead holds the search
criteria used to list a group of records. The records displayed when a Dynamic group is
retrieved may therefore change as the data in your database changes.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
In the Parties module, search for all Person Parties from Australia (use the
Country: (Address) field).
Select Tools>Group>Save Search Criteria from the Menu bar.
The Save Group box displays.
Select
.
The Group Properties box displays:
Note that the icon beside the Title field indicates that this is a Dynamic group.
In the Title field give your group a descriptive name, e.g. Australian Parties
(Train1), where Train1 is your username.
Add a more verbose description in the Description field. Enter All Person Parties
located in Australia.
We'll give all other users permission to access the group. Select the Security tab
and double-click Everyone in the Names list.
Click
.
The new Dynamic group displays in the Save Group box:
Page 165
How to sort and group
Note the
icon beside the name, and that the number of records listed in the
Records column is Unknown, identifying this as a Dynamic group: until the group is
retrieved, there's no knowing how many records are in the group.
8.
Select
9.
10.
Select the New Search
button in the Tool bar to return to Search mode.
Select Tools>Group>Retrieve Group from the Menu bar.
The Restore Group box displays.
Double-click the name of your new dynamic group in the list (or select the name of
11.
12.
13.
14.
Page 166
to exit the Save Group box.
the group and then click
).
The group of records displays.
Note how many records are listed.
In the Parties module add a new record where:
•
Party Type = Person
•
Last: (Person Details) = Train1, where Train1 is your username
•
Country: (Physical Address) = Australia
Select the New Search
button in the Tool bar to return to Search mode.
Retrieve your Dynamic group and note how many records are listed now.
Any time a record is added which matches the search criteria of this group, it will be
listed when the group is retrieved.
How to sort and group
Retrieving a group of records
We've already retrieved our Static and Dynamic groups in Search mode. It is also
possible to retrieve a group when you have one or more records displaying in Display
mode.
The same technique operates for Static and Dynamic groups:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Search for any Person Parties from New Zealand (use the Country: (Address)
field).
Select Tools>Group>Retrieve Group from the Menu bar.
The Restore Group box displays.
Double-click your group, British Parties (Train1), where Train1 is your
username.
A message displays asking whether you want to merge the records in your group
with the records currently displayed in the module:
•
If you click
, the records currently displayed in the module will be
replaced with the records in the group.
•
If you click
, the two sets of records will be merged.
Click
.
The records in your group are added to the records from the search you performed
at Step 1.
Page 167
How to sort and group
How to modify a Dynamic group
As we've seen, a Dynamic group comprises a set of search criteria, for instance, all
Person Parties from Australia. If you want your Dynamic group to return a different set
of records, you need to modify the group's search criteria.
In this exercise you'll modify your Dynamic group to list all Person Parties from
Australia OR New Zealand.
1.
You can do this from either Search or Display mode, but for this exercise return to
2.
Search mode by clicking
in the Tool bar.
Select Tools>Group>Retrieve Group in the Menu bar.
The Restore Group box displays:
3.
Select (click once) your Dynamic group, Australian Parties (Train1), where
Train1 is your username.
The
4.
Page 168
button is now enabled.
Click
.
The Parties module opens in Search mode, displaying the search criteria of this
Dynamic group:
How to sort and group
5.
Modify the search criteria as necessary.
In this case, add New Zealand in the row below Australia, making this a Boolean
OR search (Person Parties from Australia OR New Zealand will be returned).
6.
7.
Select
to run a search.
Select Tools>Group>Save Search Criteria from the Menu bar.
The Save Group box displays.
Select (click once) your Dynamic group, Australian Parties (Train1), where
Train1 is your username.
8.
9.
Click
.
A warning message displays:
10.
11.
Click
to proceed.
Edit the title and description of your group record: call it Australian and New
Zealand Parties (Train1), where Train1 is your username.
12.
Click
box.
13.
14.
Click
in the Tool bar to return to Search mode.
Retrieve your Dynamic group.
Now it returns all Person Parties from Australia OR New Zealand.
when you're done and click
to exit the Save Group
Page 169
How to sort and group
Using the Groups module
The Groups module provides an alternative way to manage groups. As well as using the
Tools>Group Menu commands, it is possible to insert, update and delete groups using a
familiar module interface.
The Groups module also includes additional functionality which is beyond the scope of
this course: a dynamic Query group (using a TexQL statement) can be created and run in
the Groups module; and Record Level Security permissions can be managed. Search
the EMu Help for Using the Groups Module for details.
Here we'll just take a quick look at the Groups module.
Page 170
How to sort and group
View and manage groups in the Groups module
With the Groups module it is possible to view, create, update and delete groups in a
familiar module interface.
1.
2.
In the Groups module, search for your Dynamic group: select your group name
from the Name: (Group Information) Lookup List, e.g. Australian and New
Zealand Parties (Train1), where Train1 is your username, and run the search:
Note that:
•
Group Type is indicated as Terms (the search terms, or criteria, are saved in
this group).
•
The source module is indicated as eparties (this is the back-end name of
the Parties module).
Click the Terms tab:
Page 171
How to sort and group
Here you find the search criteria of your Dynamic group.
From here you can:
•
5.
Page 172
. This will open the Parties
And then modify the Dynamic group by clicking
and following the steps
outlined in How to modify a Dynamic group (page 168).
Close the Parties module if you opened it at Step 2.
In the Groups module, return to Search mode and view the Groups record for your
Static group. Your Static group should be called British Parties (Train1),
where Train1 is your username.
Click the Static tab:
•
3.
4.
View the records in the group by clicking
module and display all records in the group.
How to sort and group
Here you'll find:
•
A count of the number of records in the group.
•
A list of the IRNs (Internal Record Numbers) of the records in the group. Each
record has a unique IRN.
From here you can:
•
View any of the records in the group by selecting a record in the list and
clicking
.
Add new records to the group by clicking
.
Remove records from the group by right-clicking a record and selecting
Delete from the context menu that displays.
Close the Groups module.
•
•
6.
The Groups module also includes additional functionality which is beyond
the scope of this course: a dynamic Query group (using a TexQL
statement) can be created and run in the Groups module; and Record
Level Security permissions can be managed. Search the EMu Help for
Using the Groups Module for details.
Page 173
The Ditto utility
SECTION 9
The Ditto utility
EMu provides a range of powerful tools to assist you with adding and updating records,
including:
•
•
•
The Ditto utility
Copy information in one record into another record.
The Import Tool
Batch import new records or batch update existing records.
Record Templates
Create a batch of records based on an existing record.
Although very useful and powerful tools, the Import Tool and Record Templates are
beyond the scope of this course as they require a good understanding of how EMu
works, as well as more advanced technical knowledge than is required for this course.
Both tools are covered in the Advanced use of EMu course.
In this course we'll learn how to use the Ditto utility, a particularly useful tool when adding
or editing records. As the name might suggest to you, the Ditto utility allows you to copy
data from one record into one or more other records.
With the Ditto utility it is possible to copy data from:
•
•
•
One field in a record into the same field in another record.
A tab in a record into the same tab in another record.
All fields in a record into another record.
EMu can be configured so that some fields are excluded when you copy
all fields from the Ditto record. Unique-value fields cannot be copied
because the value can not be used in more than one record, e.g. a unique
Registration Number field.
The daDittoAll Operations privilege is required to use the
Edit>Ditto>All Fields (Shift+F9) option.
Page 175
The Ditto utility
How to use the Ditto utility
Before the Ditto utility can be used to copy data from one record to another, it is
necessary to select which record is to be the Ditto record (the record which will be
copied).
1.
2.
3.
In the Parties module, search for the record for Nick Margiolakis.
Look at the information recorded on the Organisation and Address tabs.
We are going to create another Parties record for someone from the same
organisation and rather than re-typing this information, we'll use the Ditto Utility to
copy it across to the new record.
Select Edit>Ditto>Use Current Record for Ditto from the Menu bar (or use the
keyboard shortcut Ctrl+F9).
This Parties record is now the current Ditto record. It will remains the Ditto record
until you manually change it or until you save a record if the Update on Save option
is active (explained below).
When a record is selected to be a Ditto record, it is listed in the Ditto box from where it can
be re-selected at any time. Let's take a look at the Ditto box:
1.
Select Edit>Ditto>Select Ditto Record from the Menu bar.
The Ditto box displays:
The Ditto box you see may list some different records to those shown
above, but it will include the Nick Margiolakis record.
As you can see, a number of records can be flagged as Ditto records. Only one,
however, can be the current (active) Ditto record, indicated by the highlight.
You could select any of these records in the Ditto box and it would become the
current Ditto record.
When a record is added to the Ditto box it is typically given a Temporary status and
will be replaced when the number of Ditto records that can be saved as Ditto
records has been exceeded. As we'll see later, you can make a Ditto record a
Permanent addition of the Ditto box.
Page 176
The Ditto utility
The number of records that can be stored as Ditto records is specified
using the Recent List Length entry in the EMu Registry. Search the EMu
Help for details.
2.
For now, we want the Nick Margiolakis Parties record to remain as the current
Ditto record, so close the Ditto box without making a selection.
Page 177
The Ditto utility
Update on Save
When enabled, the Update on Save option means that whenever you update a record
using the Ditto utility, the updated record automatically becomes the active Ditto record.
That is:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Record A is the active Ditto record.
We create a new record, Record B, and use the Ditto utility to add data from Record
A to Record B.
We edit Record B and save the record.
Record B is now the active Ditto record.
This can be useful in some circumstances but not if we wish to copy the same data into
each record we edit / create.
To check whether Update on Save is enabled or not:
1.
2.
3.
Page 178
Select Edit>Ditto from the Menu bar:
If there is a tick beside Update on Save (as above), it is enabled.
If Update on Save is enabled, click the Update on Save menu option again to
disable it.
Select Edit>Ditto from the Menu bar and you'll see that the tick has gone and
Update on Save is not active.
The Ditto utility
Ditto
We have selected a record to be the Ditto record. Now we'll copy data from that record
into a new record:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Add a new record to the Parties module, and ensure that the Party Type is Person.
This record is for another employee of the National Museum who just so happens
to share your name!
Enter your details in First: (Person Details) and Last: (Person Details).
On the Organisation tab, place the cursor in the Organisation: (Organisation
Details) field and select Edit>Ditto>Current Field from the Menu bar (or use the
keyboard shortcut, F9).
The organisation name from the Ditto record is copied into the field.
On the Address tab, select Edit>Ditto>Current Tab from the Menu bar (or use the
keyboard shortcut Shift+Ctrl+F9).
All the details from the Address tab in the Ditto record are copied to the Address tab
in the new record.
Delete the Business telephone number.
Keep in mind when using the Ditto Utility that some data will be unique to a record.
Back on the Organisation tab, enter Registrar in Position: (Organisation Details).
Now select Edit>Ditto>Current Tab from the Menu bar (or use the keyboard
shortcut Shift+Ctrl+F9).
What happens? The Registrar value is overwritten.
Be aware that when you copy data from the Ditto tab to the same tab in another
record, ALL of the data on the tab is over-written by the data in the Ditto tab.
8.
Click
9.
10.
Click
when asked if you would like to save your changes.
Create a new Parties record and this time select Edit>Ditto>All Fields from the
Menu bar (or use the keyboard shortcut Shift+F9).
View the record: all the data (except for unique values) in the Ditto record is copied
into the new record.
Again cancel the record and do not save your changes.
11.
in the Tool bar to cancel the record.
Page 179
The Ditto utility
How to add a Ditto record to the Ditto
box permanently
When a record is selected to be a Ditto record it is added to the Ditto box. By default, Ditto
records are assigned a status of Temporary and will be replaced when the number of
Ditto records that can be saved as Ditto records has been exceeded.
The number of records that can be stored as Ditto records is specified
using the Recent List Length entry in the EMu Registry. Search the EMu
Help for details.
If you're likely to use a record often as a Ditto record, you can add it to the Ditto box
permanently:
1.
In the Parties module, select Edit>Ditto>Select Ditto Record.
The Ditto box displays:
2.
Right-click the Ditto record that you wish to make permanent, Nick Margiolakis in
this exercise, and select Properties from the context menu that displays.
The Ditto Properties box displays:
Page 180
The Ditto utility
3.
Click the Permanent radio button.
4.
Select
.
The record is marked as permanent in the Ditto box and will remain in the list until
manually removed.
Page 181
Reports
SECTION 10
Reports
Getting your collection data into EMu is the first step in turning it into information. Once in
EMu there are many ways in which you can enhance and present the data through
searching, linking, sorting, grouping and listing records. Perhaps the most useful way to
present your data however is in a report.
EMu’s comprehensive reporting system allows any information to be drawn from any set
of records for reporting purposes. EMu is packaged with a suite of more than one
hundred pre-defined reports. It also comes with a series of tools to generate new and
customised reports in numerous formats using a wide range of report writers, including
XML, Crystal Reports, Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
Out of the box, EMu modules are supplied with a variety of useful reports designed using
Crystal Reports. The Crystal Reports Viewer is bundled with EMu, allowing users to:
•
•
•
Preview a Crystal report.
Print a Crystal report.
Export the Crystal report in a variety of formats, e.g. PDF, Microsoft Excel (XLS),
Comma Separated Values (CSV), Microsoft Word (RTF), HTML, Tab Separated
Text (TTX), XML.
EMu facilitates the production of reports using the most common and popular reporting
application, Crystal Reports, but it is also able to produce reports with many other
applications. In fact it is possible to run a report directly out of EMu in any ODBC (Open
Database Connectivity) compliant application, such as Microsoft Word and Excel.
There are various other ways to report on your EMu data however. Using the reporting
mechanism it is a fairly simple matter to export your data in a broad range of formats,
including CSV and XML, any of which can be manipulated outside of EMu to produce
sophisticated reports.
And, simplest of all, it is possible to copy data straight out of List View in any EMu module
and paste it directly into Microsoft Excel, where manipulation of the data can quickly
produce meaningful reports.
Page 183
Reports
Reports can be created as:
Type
Description
Crystal Print
Generates a report and prints it.
Crystal Report
Generates a report and displays it in the Crystal Viewer.
Crystal Report Multi-hierarchy
Generates a report in a multi-hierarchical format used for
generating Lookup Lists.
Export CSV Format
Generates a file in CSV format and asks you where to save it.
Export ODBC Data
Source
Generates a file in ODBC format and saves it automatically in
the ODBC folder on your PC.
Export XML
Document
Generates a file in XML format and asks you where to save it.
Microsoft Excel
Generates a report in Microsoft Excel format and opens Excel
to view the report.
Microsoft PowerPoint
Generates a report in Microsoft PowerPoint format and opens
PowerPoint to view the report.
Microsoft Word
Generates a report in Microsoft Word format and opens Word to
view the report.
WordPerfect
Generates a report in WordPerfect format and opens
WordPerfect to view the report.
XML Document
Generates a report in XML, downloads it to your computer and
invokes the registered XML viewer (generally a web browser).
XSLT Report
Generates a report in XSLT, downloads it to your computer and
invokes the registered XSLT viewer.
Object Locator Report Generates an Object Locator report and opens a web browser
to display the Object Locator identifying the location of objects.
The creation of reports using Crystal Reports or Microsoft Word requires a good
understanding of how EMu works, as well as more advanced technical knowledge than is
required for this course. It is covered in a separate EMu training course, EMu Reports
Training.
In this section we will learn how to run a pre-existing report, but also how to create a very
simple but extremely useful report in Microsoft Excel.
Page 184
Reports
How to run a report
All EMu modules have at least one pre-defined report, and often many more. Typically
these reports were built using Crystal Reports and will display in EMu using the built-in
Crystal Reports viewer. The Crystal Reports viewer allows you to:
•
•
•
•
•
Preview the report
Select a printer and print the report
Export the report in different formats, e.g. Excel, Word, HTML
Save the report as a file
Email the report to another user
Running a pre-defined report is very simple:
1.
2.
Display one or more records in Details View - perhaps after running a search,
retrieving the records in a group, or adding new records to EMu for instance.
Select the report to be run.
Let's give that a go:
1.
2.
In the Parties module, search for all Person Parties located in Australia OR New
Zealand
-ORIf you completed the exercises in the Groups section of this course, retrieve the
records in your Dynamic group Australian and New Zealand Parties (Train1),
where Train1 is your username.
Select the first five records (you can do this in List View or Details View).
3.
Click
in the Tool bar.
The Reports box displays with a list of pre-defined reports:
4.
Select a report from the list, e.g. List (A4).
Page 185
Reports
5.
Select the Report
records.
button to generate a report using only the selected
You'd select
to run the report on all records listed.
The Crystal Reports viewer opens (as this is a Crystal Report and not, say, a
Microsoft Word report) and displays your records as a formatted report.
6.
7.
Page 186
Print the report by selecting the Print Report
button in the report Tool bar.
Your trainer will tell you which printer to print to.
Close the Crystal Report viewer when you're done.
Reports
How to create a report in Microsoft Excel
(without the need for visual basic code!)
This exercise requires access to Microsoft Excel and assumes that
trainees have some experience using the application. It assumes that
trainees are familiar with the preceding sections in this training course.
Most report development is done using Crystal Reports, however it is also possible to
create very powerful and sophisticated EMu reports in Microsoft Word and Excel. This
does however require some Visual Basic programming skills and is not recommended for
non-technical users.
The good news is that there is a very simple method to get data out of EMu and into
Microsoft Excel without the need for programming proficiency; once in Excel the data can
be manipulated in many ways to produce sophisticated reports fairly quickly. We'll look at
one simple method to achieve this:
•
Cut and paste directly out of EMu
In this method you can report on data in any field in the current module. Although
you can include data in an attachment field (which generally includes Summary
Data from an attached record), it is not possible to include data from any other field
in an attached module.
Page 187
Reports
How to create an Excel report with cut and paste
Although using Visual Basic code will allow you to produce extremely sophisticated
reports in Microsoft Excel, it is nonetheless very easy to produce highly useful reports in
Excel using a simple cut and paste of data directly out of a module in List View.
If all the data you need to report on is in a single module, it is easy to get
the data into an Excel spreadsheet, and then manipulate the data as
required in Excel. If you wish to include linked data from more than one
module however, you will need to export report data to a CSV file or use
Visual Basic code, both of which are beyond the scope of this course but
are covered in the EMu Reports Training course.
To make this exercise more interesting we'll make use of much that you have covered in
this course. You'll:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Search for a set of records.
Create a Dynamic group.
Add a new Valuations record.
Attach records.
Create a List View.
Run a report.
This exercise assumes that you are familiar with MS Excel and know how
to format data and perform simple calculations.
In this exercise we retrieve records in the Valuations module and create a simple Excel
report that totals some figures and generates a chart:
1.
In the Valuations module, search for all records with a Date Valued between 1 July
2011 and 30 June 2012.
You'll need to specify a range search to achieve this. In Date Valued:
(Valuation) enter >=01/07/2011 <=30/06/2012
This date range specifies that the search returns any records where the date is
equal to or greater than 1 July 2011 and equal to or less than 30 June 2012.
Check with your trainer what the date format is with the training
environment you are using. The example above assumes a date format of
dd/mm/yyyy, but it's possible that your training environment has been set
up with a date format of mm/dd/yyyy.
2.
3.
4.
Page 188
Note the number of records currently listed by this search. _______________
Create a Dynamic group and call it Valuations (Train1), where Train1 is your
username.
Create a new record in the Valuations module:
4.1. Attach Painting One by Train1, where Train1 is your username, to Object
Valued: (Valuation). If you have not already created this record in an earlier
exercise, select another object in the Catalogue module.
4.2. Attach your Parties record to Valued By: (Valuation). If you have not already
created this record in an earlier exercise, select another Parties record.
4.3. Enter 10000 in Valuation Amount: (Valuation).
Reports
5.
6.
7.
4.4. Change Date Valued: (Valuation) to 23 February 2012 (23/02/2012 if date
format is dd/mm/yyyy or 02/23/2012 if date format is mm/dd/yyyy).
4.5. Save the record.
Return to Search mode and then retrieve your Dynamic group.
Note how many records are listed in the group now. _______________
View the records in your Dynamic group in List View:
This List View does not include the fields we need for our Excel report and there
isn't a List View that does, so we'll need to create a List View with the following
fields:
•
Date Valued: (Valuation)
•
Object Valued: (Valuation)
•
Valuation Amount: (Valuation)
Call your new List View Valuations (Train1), where Train1 is your username.
When you save your List View, the records should display as:
Page 189
Reports
8.
Now we're ready to create our Excel report.
Select the records that you wish to include in the report (use Shift+F8 to select all
records in the result set):
9.
Select Edit>Copy in the Menu bar to copy the data.
Page 190
Reports
If a field you copy out of EMu is a table of values, the data will not format
correctly when it is pasted into Excel. A table of values is a field with more
than one row; each row can hold a separate value (e.g. Other Names:
(Person Details) in the Parties module). None of the fields in this exercise
is a table of values, but you will find a solution to this issue by searching
the EMu Help for Copy Special: Cut & Paste in List View.
10.
11.
Open Microsoft Excel.
Select Edit>Paste Special from the Excel Menu bar (or Paste>Paste Special on
the Home tab of Excel 2010), select CSV from the Paste Special box and then click
:
Your EMu data is pasted into an Excel Spreadsheet:
Page 191
Reports
12.
Format the data and manipulate it as required to produce your report. In the
example below, this involved:
•
Formatting date and currency values.
•
Wrapping text within a cell and aligning the text to the top of the cell.
•
Left-aligning column headers and formatting the headings.
•
Sorting the data in ascending order by date.
•
Formatting the column headings.
•
Adding a grand total.
If you're unsure how to do any of these, ask your Trainer for assistance.
You could of course do much more to this report, including adding a chart, creating
sub-totals based on month or year, etc., but this will do for our purposes:
Page 192
Reports
13.
14.
15.
Print your Excel report.
Save the report and close Excel.
Close any open EMu modules.
Page 193
IMu showcase
SECTION 11
IMu showcase
IMu, or Internet Museum, broadly describes KE Software's
strategy and toolset for distributing data held within EMu via the
Internet. Distribution includes the publishing of content on the web,
but goes far beyond this to cover sharing of data via the Internet
(Portals, online partnerships, etc.); publishing content to new mobile technologies; iPod
guided tours, etc.
IMu includes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
IMu Web
IMu allows you to choose which components of your collection to publish online
and then manages the process for you.
With the standard IMu interface, users and the general public are able to browse a
collection online, search for narratives, objects and related information such as
multimedia resources and artists’ biographies. Basic (keyword), advanced and
structured searching are enabled. Records returned by a search can be displayed
in lists, as a series of thumbnail images or in detail.
IMu Intranet
The IMu Intranet provides a working web interface to your collection for staff and
other users with permission.
My Museum
IMu allows online visitors to browse your collection and add objects of interest to a
list (similar to a shopping cart). Lists are persistent and can be viewed and modified
at any time. Lists can be published in a range of formats, including IMu Tours (see
below).
IMu Object Locator
The Object Locator is an online (Internet and Intranet) mapping utility designed for
pinpointing the location of objects in your collection on floor and grounds plans.
IMu Web Maps
In the simplest terms IMu Web Maps is one more way to display your data. It is a
web browser utility that plots the location and distribution of data (typically
specimens) on maps.
IMu Tours
IMu Tours is the next generation in guided tours: a personalised guided tour, IMu
Tours combines the freedom of a self-guided tour with the convenience of a
personal guide.
Implemented using standard web technologies, the IMu Web interface can be
integrated easily with any existing website. It is highly configurable onsite and is
provided with a rich suite of web tools, allowing almost any form of web interface to
be configured.
IMu’s web interfaces are delivered via a suite of web services (broad range of
technologies, including PHP, Java, .Net and Perl) that can be configured onsite to
be consistent with an institution's preferred online presence.
Page 195
IMu showcase
Visualisation tools
Floor plan showing several objects, one of which has been highlighted.
The Object Locator is an online (Internet or Intranet) mapping utility designed for
pinpointing the location of objects in your collection on floor and grounds plans. The
Object Locator can be of use to EMu users as well as visitors to an institution:
•
•
Page 196
EMu users are able quickly and easily to search their Catalogue for objects and
locate them on a map; plan the use of exhibition floor spaces; design
pre-configured tours for visitors; develop and use Disaster Recovery Plans.
Visitors are able to plan a visit to a collection from home or can use an information
booth inside the institution, searching for objects they'd like to see, and locating
them on a map; or perhaps they will opt for a pre-configured tour of collection
highlights developed by the institution.
IMu showcase
IMu Tours
IMu Tours is the next generation in guided tours: a personalised guided tour, IMu
combines the freedom of a self-guided tour with the convenience of a personal guide.
IMu Tours is fully integrated with EMu and draws its content for a tour directly out of your
existing EMu collection. Onsite or off, visitors browse your EMu collection on the web,
choosing the objects they want to see. IMu Tours determines the best viewing sequence
and shortest path from one selected object to the next and builds an audio / video tour for
download to a digital media player. The downloaded podcast includes directions for
getting from one object to the next and narratives for each object or exhibit. Onsite the
visitor is guided on their own personal tour of your collection, with narratives presented at
each destination.
IMu Tours revolutionises the audio tour of a collection, leaving behind the limitations of
the old technology. Depending on the capabilities of a visitor's digital media player the
audio tour is enhanced with a video display of a map and pointers to the next exhibit. And
at the destination, the narrative can include a multimedia presentation.
A visitor's virtual experience of browsing your collection online is brought into the real
space of your institution. Gone are the days of the predetermined tour. Your visitors
choose what they want to see, and travel at their own pace, guided by IMu Tours and
informed by your narratives.
Potentially, no two tours will be the same.
Page 197
IMu showcase
Geo-referencing and Mapping
EMu supports geo-referencing of your collection. Comprehensive geo-referencing details
can be stored in EMu and used to map objects and specimens in mapping tools such as
IMu Web Maps. Geo-referencing information is designed to contain all locality
co-ordinate information and associated error values.
IMu Web Maps is a web browser utility that can be accessed from within EMu or directly
from a website and which plots the location and distribution of data (typically specimens)
on maps. IMu Web Maps is interactive and dynamic, with data sourced directly out of
EMu or from other suitable web service data providers.
IMu Web Maps comprises discrete components that can be used to incorporate maps of
varying sophistication or features in other web pages. It can be implemented and
accessed as part of a website or can be generated as a web page directly out of the EMu
client.
It is possible to map the collection locality of a series of specimens by plotting details on a
map of the world. With a large enough set of specimens, this can provide a distribution
map for various species that have been collected:
Map showing the global distribution of various species.
The map is interactive and allows users to zoom in and out, pan around and request
information on individual points. Different species are shown in different colours, making
it easy to compare the distribution of multiple species.
Page 198
IMu showcase
IMu Web Maps interfaces with WMS map servers, thus allowing display of specimen data
over maps / layers from Google Maps, Bing Maps, Yahoo, etc. OGR servers are also
supported.
Map projection can be changed on the fly, for example interactively changing the display
to polar stereographic, mercator, geographic projection, and so on.
Page 199
IMu showcase
IMu Web
IMu allows you to choose which components of your collection to publish online and then
manages the process for you.
With the standard IMu interface, users and the general public are able to browse a
collection online, search for narratives, objects and related information such as
multimedia resources and artists’ biographies. Basic (keyword), advanced and structured
searching are enabled. Records returned by a search can be displayed in lists, as a
series of thumbnail images or in detail.
Showcase the Arts Centre Melbourne:
http://collections.artscentremelbourne.com.au/paminter/imu.php?request=search
Page 200
Answers
SECTION 12
Answers
Working with a module window: Putting it all together (page 32)
6.
Ctrl
7.
Keyboard arrow keys when the tab has focus; otherwise Ctrl+Shift+M
8.
Tab
9.
Shift+Tab
Find a Field utility (page 33)
5.
Admin
6.
Audit
7.
Physical
Lookup List shortcuts (page 45)
13.
Museum of N
How to use the EMu Help (page 53)
4.
4
5.
600209
6.
600085
A basic search (page 61)
2.
1964
5.
294
8.
Shift+Del
Additional basic search exercises (page 70)
7.
1984
8.
5
9.
Felix Man
Combining Boolean operators in more than one field (page 75)
3.
3
Page 201
Answers
How to make use of Boolean operators (page 76)
12.
4
13.
3
14.
1
15.
6
16.
2
How to perform an Additional Search: Additional Exercise (page 78)
1.
373
2.
378
A Phrase search (page 82)
1.
5
3.
3
7.
1
Stemming (page 84)
1.
26
2.
Paint, Painted, Painting, Painting's, Paintings
3.
working, work
ladies, lady
Phonetic retrieval (page 85)
1.
allan, allen, allon, alanna, alwyn, allain
kaye, kay
reed, rodway, reid, read, reade, roth, reddy, rodda
Wildcard searches (page 88)
2.
reed, read, reid, redd
3.3
theat??
34
4.
brown*
13
5.
6
Page 202
Answers
6.
melbourne$
1
Range searches (page 89)
1.
44
2.
>="1 January 1950"
3.1
Correct: "6 June 1995"
3.3
1995.043.005
4
18
5.
>=1/1/1900 < 1/1/1910 (or <=31/12/1909)
4
Searching, browsing and displaying: Additional Exercises (page 108)
1.
3
2.
New Search
3.
No; Default Value
4.
5
5.
And
6.
3
7.
Not
2
10.
15
11.
^cra*
11
12.
centre$ !antique
6
13.
18
>="1 January 1980" < "1 January 1990" (or <="31 December 1989")
How to delete and discard records: Additional Exercise (page 121)
1.
5
2.
373
3.
346
4.
351
6.
373
7.
235
Page 203
Answers
How to add a record and how to save it (page 125)
2.
Ctrl+N
8.
Ctrl+S
Attaching records with the Attach button (page 133)
3.
Summary, Creation
How to create an Excel report with cut and paste (page 188)
2.
21
5.
>21
Page 204
Keyboard Shortcuts
SECTION 13
Keyboard Shortcuts
Page 205
EMu QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
Shortcuts available at all times
Ctrl+N
Create a New record
Ctrl+P
Print the current tab
Ctrl+Tab
Cycle through all open
module windows & the
Command Centre.
Ctrl+T
Give focus to the tab label
(whenever Tabs display) then use
keyboard arrow keys to move
through the tabs.
F1
Opens Field Level Help (if
the cursor is in a field),
otherwise opens the EMu
Help.
CTRL+Z
Undo
Shift+Ctrl+Z
Redo
Working with fields
F3
Find a Field
Ctrl+C
Copy
F12
Display the current field's
Lookup List
Ctrl+X
Cut
F11
In Search mode and also in
Edit mode (if there are no
terms entered in the
attachment field), open the
attachment module for the
field.
Make an attachment in Edit
mode using any terms entered
in the attachment field.
Ctrl+V
Paste
Ctrl+;
Insert current date
Shift+Ctrl+;
Insert current time
Ctrl+Alt+Tab
Insert a tab character
Searching
Ctrl+F
Shift+Del
Search
Clear all fields of search terms
After searching
Navigation
Selecting Records
F5
Move to the previous record
F8
Select Current Record
F6
Move to the next record
Ctrl+F8
Add Current Record to selection
Ctrl+G
Goto a record
Shift+F8
Select all Records in search
results
F4
Display Reverse Attachment
tabs (when another record has
attached to the current
record).
Ctrl+D
Discard Current record
Editing & Saving records
Ditto
Ctrl+S
Save changes
Esc
Cancel changes (Edit Mode)
Ctrl+F9
Use current record for Ditto
F9
Paste data into the current field
from the same Ditto record field.
Shift+Ctrl+F9
Paste data into the current tab
from the same Ditto record tab.
Ctrl+R
Refresh data to reflect any changes
Shift+F9
Paste all data from the Ditto
record into the current record.
Ctrl+H
Open the Replace dialogue box
Discard New Record (New Mode)
Insert / Edit / Display Toolbar
Search Toolbar
Multimedia Tab Toolbar
KE Software
www.kesoftware.com
Index
F
Field Level Help • 53, 58
A
Fields
Auto-fill • 50
A basic search • 63, 205
Find a Field utility • 36, 205
A phrase search • 84, 206
Finding Help when you need it • 54
About KE Software • 4
Finding your way around a module • 31
About this course • 1
For the trainer • 2
Accessing EMu and finding your way around • 13, 43
Adding a value to a Lookup List • 51
G
Geo-referencing and Mapping • 201
Additional attachments exercise • 138
Additional basic search exercises • 72, 205
Additional Exercise • 123, 207
Additional Exercises • 110, 207
Getting Help when you need it • 10
Grouping records • 158
Dynamic Group • 167
Static Group • 161, 169
Grouping Records • 24, 158
Also Search • 96, 135
AND • 76
H
Answers • 1, 205
Attaching records by drag and drop • 137
Attaching records with the Attach button • 135, 208
Attachment terminology • 134, 139
How EMu changes dynamically as you work
Tab Switching • 43
How to add a Ditto record to the Ditto box permanently •
182
Attachments • 134
How to add a record and how to save it • 24, 127, 131, 135,
137, 208
Automatic sorting of search results • 156
How to add records to a Static group • 164
B
Boolean operators • 73
How to add, save, edit and link records • 125
How to attach records to each other • 132
How to clean up a Lookup List • 52
C
How to create a List View • 104
Combining Boolean operators in more than one field • 77,
205
How to create a report in Microsoft Excel (without the
need for visual basic code!) • 102, 143, 189
Command Centre • 20
How to create an Excel report with cut and paste • 190, 208
Common wildcard searches • 89
How to create your own Shortcuts View • 41
Current and selected records • 112
How to delete and discard records • 111
Current and Selected records • 112
How to discard the current or selected records • 115
D
Default values
new record • 126
search • 99
How to edit a record • 131, 135
How to edit a saved sort • 154
How to group records
Dynamic group • 167
Static group • 161
Displaying and browsing the results of your search • 67
How to locate fields • 36, 47, 135
Ditto • 181
How to log in to a group • 19
E
Elements of a module window • 28
EMuUsers Forum • 10
How to log in to EMu • 15
How to make use of Boolean operators • 78, 206
How to modify a Dynamic group • 170, 175
How to move about within a module window • 32
How to move from one tab to another • 34
R
How to open, move and close modules • 23
How to perform an Additional Search • 80, 206
How to replace the records in a static group • 166
How to run a report • 187
How to search attached documents • 95
How to sort and group • 120, 122, 143
How to sort records with an Ad-hoc sort • 153
How to sort records with an existing sort • 145
How to specify your own sort criteria and save the sort •
148
Range searches • 91, 207
Records
Attachments • 134
Current and Selected records • 112
Grouping records • 158
Search • 62
Sort • 144
Reports • 185
Retrieving a group of records • 169
Reverse attachments • 140
How to use a Lookup List • 47, 81
S
How to use Shortcuts View • 38
Search • 62
Adding an additional search • 80
Show Search function • 97
How to use the Ditto utility • 178
How to use the EMu Help • 55, 205
I
Searching an attachment field • 139
Searching, browsing and displaying • 61, 85, 126, 143
IMu showcase • 197
Several ways to perform the same task • 8
IMu Tours • 200
Show Search function • 14, 97
IMu Web • 203
So what is EMu? • 6
Inverting a selection and a first look at grouping records •
120
Some other EMu search functions • 96
K
Sort • 144
Sort Options • 150, 151
Sorting Records • 102, 144
Keyboard Shortcuts • 8, 209
L
List Views • 68, 101
Static and Dynamic groups • 159
Stemming • 86, 206
Support • 11
Lookup List hierarchies • 50
T
Lookup List shortcuts • 48, 205
Text searches • 84
Lookup Lists • 43, 45, 48, 51
Auto-fill • 50
The Command Centre • 20
M
Module Window • 25, 28
Opening and closing • 23
Navigating
Between tabs • 34
The most frequently used search commands • 62
The What's this button • 57
Typographical conventions • 9
Typographical Conventions • 9
NOT • 76
O
OR • 76
U
Update on Save • 180
Using the Groups module • 173
P
Pattern matching and the wildcard search • 88
Proximity searching • 93
The EMu Help • 10, 53
The module window • 25
N
Phonetic retrieval • 87, 206
The Ditto utility • 177
Using the Tools>Group menu options • 161
V
View and manage groups in the Groups module • 174
Visualisation tools • 199
W
Welcome • 3
Wildcard searches • 90, 206
Working with a module window
Putting it all together • 35, 205
Download PDF
Similar pages