Building Services - Ku-ring

Building Design and Sustainability
Introduction
3.1 Green Buildings
3.2 Social Impact
3.3 Building Services
3.4 Waste Management
3.5 Acoustic Privacy
3.6 Visual Privacy
3.7 Materials, Finishes and Colours
3.8 Roof Terraces and Podiums
3.9 Construction, Demolition and Disposal
3R References
3R.1 Green Star Rating Information Sheet
3R.2 Credit Summary Example - From GBCA Office Rating Tool
3R.3 Checklist of ESD Measures to be Submitted with Development
Application and Updated for CC Approval
3R.4 Examples of ESD Measures
3R.5 Council’s Standard Bin Characteristics
3R.6 Council’s Collection vehicle characteristics
3R.7 Vehicle Access/Turning Circles
3R.8 What is a Waste Management Plan?
3R.9 Waste Management Plan
3R.10 Waste Guidelines
Draft Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
BUILDING DESIGN AND SUSTAINABILITY
PART
3
p 3-1
VOLUME C
INTRODUCTION
This Part guides development in meeting the and objectives within
KLEP (Local Centres) 2012. This Part applies to all development types
whether or not it is individually specified in Volume A of this DCP. It also
supplements the objectives and controls for each development type in
Volume A and should be read with the section on Building Design and
Sustainability for the relevant development type.
Each section within this Part applies to a range of development types,
and some sections to all development. It provides a consistent area
wide approach to issues that developments must address. These issues
include, but are not limited to, various aspects of sustainability, amenity
and quality streets and public areas.
p 3-2
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Objectives
1 To ensure that
development minimises
the use of non-renewable
energy resources and
water consumption.
2 To utilise an integrated
sustainability assessment
tool for gauging building
sustainability.
3 To develop green buildings
that incorporate innovative
design, construction and
operational practices that
significantly reduce, or
eliminate, the negative
impact of development
on the environment and
building occupants.
4 To ensure commercial
buildings deliver lower
operating costs from
reduced energy and
alternative resource
consumption, and so
represent better life cycle
value.
This section applies to all buildings that are not required to comply with
BASIX standards.
All non-residential buildings are required to incorporate Ecologically
Sustainable Design measures as stated in Control 1.
All non-residential buildings with a total gross floor area above 2,000m2
are required to use the Green Building Council of Australia’s Rating
Tools to provide buildings with a sustainable structure, architecture, and
performance, that incorporate measures to reduce water and energy
consumption (resulting in cost-effective savings as well as a reduction of
carbon emissions). This will enable buildings with a net lettable office area
of 2,000m2 or more to easily achieve the ongoing mandatory performance
ratings required under the Building Energy Efficiency Disclosure Act 2010
(refer to the website for details: www.cbd.gov.au.)
The Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA) has developed Rating
Tools for various building types. Where a Green Building Council of
Australia (GBCA) Rating Tool is available for the applicant’s building type,
developments must follow Controls 1, 2, 3, 4.
For building types where a GBCA Rating Tool is not available or is in the
Pilot stage, developments must follow Controls 1, 5, 6, 7.
Controls
General
1
5 To ensure that all nonresidential buildings
consider and incorporate
Ecologically Sustainable
Design (ESD) systems
and measures.
All new non residential developments must include Ecologically
Sustainable Design (ESD) measures in the following areas, and list
them under these titles in the required ESD report:
i) Water Efficiency - provide systems to minimise mains water
usage.
ii) Energy Generation - building design must demonstrate a
reduced reliance on mains power and provision of alternate
energy sources.
iii) Heating and Cooling - use of mechanical air conditioning and
heating must be minimised. Where it is unavoidable, the systems
must be of a high efficiency in technology choice to reduce peak
energy demand.
iv) Lighting - buildings must be designed to reduce the need for
artificial light use.
Note: Refer to 3R of this Part for potential measures to meet the above.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3
3.1 GREEN BUILDINGS
p 3-3
VOLUME C
3.1 GREEN BUILDINGS (continued)
Controls
Green Star Rating
Building types that have a GBCA Rating Tool available
2
Where the total allowable gross floor area on a single site is
5,000m2 or greater, buildings are to achieve a Five Star Green Star
(‘Australian Excellence’) Design Rating under the GBCA Green Star
Rating Tool relevant to that type of property.
Note 1: Refer to 3R of this Part for the Green Star Information Sheet.
Note 2: Refer to www.gbca.org.au for the latest version of the GBCA’s
Green Star Rating Tools.
3
Where the total allowable gross floor area on a single site is above
2,000m2 but below 5,000m2, all new buildings are to achieve Four
Star Green Star (‘Best Practice’) Design Rating under the GBCA
Green Star Rating Tool relevant to that type of property.
Figure 3.1-1:
Green Star rated buildings.
`
Figure 3.1-2:
Photovoltaic cells integrated into the
awning design.
p 3-4
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Controls
4
Where the GBCA has a Rating Tool, applicants are required to
submit documentation prepared by a GBCA Accredited Professional
showing how the design proposal will achieve the required Green
Star rating. The following documentation is required for Development
Application submission:
i) Credit Summary: showing the point distribution for the proposal
and the predicted point scoring for the Green Star rating
(Refer to 3R.2 of this Part for an example);
ii) Ecologically Sustainable Design (ESD) Report: stating strategy,
methods and systems proposed to achieve the Green Star
rating, including the requirements in (1) of this section;
iii) Annotated Development Application Drawings: clearly indicating
the Green Star rating elements described in the ESD Report.
iv) A signed Statement of Commitment from the applicant to
implement and achieve a Green Star Certified development.
Note 1: The signed Statement of Commitment binds the applicant to
continue consultation with their GBCA Accredited Professional to develop
and submit the DA approved design to GBCA for formal Certification.
Refer to www.gbca.org.au for a list of Green Star Accredited Professionals.
Note 2: Approved DAs will have a Condition of Consent requiring
the applicant to include the following documentation as part of their
Construction Certificate submission:
i. An updated Credit Summary and ESD Report describing elements/
systems incorporated to achieve nominated Green Star rating;
ii. A Checklist Table of each ESD system/element (refer to 3R.3 of this
Part);
iii.Annotated Construction Certificate Drawings clearly indicating
elements/systems described in the ESD Report including the
requirements of (1) in this section;
iv.A copy of the letter and invoices from the GBCA to the applicant,
confirming the project is registered for Green Star Rating.
Note 3: Approved DAs will have a Condition of Consent requiring the
applicant to submit to Council the GBCA Green Star Certificate prior to the
release of the Occupation Certificate.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.1 GREEN BUILDINGS (continued)
p 3-5
VOLUME C
3.1 GREEN BUILDINGS (continued)
Controls
Building types that do not have a GBCA Rating Tool available
5
All new buildings that do not have a GBCA Rating Tool available
must demonstrate how the design is capable of achieving an ESD
level equivalent to a minimum GBCA Green Star Rating of 5 Star
where the total allowable GFA is 5,000m2 or greater); or a minimum
GBCA Green Star Rating of 4 Star (where total allowable GFA
is between 2,000m2 and 5,000m2). Where a GBCA Pilot Tool is
available, the applicant and their GBCA Accredited Professional
Consultant may choose to utilise it for the DA submission, or may
choose to utilise the GBCA Green Star - Custom Tool service.
Note: Pilot Tools are currently being developed by GBCA. Applicants
are encouraged to consider these in their design development to create
sustainable buildings. Refer to www.gbca.org.au.
6
All new buildings utilising a GBCA Pilot or Custom Tool must
provide documentation at Development Application (DA) stage in
accordance with the relevant parts of this section.
7
All new buildings that do not have a GBCA Rating Tool available
must provide the following documentation at DA stage:
i) Ecologically Sustainable Design (ESD) Report: Prepared by a
GBCA Accredited Professional which verifies that the elements/
systems included in the development will, in the view of that
professional, result in buildings with an ESD level equivalent to
the Star Rating mentioned in 3.1 (5) of this Part.
ii) Annotated Development Application Drawings: clearly indicating
the elements/systems described in the ESD Report, including
the requirements in (1) of this section.
iii) A signed Statement of Commitment from the applicant to
develop and implement the elements/systems described in the
ESD Report.
Note 1: Applicants are advised to consult with a GBCA Accredited
Professional for the preparation of the ESD Report.
Refer to www.gbca.org.au for a list of Green Star Accredited Professionals.
Note 2: Approved DAs will have a Condition of Consent requiring
the applicant to include the following documentation as part of their
Construction Certificate submission:
i. An updated ESD Report describing elements/systems incorporated to
achieve 5 Star or 4 Star (depending on total gross building floor area
for the development site) Green Star Rating;
ii. A Checklist Table of each ESD system/element (refer to 3R.3 of this
Part);
iii.Annotated Construction Certificate (CC) Drawings clearly indicating
elements/systems described in the ESD Report.
iv.A letter from the Applicant’s Green Star Accredited Professional
Figure 3.1-3:
Green Star rated buildings.
p 3-6
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
stating that the building design as in the CC drawings is able to
achieve 5 Star (where the total allowable GFA is 5,000m2 or greater)
or 4 Star (where the total allowable GFA is between 2,000m2 to 5,000
m2).
Objectives
Controls
1 To ensure that
development minimises
adverse social impacts.
1
Proposals must consider the impacts of the development on nearby
residents and users of the site.
2
A Social Impact Statement will be required in the case of proposals
which are likely to have a significant social impact because they are
likely:
2 To ensure that social
considerations are
an integral part of
development proposals.
i) To contribute to social inequity;
ii) To increase risk to public safety; or
iii) To threaten the existing sense of community identity or
cohesiveness.
Note: Council may require a social impact statement (SIS) by an
appropriately qualified and experienced social impact practitioner. Council
will consider the scale of the development and the extent of potential
adverse impact (geographically and over time) in determining the need for
an SIS. Examples of developments that may require an SIS include major
retail centre, major health or education institutions, sex services premises,
pub, entertainment facility, late night trading venue, hazardous or offensive
uses; strata subdivision of a low rental residential building (of 6 or more
dwellings).
3
A Social Impact Statement must:
i) Support socially responsible development and decision-making,
contributing to the determination of best policy or development
alternatives;
ii) Acknowledge the values of different sectors of society;
iii) Assess the distributional equity of impacts in regard to both intragenerational equity and inter-generational equity;
iv) Identify impacts that are directly related to the proposal
(demonstrate the connection between the intervention and the
likely impact);
v) Address how net social benefit can be enhanced through the
proposal and how negative social outcomes can be ameliorated
and managed through mitigating and monitoring measures; and
vi) Demonstrate rigour and a social science base in presenting
evidence for the assessment and recommendations.
Note: See Council’s Social Impact Assessment Policy for more detailed
guidelines.
4
Where relevant, particular attention is to be paid to:
-- Children;
-- Young people;
-- Women;
-- Older people;
-- People with a disability;
-- People from culturally and linguistically diverse background;
-- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3
3.2 SOCIAL IMPACT
p 3-7
VOLUME C
3.3 BUILDING SERVICES
Objectives
Controls
1 To ensure visually
intrusive service elements
are located away from the
streetscape.
1
All applicants must consult with service providers such as energy,
electricity, gas, water, telephone and fire.
2
Services and structures required by the providers are to be located
within basements, or concealed within the facade, with appropriate
access. Where this is not possible, the proposal must demonstrate
an alternative method of minimising street impact, such as screening
with landscape or built elements. Particular care should be taken in
mixed use precincts to ensure substations and fire hydrants are not
visible from the primary street and principal active street frontages.
3
Ventilation stacks are to be concealed within the building. Where
they exhaust at street level (eg from basements) they should be
integrated within the design of the site. (See Figure 3.3-1)
4
All new developments designed to allow for commercial uses must
include an internal ventilation shaft to ensure future alterations do
not place the shaft in an unsuitable location.
5
With the exception of dwelling houses, all buildings must
accommodate proposed or future air conditioning units within the
basement or on rooftops, with provision of associated vertical/
horizontal stacks to all sections of the building.
6
Air conditioning units located within basements must be screened
and have adequate ventilation.
7
Air conditioning units located on the roof will only be permitted where
they are well screened, integrated into the building form and do not
result in adverse noise impacts on neighbouring occupants.
2 To ensure that proposed
or future service provision
does not detract from the
visual or general amenity
of the building users.
Figure 3.3-1 Public art used
to hide ventilation stacks
Figure 3.3-2 Services for
residential flat building
integrated within mailbox
structure.
p 3-8
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Objectives
Controls
1 To enable efficient,
effective and sustainable
waste management
practices.
General
2 To ensure waste collection
and storage within the site
that does not affect the
amenity of residents with
regard to odour, visual
appearance or noise
disturbance.
1
All waste and recycling facilities must comply with the BCA and all
relevant Australian Standards.
2
All waste and recycling storage containers must be stored within the
boundary of the subject site.
3
All putrescible and non-putrescible waste materials stored in any
waste and recycling room or at centralised collection points must be
contained in approved rigid containers supplied by the Council.
4
During the design of the development, waste must be minimised by:
i) matching building dimensions to standard sizes of building
materials;
3 To ensure waste and
recycling storage areas
are designed and
constructed to meet
the requirements of the
building’s use and its
occupants.
4 To ensure design and
management of waste and
recycling facilities protect
public health.
ii) using recycled materials, selecting materials that reduce waste
or do not require disposal, or can be reused or recycled in the
future;
iii) utilising component parts that may be easily replaced; and
iv) designing with minimal site disturbance by avoiding unnecessary
excavation or fill.
5
No compaction equipment is to be used for any sized bin.
Storage Room
6
Sufficient space must be provided within the premises for the
storage and manoeuvring of the number of bins required to store the
volume of waste and recycling materials.
7
Sufficient space must be provided to adequately house any
additional equipment to handle or manage the waste generated.
8
For buildings exceeding four (4) storeys which contain a residential
component; where a chute system is proposed, a fully enclosed
waste and recycling materials compartment must be provided within
each storey of the building. The facility must be designed to contain
the waste chute hopper and the number of recycling storage bins
equivalent to 2 x 240 litre bins for every 4 units per storey.
Access to collection point
This section does not apply to residential developments of 4 dwellings or
less, which do not have an internal collection point.
9
The location of the waste and recycling room must be conveniently
accessible and have unimpeded access for both occupants
and collection service operators. In the event that the proposed
development is protected by a security system and/or locked gates,
the waste and recycling room/s must have unimpeded access for the
collection service providers. Where security gates are provided to
the development, gates must be accessible by Council’s master key.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT
p 3-9
VOLUME C
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
Controls
10 The maximum grade of any access road leading to a waste and
recycling room must be not more than 1:5 (20%). The turning area at
the base of any ramp must be sufficient to allow for the manoeuvre
of a 6.0m rigid vehicle to exit the building in a forward direction.
11 The waste and recycling collection point must be located on a level
surface away from gradients and vehicle ramps, with the path of
travel being free from any floor obstructions such as steps to allow
for the transfer of wheelie bins to and from the storage room to the
collection vehicle.
12 The vehicle access road leading to and from the collection point
in a waste and recycling room must have a minimum finished floor
to ceiling height of 2.6m for residential waste rooms and 4.5m for
commercial waste rooms for the entire length of travel within the
building. This clearance is to be kept free of any overhead conduits,
ducting, services or other obstructions.
13 The Waste Management Plan (WMP) must describe how the waste
management system is to be managed and who is responsible for
each stage of the process. (Refer to Waste Management Plan, 3R.8
of this Part)
Construction of waste and recycling rooms
14 The floor of any waste and recycling room must be:
i) constructed of either concrete which is at least 75mm thick; or
other equivalent material; and
ii) graded and drained to a floor waste which is connected to the
sewer.
15 The walls of any waste room, recycling room and waste service
compartment are to be constructed of solid impervious material and
shall be cement rendered internally to a smooth even surface coved
at all intersections.
16 All waste and recycling rooms must be provided with an adequate
supply of hot and cold water mixed through a centralised mixing
valve with hose cock. This does not include waste and recycling
service compartments located on residential floors of multioccupancy dwellings.
Note: This control is to aid in cleaning of the area.
17 A close-fitting and self-closing door that can be opened from within
the room must be fitted to all waste and recycling rooms.
18 In the event that Council permits the installation of a roller shutter
door (under special circumstance only), a sign must be erected in a
conspicuous position drawing attention to the fact the door must be
kept closed at all times when not in use.
19 All waste and recycling rooms must be constructed to prevent the
entry of vermin (eg. no gaps under access doors etc).
p 3-10
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Controls
20 All waste and recycling rooms must be ventilated by either:
i) mechanical ventilation system exhausting at a rate of 5L/s per m2
of floor area, with a minimum rate of 100L/s; or
ii) permanent, unobstructed natural ventilation openings direct to
the building exterior, not less than one-twentieth (1/20th) of the
floor area.
21 Meters and piping are not to be located in the waste and recycling
room.
22 All waste and recycling rooms must be provided with artificial light
controlled by switches located both outside and inside the rooms.
23 Clearly printed “NO STANDING” signs must be affixed to the
external face of each waste and recycling room.
24 Clearly printed signage must be affixed in all communal waste
collection and storage areas, specifying which materials are
acceptable in the recycling system and identifying the location of
waste and recycling storage areas, as well as waste and recycling
service compartments.
25 Waste management systems must not be visible from outside the
building. Where this is unavoidable and Council is in agreement, it
must be designed to be consistent with the overall appearance of the
development.
Residential Buildings
26 Centralised waste collection points are required in the following
circumstances:
i) Attached dwellings where the number exceeds four dwellings in
total; and
ii) Where site characteristics (eg. steep sites, narrow street
frontage) make access to the street difficult for individual unit
holders and where placement of bins on the street frontage
is assessed as dangerous for either the public or service
personnel, or would have a detrimental effect on the street
amenity.
Low / Medium Scale Residential
This section applies to single dwellings, including both the principal and
secondary dwellings; dual occupancy development whether attached or
detached; and small scale multi-dwelling housing where the number does
not exceed four dwellings in total.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
p 3-11
VOLUME C
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
Controls
27 Council’s standard waste and recycling service is:
Waste Type
Bin Type
Waste (garbage)
1 x 120L
Co-mingled recycling
1 x 240L
Recycling of paper and cardboard
1 x 240L
Green waste (communal except for single
dwellings)
(subject to Owners Corporation Agreement on a
fee for service basis)
1 x 360L
Note: To check the service level for the relevant collection zone contact
Council’s Customer Service Section. Waste is collected weekly while all
other waste types are collected on a fortnightly basis.
28 Developments must allocate, within each property boundary, an area
for storing Council specified waste and recycling bins, preferably
located at the rear of the premises to minimise visual clutter. The
storage area is to be a minimum of 3m from openable windows and
integrated with the landscaping. Refer to 3R.5 of this Part for bin
characteristics.
29 All new dwellings must be designed so as to allow the internal
accommodation of one receptacle to collect waste and another to
collect recycling materials, each with the capacity to store one day’s
worth of material.
30 A path must be established for wheeling bins to the collection point;
it must be level and free of steps or kerbs.
31 An area is to be nominated for on-site composting.
Multi-Dwelling Housing
This section applies to multi-dwelling development, such as attached
dwellings, townhouses and villas, where basement car parking is not
provided and dwellings are separately accessed via a private access
road, or where centralised arrangements are not required under 3.4 (25)
of this Part.
32 Space is to be provided for:
p 3-12
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Waste Type
Bin Type
Waste (garbage)
1 x 120L
Co-mingled recycling
1 x 240L
Recycling of paper and cardboard
1 x 240L
Green waste (communal)
(subject to Owners Corporation Agreement on a fee
for service basis)
1 x 360L
Note: To check the service level for the relevant collection zone contact
Council’s Customer Service Section. Waste is collected weekly while all
other waste types are collected on a fortnightly basis.
Controls
33 All new dwellings must be designed so as to allow the internal
accommodation of one receptacle to collect waste and two
receptacles to collect recycling materials, each with the capacity to
store one day’s worth of material.
34 All such developments must allocate, within each property boundary,
an area for storing Council specified waste and recycling bins,
preferably located at the rear of the buildings to minimise visual
clutter. The storage area is to be a minimum of 3m from openable
windows and integrated with the landscaping. Refer to 3R.5 of this
Part for bin characteristics.
35 An area is to be nominated for on-site communal composting.
36 Centralised collection points are to be provided, directly accessible
from the street/rear lane and/or the internal road. Collection points
must be located a minimum of 12m from any openable window. One
collection point is to serve a maximum of 6 units.
37 Where on site collection points are provided, the full path of travel to
and from the collection points is to be designed to allow a 6m rigid
vehicle, weighing GVM 7 tonnes, to enter and exit the development
in a forward direction.
38 A path shall be established for wheeling bins to the collection point; it
must be level and free of steps or kerbs.
Medium / High Density Housing
This section applies to attached dwellings where the number exceeds
four dwellings in total (eg. residential flat building, multi-dwelling housing)
where basement parking is provided.
39 Council’s standard waste and recycling service for multi-dwelling
housing and residential flat development, where the number of units
exceeds four is as follows:
Waste Type
Number of
Units
Number of Bin/s
Waste
(garbage)
N/A
1 x 120L MGB per unit dwelling or 1
x 240L MB per 2 units
Co-mingled
recycling
of glass,
steel and
aluminium
cans and
plastic etc
For every 4
units or part
thereof.
1 x 240L MGB (communal)
Recycling of
paper and
cardboard
For every 4
units or part
thereof.
1 x 240L MGB (communal)
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GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
p 3-13
VOLUME C
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
Controls
Green waste
Optional
Please contact Council’s Waste
Service Team to discuss options.
Green waste bins will be subject
to Owners Corporation Agreement
on a fee for service basis. Green
waste bins will be serviced from
the street frontage due to the small
number of bins involved.
Note: To check the service level for the relevant collection zone contact
Council’s Customer Service Section. All bins are collected weekly except
green waste bins. Please contact Council’s Waste Service Team to discuss
options.
40 All new dwellings must be designed so as to allow the internal
accommodation of one receptacle to collect waste and another to
collect recycling, each with the capacity to store one day’s worth of
materials.
41 Centralised waste and recycling rooms must be provided in the
basement that has sufficient capacity to store all waste and recycling
likely to be generated in the entire building in a week.
42 The full path of travel to and from the waste and recycling room is to
be designed to allow a 6m rigid vehicle, weighing GVM 7 tonnes, to
enter and exit the development in a forward direction.
43 The minimum floor to ceiling height within the vehicle accessway
leading to and from the waste and recycling room(s) must be 2.6m
for the entire length of travel required within the development.
Note: Prior to pouring of the ground floor slab, the applicant will be required
to obtain confirmation from Council engineers that 2.6m headroom has
been provided.
44 Noise attenuation measures are required to ensure that the use of,
and collection from, the waste and recycling room do not give rise to
“offensive noise” as defined under the Protection of the Environment
Operations Act 1997.
45 An area is to be nominated for on-site communal composting.
Mixed Use Buildings
46 In a mixed use development, the waste handling, storage and
collection system from residential waste and commercial waste must
be completely separate and self-contained.
47 There must be at least two separate centralised waste and recycling
storage areas, one for residential waste and one for commercial.
The WMP shall identify the collection points and management
systems for both residential and commercial waste streams.
48 An area must be nominated on relevant plans for on-site composting
and/or worm farm if the proposal has a residential component.
p 3-14
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Controls
49 Where there is a residential component, any new dwellings must
be designed so as to allow the internal accommodation of one
receptacle to collect waste and another to collect recyclable
materials, each with the capacity to store one day’s worth of
materials.
Other Development Types
This section applies to other development types not covered by controls
25 to 48 above. It applies to any development that incorporates a
commercial, business or light industrial use (eg. retail premises, offices,
hospitals, restaurants and food retailers, light industries, residential care
facilities and the like).
50 Buildings must have a dedicated and enclosed waste and recycling
room(s) which has adequate storage area to meet the generation
rates (refer to 3R.10 of this Part).
51 Centralised collection points are to be provided, directly accessible
from the street/rear lane and/or the internal road. Collection points
must be located a minimum of 12m from any openable window. One
collection point is to serve a maximum of 6 units.
52 Where on site collection points are provided, the full path of travel
to and from the collection points is to be designed to allow an
appropriately sized rigid vehicle to enter and exit the development
in a forward position. The design and location of the waste and
recycling room must allow for adequate access for the relevant
vehicle size, including manoeuvring and loading.
Note: Standard sizes include a 6m rigid vehicle, weighing GVM 7 tonnes
and an 11m rigid vehicle, weighing GVM of 22 tonnes. The size will be
dependent on the the intended usage and quantity of waste generated
by the development type. Consultation with Council’s waste section early
in the design phase to ascertain the relevant vehicle size is strongly
recommended.
53 A path shall be established for wheeling bins to the collection point; it
must be level and free of steps or kerbs.
54 The size and design of the waste and recycling rooms must be
based on the following criteria:
i) the proposed and potential land use of the building;
ii) the floor area of the building;
iii) the number of separate occupancies contained within the
development;
iv) waste and recycling generation rates associated with the land
use;
v) type and amount of waste/recycling to be produced;
vi) the number and sizes of bins required to contain waste/recycling
materials likely to be generated during the period between
collections; and
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
p 3-15
VOLUME C
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
Controls
vii) the size and design of the waste/recycling storage is to allow for
future changes of use.
55 The minimum floor to ceiling height within the vehicle accessway
leading to and from the waste and recycling room(s) must be 4.6m
for the entire length of travel required within the development.
56 For recycling materials, clinical, medical or liquid waste, the design
must reflect the separate storage, operation and management of
these waste materials within the development.
57 In the event of the generation of:
i) more than 1.5m3 per day of food waste, other than unprocessed
or uncooked fruit and vegetables; or
ii) organic veterinary or medical waste;
stored waste must be refrigerated unless collected daily.
58 Where refrigeration is required:
i) the temperature must be maintained at or below 5°C;
ii) all refrigeration equipment must be installed with sufficient space
for cleaning both the equipment and the storage area;
iii) the floors walls and ceiling of the refrigerated waste room must
be constructed of a smooth impervious material and coved at all
intersections;
iv) the floor of the refrigerated waste room must be graded to the
doorway and a floor waste, designed in accordance with Sydney
Water guidelines, shall be located outside the room as close as
practicable to the doorway; and
v) noise attenuation measures must be put in place to ensure
that the noise generated by the refrigeration equipment
associated with the waste and recycling room shall not give
rise to “offensive noise” as defined under the Protection of the
Environment Operations Act 1997.
59 In circumstances involving the use of baling equipment for paper
and cardboard, sufficient area must be provided for the storage of
a minimum of four (4) bales without impacting on the access and
service conditions for collection materials for each day.
60 Where liquid wastes such as oils are generated by the business, a
separate bunded storage area for these wastes must be provided
with drainage directed to a grease trap. The bunded area is to be
weather protected and have a capacity not less than 20% of the
storage contents to contain any spill.
Note: Liquid waste from grease traps must only be removed by licensed
waste contractors approved by Sydney Water Corporation and the NSW
Environment Protection Authority.
61 Any construction for food premises must be in accordance with the
‘National Code for the Construction and Fit-out of Food Premises’
p 3-16
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Controls
Note: Contact Council for a copy of this Code and advice on the
construction of food premises.
62 For retail premises, light industry, hospitals, residential care facilities,
a waste service compartment must:
i) be provided on each storey of the building;
ii) have the capacity to store at least one day’s volume of waste and
recycling likely to be generated on that floor; and
iii) provide for the separation of paper and cardboard for recycling
on each storey.
63 If more than 10m3 of waste and recycling is likely to be generated
per day, then the central waste and recycling room must be separate
from the goods receival dock.
64 Separate space and collection arrangements must be made for
clinical/hazardous waste.
65 For offices, provision must be made on each floor and in the central
waste and recycling storage area, for the separation and storage
of all recyclable materials such as cardboard, paper and paper
products likely to arise on the premises.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.4 WASTE MANAGEMENT (continued)
p 3-17
VOLUME C
C
VOLUME
3.5 ACOUSTIC PRIVACY
Objectives
Controls
1 To ensure high standards
of acoustic privacy for
all occupants of the
development.
1
Development is to be designed to minimise the impact of external
noise sources (eg busy roads, railways, swimming pools, heavy
vehicle entries) on the internal and external spaces used by
occupants.
2 To minimise the impact
of the development on
the acoustic privacy
of neighbouring
developments.
2
Balconies and other external building elements are to be designed
and located to minimise infiltration and reflection of noise onto the
facade.
3
Buildings must be designed to minimise noise transmission by, but
not limited to:
3 To ensure housing
adjoining main roads is
designed and constructed
to minimise the impact
of external noise and
facilitate comfortable living
conditions for residents.
4 To ensure measures to
address acoustic privacy
have regard to the existing
or desired future character
of the street.
Service and
circulation areas
used to buffer
noise sensitive
areas.
Circulation
Core
i) careful siting and orientation of the building;
ii) locating bedrooms away from both internal and external noise
generators of a development, eg by using storage or circulation
areas as a buffer or grouping room uses according to the noise
level generated.
Note: Internal noise generators include, but are not limited to - kitchens,
laundries and living areas
External noise generators include, but are not limited to - traffic, railway line,
vehicle entries and mechanical equipment; pool pumps, air conditioning
units, garbage collection areas, tennis courts.
iii) fitting out building services with appropriate acoustic insulation;
iv) incorporating appropriate noise shielding or attenuation
techniques into the design and construction of the development.
4
Measures such as mounding or high solid fencing will only be
permitted where they are compatible with the streetscape.
5
When designing and siting active open space areas (eg BBQ areas,
swimming pools, communal areas etc) regard must be paid to
potential noise impacts on adjacent rooms and buildings, such as
bedrooms.
6
The noise level from air conditioning systems is not to exceed the
Laeq 15 minute by 5dBA measured at any bedroom window.
Kitchen
Bed
Bed
Lounge/Dining
Bath
Figure 3.5.1:
Buffer zone to minimise noise
pollution.
See Volume B Part 8
for development near rail
corridors and busy roads
p 3-18
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Objectives
Controls
1 To ensure the impact of
development on the visual
privacy of neighbouring
occupants is minimised.
1
Private open spaces and principal living spaces of the proposed
dwelling/s and adjacent dwellings are to be protected from direct or
unreasonable overlooking. Siting and design measures to achieve
this include:
i) use of distance or slope;
2 To ensure that the level
of visual privacy to
principal living areas
and private open spaces
is appropriate to the
development type.
ii) appropriate dwelling layout;
iii) off-setting windows in relation to adjacent windows;
iv) use of obscure glass or highlight windows;
v) screening devices such as fences, louvres, translucent screens,
perforated panels, trellises and courtyard walls;
3 To ensure high standards
of visual privacy for
all occupants within
low density residential
development.
vi) using solid or semi-transparent balustrades or screens to
balconies or terraces;
vii) using deep sills with planter boxes;
viii)providing vegetation as a screen between spaces;
4 To ensure visual privacy
measures do not
compromise outlook,
ventilation and solar
access or the functioning
of internal and external
spaces.
ix) utilising pergolas or shading devices to limit overlooking of lower
building levels or communal and private open space.
2
For low density residential development first floor decks, balconies
and roof top terraces are not permitted where they unreasonably
overlook or would directly overlook principal living spaces or private
open space and the impact cannot be adequately mitigated.
property
property boundary
boundary
area to be screened
area to be or
screened
obscured
or obscured
property
boundary
existing secluded
existing secluded
private open space
existing secluded
private open space
private open space
existing
dwelling
area to be screened
or obscured
area to be
screened
or obscured
area to
area to be
be screened
screened or obscured
or obscured
existing
existing dwelling
dwelling
existing secluded
private open space
property boundary
9m radius
new dwelling
property boundary
property boundary
existing
dwelling
9m radius
existing secluded
existing secluded
new dwelling
private
open space
private open space
new dwelling
new dwelling
9m radius
9m radius
new dwelling
new dwelling
existing
dwelling
Figure 3.6.1: Designs incorporating screening
to protect residents of the development.
property
boundary
9m radius
9m radius
existing
dwelling
Figure 3.6.2: Area of neighbouring
development to be protected from
overlooking..
property
boundary
property boundary
property
property boundary
boundary
property boundary
property
property boundary
boundary
property boundary
property boundary
p 10-19
Figure 3.6.3: Arrangement of windows to avoid overlooking of adjacent open space or living
areas
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3
3.6 VISUAL PRIVACY
pr
p 3-19
VOLUME C
Objectives
3.7 MATERIALS, FINISHES AND COLOURS
Controls
Sustainability of Building Materials
1 To encourage buildings to
have a low environmental
impact.
1
Development proposals must consider the following in the selection
of building materials:
i) recycled or recyclable materials with low embodied energy;
2 To provide good indoor air
quality.
ii) materials that come from renewable sources;
3 To limit pollution and
protect public health and
comfort.
iv) materials with a low life cycle cost and/or high durability;
iii) materials that generate a lower environmental cost over time;
v) production methods with a low environmental impact.
4 To design buildings that
provide optimum thermal
conditions wherever
possible.
2
Where the use of timber is proposed, only FSC, AFS or PEFC
certified timbers may be specified for construction or finishing.
3
Medium Density Fibreboard (MDF) and particleboard must not be
specified as a construction material for the development.
5 To reduce the
consumption of natural
and non-renewable,
resources.
4
The use of alternatives to PVC piping is highly encouraged including
Colorbond (above ground only), and HDPE where appropriate.
5
The use of construction materials and chemicals with toxic
components must be avoided, to facilitate recycling and reduce
pollution.
6
Structures must be designed with physical, rather than chemical,
termite measures. This can be achieved by:
6 To ensure material
selection has been equally
driven by environmental
sustainability,
safety, commercial
competitiveness and
quality.
7 To promote use of
materials and finishes that
contribute to the design of
innovative buildings.
i) appropriate materials and construction design;
ii) physical barriers;
iii) suspended floor systems.
7
Low Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) are to be used throughout
the building interior (carpets, paints, adhesives, sealants and all
other finishes), and low emission building materials are to be used
across the site.
8
Avoid the use of ozone depleting products and materials, or products
and materials manufactured using ozone depleting substances.
9
Avoid materials likely to contribute to poor internal air quality, such as
those generating formaldehyde, or those that may create a breathing
hazard in the event of fire, such as polyurethane
10 The requirements below apply only to non-residential development:
i) Use heavy weight building materials, such as concrete, as
thermal mass on roofs and/or walls. Where lighter weight
materials are used they are to be well insulated.
ii) Encourage the use of photovoltaic cells which can be mounted
as panels, or used as an integrated building cladding or sun
shading.
Figure 3.7-1
Recycled timber wall as a
feature in the entry lobby.
p 3-20
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
iii) Use light coloured internal finishes to improve internal reflections
and minimise lighting use.
Objectives
Controls
Materials and Finishes
1 To reflect and reinforce
the local character of Kuring-gai.
2 To complement the
streetscape and natural
environment.
3 To promote the use of high
quality materials, finishes
and colours for building
facade articulation design
and visual interest.
11 External walls must be constructed of high quality and durable
materials and finishes.
Note: Material and finishes selection is to be made in accordance
with objectives and controls as stated in 3.7 of this Part to ensure low
environmental impact.
12 Reuse or recycling of existing local materials such as sandstone
and brick is encouraged.
13 Large, unbroken expanses of any single material and finish
(rendered or not) to building facades must be avoided.
Note: Refer to Volume A Parts 6-10 of this DCP for relevant building facade
articulation controls.
4 To ensure the use of
materials, finishes and
colours creates well
proportioned facades and
minimises the visual bulk.
14 New development is to avoid extensive use of highly reflective or
gloss materials on the exterior of buildings.
5 To encourage the use of a
subdued palette of colours
and limited range of hues
for building consistency
across the LGA.
16 The exterior finish material (eg. sandstone or brick) must be integral
to the overall building façade design and must not appear to be
cosmetic.
15 For buildings of 3 storeys and above, a large expanse of sandstone
or face brick is not to be used on the upper levels of the buildings.
17 Highly contrasting coloured bricks are to be restricted to use on
building elements such as sills, window heads, string courses and to
assist in the division of the building into bays.
18 For buildings of 3 storeys and above, lightweight materials and
finishes (eg. timber and copper/steel) are encouraged for the upper
levels of buildings to assist in minimising the bulk and scale of the
building.
Figure 3.6-1:
Use of lightweight materials to minimise bulk and scale of building.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.7 MATERIALS, FINISHES AND COLOURS
(continued)
p 3-21
VOLUME C
3.7 MATERIALS, FINISHES AND COLOURS
(continued)
Controls
19 Where louvres are used, they are to be an integral element in the
building façade design.
Figure 3.6-3:
Louvres and sliding panels as an integrated facade element.
20 Where building cladding is used, consider dual purpose solutions.
For example, use of photovoltaic cells mounted on panels used for
cladding.
21 Where additions and alterations are proposed, external materials
and finishes must complement the existing building.
Colours
22 The selection of a colour scheme for new development and in
the restoration of existing facades must comply with the following
guidelines:
i) Base colours for major areas of building façade are to be light in
tone (eg. earth tone) with minimal colour intensity (or hue) eg. off
white or grey colours. Larger expanses of bold colour, black and
white must be avoided, as these detract from the prominence of
other façade details. Contrasting tints, tones and shades are to
be restricted to small areas. See Figure 3.6-4.
ii) Highlight colours to window and door mouldings, string courses,
parapet details and the like, are to be in sufficient contrast to the
base colour. Strong colours to large sections of the building must
be avoided. Details should be finished in a matt to semi gloss
range. See Figure 3.6-4.
iii) Trim colours for window frames and awning fascias are to be a
darker contrast to base and highlight colours. Window frames
should be finished in either a semi gloss or full gloss.
23 Natural earth tones are to be used on building facades in close
proximity to bushland.
Figure 3.6-2:
A mix of materials, finishes
and colours for building
facade.
p 3-22
24 For buildings of 3 storeys or above, recessive colours are
encouraged for the upper levels of buildings to assist in minimising
the bulk and scale of the building. Refer to Figure 3.6-4.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Controls
25 When repainting existing buildings, colours should generally be
evocative of the era of the building.
26 For commercial/office development, the use of corporate colours to
identify a business name is to be limited to signage, and must not be
used as the main building façade colour.
Figure 3.6-4:
Preferred selection of colour schemes.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.7 MATERIALS, FINISHES AND COLOURS
(continued)
p 3-23
VOLUME C
3.8 ROOF TERRACES AND PODIUMS
This section does not apply to single dwellings
Objectives
Controls
1 To provide high quality
of private and public
common open space
on roof terraces and
podiums.
1
All roof terraces and podiums must provide appropriate building
systems to make them trafficable, and to support landscaping.
2
Roof and terrace common open areas must incorporate sun shading
devices, wind screens and facilities such as BBQ and kitchenette
area to encourage usage.
3
Where artificial lighting is required, energy efficient lights must be
used in conjunction with timers or daylight controls. All light spill is
prohibited.
4
Roof terraces and podiums must provide soft landscaping areas
that complement the appearance of the building, soften the edges of
the building, and reduce the scale of raised terraces and other built
elements such as services.
5
Robust and drought tolerant plant material must be used to minimise
maintenance and ensure long term survival.
6
Roof terraces and podiums are to be designed for optimum
conditions for plant growth by appropriate solar access, soil mix, and
the provision of water connections and drainage.
7
Minimum soil provision for a range of plant sizes must be in
accordance with the following:
i) Large trees (canopy diameter of up to 16m at maturity)
-- minimum soil volume 150m3
-- minimum soil depth 1.3m
-- minimum soil area 10m x 10m area or equivalent
ii) Medium trees (8m canopy diameter at maturity)
-- minimum soil volume 36m3
-- minimum soil depth 1m
-- approximate soil area 6m x 6m or equivalent
iii) Small trees (4m canopy diameter at maturity)
-- minimum soil volume 11m3
-- minimum soil depth 0.8m
-- approximate soil area 3.5m x 3.5m or equivalent
iv) Shrubs
-- minimum soil depth 0.5-0.6m
v) Ground cover
-- minimum soil depth 0.3-0.45m
vi) Turf
-- minimum soil depth 0.1-0.3m
Note 1: Any subsurface drainage requirements are in addition to the
minimum soil depths quoted above.
Note 2: Council will require a long term maintenance plan for both the
greenery and the waterproofing.
2 To design roof terraces so
that they contribute to the
streetscape.
3 To encourage use of low
maintenance planting
and low water use on roof
terraces and podiums
with appropriate support
systems.
Figure 3.8-1:
Roof top recreation area.
Figure 3.8-2:
Roof top public parkland.
Figure 3.8-3:
Roof top vegetable garden.
p 3-24
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Objectives
Controls
1 To encourage the use of
materials which will have
a minimal impact on the
natural environment during
their growth, extraction,
use and disposal.
1
i) restricting machinery and vehicle movement to the building
footprint and access corridor;
ii) avoiding excavation beyond the building area;
iii) locating drainage lines close to the building or within previously
excavated areas where possible; and
2 To reduce the volume and
cost of construction and
demolition waste material.
3 To preserve the various
natural elements and
habitats such as soil
profile, vegetation,
natural rock shelves and
watercourses.
Site disturbance during construction or demolition must be
minimised by:
iv) confining storage areas to previously excavated areas, away
from the drip-line of trees to be retained.
A site management plan showing tree protection areas, machinery
usage zones, storage areas, dust sheets and location of stormwater
pollution barriers may be required.
2
A Waste Management Plan (WMP) must be submitted with the
application, in accordance with 3R.8 of this Part. Evidence such
as weighbridge dockets, copies of invoices or some other form
of written evidence will be required to be submitted to Council
on completion of the development to verify the quantities and
destination of waste and recycling materials generated during works
(either demolition and or construction).
5 To protect the health and
integrity of aquatic and
terrestrial environments.
Note: Plans and drawings of the proposed development that highlight the
location of and space allocated to the waste management facilities and the
nominated waste collection point must be attached to the WMP. The path of
access for both users and collection vehicles must also be highlighted.
6 To ensure regular rainfall
events do not adversely
affect water quality.
3
Provide source separation facilities on building sites so that different
waste streams may be easily separated during construction and
demolition to encourage the reuse and recycling of materials.
4 To protect neighbouring
structures and
minimise disturbance
to neighbouring and
downstream properties.
7 To protect the sensitive
Hawkesbury Sandstone
communities in the LGA.
8 To prevent cumulative
impacts from pollutants,
(such as excess nutrients,
sediment) on downstream
ecosystems.
9 To maintain visual amenity
of the locality and the
natural environment.
Stormwater Quality Control During Construction
4
Manage soil, water and materials on construction sites to prevent
erosion, sedimentation and pollution of waterbodies and the natural
environment.
5
Manage the quality and quantity of post-construction stormwater
runoff from the site to protect downstream ecological communities,
to prevent altered nutrient regimes and to reduce litter entering the
waterways.
6
Control erosion and sedimentation by:
i) Minimising the extent of disturbance;
10To protect the health and
safety of people on the
worksite.
11To ensure compliance with
relevant legislation.
ii) Rapidly stabilising the disturbed areas;
iii) Diverting clean runoff around work areas; and
iv) Trapping eroded sediment as close to the source as is practical.
7
Provide for appropriate management of wastes, chemicals and fuel
through:
i) Appropriate storage and handling to prevent discharge of
pollutants to waterways;
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.9 CONSTRUCTION, DEMOLITION AND
DISPOSAL
p 3-25
VOLUME C
3.9 CONSTRUCTION DEMOLITION AND
DISPOSAL (continued)
Controls
ii) On-site containment of waste water from construction activities;
iii) Appropriate storage and disposal of waste materials; and
iv) Appropriate management and disposal of waste water.
Note: Under the POEO Act 1997, owners and builders have a responsibility
to notify Council or the Environment Protection Authority (NSW Office of
Environment and Heritage) of any harmful pollution incident as soon as is
practicable.Allowing pollutants (including sediment) to enter any waterway
is an offence under the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997.
Failure to notify could result in a maximum fine of $250,000 for corporations
and $120,000 for individuals.
Erosion and sediment control
8
All activities that have the potential to pollute must comply with the
requirements of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act
1997 (POEO Act 1997).
9
Erosion and sediment control are to be carried out in accordance
with the Landcom document ‘Managing Urban Stormwater: Soils and
Construction, 2006’ (the ‘Blue Book’).
10 All development applications must be accompanied by an ‘Erosion
and Sediment Control Plan’ (ESCP) that will describe the measures
to be taken at development sites to minimise land disturbance
and erosion and to control sediment pollution. An ESCP shall
be prepared in accordance with Landcom “Managing Urban
Stormwater, Soil and Construction”.
11 Excavation of the site must be limited to the immediate construction
area.
12 Where materials are stockpiled on a site, no part of a stockpile is to
be placed under the canopy of any tree that is to be retained.
13 Waste (including skip bins) and construction materials,and
equipment and sediment barriers must at no time be placed in public
walkways, verges, Council roads or road reserves unless a permit
has been obtained from Council, the prescribed fee has been paid
to Council and the materials are stored subject to public liability
insurance cover to the order of $20 million.
Note: Under the Roads General Regulation 2000, significant fines apply
to the placing on the road (including footpath) of a thing likely to restrict /
endanger road users.
Controls for Vegetative Stabilisation
14 Where retention of vegetation is not possible, regeneration or
revegetation of cleared or modified areas immediately following
construction may be required to stabilise disturbed land.
15 Revegetation of a site can be either temporary or permanent,
depending on the speed of stabilisation required and the intended
future use of the site. It is also possible to make use of both
techniques at the same time. Vegetative stabilisation, where utilised,
must be undertaken in accordance with the following controls:
p 3-26
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
Controls
i) Before undertaking any regeneration or revegetation works, the
initial cause of degradation must be addressed;
ii) Erosion and sediment control measures must be retained in
good working condition until such time as the site is properly
stabilised;
iii) All landscaping on disturbed areas must be carried out in
accordance with the approved landscape plans and vegetative
stabilisation must not preclude the carrying out of works in
accordance with the landscape plan;
iv) Non-indigenous plant species used for temporary vegetative
stabilisation must be non-invasive and must be of a form that will
not deter the establishment of indigenous species;
Note: Temporary vegetation is generally undertaken using annual
species as they tend to grow faster, however annual species are not
appropriate for permanent vegetative stabilisation as they commonly
cease to provide stabilisation after 6-8 months.
vii) Regeneration or revegetation undertaken in bushland must be
permanent, utilising only locally native species;
viii)Where permanent vegetative stabilisation is undertaken in
bushland, the ground must be further protected against erosion
by the placement of mulch or a biodegradable blanket;
ix) If degradation has altered conditions such that revegetation to
pre-development standards is not possible, rehabilitation must
be designed to suit the changed conditions; and
x) All disturbed areas must be rehabilitated (landscaped) within
twenty (20) days of completion of building works or provided with
interim control treatment.
Management of wastes, chemicals and fuel
16 The following controls apply to the storage of hazardous and
dangerous liquids:
i) Storage areas must be located well away from drains;
ii) Bunding capable of retaining the full stored capacity must be
constructed around the perimeter of all liquid storage areas;
iii) Where possible, liquids must be stored indoors;
iv) Outdoor storage areas for liquids must be roofed to prevent
rainwater entering the bunded area unless roofing the area
would render it unsafe; and
v) Storage of liquids must be in accordance with AS1940: The
Storage and Handling of Flammable and Combustible Liquids or
any standard replacing that standard.
Note: Under the POEO Act 1997, it is an offence to store hazardous and
dangerous liquids (including oils, solvents, fuels, acids and paints) in such a
way as to allow any water pollution incident to occur.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT CONTROLS
3.9 CONSTRUCTION DEMOLITION AND
DISPOSAL (continued)
p 3-27
VOLUME C
3.9 CONSTRUCTION DEMOLITION AND
DISPOSAL (continued)
Controls
Disposal of Wastewater
17 Wastewater must be kept separate from stormwater. Wastewater
must not enter any stormwater system either on or off the property.
18 Washing and cleaning activities on commercial or industrial
premises must be undertaken only within the confines of a bunded
area.
19 Wastewater must be retained on site and treated prior to disposal in
accordance with NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change
and Water and Sydney Water requirements.
Environmental Site Management Plan
20 A preliminary Environmental Site Management Plan (ESMP)
must be prepared to accompany all development applications
in accordance with the ‘Blue Book’, the environmental controls
contained in this DCP and in accordance with Council’s DA Guide.
21 The preliminary ESMP must demonstrate consideration by the
applicant of the environmental effects of the proposed construction
works and the means by which the construction site will be
maintained throughout the construction process to ensure the
optimum environmental outcome for the project.
Once Consent is Granted
22 A final Erosion and Sediment Control Plan(s) is (are) to be prepared
in accordance with the ‘Blue Book’ and the conditions of consent.
23 The final ESMP must include both written commentary and a plan
of the works (minimum scale 1:200). This will be assessed and
approved by the Principal Certifying Authority with the Construction
Certificate documentation.
p 3-28
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
PART
3R
3R References
3R.1 Green Star Rating Information Sheet
3R.2 Credit Summary Template - From GBCA Office
Rating Tool
3R.3 Examples of ESD Measures
3R.4 Council’s Standard Bin Characteristics
3R.5 Council’s Collection vehicle characteristics
3R.6 Vehicle Access/Turning Circles
3R.7 What is a Waste Management Plan?
REFERENCES
3R.8 Waste Management Plan
3R.9 Waste Guidelines
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-29
VOLUME C
3R.1 GREEN STAR RATING INFORMATION
SHEET
What is the Green Rating Star environmental rating system?
The Green Star environmental rating system for buildings was developed
by the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). Green star is a
comprehensive rating system for evaluating the environmental design and
performance of Australian buildings based on a number of categories.
The nine categories included within all Green star rating tools are:
•• Management
•• Materials
•• Indoor Environmental Quality
•• Land use and Ecology
•• Energy
•• Emissions
•• Transport
•• Innovation
•• Water
These categories are divided into credits, each of which addresses
an initiative that improves or has potential to improve environmental
performance. Points are awarded in each credit for actions that
demonstrate that the project has met the overall objectives of Green Star.
Once all claimed credits in each category are assessed, a percentage
score is calculated and Green Star environmental weighting factors are
then applied.
Note: See 3R.2 of this Part for GBCA Credit Summary Example
What do Green Star ratings mean?
Green Star rating tools use stars to measure performance:
i) 4 Star Green Star Certified rating (score 45-59) signifies
‘Best Practice’ in environmentally sustainable design and/or
construction;
ii) 5 Star Green Star Certified rating (score 60-74) signifies
‘Australian Excellence’ in environmentally sustainable design
and/or construction;
iii) 6 Star Green Star Certified rating (score 75-100) signifies
‘World Leadership’ in environmentally sustainable design and/or
construction.
Projects that obtain a 4 Star rating or above using the GBCA rating tools,
are eligible to apply for formal certification through the GBCA, following
which they are permitted to advertise their status as “green buildings”.
Why should buildings have a Green Star Rating?
Green Star Rating confirms that the building is designed with sustainable
principles that will contribute to the reduction of carbon emissions and the
preservation of non-renewable material sources. It also sets up a system
of ongoing sustainable management that enables the ongoing operation
of the building to remain sustainable. In addition, there are many business
benefits of Green Star buildings as outlined below:
p 3-30
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R.1 GREEN STAR RATING INFORMATION
SHEET (continued)
3R
Lower operating costs
Green buildings are built for high energy and water efficiency, so they are
cheaper to operate. Green buildings achieve energy savings of at least
20-30% when compared with industry standards, and sometimes much
more.
The Szencorp Building at 40 Albert Road in South Melbourne, for
instance, was the first existing office refurbishment in Australia to be
awarded a 6 Green Star - Office Design rating, and has reported energy
savings of over 70% after two years of operation.
Green buildings deliver a higher return on investment. The McGraw
Hill Construction Report (2007) found that building green increases
a property’s value by 7.5% and improves the return on investment by
6.6%. the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors’ report Green Value:
Growing Buildings, Growing Assets (2006) confirms this, revealing that
green building practices improve an asset’s value by securing tenants
more quickly, commanding higher rents or prices, enjoying lower
tenant turnover, costing less to operate and maintain, attracting grants,
subsidies and other inducements, and improving business productivity
for occupants, which affects churn, renewals, inducements and fitting out
costs.
Greater tenant attraction
More tenants are seeking environmentally sustainable , healthy and
productive workspaces that demonstrate their commitment to corporate
social responsibility.
The BCI Australia Green Building Market Report (2008) found that client
demand is one of the primary drivers for committing to green building,
with 65% of respondents nominating it as an important factor. In return,
owners are rewarded with decreased vacancy periods and a subsequent
increase in occupancy ratios of 3.5%.
REFERENCES
Higher return on investment
Enhanced marketability
The owners of Australia’s first Green Star certified project at 8 Brindabella
Circuit in Canberra say they could not put a financial figure on the amount
of free publicity they have received from their green building, both through
their Green Star certification and their subsequent environmental awards.
In fact, the owners have needed to completely rethink their marketing
strategy, as they now have a waiting list of prospective tenants.
Productivity benefits
Green buildings consistently outperform non-green buildings in terms
of comfort and productivity. Natural light, fresh air and access to views
of the outdoors, as well as control over their own individual workspace
temperature and lighting, can directly affect productivity.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-31
VOLUME C
3R.1 GREEN STAR RATING INFORMATION
SHEET (continued)
For example, a post-refurbishment study of 500 Collins Street in
Melbourne found a 9% increase in typing speeds of secretaries and a 7%
increase in lawyers’ billings ratio, despite a 12% decline in the average
monthly hours worked. At the City of Melbourne’s CH2, Australia’s first
6 Green Star – Office Design rated building, productivity has risen by
an impressive 10.9% since staff moved into their green office, with an
estimated annual cost savings of $2 million.
Note: Refer to www.gbca.org.au for more information
p 3-32
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R.2 CREDIT SUMMARY EXAMPLE
3R
from GBCA Office Rating Tool
REFERENCES

Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-33
p 3-34
Category
Title
Points
achieved
From updated Credit
Summary
Project details:
Description of system/element
From updated ESD Report
Location in DWG
building
Ref.
CHECKLIST OF ESD MEASURES
Estimated
Installation dates for
system/element
From proposed
Schedule of Works
CERTIFIER
CHECK
VOLUME C
3R.3 CHECKLIST OF ESD MEASURES TO
BE SUBMITTED WITH DEVELOPMENT
APPLICATION AND UPDATED FOR CC
APPROVAL
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R.4 EXAMPLES OF ESD MEASURES
3R
Water Efficiency
These measures ensure all non-residential buildings implement systems
of water collection and recycling. Systems to minimise mains water usage
may include:
i) On-site rainwater collection and on-site waste water treatment to
provide recycled water for use within the development.
iii) Utilise water efficient landscape principles, such as the selection
of low water usage species, including local species, and the use
of tree foliage to create on ground shade and windbreaks.
Energy Generation
These measures encourage implementation of systems that provide
alternative energy sources. Energy generation measures may include:
i) Solar louvres (powered by photovoltaic cells) that track the sun to
supply building use;
ii) Solar hot water system;
iii) Solar energy collection technology such as solar heat pumps for
hot water and photovoltaic cells;
Wind turbines
The exhaust plenum is at slightly
negative pressure, induced by north
flues stack effect and wind-powered
turbines
Roof top energy
Includes photovoltaic cells, solar
hot water panels and gas fired
co-generation plant.
Vertical planting
Green north facades and roof top
assists shading, glare and air quality.
Access to nature enhances
productivity relieving stress.
plantroom
roof deck
Healthy air
100% outside air supply via vertical
ducts deliver air floor by floor to
sealed access floor plenum.
office
Shading and light
Light shelf and balcony floors provide
horizontal shading from northern sun.
Ambient and direct daylight bounces
off external and internal light shelf.
office
Displacement air
Fresh air fed at low speed
through controllable floor vents.
office
REFERENCES
ii) Provide low flush toilets and water efficient fixtures and fittings,
including waterless urinals.
office
Exhaust
Light shelf and balcony floors provide
horizontal shading from northern sun.
Ambient and direct daylight bounces
off external and internal light shelf.
Thermal mass
Thermal mass in concrete
slab absorbs excess heat
from the space.
office
Shower towers
Air and water falls to provide
cool water for building
reticulation and cool air to
supplement ground floor and
retail cooling.
office
Chilled ceilings
Chilled ceilings panels absorb radiated
heat from equipment and occupants.
Occupants experience ‘coolth’ by
radiating heat to chilled ceiling overhead.
office
office
office
square
street
retail
Figure 3R.3-1:
Example of 6 Star Green Star
Building CH2 Melbourne
(Source: GBCA)
basement
Phase change material
Water is piped to phase change
plans for re-cooling
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-35
VOLUME C
3R.3EXAMPLES OF ESD MEASURES
(continued)
i) Use of photovoltaic cells which can be mounted as panels, or
used as an integrated building cladding as shading device;
ii) Use of co-generation or tri-generation plants located within the
basement to service the whole building; and
iii) Wind turbine technology.
Heating and Cooling
These measures reduce the heat and carbon output of non-residential
buildings. Alternative heating and cooling measures may include (refer to
Figure 8R.3-2):
i) Displacement ventilation with low level air delivery and high level
air exhaust to create air change effectiveness;
ii) Thermal chimneys in atriums to draw warm air up and out of
work areas;
iii) New generation cooling systems such as chilled ceiling beams;
iv) Active mass cooling system utilising thermo-active slabs and
concrete core conditioning;
v) Radiant slab heating to provide energy efficient thermal comfort;
vi) Night purge systems to cool and clear stale air within the
building;
vii) Roof surfaces with a sheen finish that reduce heat gain in
summer (only where they do not impact on the amenity of
neighbour in terms of glare and reflectivity).
Thermal mass
Thermal mass in concrete
slab absorbs excess heat
from the space.
Floor slab above
High level exhaust
Displacement air systems
with adjustable vents in a
raised access floor provide
a much more efficient and
healthy air delivery.
ceiling
Chilled ceilings
Chilled ceilings panels
absorb radiated heat from
equipment and occupants.
Occupants experience
‘coolth’ by radiating heat to
chilled ceiling overhead.
Air warmed by body
heat rises towards
exhaust registers in
the ceiling.
Underfloor air supply
Displacement air
Fresh air fed at low
speed through
controllable floor vents.
Figure 3R.3-2:
A displacement air system. Removing contaminants efficiently with
100% fresh air supply, resulting in a healthier work environment.
p 3-36
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R
3R.3EXAMPLES OF ESD MEASURES
(continued)
viii)Roof gardens and landscaped terraces which provide thermal
insulation; and
ix) Use of tri-generation plants located within the building basement.
x) Use of vertical planting to shade building elevations.
xi) Insulation and ventilation of roof spaces.
xii) Use of heavy weight building materials, such as concrete, for
thermal mass on flat roofs and/or walls. Where lighter weight
materials are used they are to be well insulated.
These measures reduce the energy uptake for lighting systems within
non-residential building sites. Measures to reduce artificial light use may
include (refer to Figure 8R.3.3):
i) Considering internal building use relative to window location.
ii) Consider fenestration with high performance glazing with
spectrally selective glass that allows views and a high degree of
diffused natural light into the workspace without glare.
iii) Select and position light fittings to minimise energy consumption.
For example create separate lighting zones for areas close to
and further away from windows.
iv) Lighting used in common areas such as entries, corridors, car
parks and communal open space areas must utilise daylight
sensor control, movement detectors, automated dimmers and
timers. Lightspill must be controlled.
v) Improve internal natural light reflection and minimise lighting use
by using light coloured internal finishes.
A glazed roof with internal blinds
reduce glare during summer
and traps heat during winter
REFERENCES
Lighting
vents
Air vents allow ventilation and
incoming of natural light
Light shelves and
reflectors to improve
quantity of natural light
office space
office space
Atrium
Balcony fronts reflect lights
down to lower levels
Light collectors on
external walls
office space
office space
Internal air movement
office space
office space
Figure 3R.3-3:
Lighting and ventilation.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-37
VOLUME C
3R.5 COUNCIL’S STANDARD BIN
CHARACTERISTICS
A2.1 Council’s Standard Bin Characteristics
Bin Type
120 Litre MGB
Characteristics
Uses
Landfill Collection
Used for domestic waste that
cannot be recycled. Contents to
be taken to landfill.
Co-mingled/Paper Recycling
240 Litre MGB
Used for the storage of material
that can be recycled.
Two bins are supplied, one for
paper and cardboard while the
other is for co-mingled material
such as plastics, metal and
aluminum cans.
Vegetation Recycling
360 Litre MGB
Used for the storage of
vegetation material for recycling
as garden mulch or similar.
Dimensions
Overall Height
Cart Body Height
Overall Width
Overall Depth
Wheel Diameter
Load Rating
p 3-38
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
V
W
X
Y
Z
1171mm
1088mm
704mm
803mm
305mm
154Kg
3R.6 COUNCIL’S COLLECTION VEHICLE
CHARACTERISTICS
3R
Waste collection vehicles may be side loading, rear end loading or top
loading. The size of the vehicle varies according to the collection service.
Thus it is impossible to specify what constitutes the definitive garbage
truck. Developers must consult with Council regarding the type of vehicle
to be used for the development if the development is to be serviced by
Council collection vehicles.
Any turning circle considerations must also include allowances for driver
steering error and overhangs. The steering error allowances shall be
at least 0.6 metres (absolute minimum) on both sides of the theoretical
wheel path, and 1m as a desirable minimum.
1
Collection from Enclosures
Collection vehicles may enter building basements for the collection of
waste and/or recyclables provided the following requirements are met:
i) The gradient of the ramp access to basement should not exceed
1:5;
ii) The height to the structural members and upper floor ceiling
should allow for a typical collection vehicle travel height /
operational height consistent with type of vehicle employed;
iii) The provision of space clear of structural members or vehicle
parking spaces is adequate to allow the typical three-point turn
of collection vehicles; and
iv) The basement floor should be of industrial-type strength
pavement and designed for a maximum wheel loading of 7
tonnes per axle in order to accommodate waste and recycling
collection trucks.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
REFERENCES
The following characteristics represent the typical collection
vehicle used by Council; however these are for guidance only.
p 3-39
VOLUME C
3R.7 VEHICLE ACCESS/TURNING CIRCLES
Best design practice for access and egress from a development calls for
a separate entrance and exit to allow the collection vehicle to travel in a
forward direction at all times. Where there is a requirement for collection
vehicles to turn at a cul-de-sac head within a development, the design
should incorporate a bowl, ‘T’, or ‘Y’ shaped arrangement.
1
The design aspects that shall be taken into account include the
following:
i) Placement of waste and recycling bins outside each home, or in
a common collection area;
ii) The presence of parked cars on access roads;
iii) Trucks should only be expected to make a three-point turn to
complete a U-turn; and
iv) Allow for collection vehicle overhang and possible interference
with bins and road furniture.
2
Internal Road Geometry
The design parameters covered in AS2890.2 Off Street Parking – Part 2
Commercial Vehicle Facility must be complied with.
p 3-40
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R.8 WHAT IS A WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN?
1
3R
A waste management plan (WMP) is a checklist that provides
Council with details of the following:
i) The volume and type of waste to be generated;
ii) How the waste is to be stored and treated on site;
iii) How and where the non-reusable, or recyclable residual, is to be
disposed of; and
Completion of the WMP will help to determine what materials are on
the site and how and where they will be stored, re-used/recycled and
eventually disposed of. A list of local outlets and other waste disposal
facilities can be obtained from Council’s ‘Register of Waster Receiving
Facilities for Waste Planning’ and from the Waste Service NSW recycling
directory.
A copy of the proforma WMP follows. Further copies can be obtained
from Council’s Customer Service counter or from Council’s website –
www.kmc.gov.au.
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
REFERENCES
iv) How ongoing waste management for the site will operate.
p 3-41
VOLUME C
3R.9 WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN
To be completed for all Developer Applications:
To facilitate sustainable waste management and waste reduction, Council
requires on-site sorting and storage of waste products pending re-use or
collection. Completing this proforma will assist you in identifying the type
A2.5 Waste Management Plan
of waste that will be generated and in advising Council how you intend to
reuse, recycle or dispose of your waste.
To be completed for all Development Applications.
The information provided on the proforma (and on your accompanied
To facilitate sustainable waste management and waste reduction, Council requires on-site sorting and
plans)reuse
will be
assessed Completing
against thethis
design
objectives
ofyou
theinDCP (e.g. to
storage of waste products pending
or collection.
proforma
will assist
and and
minimise
disposal
where
possible)
and
the relevant
identifying the type of wastemaximise
that will bereuse
generated
in advising
Council
how you
intend to
reuse,
recycle or dispose of your waste.
controls for your particular use.
The information provided onIfthe
proforma
(and on your
plans) provide
will be assessed
against the
space
is insufficient
inaccompanied
the table please
attachments.
design objectives of the DCP (e.g. to maximise reuse and minimise disposal where possible) and the
relevant controls for your particular use.
If space is insufficient in the table please provide attachments.
Outline of Proposal
Applicant’s Name & Address: __________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Phone: ____________________________Fax: __________________________________
Site Address: ______________________________________________________________
Buildings & other structures currently on the site: __________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Builders Name & Address: ____________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
Brief Description of Proposal: __________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
The details provided on this form are your intentions for managing waste relating to this project.
Signature of Applicant: __________________________ Date: _______________________
p 3-42
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R.9 WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN (continued)
Section One: To be completed for all Development Applications involving demolition (including major
renovations and excavation), single-dwellings, dual occupancy and non-habitable building or structure.
REFERENCES
3R
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-43
VOLUME C
p 3-44
3R.9 WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN (continued)
Section Two: Construction Stage (To be completed and submitted with all Development Applications for all
other developments not included in Section One).
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R.9 WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN (continued)
Section Three: Use of Premises (Occupation Stage) (To be completed and submitted with all development
Applications with Section Two).
REFERENCES
3R
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-45
VOLUME C
3R.8 WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN (continued)
Section Four: On Going Management (To be completed and submitted with Sections Two and Three).
Space
Number of Units (if applicable):____________________________________________________
Estimated garbage generation (see Waste Guidelines at A.26): ___________________________
Estimated recycling generation (see Waste Guidelines at A.26): _ _________________________
Describe the equipment & system to be used for managing:
Garbage _____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Recyclables _ _________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Garden Organics (if applicable)____________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________
Access
Describe arrangements for access by system users to waste facilities (highlight on plan
drawings): ____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Describe arrangements for access by collection contractors to waste facilities (highlight on plan
drawings): ____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Amenity
Describe how noise associated with residents using bins, collection contractors emptying the
bins has been minimised: ________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Describe the ventilation of waste storage areas (highlight on plan drawings): ________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Describe facilities for washing bins and waste storage areas (highlight on plan drawings): _ ____
____________________________________________________________________________
p 3-46
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
3R
3R.10 WASTE GUIDELINES
Type of Premises
Garbage
Generation
Recycling
Generation
Butcher
80L/100m2 floor area/
day
Information not
available
Delicatessen
80L/100m2 floor area/
day
Information not
available
Fish shop
80L/100m2 floor area/
day
Information not
available
Greengrocer
240 L/100m2 floor
area/day
120L/100m2 floor area/
day
Restaurants
660L/100m2 floor
area/day
130L/100m2 floor area/
day
Supermarkets
660L/100m2 floor
area/day
240L/100m2 floor area/
day
Takeaway
80L/100m2 floor area/
day
Information not
available
Retail (non-food sales)
Shops with less than
50L/100m2 floor area/
day
100m2 floor area
25L/100m2 floor area/
day
Shops with over
100m2 floor area
50L/100m2 floor area/
day
50L/100m2 floor area/
day
Showrooms
40L/100m2 floor area/
day
10L/100m2 floor area/
day
Hairdresser
60L/100m2 floor area/
day
Information not
available
40L/occupant/week
20L/occupant/week
60L/occupant/week
20L/occupant/week
10L/100m2/day
10L/100m2/day
5L/bed/day50L
50L/100m2 of bar and
dining areas/day
Other
Backpacker
accommodation
Boarding house/
guesthouse
Offices
Hotel
100m2 floor area/day
REFERENCES
Food premises
660L/100m2 dining
area/day
Licensed club
50L/100m2 floor area/
day
50L/100m2 of bar and
diningareas/day
Motel (without public
restaurant)
5L/bed/day
1L/bed/day
660L/100m2 dining
area/day
Better Practice Guide for Waste Management in Multi-Unit Dwellings.
The current standard NSW commercial waste generation rates are those
established by the Combined Sydney Region of Councils. For further
information on commercial waste generation rates as they become
available, please refer to www.environment.nsw.gov.au
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
p 3-47
VOLUME C
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p 3-48
Ku-ring-gai Local Centres Development Control Plan
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