Financial
Statements
2016
Financial
Statements
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 02 °
Financial
Statements
1
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated
Financial Statements
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated
Financial Statements
3
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Company
Financial Statements
4
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial
Statements
5
Other Supplementary Information
Including the Independent
Auditor’s Report
2016
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 03 °
Chapter
1
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 04 °
Financial Statements 2016
Airbus Group SE
IFRS Consolidated
Financial Statements
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated
Income Statements for the years ended
31 December 2016 and 2015
06
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated
Statements of Comprehensive Income
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
07
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated
Statements of Financial Position
at 31 December 2016 and 2015
08
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated
Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended
31 December 2016 and 2015
10
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated
Statements of Changes in Equity
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
11
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 05 °
1
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Income Statements
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
(In € million)
Note
2016
Revenues
10
66,581
64,450
Cost of sales
10
(61,317)
(55,599)
Gross margin
10
5,264
8,851
(997)
(1,065)
Selling expenses
2015
(1,726)
(1,586)
Research and development expenses
11
(2,970)
(3,460)
Other income
13
2,689
474
Other expenses
13
(254)
(222)
Share of profit from investments accounted for under the equity method
12
231
1,016
Other income from investments
12
21
54
2,258
4,062
Administrative expenses
Profit before finance costs and income taxes
Interest income
247
183
Interest expense
(522)
(551)
(692)
(319)
Total finance costs
14
(967)
(687)
Income taxes
15
(291)
(677)
1,000
2,698
995
2,696
5
2
€
€
Other financial result
Profit for the period
Attributable to:
Equity owners of the parent (Net income)
Non-controlling interests
Earnings per share
Basic
16
1.29
3.43
Diluted
16
1.29
3.42
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements (IFRS).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 06 °
Financial Statements 2016
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
Note
2016
2015
1,000
2,698
(1,649)
761
(102)
(36)
15
365
(235)
(174)
222
35
(247)
(4,699)
Change in fair value of available-for-sale financial assets
(53)
368
Share of changes in other comprehensive income
from investments accounted for under the equity method
(35)
(142)
(In € million)
Profit for the period
Other comprehensive income
Items that will not be reclassified to profit or loss:
Remeasurement of the defined benefit pension plans
Share of remeasurement of the defined benefit pension plans
from investments accounted for under the equity method
Income tax relating to items that will not be reclassified
Items that may be reclassified to profit or loss:
Foreign currency translation differences for foreign operations
Change in fair value of cash flow hedges
Income tax relating to items that may be reclassified
(7)
1,112
(1,902)
(2,649)
(902)
49
15
Other comprehensive income, net of tax
Total comprehensive income of the period
Attributable to:
Equity owners of the parent
Non-controlling interests
(917)
76
15
(27)
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements (IFRS).
1
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 07 °
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Statements of Financial Position
at 31 December 2016 and 2015
Note
2016
2015
Intangible assets
17
12,068
12,555
Property, plant and equipment
18
16,913
17,127
5
66
(In € million)
Assets
Non-current assets
Investment property
7
1,608
1,326
Other investments and other long-term financial assets
19
3,655
2,492
Non-current other financial assets
23
976
1,096
Non-current other assets
24
2,358
2,166
Deferred tax assets
15
7,557
6,759
Non-current securities
34
9,897
9,851
55,037
53,438
Investments accounted for under the equity method
Current assets
Inventories
20
29,688
29,051
Trade receivables
21
8,101
7,877
Current portion of other long-term financial assets
19
522
178
Current other financial assets
23
1,257
1,402
Current other assets
24
2,576
2,819
Current tax assets
Current securities
34
Cash and cash equivalents(1)
34
Assets and disposal group of assets classified as held for sale
6
Total assets(1)
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 08 °
1,110
860
1,551
1,788
10,143
6,590
54,948
50,565
1,148
1,779
111,133
105,782
Financial Statements 2016
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
Note
(In € million)
2016
2015
Equity and liabilities
Equity attributable to equity owners of the parent
773
785
Share premium
2,745
3,484
Retained earnings
4,987
6,316
(4,845)
(4,316)
Capital stock
Accumulated other comprehensive income
(3)
(303)
3,657
5,966
Treasury shares
Non-controlling interests
Total equity(2)
(5)
7
32
3,652
5,973
Non-current liabilities
Non-current provisions
22
10,826
9,871
Long-term financing liabilities
34
8,791
6,335
Non-current other financial liabilities
23
13,313
14,038
Non-current other liabilities
24
16,279
14,993
Deferred tax liabilities
15
1,292
1,200
288
263
50,789
46,700
6,143
5,209
Non-current deferred income
Current liabilities
Current provisions
22
Short-term financing liabilities
34
1,687
2,790
Trade liabilities(1)
21
12,532
10,864
Current other financial liabilities
23
5,761
5,021
Current other liabilities
24
27,535
27,037
1,126
908
917
1,049
55,701
52,878
991
231
Total liabilities(1)
107,481
99,809
Total equity and liabilities(1)
111,133
105,782
Current tax liabilities
Current deferred income
Disposal group of liabilities classified as held for sale
6
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted by € -899 million.
(2) As of 31 December 2016, the accumulated other comprehensive income, previously classified within equity relating to assets and disposal groups classified as held for sale,
amounts to € -56 million.
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements (IFRS).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 09 °
1
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
Note
(In € million)
Profit for the period attributable to equity owners of the parent (Net income)
Profit for the period attributable to non-controlling interests
Adjustments to reconcile profit for the period to cash provided by operating activities:
Interest income
Interest expense
Interest received
Interest paid
Income tax expense
Income tax paid
Depreciation and amortisation
Valuation adjustments
Results on disposals of non-current assets
Results of investments accounted for under the equity method
Change in current and non-current provisions
Contribution to plan assets
Change in other operating assets and liabilities:(1)
Inventories
Trade receivables
Trade liabilities(1)
Advance payments received
Other assets and liabilities
Customer financing assets
Customer financing liabilities
Cash provided by operating activities(1)(2)
Investments:
Purchases of intangible assets, property, plant and equipment, investment property
Proceeds from disposals of intangible assets, property, plant and equipment, investment property
Acquisitions of subsidiaries, joint ventures, businesses and non-controlling interests (net of cash)
Proceeds from disposals of subsidiaries (net of cash)
Payments for investments accounted for under the equity method, other investments
and other long-term financial assets
Proceeds from disposals of investments accounted for under the equity method,
other investments and other long-term financial assets
Dividends paid by companies valued at equity
Disposals of non-current assets and disposal groups classified as assets held for sale
and liabilities directly associated
Payments for investments in securities
Proceeds from disposals of securities
Cash (used for) investing activities
Increase in financing liabilities
Repayment of financing liabilities
Cash distribution to Airbus Group SE shareholders
Dividends paid to non-controlling interests
Changes in capital and non-controlling interests
Share buyback
Cash (used for) financing activities
Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
■
■
■
■
■
■
2016
2015
2,696
2
995
5
(247)
522
139
(378)
291
(559)
2,294
1,132
(1,870)
(231)
1,321
(290)
1,245
(3,477)
(1,215)
2,398
4,628
(837)
(202)
(50)
4,369
(183)
551
131
(388)
677
(595)
2,466
487
(234)
(1,016)
(54)
(217)
(1,432)
(4,133)
(1,378)
894
3,752
(417)
(193)
43
2,891
6
6
(3,060)
72
(120)
731
(2,924)
78
(13)
127
(691)
(258)
7
182
192
1,731
34
1,527
(2,280)
2,617
(830)
3,297
(1,725)
(1,008)
(4)
60
(736)
(116)
60
127
(7,151)
4,790
(3,459)
1,254
(262)
(945)
(3)
195
(264)
(25)
171
3,483
(422)
6,677
7,099
34
10,160
6,677
34
6
10,143
17
6,590
87
9
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
6
34
34
32
32
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents(1)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
(1)
(1)
thereof presented as cash and cash equivalents(1)
thereof presented as part of disposal groups classified as held for sale
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted accordingly
(cash and cash equivalents at 31 December 2015: € -899 million and at 31 December 2014: € -190 million; change in trade liabilities in 2015: € -709 million).
(2) The 2016 cash provided by operating activities has been positively impacted by certain agreements reached with Airbus’ suppliers relating to the settlement of claims and
negotiation on payment terms.
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements (IFRS).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 10 °
Financial Statements 2016
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
Equity attributable to equity holders of the parent
Accumulated other
comprehensive income
(In € million)
Capital
Share
Note stock premium
Balance at
1 January 2015
AvailableCash
for-sale
flow
Retained financial
assets hedges
earnings
Foreign
currency
translation Treasury
adjustments
shares
Noncontrolling Total
Total interests equity
785
4,500
2,989
670
(3,310)
1,435
(8)
7,061
18
7,079
Profit for the period
0
0
2,696
0
0
0
0
2,696
2
2,698
Other comprehensive
income
0
0
491
165
(3,554)
278
0 (2,620)
(29)
(2,649)
Total comprehensive
income of the period
0
0
3,187
165
(3,554)
278
0
76
(27)
49
Capital increase
32
3
115
0
0
0
0
0
118
24
142
Share-based payment
(IFRS 2)
30
0
0
29
0
0
0
0
29
0
29
Cash distribution
to Airbus Group SE
shareholders / dividends
paid to non-controlling
interests
32
0
(945)
0
0
0
0
0
(945)
(3)
(948)
0
0
61
0
0
0
0
61
(5)
56
Equity component
convertible bond
32
0
0
53
0
0
0
0
53
0
53
Change in treasury shares
32
0
0
(3)
0
0
0
(484)
(487)
0
(487)
Cancellation of treasury
shares
(3)
(186)
0
0
0
0
189
0
0
0
Balance at
31 December 2015
Equity transaction (IAS 27)
785
3,484
6,316
835
(6,864)
1,713
(303)
5,966
7
5,973
Profit for the period
0
0
995
0
0
0
0
995
5
1,000
Other comprehensive
income
0
0
(1,383)
(65)
(289)
(175)
0 (1,912)
10
(1,902)
Total comprehensive
income of the period
0
0
(388)
(65)
(289)
(175)
0
(917)
15
(902)
Capital increase
32
2
58
0
0
0
0
0
60
0
60
Share-based payment
(IFRS 2)
30
0
0
31
0
0
0
0
31
0
31
Cash distribution
to Airbus Group SE
shareholders / dividends
paid to non-controlling
interests
32
(4)
(1,012)
Equity transaction (IAS 27)
Change in treasury shares
Cancellation of treasury
shares
Balance at
31 December 2016
32
0
0
(1,008)
0
0
0
0 (1,008)
0
0
38
0
0
0
0
38
(23)
15
0
0
(2)
0
0
0
(511)
(513)
0
(513)
(14)
(797)
0
0
0
0
811
0
0
0
773
2,745
4,987
770 (7,153)
1,538
(3) 3,657
(5)
3,652
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements (IFRS).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 11 °
1
Chapter
2
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 12 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS
Consolidated Financial
Statements
2.1 Basis of Presentation
15
2.2 Airbus Structure
20
2.3 Segment Information
26
2.4 Airbus Performance
29
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
35
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefits
48
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
61
2.8 Other Notes
79
2.9 Appendix “Simplified Airbus Structure Chart” 83
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 13 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
CONTENTS
2.1 Basis of Presentation
15
20.
Inventories
40
1.
The Company
15
21.
Trade Receivables and Trade Liabilities
40
2.
Significant Accounting Policies
15
22.
3.
Key Estimates and Judgements
17
Provisions, Contingent Assets
and Contingent Liabilities
41
4.
Change in Accounting Policies
and Disclosures
18
Other Financial Assets and
Other Financial Liabilities
43
2.2 Airbus Structure
20
5.
Scope of Consolidation
20
6.
Acquisitions and Disposals
20
7.
Investments Accounted for under
the Equity Method
Related Party Transactions
8.
23.
24.
Other Assets and Other Liabilities
44
25.
Sales Financing Transactions
44
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefits
48
26.
Number of Employees
48
23
27.
Personnel Expenses
48
26
28.
Personnel-Related Provisions
48
29.
Post-Employment Benefits
48
2.3 Segment Information
26
30.
Share-Based Payment
54
9.
Segment Information
27
31.
Remuneration
57
2.4 Airbus Performance
29
10.
Revenues, Cost of Sales and Gross Margin
29
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial
Instruments
11.
Research and Development Expenses
30
32.
Total Equity
61
12.
Share of Profit from Investments Accounted
for under the Equity Method and Other
Income from Investments
33.
Capital Management
62
30
34.
Net Cash
63
13.
Other Income and Other Expenses
30
35.
Information about Financial Instruments
66
14.
Total Finance Costs
31
15.
Income Tax
31
16.
Earnings per Share
34
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities 35
17.
Intangible Assets
35
18.
Property, Plant and Equipment
37
19.
Other Investments and Other LongTerm Financial Assets
61
2.8 Other Notes
79
36.
Litigation and Claims
79
37.
Auditor Fees
82
38.
Events after the Reporting Date
82
2.9 Appendix “Simplified Airbus
Structure Chart”
83
39
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 14 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.1 Basis of Presentation
2.1 Basis of Presentation
1.
The Company
The accompanying IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
present the fi nancial position and the results of operations
of Airbus Group SE (the “Company”) and its subsidiaries, a
European Company (Societas Europaea (“SE”)) legally seated
in Amsterdam (current registered offi ce at Mendelweg 30,
2333 CS Leiden, The Netherlands, under number 24288945).
On 1 January 2017, the Company has been further integrated
by merging its Group structure with the commercial aircraft
activities of Airbus, with associated restructuring measures. In
this new set-up, the Company will retain Airbus Defence and
Space and Airbus Helicopters as Divisions. Airbus Group SE
will change its name to Airbus SE; the legal name change from
Airbus Group SE to Airbus SE is still subject to the approval of
2.
the Annual General Meeting due to be held on 12 April 2017.
Therefore, the Company together with its subsidiaries will be
referred to as “Airbus” and no longer as “the Group”. As a
consequence, the segment formerly known as Airbus will now
be referred to as “Airbus Commercial Aircraft”; there are no
changes to the segment reporting in 2016. The Company is
listed on the European stock exchanges in Paris, Frankfurt
am Main, Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia and Bilbao. The IFRS
Consolidated Financial Statements were authorised for issue
by the Company’s Board of Directors on 21 February 2017.
They are prepared and reported in euro (“€”) and all values are
rounded to the nearest million appropriately.
Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of preparation — Airbus’ Consolidated Financial
Statements are prepared in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”), issued by the
International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) as endorsed
by the European Union (“EU”) and with Part 9 of Book 2 of the
Netherlands Civil Code. When reference is made to IFRS, this
intends to be EU-IFRS. The Consolidated Financial Statements
have been prepared on a historical cost basis, unless otherwise
indicated.
Airbus describes the accounting policies applied in each of the
individual notes to the financial statements and avoids repeating
the text of the standard, unless this is considered relevant to
the understanding of the note’s content. The most significant
accounting policies are set out below:
Revenue recognition — Revenue is recognised to the extent
that it is probable that the economic benefit arising from the
ordinary activities of Airbus will flow to Airbus, that revenue
can be measured reliably and that the recognition criteria, for
each type of revenue-generating activity (sales of goods and
services and construction contracts), have been met. Revenue
is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or
receivable.
Revenues from the sale of commercial aircraft are
recognised when the aircraft is delivered, risks and rewards of
ownership have been transferred to the customer and revenues
can be measured reliably except for launch customer contracts
(see “Revenue from construction contracts”). Revenues from
sales of aircraft (and related cost of sales) always include the
engine component. Customers will generally benefi t from a
concession from the engine manufacturer, negotiated directly
between the customer and the engine manufacturer. When
reliable information exists, the engine prices considered in our
revenues (and cost of sales) reflect the effect of the concessions.
Revenue from construction contracts — Construction
contract accounting is applied for military programmes, space
projects as well as for launch customer contracts in the civil
aircraft business if customers have significantly influenced the
structural design and technology of the aircraft type under the
contract. As a result of certain airline customers’ increasing
involvement in the development and production process of the
A350 XWB programme, Airbus applies IAS 11 “Construction
contracts” to a fixed number of launch customer contracts of the
A350 XWB programme. When the outcome can be estimated
reliably, revenues and contract costs are recognised as revenue
and expensed respectively by reference to the percentage of
completion of the contract activity at the end of the reporting
period (“PoC method”). Contract revenues include the purchase
price agreed with the customer considering escalation formulas,
contract amendments and claims and penalties when assessed
as probable. The PoC method used depends on the contract.
The method is based either on inputs (i.e. costs incurred for
development contracts) or outputs (i.e. contractually agreed
technical milestones, delivered units).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 15 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.1 Basis of Presentation
Whenever the outcome of a construction contract cannot be
estimated reliably – for example during the early stages of a
contract or during the course of a contract’s completion –
all related contract costs that are incurred are immediately
expensed and revenues are recognised only to the extent of
those costs being recoverable (the “early stage”, also called
“zero profit margin” method of accounting) (see “– Note 3: Key
Estimates and Judgements”).
Provision for loss making contracts — Airbus records
provisions for loss making contracts when it becomes probable
that the total contract costs will exceed total contract revenues.
Before a provision for loss making contracts is recorded, the
related assets under construction are written-off. Loss making
sales contracts are identified by monitoring the progress of the
contract as well as the underlying programme and updating
the estimate of contract costs, which requires significant and
complex assumptions, judgements and estimates related to
achieving certain performance standards as well as estimates
involving warranty costs (see “– Note 3: Key Estimates and
Judgements”, “– Note 10: Revenues, Cost of Sales and Gross
Margin” and “– Note 22: “Provisions, Contingent Assets and
Contingent Liabilities”).
Research and development expenses — Research and
development activities can be either contracted or self-initiated.
The costs for contracted research and development activities,
carried out in the scope of externally financed research and
development contracts, are expensed when the related
revenues are recorded.
The costs for self-initiated research are expensed when
incurred. The costs for self-initiated development are
capitalised when:
■
■
■
■
the product or process is technically feasible and clearly
defined (i.e. the critical design review is finalised);
adequate resources are available to successfully complete
the development;
the benefi ts from the assets are demonstrated (a market
exists or the internal usefulness is demonstrated) and the
costs attributable to the projects are reliably measured;
Airbus intends to produce and market or use the developed
product or process and can demonstrate its profitability.
Income tax credits granted for research and development
activities are deducted from corresponding expenses or from
capitalised amounts when earned.
Development costs which are capitalised, are recognised
either as intangible assets or, when the related development
activities lead to the construction of specialised tooling for
production (“jigs and tools”), or involve the design, construction
and testing of prototypes and models, as property, plant and
equipment. Capitalised development costs are generally
amortised over the estimated number of units produced. If
the number of units produced cannot be estimated reliably,
capitalised development costs are amortised over the
estimated useful life of the internally generated intangible asset.
Amortisation of capitalised development costs is recognised
in cost of sales.
Inventories are measured at the lower of acquisition cost
(generally the average cost) or manufacturing cost and net
realisable value. Manufacturing costs comprise all costs that
are directly attributable to the manufacturing process, such as
direct material and labour, and production related overheads
(based on normal operating capacity and normal consumption
of material, labour and other production costs), including
depreciation charges. Net realisable value is the estimated
selling price in the ordinary course of the business less the
estimated costs to complete the sale. Inventories include work
in progress arising under construction contracts for which
revenues are recognised based on output methods.
Transactions in foreign currency, i.e. transactions in
currencies other than the functional currency of an Airbus
entity, are translated into the functional currency at the foreign
exchange rate prevailing at the transaction date. Monetary
assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the
end of the reporting period are remeasured into the functional
currency at the exchange rate in effect at that date. Except
when deferred in equity as qualifying cash flow hedges
(see “– Note 35: Information about Financial Instruments”),
these foreign exchange remeasurement gains and losses are
recognised, in line with the underlying item:
■
■
in the profi t before fi nance costs and income taxes if the
substance of the transaction is commercial (including sales
financing transactions); and
in the finance costs for financial transactions.
Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign
currencies that are stated at historical cost are translated
into functional currency at the foreign exchange rate in
effect at the date of the transaction. Translation differences
on non- monetary financial assets and liabilities that are
measured at fair value are reported as part of the fair value
gain or loss. However, translation differences of non-monetary
financial assets measured at fair value and classified
as available-for- sale are included in Accumulated other
comprehensive income (“AOCI”).
Hedge accounting — Most of Airbus’ revenues are
denominated in US dollar (“US$”), while a major portion of its
costs are incurred in euro. Airbus is significantly exposed to the
risk of changes in US$/€ exchange rates. Furthermore, Airbus is
exposed, though to a much lesser extent, to foreign exchange
risk arising from costs incurred in currencies other than the euro
and to other market risks such as interest rate risk, commodity
price and equity price risk.
In order to manage and mitigate those risks, Airbus enters into
derivative contracts. Airbus applies cash flow hedge accounting
to its derivative contracts whenever the relevant IFRS criteria
can be met. Hedge accounting ensures that derivative gains
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 16 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.1 Basis of Presentation
or losses are recognised in profi t or loss (mainly as part of
the revenue) in the same period that the hedged items or
transactions affect profit or loss.
which do not qualify for hedge accounting are accounted for
at fair value through profit and loss, any related gains or losses
being recognised in financial result.
The major portion of Airbus’ derivative contracts is accounted for
under the cash flow hedge model. The fair value hedge model is
used only for certain interest rate derivatives. Derivative contracts
Airbus’ hedging strategies and hedge accounting policies
are described in more detail in “– Note 35: Information about
Financial Instruments”.
3.
Key Estimates and Judgements
The preparation of Airbus’ Consolidated Financial Statements
requires the use of estimates and assumptions. In preparing
these fi nancial statements, management exercises its best
judgement based upon its experience and the circumstances
prevailing at that time. The estimates and assumptions are
based on available information and conditions at the end of
the financial period presented and are reviewed on an ongoing
basis. Key estimates and judgements that have a significant
influence on the amounts recognised in Airbus’ Consolidated
Financial Statements are mentioned below:
Airbus makes estimates and provides, across the programmes,
for costs related to in service technical issues which have
been identifi ed and for which solutions have been defi ned,
which reflects the latest facts and circumstances. Airbus is
contractually liable for the repair or replacement of the defective
parts but not for any other damages whether direct, indirect,
incidental or consequential (including loss of revenue, profit
or use). However, in view of overall commercial relationships,
contract adjustments may occur, and be considered on a case
by case basis.
Revenue recognition on construction contracts — The
PoC method is used to recognise revenue under construction
contracts. This method places considerable importance on
accurate estimates at completion as well as on the extent of
progress towards completion. For the determination of the
progress of the construction contract signifi cant estimates
include total contract costs, remaining costs to completion,
total contract revenues, contract risks and other judgements.
Estimates and judgements are subject to change based
on new information as contracts and related programmes
progress. Furthermore, the complex design and manufacturing
processes of Airbus’ industry require challenging integration
and coordination along the supply chain including an ongoing
assessment of suppliers’ assertions which may additionally
impact the outcome of these monitoring processes
(see “– Note 10: Revenues, Cost of Sales and Gross Margin”
and “– Note 22: Provisions, Contingent Assets and Contingent
Liabilities” for further information).
The management of the operating Divisions continually review
all estimates involved in such construction contracts and adjusts
them as necessary (see “– Note 21: Trade Receivables and
Trade Liabilities” for further information).
Provisions — The determination of provisions, for example for
contract losses, warranty costs, restructuring measures and
legal proceedings is based on best available estimates. Loss
making contracts are identified by monitoring the progress of
the contract as well as the underlying programme and updating
the estimate of contract costs, which also requires significant
judgement related to achieving certain performance standards
as well as estimates involving warranty costs. Depending on the
size and nature of Airbus’ contracts and related programmes,
the extent of assumptions, judgements and estimates in these
monitoring processes differs. In particular, the introduction
of commercial or military aircraft programmes (such as
the A350 XWB and the A400M) or major derivative aircraft
programmes particularly involves an increased level of estimates
and judgements associated with the expected development,
production and certifi cation schedules and expected cost
components.
Employee benefits — Airbus accounts for pension and other
post-retirement benefits in accordance with actuarial valuations.
These valuations rely on statistical and other factors in order to
anticipate future events. The actuarial assumptions may differ
materially from actual developments due to changing market
and economic conditions and therefore result in a significant
change in post-retirement employee benefit obligations and
the related future expense (see “– Note 29: Post-Employment
Benefits”).
Legal contingencies — Airbus companies are parties to
litigations related to a number of matters as described in
“– Note 36: Litigation and Claims”. The outcome of these matters
may have a material effect on the financial position, results
of operations or cash flows of Airbus. Management regularly
analyses current information about these matters and provides
provisions for probable cash outflows, including the estimate
of legal expenses to resolve the matters. Internal and external
lawyers are used for these assessments. In making the decision
regarding the need for provisions, management considers the
degree of probability of an unfavourable outcome and the ability
to make a sufficiently reliable estimate of the amount of loss.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 17 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.1 Basis of Presentation
The filing of a suit or formal assertion of a claim against Airbus
companies or the disclosure of any such suit or assertion, does
not automatically indicate that a provision may be appropriate.
Income taxes — Airbus operates and earns income in numerous
countries and is subject to changing tax laws in multiple
jurisdictions within these countries. Significant judgements are
necessary in determining the worldwide income tax liabilities.
Although management believes that it has made reasonable
estimates about the fi nal outcome of tax uncertainties, no
assurance can be given that the final tax outcome of these
matters will be consistent with what is reflected in the historical
income tax provisions. At each end of the reporting period,
Airbus assesses whether the realisation of future tax benefits
is probable to recognise deferred tax assets. This assessment
requires the exercise of judgement on the part of management
with respect to, among other things, benefits that could be
realised from available tax strategies and future taxable income,
as well as other positive and negative factors. The recorded
4.
amount of total deferred tax assets could be reduced, through
valuation allowances recognition, if estimates of projected future
taxable income and benefits from available tax strategies are
lowered, or if changes in current tax regulations are enacted
that impose restrictions on the timing or extent of Airbus’ ability
to utilise future tax benefits. The basis for the recoverability test
of deferred tax assets is the same as Airbus’ latest five year
operative planning also taking into account certain qualitative
aspects regarding the nature of the temporary differences.
Qualitative factors include but are not limited to an entity’s
history of planning accuracy, performance records, business
model, backlog, existence of long-term contracts as well as the
nature of temporary differences (see “– Note 15: Income Tax”).
Other subjects that involve assumptions and estimates are
further described in the respective notes (see “– Note 6:
Acquisitions and Disposals”, “– Note 17: Intangible Assets” and
“– Note 21: Trade Receivables and Liabilities”.
Change in Accounting Policies and Disclosures
The accounting policies applied by Airbus for preparing its 2016 year-end Consolidated Financial Statements are the same as
applied for the previous year. Amendments and improvements to standards effective on 1 January 2016 have no impact on the
Consolidated Financial Statements.
New, Revised or Amended IFRS Standards and Interpretations Issued but not yet Applied
A number of new or revised standards, amendments and improvements to standards as well as interpretations are not yet effective
for the year ended 31 December 2016 and have not been applied in preparing these Consolidated Financial Statements and
early adoption is not planned:
IASB effective date for
annual reporting periods
beginning on or after
Endorsement status
IFRS 9 “Financial instruments”
1 January 2018
Endorsed
IFRS 15 “Revenue from contracts with customers”
1 January 2018
Endorsed
Clarifications to IFRS 15 “Revenue from contracts with customers”
1 January 2018
Not yet endorsed
Standards and amendments
Amendments to IFRS 10 and IAS 28 “Sale or contribution of assets between
an investor and its associate or joint venture”
-
Not yet endorsed
Amendment to IAS 7 “Disclosure initiative”
1 January 2017
Not yet endorsed
Amendments to IFRS 2 “Classification and measurement of share-based
payment transactions”
1 January 2018
Not yet endorsed
IFRIC 22 “Foreign currency transactions and advance consideration”
1 January 2018
Not yet endorsed
IFRS 16 “Leases”
1 January 2019
Not yet endorsed
IFRS 9 “Financial Instruments”
IFRS 9, published in July 2014, replaces the existing guidance in
IAS 39 “Financial instruments: recognition and measurement”.
IFRS 9 includes revised guidance on the classifi cation and
measurement of financial instruments, including a new expected
credit loss model for calculating impairment on financial assets,
and the new general hedge accounting requirements. It also
carries forward the guidance on recognition and derecognition
of financial instruments from IAS 39.
An assessment of the materiality of IFRS 9 impact on Airbus’
Financial Statements is currently being performed.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 18 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.1 Basis of Presentation
IFRS 15 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers”
On May 2014, the IASB issued IFRS 15 which establishes a
single comprehensive framework for determining when to
recognise revenue and how much revenue to recognise. IFRS 15
will replace the current revenue recognition standards IAS 18
“Revenue” and IAS 11 “Construction contracts” and related
interpretations when it becomes effective.
Airbus has completed an initial qualitative assessment of the
potential impact of the adoption of IFRS 15 on its consolidated
financial statements.
Revenue recognition should depict the transfer of control of the
goods and services to the customer. IFRS 15 will require Airbus to
identify the different performance obligations it assumes under a
contract, and account for them separately based on their relative
stand-alone selling prices. For all contracts, including long-term
construction contracts currently accounted for under the PoC
method, Airbus will only be able to recognise revenue once
certain conditions providing evidence that control of a good
or service has transferred to the customer are met. IFRS 15
introduces three criteria among which control is transferred over
time and as a result revenue could be recognised over time:
(i) customer simultaneously receives and consumes the
benefits provided by the entity’s performance as the entity
performs;
(ii) the entity’s performance creates or enhances an asset that
the customer controls as the asset is created or enhanced;
(iii) the entity’s performance does not create an asset with
alternative use to the entity and the entity has enforceable
right to payment to performance completed to date.
The current signifi cant accounting policies (see “– Note 2:
Significant Accounting Policies”) will be impacted by IFRS 15,
as follows:
Sales of commercial aircraft – Revenue will be recognised
once the customer is controlling the aircraft. In most of the
cases, the physical delivery of the aircraft results in the transfer
of control to the customer. Airbus does not expect any change
in the timing of the revenue recognition of commercial aircraft.
The assessment of the impact on the measurement of the
revenue is still ongoing specifically on the concessions granted
by some of Airbus’ suppliers to Airbus’ customers and on
potential impact of significant financing component.
Construction contracts – This notion is not maintained under
IFRS 15. Airbus has been analysing its major construction
contracts (see “– Note 2: Significant Accounting Policies”) and
may conclude for some of them that the criteria stated under
the criteria (ii) and/or (iii) criteria above are not fulfilled. In such
case, revenue and related production costs will be recognised
at the delivery of each separate performance obligation instead
of over the contract using a single margin.
In certain circumstances, the standard considers work in
progress to be controlled by the customer, in which case it would
be inappropriate for an entity to recognise work in progress
as an asset on its balance sheet. As a result, Airbus will use a
method which will reflect the over time transfer of control when
sold assets have no alternative use to the final customer. The
assessment of the quantitative impact of the implementation
of the new revenue standard is still ongoing.
Transition – Airbus plans to adopt IFRS 15 in its consolidated
financial statements for the year ending 31 December 2018,
using the retrospective approach.
The implementation of IFRS 15 will generate more extensive
disclosures in the financial statements (i.e. backlog based on
contract transaction price).
IFRS 16 “Leases”
IFRS 16 introduces a single, on-balance lease sheet accounting
model for lessees. A lessee recognises a right-of-use asset
representing its right to underlying asset and a lease liability
representing its obligation to make lease payments.
Airbus does not expect significant change on current financial
leases and on the current accounting recognition of its actual
leases when Airbus is acting as a lessor.
The assessment of the materiality of IFRS 16 impact on
operating leases on Airbus’ Financial Statements is currently
being performed.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 19 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.2 Airbus Structure
2.2 Airbus Structure
5.
Scope of Consolidation
Consolidation — Airbus’ Consolidated Financial Statements
include the financial statements of Airbus Group SE and all
material subsidiaries controlled by Airbus. Airbus’ subsidiaries
prepare their financial statements at the same reporting date
as Airbus’ Consolidated Financial Statements (see Appendix
“Simplified Airbus Structure Chart”).
Subsidiaries are entities controlled by Airbus including so-called
Structured Entities (“SE”) which are created to accomplish a
narrow and well-defined objective (see “– Note 25: Sales
Financing Transactions”). They are fully consolidated from the
date control commences to the date control ceases.
The assessment of the control of SE is performed in three steps.
In a first step, Airbus identifies the relevant activities of the SE
(which may include managing lease receivables, managing the
sale or re-lease at the end of the lease and managing the sale
or re-lease on default) and in a second step, Airbus assesses
which activity is expected to have the most significant impact
on the SE’s return. Finally, Airbus determines which party or
parties control this activity.
Airbus’ interests in equity-accounted investees comprise
investments in associates and joint ventures. Investments in
associates and in joint ventures are accounted for using the
equity method and are initially recognised at cost.
The financial statements of Airbus’ investments in associates
and joint ventures are generally prepared for the same reporting
period as for the parent company. Adjustments are made where
necessary to bring the accounting policies and accounting
periods in line with those of Airbus.
PERIMETER OF CONSOLIDATION
31 December
Number of companies
2016
2015
Fully consolidated entities
244
262
Investments accounted for using the equity method:
■
in joint ventures
52
■
in associates
23
19
319
334
Total
53
For more details related to unconsolidated and consolidated SE, please see “– Note 25: Sales Financing Transactions”.
6.
Acquisitions and Disposals
Business combinations are accounted for using the
acquisition method, as at the acquisition date, which is the
date on which control is transferred to Airbus.
using appropriate valuation techniques which are generally
based on a forecast of the total expected future net cash
flows.
The determination of the fair value of the acquired assets
and the assumed liabilities which are the basis for the
measurement of goodwill requires significant estimates.
Land, buildings and equipment are usually independently
appraised while marketable securities are valued at market
prices. If any intangible assets are identified, depending on
the type of intangible asset and the complexity of determining
its fair value, Airbus either consults with an independent
external valuation expert or develops the fair value internally,
These evaluations are linked closely to the assumptions made
by management regarding the future performance of the
assets concerned and the discount rate applied.
Loss of control, loss of joint control, loss of significant
influence — Upon loss of control of a subsidiary, the assets
and liabilities and any components of Airbus’ equity related
to the subsidiary are derecognised. Any gain or loss arising
from the loss of control is recognised within other income
or other expenses in the Consolidated Income Statement.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 20 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.2 Airbus Structure
If Airbus retains any interest in the previous subsidiary, such
interest is measured at fair value at the date the control is lost.
Assets and liabilities of a material subsidiary for which a loss of
control is highly probable are classified as assets and liabilities
held for sale when Airbus has received suffi cient evidence
that the loss of control will occur in the 12 months after the
classification. These assets and liabilities are presented after
elimination of intercompany transactions.
When the loss of significant influence or the loss of joint control
of an investment accounted under the equity method is highly
probable and will occur in the coming 12 months, this associate
or joint venture is classified as an asset held for sale.
Sale of investment in an associate or joint venture — Any
gain or loss arising from the disposal of investment accounted
for under the equity method is recognised within share of profit
from investments accounted for under the equity method.
6.1
Acquisitions
On 9 March 2016, Airbus Commercial Aircraft acquired 100% of
the shares of the Navtech Inc. Group (“Navtech”), a leading
global provider of flight operations solutions, and has recognised
goodwill of € 104 million. The one year window period for the
completion of the purchase price allocation will end on 9 March
2017.
Navtech provides aviation services with a suite of flight
operations products, aeronautical charts, navigation data
solutions, flight planning, aircraft performance and crew planning
solutions. Navtech generates annual revenues of approximately
US$ 40 million and employs over 250 employees, mainly based
in Waterloo (Canada) and in Hersham and Cardiff (UK).
There were no material acquisitions in 2015.
6.2
Disposals
On 17 June 2015, Airbus Commercial Aircraft signed an
agreement with Singapore-based ST Aerospace Ltd. (“STA”)
to offer passenger-to-freighter (“P2F”) conversion solutions for
its A320 and A321 aircraft. Elbe Flugzeugwerke’s (“EFW”),
Dresden (Germany), assets and liabilities were classified as
disposal groups held for sale as of 31 December 2015. On
4 January 2016, STA acquired an additional 20% of the shares
by way of a contribution in kind and a capital increase to EFW,
and consequently, Airbus lost the control of EFW. Airbus
retains 45% of the shares of EFW with significant influence.
Airbus Commercial Aircraft has recognised in other income a
€ 19 million gain during the year.
On 2 June 2016, Airbus DS Holding SAS (France) and Astrium
International Holdings B.V. (Netherlands), as beneficiaries, and
a French private equity firm, Apax Partners, closed the sale
of the business communications entities. The assets and
liabilities of these entities were previously classified as disposal
groups held for sale. The gain resulting from this transaction of
€ 146 million was recognised in other income (reported in Airbus
Defence and Space Division).
On 25 March 2015, Airbus sold 1,612,407 Dassault Aviation
shares, corresponding to 17.5% of the Dassault Aviation’s share
capital, of which 460,688 shares (5%) were sold to Dassault
Aviation for € 980 per share and 1,151,719 shares (12.5%) were
sold to institutional investors at € 1,030 per share. On 14 April
2015, Airbus sold an additional 115,172 shares (1.25%) to
institutional investors at € 1,030 per share.
As of 31 March 2015, the remaining equity investment in
Dassault Aviation with the carrying amount of € 1,320 million
was classified as an asset held for sale (reported in
“Other / HQ / Conso.”) as Airbus intends to pursue market
opportunities to sell the remainder of this investment. Prior
to the reclassification, the carrying amount included the
Airbus interest in Dassault Aviation’s first quarter 2015 result
and a negative catch-up on 2014 of € -119 million.
In 2015, Airbus recognised € 748 million (€ 697 million in share of
profit from investments accounted for under the equity method
and € 51 million in other income) representing the net capital
gain on partial disposal after transaction costs.
On 14 June 2016, Airbus Group SAS sold approximately
1.33 million shares in Dassault Aviation, around 62% to
institutional investors and 38% to Dassault Aviation, at a
price of € 950 per share. The total gain on these transactions
amounted to € 528 million recognised in other income (reported
in “Other / HQ / Conso.”).
The remaining investment, representing 10% of Dassault
Aviation’s share capital, is now classified as other investments
and measured at fair value (see “– Note 19: Other Investments
and Other Long-Term Financial Assets”). The resulting gain
of € 340 million is recognised in other income (reported in
“Other / HQ /Conso.”). Previously, the investment in Dassault
Aviation was classified as asset held for sale.
The Company also issued bonds exchangeable in Dassault
Aviation shares (see “– Note 34: Net Cash”). In the event of
exchange in full of the bonds, Airbus will have fully disposed of
its Dassault Aviation stake.
On 14 January 2015, Airbus and Safran completed the first phase
of the integration process of Airbus Safran Launchers (“ASL”)
enabling the entity to become operational. Coordination and
programme management of the civil activities of the launcher
business as well as relevant participations were transferred
to ASL.
Airbus received 50% of issued shares in ASL initially recognised
at € 56 million as at-equity investment. The loss of control in
the business resulted in a capital gain of € 49 million, which is
reported in Airbus Defence and Space Division in other income.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 21 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.2 Airbus Structure
On 16 June 2015, ASL, the French state and the Centre
National d’Études Spatiales (“CNES”), the French space
agency, reached an agreement to transfer CNES’s stake in
Arianespace to ASL, which was authorised on 20 July 2016
by the European Commission. On 12 August 2015, ASL was
awarded the Ariane 6 development contract by the European
Space Agency (“ESA”).
Airbus and Safran finalised the respective contribution balance
sheet in the third quarter 2016 in alignment with the provision
of the Master Agreement. On 31 December 2016, the transfer
of the 34.68% of CNES’s stake in Arianespace to ASL was
completed. ASL holds 74% of the shares of Arianespace. This
change in the shareholder mix at Arianespace fi nalises the
creation of a new launcher governance in Europe.
On 20 May 2016, Airbus and Safran signed the second phase
of the Master Agreement enabling the joint venture to be
fully equipped for all design, development, production and
commercial activities related to civil and military launchers and
associated propulsion systems. During the second phase,
Safran and Airbus integrated within the joint venture all the
remaining contracts, assets and industrial resources, related
to space launchers and associated propulsion systems.
On 30 June 2016, Airbus contributed the second phase
assets and liabilities in exchange for shares issued by Airbus
Safran Launchers Holding, and also sold additional assets
in exchange for € 750 million in cash. Airbus participation in
ASL accounted for at-equity amounts to € 677 million. The
loss of control in the business resulted in a capital gain of
€ 1,175 million recognised in other income (reported in Airbus
Defence and Space Division).
The allocation of the purchase price is currently ongoing at
ASL level and is expected to be finalised during the one year
window period ending on 30 June 2017. As a result of this
preliminary allocation, € 7 million depreciation expense net of
tax was recognised during the year 2016.
6.3
On 20 August 2015, Airbus Defence and Space GmbH,
Rohde & Schwarz GmbH und Co. KG, Thales Electronic
Systems GmbH and Northrop Grumman Litef GmbH sold
their shares in Elektroniksystem und Logistik GmbH (“ESG”)
to E-Sicherheitsbeteiligungen GmbH. Airbus recognised a
€ 59 million gain in share of profit from investments accounted
for under the equity method, which is reported in Airbus Defence
and Space Division. The assets and liabilities of this company
were classified as held for sale as at 31 December 2014.
On 1 October 2015, Airbus sold its shares in its fully owned
subsidiary Cimpa SAS to Sopra Steria Group. The € 72 million
gain on this disposal is recognised in other income.
Assets and Disposal Groups Classified as Held for Sale
As of 31 December 2016, Airbus accounted for assets and
disposal groups of assets classified as held for sale in the
amount of € 1,148 million (2015: € 1,779 million). Disposal group
of liabilities classified as held for sale as of 31 December
2016 amount to € 991 million (2015: € 231 million). The assets
and disposal groups classified as held for sale are related to
the defence electronics companies and Atlas Elektronik GmbH
(“Atlas”).
business, a leading global provider of mission-critical sensors,
integrated systems and services for premium defence and
security applications mainly based in Ulm (Germany). Such
divestment is part of the strategic review of the Airbus Defence
and Space business portfolio. The transaction is expected to
be closed within 12 months of the date of the agreement. The
assets and liabilities relative to this disposal group have been
classified as held for sale since 31 March 2016.
On 18 March 2016, Airbus reached an agreement with affiliates
of KKR & Co. L.P. (the acquirer) to sell its defence electronics
On 20 December 2016, Airbus signed a sale purchase agreement
to sell to Thyssen Krupp its 49% stake in Atlas.
The assets and disposal group of assets and liabilities classified as held for sale consist of:
31 December
2016
2015
13
1,253
Other non-current assets
354
269
Inventory
428
75
Trade receivables
247
84
(In € million)
Non-current financial assets
Other assets
89
11
Cash and cash equivalents
17
87
1,148
1,779
559
69
6
0
Assets and disposal group of assets classified as held for sale
Provisions
Non-current financial liabilities
Trade liabilities
85
0
Other liabilities
341
162
Disposal group of liabilities classified as held for sale
991
231
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 22 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.2 Airbus Structure
6.4
Cash Flows from Disposals including Assets and Disposal Groups Classified as Held for Sale
The following chart provides details on cash flow from disposals (resulting in assets and liabilities disposed) of subsidiaries, joint
ventures and businesses:
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Total selling price received by cash and cash equivalents
2,273
277
Cash and cash equivalents included in the disposed subsidiaries
Total
(15)
(23)
2,258
254
The aggregate cash flow from disposals of subsidiaries and assets and disposals groups classified as held for sales in 2016 results
mainly from the completion of the creation of ASL, the sale of Dassault Aviation shares and the sale of business communication
entities.
The aggregate cash flow from disposals of subsidiaries and assets and disposals groups classified as held for sales in 2015 results
mainly from the sale of CIMPA, the partial sale of Dassault Aviation share and the completion of the first phase of the creation of ASL.
7.
Investments Accounted for under the Equity Method
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Investments in joint ventures
1,437
1,264
Investments in associates
Investments accounted for under the equity method
7.1
171
62
1,608
1,326
Investments in Joint Ventures
The joint ventures in which Airbus holds interests are structured in separate incorporated companies. Under joint arrangement
agreements, unanimous consent is required from all parties to the agreement for all relevant activities. Airbus and its partners
have rights to the net assets of these entities through the terms of the contractual agreements.
Airbus’ interests in its joint ventures, being accounted for under the equity method, are stated in aggregate in the following table:
(In € million)
Airbus’ interest in equity on investee at beginning of the year
(1)
2016
2015
1,264
885
595
179
Result from continuing operations attributable to Airbus
182
243
Other comprehensive income attributable to Airbus
(93)
46
Dividends received during the year
(195)
(89)
Reclassification as asset held for sale
(198)
0
Deconsolidation of investment
(112)
0
New joint ventures
(6)
0
1,437
1,264
Others
Carrying amount of the investment at 31 December
(1) In 2016, it includes the impact of the completion of the second phase of the ASL creation (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
Airbus’ individually material joint ventures are ASL, Paris (France), MBDA S.A.S., Paris (France), and GIE ATR, Blagnac (France),
as parent companies of their respective groups. These joint venture companies are not publicly listed.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 23 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.2 Airbus Structure
ASL is a 50% joint venture between Airbus and Safran. ASL is
the head company in a group comprising several subsidiaries
and affiliates, all leading companies in their fields, such as: APP,
Arianespace, Cilas, Eurockot, Eurocryospace, Europropulsion,
Nuclétudes, Pyroalliance, Regulus, Sodern and Starsem.
ASL inherits a rich portfolio of products and services, enabling
it to deliver innovative and competitive solutions to numerous
customers around the world.
GIE ATR is manufacturing advanced turboprop aircraft. It is
a 50% joint venture between Alenia Aermacchi, a Leonardo
(formerly Finmeccanica) group company and Airbus. Both Alenia
Aermacchi and Airbus provide airframes which are assembled
by GIE ATR in France. The members of ATR GIE are legally
entitled to the whole benefits and are liable for the commitments
of the Company. GIE ATR is obliged to transfer its cash to each
member of the joint venture.
Airbus held a 37.5% stake in MBDA at 31 December 2016 and
2015, which is a joint venture between Airbus, BAE Systems
and Leonardo (formerly Finmeccanica). MBDA offers missile
systems capabilities that cover the whole range of solutions
for air dominance, ground-based air defence and maritime
superiority, as well as advanced technological solutions for
battlefield engagement.
Atlas was a joint venture of Thyssen Krupp and Airbus (which at
31 December 2015 held a 49% stake). As of 31 December 2015,
it was also considered an individually material joint venture.
Following the signature of the sale purchase agreement, its
remaining equity investment has been reclassified as asset held
for sale (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
The following table summarises financial information for ASL, MBDA and GIE ATR based on their Consolidated Financial Statements
prepared in accordance with IFRS:
ASL
MBDA
GIE ATR
(In € million)
2016
2015
2016
2015
2016
2015
Revenues
2,227
1,215
2,955
2,875
1,651
1,760
(35)
0
(92)
(86)
(18)
(50)
Interest income
2
0
8
2
0
1
Interest expense
(2)
0
(3)
(15)
(3)
(2)
Depreciation and amortisation
Income tax expense
(40)
5
(66)
(74)
(3)
0
Profit from continuing operations
102
(8)
213
218
331
340
(4)
0
(215)
65
14
16
356
Other comprehensive income
Total comprehensive income (100%)
98
(8)
(2)
283
345
Non-current assets
5,324
229
2,339
2,010
147
94
Current assets
5,518
1,652
6,425
5,384
814
639
thereof cash and cash equivalents
Non-current liabilities
thereof non-current financial liabilities
(excluding trade and other payables and provisions)
Current liabilities
thereof current financial liabilities
(excluding trade and other payables and provisions)
Total equity (100%)
Equity attributable to equity owners of the parent
Non-controlling interests
797
21
1,890
1,420
7
5
526
11
1,357
1,249
98
111
35
0
7
9
0
0
6,511
1,669
7,119
5,811
407
159
333
10
122
26
0
0
3,805
201
288
334
456
463
3,797
201
288
334
456
463
8
0
0
0
0
0
ASL
MBDA
(In € million)
2016
2015
Airbus’ interest in equity on investee
1,899
101
255
0
(1,479)
(49)
Goodwill
PPA adjustments, net of tax
2016
GIE ATR
2015
2016
2015
108
125
228
232
282
282
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fair value adjustments and modifications
for differences in accounting policies
0
0
(14)
(13)
0
0
Elimination of downstream inventory
2
(1)
0
0
(4)
0
677
51
376
394
224
232
Carrying amount of the investment
at 31 December
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 24 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.2 Airbus Structure
The development of these investments is as follows:
ASL
(In € million)
2016
MBDA
GIE ATR
2015
2016
2015
2016
2015
Airbus’ interest in equity on investee at beginning
of the year
51
0
394
306
232
118
Result from continuing operations attributable to Airbus
38
(4)
80
84
166
170
Other comprehensive income attributable to Airbus
(2)
0
(82)
28
7
8
0
0
(16)
(24)
(177)
(64)
590
55
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
(4)
0
677
51
376
394
224
232
Dividends received during the year
Changes in consolidation
Others
Carrying amount of the investment
at 31 December
Airbus’ share of contingent liabilities of MBDA as of 31 December 2016 is € 455 million (2015: € 399 million).
7.2
Investments in Associates
Airbus’ interests in associates, being accounted for under the equity method, are stated in aggregate in the following table:
2016
2015(1)
Airbus’ interest in equity on investee at beginning of the year
62
77
Result from continuing operations attributable to Airbus
49
40
Other comprehensive income attributable to Airbus
(27)
(29)
Dividends received during the year
(10)
(10)
(3)
(16)
(In € million)
Disposal of shares
Changes in consolidation(2)
100
0
Carrying amount of the investment at 31 December
171
62
(1) In 2015, excluding the individually material investment in Dassault Aviation, reclassified during the year to assets held for sale (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
(2) In 2016, it includes the change in consolidation method of EFW.
The cumulative unrecognised comprehensive loss amounts for these associates to € -108 million and € -117 million as of
31 December 2016 and 2015, respectively (thereof € +9 million for the period).
2
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 25 °
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.3 Segment Information
8.
Related Party Transactions
(In € million)
Sales of goods
and services
and other
income
Purchases of
goods and
services and
other expense
Receivables
due as of
31 December
Payables
due as of
31 December
Other
liabilities /
Loans
received as of
31 December
2016
Total transactions with associates
Total transactions with joint ventures
11
55
4
9
85
1,904
488
1,213
203
815
2015
Total transactions with associates
Total transactions with joint ventures
7
40
96
4
79
1,771
121
1,850
14
544
Transactions with unconsolidated subsidiaries are immaterial
to Airbus’ Consolidated Financial Statements.
A part of the shares in Dassault Aviation was sold back to
Dassault Aviation during 2016 and 2015 (for more details, see
“– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
As of 31 December 2016, Airbus granted guarantees of
€ 152 million to Air Tanker group in the UK (2015: € 503 million).
For information regarding the funding of Airbus’ pension plans,
which are considered as related parties, please see “– Note 29:
“Post-Employment Benefits”.
The information relative to compensation and benefits granted
to Members of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors
are disclosed in “– Note 31: Remuneration”.
2.3 Segment Information
Airbus operates in three reportable segments which reflect the
internal organisational and management structure according to
the nature of the products and services provided.
■
■
Airbus Commercial Aircraf t (formerly Airbus) —
Development, manufacturing, marketing and sale of
commercial jet aircraft of more than 100 seats; aircraft
conversion and related services; development, manufacturing,
marketing and sale of regional turboprop aircraft and aircraft
components.
Airbus Helicopters — Development, manufacturing,
marketing and sale of civil and military helicopters; provision
of helicopter related services.
■
Airbus Defence and Space — Military combat aircraft
and training aircraft; provision of defence electronics and of
global security market solutions such as integrated systems
for global border security and secure communications
solutions and logistics; training, testing, engineering and other
related services; development, manufacturing, marketing
and sale of missiles systems; development, manufacturing,
marketing and sale of satellites, orbital infrastructures and
launchers; provision of space related services; development,
manufacturing, marketing and sale of military transport aircraft
and special mission aircraft and related services.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 26 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.3 Segment Information
9.
Segment Information
The following table presents information with respect to Airbus’ business segments. As a rule, inter-segment transfers are carried
out on an arm’s length basis. Inter-segment sales predominantly take place between Airbus Commercial Aircraft and Airbus
Defence and Space and between Airbus Helicopters and Airbus Commercial Aircraft. The holding function of Airbus, the Airbus
Group Bank and other activities not allocable to the reportable segments, combined together with consolidation effects, are
disclosed in the column “Other / HQ / Conso.”.
Airbus uses EBIT as a key indicator of its economic performance.
Business segment information for the year ended the 31 December 2016 is as follows:
(In € million)
Total revenues
Internal revenues
Revenues
Profit before finance costs
and income taxes (EBIT)
thereof:
Airbus
Commercial
Airbus
Aircraft Helicopters
49,237
6,652
Airbus
Defence
Total
and Space segments
11,854
67,743
Other /
HQ /
Conso.
Consolidated
57
67,800
(646)
(448)
(118)
(1,212)
(7)
(1,219)
48,591
6,204
11,736
66,531
50
66,581
1,543
308
(93)
1,758
500
2,258
■
depreciation and amortisation
(1,568)
(183)
(483)
(2,234)
(60)
(2,294)
■
research and development expenses
(2,147)
(327)
(332)
(2,806)
(164)
(2,970)
■
■
share of profit from investments
accounted for under the equity method
additions to other provisions
185
6
41
232
(1)
231
1,395
693
3,700
5,788
311
6,099
Interest result
(275)
Other financial result
(692)
Income taxes
(291)
Profit for the period
1,000
Business segment information for the year ended the 31 December 2015 is as follows:
(In € million)
Total revenues
Internal revenues
Revenues
Profit before finance costs
and income taxes (EBIT)
Airbus
Commercial
Airbus
Aircraft Helicopters
Airbus
Defence
Total
and Space segments
Other /
HQ /
Conso.
Consolidated
45,854
6,786
13,080
65,720
296
66,016
(764)
(633)
(163)
(1,560)
(6)
(1,566)
45,090
6,153
12,917
64,160
290
64,450
2,287
427
736
3,450
612
4,062
thereof:
■
depreciation and amortisation
(1,608)
(159)
(654)
(2,421)
(45)
(2,466)
■
research and development expenses
(2,702)
(325)
(344)
(3,371)
(89)
(3,460)
■
■
share of profit from investments
accounted for under the equity method
179
4
159
342
674
1,016
additions to other provisions
897
616
2,009
3,522
263
3,785
Interest result
(368)
Other financial result
(319)
Income taxes
(677)
Profit for the period
2,698
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 27 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.3 Segment Information
Segment capital expenditures
(In € million)
2016
2015
Airbus Commercial Aircraft
2,304
2,001
Airbus Helicopters
236
280
Airbus Defence and Space
469
552
Other / HQ / Conso.
Total capital expenditures(1)
51
91
3,060
2,924
(1) Excluding expenditure for leased assets.
31 December
Segment assets
(In € million)
Airbus Commercial Aircraft
2016
2015
51,457
47,857
Airbus Helicopters
10,104
10,172
Airbus Defence and Space
16,457
19,388
1,709
738
79,727
78,155
Other / HQ / Conso.
Total segment assets
Unallocated
8,667
7,619
Securities
11,448
11,639
Cash and cash equivalents(1)
10,143
6,590
Deferred and current tax assets
Assets classified as held for sale
Total assets
1,148
1,779
111,133
105,782
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted by € -899 million.
The revenues by geographical areas are disclosed in “– Note 10: Revenues, Cost of Sales and Gross Margin”. The property, plant
and equipment by geographical areas is disclosed in “– Note 18: Property, Plant and Equipment”.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 28 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.4 Airbus Performance
2.4 Airbus Performance
10. Revenues, Cost of Sales and Gross Margin
Revenues
Revenues are mainly comprised of sales of goods and services, as well as revenues associated with construction contracts
accounted for under the PoC method, contracted research and development and customer financing.
2016
(In € million)
2015
Revenues from construction contracts
10,956
9,860
Other revenues(1)
55,625
54,590
66,581
64,450
9,045
8,328
Total(2)
thereof service revenues including sale of spare parts
(1) Includes mainly revenues from sales of commercial aircraft recognised under IAS 18.
(2) For more details, please see “– Note 9: Segment Information”.
Revenues increased by 3.3%, mainly at Airbus Commercial
Aircraft, mostly driven by a positive volume effect and a
favourable foreign exchange impact. Deliveries increased to
688 aircraft (635 in the previous year). Airbus Defence and
Space revenues decreased mainly due to perimeter changes for
defence activities (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”)
and include revenues related to the A400M programme of
€ 1,702 million (2015: € 1,648 million).
Revenues by geographical areas based on the location of the customer are as follows:
2016
2015
Europe
21,377
20,060
Asia – Pacific
21,266
18,755
North America
8,931
10,217
Middle East
8,464
8,612
Latin America
4,925
4,096
Other countries
1,618
2,710
66,581
64,450
(In € million)
Total
Cost of Sales and Gross Margin
Cost of sales increased by 10.3%. The increase was primarily
due to business growth at Airbus Commercial Aircraft, the higher
net charge related to A400M programme for € 2,210 million
(in 2015: € 290 million) and to A350 XWB programme for
€ 385 million (in 2015: € 0 million).
Inventories recognised as an expense during the period amount
to € 47,835 million (in 2015: € 45,289 million).
The gross margin decreased by € -3,587 million to € 5,264 million
compared to € 8,851 million in 2015, resulting in a gross margin
rate decrease from 13.7% to 7.9%. Included are net charges
recorded in 2016, as mentioned above.
In 2016, Airbus Commercial Aircraft has delivered 49 A350 XWB
aircraft, including to 7 new customers.
To reflect expected lower revenues escalation, increased
learning curve costs and delivery phasing, Airbus Commercial
Aircraft recorded a net charge of € 385 million on A350 XWB
loss making contracts in the second quarter 2016.
The industrial ramp-up is progressing and associated risks
continue to be closely monitored in line with the schedule, aircraft
performance and overall cost envelope, as per customer’s
commitment. Despite the progress made, challenges remain
with the ramp-up acceleration and recurring costs convergence.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 29 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.4 Airbus Performance
17 A400M aircraft were delivered during 2016. Acceptance
activities of one additional aircraft were finalised at the end of
December 2016, but transfer of title only took place on 1 January
2017 (corresponding revenues will be recognised in 2017). In
total, 38 aircraft have now been delivered to the customer as
of 31 December 2016.
Industrial efficiency and military capabilities remain a challenge
for the A400M programme and furthermore, the EASA
Airworthiness Directive, linked to the Propeller Gear Box (“PGB”)
on the engine, and various PGB quality issues have strongly
impacted the customer delivery programme.
The first major development milestone of the mission capability
roadmap defined with customers earlier in 2016 was successfully
completed in June with certification and delivery of “MSN 33”,
the ninth aircraft for the French customer, however achievement
of contractual technical capabilities remains challenging.
In the first half-year 2016, management reviewed the programme
evolution and estimated contract result incorporating the
implications at this time of the revised engine programme
and its associated recovery plan, technical issues related to
the aluminium alloy used for some parts within the aircraft,
recurring cost convergence issues, an updated assumption
of export orders during the launch contract phase and finally
some delays, escalation and cost overruns in the development
programme. During the second half-year 2016, the programme
encountered further challenges to meet military capabilities and
management reassessed the industrial cost of the programme,
now including an estimation of the commercial exposure. As a
result of these reviews, Airbus Defence and Space has recorded
a charge of € 2,210 million in 2016 (thereof € 1,026 million in
the first half-year 2016). This represents the current best
management assessment. Challenges remain on meeting
contractual capabilities, securing sufficient export orders in
time, cost reduction and commercial exposure, which could
be significant. Given the order of magnitude on the cumulative
programme loss, the Board of Directors has mandated the
management to re-engage with customers to cap the remaining
exposure.
The A400M contractual SOC 1, SOC 1.5 and SOC 2 milestones
remain to be achieved. SOC 1 fell due end October 2013,
SOC 1.5 fell due end December 2014, and SOC 2 end of
December 2015. The associated termination rights became
exercisable by OCCAR on 1 November 2014, 1 January 2016,
and 1 January 2017, respectively. Management judges that
it is highly unlikely that any of these termination rights will be
exercised.
11. Research and Development Expenses
Research and development expenses decreased by 14.2% primarily reflecting R&D activities on the A350 XWB programme at
Airbus Commercial Aircraft. In addition, an amount of € 311 million of development costs has been capitalised, mainly related to
the H160 and A350 XWB programmes.
12. Share of Profit from Investments Accounted for under
the Equity Method and Other Income from Investments
2016
(In € million)
2015
Share of profit from investments in joint ventures
182
243
Share of profit from investments in associates(1)
49
773
231
1,016
21
54
Share of profit from investments accounted for under the equity method
Other income from investments
(1) In 2015, it includes a significant impact from the investment in Dassault Aviation. For more details, please see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 30 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.4 Airbus Performance
13. Other Income and Other Expenses
Other income increased by € +2,215 million. This increase
is mainly due to the capital gain of € 1,175 million following
the completion of the creation of ASL, the capital gain of
€ 146 million from the sale of the business communications
entities, the capital gain from the sale of Dassault Aviation shares
of € 528 million and the revaluation at fair value of the remaining
investment in Dassault Aviation for € 340 million (see “– Note 6:
Acquisitions and Disposals”).
Other expenses increased to € -254 million compared to
€ -222 million in 2015.
14. Total Finance Costs
Interest income derived from Airbus’ asset management and lending activities is recognised as interest accrues, using the
effective interest rate method.
(In € million)
Interest on European Government refundable advances
2016
2015
(212)
(280)
(63)
(88)
(275)
(368)
Change in fair value measurement of financial instruments
(370)
(119)
Foreign exchange translation of monetary items
(220)
(74)
Unwinding of discounted provisions
(65)
(101)
Others
(37)
(25)
Total other financial result
(692)
(319)
Total
(967)
(687)
Others
Total interest result(1)
(1) In 2016, the total interest income amounts to € 247 million (in 2015: € 183 million) for financial assets which are not measured at fair value through profit or loss. For financial
liabilities which are not measured at fair value through profit or loss € -522 million (in 2015: € -551 million) are recognised as total interest expenses. Both amounts are calculated
by using the effective interest method.
15. Income Tax
The expense for income taxes is comprised of the following:
(In € million)
Current tax expense
Deferred tax benefit (expense)
Total
2016
2015
(753)
(661)
462
(16)
(291)
(677)
In 2016, € 15 million of current tax income (in 2015: € 42 million) and € -13 million of deferred tax expense (in 2015: € -56 million)
relate to prior years.
Main income tax rates and main changes impacting Airbus:
Countries
2016
2017
> 2017
Netherlands
25.00%
25.00%
25.00%
France(1)
34.43%
34.43%
34.43%
Germany
30.00%
30.00%
30.00%
Spain
25.00%
25.00%
25.00%
UK(2)
20.00%
19.00%
18.00%
(1) A tax law has been enacted in December 2016 changing the rate for income taxes from 34.43% to 28.92% as of 1 January 2020.
(2) 20% from 1 April 2015 until 31 March 2017, 19% from 1 April 2017 until 31 March 2020 and 17% from 1 April 2020.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 31 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.4 Airbus Performance
The following table shows a reconciliation from the theoretical income tax (expense) using the Dutch corporate tax rate to the
reported income tax (expense):
(In € million)
2016
Profit before income taxes
1,291
3,375
25.0%
25.0%
Expected (expense) for income taxes
(323)
(844)
Effects from tax rate differentials
(194)
(329)
580
412
* Corporate income tax rate
Income from investments / associates(1)
2015
73
66
(117)
(90)
Change in valuation allowances
(102)
96
Non-deductible expenses and tax-free income
(208)
12
Reported tax (expense)
(291)
(677)
Tax credit
Change of tax rate
(1) In 2016, it includes the impact of the completion of the second phase of the ASL creation and the impact from the sale of shares of Dassault Aviation, both subject to specific
tax treatment. In 2015, it includes the impact of the partial sale of shares of Dassault Aviation subject to specific tax treatment. For more details, see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and
Disposals”.
Changes in valuation allowances represent reassessments of the recoverability of deferred tax assets based on future taxable
profits of certain companies mainly for Airbus Commercial Aircraft and Airbus Defence and Space in Germany. The amount of
change in valuation allowances of € -102 million in 2016 (2015: € 96 million) excludes a positive impact of € 2 million (2015: € 1 million)
from a change in tax rates which is presented in the line “change of tax rate”.
As Airbus controls the timing of the reversal of temporary
differences associated with its subsidiaries (usually referred to as
“outside basis differences”) arising from yet undistributed profits
and changes in foreign exchange rates, it does not recognise
a deferred tax liability. For temporary differences arising from
investments in associates Airbus recognises deferred tax
liabilities. The rate used reflects the assumptions that these
differences will be recovered from dividend distribution unless
a management resolution for the divestment of the investment
exists at the closing date. For joint ventures, Airbus assesses its
ability to control the distribution of dividends based on existing
shareholder agreements and recognises deferred tax liabilities
accordingly.
As of 31 December 2016, the aggregate amount of temporary
differences associated with investments in subsidiaries,
branches and associates and interests in joint arrangements,
for which deferred tax liabilities have not been recognised,
amounts to € 104 million.
Companies in defi cit situations in two or more subsequent
years recorded a total deferred tax asset balance of € 1 million
(in 2015: € 52 million). Assessments show that these deferred
tax assets will be recovered in future through either (i) own
projected profits, or (ii) profits of other companies integrated in
the same fiscal group (“régime d’intégration fiscale” in France,
“steuerliche Organschaft” in Germany) or (iii) via the “loss
surrender-agreement” in the UK.
Deferred taxes on net operating losses (“NOL”), trade tax loss carry forwards and tax credit carry forwards:
(In € million)
NOL
France
Germany
Spain
UK
Other
countries
31 December
2016
31 December
2015
958
1,565
307
1,809
270
4,909
6,503
Trade tax loss carry forwards
0
1,510
0
0
0
1,510
1,955
Tax credit carry forwards
0
0
392
54
14
460
323
330
462
470
361
83
1,706
1,849
(9)
(268)
(149)
(51)
(9)
(486)
(423)
321
194
321
310
74
1,220
1,426
Tax effect
Valuation allowances
Deferred tax assets on NOL’s
and tax credit carry forwards
NOLs, capital losses and trade tax loss carry forwards are indefinitely usable in France, Germany, the UK and Spain. In Spain,
R&D tax credit carry forwards still expire after 18 years. The first tranche of tax credit carry forwards (€ 1 million) will expire in
2020. No deferred tax has been recognised for this tranche.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 32 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.4 Airbus Performance
Roll forward of deferred taxes:
(In € million)
2016
2015
Net deferred tax asset at beginning of the year
5,559
4,587
Deferred tax benefit (expense) in income statement
Deferred tax recognised directly in AOCI (IAS 39)
Deferred tax on remeasurement of the net defined benefit pension plans
(16)
(7)
1,112
365
(235)
(114)
111
6,265
5,559
Others
Net deferred tax asset at 31 December
462
Details of deferred taxes recognised cumulatively in equity are as follows:
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
(97)
(86)
2,612
Available-for-sale investments
Cash flow hedges
2,616
Deferred tax on remeasurement of the net defined benefit pension plans
1,678
1,313
Total
4,197
3,839
Deferred income taxes as of 31 December 2016 are related to the following assets and liabilities:
1 January 2016
(In € million)
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investments and other long-term
financial assets
Inventories
Receivables and other assets
Prepaid expenses
Provision for retirement plans
Deferred
tax
assets
Deferred
tax
liabilities
Other movements
Movement through
income statement
31 December 2016
OCI /
IAS 19
Others(1)
R&D
tax
credits
Deferred
tax
assets
Deferred
tax benefit
(expense)
Deferred
tax
liabilities
53
(538)
0
16
0
(71)
70
(610)
832
(1,353)
0
8
0
(130)
741
(1,384)
186
(157)
(10)
(46)
0
(82)
197
(306)
1,333
(752)
0
111
0
(879)
1,140
(1,327)
837
(2,615)
(4)
21
0
2,601
2,007
(1,167)
3
(1)
0
0
0
(1)
1
0
1,519
0
393
(77)
0
(415)
1,420
0
Other provisions
1,999
(627)
0
14
0
1,055
3,876
(1,435)
Liabilities
4,007
(440)
1
(71)
0
(1,400)
4,785
(2,688)
Deferred income
NOLs and tax credit carry forwards
Deferred tax assets (liabilities)
before offsetting
Valuation allowances
on deferred tax assets
98
(74)
0
(7)
0
17
105
(71)
1,849
0
0
(91)
81
(133)
1,706
0
12,716
(6,557)
380
(122)
81
562
16,048
(8,988)
(600)
0
(22)
(15)
(58)
(100)
(795)
0
Set-off
(5,357)
5,357
0
0
0
0
(7,696)
7,696
Net deferred tax assets (liabilities)
6,759
(1,200)
358
(137)
23
462
7,557
(1,292)
(1) “Others” mainly comprises changes in the consolidation scope and foreign exchange rate effects.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 33 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.4 Airbus Performance
Deferred income taxes as of 31 December 2015 are related to the following assets and liabilities:
1 January 2015
(In € million)
Deferred
tax
assets
Intangible assets
Property, plant and equipment
Investments and other long-term
financial assets
Inventories
Receivables and other assets
Prepaid expenses
Deferred
tax
liabilities
Other movements
Movement through
income statement
31 December 2015
OCI /
IAS 19
R&D
tax
credits
Deferred
tax
assets
Others(1)
Deferred
tax benefit
(expense)
Deferred
tax
liabilities
50
(475)
0
(1)
0
(59)
53
(538)
490
(1,355)
0
(10)
0
354
832
(1,353)
332
(167)
(35)
80
0
(181)
186
(157)
1,219
(457)
0
(8)
0
(173)
1,333
(752)
397
(2,267)
(115)
(1)
0
208
837
(2,615)
2
0
0
0
0
0
3
(1)
Provision for retirement plans
1,897
0
(235)
13
0
(156)
1,519
0
Other provisions
2,422
(498)
0
(2)
0
(550)
1,999
(627)
Liabilities
2,335
(871)
1,389
1
0
713
4,007
(440)
53
(22)
0
0
0
(7)
98
(74)
2,080
0
0
82
(51)
(262)
1,849
0
11,277
(6,112)
1,004
154
(51)
(113)
12,716
(6,557)
Deferred income
NOLs and tax credit carry forwards
Deferred tax assets (liabilities)
before offsetting
Valuation allowances
on deferred tax assets
(578)
0
(127)
8
0
97
(600)
0
Set-off
(4,982)
4,982
0
0
0
0
(5,357)
5,357
Net deferred tax assets (liabilities)
5,717
(1,130)
877
162
(51)
(16)
6,759
(1,200)
(1) “Others” mainly comprises changes in the consolidation scope and foreign exchange rate effects.
16. Earnings per Share
2016
2015
Profit for the period attributable to equity owners of the parent (Net income)
€ 995 million
€ 2,696 million
Weighted average number of ordinary shares
773,798,837
785,621,099
€ 1.29
€ 3.43
Basic earnings per share
Diluted earnings per share – Airbus’ categories of dilutive
potential ordinary shares are Stock Option Plan (“SOP”),
share-settled Performance Units relating to Long-Term
Incentive Plans (“LTIP”) and the convertible bond issued
on 1 July 2015. The last SOP expired in December 2016. During
2016, the average price of the Company’s shares exceeded
the exercise price of the share-settled Performance Units
and therefore 287,807 shares (in 2015: 359,335 shares) were
considered in the calculation of diluted earnings per share. The
dilutive effect of the convertible bond was also considered in
the calculation of diluted earnings per share in 2016, by adding
back € 7 million of interest expense to the profit for the period
attributable to equity owners of the parent (2015: € 3 million)
and by including 5,022,990 of dilutive potential ordinary shares
(2015: 2,511,495 shares).
Profit for the period attributable to equity owners of the parent (Net income)
Weighted average number of ordinary shares (diluted)(1)
Diluted earnings per share
(1) Dilution assumes conversion of all potential ordinary shares.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 34 °
2016
2015
€ 1,002 million
€ 2,699 million
779,109,634
788,491,929
€ 1.29
€ 3.42
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
17. Intangible Assets
Intangible assets comprise (i) goodwill (see “– Note 5: Scope of Consolidation”), (ii) capitalised development costs (see “– Note 2:
“Significant Accounting Policies”) and (iii) other intangible assets, e.g. internally developed software and acquired intangible assets.
Intangible assets with finite useful lives are generally amortised on a straight-line basis over their respective estimated useful lives
(3 to 10 years) to their estimated residual values.
Intangible assets as of 31 December 2016 and 2015 comprise the following:
31 December 2016
(In € million)
Goodwill
Capitalised development costs
Other intangible assets
Total
1 January 2016
Gross
amount
Amortisation /
Impairment
Net book
value
Gross
amount
Amortisation /
Impairment
Net book
value
10,498
(1,073)
9,425
10,995
(1,088)
9,907
2,871
(1,164)
1,707
2,686
(1,027)
1,659
3,399
(2,463)
936
3,375
(2,386)
989
16,768
(4,700)
12,068
17,056
(4,501)
12,555
Net Book Value
(In € million)
Balance at
Changes in
Balance at
1 January Exchange
consolidation
Amortisation / 31 December
2016 differences Additions
scope Reclassification(1) Disposals(1)
2016
Impairment
Goodwill
9,907
(11)
89
52
(102)
(510)
0
9,425
Capitalised
development
costs
1,659
(38)
311
3
(19)
0
(209)
1,707
Other intangible
assets
Total
989
10
199
21
(15)
(26)
(242)
936
12,555
(39)
599
76
(136)
(536)
(451)
12,068
(1) Includes intangible assets from entities disposed and reclassified to assets of disposal groups classified as held for sale (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
(In € million)
Balance at
Changes in
1 January Exchange
consolidation
2015 differences Additions
scope Reclassification(1)
Amortisation /
Disposals
Impairment
Balance at
31 December
2015
Goodwill
9,979
60
0
0
(107)
(25)
0
9,907
Capitalised
development
costs
1,688
20
154
0
0
0
(203)
1,659
Other intangible
assets
1,091
17
211
0
(37)
(11)
(282)
989
12,758
97
365
0
(144)
(36)
(485)
12,555
Total
(1) Includes intangible assets from entities reclassified to assets of disposal groups classified as held for sale (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
Development Costs
Airbus has capitalised development costs in the amount of € 1,707 million as of 31 December 2016 (€ 1,659 million as of 31 December
2015) as internally generated intangible assets mainly for the Airbus Commercial Aircraft A350 XWB (€ 808 million) and A380
(€ 336 million) programmes. The amortisation for the A380 and A350 XWB programmes development costs is performed on a
unit of production basis.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 35 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Impairment Tests
Airbus assesses at each end of the reporting period whether
there is an indication that a non-fi nancial asset or a Cash
Generating Unit (“CGU”) to which the asset belongs may be
impaired. In addition, intangible assets with an indefinite useful
life, intangible assets not yet available for use and goodwill are
tested for impairment in the fourth quarter of each financial year
irrespective of whether there is any indication for impairment.
An impairment loss is recognised in the amount by which the
asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. For
the purpose of impairment testing any goodwill is allocated to
the CGU or group of CGUs in a way that reflects the way goodwill
is monitored for internal management purposes.
The discounted cash flow method is used to determine the
recoverable amount of a CGU or the group of CGUs to which
goodwill is allocated. The discounted cash flow method
is particularly sensitive to the selected discount rates and
estimates of future cash flows by management. Discount rates
are based on the weighted average cost of capital (“WACC”)
for the groups of cash-generating units. The discount rates
are calculated based on a risk-free rate of interest and a
market risk premium. In addition, the discount rates reflect the
current market assessment of the risks specific to each group
of cash-generating units by taking into account specific peer
group information on beta factors, leverage and cost of debt.
Consequently, slight changes to these elements can materially
affect the resulting valuation and therefore the amount of a
potential impairment charge.
These estimates are influenced by several assumptions
including growth assumptions of CGUs, availability and
composition of future defence and institutional budgets, foreign
exchange fluctuations or implications arising from the volatility
of capital markets. Cash flow projections take into account past
experience and represent management’s best estimate about
future developments.
As of 31 December 2016 and 2015, goodwill was allocated to CGUs or group of CGUs, which is summarised in the following
schedule:
Airbus
Commercial
Aircraft
Airbus
Helicopters
Goodwill as of 31 December 2016
6,873
Goodwill as of 31 December 2015
6,759
(In € million)
Airbus
Defence
and Space
Other / HQ
308
2,230
14
9,425
299
2,835
14
9,907
Consolidated
The goodwill mainly relates to the creation of Airbus in 2000 and the Airbus Combination in 2001.
General Assumptions Applied in the Planning
Process
The basis for determining the recoverable amount is the value
in use of the CGUs. Generally, cash flow projections used for
Airbus’ impairment testing are based on operative planning.
The operative planning, which covers a planning horizon of five
years, used for the impairment test, is based on the following
key assumptions which are relevant for all CGUs:
■
■
■
increase of expected future labour expenses of 2% (2015: 2%);
future interest rates projected per geographical market, for
the European Monetary Union, the UK and the US;
future exchange rate of 1.25 US$/€ (2015: 1.25 US$/€) to
convert in euro the portion of future US dollar which are not
hedged;
Airbus follows an active policy of foreign exchange risk hedging.
As of 31 December 2016, the total hedge portfolio with maturities
up to 2023 amounts to US$ 102 billion (US$ 102 billion as of
31 December 2015) and covers a major portion of the foreign
exchange exposure expected over the period of the operative
planning (2017 to 2021). The average US$/€ hedge rate of
the US$/€ hedge portfolio until 2023 amounts to 1.25 US$/€
(previous year: 1.28 US$/€) and for the US$/£ hedge portfolio
until 2022 amounts to 1.49 US$/£ (previous year: 1.58 US$/£).
For the determination of the operative planning in the CGUs,
management assumed future exchange rate of 1.25 US$/€ from
2017 onwards to convert in euro the portion of future US dollar
which are not hedged.
General economic data derived from external macroeconomic
and financial studies has been used to derive the general key
assumptions.
In addition to these general planning assumptions, the following
additional CGU specific assumptions, which represent
management’s current best assessment as of the date of these
Consolidated Financial Statements, have been applied in the
individual CGUs.
Airbus Commercial Aircraft
■
The planning takes into account the decision to ramp-up
A320 programme deliveries progressively to a maximum of
60 aircraft per month. A330 deliveries are now at rate 6 as
Airbus Commercial Aircraft transitions for the introduction of
the first A330 Neo from 2018. The A350 XWB delivery rate
increases to 10 aircraft per month from the end of 2018 whilst
A380 deliveries are expected to reduce to 12 deliveries per
year from 2018.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 36 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
■
■
■
■
In the absence of long-term financial reference, expected cash
flows generated beyond the planning horizon are considered
through a terminal value.
Long-term commercial assumptions in respect of market
share, deliveries and market value are based on General
Market Forecast updated in 2016. The development of market
share per segment considers enlargement of the competition
as per current best assessment. Current market evolutions
are considered through sensitivities.
Due to the huge hedge portfolio, the carrying value and the
planned cash flows of the CGU Airbus Commercial Aircraft
are materially influenced.
Cash flows are discounted using a euro weighted WACC of
6.9% (2015: 8.4%).
Airbus Helicopters
■
■
■
■
Airbus Defence and Space
After a successful restructuring and portfolio review, Airbus
Defence and Space’s focus for the planning period is to increase
business and profitability while implementing a growth strategy
to pave the way for future upsides.
■
■
The planning takes into account the ramp-up of our medium
segment driven by the H135 which has been certifi ed in
2015 and the H175, the continuing deliveries of NH90 and
a continuous growth of our support and services activity.
In the absence of long-term financial reference, expected
cash flows generated beyond the planning horizon are
considered through a terminal value. The terminal value
reflects management’s assessment of a normative operating
year based on an outlook of a full aeronautic cycle over the
next decade.
Long-term commercial assumptions in respect of market
share, deliveries and market value are based on the helicopter
market forecast considering the decrease of last three years
in the civil and parapublic market partially driven by decrease
of investment in oil and gas, needs of helicopter fleet renewal
and growth markers and the increase of Airbus Helicopters
market share in this environment. Current market evolutions
are considered through sensitivities.
Cash flows are discounted using a euro weighted WACC of
6.7% (2015: 8.2%).
■
■
■
The planning period is characterised by a strong forecasted
order intake across Military Aircraft and Space Systems.
The major products driving significant growth are A400M
programme, including export contracts, Combat aircraft,
Tankers, satellites and Services.
Airbus Defence and Space assumes a further increase
in profi tability over the planning period, driven by higher
programme performance and cost savings.
Airbus Defence and Space’s Free Cash Flow target is also
expected to grow leveraging on a solid cash generation from
current contracts and businesses as well as future order
intakes (Military Aircraft, Satellites, Communication Intelligence
and Security) and improvement on the A400M programme.
Cash flows are discounted using a euro weighted WACC of
6.5% (2015: 8.0%).
18. Property, Plant and Equipment
Property, plant and equipment is valued at acquisition or manufacturing costs less accumulated depreciation and impairment
losses. Items of property, plant and equipment are generally depreciated on a straight-line basis. The following useful lives are
assumed:
Buildings
10 to 50 years
Site improvements
6 to 30 years
Technical equipment and machinery
3 to 20 years
Jigs and tools(1)
5 years
Other equipment, factory and office equipment
2 to 10 years
(1) If more appropriate, jigs and tools are depreciated using the number of production or similar units expected to be obtained from the tools (sum-of-the-units method).
For details on assets related to lease arrangements on sales financing, please see “– Note 25: Sales Financing Transactions”.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 37 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Property, plant and equipment as of 31 December 2016 and 2015 comprise the following:
31 December 2016
Gross
amount
(In € million)
Land, leasehold improvements and buildings
including buildings on land owned by others
Depreciation /
Impairment
1 January 2016
Net book
value(1)
Gross
amount
Depreciation /
Impairment
Net book
value(1)
9,444
(4,252)
5,192
9,518
(4,349)
5,169
Technical equipment and machinery
20,331
(12,076)
8,255
20,296
(11,946)
8,350
Other equipment, factory and office
equipment(2)
3,933
(2,939)
994
4,324
(3,290)
1,034
Construction in progress
2,472
0
2,472
2,574
0
2,574
36,180
(19,267)
16,913
36,712
(19,585)
17,127
Total
(1) Includes the net book value of aircraft under operating lease (see “– Note 25: Sales Financing Transactions”).
(2) Buildings, technical equipment and other equipment accounted for in fixed assets under finance lease agreements for net amounts to € 356 million (2015: € 364 million).
Net Book Value
(In € million)
Balance at
Changes in
Balance at
1 January Exchange
consolidation
Depreciation / 31 December
2016 differences Additions
scope Reclassification(1) Disposals(1)
2016
Impairment
Land, leasehold
improvements
and buildings
including
buildings on land
owned by others
5,169
(61)
67
(3)
349
(37)
(292)
5,192
Technical
equipment
and machinery
8,350
(263)
531
20
1,059
(137)
(1,305)
8,255
Other equipment,
factory and office
equipment
1,034
(5)
419
2
109
(351)
(214)
994
Construction
in progress
2,574
(88)
1,788
1
(1,615)
(188)
0
2,472
17,127
(417)
2,805
20
(98)
(713)
(1,811)
16,913
Total
(1) Includes property, plant and equipment from entities disposed and reclassified to assets of disposal groups classified as held for sale (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
(In € million)
Balance at
Changes in
1 January Exchange
consolidation
Depreciation /
2015 differences Additions
scope Reclassification(1) Disposals(1)
Impairment
Balance at
31 December
2015
Land, leasehold
improvements
and buildings
including
buildings on land
owned by others
4,808
33
339
0
372
(79)
(304)
5,169
Technical
equipment and
machinery
8,246
154
508
0
869
(154)
(1,273)
8,350
Other equipment,
factory and office
equipment
1,162
38
377
0
0
(199)
(344)
1,034
Construction
in progress
Total
2,105
24
1,811
0
(1,366)
0
0
2,574
16,321
249
3,035
0
(125)
(432)
(1,921)
17,127
(1) Includes property, plant and equipment from entities disposed and reclassified to assets of disposal groups classified as held for sale (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and Disposals”).
In 2016, Airbus capitalised € 5 million of borrowing cost on the production of qualifying assets (2015: € 8 million). Airbus’ borrowing
rate at the end of 2016 was 1.46% (2015: 2.06%).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 38 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Property, Plant and Equipment by Geographical Areas
31 December
(In € million)
2016
France
7,263
7,035
Germany
4,348
4,294
UK
2,472
3,015
Spain
1,636
1,560
Other countries
1,078
1,105
16,797
17,009
Property, plant and equipment by geographical areas(1)
2015
(1) Property, plant and equipment by geographical areas excludes leased assets of € 116 million (2015: € 118 million).
Off-Balance Sheet Commitments
Commitments related to property, plant and equipment
comprise contractual commitments for future capital
expenditures and contractual commitments for purchases of
“Land, leasehold improvements and buildings including buildings
on land owned by others” (€ 310 million as of 31 December 2016
compared to 2015 of € 320 million).
Future nominal operating lease payments (for Airbus as a
lessee) for rental and lease agreements not relating to aircraft
sales fi nancing amount to € 768 million as of 31 December
2016 (2015: € 844 million), and relate mainly to procurement
operations (e.g. facility leases).
Maturities as of 31 December 2016 and 31 December 2015 are as follows:
31 December
2016
(In € million)
2015
Not later than 1 year
159
158
Later than 1 year and not later than 5 years
397
393
Later than 5 years
212
293
Total
768
844
19. Other Investments and Other Long-Term Financial Assets
31 December
(In € million)
2016
Other investments
2,091
1,232
Other long-term financial assets
1,564
1,260
3,655
2,492
522
178
4,177
2,670
Total non-current other investments and other long-term financial assets
Current portion of other long-term financial assets
Total
Other investments mainly comprise Airbus’ participations.
The increase is mainly due to the reclassifi cation in other
investments (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and D isposals”) of
the remaining investment in Dassault Aviation (Airbus share:
10%) amounting to € 876 million as of 31 December 2016. Other
significant participations at 31 December 2016 include AviChina
(Airbus share: 5.0%, 2015: 5.0%) amounting to € 180 million
(2015: € 199 million) and CARMAT SAS (Airbus share: 22.4%,
2015: 24.2%) amounting to € 38 million (2015: € 43 million).
2015
Other long-term financial assets and the current portion of
other long-term financial assets encompass other loans in the
amount of € 1,147 million and € 717 million as of 31 December
2016 and 2015, and the sales finance activities in the form of
finance lease receivables and loans from aircraft financing (see
“– Note 25: Sales Financing Transactions”).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 39 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
20. Inventories
31 December 2016
(In € million)
Gross amount
Raw materials and manufacturing supplies
Write-down
Net book value
3,288
(508)
2,780
27,304
(6,246)
21,058
Finished goods and parts for resale
3,374
(624)
2,750
Advance payments to suppliers
3,155
(55)
3,100
37,121
(7,433)
29,688
Work in progress
Total
31 December 2015
(In € million)
Gross amount
Write-down
Net book value
3,229
(476)
2,753
20,435
Raw materials and manufacturing supplies
Work in progress
25,585
(5,150)
Finished goods and parts for resale
3,134
(779)
2,355
Advance payments to suppliers
3,559
(51)
3,508
35,507
(6,456)
29,051
Total
The increase in work in progress of € +623 million is driven by
Airbus Commercial Aircraft mainly associated with A350 XWB
ramp-up, partly offset by a decrease in Airbus Defence and
Space, mainly related to the reclassification of defence
electronics entities to disposal groups classified as held for
sale and the creation of ASL (see “– Note 6: Acquisitions and
Disposals”). It is also related to a decrease in work in progress
for the A400M programme reflecting the netting of inventories
with the respective portion of the loss making contracts
provision (see “– Note 22: Provisions, Contingent Assets and
Contingent Liabilities”). Finished goods and parts for resale
increased by € +395 million, primarily at Airbus Commercial
Aircraft. Advance payments to suppliers decreased at Airbus
Defence and Space, mostly due to the creation of ASL.
Write-downs for inventories are recorded when it becomes
probable that total estimated contract costs will exceed total
contract revenues. In 2016, write-downs of inventories in the
amount of € -306 million (2015: € -410 million) are recognised
in cost of sales, whereas reversal of write-downs amounts
to € 217 million (2015: € 66 million). At 31 December 2016
€ 9,374 million of work in progress and € 2,301 million of finished
goods and parts for resale were carried at net realisable value.
21. Trade Receivables and Trade Liabilities
Trade receivables arise when Airbus provides goods or
services directly to a customer with no intention of trading
the receivable. Trade receivables include claims arising from
revenue recognition that are not yet settled by the debtor as
well as receivables relating to construction contracts. Trade
receivables are initially recognised at their transaction price
and are subsequently measured at amortised cost less any
allowance for impairment. Gains and losses are recognised in
the Consolidated Income Statement when the receivables are
derecognised or impaired as well as through the amortisation
process.
Allowance for doubtful accounts involves significant
management judgement and review of individual receivables
based on individual customer creditworthiness, current
economic trends including potential impacts from the EU
sovereign debt crisis and analysis of historical bad debts.
Assets and liabilities relative to constructions contracts —
In the construction contract business, an asset or liability is
classified as current when the item is realised or settled within
Airbus’ normal operating cycle for such contracts and as noncurrent otherwise. As a result, assets and liabilities relating to
the construction contract business such as trade receivables
and payables and receivables from PoC method, that are settled
as part of the normal operating cycle are classified as current
even when they are not expected to be realised within 12 months
after the reporting period.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 40 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Trade Receivables
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Receivables from sales of goods and services
8,366
8,153
(265)
(276)
8,101
7,877
1,153
1,819
Allowance for doubtful accounts
Total
thereof trade receivable not expected to be collected within 1 year
The trade receivables increased by € +224 million, mainly in
Airbus Commercial Aircraft.
In application of the PoC method, as of 31 December 2016
an amount of € 2,882 million (in 2015: € 2,936 million) for
construction contracts is included in the trade receivables net
of related advance payments received.
The aggregate amount of costs incurred and recognised
profits (less recognised losses) to date amounts to
€ 73,017 million (in 2015: € 71,813 million).
The gross amount due from customers for contract work,
on construction contracts recognised under the PoC method,
is the net amount of costs incurred plus recognised profits less
the sum of recognised losses and progress billings. In 2016, it
amounts to € 7,887 million (in 2015: € 9,190 million). Due to the
nature of certain contracts and the respective recognition of
revenues, these incurred costs also include associated work
in progress and respective contract losses.
The gross amount due to customers for contract work on
construction contracts recognised under the PoC method, is
the net amount of costs incurred plus recognised profits less the
sum of recognised losses and progress billings for all contracts
in progress for which progress billings exceed costs incurred
plus recognised profits (less recognised losses). In 2016, the
gross amount due to customers amounts to € 87 million (in
2015: € 77 million).
The respective movement in the allowance for doubtful accounts in respect of trade receivables during the year was as follows:
(In € million)
Allowance balance at beginning of the year
2016
2015
(276)
(289)
Foreign currency translation adjustment
(1)
0
Utilisations / disposals
39
15
(Additions)
Allowance balance at 31 December
(27)
(2)
(265)
(276)
Trade Liabilities
As of 31 December 2016, trade liabilities amounting to € 133 million (2015: € 129 million) will mature after more than one year.
22. Provisions, Contingent Assets and Contingent Liabilities
2
Provisions — The determination of provisions, for example for
contract losses, warranty costs, restructuring measures and
legal proceedings is based on best available estimates.
In general, as the contractual and technical parameters to be
considered for provisions in the aerospace sector are rather
complex, uncertainty exists with regard to the timing and
amounts of expenses to be taken into account.
The majority of other provisions are generally expected to result
in cash outflows during the next 1 to 12 years.
31 December
(In € million)
2016
Provision for pensions (Note 29)
8,656
7,615
Other provisions (Note 22)
8,313
7,465
16,969
15,080
Total
thereof non-current portion
thereof current portion
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 41 °
2015
10,826
9,871
6,143
5,209
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Movements in other provisions during the year were as follows:
Reclassification /
Change in
consolidated
group
Additions
Balance at
1 January
2016
Exchange
differences
Increase
from
passage
of time
356
(3)
0
2,787
(1,196)
(674)
(119)
1,151
2,431
2
0
1,099
(219)
(967)
(186)
2,160
Aircraft financing risks(1)
618
21
40
50
(14)
(66)
(55)
594
Obligation from services
and maintenance
agreements
600
8
14
138
0
(134)
(35)
591
Warranties
385
2
2
87
(40)
(73)
(24)
339
1,020
(In € million)
Contract losses
Outstanding costs
Personnel-related
provisions(2)
Used
Released
Balance at
31 December
2016
1,145
(1)
1
615
(80)
(538)
(122)
Litigation and claims(3)
130
0
0
39
3
(14)
(36)
122
Asset retirement
161
(1)
6
2
1
(1)
(2)
166
1,639
(4)
2
1,282
(105)
(523)
(121)
2,170
7,465
24
65
6,099
(1,650)
(2,990)
(700)
8,313
Other risks and charges
Total
(1) See “– Note 25: Sales Financing Transactions”.
(2) See “– Note 28: Personnel-Related Provisions”.
(3) See “– Note 36: Litigation and Claims”.
In 2016, provision for contract losses mainly includes the A400M programme (€ 825 million) and other Airbus Defence and Space
programmes (€ 260 million). The additions to the contract losses provision include the net charge of € 2,210 million for the A400M
programme before netting with work in progress. Reclassification / Change in consolidated group mainly relates to the offsetting of
the A400M programme contract provision to respective inventories (see “– Note 10: Revenues, Costs of Sales and Gross Margin”).
The majority of the addition to provisions for outstanding costs relates to Airbus Defence and Space (€ 529 million) and corresponds
among others to the Eurofighter programme and to diverse tasks to complete on construction contracts, as well as to Airbus
Helicopters (€ 501 million), mainly for the NH90 and Tiger programmes.
The agreement on insurance reimbursement that was under negotiation at year-end 2015 was settled during the first half-year 2016.
An additional provision of € 160 million related to restructuring measures has been recorded at year-end 2016 following the
announcement in September 2016 of the merger of Airbus structure with the commercial aircraft activities of its largest division
Airbus Commercial Aircraft to increase future competitiveness. Accordingly, a plan including temporary contract termination,
non-replacement of attrition, redeployment, partial and early retirement as well as voluntary leaves in Germany, France, the UK
and Spain has been communicated to the employees and the European Works Council in November 2016.
In Airbus Helicopters, the business has been reassessed in 2016 leading to a restructuring provision of € 42 million.
In 2016, after reassessing and adjusting the restructuring provision recorded in 2013 in Airbus Defence and Space and
Headquarters, € 20 million has been released.
An H225 Super Puma helicopter was involved in an accident on 29 April 2016. Management is cooperating fully with the authorities
to determine the precise cause of the accident. On the basis of recent developments, an estimate of the related future costs has
been prepared and consequently a provision has been recorded in the accounts as of 31 December 2016.
Contingent assets and contingent liabilities — Airbus is
exposed to technical and commercial contingent obligations
due to the nature of its businesses. To mitigate this exposure,
Airbus has subscribed a Global Aviation Insurance Programme
(“GAP”). When Airbus has obtained insurance coverage from
third parties for these risks, any reimbursement is recognised
separately only when it is virtually certain to be received.
Information required under IAS 37 “Provisions, contingent
liabilities and contingent assets” is not disclosed if Airbus
concludes that disclosure can be expected to prejudice
seriously its position in a dispute with other parties.
For other contingent liabilities, please see “– Note 36: Litigation
and Claims” and “– Note 10: Revenues, Cost of Sales and Gross
Margin” (mainly A400M programme).
Other commitments include contractual guarantees
and performance bonds to certain customers as well as
commitments for future capital expenditures and amounts
which may be payable to commercial intermediaries if future
sales materialise.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 42 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
23. Other Financial Assets and Other Financial Liabilities
Other Financial Assets
31 December
(In € million)
Positive fair values of derivative financial instruments
(1)
Others
Total non-current other financial assets
2016
2015
893
931
83
165
976
1,096
Receivables from related companies
517
616
Positive fair values of derivative financial instruments(1)
258
349
482
437
Total current other financial assets
1,257
1,402
Total
2,233
2,498
Others
(1) See “– Note 35: Information about Financial Instruments”.
Other Financial Liabilities
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Liabilities for derivative financial instruments(1)
6,544
6,703
European Governments refundable advances
6,340
6,716
429
619
13,313
14,038
Liabilities for derivative financial instruments(1)
4,476
3,884
European Governments refundable advances
730
570
Others
Total non-current other financial liabilities
Liabilities to related companies
116
80
Others
439
487
5,761
5,021
19,074
19,059
5,761
5,021
Total current other financial liabilities
Total
thereof other financial liabilities due within 1 year
(1) See “– Note 35: Information about Financial Instruments”.
Refundable advances from European Governments are provided to Airbus to finance research and development activities for certain
projects on a risk-sharing basis, i.e. they have to be repaid to the European Governments subject to the success of the project.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 43 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
24. Other Assets and Other Liabilities
Other Assets
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Prepaid expenses
2,265
2,051
93
115
2,358
2,166
1,589
1,450
Prepaid expenses
552
663
Others
435
706
Total current other assets
2,576
2,819
Total
4,934
4,985
Others
Total non-current other assets
Value added tax claims
Other Liabilities
31 December
(In € million)
Customer advance payments
Others
Total non-current other liabilities
Customer advance payments(1)
Tax liabilities (excluding income tax)
2016
2015
15,714
14,472
565
521
16,279
14,993
24,115
23,612
1,047
885
2,373
2,540
Total current other liabilities
27,535
27,037
Total
43,814
42,030
26,562
26,313
Others
thereof other liabilities due within 1 year
(1) Of which € 6,318 million (2015: € 8,252 million) relate to construction contracts mainly in Airbus Defence and Space (2016: € 5,001 million and 2015: € 7,007 million) and Airbus
Helicopters (2016: € 1,317 million and 2015: € 1,246 million).
25. Sales Financing Transactions
Sales financing — With a view to facilitating aircraft sales for
Airbus Commercial Aircraft and Airbus Helicopters, Airbus may
enter into either on-balance sheet or off-balance sheet sales
financing transactions.
On-balance sheet transactions where Airbus Commercial
Aircraft is lessor are classified as operating leases, finance leases
and loans, inventory and to a minor extent, equity investments:
(i) Operating leases – Aircraft leased out under operating
leases are included in property, plant and equipment at cost
less accumulated depreciation (see “– Note 18: Property,
Plant and Equipment”). Rental income from operating leases
is recorded as revenues on a straight-line basis over the
term of the lease.
(ii) Finance leases and loans – When, pursuant to a financing
transaction, substantially all the risks and rewards of
ownership of the financed aircraft reside with a third party,
the transaction is characterised as either a finance lease
or a loan. In such instances, revenues from the sale of the
aircraft are recorded upon delivery, while financial interest
is recorded over time as financial income. The outstanding
balance of principal is recorded on the statement of financial
position (on-balance sheet) in long-term financial assets, net
of any accumulated impairments.
(iii) Inventory – Second hand aircraft acquired as part of a
commercial buyback transaction, returned to Airbus after
a payment default or at the end of a lease agreement are
classified as inventory held for resale if there is no subsequent
lease agreement in force (see “– Note 20: Inventories”).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 44 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Off-balance sheet commitments — Financing commitments
are provided to the customer either as backstop commitments
before delivery, asset value guarantees at delivery, operating
head-lease commitments or counter guarantees:
(i) Backstop commitments are guarantees by Airbus
Commercial Aircraft, made when a customer-order is
placed, to provide financing to the customer in the event
that the customer fails to secure sufficient funding when
payment becomes due under the order. Such commitments
are not considered to be part of Gross Customer Financing
Exposure as (i) the financing is not in place, (ii) commitments
may be transferred in full or part to third parties prior to
delivery, (iii) past experience suggests it is unlikely that all
such proposed financings actually will be implemented and,
(iv) Airbus retains the asset until the aircraft is delivered and
does not incur an unusual risk in relation thereto. In order to
mitigate customer credit risks for Airbus, such commitments
typically contain financial conditions which guaranteed
parties must satisfy in order to benefit therefrom.
(ii) Asset value guarantees are guarantees whereby Airbus
guarantees a portion of the value of an aircraft at a specific
date after its delivery. Airbus Commercial Aircraft considers
the financial risks associated with such guarantees to be
acceptable, because (i) the guarantee only covers a tranche
of the estimated future value of the aircraft, and its level
is considered prudent in comparison to the estimated
future value of each aircraft, and (ii) the exercise dates of
outstanding asset value guarantees are distributed through
2028. It is management policy that the present value of the
guarantee given does not exceed 10% of the sales price of
the aircraft.
As of 31 December 2016, the nominal value of asset value
guarantees provided to beneficiaries amounts to € 836 million
(2015: € 781 million), excluding € 51 million (2015: € 97 million)
where the risk is considered to be remote. The present
value of the risk inherent in asset value guarantees where
a settlement is being considered probable is fully provided
for and included in the total of provisions recognised for
asset value risks of € 580 million (2015: € 550 million) (see
“– Note 22: Provisions, Contingent Assets and Contingent
Liabilities”).
(iii) Operating head-lease commitments – Airbus has entered
into head-lease sub-lease transactions in which it acts as a
lessee under an operating head-lease and lessor under the
sub-lease. Airbus’ customer financing exposure to operating
head-lease commitments, determined as the present value
of the future head-lease payments, was € 0 million in 2016
(2015: € 92 million).
Exposure — In terms of risk management, Airbus manages its
gross exposure arising from its sales financing activities (“Gross
Customer Financing Exposure”) separately for (i) customer’s
credit risk and (ii) asset value risk.
Gross Customer Financing Exposure is the sum of
(i) the book value of operating leases before impairment,
(ii) the outstanding principal amount of finance leases or loans
due before impairment, (iii) the guaranteed amounts under
financial guarantees and the net present value of head-lease
commitments, (iv) the book value of second hand aircraft for
resale before impairment, and (v) the outstanding value of any
other investment in sales fi nancing SEs before impairment.
This Gross Customer Financing Exposure may differ from
the value of related assets on Airbus’ Statement of Financial
Position and related off-balance sheet contingent commitments,
mainly because (i) assets are recorded in compliance with IFRS,
but may relate to transactions that are financed on a limited
recourse basis and (ii) the carrying amount of the assets on the
Consolidated Statement of Financial Position may have been
adjusted for impairment losses.
Gross Customer Financing Exposure amounts to US$ 1.8 billion
(€ 1.7 billion) (2015: US$ 1.5 billion (€ 1.4 billion)).
Net exposure is the difference between Gross Customer
Financing Exposure and the collateral value. Collateral value
is assessed using a dynamic model based on the net present
value of expected future receivables, expected proceeds from
resale and potential cost of default. This valuation model yields
results that are typically lower than residual value estimates by
independent sources in order to allow for what management
believes is its conservative assessment of market conditions and
for repossession and transformation costs. The net exposure
is fully provided for by way of impairment losses and other
provisions.
Impairment losses and provisions — For the purpose of
measuring an impairment loss, each transaction is tested
individually. Impairment losses relating to aircraft under operating
lease and second hand aircraft for resale (included in inventory)
are recognised for any excess of the aircraft’s carrying amount
over the higher of the aircraft’s value in use and its fair value
less cost to sell. Impairment allowances are recognised for
finance leases and loans when their carrying amounts exceed
the present value of estimated future cash flows (including cash
flows expected to be derived from a sale of the aircraft). Under
its provisioning policy for sales financing risk, Airbus records
provisions as liabilities for estimated risk relating to off-balance
sheet commitments.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 45 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Security — Sales financing transactions, including those that
are structured through SE, are generally collateralised by the
underlying aircraft. Additionally Airbus benefits from protective
covenants and from security packages tailored according to
the perceived risk and the legal environment.
Airbus endeavours to limit its sales fi nancing exposure by
sharing its risk with third parties usually involving the creation of
an SE. Apart from investor interest protection, interposing an SE
offers advantages such as flexibility, bankruptcy remoteness,
liability containment and facilitating sell-downs of the aircraft
financed. An aircraft financing SE is typically funded on a nonrecourse basis by a senior lender and one or more providers of
subordinated financing. When Airbus acts as a lender to such
SEs, it may take the role of the senior lender or the provider
of subordinated loan. Airbus consolidates an aircraft financing
SE if it is exposed to the SE’s variable returns and has the
ability to direct the relevant remarketing activities. Otherwise,
it recognises only its loan to the SE under other long-term
financial assets. At 31 December 2016 the carrying amount of
its loans from aircraft financing amounts to € 732 million (2015:
€ 553 million). This amount also represents Airbus’ maximum
exposure to loss from its interest in unconsolidated aircraft
financing SEs.
On-Balance Sheet Operating and Finance Leases
The minimum future operating lease payments (undiscounted) due from customers to be included in revenues, and the future
minimum lease payments (undiscounted) from investments in finance leases to be received in settlement of the outstanding
receivable at 31 December 2016 are as follows:
Aircraft under
operating lease
Finance lease
receivable(1)
Not later than 1 year
25
133
Later than 1 year and not later than 5 years
60
71
(In € million)
Later than 5 years
31 December 2016
8
15
93
219
(1) Includes € 12 million of unearned finance income.
Off-Balance Sheet Commitments
Operating head-lease commitments comprise operating lease payments due by Airbus Commercial Aircraft as lessee under
head-lease transactions. As of 31 December 2016 and as of 31 December 2015, the scheduled payments owed under sales
financing head-leases are as follows:
31 December
2016
(In € million)
2015
Not later than 1 year
52
62
Later than 1 year and not later than 5 years
48
98
Later than 5 years
Total aircraft lease commitments(1)
Of which commitments where the transaction has been sold to third parties
Total aircraft lease commitments where Airbus bears the risk (not discounted)
(1) Backed by sublease income from customers with an amount of € 75 million in 2016 (2015: € 119 million).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 46 °
0
0
100
160
(100)
(149)
0
11
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.5 Operational Assets and Liabilities
Financing Liabilities
Financing liabilities from sales financing transactions are mainly based on variable interest rates (see “– Note 34.3: Financing
Liabilities”) and entered into on a non-recourse basis (i.e. in a default event, the creditor would only have recourse to the aircraft
collateral).
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
45
94
0
0
45
94
Loans
Liabilities to financial institutions
Total sales financing liabilities
Customer Financing Exposure
The on-balance sheet assets relating to sales financing, the off-balance sheet commitments and the related financing exposure
(not including asset value guarantees) as of 31 December 2016 and 2015 are as follows:
31 December 2016
(In € million)
Operating leases(1)
Finance leases and loans
Inventory
Other investments
On-balance sheet customer financing
Off-balance sheet customer financing
Non-recourse transactions on-balance sheet
31 December 2015
Airbus
Commercial
Aircraft
Airbus
Helicopters
Total
Airbus
Commercial
Aircraft
169
44
213
337
0
337
1,094
54
1,148
779
61
840
208
0
208
179
0
179
Airbus
Helicopters
Total
28
0
28
28
0
28
1,499
98
1,597
1,323
61
1,384
182
21
203
84
8
92
(109)
0
(109)
(17)
0
(17)
0
0
0
(24)
0
(24)
Gross Customer Financing Exposure
1,572
119
1,691
1,366
69
1,435
Collateral values
(942)
Off-balance sheet adjustments
(1,157)
(60)
(1,217)
(922)
(20)
Net exposure
415
59
474
444
49
493
Operating leases
(89)
(9)
(98)
(220)
0
(220)
(158)
(50)
(208)
(113)
0
(113)
0
0
0
0
(49)
(49)
On-balance sheet commitments - inventories
(154)
0
(154)
(93)
0
(93)
Off-balance sheet commitments - provisions(2)
(14)
0
(14)
(18)
0
(18)
(415)
(59)
(474)
(444)
(49)
(493)
Finance leases and loans
On-balance sheet commitments - provisions(2)
Asset impairments and provisions
(1) For 2016 and 2015, depreciation amounts to € 12 million and € 27 million respectively and related accumulated depreciation is € 84 million and € 203 million respectively.
(2) See “– Note 22: Provisions, Contingent Assets and Contingent Liabilities”.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 47 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefits
26. Number of Employees
Airbus
Commercial
Aircraft
Airbus
Defence
and Space
Airbus
Helicopters
Total
segments
Other / HQ
Consolidated
31 December 2016
73,852
22,507
34,397
130,756
3,026
133,782
31 December 2015
72,816
22,520
38,206
133,542
3,032
136,574
27. Personnel Expenses
(In € million)
Wages, salaries and social contributions
Net periodic pension cost (Note 29)
Total
2016
2015
12,595
13,022
533
598
13,128
13,620
28. Personnel-Related Provisions
Several German Airbus companies provide life-time working account models, being employee benefit plans with a promised return
on contributions or notional contributions that qualify as other long-term employee benefits under IAS 19. The employees’
periodical contributions into their life-time working accounts result in corresponding personnel expense in that period, recognised
in other personnel charges.
(In € million)
Balance at
1 January
2016
Exchange
differences
Increase
from
passage
of time Additions
Reclassification /
Change in
consolidated
group Used Released
Balance at
31 December
2016
Restructuring measures /
pre-retirement part-time work(1)
265
0
0
247
(11)
(97)
(39)
Other personnel charges
880
(1)
1
368
(69)
(441)
(83)
655
1,145
(1)
1
615
(80) (538)
(122)
1,020
Total
365
(1) See “– Note 22: Provisions, Contingent Assets and Contingent Liabilities”.
29. Post-Employment Benefits
31 December
(In € million)
Provision for retirement plans (Note 29.1)
Provision for deferred compensation (Note 29.2)
Total
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 48 °
2016
2015
7,749
6,867
907
748
8,656
7,615
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
29.1 Provisions for Retirement Plans
When Airbus employees retire, they receive indemnities as
stipulated in retirement agreements, in accordance with
regulations and practices of the countries in which Airbus
operates.
France — The French pension system is operated on a “pay
as you go” basis. Besides the basic pension from the French
social security system, each employee is entitled to receive a
complementary pension from defined contribution schemes
Association pour le régime de retraite complémentaire des
salaries (“ARRCO”) and Association générale des institutions de
retraite des cadres (“AGIRC”). Moreover, French law stipulates
that employees are paid retirement indemnities in the form of
lump sums on the basis of the length of service, which are
considered as defined obligations.
Germany — Airbus has a pension plan (P3) for executive
and non-executive employees in place. Under this plan, the
employer provides contributions for the services rendered by
the employees, which are dependent on their salaries in the
respective service period. These contributions are converted
into components which become part of the accrued pension
liability at the end of the year. Total benefits are calculated as
a career average over the entire period of service. Certain
employees that are not covered by this plan receive retirement
indemnities based on salary earned in the last year or on
an average of the last three years of employment. For some
executive employees, benefits are dependent on the final salary
of the respective individual at the date of retirement and the time
period served as an executive.
Parts of the pension obligation in Germany are funded by assets
invested in specifi c funding vehicles. Besides a relief fund
(“Unterstützungskasse”), Airbus has implemented a Contractual
Trust Arrangement. The Contractual Trust Arrangement
structure is that of a bilateral trust arrangement. Assets that
are transferred to the relief fund and the Contractual Trust
Arrangement qualify as plan assets under IAS 19.
UK — The Airbus Group UK Pension Scheme (“the Scheme”)
was implemented by Airbus Defence and Space Ltd., Stevenage
(UK) as the principal employer. This plan comprises all eligible
employees of Airbus Defence and Space Ltd. as well as all
personnel, who were recruited by one of Airbus companies
located in the UK and participating in the scheme. The majority
of the Scheme’s liabilities relate to Airbus Defence and Space
Ltd. The major part of the obligation is funded by scheme
assets due to contributions of the participating companies.
The Scheme is a registered pension scheme under the Finance
Act 2004. The trustee’s only formal funding objective is the
statutory funding objective under the Pensions Act part 6,2004,
which is to have sufficient and appropriate assets to cover the
Scheme’s obligations. Since 1 November 2013, this plan is
generally closed for new joiners, who participate in a separate
defined contribution plan.
Moreover, Airbus participates in the UK in several funded
trustee-administered pension plans for both executive and
non-executive employees with BAE Systems being the principal
employer. Airbus’ most signifi cant investments in terms of
employees participating in these BAE Systems UK pension
plans is Airbus Operations Ltd. Participating Airbus Operations
Ltd. employees have continued to remain members in the BAE
Systems UK pension plans due to the UK pension agreement
between Airbus and BAE Systems and a change in the UK
pensions legislation enacted in April 2006.
For the most significant of these BAE Systems Pension
Schemes, the Main Scheme, BAE Systems, Airbus and the
scheme Trustees agreed on a sectionalisation, which was
implemented on 1 April 2016. Although BAE Systems remains
the only principal employer of the Scheme, Airbus has obtained
powers in relation to its section which are the same as if it
were the principal employer. The deficit of the Main Scheme
was allocated between BAE Systems and Airbus based in
principle on each Member’s last employer, which was done
in December 2015. Before, the deficit allocation was based
on the relative payroll contributions of active members which
amounted to a share of Airbus in BAE Systems’ main scheme in
2015 to 20.96%. The impact of this change was mainly reflected
in the remeasurements of the previous period.
The other schemes qualify as multi-employer defined benefit
pension plans under IAS 19 “Employee benefits”. Based on
detailed information about the other pension schemes provided
by BAE Systems, Airbus is able to appropriately and reliably
estimate the share of its participation in the schemes, i.e. its
share in plan assets, defined benefit obligation (“DBO”), and
pension costs. The information enables Airbus to derive keys
per plan to allocate for accounting purposes an appropriate
proportion in plan assets, DBO and pension costs to its UK
investments as of the reporting date, taking into account the
impact of contributions as well as future extra contributions
agreed by BAE Systems with the trustees. Therefore, Airbus
accounts for its participation in BAE Systems’ UK defined benefit
schemes under the defined benefit accounting approach in
accordance with IAS 19.
Based on the funding situation of the respective pension
schemes, the pension plan trustees determine the contribution
rates to be paid by the participating employers to adequately
fund the schemes. The different UK pension plans in which
Airbus investments participate are currently underfunded.
Airbus Operations Ltd. (for its section of the Main Scheme)
and BAE Systems (for the other schemes) have agreed with
the trustees various measures designed to make good the
underfunding. These include (i) regular contribution payments
for active employees well above such which would prevail for
funded plans and (ii) extra employers’ contributions.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 49 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
In the event that an employer who participates in the BAE
Systems pension schemes fails or cannot be compelled to
fulfil its obligations as a participating employer, the remaining
participating employers are obliged to collectively take on its
obligations. Airbus considers the likelihood of this event as
remote. However, for the Main Scheme Airbus considers that
its obligation is in principle limited to that related to its section.
Risks
The DBO exposes Airbus to actuarial risks, including the
following ones:
Market price risk — The return on plan assets is assumed to
be the discount rate derived from AA-rated corporate bonds.
If the actual return rate of plan assets is lower than the applied
discount rate, the net DBO increases accordingly. Moreover, the
market values of the plan assets are subject to volatility, which
also impacts the net liability.
Interest rate risk — The level of the DBO is signifi cantly
impacted by the applied discount rate. The low interest rates,
particular in the euro-denominated market environment, lead
to a relatively high net pension liability. If the decline in returns
of corporate bonds will continue, the DBO will further increase
in future periods, which can only be offset partially by the
positive development of market values of those corporate bonds
included in plan assets. Generally, the pension obligation is
sensitive to movements in the interest rate leading to volatile
results in the valuation.
Infl ation risk — The pension liabilities can be sensitive to
movements in the inflation rate, whereby a higher inflation rate
could lead to an increasing liability. Since some pension plans
are directly related to salaries, increases in compensations could
result in increasing pension obligations. A fixed interest rate has
been agreed for the deferred compensation plan P3, which is
financed by the employees.
Longevity risk — The pension liabilities are sensitive to the life
expectancy of its members. Rising life expectancies lead to an
increase in the valuation of the pension liability.
The weighted-average assumptions used in calculating the actuarial values of the most signifi cant retirement plans as of
31 December are as follows:
Pension plans in
Germany
France
Participation in BAE
Systems Pension
Scheme (UK)
UK
2016
2015
2016
2015
2016
2015
2016
1.7
2.4
1.9
2.5
2.7
3.9
2.6
3.9
2.75
2.75
2.5
2.5
2.6
3.0
2.6
3.2
Rate of pension increase
1.7
1.7
- / 1.7
- / 1.7
3.0
2.9
3.1
2.3-3.2
Inflation rate
1.7
1.7
1.7
1.7
3.1
3.0
3.1
3.2
Assumptions in %
Discount rate
Rate of compensation increase
For Germany and France, Airbus derives the discount rate used
to determine the DBO from yields on high quality corporate
bonds with an AA rating. The determination of the discount rate
is based on the iBoxx€ Corporates AA bond data and uses the
granularity of single bond data in order to receive more market
information from the given bond index. The discount rate for
the estimated duration of the respective pension plan is then
extrapolated along the yield curve. In the UK it is determined with
reference to the full yield curve of AA-rated sterling-denominated
corporate bonds of varying maturities. The salary increase
rates are based on long-term expectations of the respective
employers, derived from the assumed inflation rate and adjusted
by promotional or productivity scales.
2015
Rates for pension payment increases are derived from the
respective inflation rate for the plan.
Inflation rate for German plans corresponds to the expected
increase in cost of living. In the UK, the inflation assumptions
are derived by reference to the difference between then yields
on index-linked and fixed-interest long-term government bonds.
For the calculation of the German pension obligation, the
“2005 G” mortality tables (generation tables) as developed by
Professor Dr. Klaus Heubeck are applied. For the UK schemes,
the Self-Administered Pensions S1 mortality tables based on
year of birth (as published by the Institute of Actuaries) is used
in conjunction with the results of an investigation into the actual
mortality experience of scheme members. In France, Institute
for French Statistics (“INSEE”) tables are applied.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 50 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
The development of the DBO is set out below:
DBO
(In € million)
Balance as of
1 January 2015
Plan assets
Participation in
BAE Systems
Pension
Pension
Scheme
plans of
in the UK
Airbus
Total
Participation in
BAE Systems
Pension
Pension
Scheme
plans of
in the UK
Airbus
Total
Total
provisions
10,625
4,337
14,962
(4,237)
(3,158)
(7,395)
7,567
Service cost
358
81
439
0
0
0
439
Interest cost and income
219
175
394
(105)
(130)
(235)
159
(2)
0
(2)
0
0
0
(2)
(642)
(1,218)
(1,860)
0
0
0
(1,860)
213
(44)
169
0
0
0
169
0
0
0
67
898
965
965
(95)
5
(90)
0
0
0
(90)
Remeasurements: Actuarial
(gains) and losses arising
■
■
■
■
from changes in
demographic assumptions
from changes in financial
assumptions
from changes in experience
adjustments
from plan assets
Change in consolidation,
transfers and others
Benefits paid
(338)
(168)
(506)
139
168
307
(199)
Contributions by employer
and other plan participants
0
0
0
(245)
(117)
(362)
(362)
Foreign currency translation
adjustment
54
279
333
(50)
(202)
(252)
81
Balance as of
31 December 2015
10,392
3,447
13,839
(4,431)
(2,541)
(6,972)
6,867
Service cost
316
63
379
0
0
0
379
Interest cost and income
251
119
370
(126)
(90)
(216)
154
(4)
0
(4)
0
0
0
(4)
6
0
6
0
0
0
6
1,027
786
1,813
0
0
0
1,813
158
0
158
0
0
0
158
0
0
0
(179)
(296)
(475)
(475)
Settlements
Remeasurements: Actuarial
(gains) and losses arising
■
■
■
■
from changes in
demographic assumptions
from changes in financial
assumptions
from changes in experience
adjustments
from plan assets
Change in consolidation,
transfers and others
(530)
2
(528)
44
0
44
(484)
Benefits paid
(348)
(79)
(427)
132
79
211
(216)
0
0
0
(104)
(167)
(271)
(271)
(164)
(530)
(694)
133
383
516
(178)
11,104
3,808
14,912
(4,531)
(2,632)
(7,163)
7,749
Contributions by employer
and other plan participants
Foreign currency translation
adjustment
Balance as of
31 December 2016
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 51 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
The funding of the plans is as follows:
31 December
2016
2015
(In € million)
DBO
Plan assets
DBO
Plan assets
Unfunded pension plans
1,577
0
1,491
0
Funded pension plans (partial)
13,335
(7,163)
12,348
(6,972)
Total
14,912
(7,163)
13,839
(6,972)
In 2016, contributions in the amount of € 104 million
(2015: € 241 million) are made into the pension plans of Airbus,
mainly relating to the relief fund in Germany with € 50 million
(2015: € 50 million) and the Airbus Group UK scheme with
€ 50 million (2015: € 58 million). Previous year included
additionally the Contractual Trust Arrangement of € 130 million.
Contributions of approximately € 400 million are expected to
be made in 2017.
The weighted average duration of the DBO for retirement plans
and deferred compensation is 16 years at 31 December 2016
(31 December 2015: 14 years).
The split of the DBO for retirement plans and deferred compensation between active, deferred and pensioner members for the
most significant plans is as follows (as of 31 December 2016 unless otherwise noted):
Active
Deferred
Pensioner
Germany
44%
6%
50%
France
99%
0%
1%
67%
16%
17%
60%
17%
23%
UK
(1)
Participation in BAE Systems Pension Scheme (Main Scheme)
(1) As of 5 April 2016.
The following table shows how the present value of the DBO of retirement plans and deferred compensation would have been
influenced by changes in the actuarial assumptions as set out for 31 December 2016:
Change in actuarial assumptions
Impact on DBO
Change as of 31 December
Present value of the obligation
Discount rate
Rate of compensation increase
Rate of pension increase
2016
2015
15,930
14,680
Increase by 0.5%-point
(1,197)
(1,007)
Decrease by 0.5%-point
1,322
1,062
Increase by 0.25%-point
106
188
Decrease by 0.25%-point
(279)
(305)
Increase by 0.25%-point
342
256
Decrease by 0.25%-point
(486)
(369)
Life expectancy
Sensitivities are calculated based on the same method (present
value of the DBO calculated with the projected unit method)
as applied when calculating the post-employment benefit
obligations. The sensitivity analyses are based on a change of
one assumption while holding all other assumptions constant.
Increase by 1 year
287
283
Reduction by 1 year
(461)
(411)
This is unlikely to occur in practice and changes of more than
one assumption may be correlated leading to different impacts
on the DBO than disclosed above. If the assumptions change
at a different level, the effect on the DBO is not necessarily in
a linear relation.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 52 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
The fair value of the plan assets for retirement plans and deferred compensation can be allocated to the following classes:
2016
(In € million)
Equity securities
Europe
Rest of the world
Emerging markets
Global
Quoted
prices
2015
Unquoted
prices
Quoted
prices
Total
Unquoted
prices
Total
1,112
0
1,112
990
0
990
5
0
5
0
0
0
248
0
248
221
0
221
1,474
0
1,474
1,454
0
1,454
Corporates
1,877
0
1,877
1,549
0
1,549
Governments
1,464
0
1,464
1,715
0
1,715
17
288
305
273
0
273
Commodities
161
0
161
119
0
119
Hedge funds
236
0
236
251
0
251
0
(60)
(60)
0
(58)
(58)
337
3
340
331
4
335
62
0
62
48
0
48
209
(142)
67
252
(64)
188
7,202
89
7,291
7,203
(118)
7,085
Bonds
Pooled investment vehicles
Derivatives
Property
Cash and money market funds
Others
Balance as of 31 December
The majority of funded plans apply broadly an asset-liability
matching (“ALM”) framework. The strategic asset allocation
(“SAA”) of the plans takes into account the characteristics of
the underlying obligations. Investments are widely diversified,
such that the failure of any single investment would not have a
material impact on the overall level of assets. A large portion of
assets in 2016 consists of fixed income instruments, equities,
although Airbus also invests in property, commodities and
hedge funds. Airbus is reassessing the characteristics of the
pension obligations from time to time or as required by the
applicable regulation or governance framework. This typically
triggers a subsequent review of the SAA.
The amount recorded as provision for retirement plans can be allocated to the significant countries as follows:
Pension plans of Airbus
Share of
multi-employer
plan in the UK
Total
Germany
France
UK
Others
DBO
7,793
1,545
1,044
10
3,447
13,839
Plan assets
3,464
17
950
0
2,541
6,972
Recognised as of 31 December 2015
4,329
1,528
94
10
906
6,867
DBO
8,227
1,643
1,223
11
3,808
14,912
Plan assets
3,514
17
1,000
0
2,632
7,163
Recognised as of 31 December 2016
4,713
1,626
223
11
1,176
7,749
(In € million)
Employer’s contribution to state and private pension plans, mainly in Germany and France, are to be considered as defined
contribution plans. Contributions in 2016 amount to € 703 million (2015: € 689 million).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 53 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
29.2 Provisions for Deferred Compensation
This amount represents obligations that arise if employees elect to convert part of their remuneration or bonus into an equivalent
commitment for deferred compensation which is treated as a defined benefit post-employment plan. The development for the
DBO and plan assets is as follows:
2016
(In € million)
2015
DBO
Plan
assets
Total
DBO
Plan
assets
Total
Balance as of 1 January
841
(113)
728
744
(81)
663
Service cost
118
0
118
137
0
137
Interest cost
20
0
20
14
0
14
0
(3)
(3)
0
(2)
(2)
Interest income
Remeasurements: Actuarial (gains) and losses arising
■
from changes in financial assumptions
0
0
0
(34)
0
(34)
■
from changes in experience adjustments
35
0
35
0
0
0
■
from plan assets
91
2
93
0
3
3
(80)
1
(79)
(15)
0
(15)
Transfer and change in consolidation
Benefits paid
(7)
0
(7)
(5)
0
(5)
Contributions
0
(15)
(15)
0
(33)
(33)
1,018
(128)
890
841
(113)
728
Balance as of 31 December
RECOGNISED AS
31 December
(In € million)
Provision
Non-current other assets and current other assets
Total
The portion of the obligation, which is not protected by the
pension guarantee association or Pensions-Sicherungs Verein
(“PSV”) in case of an insolvency of Airbus companies concerned,
is covered by securities. Trust agreements between the trust and
the participating companies stipulate that some portions of the
2016
2015
907
748
17
20
890
728
obligation must be covered with securities in the same amount,
while other portions must be covered by 115% leading to an
overfunding of the related part of the obligation. These amounts
are recognised as other non-current and current assets.
30. Share-Based Payment
Share-based compensation — In 2007, Airbus introduced a
Performance and Restricted Unit Plan or LTIP which qualifies
as a cash settled share-based payment plan under IFRS 2. The
grant of so called “units” will not physically be settled in shares
(except with regard to Airbus Executive Committee Members). For
details of the conversion of some Performance Units granted to
Executive Committee Members into equity-settled plans please
see “– Note 31.1: Remuneration-Executive Committee”. In 2016,
Airbus implemented a Performance Units and Performance
Share Plan, which is granted in units as well as in shares.
For plans settled in cash, provisions for associated services
received are measured at fair value by multiplying the number
of units expected to vest with the fair value of one LTIP unit
at the end of each reporting period, taking into account the
extent to which the employees have rendered service to date.
The fair value of each LTIP unit is determined using a forward
pricing model. Changes of the fair value are recognised as
personnel expense of the period, leading to a remeasurement
of the provision.
Besides the SOP that has been granted in the past and the
equity settled part of the LTIP 2016, the Employee Share
Ownership Plan (“ESOP”) is an additional equity settled
share-based payment plan. Airbus offers its employees under
this plan the Company shares at fair value matched with a
number of free shares based on a determining ratio. The fair
value of shares provided is reflected as personnel expense in
Airbus’ Consolidated Income Statements with a corresponding
increase in equity.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 54 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
30.1 SOP and LTIP
Based on the authorisation given to it by the Shareholders’
Meetings, Airbus’ Board of Directors approved a SOP in 2006
(see date below). This plan provides to the Members of the
Executive Committee as well as to Airbus’ senior management
the grant of options for the purchase of the Company’s shares.
For the Company’s SOP, the granted exercise price exceeded
the share price at the grant date.
In the years 2011 to 2015, the Board of Directors of Airbus
approved the granting of LTIP Performance and Restricted
Units. In 2016, it approved an LTIP Performance Units and
Performance Share Plan.
In 2014, Airbus decided to hedge the share price risk inherent in
the cash-settled LTIP units by entering equity swaps where the
reference price is based on the Airbus share price. To the extent
that LTIP units are hedged, compensation expense recognised
for these units will effectively reflect the reference price fixed
under the equity swaps.
In 2016, compensation expense for LTIPs including the
effect of the equity swaps amounted to € 35 million (in 2015:
€ 175 million). For the SOP, expenses were neither recognised
in 2016 nor in 2015.
The fair value of units and shares granted per vesting date is as follows (LTIP plan 2016):
Expected vesting date
FV of Performance Units and Shares
(In € per unit / share granted)
May 2020 – Performance share
45.15
May 2020 – Performance unit
45.13
May 2021 – Performance unit
44.71
As of 31 December 2016 provisions of € 179 million (2015: € 320 million) relating to LTIP have been recognised.
The lifetime of the Performance and Restricted Units as well as Performance Shares is contractually fixed (see the description of
the respective tranche). For the units, the measurement is next to other market data, mainly affected by the share price as of the
end of the reporting period (€ 62.84 as of 31 December 2016) and the lifetime of the units.
The principal characteristics of the SOP as at 31 December 2016 are summarised in the table below:
SOP 2006
Date of Shareholders’ Meeting
4 May 2006
Grant date
18 December 2006
Number of options granted
1,747,500
Number of options outstanding
0
Total number of eligible employees
Vesting conditions
221
50% of options may be exercised after a period of two years from the date of grant
of the options; 50% of options may be exercised as of the third anniversary
of the date of grant of the options (subject to specific provisions contained in the
Insider Trading Rules — see “Part 2/3.1.3 Governing Law — Dutch Regulations”)
Expiry date
16 December 2016
Conversion right
One option for one share
Vested
100%
Exercise price
Exercise price conditions
€ 25.65
110% of fair market value of the shares at the date of grant
Number of exercised options
1,501,000
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 55 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
The following table summarises the development of the number of outstanding stock options:
Number of options
Balance at
1 January
Tranches
SOP 2006
Exercised
Balance at
31 December
Forfeited
2015
511,750
(241,750)
(5,500)
264,500
2016
264,500
(224,500)
(40,000)
0
The weighted average share price at the date of exercise for share options exercised in 2016 was € 59.21 (2015: € 60.65).
The principal characteristics of the LTIPs as at 31 December 2016 are summarised below:
Grant date
LTIP 2011
(1)
9 November 2011
LTIP 2012
LTIP 2013
LTIP 2014
13 December 2012 17 December 2013 13 November 2014
LTIP 2015
LTIP 2016
29 October 2015
25 October 2016
Performance and Restricted Unit plan
Performance plan
Units
Performance Restricted Performance Restricted Performance Restricted Performance Restricted Performance Restricted
Number
of units
granted(2)
2,606,900 882,591 2,123,892 621,980 1,245,052 359,060 1,114,962
Number
of units
outstanding
Total number
of eligible
beneficiaries
Vesting
conditions
Share price
per unit is
limited at
the vesting
dates to(3)
Vesting
dates
Number of
vested units
0
0
1,771
880,095
283,320 1,159,814
1,797
Units
Shares
291,420
926,398
240,972
615,792
621,198
346,100 1,068,502 287,442
916,246
239,674
615,792
621,198
1,709
1,621
1,564
1,671
The Performance and Restricted Units and Performance Shares will vest if the participant is still employed by an Airbus company
at the respective vesting dates and, in the case of Performance Units and Shares, upon achievement of mid-term business
performance. Vesting schedule is made up of four payments (from the LTIP 2014 onwards two payments) over two years.
-
€ 55.66
€ 92.34
€ 94.90
25% each:
25% each
25% each:
in May 2016
expected:
in May 2015
in November 2016
in May 2017
in November 2015 25% each expected: in November 2017
in May 2016
in May 2017
in May 2018
in November 2016 in November 2017 in November 2018
3,108,160 823,828
855,388
289,135
3,860
0
€ 112.62
50% each
expected:
in June 2018
in June 2019
2,500
0
€ 105.34
50% each
expected:
in June 2019
in July 2020
2,116
0
-
50% each
expected:
in
100%
May 2020 expected
in
in
May 2021 May 2020
0
0
(1) Date, when the vesting conditions were determined.
(2) Based on 100% target performance achievement. A minimum of 50% of Performance Units will vest; 100% in case of on-target performance achievement; up to a maximum of
150% in case of overachievement of performance criteria. In case of absolute negative results (cumulative EBIT of Airbus) during the performance period, the Board of Directors
can decide to review the vesting of the Performance Units including the 50% portion which is not subject to performance conditions (additional vesting condition).
(3) Corresponds to 200% of the respective reference share price. Overall, the pay-out for Performance Units is limited to a total amount of 250% of the units originally granted, each
valued with the respective reference share price of € 27.83 (for LTIP 2012), € 46.17 (for LTIP 2013), € 47.45 (for LTIP 2014), € 56.31 (for LTIP 2015) and € 52.67 (for LTIP 2016).
30.2 ESOP
In 2016, the Board of Directors approved a new ESOP. Eligible
employees were able to purchase a fixed number of previously
unissued shares at fair market value (4, 6, 10, 19, 38 or 76 shares).
Airbus matched each fixed number of shares with a number of
the Company free shares based on a determined ratio (4, 5, 7,
11, 16 and 25 free shares, respectively). During a custody period
of at least one year or, provided the purchase took place in the
context of a mutual fund (regular savings plan), of five years,
employees are restricted from selling the shares, but have the
right to receive all dividends paid. Employees who directly
purchased the Company shares have, in addition, the ability to
vote at the annual shareholder meetings. The subscription price
was equal to the closing price at the Paris stock exchange on
23 February 2016 and amounted to € 55.41. Investing through
the mutual fund led to a price which corresponds to the average
price at the Paris stock exchange during the 20 trading days
immediately preceding 23 February 2016, resulting in a price
of € 54.31. The Company issued and sold 485,048 ordinary
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 56 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
shares with a nominal value of € 1.00 each. Compensation
expense (excluding social security contributions) of € 27 million
was recognised in connection with ESOP.
In 2015, the Board of Directors approved a new ESOP. Eligible
employees were able to purchase a fixed number of previously
unissued shares at fair value (4, 6, 9, 19, 37, 74 or 148 shares).
Airbus matched each fixed number of shares with a number of
the Company free shares based on a determined ratio (4, 5, 6,
11, 16, 25 and 39 free shares, respectively). During a lock-up
period of at least one year or, provided the purchase took place
in the context of a mutual fund (regular savings plan), of five
years, employees are restricted from selling the shares, but have
the right to receive all dividends paid. Employees who directly
purchased the Company shares have, in addition, the ability to
vote at the annual shareholder meetings. The subscription price
was equal to the closing price at the Paris stock exchange on
26 February 2015 and amounted to € 51.63. Investing through
the mutual fund led to a price which corresponds to the average
price at the Paris stock exchange during the 20 trading days
immediately preceding 26 February 2015, resulting in a price of
€ 49.70. The Company issued and sold 477,985 ordinary shares
with a nominal value of € 1.00 each. Compensation expense
(excluding social security contributions) of € 25 million was
recognised in connection with ESOP.
31. Remuneration
31.1 Remuneration – Executive Committee
Airbus’ key management personnel consists of Members of the Executive Committee and Non-Executive Board Members.
The Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”), who chairs the Executive Committee, is the sole Executive Board Member. The annual
remuneration and related compensation costs of the key management personnel as expensed in the respective year can be
summarised as follows:
2016
(In € million)
Executive Committee, including Executive Board Member
Salaries and other short-term benefits (including bonuses)
28.4
Post-employment benefit costs
Share-based remuneration (“LTIP award”, including associated hedge result)
Termination benefits
2015
23.2
6.1
7.5
20.5
15.4
0.0
3.5
Other benefits
0.7
0.8
Social charges
5.5
6.5
Non-Executive Board Members
Short-term benefits (including social charges)
Total expense recognised
1.8
1.5
63.0
58.4
For additional information regarding the remuneration of Executive Committee Members (including the CEO), please also refer to
the “Report of the Board of Directors – Chapter 4.4: Remuneration Report”.
Salaries and Other Short-Term Benefits (Including Bonuses)
The amount of bonuses is based on estimated performance
achievement as at the balance sheet date and difference
between previous year estimation and actual pay-out in the
current year. Outstanding short-term benefits (bonuses) at yearend 2016 for Executive Committee Members based on estimated
performance achievement at year-end was € 13.4 million (2015:
€ 13.4 million).
In 2015, Airbus had to recognise high salary taxes for Executive
Committee Members subject to French tax jurisdictions under
the “Taxe sur les hauts revenus”, requiring exceptional 50%
charges on individual annual remuneration exceeding € 1 million
(2015: € 1 million). For 2016, this surtax has been abolished.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 57 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
Post-Employment Benefit Cost
The pension DBO of the Executive Committee, including the
CEO, at 31 December 2016 amounted to € 68.3 million (2015:
€ 61.6 million). The disclosed DBO reflects the total outstanding
balance for all Executive Committee Members subject to a
defined benefit plan and in charge at the end of the respective
balance sheet date.
Share-Based Remuneration (“LTIP Award”)
The share-based payment expenses result from not yet forfeited
units granted to the Executive Committee Members under the
Airbus LTIP which are re-measured to fair value as far as they
are cash settled.
In 2016, the Members of the Executive Committee were granted
85,386 Performance Units and 91,082 Performance Shares
for LTIP 2016 and 13,674 additional units for LTIP 2015 (2015:
184,652 units), the respective fair value of these Performance
Units and Shares at the respective grant dates was € 8.76 million
(2015: € 10.3 million). Fair value of outstanding LTIP balances
at the end of 2016 for all Executive Committee Members
was € 14.5 million (2015: € 21.6 million). The total number of
outstanding Performance and Restricted Units amounted to
467,245 at 31 December 2016 (2015: 775,744), granted to the
current Members of the Executive Committee.
Until and including the plan 2015, based on the intention of the
Board of Directors to increase the long-term commitment of
Executive Committee Members to the success of Airbus, the
Board has authorised the Executive Committee Members to
opt for partial conversion of the otherwise cash settled LTIPs
into share-settled plans at each grant date of any new LTIP,
requiring a minimum conversion rate into equity settlement of
25% of total granted Performance Units. At the conversion date,
each Executive Committee Member individually determined
the split of equity and cash settlement for the formerly granted
LTIP. After overall performance assessment of each of the
plans, the vesting dates as determined at the initial grant date
apply to all cash settled Performance Units, however, units
converted into equity settlement only vest at the last of the
vesting dates of the respective plan.
The number of Performance Units granted to Executive Committee Members 31 December 2016 are summarised below:
LTIP 2011(1)
LTIP 2012(2)
LTIP 2013(3)
LTIP 2014
LTIP 2015(4)
Total number of units granted
337,280
245,551
203,000
199,310
189,476
Number of cash-settled units
227,949
177,933
138,300
147,269
143,217
Number of equity-settled units
109,331
67,718
64,700
52,041
46,259
31 December
2012
28 February
2013
28 February
2014
28 February
2015
28 February
2016
€ 29.50
€ 39.70
€ 53.39
€ 55.33
€ 59.78
Date of conversion
Share price at date of conversion
(1) Based on performance achievement of 128% for Performance Units under 2011 LTIP.
(2) Based on performance achievement of 89% for Performance Units under 2012 LTIP.
(3) Based on performance achievement of 75% for Performance Units under 2013 LTIP.
SOP
Other Benefits
To the other current Members of the Executive Committee
and to Airbus’ senior management, there were no outstanding
stock options at 31 December 2016 (2015: 264,500). During the
year 2016, the Executive Committee Members have exercised
10,000 options (2015: 241,085) granted under the remaining
SOP 2006. 97,500 options (2015: 137,500) were exercised
and 40,000 options (2015: 0 options) were forfeited by former
Executive Committee Members. As all Airbus SOPs vested
before 2012 no related personnel expense was recognised in
2016 or in 2015.
Other benefi ts include expenses for Executive Committee
Members’ company cars and accident insurance. There were no
outstanding liabilities at 31 December 2016 or 2015 respectively.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 58 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
31.2 Remuneration – CEO
The total remuneration of the CEO and Executive Member of the Board of Directors, related to the reporting periods 2016 and
2015, can be summarised as follows:
2016
2015
Base salary
1,500,000
1,400,004
(In €)
Annual variable pay
2,062,000
1,659,000
Post-employment benefits costs
1,075,888
1,079,861
Share-based remuneration (“LTIP award”)(1)
1,528,732
2,401,751
Other benefits
71,755
69,050
Social charges
11,668
11,368
(1) Expense related to share-based payment plans as recognised in the annual period (service period) including the result from the hedge of cash-settled share-based payment:
see “– Note 30: Share-Based Payment” for details. The pay-out from vested cash settled LTIP in 2016 was € 2,279,689 (2015: € 3,148,629).
Annual Variable Pay
The annual variable pay is based on estimated performance achievement as at the balance sheet date and difference between
the previous year’s estimation and actual pay-out in the current year.
Post-Employment Benefit Costs
Post-employment benefit costs relate to the aggregated amount of current service and interest costs as well as interest costs on
employee’s contribution to the defined benefit plan.
For the CEO, the pension DBO including deferred compensation amounted to € 21,251,788 as of 31 December 2016 (€ 17,118,048
as of 31 December 2015), whilst the amount of current service and interest cost related to his pension promise accounted for in
the fiscal year 2016 represented an expense of € 1,075,888 (2015: € 1,079,861). This amount has been accrued in the Consolidated
Financial Statements.
Share-Based Remuneration
The table below gives an overview of the interests of the CEO, under the various LTIPs of Airbus:
LTIP
Granted date
Performance Units
Re-evaluation of PU
PUs re-evaluated
Vested in 2016
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
51,400
50,300
30,300
29,500
24,862
28,480
128%
89%
75%
100%
100%
100%
65,792
44,767
22,726
29,500
24,862
28,480
■
in cash
24,672
16,787
0
0
0
0
■
in shares
16,448
0
0
0
0
0
Outstanding 2016
■
in cash
0
16,788
11,363
22,125
18,647
14,240
■
in shares
0
11,192
11,363
7,375
6,215
14,240
November 2016
November 2017
July 2020
May 2020
Vesting schedule
Cash-settled units
Equity-settled units
For vesting dates, please see “– Note 30.1: SOP and LTIP”
November 2018
June 2019
Vesting of all Performance Units granted to the CEO is subject to performance conditions.
Fair value of outstanding LTIP balances at the end of 2016 for the CEO was € 2,353,453 (2015: € 3,460,607).
Other Benefits
The CEO is entitled to accident insurance coverage and a company car. In 2016, the total amount expensed was € 71,755 (2015:
€ 69,050). Airbus has not provided any loans to / advances to / guarantees on behalf of the CEO.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 59 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.6 Employees Costs and Benefi ts
31.3 Remuneration – Board of Directors
The remuneration of the Non-Executive Members of the Board of Directors was as follows:
2016
(In €)
2015
Fixum(1)
Attendance fees(2)
Total
Fixum(1)
Attendance fees
Total
Non-Executive Board Members
180,000
60,000
240,000
180,000
70,000
250,000
Manfred Bischoff
26,154
20,000
46,154
80,000
25,000
105,000
Ralph D. Crosby
80,000
50,000
130,000
80,000
35,000
115,000
Denis Ranque
(3)
67,582
40,000
107,582
0
0
0
Hans-Peter Keitel
100,000
60,000
160,000
100,000
35,000
135,000
Hermann-Josef Lamberti
110,000
55,000
165,000
110,000
30,000
140,000
Catherine Guillouard
Anne Lauvergeon
32,692
10,000
42,692
100,000
30,000
130,000
Lakshmi N. Mittal
100,000
50,000
150,000
100,000
35,000
135,000
María Amparo Moraleda Martínez
100,000
55,000
155,000
50,000
20,000
70,000
(3)
Claudia Nemat
67,582
30,000
97,582
0
0
0
Sir John Parker
110,000
60,000
170,000
110,000
30,000
140,000
32,692
20,000
52,692
100,000
25,000
125,000
Michel Pébereau
Carlos Tavares
(4)
Jean-Claude Trichet
54,066
20,000
74,066
0
0
0
100,000
60,000
160,000
100,000
35,000
135,000
Former Non-Executive Board Members
Josep Piqué i Camps
Total
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
0
0
0
41,668
0
41,668
1,160,768
590,000
1,750,768
1,151,668
370,000
1,521,668
The fixum related to 2016 was paid 50% in December 2016 and the other 50% will be paid in July 2017. The fixum related to 2015 was paid in 2016.
The attendance fees are paid at the end of each semester.
Member of the Company Board of Directors and Audit Committee as of 28 April 2016.
Member of the Company Board of Directors as of 28 April 2016.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 60 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
32. Total Equity
32.1 Equity Attributable to Equity Owners of the Parent
The Company’s shares are exclusively ordinary shares with a par value of € 1.00. The following table shows the development of
the number of shares issued and fully paid:
(In number of shares)
Issued as at 1 January
Issued for ESOP
Issued for exercised options
Cancelled
Issued as at 31 December
Treasury shares as at 31 December
Outstanding as at 31 December
Authorised shares
2016
2015
785,344,784
784,780,585
1,474,716
1,539,014
224,500
1,910,428
(14,131,131)
(2,885,243)
772,912,869
785,344,784
(184,170)
(1,474,057)
772,728,699
783,870,727
3,000,000,000
3,000,000,000
Holders of ordinary shares are entitled to dividends and are
entitled to one vote per share at general meetings of the
Company.
which € 223 million were recognised in financial liability which
led to a reduction of equity by € -513 million. The share buyback
has been completed for a total amount of € 1 billion.
Capital stock comprises the nominal amount of shares
outstanding. The addition to capital stock represents the
contribution for exercised options of € 224,500 (in 2015:
€ 1,910,428) in compliance with the implemented SOP and
by employees of € 1,474,716 (in 2015: € 1,539,014) under the
ESOPs.
On 28 April 2016, the Annual General Meeting (“AGM”) of
the Company authorised the Board of Directors, for a period
expiring at the AGM to be held in 2017, to issue shares and
grant rights to subscribe for shares in the Company’s share
capital for the purpose of:
Share premium mainly results from contributions in kind in
the course of the creation of Airbus, cash contributions from
the Company’s initial public offering, capital increases and
reductions due to the issuance and cancellation of shares.
Retained earnings include mainly the profit of the period and the
changes in other comprehensive income from remeasurements
of the defined benefit pension plans net of tax which amounts to
€ -1,383 million in 2016 (2015: € +491 million), and cash dividend
payments to Airbus Group SE shareholders.
On 28 April 2016, the Shareholders’ General Meeting decided to
distribute a gross amount of € 1.30 per share, which was paid on
4 May 2016. For the fiscal year 2016, Airbus’ Board of Directors
proposes a cash distribution payment of € 1.35 per share.
Treasury shares represent the amount paid or payable for own
shares held in treasury and relates to the share buyback which
took place between 2 November 2015 and 30 June 2016. As of
31 December 2015, the Company bought back € 264 million of
shares and recognised a financial liability of € 223 million for its
irrevocable share buyback commitment at that date. Recognition
of the financial liability led to a corresponding reduction of equity.
In 2016, the Company bought back € 736 million of shares of
■
■
ESOPs and share- related LTIPs in the limit of 0.14% of
the Company’s authorised share capital (see “– Note 30:
Share-Based Payment”);
funding the Company and its subsidiaries, provided that
such powers shall be limited to an aggregate of 0.3% of
the Company’s authorised share capital (see “– Note 34.3:
Financing Liabilities”).
For each operation, such powers shall not extend to issuing
shares or granting rights to subscribe for shares if there is no
preferential subscription right and for an aggregate issue price
in excess of € 500 million per share issuance.
Also on 28 April 2016, the AGM authorised the Board of
Directors for an 18-month period to repurchase up to 10%
of the Company’s issued and outstanding share capital (i.e.
issued share capital excluding shares held by the Company or
its subsidiaries) at a price not exceeding the higher of the price of
the last independent trade and the highest current independent
bid on the trading venues of the regulated market of the country
in which the purchase is carried out.
Furthermore, the AGM authorised both the Board of Directors
and the CEO, with powers of substitution, that the number of
shares repurchased by the Company pursuant to the share
buyback programme are cancelled.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 61 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
32.2 Non-Controlling Interests
The non-controlling interests (“NCI”) from non-wholly owned subsidiaries amount to € -5 million as of 31 December 2016
(2015: € 7 million). These NCI do not have a material interest in Airbus’ activities and cash flows.
Subsidiaries with NCI that are material to their stand-alone financial information are:
GEW
Airbus
Technologies (Pty) Ltd. DS Optronics (Pty) Ltd
Principal place of business
Pretoria (South Africa)
Ownership interest held by NCI
NCI (in € million)
Profit (loss) allocated to NCI (in € million)
Irene (South Africa)
Alestis
Aerospace S.L.
PFW
Aerospace GmbH
La Rinconada (Spain)
Speyer (Germany)
2016
2015
2016
2015
2016
2015
2016
2015
25%
25%
30%
30%
38.09%
38.09%
25.10%
25.10%
13
9
10
7
(34)
(25)
(28)
(28)
1
2
1
1
(5)
(7)
0
0
33. Capital Management
Airbus seeks to maintain a strong financial profile to safeguard its going concern, financial flexibility as well as shareholders’, credit
investors’ and other stakeholders’ confidence in Airbus. Consequently, operating liquidity is of great importance.
As part of its capital management, it is one of Airbus’ objectives to maintain a strong credit rating by institutional rating agencies.
This enables Airbus to contain its cost of capital which positively impacts its stakeholder value (entity value). Next to other nonfinancial parameters, the credit rating is based on factors such as, cash flow ratios, profitability and liquidity ratios. Airbus monitors
these ratios to keep them in a range compatible with a strong rating.
Rating agency
Long-term rating
Outlook
Short-term rating
Standard and Poor’s(1)
A+
Stable
A-1+
Moody’s Investors Services
A2
Stable
P-1
Fitch Ratings (unsolicited)
A-
Stable
F-2
(1) The long-term rating with Standard and Poor’s has been upgraded to A+ from A in September 2016.
Airbus’ stand-alone ratings reflect the strong backlog providing
revenue visibility and Airbus Commercial Aircraft leading market
position, Airbus’ strong liquidity and improving credit metrics
as well as management’s focus on programmes execution,
profitability and cash generation improvement. The rating is
constrained by Airbus’ exposure to structural currency risk.
In accordance with Airbus’ conservative financial policy, a strong
rating is key to maintain a wide array of funding sources at
attractive conditions, to have broad access to long-term hedging
and to strengthen Airbus Commercial Aircraft’s position as a
solid counterparty for its customers and suppliers.
Among other indicators, Airbus uses a Value Based Management
approach in order to guide the Company towards sustainable
value creation by generating financial returns above the cost
of capital.
The key elements of the Value Based Management concept are:
■
■
■
the definition of financial returns;
the definition of the Company’s capital base; and
the measurement of value creation derived from the two
above.
Airbus uses Return on Capital Employed (“RoCE”) to measure
the value created by financial returns relative to its capital base.
RoCE, as defined by Airbus, uses EBIT for the numerator and
Average Capital Employed for the denominator. The Average
Capital Employed for Airbus is defined as the average of the
annual opening and closing positions of Fixed Assets plus Net
Operating Working Capital plus O perating Cash less Other
Provisions.
Financial value is created if profits relative to Airbus’ Capital
Employed exceed the Company’s cost of capital. Value can
be measured by comparing RoCE to the WACC. A fi ve year
plan for a value creation ambition is constructed annually, and
is composed of (i) RoCE, (ii) EBIT, and (iii) Free Cash Flow,
which is defined as Cash provided by operating activities and
Cash used for investing activities less Change of securities,
Contribution to plan assets for pensions and realised Treasury
swaps. The Company’s long-term aspiration is to reach the
first quartile of RoCE performance among our aerospace and
defence peers.
Airbus also monitors the level of dividends paid to its
shareholders.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 62 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
The Company generally satisfies its obligations arising from
share-based payment plans by issuing new shares. In order to
avoid any dilution of its current shareholders out of these sharebased payment plans, the Company performs share buybacks
and cancels its own shares following the decisions of the Board
of Directors and approval of the AGM. Apart from this purpose,
the Company generally does not trade with treasury shares.
The Company complies with the capital requirements under
applicable law and its Articles of Association.
34. Net Cash
The net cash-position provides financial flexibility to fund Airbus’ operations, to react to business needs and risk profile and to
return capital to the shareholders.
31 December
(In € million)
Cash and cash equivalents(1)
2016
2015
10,143
6,590
Current securities
1,551
1,788
Non-current securities
9,897
9,851
Short-term financing liabilities
(1,687)
(2,790)
Long-term financing liabilities
(8,791)
(6,335)
Total(1)
11,113
9,104
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted by € -899 million.
Derivative instruments recognised on Airbus’ Statement of
Financial Position consist of (i) instruments that are entered
into as hedges of Airbus’ operating activities or interest result,
and (ii) embedded foreign currency derivatives that arise from
separating the foreign currency component from certain
operating contracts. Cash flows resulting from the settlement
of these derivatives are therefore recorded as part of cash flow
from operations. Similarly, financial assets and liabilities arising
from customer financing activities and refundable advances
from European Governments are considered part of operating
activities and related cash flows are hence recognised as cash
flows from operating activities.
34.1 Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents are composed of the following elements:
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Bank account and petty cash
3,100
1,504
Short-term securities (at fair value through profit and loss)
5,513
3,220
Short-term securities (available-for-sale)(1)
1,535
1,952
12
1
10,160
6,677
17
87
10,143
6,590
Others
Total cash and cash equivalents
(1)
Recognised in disposal groups classified as held for sale
Recognised in cash and cash equivalents
(1)
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted by € -899 million.
Only securities with a maturity of three months or less from the date of the acquisition, that are readily convertible to known
amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value, are recognised in cash equivalents.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 63 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
34.2 Securities
34.3 Financing Liabilities
The majority of Airbus’ securities consists of debt securities and
are classified as available-for-sale financial assets and carried
at their fair values (see “– Note 35.2: Carrying Amounts and
Fair Values of Financial Instruments” for more details on how
available-for-sale assets are accounted for).
Financing liabilities comprise obligations towards financial
institutions, issued corporate bonds, deposits made by
customers of Airbus Group Bank, borrowings received from
joint ventures and other parties as well as finance lease liabilities.
Financing liabilities are recorded initially at the fair value of
the proceeds received, net of transaction costs incurred.
Subsequently, financing liabilities are measured at amortised
cost, using the effective interest rate method with any difference
between proceeds (net of transaction costs) and redemption
amount being recognised in total finance income (cost) over the
period of the financing liability.
Airbus’ security portfolio amounts to € 11,448 million
and € 11,639 million as of 31 December 2016 and 2015,
respectively. The security portfolio contains a non-current
portion of available-for-sale-securities of € 9,897 million (in
2015: € 9,848 million), no amount of securities designated at
fair value through profit and loss (in 2015: € 3 million), and a
current portion of available-for-sale-securities of € 1,551 million
(in 2015: € 1,788 million).
Included in the securities portfolio as of 31 December 2016
and 2015, respectively, are corporate and government bonds
bearing either fixed rate coupons (€ 10,736 million nominal value;
comparably in 2015: € 10,956 million) or floating rate coupons
(€ 360 million nominal value; comparably in 2015: € 397 million)
and foreign currency funds of hedge funds (€ 6 million nominal
value; 2015: € 8 million).
When Airbus enters into securities lending activities, the
securities pledged as collateral continue to be recognised on
the balance sheet. There were no such securities pledged as
of 31 December 2016 and 2015.
Financing liabilities to fi nancial institutions include liabilities
from securities lending transactions. In securities lending
transactions, Airbus receives cash from its counterparty and
transfers the securities subject to the lending transaction as
collateral. The amount of cash received is recognised as a
financing liability. The securities lent are not derecognised, but
remain on Airbus’ Statement of Financial Position.
The Company has issued several euro-denominated bonds
under its Euro Medium Term Note programme (“EMTN”) and a
stand-alone US dollar-denominated bond on the US institutional
market under Rule 144A. It has also issued an euro-denominated
convertible bond and euro-denominated exchangeable bonds
into Dassault Aviation shares. Furthermore, the Company has
long-term US dollar-denominated loans outstanding with the
European Investment Bank (“EIB”) and the Development Bank
of Japan (“DBJ”).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 64 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
The terms and repayment schedules of these bonds and loans are as follows:
Carrying amount
(In € million)
Principal
amount
(In million)
EMTN 15 years
€ 500
EMTN 7 years
US$ Bond 10 years
€ 1,000
US$ 1,000
EMTN 10 years
€ 1,000
2016
533
0
940
1,052
2015
550
1,018
Issuance
date
Sep. 2003
Aug. 2009
917
Apr. 2013
1,021
Apr. 2014
€ 500
526
497
Oct. 2014
US$ 3,000
0
505
Apr. 2015
EMTN 15 years
US$ Commercial
paper programme
31 December
Convertible bond
7 years
EMTN 10 years
EMTN 15 years
Exchangeable
bonds 5 years
€ 500
€ 600
€ 900
€ 1,078
Bonds
DBJ 10 years
US$ 300
464
589
861
458
0
May 2016
0
1,048
0
6,013
4,966
285
Jul. 2015
May 2016
276
Coupon
or interest
rate
5.50%
4.625%
2.70%
2.375%
2.125%
0.00%
0.875%
1.375%
EIB 7 years
US$ 406
385
373
Feb. 2013
3M US-Libor
+0.93%
Others
Liabilities to financial
institutions
US$ 320
304
294
0
223
370
153
2,423
2,462
Dec. 2014
2.52%
Dec. 2015
6M US-Libor
+0.559%
The Company can issue commercial paper under the so called
“billet de trésorerie” programme at floating or fixed interest rates
corresponding to the individual maturities ranging from 1 day
to 12 months. The programme has been set up in 2003 with a
maximum volume of € 2 billion, increased in 2013 to a maximum
1.386%
0.951%
1.49%
0.333%
Apr. 2024
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Euribor +1.40%
Oct. 2029
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Euribor +0.84%
Jul. 2022
Convertible into
Airbus Group SE
shares at € 99.54
per share
May 2026
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Euribor
May 2031
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Euribor
Jun. 2021
Exchangeable
into Dassault
Aviation shares
Jan. 2021
Interest rate
swapped into
4.76% fixed
Interest rate
swapped into
3.2% fixed
Feb. 2020
Aug. 2011
Share buyback
commitment
2.194%
Apr. 2023
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Libor +0.68%
Aug. 2021
567
EIB 10 years
2.394%
Aug. 2016
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Euribor +1.57%
Jan. 2011
488
576
2.73%
Sep. 2018
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Euribor +1.72%
3M US-Libor
+1.15%
US$ 721
591
4.68%
Additional
features
0.00%
EIB 10 years
US$ 627
5.58%
Maturity
date
Jun. 2016
3M US-Libor
+0.85%
EIB 10 years
Effective
interest
rate
2.52%
Dec. 2024
Interest rate
swapped into 3M
Libor +0.61%
Dec. 2025
volume of € 3 billion. As of 31 December 2016, there was no
outstanding amount under the programme. The Company
established in April 2015 a US$ 2 billion commercial paper
programme which has been increased to US$ 3 billion in
April 2016.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 65 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
Financing liabilities include outstanding debt of € 85 million
(2015: € 129 million) relating to a loan Airbus Commercial
Aircraft received from Air 2 US in 1999 by way of a reinvestment
note amounting to US$ 800 million, bearing a fi xed interest
rate of 9.88%, and other liabilities related to sales financing
(see “– Note 25: Sales Financing Transactions”).
(In € million)
In June 2016, the Company issued € 1,078 million exchangeable
bonds into Dassault Aviation shares, with a 5-year maturity.
The exchangeable bonds were issued at 103.75% of par with
a coupon of 0%. Their effective interest rate, after separation
of the equity conversion option related to Dassault Aviation
shares, is 0.333%.
Not exceeding 1 year
Over 1 year up to 5 years
More than 5 years
Bonds
Total
0
1,581
4,432
6,013
Liabilities to financial institutions
351
1,573
499
2,423
Loans
332
213
118
663
15
154
220
389
Liabilities from finance leases
Others
(1)
31 December 2016
Bonds
989
1
0
990
1,687
3,522
5,269
10,478
1,523
550
2,893
4,966
Liabilities to financial institutions
349
1,112
1,001
2,462
Loans
255
163
240
658
13
145
230
388
Liabilities from finance leases
Others(1)
31 December 2015
650
1
0
651
2,790
1,971
4,364
9,125
(1) Included in “others” are financing liabilities to joint ventures.
The aggregate amounts of financing liabilities maturing during the next five years and thereafter as of 31 December 2016 and as
of 31 December 2015, are as follows:
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
1 year
1,687
2,790
829
228
3 years
271
835
4 years
703
252
2 years
5 years
1,719
656
Thereafter
5,269
4,364
10,478
9,125
Total
35. Information about Financial Instruments
35.1 Financial Risk Management
By the nature of its activities, Airbus is exposed to a variety of
financial risks: (i) market risks, in particular foreign exchange risk,
but also interest rate risk, equity price risk and commodity price
risk, (ii) liquidity risk and (iii) credit risk. Airbus’ overall financial
risk management activities focus on mitigating unpredictable
financial market risks and their potential adverse effects on
Airbus’ operational and financial performance.
policies approved by the Board of Directors or by the Chief
Financial Officer. The identification, evaluation and hedging of
the financial risks is in the joint responsibility of established
treasury committees and Airbus’ Divisions.
Airbus uses financial derivatives solely for risk mitigating
purposes (“hedging”) and applies hedge accounting for a
significant portion of its hedging portfolio.
The financial risk management of Airbus is generally carried
out by the Corporate Finance department at Airbus under
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 66 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
Market Risk
Foreign exchange risk — Foreign exchange risk arises
when future commercial transactions or firm commitments,
recognised monetary assets and liabilities and net investments
in foreign operations are denominated in a currency that is not
the entity’s functional currency.
Airbus manages a long-term hedge portfolio with maturities of
several years covering its net exposure to US dollar sales, mainly
from the activities of Airbus Commercial Aircraft. This hedge
portfolio covers a large portion of Airbus’ firm commitments
and highly probable forecast transactions.
Most of Airbus’ revenue is denominated in US dollars, while a
major portion of its costs is incurred in euro and to some extent
in other foreign currencies. Consequently, to the extent that
Airbus does not use financial instruments to hedge its exposure
resulting from this currency mismatch, its profits will be affected
by changes in the €/US$ exchange rate. As Airbus intends to
generate profits primarily from its operations rather than through
speculation on exchange rate movements, it uses hedging
strategies to manage and minimise the impact of exchange
rate fluctuations on these profits.
With respect to its commercial aircraft products, Airbus
typically hedges firmly committed sales in US dollars using a
“first flow approach”. Under that approach, the foreign currency
derivatives Airbus enters into are designated as a hedge of the
first US dollar inflows received from the customer at aircraft
delivery in a given month. The strategy implies that only a portion
of the expected monthly customer payments made at aircraft
delivery are hedged. For this reason, a reduction of monthly
cash inflows as a result of postponements or order cancellations
have no impact on the effectiveness of the hedge as long as the
actual gross US dollar cash inflows received at aircraft delivery
in a particular month exceed the portion designated as being
hedged in that month.
Similarly, though to a much lesser extent, Airbus hedges its
expected foreign currency exposure arising from US dollar or
pound sterling cash outflows in the commercial aircraft business
on a first outflow basis.
In military aircraft and non-aircraft businesses, Airbus hedges
in and outflows in foreign currencies from firmly committed
or highly probable forecast sales and purchase contracts.
Here, foreign currency derivatives are typically contracted in
lower volumes; they may be accounted for using a first flow
approach or are designated as hedges of specifi c agreed
milestone payments. The amount of the expected fl ows to
be hedged can cover up to 100% of the equivalent of the net
US dollar exposure at inception. The coverage ratio considers
the variability in the range of potential outcomes taking into
account macroeconomic movements affecting spot rates and
interest rates as well as the robustness of the commercial
cycle.
In situations where the payment dates for hedged firmly
committed cash flows are not fixed and subject to potentially
significant delays, Airbus may use rollover strategies, usually
involving F/X swaps.
For all foreign currency hedges of future cash flows which qualify
for hedge accounting under IAS 39, Airbus uses the cash flow
hedge model, which requires (i) recognising the effective portion
of the fair value changes of the hedging derivatives in equity
(within other comprehensive income) and (ii) recognising the
effect of the hedge in profit or loss when the hedged cash flows
affect profit or loss.
In addition, Airbus hedges currency risk arising from financial
assets or liabilities denominated in currencies other than
the euro, including foreign currency receivable and payable
accounts, as well as foreign currency denominated funding
transactions or securities. Airbus applies hedge accounting if
a mismatch in terms of profit or loss recognition of the hedging
instrument and hedged item would otherwise occur. Frequently,
however, the currency-induced gains or losses of the hedging
instrument and the hedged item match in terms of profit or
loss recognition (“natural hedge”), so no hedge accounting
is required. Sometimes such gains or losses may end up in
different sections of the income statement (such as operating
profit for the hedged item and financial result for the hedging
instrument). If so, Airbus may choose to present the gains
or losses of both the hedging instrument and the hedged
item in the same income statement line item if certain formal
requirements are met.
As hedging instruments, Airbus primarily uses foreign currency
forwards, foreign currency options and to a minor extent nonderivative financial instruments.
Airbus also has foreign currency derivative instruments which
are embedded in certain purchase contracts denominated in a
currency other than the functional currency of any substantial
party to the contract, principally in US dollar and pound sterling.
If such embedded derivatives are required to be accounted for
separately from the host purchase contract, related gains or
losses are generally recognised in other financial result. However,
if the embedded derivatives qualify for hedge accounting, Airbus
might choose to designate them as a hedging instrument in a
hedge of foreign currency risk, in which case they are accounted
for under the cash flow hedge model as described above.
Interest rate risk — Airbus uses an asset-liability management
approach with the objective to limit its interest rate risk. Airbus
undertakes to match the risk profile of its interest-bearing assets
with those of its interest-bearing liabilities. The remaining net
interest rate exposure is managed through several types of
interest rate derivatives, such as interest rate swaps and interest
rate futures contracts, in order to minimise risks and financial
impacts.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 67 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
The vast majority of related interest rate hedges qualify for hedge
accounting, and most of them are accounted for under the fair
value hedge model. As a result, both the fair value changes of
these derivatives and the portion of the hedged items’ fair value
change that is attributable to the hedged interest rate risk are
recognised in profit and loss, where they offset to the extent
the hedge is effective.
A few interest rate swaps that have been entered into as a
hedge of certain of Airbus’ variable rate debt (see “– Note 34.3:
Financing Liabilities”) are accounted for under the cash flow
hedge model, and related fair value gains are recognised in
OCI and reclassified to profit or loss when the hedged interest
payments affect profit or loss.
Airbus invests in financial instruments such as overnight
deposits, certificates of deposits, commercial papers, other
money market instruments and short-term as well as mediumterm bonds. For its financial instruments portfolio, Airbus has an
Asset Management Committee in place that meets regularly and
aims to limit the interest rate risk on a fair value basis through
a value-at-risk approach.
Commodity price risk — Airbus is exposed to risk relating to
fluctuations in the prices of commodities used in the supply
chain. Airbus manages these risks in the procurement process
and to a certain extent uses derivative instruments in order to
mitigate the risks associated with the purchase of raw materials.
To the extent that the gains or losses of the derivative and
those of the hedged item or transaction do not match in terms
of profit or loss, Airbus applies cash flow hedge accounting to
the derivative instruments.
Equity price risk — Airbus is to a small extent invested in equity
securities mainly for operational reasons. Airbus’ exposure to
equity price risk is hence limited. Furthermore, Airbus is exposed
under its LTIP to the risk of the Company share price increases.
Airbus limits these risks through the use of equity derivatives
that qualify for hedge accounting and have been designated
as hedging instruments in a cash flow hedge.
Sensitivities of market risks — The approach used to
measure and control market risk exposure within Airbus’
financial instrument portfolio is, amongst other key indicators,
the value-at-risk (“VaR”). The VaR of a portfolio is the estimated
potential loss that will not be exceeded over a specified period
of time (holding period) from an adverse market movement
with a specifi ed confi dence level. The VaR used by Airbus
is based upon a 95% confidence level and assumes a fi veday holding period. The VaR model used is mainly based on
the so called “Monte-Carlo-Simulation” method. Deriving the
statistical behaviour of the markets relevant for the portfolio
out of market data from the previous two years and observed
interdependencies between different markets and prices, the
model generates a wide range of potential future scenarios for
market price movements.
Airbus’ VaR computation includes Airbus’ financial debt, shortterm and long-term investments, foreign currency forwards,
swaps and options, commodity contracts, finance lease
receivables and liabilities, foreign currency trade payables and
receivables, including intra-Airbus payables and receivables
affecting Airbus profit and loss.
Although VaR is an important tool for measuring market risk,
the assumptions on which the model is based give rise to some
limitations, including the following:
■
■
■
A 5-day holding period assumes that it is possible to hedge or
dispose of positions within that period. This is considered to
be a realistic assumption in almost all cases but may not be
the case in situations in which there is severe market illiquidity
for a prolonged period.
A 95% confidence level does not reflect losses that may occur
beyond this level. Even within the model used there is a 5%
statistical probability that losses could exceed the calculated
VaR.
T he use of historical data as a basis for estimating the
statistical behaviour of the relevant markets and finally
determining the possible range of future outcomes out of
this statistical behaviour may not always cover all possible
scenarios, especially those of an exceptional nature.
Airbus uses VaR amongst other key figures in order to determine
the riskiness of its financial instrument portfolio and in order
to optimise the risk-return ratio of its financial asset portfolio.
Further, Airbus’ investment policy defines a VaR limit for the total
portfolio of cash, cash equivalents and securities. The total VaR
as well as the different risk-factor specific VaR figures of this
portfolio are measured and serve amongst other measures as a
basis for the decisions of Airbus’ Asset Management Committee.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 68 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
A summary of the VaR position of Airbus’ financial instruments portfolio at 31 December 2016 and 2015 is as follows:
(In € million)
31 December 2016
Foreign exchange hedges for forecast
transactions or firm commitments
Total VaR
Equity price VaR
Currency VaR Commodity price VaR
Interest rate VaR
1,778
0
1,873
0
180
Financing liabilities, financial assets
(including cash, cash equivalents
securities and related hedges)
80
57
58
0
19
Finance lease receivables and
liabilities, foreign currency trade
payables and receivables
81
0
15
0
86
Commodity contracts
4
0
1
4
0
Equity swaps
4
4
0
0
0
Diversification effect
All financial instruments
31 December 2015
Foreign exchange hedges for forecast
transactions or firm commitments
Financing liabilities, financial assets
(including cash, cash equivalents
securities and related hedges)(1)
Finance lease receivables and
liabilities, foreign currency trade
payables and receivables(1)
Commodity contracts
Equity swaps
Diversification effect(1)
All financial instruments
(276)
(1)
(127)
0
(70)
1,671
60
1,820
4
215
1,814
0
1,870
0
181
196
162
61
0
14
87
0
22
0
83
7
0
3
6
0
11
11
0
0
0
(403)
(8)
(148)
0
(91)
1,712
165
1,808
6
187
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified.
The total VaR as of 31 December 2016 is stable compared to year-end 2015. The market environment, in particular foreign exchange
volatility, as well as the size of the net foreign exchange portfolio, is comparable to year-end 2015. As a result, the respective
market risks of these hedging instruments are – depending on the hedges’ actual effectiveness – offset by corresponding opposite
market risks of the underlying forecast transactions, assets or liabilities. Under IFRS 7, the underlying forecast transactions do
not qualify as financial instruments and are therefore not included in the tables shown above. Accordingly, the VaR of the foreign
exchange hedging portfolio in the amount of € 1,778 million (2015: € 1,814 million) cannot be considered as a risk indicator for
Airbus in the economic sense. When looking at the financial instrument types the noticeable change is within the financial assets
coming from the lower equity price VaR related to the decrease of the Dassault Aviation equity portfolio.
Liquidity Risk
Airbus’ policy is to maintain sufficient cash and cash equivalents
at any time to meet its present and future commitments as
they fall due. Airbus manages its liquidity by holding adequate
volumes of liquid assets and maintains a committed credit facility
(€ 3.0 billion as of 31 December 2016 and 2015) in addition to
the cash inflow generated by its operating business. Airbus
continues to keep within the asset portfolio the focus on low
counterparty risk. In addition, Airbus maintains a set of other
funding sources, and accordingly may issue bonds, notes and
commercial papers or enter into security lending agreements.
Adverse changes in the capital markets could increase Airbus’
funding costs and limit its financial flexibility.
Further, the management of the vast majority of Airbus’ liquidity
exposure is centralised by a daily cash concentration process.
This process enables Airbus to manage its liquidity surplus as
well as its liquidity requirements according to the actual needs
of its subsidiaries. In addition, management monitors Airbus’
liquidity reserve as well as the expected cash flows from its
operations.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 69 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
The contractual maturities of Airbus’ financial liabilities, based on undiscounted cash flows and including interest payments, if
applicable, are as follows:
Carrying Contractual
amount(1) cash flows(1) < 1 year(1)
(In € million)
31 December 2016
Non-derivative financial liabilities
Derivative financial liabilities
1 year2 years
2 years3 years
3 years4 years
4 years5 years
> 5 years
(23,994)
(25,293)
(14,903)
(1,268)
(458)
(886)
(1,923)
(5,856)
(11,020)
(13,891)
(4,568)
(3,772)
(2,897)
(1,511)
(831)
(312)
(35,014)
(39,184)
(19,471)
(5,040)
(3,355)
(2,397)
(2,754)
(6,168)
Non-derivative financial liabilities
(21,175)
(22,456)
(14,412)
(832)
(1,113)
(408)
(762)
(4,929)
Derivative financial liabilities
(10,587)
(12,690)
(3,973)
(2,747)
(3,518)
(1,898)
(506)
(48)
(31,762)
(35,146)
(18,385)
(3,579)
(4,631)
(2,306)
(1,268)
(4,977)
Total
31 December 2015
Total
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted by € 899 million.
Non-derivative financial liabilities included in the table above comprise financing liabilities and finance lease liabilities as presented
in the tables of “– Note 35.2: Carrying Amounts and Fair Values of Financial Instruments”. Due to their specific nature, namely
their risk-sharing features and uncertainty about the repayment dates, the European Governments refundable advances, which
amount to € 7,070 million at 31 December 2016 (€ 7,286 million at 31 December 2015) are not included.
Credit Risk
Airbus is exposed to credit risk to the extent of non-performance
by either its customers (e.g. airlines) or its counterparts with
regard to financial instruments or issuers of financial instruments
for gross cash investments. However, Airbus has policies in
place to avoid concentrations of credit risk and to ensure that
credit risk is limited.
Sales of products and services are made to customers after
having conducted appropriate internal credit risk assessment. In
order to support sales, primarily at Airbus Commercial Aircraft
and ATR, Airbus may agree to participate in the fi nancing
of customers, on a case-by-case basis, directly or through
guarantees provided to third parties. In determining the amount
and terms of the fi nancing transaction, Airbus Commercial
Aircraft and ATR take into account the airline’s credit rating
and economic factors reflecting the relevant financial market
conditions, together with appropriate assumptions as to the
anticipated future value of the financed asset.
As far as central treasury activities are concerned, credit risk
resulting from financial instruments is managed on Airbus level.
In order to ensure sufficient diversification, a credit limit system
is used.
Airbus monitors the performance of the individual fi nancial
instruments and the impact of the market developments on
their performance and takes appropriate action on foreseeable
adverse development based on pre-defined procedures and
escalation levels.
The booked amount of financial assets represents the maximum
credit exposure. The credit quality of financial assets can be
assessed by reference to external credit rating (if available)
or internal assessment of customers’ (such as airlines’)
creditworthiness by way of internal risk pricing methods.
The following table breaks down the carrying amounts of non-cash loans and receivables including finance leases, separately
showing those that are impaired, renegotiated or past due:
(In € million)
31 December 2016
Customer financing
Trade receivables
Not
past
due
Renegociated /
Past due
Past due
Past due
not past due /
Past due
> 3 and
> 6 and
> 9 and
Past due
not impaired Impaired ≤ 3 months ≤ 6 months ≤ 9 months ≤ 12 months > 12 months
Total
846
0
0
4
3
86
0
0
939
5,976
27
42
1,035
232
281
77
431
8,101
Others
1,313
9
78
111
48
182
22
466
2,229
Total
8,135
36
120
1,150
283
549
99
897
11,269
31 December 2015
Customer financing
721
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
721
Trade receivables
5,823
115
162
866
402
112
96
301
7,877
Others
1,251
24
8
196
30
45
198
183
1,935
Total
7,795
139
170
1,062
432
157
294
484
10,533
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 70 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
The management believes that the unimpaired amounts that are
past due are still collectible in full, based on historic payment
behaviour and analysis of customer credit risk, including
underlying customers’ credit ratings if they are available.
At year-end there was no indication that any financial assets
carried at fair value were impaired.
35.2
Carrying Amounts and Fair Values
of Financial Instruments
Financial instruments — Airbus’ financial assets mainly consist
in cash, short to medium-term deposits and securities. Airbus’
financial liabilities include trade liabilities, obligations towards
financial institutions, issued bonds and refundable advances
from European Government s. All purchases and sales of
financial assets are recognised on the settlement date according
to market conventions. Airbus classifies its financial assets in
the following three categories: (i) at fair value through profit or
loss, (ii) loans and receivables and (iii) available-for-sale financial
assets. Their classifi cation is determined by management
when first recognised and depends on the purpose for their
acquisition.
Within Airbus, all investments in entities which do not qualify
for consolidation or equity-method accounting are classified as
non-current available-for-sale financial assets. They are included
in the line other investments and other long-term financial assets
in the Consolidated Statement of Financial Position.
Available-for-sale financial assets — Financial assets
classified as available-for-sale are accounted for at fair value.
Changes in their fair value other than impairment losses and
foreign exchange gains and losses on monetary items are
recognised directly within AOCI. As soon as such fi nancial
assets are sold or otherwise disposed of, or are determined to
be impaired, the cumulative gain or loss previously recognised
in equity is recorded as part of other income (other expense)
from investments in the Consolidated Income Statement for
the period. Interest earned on the investment is presented as
interest income in the Consolidated Income Statement using the
effective interest method. Dividends earned on investment are
recognised as other income (other expense) from investments
in the Consolidated Income Statement when the right to the
payment has been established.
In case of the impairment of debt instruments classifi ed as
available-for-sale, interest continues to be accrued at the original
effective interest rate on the reduced carrying amount of the
asset and is recorded in financial result. If, in a subsequent year,
the fair value of a debt instrument increases and the increase can
be objectively related to an event occurring after the impairment
loss was recognised in the Consolidated Income Statement, the
impairment loss is reversed through the Consolidated Income
Statement.
Financial assets at fair value through profi t or loss —
Within Airbus, only derivatives not designated as hedges are
categorised as held for trading. Furthermore, Airbus designates
certain financial assets (such as investments in accumulated
money market funds) at fair value through profit or loss at initial
recognition if they are part of a group of financial assets that
is managed and its performance is evaluated on a fair value
basis, in accordance with a documented risk management or
investment strategy.
Airbus assigns its financial instruments into classes based on
their balance sheet category.
2
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 71 °
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
The following table presents the carrying amounts and fair values of financial instruments by class and by IAS 39 measurement
category as of 31 December 2016:
Fair value
for hedge
relations
Fair value through
profit or loss
(In € million)
Assets
Other investments and other
long-term financial assets
Held for
trading
Designated
Fair
value
Loans and receivables
Available- and financial liabilities
at amortised cost
for-sale
Fair
value
Amortised
cost
Other
Fair
value
Financial
instruments
total
Book
value
0
0
Fair
value
■
Equity investments(1)(2)
0
0
0
2,091
0
■
Customer financing(3)
0
0
0
0
732
735
207
939
942
■
Other loans
0
0
0
0
1,147
1,147
0
1,147
1,147
Trade receivables
0
0
0
0
8,101
8,101
0
8,101
8,101
Other financial assets
66
0
1,085
0
0
0
0
1,151
1,151
0
0
0
0
1,082
1,082
0
1,082
1,082
11,448
■
Derivative instruments(6)
■
Non-derivative instruments
2,091
2,091
Securities
0
0
0
11,448
0
0
0
11,448
Cash and cash equivalents
0
5,513
0
1,535
3,095
3,095
0
10,143
10,143
66
5,513
1,085
15,074
14,157
14,160
207
36,102
36,105
Liabilities
Financing liabilities
0
0
0
0
(6,013)
(6,217)
Total
■
■
■
Issued bonds and
commercial papers
Liabilities to banks and other
financing liabilities
0
0
0
0
(4,076)
Finance lease liabilities(4)
0
0
0
0
0
Other financial liabilities
■
■
■
Derivative instruments(7)
European Governments
refundable advances(5)
Other
Trade liabilities
Total
0
(6,013)
(6,217)
(4,086)
0
(4,076)
(4,086)
0
(389)
(389)
(389)
0
(11,020)
(11,020)
(7,070)
(349)
0
(10,671)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
(7,070)
(7,070)
0
(7,070)
(38)
0
0
0
(946)
(946)
0
(984)
(984)
0
0
0
0
(12,532)
(12,532)
0
(12,532)
(12,532)
(387)
0
(10,671)
0
(30,637)
(30,851)
(389) (42,084) (42,298)
(1) Other than those accounted for under the equity method.
(2) For certain unlisted equity investments price quotes are not available and fair values may not be reliably measurable using valuation techniques because the range of reasonable
fair value estimates is significant and the probabilities of the various estimates within the range cannot be reasonably assessed. These equity investments are accounted for
at cost, and their fair values as reported in the table above equal their carrying amounts. As of 31 December 2016, the aggregate carrying amount of these investments was
€ 494 million.
(3) This includes finance lease receivables, which are not assigned to an IAS 39 measurement category, but reported as “other”.
(4) Finance lease liabilities are accounted for in accordance with IAS 17 in a manner that is similar, though not identical in all respects, to amortised-cost accounting under IAS 39.
They are therefore assigned to the category “other”.
(5) The European Governments refundable advances of € 7,070 million are measured at amortised cost. Fair values cannot be reliably measured because their risk sharing nature
and the uncertainty of the repayment dates give rise to a broad range of reasonable fair value estimates and make it impossible to reasonably assess the probabilities of the
various estimates within the range. This may change and reliable fair value measures become available as the related programmes approach the end of production.
(6) This includes credit value adjustments of € -44 million, of which € -42 million is recognised in OCI.
(7) This includes debit value adjustments of € 87 million, of which € 82 million is recognised in OCI.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 72 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
The following table presents the carrying amounts and fair values of financial instruments by class and by IAS 39 measurement
category as of 31 December 2015:
Fair value through
profit or loss
(In € million)
Fair value
for hedge
relations
Availablefor-sale
Held for
trading
Designated
Fair
value
Fair
value
Loans and receivables
and financial liabilities
at amortised cost
Amortised
cost
Other
Fair
value
Financial
instruments total
Book
value
Fair
value
Assets
Other investments and other
long-term financial assets
■
Equity investments(1)(2)
0
0
0
1,232
0
0
0
1,232
1,232
■
Customer financing(3)
0
0
0
0
553
553
168
721
721
■
Other loans
0
0
0
0
717
717
0
717
717
0
0
0
0
7,877
7,877
0
7,877
7,877
317
0
963
0
0
0
0
1,280
1,280
0
0
0
0
1,218
1,218
0
1,218
1,218
0
3
0
11,636
0
0
0
11,639
11,639
Trade receivables
Other financial assets
■
Derivative instruments(6)
■
Non-derivative instruments
Securities
Cash and cash equivalents(8)
Total(8)
0
3,220
0
1,952
1,418
1,418
0
6,590
6,590
317
3,223
963
14,820
11,783
11,783
168
31,274
31,274
0
0
0
0
(4,966)
(5,091)
0
(4,966)
(5,091)
Liabilities
Financing liabilities
■
■
■
Issued bonds and
commercial papers
Liabilities to banks and
other financing liabilities
0
0
0
0
(3,771)
(3,822)
0
(3,771)
(3,822)
Finance lease liabilities(4)
0
0
0
0
0
0
(388)
(388)
(388)
Derivative instruments(7)
(427)
0
(10,160)
0
0
0
0
(10,587)
(10,587)
European Governments
refundable advances(5)
0
0
0
0
(7,286)
(7,286)
0
(7,286)
(7,286)
(74)
0
0
0
(1,112)
(1,112)
0
(1,186)
(1,186)
0
0
0
0
(10,864)
(10,864)
0
(10,864)
(10,864)
(501)
0
(10,160)
0
(27,999)
(28,175)
(388)
Other financial liabilities
■
■
■
Other
Trade liabilities(8)
Total(8)
(39,048) (39,224)
(1) Other than those accounted for under the equity method.
(2) For certain unlisted equity investments price quotes are not available and fair values may not be reliably measurable using valuation techniques because the range of reasonable
fair value estimates is significant and the probabilities of the various estimates within the range cannot be reasonably assessed. These equity investments are accounted for
at cost, and their fair values as reported in the table above equal their carrying amounts. As of 31 December 2015, the aggregate carrying amount of these investments was
€ 404 million.
(3) This includes finance lease receivables, which are not assigned to an IAS 39 measurement category, but reported as “other”.
(4) Finance lease liabilities are accounted for in accordance with IAS 17 in a manner that is similar, though not identical in all respects, to amortised-cost accounting under IAS 39.
They are therefore assigned to the category “other”.
(5) The European Governments refundable advances of € 7,286 million are measured at amortised cost. Fair values cannot be reliably measured because their risk sharing nature
and the uncertainty of the repayment dates give rise to a broad range of reasonable fair value estimates and make it impossible to reasonably assess the probabilities of the
various estimates within the range. This may change and reliable fair value measures become available as the related programmes approach the end of production.
(6) This includes credit value adjustments of € -47 million, of which € -28 million is recognised in OCI.
(7) This includes debit value adjustments of € 117 million, of which € 95 million is recognised in OCI.
(8) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted by € -899 million.
Fair Value Hierarchy
Fair value of financial instruments — The fair value of quoted
investments is based on current market prices. If the market
for fi nancial assets is not active, or in the case of unlisted
financial instruments, Airbus determines fair values by using
generally accepted valuation techniques on the basis of market
information available at the end of the reporting period. Derivative
instruments are generally managed on the basis of Airbus’ net
exposure to the credit risk of each particular counterparty and
fair value information is provided to Airbus’ key management
personnel on that basis. For these derivative instruments, the
fair value is measured based on the price that would be received
to sell a net long position, or transfer a net short position, for
a particular credit risk exposure as further described below.
Depending on the extent the inputs used to measure fair values
rely on observable market data, fair value measurements may
be hierarchised according to the following levels of input:
■
Level 1: quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for
identical assets and liabilities;
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 73 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
■
■
Level 2: inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for
the asset or liability – fair values measured based on Level 2
input typically rely on observable market data such as interest
rates, foreign exchange rates, credit spreads or volatilities;
Level 3: inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on
observable market data – fair values measured based on
Level 3 input rely to a significant extent on estimates derived
from Airbus’ own data and may require the use of assumptions
that are inherently judgemental and involve various limitations.
The fair values disclosed for financial instruments accounted for
at amortised cost reflect Level 2 input. Otherwise, fair values
are determined mostly based on Level 1 and Level 2 input and
to a minor extent on Level 3 input.
The following table presents the carrying amounts of the financial instruments held at fair value across the three levels of the fair
value hierarchy as of 31 December 2016 and 2015, respectively:
31 December 2016
(In € million)
31 December 2015
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Total
1,597
0
0
1,597
828
0
0
828
0
1,148
3
1,151
0
1,234
46
1,280
11,446
2
0
11,448
11,474
165
0
11,639
Financial assets measured at fair value
Equity instruments
Derivative instruments
Securities
Cash equivalents(1)
5,513
1,535
0
7,048
3,042
2,130
0
5,172
18,556
2,685
3
21,244
15,344
3,529
46
18,919
Derivative instruments
0
(11,009)
(11)
(11,020)
0
(10,587)
0
(10,587)
Other liabilities
0
0
(38)
(38)
0
0
(74)
(74)
0
(11,009)
(49)
(11,058)
0
(10,587)
(74)
(10,661)
Total(1)
Financial liabilities measured at fair value
Total
(1) Investments made by Airbus Group SE in certain securities and trade liabilities have been reassessed and reclassified. Previous year figures are adjusted by € -899 million.
The development of financial instruments of Level 3 is as follows:
Financial assets
(In € million)
Commodity
swap
agreements
1 January 2015
Total gains or losses in profit or loss
OCI
Settlements
31 December 2015
Total gains or losses in profit or loss
OCI
Settlements
31 December 2016
Financial liabilities
Total
Written put
options on
NCI interests
Commodity
swap
agreements
Earn-out
agreements
Total
(137)
2
2
(127)
0
(10)
59
59
0
0
0
0
0
0
60
0
0
60
(15)
(15)
3
0
0
3
46
46
(64)
0
(10)
(74)
(10)
(10)
(2)
(11)
0
(13)
0
0
0
0
0
0
(33)
(33)
38
0
0
38
3
3
(28)
(11)
(10)
(49)
The profit of the period impact attributable to Level 3 financial assets and liabilities which are still held by Airbus as of 31 December
2016 was a loss of € -16 million (2015: gain of € 46 million).
Financial Assets Classified as Level 3
The financial assets measured at fair value that are classified
as Level 3 mainly consist of short-term commodity contracts
whose notional amounts vary with the actual volumes of certain
commodity purchases made by Airbus in specifi c months.
For fair value measurement purposes, the notional amounts,
being the unobservable input, are set with reference to monthly
commodity volumes that management expects to purchase
based on planning forecasts. The fair values are otherwise
determined using observable market data including quoted
interest rates and pricing information obtained from recognised
vendors of market data.
A deviation of 10% of actual monthly volumes purchased
from expected monthly volumes purchased would increase or
decrease (depending on whether actual volumes are 10% more
or 10% less than expected volumes) the total Level 3 fair value of
these short-term commodity contracts by less than € 1 million.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 74 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
Financial Liabilities Classified as Level 3
The financial liabilities measured at fair value that are classified as
Level 3 consist of several written put options on non-controlling
interest of Airbus subsidiaries. The fair values of these NCI
puts (i.e. the net present value of their redemption amount on
exercise) are derived from a discounted cash flow analysis of
the latest operating planning figures of the respective entities.
The fair value measurements are performed on an annual basis
in line with the operative planning cycle. Apart from the detailed
5-year operating planning figures, there are two unobservable
inputs that significantly affect the values of the NCI puts: the
WACC used to discount the forecasted cash flows and the
growth rate used to determine the terminal value. WACC and
growth rates as well as operating planning figures that were
used for the determination of the Level 3 fair values are derived
from the input perimeters as applied for the impairment test as
disclosed in “– Note 17: Intangible Assets – Goodwill Impairment
Tests”. An increase (decrease) of the discount rates by 50 basis
points results in a decrease (increase) of the NCI put values by
€ 1 million (€ 5 million). An increase (decrease) in the growth rates
by 50 basis points increases (decreases) the NCI put values by
€ 1 million (€ 5 million) respectively.
Another element of financial liabilities measured at fair value
classified as Level 3 are earn-out payments that have been
agreed with former shareholders of entities acquired by Airbus
in business combinations. Fair value measurement is based on
the expectation regarding the achievement of defined target
figures by the acquired entity or its ability to close identified
customer contracts.
Financial Assets Designated at Fair Value through Profit or Loss
The following types of financial assets held at 31 December 2016 and 2015, respectively, are designated at fair value through
profit or loss:
(In € million)
Nominal amount at
initial recognition as
of 31 December 2016
Designated at fair value through profit
or loss at recognition:
■
Money market funds (accumulating)
■
Foreign currency funds of hedge funds
Total
Nominal amount at
Fair value as of initial recognition as of
31 December 2016
31 December 2015
Fair value as of
31 December 2015
5,513
5,513
3,220
3,220
6
0
8
3
5,519
5,513
3,228
3,223
Airbus manages these assets and measures their performance on a fair value basis.
In addition, Airbus invests in non-accumulating money market funds, which pay interest on a monthly basis. The fair value of those
funds corresponds to their nominal amount at initial recognition date amounting to € 705 million (2015: € 720 million).
Fair Value Measurement Method
The methods Airbus uses to measure fair values are as follows:
Equity instruments — The fair values of listed equity instruments
reflect quoted market prices. The fair values of unlisted equity
instruments may not be reliably measured because the range of
reasonable fair value estimates is significant and the probabilities
of the various estimates within the range cannot be reasonably
assessed. Those instruments are measured at cost, and their
carrying amounts used as a proxy for fair value.
Customer financing assets and other loans — The carrying
amounts reflected in the annual accounts are used as a proxy
for fair value.
Trade receivables and other receivables — The carrying
amounts reflected in the annual accounts are used as reasonable
estimates of fair value because of the relatively short period
between the receivables’ origination and their maturity.
Securities — The fair values of securities reflect their quoted
market price at the end of the reporting period.
Cash and cash equivalents include cash in hand, cash in
banks, checks, fixed deposits as well as commercial papers
and money market funds. The carrying amounts reflected in the
annual accounts are used as reasonable estimates of fair value
because of the relatively short period between the origination
of the instrument and its maturity or due date. The fair value
of commercial papers is determined based on Level 2 input
by discounting future cash fl ows using appropriate interest
rates. The fair values of money market funds are determined
by reference to their quoted market price.
Derivatives — The fair values of derivative instruments reflect
quoted market prices, where available, but in most cases
are determined using recognised valuation techniques such
as option-pricing models and discounted cash flow models.
The valuation is based on observable market data such as
currency rates, currency forward rates, interest rates and yield
curves, commodity forward prices as well as price and rate
volatilities obtained from recognised vendors of market data.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 75 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
Furthermore, to the extent that these instruments are subject
to master netting arrangements and similar agreements and
managed on the basis of net credit exposure, their fair values
reflect credit and debit value adjustments based on the net long
or net short position that Airbus has with each counterparty.
Except for certain short-term commodity contracts discussed
in the Level 3 section above, derivative fair values are measured
based on Level 2 input.
Financing liabilities — The fair values disclosed for financing
liabilities, other than those of issued bonds and issued
commercial papers, are determined based on Level 2 input by
discounting scheduled or expected cash flows using appropriate
market interest rates. The fair values disclosed for the issued
EMTN and US dollar bonds reflect public price quotations that
qualify as Level 1 input. For issued commercial papers, the
carrying amounts reflected in the annual accounts are used
as reasonable estimates of fair value because of the relatively
short period between the origination of these instruments and
their maturity.
Trade liabilities and current other financial liabilities — For
the same reason, carrying amounts are used as reasonable
fair value approximations for trade liabilities and current other
financial liabilities.
The following interest rate curves are used in the determination of the fair value in respect of the derivative financial instruments
as of 31 December 2016 and 2015:
31 December
2016
(Interest rate in %)
2015
2016
€
2015
2016
US$
2015
£
6 months
(0.26)
(0.08)
1.31
0.94
0.60
1 year
(0.11)
0.14
1.62
1.12
0.81
0.85
1.13
5 years
(0.06)
0.21
1.97
1.72
0.87
1.59
10 years
0.54
0.89
2.35
2.18
1.23
1.99
35.3 Potential Effect of Set-Off Rights on Recognised Financial Assets and Liabilities
Airbus reports all its financial assets and financial liabilities on a gross basis. With each derivative counterparty there are master
netting agreements in place providing for the immediate close-out of all outstanding derivative transactions and payment of the
net termination amount in the event a party to the agreement defaults or another defined termination event occurs. Furthermore,
securities lending transactions are accounted for as collateralised borrowings. As a result, the securities pledged as collateral
continue to be recognised on the balance sheet and the amount of cash received at the outset of the transaction is separately
recognised as a financial liability. The following tables set out, on a counterparty specific basis, the potential effect of master netting
agreements and collateralised borrowings on Airbus’ financial position, separately for financial assets and financial liabilities that
were subject to such agreements as of 31 December 2016 and 31 December 2015, respectively:
Derivative instruments
(In € million)
Gross
amounts
recognised
Gross
amounts
recognised
set off in
the financial
statements
Net amounts
presented in
the financial
statements
Related amounts not set
off in the statement
of financial position
Financial
instruments
Cash collateral
received
Net amount
31 December 2016
Financial assets
Financial liabilities
1,363
0
1,363
(1,358)
0
5
10,879
0
10,879
(1,358)
0
9,521
31 December 2015
Financial assets
Financial liabilities
1,280
0
1,280
(1,280)
0
0
10,587
0
10,587
(1,280)
0
9,307
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 76 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
35.4 Notional Amounts of Derivative Financial Instruments
The contract or notional amounts of derivative financial instruments shown below do not necessarily represent amounts exchanged
by the parties and, thus, are not necessarily a measure for the exposure of Airbus through its use of derivatives.
The notional amounts of foreign exchange derivative financial instruments are as follows, specified by year of expected maturity:
Remaining period
1 year
2 years
3 years
4 years
5 years
6 years
22,482
22,163
18,416
11,839
5,496
1,291
Purchased US-dollar put options
0
0
4,079
4,198
740
0
Written US-dollar put options
0
0
4,079
4,198
740
0
(104)
0
0
0
0
0
20,395
21,234
20,041
14,655
4,086
Purchased US-dollar put options
0
0
0
3,536
Written US-dollar put options
0
0
0
3,536
906
0
0
0
(In € million)
7 years > 7 years
Total
31 December 2016
Net forward sales contracts
(11)
0
81,676
0
0
9,017
0
0
9,017
0
0
(104)
(367)
(445)
2
79,601
3,399
441
0
0
7,376
3,399
441
0
0
7,376
0
0
0
0
906
7 years > 7 years
Total
Foreign exchange options
Foreign exchange swap contracts
31 December 2015
Net forward sales contracts
Foreign exchange options
Foreign exchange swap contracts
The notional amounts of interest rate contracts are as follows:
Remaining period
(In € million)
1 year
2 years
3 years
4 years
5 years
6 years
31 December 2016
Interest rate contracts
36
1,096
989
7
988
4
949
3,771
7,840
130
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
130
Interest rate contracts
1,382
36
1,194
1,152
7
864
4
3,232
7,871
Interest rate future contracts
1,032
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,032
Interest rate future contracts
31 December 2015
Please also see “– Note 34.3: Financing Liabilities”.
The notional amounts of commodity contracts are as follows:
Remaining period
1 year
2 years
3 years
4 years
> 4 years
Total
31 December 2016
270
41
16
6
0
333
31 December 2015
336
129
23
11
1
500
(In € million)
The notional amounts of equity swaps are as follows:
Remaining period
1 year
2 years
3 years
4 years
> 4 years
Total
31 December 2016
76
52
49
19
0
196
31 December 2015
153
76
52
49
19
349
(In € million)
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 77 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.7 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
35.5 Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedge Accounting Disclosure
The development of the foreign exchange rate hedging instruments recognised in AOCI as of 31 December 2016 and 2015 is as
follows:
Equity attributable
to equity owners
of the parent
(In € million)
Non-controlling
interests
Total
1 January 2015
(3,310)
(22)
(3,332)
Unrealised gains and losses from valuations, gross(1)
(8,421)
(111)
(8,532)
3,762
71
3,833
(4,659)
(40)
(4,699)
1,134
13
1,147
Transferred to profit or loss for the period, gross(1)
Changes in fair values of hedging instruments recorded in AOCI, gross
Changes in fair values of hedging instruments recorded in AOCI, tax
Share of changes in fair values of hedging instruments from
investments accounted for under the equity method, net
(29)
0
(29)
Changes in fair values of hedging instruments recorded in AOCI, net
(3,554)
(27)
(3,581)
31 December 2015
(6,864)
(49)
(6,913)
Unrealised gains and losses from valuations, gross
(3,462)
(50)
(3,512)
Transferred to profit or loss for the period, gross
3,199
66
3,265
Changes in fair values of hedging instruments recorded in AOCI, gross
(263)
16
(247)
12
(8)
4
Changes in fair values of hedging instruments recorded in AOCI, tax
Share of changes in fair values of hedging instruments from
investments accounted for under the equity method, net
Changes in fair values of hedging instruments recorded in AOCI, net
31 December 2016
(38)
0
(38)
(289)
8
(281)
(7,153)
(41)
(7,194)
(1) Previous year figures are adjusted to correct a sign error.
In the year 2016, an amount of € -3,265 million (2015 adjusted: € -3,833 million) was reclassified from equity mainly to revenues
resulting from matured cash flow hedges. No material ineffectiveness arising from hedging relationship has been determined.
In addition, a loss of € -27 million was recognised in the profit of the period in 2016 (2015: gain of € 20 million) on derivatives that
were designated as hedging instruments in a fair value hedge, and a gain of € 12 million (2015: loss of € -18 million) attributable to
the hedged risk was recognised in the profit of the period on the corresponding hedged items. Corresponding with its carrying
amounts, the fair values of each type of derivative financial instruments as of 31 December 2016 and 2015, respectively, are as
follows:
31 December
2016
(In € million)
Foreign currency contracts – cash flow hedges
2015
Assets
Liabilities
Assets
Liabilities
946
(10,398)
832
(10,017)
Foreign currency contracts – not designated in a hedge relationship
4
(25)
182
(82)
Interest rate contracts – cash flow hedges
0
(26)
0
(40)
Interest rate contracts – fair value hedges
122
(38)
101
(8)
59
(71)
80
(87)
2
(27)
0
(57)
Interest rate contracts – not designated in a hedge relationship
Commodity contracts – cash flow hedges
3
(34)
46
(73)
15
(3)
30
(7)
Embedded bonds conversion option – not designated in a hedge relationship
0
(122)
0
0
Embedded foreign currency derivatives – cash flow hedges
0
(179)
0
(31)
Commodity contracts – not designated in a hedge relationship
Equity swaps – cash flow hedges
Embedded foreign currency derivatives – not designated in a hedge relationship
Total
0
(97)
9
(185)
1,151
(11,020)
1,280
(10,587)
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 78 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.8 Other Notes
35.6 Net Gains or Net Losses
Airbus’ net gains or net losses recognised in profit or loss in 2016 and 2015, respectively, are as follows:
(In € million)
2016
2015
(451)
(178)
50
166
Financial assets or financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss:
Held for trading
Designated on initial recognition
15
183
Loans and receivables(1)
(160)
(182)
Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost
(249)
(192)
Available-for-sale financial assets
(1) Contain among others impairment losses.
Net losses of € -50 million (2015: net gain of € 366 million) are recognised directly in equity relating to available-for-sale financial
assets.
Interest income from financial assets or financial liabilities through profit or loss is included in net gains or losses.
35.7 Impairment Losses
The following impairment losses on financial assets are recognised in profit or loss in 2016 and 2015, respectively:
2016
2015
Equity instruments
(12)
(49)
Customer financing
(123)
(25)
(10)
(12)
(In € million)
Other investments and other long-term financial assets:
Other loans
Trade receivables
Total
(34)
(25)
(179)
(111)
2.8 Other Notes
36. Litigation and Claims
2
Litigation and claims — Various legal actions, governmental
investigations, proceedings and other claims are pending or
may be instituted or asserted in the future against the Company.
Litigation is subject to many uncertainties, and the outcome
of individual matters is not predictable with certainty. The
Company believes that it has made adequate provisions to
cover current or contemplated litigation risks. It is reasonably
possible that the fi nal resolution of some of these matters
may require the Company to make expenditures, in excess of
established reserves, over an extended period of time and in
a range of amounts that cannot be reasonably estimated. The
term “reasonably possible” is used herein to mean that the
chance of a future transaction or event occurring is more than
remote but less than likely.
Airbus is involved from time to time in various legal and
arbitration proceedings in the ordinary course of its business,
the most significant of which are described below. Other
than as described below, Airbus is not aware of any material
governmental, legal or arbitration proceedings (including any
such proceedings which are pending or threatened), during
a period covering at least the previous twelve months which
may have, or have had in the recent past significant effects on
Airbus Group SE’s or Airbus’ financial position or profitability.
If the Company concludes that the disclosures relative to
contingent liabilities can be expected to prejudice seriously its
position in a dispute with other parties, the Company limits its
disclosures to the nature of the dispute.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 79 °
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.8 Other Notes
WTO
Eurofighter Austria
Although Airbus is not a party, Airbus is supporting the European
Commission in litigation before the WTO. Following its unilateral
withdrawal from the 1992 EU-US Agreement on Trade in Large
Civil Aircraft, the US lodged a request on 6 October 2004 to
initiate proceedings before the WTO. On the same day, the EU
launched a parallel WTO case against the US in relation to its
subsidies to Boeing. On 19 December 2014, the European Union
requested WTO consultations on the extension until the end of
2040 of subsidies originally granted by the State of Washington
to Boeing and other US aerospace firms until 2024.
In March 2012, the German public prosecutor, following a request
for assistance by the Austrian public prosecutor, launched
a criminal investigation into alleged bribery, tax evasion and
breach of trust by current and former employees of EADS
Deutschland GmbH (renamed on 1 July 2014 Airbus Defence
and Space GmbH) and Eurofighter Jagdflugzeug GmbH as well
as by third parties relating to the sale of Eurofighter aircraft to
Austria in 2003. After having been informed of the investigation
in 2012, Airbus retained the law firm Clifford Chance to
conduct a fact finding independent review. Upon concluding
its review, Clifford Chance presented its fact finding report to
Airbus in December 2013. Airbus provided the report to the
public prosecutors in Germany. Airbus’ request for access to
the prosecutor’s file is pending. Airbus Defence and Space
GmbH settled with the tax authorities in August 2016 on the
question of deductibility of payments made in connection with
the Eurofighter Austria campaign. In February 2017, the Austrian
Federal Ministry of Defence has raised criminal allegations
against Airbus Defence and Space GmbH for wilful deception
and fraud in the context of the sale of the Eurofighter aircraft to
Austria and respective damage claims. Airbus is cooperating
fully with the authorities.
On 1 June 2011, the WTO adopted the Appellate Body’s final
report in the case brought by the US assessing funding to
Airbus Commercial Aircraft from European Governments. On
1 December 2011, the EU informed the WTO that it had taken
appropriate steps to bring its measures fully into conformity
with its WTO obligations, and to comply with the WTO’s
recommendations and rulings. Because the US did not agree,
the matter is now under WTO review pursuant to WTO rules.
On 23 March 2012, the WTO adopted the Appellate Body’s final
report in the case brought by the EU assessing funding to Boeing
from the US. On 23 September 2012, the US informed the WTO
that it had taken appropriate steps to bring its measures fully
into conformity with its WTO obligations, and to comply with
the WTO’s recommendations and rulings. Because the EU did
not agree, the matter is now under WTO review pursuant to
WTO rules.
Exact timing of further steps in the WTO litigation process is
subject to further rulings and to negotiations between the US
and the EU. Unless a settlement, which is currently not under
discussion, is reached between the parties, the litigation is
expected to continue for several years.
GPT
Prompted by a whistleblower’s allegations, Airbus conducted
internal audits and retained PricewaterhouseCoopers (“PwC”) to
conduct an independent review relating to GPT Special Project
Management Ltd. (“GPT”), a subsidiary that Airbus acquired in
2007. The allegations called into question a service contract
entered into by GPT prior to its acquisition by Airbus, relating to
activities conducted by GPT in Saudi Arabia. PwC’s report was
provided by Airbus to the UK Serious Fraud Office (the “SFO”) in
March 2012. In the period under review and based on the work
it undertook, nothing came to PwC’s attention to suggest that
improper payments were made by GPT. In August 2012, the SFO
announced that it had opened a formal criminal investigation
into the matter. Airbus is in continuing engagement with the
authorities.
Investigation by the UK SFO into Civil Aviation
Business
In the context of review and enhancement of its internal
compliance improvement programme, Airbus discovered
misstatements and omissions relating to information provided
in respect of third party consultants in certain applications for
export credit financing for Airbus customers. In early 2016,
Airbus informed the UK, German and French Export Credit
Agencies (“ECAs”) of the irregularities discovered. Airbus made
a similar disclosure to the UK Serious Fraud Office (“SFO”). In
August 2016, the SFO informed Airbus that it had opened an
investigation into allegations of fraud, bribery and corruption
in the civil aviation business of Airbus relating to irregularities
concerning third party consultants (business partners). Airbus
is cooperating fully with the SFO. The SFO investigation and
any enforcement action potentially arising as a result could have
negative consequences for Airbus. The potential imposition of
any monetary penalty (and the amount thereof) arising from
the SFO investigation would depend on factual findings, and
could have a material impact on the fi nancial statements,
however at this stage it is too early to determine the likelihood
or extent of any liability. Investigations of this nature could
also result in (i) civil claims or claims by shareholders against
Airbus (ii) adverse consequences on Airbus’ ability to obtain or
continue financing for current or future projects (iii) limitations
on the eligibility of group companies for certain public sector
contracts and/or (iv) damage to Airbus’ business or reputation
via negative publicity adversely affecting Airbus’ prospects in
the commercial market place.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 80 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.8 Other Notes
ECA Financing
Review of Business Partner Relationships
ECA financing continues to be suspended. Airbus is working
with the relevant ECAs to re-establish ECA financing.
In light of regulatory investigations and commercial disputes,
including those discussed above, Airbus has determined to
enhance certain of its policies, procedures and practices,
including Ethics and Compliance. Airbus is accordingly in the
process of revising and implementing improved procedures,
including those with respect to its engagement of consultants
and other third parties, in particular in respect of sales support
activities and is conducting enhanced due diligence as a precondition for future or continued engagement and to inform
decisions on corresponding payments. Airbus has therefore
engaged legal, investigative, and forensic accounting expertise
of the highest calibre to undertake a comprehensive review of all
relevant third party business consultant relationships and related
subject matters. Airbus believes that these enhancements to
its controls and practices will best position it for the future,
particularly in light of advancements in regulatory standards.
Certain consultants and other third parties have initiated
commercial litigation and arbitration against Airbus seeking
relief. The comprehensive review and these enhancements of
its controls and practices may lead to additional commercial
disputes or other civil law or criminal law consequences in the
future, which could have a material impact on the fi nancial
statements, however at this stage it is too early to determine
the likelihood or extent of any liability.
Other Investigations
In October 2014, the Romanian authorities announced an
investigation relating to a border surveillance project in Romania.
Airbus confirms that Airbus Defence and Space GmbH had been
informed that the German prosecution office is also investigating
potential irregularities in relation to this project, a project in Saudi
Arabia and a project of Tesat-Spacecom GmbH & Co. KG.
The public prosecutor in Germany has launched administrative
proceedings in the context of those investigations against Airbus
Defence and Space GmbH and Tesat-Spacecom GmbH &
Co. KG. Airbus has cooperated fully with the authorities. In
October 2016, the German authorities announced that they
were dropping their investigations into the Romanian and Saudi
projects. The tax authorities may challenge the tax treatment
of business expenses in connection with the Romanian and
Saudi projects.
In 2013, public prosecutors in Greece and Germany launched
investigations into a current employee and former managing
directors and employees of Atlas Elektronik GmbH (“Atlas”),
a joint company of ThyssenKrupp and Airbus, on suspicion
of bribing foreign officials and tax evasion in connection with
projects in Greece. The public prosecutor in Germany has
launched an administrative proceeding for alleged organisational
and supervisory shortfalls against Atlas. The authorities in
Greece have launched civil claims against Atlas. In 2015, the
public prosecutor in Germany launched another investigation
into current and former employees and managing directors of
Atlas on suspicion of bribery and tax evasion in connection
with projects in Turkey and extended the investigation in 2016
to five current and former employees of Atlas’ shareholders. A
further investigation was also launched against two former Atlas
employees on suspicion of bribery in connection with projects
in Pakistan. In 2016 two further investigations were started
by the Bremen public prosecutor with regard to operations in
Indonesia and Thailand. With the support of its shareholders,
Atlas is cooperating fully with the authorities and is conducting
its own internal investigation. Settlement talks with the Bremen
public prosecutor started in November 2016.
Commercial Disputes
In May 2013, Airbus has been notified of a commercial dispute
following the decision taken by Airbus to cease a partnership
for sales support activities in some local markets abroad. Airbus
believes it has solid grounds to legally object to the alleged
breach of a commercial agreement. However, the consequences
of this dispute and the outcome of the proceedings cannot be
fully assessed at this stage. The arbitration will not be completed
until 2018 at the earliest.
In the course of another commercial dispute, Airbus received
a statement of claim alleging liability for refunding part of the
purchase price of a large contract which the customer claims
it was not obliged to pay. The dispute is currently the subject
of arbitration.
Airbus is cooperating with a judicial investigation against
unknown persons in France related to Kazakhstan. Airbus
is cooperating with French judicial authorities pursuant to a
request for mutual legal assistance made by the government
of Tunisia in connection with historical aircraft sales.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 81 °
2
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.8 Other Notes
37. Auditor Fees
With reference to Section 2:382a (1) and (2) of the Netherlands Civil Code, the following fees for the financial year 2016 have been
charged by EY to the Company (2015: by KPMG), its subsidiaries and other consolidated entities:
2016 - EY
2015 - KPMG
Audit of the financial statements
6,578
6,008
Other audit engagements
1,226
2,396
362
608
(In € thousand)
Tax services
Other non-audit services
Total
6,870
3,764
15,036
12,776
In 2016, Airbus was audited by EY only (2015: by KPMG only). Other audit firms have audit fees related to audit process, certification
and examination of individual and consolidated accounts of € 4 million in 2016 (2015: € 6 million).
38. Events after the Reporting Date
On 1 January 2017, Airbus Group has been further integrated by merging its Group structure with the commercial aircraft activities
of Airbus, with associated restructuring measures. In this new set-up, the Company will retain Airbus Defence and Space and
Airbus Helicopters as divisions.
These Consolidated Financial Statements have been authorised for issuance by the Board of Directors on 21 February 2017.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 82 °
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 83 °
15.80 %
Airbus
Operations, S.L.
(Spain)
Airbus Operations
Limited
(UK)
Airbus Operations
GmbH
(Germany)
MBDA Group
Airbus Safran Launchers Group
Airbus Group North America
Airbus Helicopters
Airbus Defence and Space
Elbe
Flugzeugwerke
GmbH
(Germany)
45 %
Airbus Defence
and Space GmbH
(Germany)
Airbus Operations
SAS
(France)
Airbus Group
Limited
(UK)
ATR GIE
(France)
50 %*
Airbus Group, Inc.
(USA)
Airbus Defence
and Space SAS
(France)
Airbus DS SAS
(France)
MBDA Group
Subsidiaries held with no indication of ownership percentage are 100 % owned.
Legal forms are indicated for information purposes and are not always part of the legal name.
37.5 %*
Airbus DS Holding
SAS
(France)
95.96 %
Airbus Group
SAS
(France)
Airbus SAS
(France)
4.68 %
Airbus DS GmbH
(Germany)
99.99 %
Airbus Safran
Launchers Group
50 %
97.57 %
Airbus DS
Holdings B.V.
(The Netherlands)
2.43 %
Airbus Defence
and Space Holding
France SAS
(France)
4.04 %
5.06 %
EADS Casa
France
(France)
CRI, S.A.
(Spain)
90.26 %
Airbus Defence
and Space, S.A.
(Spain)
Premium Aerotec
GmbH
(Germany)
Stelia Aerospace
(France)
*Airbus owns indirectly 50 % of ATR GIE, 50 % of Airbus Safran Launchers Group and 37.50 % of MBDA Group.
66.08 %
18.12 %
DADC Luft-und
Raumfahrt
Beteiligungs GmbH
(Germany)
(The Netherlands)
AIRBUS GROUP SE
Astrium Services
UK Limited
(UK)
Airbus Defence
and Space
Limited
(UK)
EADS Casa
Holding
(France)
5%
Paradigm Secure
Communications
Limited
(UK)
Infoterra Limited
(UK)
Paradigm
Services Limited
(UK)
Vector Aerospace
Holding SAS
(France)
Airbus Helicopters
España, S.A.
(Spain)
Airbus Helicopters
UK Limited
(UK)
Airbus Helicopters
Deutschland
GmbH
(Germany)
Airbus Helicopters
(France)
95 %
Airbus Helicopters
Holding
(France)
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Consolidated Financial Statements
2.9 Appendix “Simplifi ed Airbus Structure Chart”
2.9 Appendix “Simplified Airbus Structure Chart”
2
Chapter
3
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 84 °
Financial Statements 2016
Airbus Group SE
IFRS Company
Financial Statements
IFRS Company Income Statements
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
86
IFRS Company Statements of Comprehensive
Income for the years ended 31 December 2016
and 2015
86
IFRS Company Statements of Financial Position
at 31 December 2016 and 2015
87
IFRS Company Statements of Cash Flows
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
88
IFRS Company Statements of Changes in Equity
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
89
3
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 85 °
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Company Financial Statements
IFRS Company Income Statements
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
Note
(In € million)
Operating income
Operating expenses
Income from investments
Loss on disposal of investments
Total operating result
4
2016
2015
531
476
(652)
(634)
4,021
9
0
(5)
3,900
(154)
Interest income
204
225
Interest expense
(120)
(133)
Other financial result
Total financial result
5
(101)
127
(17)
219
3,883
65
17
(11)
3,900
54
(In € million)
2016
2015
Profit for the period
3,900
54
138
26
Profit before income taxes
Tax income (expense)
6
Profit for the period
IFRS Company Statements of Comprehensive Income
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
Other comprehensive income
Items that will be reclassified to profit or loss:
Net change in fair value of available-for-sale financial assets
Net change in fair value of cash flow hedges
Other comprehensive income, net of tax
Total comprehensive income of the period
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 86 °
4
0
142
26
4,042
80
Financial Statements 2016
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Company Financial Statements
IFRS Company Statements of Financial Position
at 31 December 2016 and 2015
Note
2016
2015
Investments in subsidiaries and associates
7
15,545
14,521
Long-term financial assets
8
3,296
3,594
Non-current other financial assets
8
7,602
7,979
(In € million)
Assets
Non-current assets
Non-current other assets
Deferred tax assets
Non-current securities
6
12
4
5
9
15
9,670
9,593
36,126
35,707
Current assets
102
11
Current other financial assets
8
4,656
4,431
Current accounts Group companies
8
9,409
8,353
160
149
Current securities
12
1,489
1,683
Cash and cash equivalents
12
Trade receivables
Current other assets
Total assets
8,758
6,515
24,574
21,142
60,700
56,849
Equity and liabilities
Stockholders’ equity
11
773
785
Share premium
2,745
3,484
Retained earnings
4,014
4,939
353
211
(3)
(303)
Issued and paid up capital
Legal reserves
Treasury shares
Result of the year
3,900
54
11,782
9,170
Non-current liabilities
Long-term financing liabilities
12
7,934
5,394
Non-current financial liabilities
8
7,698
7,960
15,632
13,354
Current liabilities
Short-term financing liabilities
12
98
1,823
Current accounts Group companies
8
28,557
28,415
Current financial liabilities
8
4,543
3,991
88
96
Current other liabilities
Total equity and liabilities
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 87 °
33,286
34,325
60,700
56,849
3
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Company Financial Statements
IFRS Company Statements of Cash Flows
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
Note
2016
2015
3,900
54
Interest income
(204)
(225)
Interest expense
120
133
Interest received
231
206
(In € million)
Profit for the period (Net income)
Adjustments to reconcile profit for the period to cash provided by operating activities:
(104)
(117)
Income tax received
0
3
Depreciation and amortisation
0
5
(102)
(240)
(17)
11
Interest paid
Valuation adjustments
Deferred tax (income) expense
Change in current and non-current provisions
Change in other operating assets and liabilities:
12
2
(136)
(3)
(126)
(2)
■
Trade receivables
■
Trade liabilities
(9)
0
■
Other assets and liabilities
(1)
(1)
3,700
(171)
(921)
(546)
(642)
(670)
Cash provided by (used for) operating activities
Investments:
■
Acquisitions of subsidiaries, joint ventures, businesses and non-controlling interests
■
Payments for long-term financial assets
■
7
Proceeds from disposals of associates, joint ventures, other investments
and other long-term financial assets
11
44
1,340
127
Payments for investments in securities
(2,037)
(6,877)
Proceeds from disposals of securities
2,300
4,592
51
(3,330)
■
Repayments of other long-term financial assets
Cash provided by (used for) investing activities
Draw-down in financing liabilities
2,580
788
Repayment of financing liabilities
(1,607)
(136)
(797)
4,056
(1,008)
(945)
Change in current accounts Group companies
Cash distribution to Airbus Group SE shareholders
60
171
(736)
(264)
(1,508)
3,670
0
146
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
2,243
315
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
6,515
6,200
8,758
6,515
Changes in capital
Share buyback
Cash (used for) provided by financing activities
Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 88 °
12
Financial Statements 2016
Airbus Group SE — IFRS Company Financial Statements
IFRS Company Statements of Changes in Equity
for the years ended 31 December 2016 and 2015
Accumulated other
comprehensive income
Capital
stock
Share
premium
Retained
earnings
Availablefor-sale
financial
assets
785
4,500
4,860
195
(10)
(8)
10,322
Profit for the period
0
0
54
0
0
0
54
Other comprehensive income
0
0
0
26
0
0
26
Total comprehensive income of the period
0
0
54
26
0
0
80
Capital increase
3
115
0
0
0
0
118
Share-based payments (IFRS 2)
0
0
29
0
0
0
29
Cash distribution to Airbus Group SE shareholders
0
(945)
0
0
0
0
(945)
Equity component convertible bond
0
0
53
0
0
0
53
Change in treasury shares
0
0
(3)
0
0
(484)
(487)
Balance at 1 January 2015
Cancellation of treasury shares
Balance at 31 December 2015
Profit for the period
Cash flow
hedges
Treasury
shares
Total
equity
(3)
(186)
0
0
0
189
0
785
3,484
4,993
221
(10)
(303)
9,170
0
0
3,900
0
0
0
3,900
Other comprehensive income
0
0
0
138
4
0
142
Total comprehensive income of the period
0
0
3,900
138
4
0
4,042
Capital increase
2
58
0
0
0
0
60
Share-based payments (IFRS 2)
0
0
31
0
0
0
31
Cash distribution to Airbus Group SE shareholders
0
0
(1,008)
0
0
0
(1,008)
(513)
Change in treasury shares
Cancellation of treasury shares
Balance at 31 December 2016
0
0
(2)
0
0
(511)
(14)
(797)
0
0
0
811
0
773
2,745
7,914
359
(6)
(3)
11,782
3
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 89 °
Chapter
4
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 90 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the
IFRS Company
Financial Statements
4.1 Basis of Presentation
93
4.2 Company Performance
95
4.3 Operational Assets and Liabilities
97
4.4 Employees
100
4.5 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
100
4
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 91 °
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
CONTENTS
4.1 Basis of Presentation
93
1.
The Company
93
2.
Significant Accounting Policies
93
3.
Related Party Transactions
94
4.2 Company Performance
95
4.
Total Operating Result
95
5.
Total Financial Result
95
6.
Income Tax
96
4.3 Operational Assets and Liabilities 97
7.
Investments in Subsidiaries, Associates
and Participations
97
8.
Financial Assets and Liabilities
99
9.
Commitments and Contingencies
4.4 Employees
10.
Number of Employees
4.5 Capital Structure and Financial
Instruments
100
100
100
100
11.
Total Equity
100
12.
Cash, Securities and Financing Liabilities
102
13.
Information about Financial Instruments
104
14.
Events after the Reporting Date
109
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 92 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
4.1 Basis of Presentation
1.
The Company
The Company’s principal activity is acting as a holding and
management company for the subsidiaries of Airbus Group SE,
the “Company”, a listed company in the form of a European
Company (Societas Europaea), legally seated in Amsterdam
(current registered office at Mendelweg 30, 2333 CS Leiden,
The Netherlands) and registered at the Chamber of Commerce
in The Hague under number 24288945. The Company has its
2.
listings at the European Stock Exchanges in Paris, Frankfurt
am Main, Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia and Bilbao. The
IFRS Financial Statements were authorised for issue by the
Company’s Board of Directors on 21 February 2017. They are
prepared and reported in euro (“€”) and all values are rounded
to the nearest million appropriately.
Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of preparation — The Company’s Financial Statements
are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting
Standards (“IFRS”), issued by the International Accounting
Standards Board (“IASB”) as endorsed by the European Union
(“EU”) and with Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code.
In the Company Financial Statements of Airbus Group SE,
unless otherwise disclosed, the same accounting principles
have been applied as set out in the Notes to the Consolidated
Financial Statements, except for the valuation of the investments
as presented under investments in subsidiaries and associates
in the Company Financial Statements. These policies have been
consistently applied to all years presented.
In the Company Financial Statements, the investments in
subsidiaries and associates are recorded at acquisition
cost less impairments, whereas in prior years, investments
in Group companies were stated at net asset value. As a
consequence, the determination of the results in the Company
Financial Statements changed compared to previous years.
In the Company Statement of Income, dividend received from
investments is recorded as dividend income.
Due to this application, the Company equity and net result
are not equal to the consolidated equity and net result. A
reconciliation of the total shareholders’ equity and profit for the
period is presented in Note 11 “Total Equity” to the Company
Financial Statements.
The Company Financial Statements have been prepared on a
historical cost basis, unless otherwise indicated.
Regarding the application of new, revised or amended IFRS
standards issued but not yet applied please refer to Note 2
“Significant accounting policies” of the Group’s Consolidated
Financial Statements. Further information about Share-Based
Payments and Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOP) is
presented in Note 30 and information about Remuneration is
presented in Note 31 of the Consolidated Financial Statements.
The information with regard to Capital Management is disclosed
in Note 33, further information about Litigation and Claims refers
to Note 36 and Events after the Reporting Date are disclosed
in Note 38 of the Group’s Consolidated Financial Statements.
Unless reference is made to the accounting policies described
in the Consolidated Financial Statements, the main accounting
policies applied in the preparation of these Company Financial
Statements are described in each accounting area. These
accounting policies have been consistently applied to all
financial years presented, unless otherwise stated.
Use of Estimates and Judgements
The preparation of the Company Financial Statements in
conformity with EU-IFRS requires the use of estimates and
assumptions. In preparing those fi nancial statements, the
management exercises its best judgement based upon its
experience and the circumstances prevailing at that time. The
estimates and assumptions are based on available information
and conditions at the end of the financial period presented and
are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Actual results could differ
from these estimates.
Key accounting estimates and judgements affecting the
assessment and measurement of impairment are included
in Note 7 “Investments in Subsidiaries, Associates and
Participations” of the Company Financial Statements.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 93 °
4
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
3.
Related Party Transactions
Key Management Personnel
The details regarding the compensation of key management
personnel are described in Note 8 “Related Party Transactions”
of the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Intercompany Transactions
is common practice. In its responsibility as holding company
to manage its subsidiaries and to assist the business
activities conducted by companies of the Airbus Group and
its subsidiaries, Airbus Group SE applies transfer prices for
its business activities in conformity with market levels and in
accordance with national and international tax requirements
(arm’s length principle).
A comprehensive exchange of internal services between the
subsidiaries of a multinational corporation like Airbus Group SE
The following table discloses the related party intercompany transactions in 2016 and 2015:
(In € million)
Rendering of services, dividend income
and interest income
Purchases of services, investment charge
and interest expenses
Intercompany receivables due as
of 31 December
Intercompany payables due as
of 31 December
Transactions
with subsidiaries
2016
Transactions
with associates
2016
Transactions
with subsidiaries
2015
Transactions
with associates
2015
4,634
33
560
62
(736)
(2)
(724)
(4)
12,886
83
12,400
18
(32,403)
(666)
(32,414)
(503)
Hedge relationships receivable as
of 31 December
10,730
0
10,482
0
Hedge relationships payable as
of 31 December
(1,344)
0
(1,383)
0
For further information about granted guarantees to subsidiaries please refer to Note 9 “Commitments and Contingencies” of the
Company Financial Statements.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 94 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
4.2 Company Performance
4.
Total Operating Result
2016
2015
531
476
Operating expenses
(652)
(634)
Service fees charged by Group companies
(596)
(581)
(56)
(53)
Income from investments
4,021
9
Dividends received from Group companies
4,021
9
Expense from investments
0
(5)
Loss on disposal of investments
0
(5)
3,900
(154)
(In € million)
Operating income
Corporate services rendered to Group companies
Administrative expenses
Total operating result
5.
Total Financial Result
2016
2015
Interest result(1)
84
92
Interest income from available-for-sale securities
89
93
Others
(5)
(1)
(101)
127
(In € million)
Other financial result
Option liability exchangeable bond
Equity instruments
Interest rate hedging
(64)
0
5
159
(16)
(11)
3
(9)
FX revaluation
(29)
(12)
Total financial result
(17)
219
Financing income (expense)
(1) In 2016, the total interest income amounts to € 204 million (in 2015: € 225 million) for financial assets which are not measured at fair value through profit or loss. For financial
liabilities which are not measured at fair value through profit or loss € -120 million (in 2015: € -133 million) are recognised as total interest expenses. Both amounts are
calculated by using the effective interest method.
The Company is acting as a financial market agent on behalf of its subsidiaries, therefore the fair value changes of derivatives
are reported on a net basis.
4
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 95 °
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
6.
Income Tax
The Company is tax registered in the Netherlands. The
Company is heading a fiscal unity, which also includes Airbus
Group Finance B.V., Airbus DS Holdings B.V. and Airbus Defence
and Space Netherlands B.V. and therefore the Company is
severally and jointly liable for income tax liabilities of the fiscal
unity as a whole.
Income taxes — The tax expense for the year comprises
deferred tax. Tax is recognised in the Income Statement, except
to the extent that it relates to items recognised directly in Other
Comprehensive Income.
The amount of income tax included in the Income Statement is
determined in accordance with the rules established by the tax
authorities in the Netherlands, based on which income taxes
are payable or recoverable.
Deferred tax assets and/or liabilities, arising from temporary
differences between the carrying amounts of assets and
liabilities and the tax base of assets and liabilities, are calculated
using the substantively enacted tax rates expected to apply
when they are realised or settled. Deferred tax assets are
recognised if it is probable that they will be realised.
The expense for income taxes is comprised of the following:
2016
(In € million)
Current tax expense
2015
0
0
Deferred tax income (expense)
17
(11)
Total
17
(11)
The following table shows reconciliation from the theoretical income tax expense using the Dutch corporate tax rate to the reported
tax (expense) income:
(In € million)
2016
Profit before income taxes
3,883
65
* Corporate income tax rate
25.0%
25.0%
(971)
(16)
1,005
1
(16)
0
Expected expense for income taxes
Non-taxable income from investments
2015
Option liability exchangeable bond
Income from other companies within the fiscal unity
Other
Reported tax income (expense)
(6)
5
5
(1)
17
(11)
The first tranche of tax loss carry forwards (€ 20 million) will expire by the end of 2023.
Deferred income taxes as of 31 December 2016 are related to the following assets and liabilities:
1 January 2016
Other movements
Movement
through
income
statement
31 December 2016
Deferred
tax
assets
Deferred
tax
liabilities
Deferred
tax
assets
Deferred
tax
liabilities
OCI
Others
Deferred
tax benefit
(expense)
Securities
0
(21)
(22)
0
0
0
(43)
Financial instruments
0
(3)
(1)
0
3
0
(1)
Net operating loss and tax loss
carry forwards
39
0
0
0
14
53
0
Deferred tax assets (liabilities)
before offsetting
39
(24)
(23)
0
17
53
(44)
(24)
24
0
0
0
(44)
44
15
0
(23)
0
17
9
0
(In € million)
Set-off
Net deferred tax assets (liabilities)
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 96 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
Deferred income taxes as of 31 December 2015 are related to the following assets and liabilities:
1 January 2015
Other movements
Movement
through
income
statement
31 December 2015
Deferred
tax benefit
(expense)
Deferred
tax
assets
Deferred
tax
liabilities
Deferred
tax
assets
Deferred
tax
liabilities
OCI
Others
0
(31)
10
0
0
0
(21)
Financial instruments
27
0
0
0
(30)
0
(3)
Net operating loss and tax loss carry forwards
23
0
0
(3)
19
39
0
Deferred tax assets (liabilities)
before offsetting
50
(31)
10
(3)
(11)
39
(24)
(31)
31
0
0
0
(24)
24
19
0
10
(3)
(11)
15
0
(In € million)
Securities
Set-off
Net deferred tax assets (liabilities)
Details of deferred taxes recognised cumulatively in equity are as follows:
(In € million)
2016
2015
(43)
(21)
Available-for-sale investments
Cash flow hedges
Total
2
3
(41)
(18)
4.3 Operational Assets and Liabilities
7.
Investments in Subsidiaries, Associates and Participations
Subsidiaries
Associates
Participations
Total
14,048
21
174
14,243
196
0
0 196
Loss on disposal of investments
(5)
0
0
(5)
Share-based payments (IFRS 2)
29
0
0 29
(In € million)
Balance at 1 January 2015
Additions
Fair value changes through AOCI
0
0
58
58
14,268
21
232
14,521
136
0
785
921
Share-based payments (IFRS 2)
31
0
0
31
Fair value changes through AOCI
0
0
72
72
14,435
21
1,089
15,545
Balance at 31 December 2015
Additions
Balance at 31 December 2016
4
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 97 °
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
Investments in Subsidiaries, Associated
Companies and Participations
Investments in subsidiaries and associated companies are stated
at cost, less impairment. Dividend income from the Company’s
subsidiaries and associated companies is recognised when the
right to receive payment is established.
Available-for-sale participations are stated at fair value with
changes in fair value recognised in Other Comprehensive
Income.
For the purpose of impairment testing all consolidated
subsidiaries are allocated to Cash Generating Units (“CGU”) in
a way they are monitored for internal management purposes.
At each balance sheet date, the Company reviews whether
there is an indication that a CGU to which its investments in
subsidiaries and associated companies belong to are impaired.
If the recoverable amount of an investment is estimated to be less
than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the investment
is reduced to its recoverable amount. Any impairment loss is
recognised immediately in the Income Statement.
Impairment losses recognised in prior periods shall be reversed
only if there has been a change in the estimates or external market
information used to determine the investment’s recoverable
amount since the last impairment loss was recognised.
The recoverable amount shall not exceed the carrying amount
that would have been determined had no impairment loss been
recognised in prior years.
Change of Investments in Subsidiaries
On 26 January 2016, Airbus Group SE made a further capital
contribution of € 100 million into Airbus Group Bank GmbH.
An indication for impairment of the investments in subsidiaries
and associated companies may include, respectively,
management’s downward adjustment of the strategic plan or
a significant decrease in the share price of a publicly listed
company. Further indications for impairment of its investments
may include other areas where observable data indicates that
there is a measurable decrease in the estimated future cash
flows. These determinations require significant judgement. In
making this judgement, management evaluates, among other
factors, the financial performance of and business outlook for
its investments, including factors such as industry and sector
performance, changes in technology and operational and
financing cash flow.
On 26 September 2016, Airbus Group SE made a further capital
contribution of € 22 million into Airbus Group Proj B.V., a 100%
subsidiary, in the frame of the industrial partnership with OneWeb
Ltd. for the design and manufacturing of microsatellites.
If any indication for impairment exists, the recoverable amount
of the investments is estimated in order to determine the extent,
if any, of the impairment loss. An investment is impaired if the
recoverable amount is lower than the carrying value. The
recoverable amount is defined as the higher of an investment’s
fair value less costs to sell and its value in use.
With effect of 1 January 2015, Airbus Operations GmbH
contributed its A400M “IFA and Cargo Hold System”, Bremen
business into Airbus Defence and Space GmbH in turn to become
a new shareholder. As a consequence Airbus Group SE’s
participation in Airbus Defence and Space GmbH was diluted
from 78.48% to 66.08%.
The determination of the investment’s value in use is based
on calculations using pre-tax cash flow projections based on
financial budgets approved by management covering a five-year
period. Cash flows beyond the five-year period are extrapolated
using estimated growth rates. The discounted cash flow method
is used to determine the recoverable amount of a CGU to which
its investments in subsidiaries and associated companies
belongs to. The discounted cash flow method is particularly
sensitive to the selected discount rates and estimates of future
cash flows by management. Key assumptions used to determine
the recoverable value of the CGU are the expected future labour
expenses, future interest rates, future exchange rates to convert
in euro the portion of future US dollar and pound sterling which
are not hedged and the estimated growth rate of terminal values.
On 23 December, 2016, Airbus Group SE contributed its 100%
subsidiary Airbus Group SAS to its subsidiary Airbus SAS for
a total amount of € 1,118 million. In return for this contribution
Airbus Group SE received additional shares in Airbus SAS for
an equivalent amount.
During the year 2016, Airbus Group SE made further capital
contributions into Airbus Group Ventures Fund for a total amount
of € 14 million.
Change of Investments in Associated Companies
and Participations
On 13 September 2016, Airbus Group SE internally acquired
9.05% of the shares in Dassault Aviation SA for a total amount
of € 785 million. The acquisition of these shares in Dassault
Aviation SA is related to the issuance by the Company of an
exchangeable bond in June 2016 (see Note 12 “Cash, Securities
and Financing Liabilities”). After a share cancellation by Dassault
Aviation SA on 23 December 2016, reducing its capital by 9.6%,
the Company’s stake in Dassault Aviation SA increased to
10.00% of the total shares.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 98 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
INFORMATION ON PRINCIPAL INVESTMENTS OF THE COMPANY
2016
2015
%
Company
Head office
50.90
50.90
Aero Ré S.A.
Bertrange (Luxembourg)
66.08
66.08
Airbus Defence and Space GmbH
Taufkirchen (Germany)
100.00
100.00
Airbus Defence and Space S.A.
Madrid (Spain)
97.57
97.57
Airbus DS Holdings B.V.
Leiden (Netherlands)
100.00
100.00
Airbus Group Bank GmbH
Munich (Germany)
100.00
100.00
Airbus Group Finance B.V.
Leiden (Netherlands)
100.00
100.00
Airbus Group, Inc.
Herndon, VA (USA)
100.00
100.00
Airbus Group Ltd.
London (UK)
100.00
100.00
Airbus Group Proj B.V.
Leiden (Netherlands)
0.00
100.00
Airbus Group S.A.S.
Toulouse (France)
99.00
99.00
Airbus Group Ventures Fund I, L.P.
Mountain View, CA (USA)
100.00
100.00
Airbus Helicopters Holding S.A.S.
Marignane (France)
90.26
94.42
Airbus S.A.S.
Toulouse (France)
100.00
100.00
DADC Luft-und Raumfahrt Beteiligungs GmbH
Taufkirchen (Germany)
10.00
0.00
Dassault Aviation S.A.
Paris (France)
100.00
100.00
Premium Aerotec GmbH
Augsburg (Germany)
Percentages represent share held directly by Airbus Group SE.
8.
Financial Assets and Liabilities
Financial assets and liabilities at 31 December 2016 and 2015 consist of the following:
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Long-term financial assets
3,296
3,594
Long-term loans Group companies
3,296
3,583
Long-term loans external
Non-current other financial assets
0
11
7,602
7,979
Positive fair values of derivative financial instruments
7,602
7,979
Current other financial assets
4,656
4,431
Positive fair values of derivative financial instruments
4,551
3,982
Current portion long-term loans Group companies
Current accounts Group companies(1)
105
449
(19,148)
(20,062)
9,409
8,353
(28,557)
(28,415)
Non-current financial liabilities
(7,698)
(7,960)
Negative fair values of derivative financial instruments
(7,698)
(7,960)
Current financial liabilities
(4,543)
(3,991)
Negative fair values of derivative financial instruments
(4,543)
(3,991)
Receivables from subsidiaries
Liabilities to subsidiaries
(1) The receivables from and liabilities to subsidiaries include mainly transactions in connection with the cash pooling in Airbus Group SE. Terms and conditions are in agreement
with the prevailing market environment.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 99 °
4
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
9.
Commitments and Contingencies
Off-Balance Sheet Commitments
Airbus Group SE issued guarantees on behalf of Group companies
in the amount of € 5,849 million (2015: € 6,347 million). The
commitments of these companies to third parties mainly relate
to their operating business as described in Note 18 “Property,
Plant and Equipment”, Note 25 “Sales Financing Transactions”
and Note 35 “Information about Financial Instruments” of the
Consolidated Financial Statements. In addition, the Company
has entered into capital contribution commitments with Group
companies in the amount of € 54 million (2015: € 54 million).
On 8 December 2015, Airbus Group SE entered into a
partnership agreement to establish a corporate venture capital
fund, dubbed Airbus Group Ventures, as well as a technology
and business innovation center in Silicon Valley with a total
commitment amount of US$ 150 million. On 25 November 2015,
a first investment of US$ 5 million has been made into this fund.
During the year 2016, Airbus Group SE made further capital
contributions into Airbus Group Ventures Fund for a total amount
of US$ 15 million.
4.4 Employees
10. Number of Employees
The average number of the persons employed by the Company in 2016 was 2 (2015: 3).
4.5 Capital Structure and Financial Instruments
11. Total Equity
Airbus Group’s shares are ordinary shares with a par value of € 1.00. The following table shows the development of the number
of shares outstanding:
(In number of shares)
Issued as at 1 January
Issued for ESOP
Issued for exercised options
Cancelled
Issued as at 31 December
Treasury shares as at 31 December
Outstanding as at 31 December
Authorised shares
2016
2015
785,344,784
784,780,585
1,474,716
1,539,014
224,500
1,910,428
(14,131,131)
(2,885,243)
772,912,869
785,344,784
(184,170)
(1,474,057)
772,728,699
783,870,727
3,000,000,000
3,000,000,000
Holders of ordinary shares are entitled to dividends and are entitled to one vote per share at general meetings of the Company.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 100 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
Capital stock comprises the nominal amount of shares
outstanding. The addition to capital stock represents the
contribution for exercised options of € 224,500 (in 2015:
€ 1,910,428) in compliance with the implemented stock option
plans and by employees of € 1,474,716 (in 2015: € 1,539,014)
under the Employee Stock Ownership Plans (“ESOP”).
Share premium mainly results from contributions in kind in
the course of the creation of Airbus Group, cash contributions
from the Initial Public Offering, capital increases and reductions
due to the issuance and cancellation of shares as well as cash
distributions to Airbus Group SE shareholders.
Retained earnings include mainly the profit of the period and
cash dividend payments to Airbus Group SE shareholders.
On 28 April 2016, the Shareholders’ General Meeting decided
to distribute a gross amount of € 1.30 per share, which was paid
on 3 May 2016. For the fiscal year 2016, the Group’s Board of
Directors proposes a cash distribution payment of € 1.35 per
share.
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (“AOCI”)
includes:
■
■
change from available-for-sale financial assets (see
Note 13.2 “Carrying Amounts and Fair Values of Financial
Instruments”);
change in fair value of derivatives designated as cash flow
hedges (see Note 13.2 “Carrying Amounts and Fair Values
of Financial Instruments”).
According to Dutch law, the AOCI is considered to be a Legal
Reserve and therefore distribution is restricted.
Treasury shares represent the amount paid or payable for own
shares held in treasury and relates to the share buyback which
took place between 2 November 2015 and 30 June 2016. As
of 31 December 2015, the Group bought back € 264 million of
shares and recognised a financial liability of € 223 million for its
irrevocable share buyback commitment at that date. Recognition
of the financial liability led to a corresponding reduction of equity.
In 2016, the Group bought back € 736 million of shares on which
€ 223 million were recognised in financial liability which led to
a reduction of equity by € -513 million. The share buyback has
been completed for a total of € 1 billion.
Authorisations Granted by the Shareholders’
General Meeting of Airbus Group SE Held
on 28 April 2016
On 28 April 2016, the Annual General Meeting (“AGM”) of
the Company authorised the Board of Directors, for a period
expiring at the AGM to be held in 2017, to issue shares and
grant rights to subscribe for shares in the Company’s share
capital for the purpose of:
■
■
ESOPs and share related LTIPs in the limit of 0.14% of the
Company’s authorised share capital (see “– Note 30: ShareBased Payments” of the Group’s Consolidated Financial
Statements);
funding the Company and its Group companies, provided that
such powers shall be limited to an aggregate of 0.3% of the
Company’s authorised capital (see “– Note 34.3: Financing
Liabilities” of the Group’s Consolidated Financial Statements).
For each operation, such powers shall not extend to issuing
shares or granting rights to subscribe for shares if there is no
preferential subscription right and for an aggregate issue price
in excess of € 500 million per share issuance.
Also on 28 April 2016, the AGM authorised the Board of
Directors for an 18-month period to repurchase up to 10%
of the Company’s issued and outstanding share capital (i.e.
issued share capital excluding shares held by the Company or
its subsidiaries) at a price not exceeding the higher of the price of
the last independent trade and the highest current independent
bid on the trading venues of the regulated market of the country
in which the purchase is carried out.
Furthermore, the AGM authorised both the Board of Directors
and the CEO, with powers of substitution, that the number of
shares repurchased by the Company pursuant to the share
buyback programme are cancelled.
4
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 101 °
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
Reconciliation Consolidated to Company Equity and Net Income
The difference between the total shareholders’ equity according to the Consolidated Financial Statements and Company’s Financial
Statements as at 31 December 2016 and 2015 is as follows:
31 December
(In € million)
2016
2015
Consolidated equity
3,657
5,966
AOCI - Restatement of investments from Consolidated to Company Financial Statements
5,198
4,527
Retained Earnings - Restatement of investments from Consolidated to Company Financial Statements
2,713
(1,537)
Retained Earnings - Valuation investments at historical cost
1,487
1,487
(1,273)
(1,273)
11,782
9,170
Retained Earnings - Impairment of financial assets
Company’s equity
The difference between the net income according to the Consolidated Financial Statements and Company’s Financial Statements
for the year ended 31 December 2016 and 2015 is as follows:
2016
2015
995
2,696
Income from investments according to Consolidated Financial Statements
(1,118)
(2,694)
Income from investments according to Company Financial Statements
4,021
9
0
(5)
(In € million)
Consolidated net income
Loss on / Impairment of financial assets
Other valuation differences
Company’s net income (Profit for the period)
2
48
3,900
54
12. Cash, Securities and Financing Liabilities
12.1 Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents are composed of the following elements:
31 December
(In € million)
2016
Bank accounts
1,710
2015
444
Short-term securities (at fair value through profit or loss)
5,513
3,220
Short-term securities (available-for-sale)
1,535
2,851
Total cash and cash equivalents
8,758
6,515
Only securities with a maturity of three months or less from the date of the acquisition, that are readily convertible to known
amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value are recognised in cash equivalents.
12.2 Securities
31 December
(In € million)
2016
Current securities (available-for-sale)
1,489
1,683
Non-current securities (available-for-sale)
9,670
9,590
Non-current securities (at fair value through profit or loss)
Total securities
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 102 °
2015
0
3
11,159
11,276
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
Included in the securities portfolio as of 31 December 2016
and 2015, respectively, are corporate and government bonds
bearing either fixed rate coupons (€ 10,458 million nominal value;
comparably in 2015: € 10,604 million) or floating rate coupons
(€ 359 million nominal value; comparably in 2015: € 397 million)
and foreign currency funds of hedge funds (€ 6 million nominal
value; 2015: € 8 million).
12.3 Financing Liabilities
Current and non-current classification – A financial asset or liability is classified as current if it is settled within 12 months after
the reporting date, and as non-current otherwise.
Financing liabilities comprise obligations towards financial institutions, issued corporate bonds, and payables due to related
parties.
The Company has received several euro-denominated loans and one US dollar-denominated loan from Airbus Group Finance B.V.
(“AGFBV”). It has also issued a convertible bond in euro. Furthermore, the Company has long-term US dollar-denominated loans
outstanding with the European Investment Bank (“EIB”) and the Development Bank of Japan (“DBJ”). The terms and repayment
schedules of these bonds and loans are as follows:
Carrying amount
Principal
amount
(in million)
2016
2015
Coupon or
interest
rate
€ 499
€ 499
3M Euribor
+1.85%
at variable
rate
Sept. 2018
at variable
rate
Aug. 2016
31 December
Effective
interest
rate
Maturity
Additional features
Loans from Airbus Group Finance B.V.
AGFBV 15 years
(EMTN)
€ 500
AGFBV 7 years (EMTN)
€ 1,000
€0
€ 999
3M Euribor
+1.59%
AGFBV 10 years
(EMTN)
€ 1,000
€ 1,052
€ 1,021
2.40%
2.45%
Apr. 2024
Interest rate swapped into
3M Euribor +1.40%
AGFBV 15 years
(EMTN)
€ 500
€ 526
€ 497
2.15%
2.24%
Oct. 2029
Interest rate swapped into
3M Euribor +0.84%
AGFBV 10 years
(EMTN)
€ 600
€ 589
€0
0.91%
0.95%
May 2026
Interest rate swapped into
3M Euribor
AGFBV 15 years
(EMTN)
€ 900
€ 861
€0
1.41%
1.49%
May 2031
Interest rate swapped into
3M Euribor
AGFBV USD Loan
10 years
US$ 1,000
€ 940
€ 919
2.72%
2.80%
Apr. 2023
Interest rate swapped into
3M US-Libor +0.68%
Billet de trésorerie
programme
US$ 0
€0
€ 505
Loans from financial institutions
DBJ 10 years
US$ 300
€ 285
€ 276
3M US-Libor
+1.15%
4.84%
Jan. 2021
Interest rate swapped into
4.76% fixed
EIB 10 years
US$ 721
€ 488
€ 567
3M US-Libor
+0.85%
3.20%
Aug. 2021
Interest rate swapped into
3.2% fixed
EIB 7 years
US$ 406
€ 385
€ 373
3M US-Libor
+0.93%
at variable
rate
Feb. 2020
EIB 10 years
US$ 627
€ 591
€ 576
2.52%
2.52%
Dec. 2024
EIB 10 years
US$ 320
€ 304
€ 294
6M US-Libor
+0.56%
at variable
rate
Dec. 2025
Share buyback
commitment
€0
€ 223
Others
€0
€ 11
Interest rate swapped into
3M Euribor +0.61%
Bond
Convertible bond
7 years
Exchangeable bond
5 years
Total
thereof non-current
financing liabilities
thereof current
financing liabilities
€ 500
€ 1,078
€ 464
€ 457
€ 1,048
€0
€ 8,032
€ 7,217
€ 7,934
€ 5,394
€ 98
€ 1,823
0.00%
0.00%
1.39%
0.33%
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 103 °
July 2022
Convertible into
Airbus Group SE shares at
€ 99.54 per share
Exchangeable into Dassault
Aviation SA shares at
June 2021
€ 1,306.25 per share
4
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
The increase in long-term financing liabilities is mainly due to
the issuance in May 2016 of two bonds under the Company’s
EMTN-Programme for a total amount of € 1.5 billion, maturing
in 2026 and 2031, as well as the issuance in June 2016 of an
exchangeable bond for an amount of € 1.1 billion, maturing in
2021.
The decrease in short-term financing liabilities is mainly
due to the repayment of a bond under the Company’s EMTNProgramme that matured in August 2016 for an amount of
€ 1 billion as well as repayment of the debts related to commercial
papers and share buyback commitment for a total amount of
€ 728 million.
The Company can issue commercial paper under the so called
“billet de trésorerie” programme at fl oating or fi xed interest
rates corresponding to the individual maturities ranging from
1 day to 12 months. The programme has been set up in 2003
with a maximum volume of € 2 billion, increased in 2013 to
a maximum volume of € 3 billion. As of 31 December 2016,
there was no outstanding amount under the programme. The
Company established in April 2015 a US$ 2 billion commercial
paper programme which has been increased to US$ 3 billion
in April 2016.
In June 2016, the Company issued € 1,078 million exchangeable
bonds into Dassault Aviation shares, with a 5-year maturity.
The exchangeable bonds were issued at 103.75% of par with
a coupon of 0%. Their effective interest rate, after separation
of the equity conversion option related to Dassault Aviation
shares, is 0.333%.
13. Information about Financial Instruments
13.1 Financial Risk Management
The Company acts as an intermediary for its subsidiaries when
they wish to enter into derivative contracts to hedge against
foreign exchange risk or other market risks such as interest rate
risk, commodity price risk or equity price risk. The Company’s
practice is to set up a derivative contract with a subsidiary and
at the same time enter into a back-to-back derivative transaction
with a bank. Contracts with subsidiaries being thus mirrored (on
a one-to-one basis) by contracts with banks, the Company’s net
exposure is virtually zero. There are, however, a few derivative
contracts the Company holds in order to hedge its own market
risk exposure.
As the Company’s back-to-back hedge contracts are entered
into with different counterparties, their fair values are reflected
separately in the statement of Financial Position and recognised
as other financial assets and financial liabilities as disclosed in
Note 8 “Financial assets and liabilities” of the Company Financial
Statements.
In the Statement of Income the results of the back-to-back hedge
transactions, both realised and unrealised, are presented on a
net basis as the Company acts as an agent for its subsidiaries.
The Company’s overall financial risk management activities and
their objectives are described in detail in Section 35.1 “Financial
Risk Management” of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial
Statements.
Market Risk
Foreign exchange risk — The Company manages a longterm hedge portfolio with maturities of several years for its
subsidiaries, mainly Airbus, and to a small extent for its joint
ventures or associates. This hedge portfolio covers a large
portion of Airbus Group’s firm commitments and highly
probable forecast transactions. As explained above, owing to
the Company’s back-to-back approach, its own exposure to
foreign exchange risk is very limited.
Interest rate risk — The Company uses an asset-liability
management approach with the objective to limit its interest
rate risk. The Company undertakes to match the risk profile
of its interest-bearing assets with those of its interest-bearing
liabilities, the remaining net interest rate exposure being
managed through several types of interest rate derivatives. If
the derivative instruments qualify for hedge accounting in the
Company Financial Statements the Company applies cash flow
hedge accounting or fair value hedge accounting. For more
information on the risk management and hedging strategies
used by the Group please refer to Section 35.1 “Financial
Risk Management” of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial
Statements.
Equity price risk — The Company is to a small extent invested
in quoted equity securities mainly for strategic reasons. The
Company’s exposure to equity price risk is hence limited.
Furthermore, Airbus Group is exposed under its long-term
incentive plan (LTIP) to the risk of Airbus Group share price
movements. In order to limit these risks for the Group, the
Company enters into equity derivatives that reference the
Airbus Group SE share price.
Sensitivities of market risks — The approach used to measure
and control market risk exposure within the Group’s financial
instrument portfolio is amongst other key indicators the value-at-
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 104 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
risk (“VaR”). For information about VaR and the approach used
by the Company to assess and monitor sensitivities of market
risks please refer to Section 35.1 “Financial Risk Management”
of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
The Company is part of the Group risk management process,
which is more fully described in Section 35.1 “Financial Risk
Management” of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial
Statements.
A summary of the VaR position of the Company’s financial instruments portfolio at 31 December 2016 and 2015 is as follows:
Total VaR
Equity price VaR
Currency VaR
Interest rate VaR
31 December 2016
FX hedges
8
0
7
1
36
23
6
23
4
4
0
0
Diversification effect
(14)
(2)
(11)
(1)
All financial instruments
34
25
2
23
(In € million)
Financing liabilities, financial assets
(incl. cash, cash equivalents, securities and related hedges)
Equity swaps
31 December 2015
FX hedges
19
0
19
0
Financing liabilities, financial assets
(incl. cash, cash equivalents, securities and related hedges)
50
22
29
28
Equity swaps
11
11
0
0
(39)
(8)
(39)
0
41
25
9
28
Diversification effect
All financial instruments
The decrease in the total VaR compared to 31 December 2015 is mainly triggered by an improved asset liability match in foreign
currencies.The Company enters into derivative instruments mainly for hedging purposes of the Group. The derivative instruments
entered into with Group-external counterparties are passed on a 1:1 basis to Airbus Group entities. As a result, the respective market
risks of the Group-external derivative instruments are offset by corresponding opposite market risks of intragroup transactions.
Liquidity Risk
The Company’s policy is to maintain sufficient cash and cash equivalents at any time to meet its own and the Group’s present
and future commitments as they fall due. For information on how the Group monitors and manages liquidity risk, please refer to
Section 35.1 “Financial Risk Management” of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
The contractual maturities of the Company financial liabilities, based on undiscounted cash flows and including interest payments,
if applicable, are as follows:
(In € million)
Carrying Contractual
amount cash flows
< 1 year
1 year2 years
2 years3 years
3 years4 years
(226)
(809)
(298)
(730)
4 years- More than
5 years
5 years
31 December 2016
Non-derivative financial liabilities
Derivative financial liabilities
Total
(8,032)
(9,042)
(1,695)
(5,284)
(12,241)
(15,147)
(4,762)
(4,104)
(3,106)
(1,630)
(1,127)
(418)
(20,273)
(24,189)
(4,988)
(4,913)
(3,404)
(2,360)
(2,822)
(5,702)
(4,170)
31 December 2015
Non-derivative financial liabilities
Derivative financial liabilities
Total
(7,217)
(8,064)
(1,946)
(211)
(781)
(269)
(687)
(11,951)
(13,698)
(4,100)
(3,635)
(2,992)
(1,976)
(560)
(435)
(19,168)
(21,762)
(6,046)
(3,846)
(3,773)
(2,245)
(1,247)
(4,605)
4
Credit Risk
The Company is exposed to credit risk to the extent of nonperformance by either the related parties to which it provides
financing or its counterparts with regard to financial instruments
or issuers of financial instruments for gross cash investments.
Although the Company provides loans to Group companies its
credit risk is limited to its direct subsidiaries. For the policies
the Company has put in place to avoid concentrations of
credit risk and to ensure that credit risk is limited please refer
to Section 35.1 “Financial Risk Management” of the Notes to
the Consolidated Financial Statements.
In 2016, the total receivables, neither past due nor impaired
amount to € 4,759 million (in 2015: € 4,946 million).
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 105 °
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
13.2 Carrying Amounts and Fair Values of Financial Instruments
Financial instruments – The Company’s financial assets mainly
consist of cash, short to medium-term deposits and securities.
The Company’s financial liabilities include intragroup liabilities,
obligations towards financial institutions and issued bonds.
The Company has the same classifi cation and accounting
policies as the Group. Please refer to Section 35.1 “Financial
Risk Management” of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial
Statements for more information.
The Company assigns its financial instruments (excluding its
at-cost investments, which are outside the scope of IAS 39
“Financial instruments: recognition and measurement”) into
classes based on their category in the statement of financial
position.
The following tables present the carrying amounts and fair values of financial instruments by class and by IAS 39 measurement
category as of 31 December 2016 and 2015:
Fair value
for hedge
relations
Fair value through
profit or loss
(In € million)
Held for
trading
Designated
Loans and receivables
and financial liabilities
at amortised cost
Availablefor-sale
Fair
value
Book
value
Fair
value
Amortised
cost
Fair
value
Financial
instruments
total
Book
value
Fair
value
Assets
Other investments and
long-term financial assets
■
Equity instruments
0
0
0
1,056
1,056
0
0
1,056
1,056
■
Loans
0
0
0
0
0
3,401
3,502
3,401
3,502
Trade receivables
0
0
0
0
0
102
102
102
102
12,031
0
122
0
0
0
0
12,153
12,153
Other financial assets
■
■
Derivative instruments
Current account Group
companies
0
0
0
0
0
9,409
9,409
9,409
9,409
Securities
0
0
0
11,159
11,159
0
0
11,159
11,159
Cash and cash equivalents
0
5,513
0
1,535
1,535
1,710
1,710
8,758
8,758
122
13,750
13,750
14,622
14,723
Total
12,031
5,513
Liabilities
Financing liabilities
Issued bonds and
commercial papers
0
0
0
Liabilities to banks and
other financing liabilities
0
0
Internal loans payable
0
12,196
■
■
■
46,038
46,038
0
0
1,512
1,557
1,512
1,557
0
0
0
2,053
2,053
2,053
2,053
0
0
0
0
4,467
4,660
4,467
4,660
0
45
0
0
0
0
12,241
12,241
Other financial liabilities
■
■
Derivative instruments
Current accounts Group
companies
Total
0
0
0
0
0
28,557
28,557
28,557
28,557
12,196
0
45
0
0
36,588
36,827
48,830
49,068
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 106 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
Fair value
for hedge
relations
Fair value through
profit or loss
(In € million)
Held for
trading
Designated
Financial
instruments
total
Loans and receivables
and financial liabilities
at amortised cost
Availablefor-sale
Fair
value
Book
value
Fair
value
Amortised
cost
Fair
value
Book
value
Fair
value
Assets
Other investments and
long-term financial assets
■
Equity instruments
0
0
0
199
199
0
0
199
199
■
Loans
0
0
0
0
0
4,043
4,147
4,043
4,147
Trade receivables
0
0
0
0
0
11
11
11
11
Other financial assets
■
■
Derivative instruments
11,899
0
61
Current account Group
companies
0
0
0
0
0
0
11,960
11,960
0
0
0
0
0
8,353
8,353
8,353
8,353
Securities
0
3
0
11,273
11,273
0
0
11,276
11,276
Cash and cash equivalents
0
3,220
0
2,851
2,851
444
444
6,515
6,515
11,899
3,223
61
14,323
14,323
12,851
12,955
42,357
42,461
0
0
0
962
992
Total
Liabilities
Financing liabilities
■
■
■
Issued bonds and
commercial papers
0
0
962
992
0
2,309
2,338
2,309
2,338
0
3,945
4,070
3,945
4,070
0
0
11,951
11,951
Liabilities to banks and
other financing liabilities
0
0
0
0
Internal loans payable
0
0
0
0
11,901
0
50
0
0
Other financial liabilities
■
■
Derivative instruments
Current accounts Group
companies
Total
0
0
0
0
0
28,415
28,415
28,415
28,415
11,901
0
50
0
0
35,631
35,815
47,582
47,766
Fair Value Hierarchy
For further details please refer to Note 35.2 “Carrying Amounts and Fair Values of Financial Instruments” in the Consolidated
Financial Statements.
The fair values disclosed for financial instruments accounted for at amortised cost reflect Level 2 input.
The following table presents the carrying amounts of the financial instruments held at fair value across the three levels of the fair
value hierarchy as of 31 December 2016 and 2015, respectively:
31 December 2016
(In € million)
Level 1
Level 2
31 December 2015
Total
Level 1
Level 2
Total
Financial assets measured at fair value
Equity instruments
Derivative instruments
Securities
Cash equivalents
Total
1,056
0
1,056
199
0
199
0
12,153
12,153
0
11,961
11,961
11,139
20
11,159
11,112
164
11,276
6,218
830
7,048
3,941
2,130
6,071
18,413
13,003
31,416
15,252
14,255
29,507
0
12,241
12,241
0
11,951
11,951
Financial liabilities measured at fair value
Derivative instruments
Other liabilities
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
0
12,241
12,241
0
11,951
11,951
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 107 °
4
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
13.3 Potential Effect of Set-Off Rights on Recognised Financial Assets and Liabilities
The Company reports all its financial assets and financial liabilities on a gross basis. With each derivative counterparty there are
master netting agreements in place providing for the immediate close-out of all outstanding derivative transactions and payment
of the net termination amount in the event a party to the agreement defaults or another defined termination event occurs. The
following tables set out, on a counterparty specific basis, the potential effect of master netting agreements on the Company’s
financial position, separately for financial assets and financial liabilities that were subject to such agreements as of 31 December
2016 and 31 December 2015, respectively:
Derivative instruments
(In € million)
31 December 2016
Related amounts not set off in
the statement of financial position
Net amounts
presented in
the financial
statements
Gross amounts
recognised set
Gross
amounts off in the financial
statements
recognised
Financial
instruments
Cash collateral
received
Net
amount
Financial assets
12,153
0
12,153
(2,561)
0
9,592
Financial liabilities
12,241
0
12,241
(2,561)
0
9,680
Financial assets
11,961
0
11,961
(2,754)
0
9,207
Financial liabilities
11,951
0
11,951
(2,754)
0
9,197
7 years > 7 years
Total
31 December 2015
13.4 Notional Amounts of Derivative Financial Instruments
The maturity of hedged interest cash flows are as follows, specified by year of expected maturity:
Remaining period
1 year
2 years
3 years
4 years
5 years
6 years
31 December 2016
Interest rate contracts
30
0
0
0
488
0
949
3,595
5,062
130
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
130
Interest rate contracts
2,549
41
1,021
18
14
1,134
8
3,469
8,254
Interest rate future contracts
1,032
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,032
(In € million)
Interest rate future contracts
31 December 2015
The notional amounts of equity swaps are as follows:
Remaining period
1 year
2 years
3 years
4 years
> 4 years
Total
31 December 2016
77
52
49
19
0
197
31 December 2015
153
76
52
49
20
350
(In € million)
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 108 °
Financial Statements 2016
Notes to the IFRS Company Financial Statements
13.5 Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedge Accounting Disclosure
In addition, a loss of € -27 million was recognised in the profit for the period in 2016 (€ 20 million in 2015) on derivatives that were
designated as hedging instruments in a fair value hedge, and a gain of € 12 million (in 2015: € -18 million) attributable to the hedged
risk was recognised in the profit for the period on the corresponding hedged items. Corresponding with its carrying amounts, the
fair values of each type of derivative financial instruments are as follows:
31 December
2016
Assets
(In € million)
Foreign currency contracts – cash flow hedges
Foreign currency contracts – not designated in a hedge relationship
2015
Liabilities
Assets
Liabilities
0
0
0
26
11,941
11,962
11,669
11,671
13
Interest rate contracts – cash flow hedges
0
7
0
Interest rate contracts – fair value hedges
122
38
30
4
Interest rate contracts – not designated in a hedge relationship
23
57
100
100
Commodity contracts - not designated in a hedge relationship
52
52
130
130
Equity swaps – not designated in a hedge relationship
15
3
31
7
0
122
12,153
12,241
11,960
11,951
Option component of Exchangeable Bond
Total
13.6 Net Gains or Net Losses
The Company’s net gains or net losses recognised in profit or loss in 2016 and 2015, respectively are as follows:
2016
(In € million)
2015
Financial assets or financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss:
(168)
70
Designated on initial recognition
49
165
Available-for-sale financial assets
15
183
Held for trading
(1)
(93)
375
Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost
123
(631)
Total
(74)
162
Loans and receivables
(1) Contain among others impairment losses.
14. Events after the Reporting Date
There are no significant events after the reporting date.
4
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 109 °
Chapter
5
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 110 °
Financial Statements 2016
Other Supplementary
Information Including
the Independent
Auditor’s Report
5
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 111 °
Other Supplementary Information Including the Independent Auditor’s Report
Other Supplementary Information
1.
Appropriation of Result
Articles 30 and 31 of the Articles of Association provide that the Board of Directors shall determine which part of the result shall
be attributed to the reserves. The General Meeting of Shareholders may dispose of a reserve only upon a proposal of the Board
of Directors and to the extent it is permitted by law and the Articles of Association. Dividends may only be paid after adoption of
the annual accounts from which it appears that the shareholders’ equity of the Company is more than the amount of the issued
and paid-in part of the capital increased by the reserves that must be maintained by law.
It will be proposed at the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders that the Profit for the period of € 3,900 million as shown in the
income statements for the financial year 2016 is to be added to retained earnings and that a payment of a gross amount of € 1.35
per share shall be made to the shareholders out of retained earnings.
2.
Independent auditor’s report
To: the shareholders and board of directors of Airbus Group SE
Report on the audit of the Annual Financial Statements 2016 included in the annual report
Our opinion
We have audited the financial statements 2016 of Airbus Group SE (the Company), based in Amsterdam.
In our opinion the accompanying financial statements give a true and fair view of the financial position of Airbus Group SE as at
31 December 2016, and of its result and its cash flows for 2016 in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards
as adopted by the European Union (EU-IFRS) and with Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code.
The financial statements comprise:
■
the consolidated and company statement of financial position as at 31 December 2016;
■
the following statements for 2016: the consolidated and company income statement, the consolidated and company statements
of comprehensive income, changes in equity and cash flows;
■
the notes comprising a summary of the significant accounting policies and other explanatory information.
Basis for our opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Dutch law, including the Dutch Standards on Auditing. Our responsibilities under
those standards are further described in the “Our responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements” section of our report.
We are independent of Airbus Group SE in accordance with the Verordening inzake de onafhankelijkheid van accountants
bij assurance-opdrachten (ViO, Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants, a regulation with respect to independence) and
other relevant independence regulations in the Netherlands. Furthermore we have complied with the Verordening gedrags- en
beroepsregels accountants (VGBA, Dutch Code of Ethics).
We believe the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 112 °
Financial Statements 2016
Other Supplementary Information Including the Independent Auditor’s Report
Materiality
Materiality
€ 198 million
Benchmark applied
Explanation
5% of the EBIT adjusted
We consider EBIT adjusted as the most appropriate benchmark given the nature of the business
We have also taken into account misstatements and/or possible misstatements that in our opinion are material for the users of
the financial statements for qualitative reasons.
We agreed with the Board of Directors that misstatements in excess of € 10 million which are identified during the audit, would be
reported to them, as well as smaller misstatements that in our view must be reported on qualitative grounds.
Scope of the group audit
Airbus Group SE is at the head of a group of entities. The financial information of this group is included in the consolidated financial
statements of Airbus Group SE. The Company is structured along the divisions: Airbus, Airbus Helicopters and Airbus Defence
and Space, each comprising of multiple entities in various countries.
We are responsible for directing, supervising and performing the group audit. In this context, we have determined the nature and
extent of the audit procedures to be carried out for the Group entities, based on their size and/or risk profile.
We scope entities into the group audit where they are of significant size, have significant risks to the Company associated with them
or are considered for other reasons. This resulted in coverage of 86% of total consolidated revenue and 99% of total consolidated
assets. The remaining 14% of revenues, and 1% of total assets results from entities, none of which individually represents more
than 1% of revenues. For remaining entities, we performed, amongst others, analytical procedures or specific audit procedures
on certain account balances to corroborate our assessment that there are no significant risks of material misstatements.
We executed a program that includes participation in risk assessment and planning discussions, setting the direction of the group
audit work (including instructions to the divisional and entity auditors), review and discussion of the planned audit approach, obtaining
an understanding of the financial reporting process and performing procedures on the group consolidation, participating in the
evaluation of key accounting topics, reviewing the financial statements and participating in meetings with the management of the
Company and its divisions. As part of our audit instructions, we also included questions on key programmes (A380, A350 XWB
and A400M) and the risk of non-compliance with laws and regulations. We involved several EY specialists to assist the audit team,
including specialists from our tax, valuations, actuarial, treasury and compliance departments.
The audit of the three Airbus Divisions is performed jointly by EY network firms and other non-EY audit firms. Meetings were held with
the divisional auditors and divisional management to discuss the findings reported to the group audit team, as well as file reviews.
By performing the procedures mentioned above at group entities, together with additional procedures at consolidation level,
we have been able to obtain sufficient and appropriate audit evidence about the Company’s financial information to provide an
opinion about the consolidated financial statements.
Our key audit matters
Key audit matters are those matters that, in our professional judgment, were of most significance in our audit of the financial
statements. We have communicated the key audit matters to the supervisory board. The key audit matters are not a comprehensive
reflection of all matters discussed.
5
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 113 °
Other Supplementary Information Including the Independent Auditor’s Report
These matters were addressed in the context of our audit of the financial statements as a whole and in forming our opinion thereon,
and we do not provide a separate opinion on these matters.
Risk
Our audit approach
Litigation and claims and risk of non-compliance with laws and regulation
Description
A part of the Company’s business is characterised by competition for
individual significant contracts with customers which are often directly
or indirectly associated with governments. The process associated
with these activities is susceptible to the risk of non-compliance
with laws and regulations. In addition the Company operates in a
number of territories where the use of commercial intermediaries
is normal practice. Subsidiaries of Airbus Group SE remain under
investigation by various law enforcement agencies in Germany,
Greece, UK, Romania and Austria. In August 2016, the Company
announced that it had been informed by the Serious Fraud Office in
the UK that it had commenced a formal investigation into allegations
of fraud, bribery and corruption in the civil aviation business of the
Company. These allegations relate to irregularities concerning third
party consultants. Breaches of laws and regulations in this area can
lead to fines, penalties, criminal prosecution, commercial litigation
and restrictions on future business.
Litigation and claims involve amounts that are potentially significant
and the estimate of the amount to be provided as a liability, if any,
is inherently subjective. The outcome of these matters may have a
material effect on the Company’s result and financial position.
Reference is made to disclosure on Note 3 ‘Key estimates and
judgements’, and Note 36 ‘Litigations and claims’ of the financial
statements.
Our audit approach
We evaluated and tested the Company’s policies, procedures and
controls over the selection of intermediaries, contracting arrangements,
ongoing management, payments and responses to suspected
breaches of policy. We sought to identify and tested payments made
to intermediaries during the year, made enquiries of appropriate
personnel and evaluated the tone set by management and the Board
of Directors and the Company’s approach to managing this risk.
Having enquired of management, the Audit Committee and the Board
of Directors as to whether the Company is in compliance with laws
and regulations relating to bribery and corruption, we made written
enquiries of and met with the Company’s legal advisers to cross check
the results of those enquiries with third parties and maintained a high
level of vigilance to possible indications of significant non-compliance
with laws and regulations relating to bribery and corruption whilst
carrying out our other audit procedures. We discussed the areas
of potential or suspected breaches of law, including the ongoing
investigations, with the Audit Committee and the Board of Directors
as well as the Company’s legal advisers and assessed related
documentation. We assessed whether the disclosure in note 36 to the
financial statements of the Company’s exposure to the financial effects
of potential or suspected breaches of law or regulation complies with
accounting standards and in particular whether it is the case that the
investigations remain at too early a stage to assess the consequences
(if any), including in particular the size of any possible fines.
Accounting for construction contracts, including revenue recognition and loss provision
Description
The amount of revenue and profit recognised in a year is dependent
on the assessment of the stage of completion of construction
contracts as well as estimated total revenues and estimated
total cost. Significant estimates are made to assess the stage of
completion based on milestones, estimated revenue and costs for
key programmes such as A400M and A350 XWB (contracts with
launch customers only).
Depending on these assessments, the stage of completion is
determined, revenue is recognised and loss provisions are recorded
when the contract margin is negative.
Provisions for contract losses relate mainly to the A400M and A350
XWB launch customers and are recorded when it becomes probable
that estimated total contract costs will exceed estimated total contract
revenues. Updates to these provisions can have a significant impact
on the Company’s result and financial position. The determination of
these provisions is based on best available estimates and requires
significant management’s judgement and assumptions associated
with the technical development achievement and certification
schedules, production plan (including assumptions on ramp up),
performance guarantees as well as expected outcome from ongoing
negotiations with customers.
A key risk is the A400M programme which remains in a critical phase.
Negotiations with OCCAR/Nations on military capabilities, price
revision formula and commercial compensation remain ongoing.
Reference is made to the disclosure on Note 3 ‘Key estimates and
judgements’, Note 10 ‘Revenues, cost of sales and gross margin’
and Note 22 ‘Provisions, contingent assets and contingent liabilities’
of the financial statements.
Our audit approach
We evaluated the design and implementation of internal controls for
accounting for construction contracts. We also performed detailed
procedures on individually significant programmes, including
discussions with the individual Head of Programme, and evaluated
management’s assumptions in the determination of amongst others
the stage of completion of a project, estimates to complete for both
revenue and costs, and any provisions for loss making contracts.
We focused on management’s assessment of key contract risks and
opportunities to determine whether these are appropriately reflected in
the cost to complete forecasts, and paid specific attention for example
to technical development, delivery plan and certification schedules.
We challenged management’s assumptions by discussing and
reviewing correspondence with customers, considered the accuracy
and consistency of similar estimates made in previous years and
corroborated the assumptions with the latest contractual information.
We paid particular attention to the loss provision for the A400M
programme, including the € (2,210) million additional net charge in
2016, as well as related disclosures.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 114 °
Financial Statements 2016
Other Supplementary Information Including the Independent Auditor’s Report
Risk
Our audit approach
Valuation of inventories for contracts accounted for under IAS 18 and completeness of provision
for contract losses and customer service obligations
Description
Inventories amount in total to € 30 billion, including work in progress
of € 21 billion. Key programmes (which are accounted for under
IAS 18 Revenue recognition, for which revenue and cost of sales
are recognised as each aircraft is delivered) in light of the risks
mentioned below are the A380 and the A350 XWB contracts with
non-launch customers. With respect to the A380, a key challenge is
securing the order flow.
Estimates of total contract costs and selling price per aircraft are
necessary to determine if the net realisable value impairment or
provision for contract losses is required.
In addition to the risk of contract cancellations, significant costs
or loss of revenue may be incurred in connection with remedial
action required to correct any performance issues detected. Due
to the inherent uncertainty involved in forecasting future costs and
interpreting contractual and commercial positions in determining
impairments and provisions, this is a key audit area. Updates to
these provisions can have a significant impact on the Company’s
result and financial position.
Reference is made to the disclosures on Note 3 ‘Key estimates
and judgements’, and notes 20 ‘Inventories’ and 22 ‘Provisions,
contingent assets and contingent liabilities’ of the financial
statements.
Our audit approach
We evaluated the design and implementation of internal controls for
identifying and recording impairments and provisions and performed
detailed procedures including inquiry of the Head of Programmes and
corroboration with other audit evidence. We evaluated management’s
assumptions in the determination of the forecast revenue to be
received, cost to be incurred (including any contractual penalties) and
gross margin. Our evaluation was based on our assessment of the
historical accuracy of the Company’s estimates in previous periods
and included an analysis of contingencies and impact of known
technical issues on cost forecasts and provisions.
Particular attention was paid to the commercial status of the A380
programme, including discussions with Airbus management on the
status and their ongoing commitment to the A380 programme.
Goodwill impairment
Description
Goodwill amounts to € 9.4 billion (2015: € 9.9 billion) and represents
8% (2015: 9%) of the balance sheet total and 255% (2015: 166%)
of total equity. There is a risk of irrecoverability of the Company’s
significant goodwill balance due to weak demand in certain markets
and aircraft market cyclicality.
In its impairment calculations the company uses assumptions such
as growth rates, weighted average costs of capital and underlying
foreign exchange rates. Due to the inherent uncertainty involved in
forecasting and discounting future cash flows, which are the basis
of the assessment of recoverability, this is one of the key judgmental
areas.
Reference is made to the disclosure on Note 17 ‘Intangible assets’ of
the financial statements.
Our audit approach
In this area our audit procedures included, amongst others, testing of
the Company’s budgeting procedures upon which the forecasts are
based and the principles and integrity of the Company’s discounted
cash flow model. We used our own valuation specialists to assist us in
evaluating the assumptions and methodologies used by the Company,
in particular relating to the discount rate used. We also evaluated
management’s sensitivity analyses on the assumptions for each cash
generating unit. We compared the sum of the discounted cash flows
to the Company’s market capitalisation to assess the reasonableness
of those cash flows.
Derivative financial instruments, including impact on capitalization of Airbus Group SE
Description
The Company operates in a business environment that is exposed
to currency and interest rate volatility. A significant portion of the
Company’s revenue is dominated in US dollars, while a major part
of its costs is incurred in Euro and, to a lesser extent, in pounds
Sterling. In response to these risks the Company uses financial
instruments (mainly currency forwards) to mitigate the exposure to
changes in market rates.
There is a high inherent risk of error in the Company financial
statements, both in valuation of the financial instruments and in the
presentation and disclosure in the financial statements.
The magnitude of the Company’s hedge portfolio and potential
significant changes in the exchange rate of the US dollar versus the
Euro could have a negative impact on the equity of the Company
via the ‘mark to market’ valuation of the hedge portfolio. It therefore
also has a major impact on the capitalisation of Airbus Group SE,
with net equity (as percentage of total assets) amounting to 3.1% per
31 December 2016 (2015: 5.6%).
Reference is made to Note 35 ‘Information about financial
instruments’ of the financial statements.
Our audit approach
For the audit of financial instruments we used specialists who
tested the controls around the Company’s central treasury system,
independently calculated the valuation of the treasury portfolio and
tested the application of the hedge accounting rules and the resulting
accounting treatment. We also obtained counterparty confirmation
of the outstanding financial instruments to verify the existence and
ownership. Finally we evaluated whether appropriate disclosures
relating to financial instruments were made in the financial statements.
Independence matter
Description
In 2016, few EY staff from The Netherlands were seconded for
non-audit services contracted and allowed outside the Netherlands.
This secondment abroad caused a formal breach of independence
under Dutch law.
Our audit response
After this breach was discovered by EY it was, together with the
mitigating and corrective measures taken, reported to the Airbus Audit
Committee and the Dutch regulator. Our independence has not been
compromised and thus does not affect our opinion as an independent
auditor.
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 115 °
5
Other Supplementary Information Including the Independent Auditor’s Report
Report on other information included in the annual report
In addition to the financial statements and our auditor’s report thereon, the annual report contains other information that consists of:
■
■
the Report of the Board of Directors (we refer to www.airbusgroup.com for the Report of the Board of Directors);
other information pursuant to Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code.
Based on the following procedures performed, we conclude that the other information:
■
■
is consistent with the financial statements and does not contain material misstatements;
contains the information as required by Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code.
We have read the other information. Based on our knowledge and understanding obtained through our audit of the financial
statements or otherwise, we have considered whether the other information contains material misstatements. By performing these
procedures, we comply with the requirements of Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code and the Dutch Standard 720. The scope
of the procedures performed is less than the scope of those performed in our audit of the financial statements.
The Board is responsible for the preparation of the other information, including the Report of the Board of Directors in accordance
with Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code and other information pursuant to Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code.
Report on other legal and regulatory requirements
Engagement
We were appointed by the Annual General Meeting of Shareholders as auditor of Airbus Group SE on 28 April 2016, as of the
audit for the year 2016.
Description of responsibilities for the financial statements
Responsibilities of the Board of Directors and Audit Committee for the financial statements
The Board of Directors is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in accordance with
EU-IFRS and Part 9 of Book 2 of the Dutch Civil Code. Furthermore, the Board of Directors is responsible for such internal
control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial statements that are free from material
misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.
As part of the preparation of the financial statements, the Board of Directors is responsible for assessing the company’s ability
to continue as a going concern. Based on the financial reporting frameworks mentioned, the Board of Directors should prepare
the financial statements using the going concern basis of accounting unless the Board of Directors either intends to liquidate the
company or to cease operations, or has no realistic alternative but to do so. The Board of Directors should disclose events and
circumstances that may cast significant doubt on the company’s ability to continue as a going concern in the financial statements.
The Audit Committee is responsible for overseeing the Company’s financial reporting process.
Our responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements
Our objective is to plan and perform the audit assignment in a manner that allows us to obtain sufficient and appropriate audit
evidence for our opinion.
Our audit has been performed with a high, but not absolute, level of assurance, which means we may not have detected all
material errors and fraud.
Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably
be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of these financial statements. The materiality affects
the nature, timing and extent of our audit procedures and the evaluation of the effect of identified misstatements on our opinion.
We have exercised professional judgment and have maintained professional scepticism throughout the audit, in accordance with
Dutch Standards on Auditing, ethical requirements and independence requirements. Our audit included e.g.:
■
identifying and assessing the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, designing
and performing audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtaining audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to
provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting
from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 116 °
Financial Statements 2016
Other Supplementary Information Including the Independent Auditor’s Report
■
■
■
■
■
obtaining an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in
the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control;
evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related
disclosures made by management;
concluding on the appropriateness of management’s use of the going concern basis of accounting, and based on the audit
evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the
company’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw
attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to
modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However,
future events or conditions may cause a company to cease to continue as a going concern;
evaluating the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the disclosures;
evaluating whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair
presentation.
Because we are ultimately responsible for the opinion, we are also responsible for directing, supervising and performing the
group audit. In this respect we have determined the nature and extent of the audit procedures to be carried out for group entities.
Decisive were the size and/or the risk profile of the Company’s entities or operations. On this basis, we selected group entities for
which an audit or review had to be carried out on the complete set of financial information or specific items.
We communicate with the Board of Directors regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and
significant audit findings, including any significant findings in internal control that we identify during our audit.
We provide the Board of Directors with a statement that we have complied with relevant ethical requirements regarding independence,
and to communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on our independence,
and where applicable, related safeguards.
From the matters communicated with the Board of Directors, we determine those matters that were of most significance in the
audit of the financial statements of the current period and are therefore the key audit matters. We describe these matters in our
auditor’s report unless law or regulation precludes public disclosure about the matter or when, in extremely rare circumstances,
not communicating the matter is in the public interest.
Amsterdam, 21 February 2017
Ernst & Young Accountants LLP
Signed by: A.A. van Eimeren
5
Financial Statements 2016 - AIRBUS ° 117 °
Download PDF
Similar pages