Snowstorm coming - The Monroe Times

WEATHER
CHEESE FALL
TODAY
38/30
THURSDAY
31/13
Slight chance of
rain and snow late.
Windy, blowing snow
and heavy snow.
Sauk Prairie surges past
Monroe girls with big third quarter.
Sports, Page B1
Full forecast • Page A6
WHAT’S
THE MONROE
Potluck dinner for
WOTM members, Monroe
Moose Family Center.
Today, 6 p.m.
TIMES
Vol. CXIII
Issue 298
Times
launches
new site
4 Teens program,
movie day, second
floor program room,
Monroe Public Library.
Thursday, 3:30 p.m.
VIEWS POLL
Do you support a ban on
assault weapons?
www.themonroetimes.com.
Wednesday, December 19, 2012
www.themonroetimes.com
MONROE
WHAT’S ONLINE
UP
MONROE
PLATTEVILLE
Snowstorm coming
Local
board
awarded
$100K
Print subscribers
can register online
through Dec. 28
MONROE — The Monroe
Times launched its redesigned
website Tuesday, Dec. 18,
offering readers a fresh look
and new features.
The Times’ new website will
continue to offer local news,
sports, photos, classifieds and
advertising but with an updated, streamlined interface. In
addition, the site has also been
expanded to offer numerous
new features, including lottery
numbers, recipes, box office
numbers, professional sports
scores and even a daily exercise video.
By Tere Dunlap
tdunlap@themonroetimes.com
See ONLINE, Page A6
Storm to continue
into Thurs., drop up
to 11 inches on area
MONROE
Fire truck
to get
facelift
Brodhead FD to
assist while truck
gets refurbished
By Tere Dunlap
tdunlap@
themonroetimes.com
MONROE — To keep fire
insurance rates in the city from
going up by 14 percent and to
postpone the expense of purchasing a new ladder truck, the
current 1990 ladder truck will
get a refurbishing.
The City of Monroe Finance
and Taxation Committee
authorized Fire Chief Daryl
Rausch to spend up to
$125,000 to get the truck back
to firefighting specifications.
Rausch had set aside the
money in his 2013 budget.
Rausch estimated the refurbishing, which will include the
outrigger, cables and electrical
systems, will extend the life of
the vehicle by 10 years. All the
See FIRE, Page A6
MADISON — A strong winter
storm is expected to affect much of
Wisconsin starting Wednesday night
and lasting through Thursday. The
National Weather Service is predicting up to 12 inches of snowfall from
Grant County northeast to Door
County with smaller but significant
accumulations elsewhere.
As of press time, the National
Weather Service is calling for Green
County to receive heavy snow beginning Wednesday night, with 4 to 6
inches of accumulation. More snow, 3
to 5 inches, along with blowing snow
is expected during the day Thursday.
Chance of snow is 100 percent
Wednesday night through Thursday.
Times photos: Katjusa Cisar
ABOVE: In preparation for tonight’s storm, foreman Jeff Lanz, left,
and mechanic Scott Neuenschwander put chains on the wheels of
one of the Green County Highway Department’s six heavy-duty
V-plows Tuesday afternoon. The department is responsible for
clearing all state and county roads in the area and has 25 regular
plows at its disposal, although only about 21 are typically on the
roads during a big snowstorm.
PLATTEVILLE — The Southwest
Wisconsin Workforce Development
Board was the only one of
Wisconsin's eleven regional boards to
exceed all nine WIA performance
standards and will receive $100,666
in recognition of its performance.
Wisconsin
Department
of
Workforce Development Secretary
Reggie Newson announced Tuesday
that six Workforce Development
Boards exceeded some performance
standards for the most recent program
year, and they will receive a portion
of $300,000 in total funding awards
for recognition of their workforce
partner performance.
SWWDB is responsible for the
planning and oversight of the workforce system in southwest Wisconsin,
covering Grant, Green, Iowa,
Lafayette, Richland, and Rock counties.
The funding award is a nice reward
for their efforts, according to said Dr.
Robert T. Borremans, executive
director of SWWDB.
“It was a surprise for us,”
Borremans said. “We’ve known for a
while that we exceeded performance.”
Borremans said his board and staff
have “always been competitive”
about meeting and surpassing performance standards, but the state has
not always been forthcoming with
sharing financial funding to encourage good performance. The source of
the awards is federal Workforce
Investment Act funding, as allocated
See SNOW, Page A6
See BOARD, Page A6
MADISON
State discusses ending same-day voter registration
By Scott Bauer
Associated Press
MADISON — Wisconsin’s elections board heard Tuesday from both
supporters and opponents of allowing
voters to register at the polls on election day, an issue that’s gotten new
attention after Gov. Scott Walker
talked recently about his desire to see
the law overturned.
Walker subsequently took a softer
stand,
after
the
Government
WHAT’S NEXT
Holiday greetings get
humbug response from
offended aunt.
Teaching is near the top
of the list of the most
noble of professions.
THURSDAY • LIFE
THURSDAY • VIEWS
Accountability Board issued a preliminary report that put the cost at overturning the law at $5.2 million initially and about $1 million a year after
that. Walker last week said he wouldn’t sign a bill that costs that much, but
he stopped short of saying he would
veto any proposal or sign something
that costs less.
A pair of Republican lawmakers
said they plan to introduce a bill doing
away with election day registration,
even though Walker has said it’s not a
WHAT’S
Calendar
Classifieds
Comics
Community
Crossword
Dear Abby
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B5
B3
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priority of his and believes debating it
is a distraction.
Election day voter registration has
served the state well since it started in
1976, said Andrea Kaminski, executive director of the League of Women
Voters of Wisconsin. There is no evidence that same-day registration has
caused significant problems and eliminating it would hurt voter turnout, she
told the board.
Officials should focus on positive
reforms that will increase turnout,
See VOTING, Page A6
DEATHS • PAGE A2
IN
Horoscope
Life
Local
Sports
Sudoku
Views
Kaminski said.
The Wisconsin Municipal Clerks
Association has passed a resolution
opposing elimination of same-day registration, said its president, Vikki
Zuehlke, clerk of the village of
Waterford. She specifically cited the
costs outlined in the report as a concern.
Tom Vandervest, an election inspector in Middleton, told the board he was
B3
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Alma L. Miller • 90, Monroe, 12/15
Lillian M. Stoll • 95, New Glarus, 12/17
Cindee L. Sweeney • 41, South Wayne,
12/18
6
12307 98765
8
SPORTS
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
B1
WISCONSIN FOOTBALL
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Eagles surge past Monroe Utah State’s
Andersen to
be hired by
Wisconsin
Sauk Prairie goes
on 16-0 third
quarter run to take
control in victory
By Mark Nesbitt
mnesbitt@
themonroetimes.com
MONROE — A short-handed Monroe girls basketball
team looked like they were up
for the challenge sparked by
senior Briana Katzenberger
before Sauk Prairie went on a
big third quarter surge to
knock off the Cheesemakers
51-40 Tuesday night.
Katzenberger scored 10 of
the Cheesemakers’ first 12
points in the first quarter. The
Cheesemakers hit 7 of their
first 8 shots and jumped out to
a 12-5 lead. Katzenberger,
who scored a team-high 13
points, knocked down two
jumpers and scored on two
layups during the spurt to lead
the Cheesemakers.
The depth for Monroe (1-6,
0-2 Badger South) was tested.
The Cheesemakers played
without junior leading scorer
Taylor Barrett due to a knee
injury, senior Heather Barta
(ankle) and junior Vanessa
Studer (knee). Monroe junior
Kirsten Vetterli scored 11
points and junior Chandra
McGuire added six points.
“We knew we had to come
out strong as a team,”
Katzenberger said. “We knew
it would be difficult without
them. I was just really excited.
I was hoping we would feed
off of that (first quarter) and
that would get us going. We
just hit a wall in the third quarter.”
Sauk Prairie (4-3) went on a
16-0 third quarter run to build
a 12-point lead.
“It’s never easy,” Monroe
coach Sam Mathiason said. “It
was almost like it was coming
so easy in the first quarter. Bri
was doing a good job of reading the defense and getting to
the basket. It became a little
bit more of a struggle in the
third quarter. They changed
their defense a little and start-
Times photo: Mark Nesbitt
Monroe junior Chandra McGuire drives to the basket against Sauk Prairie’s Olivia
Rauls Tuesday night in the Eagles’ 51-40 win over the Cheesemakers.
“I was hoping we
would feed off of
that (first quarter)
and that would get
us going. We just
hit a wall in the
third quarter.”
– Monroe senior Briana
Katzenberger
ed sagging more into the
lane.”
Monroe wasn’t the only
team missing key players.
Sauk Prairie played without
junior Lindsay Sauer who
missed the game due to sickness.
“You will have injuries and
sickness in basketball because
it’s a long season,” Mathiason
said. “You have to be ready
for your opportunity. You have
to take advantage of every
opportunity you get. Briana
and Kirsten (Vetterli) took
advantage of their opportunities.”
After Vetterli scored down
low twice to start the third
quarter
to
give
the
Cheesemakers a 26-22 lead,
that is when the scoring
drought
hit.
The
Cheesemakers
went
12
straight possessions and about
5 minutes without scoring.
Sauk Prairie senior Jorgen Fox
hit a jumper and drilled a 3pointer during the surge to
give the Eagles a 31-26 lead.
Freshman Ali Roach then
knocked down a 3-pointer and
had another three-point play
with 59 seconds to go in the
third quarter to give the Eagles
a commanding 38-26 lead.
“It’s about finding that consistency and finding out where
and at what point the touches
and shots will come from,”
Mathiason said. “We have to
continue to make the extra
pass and continue to find the
consistency on the offensive
end.”
Vetterli scored down low to
start the fourth quarter to snap
See CHEESE, Page B2
BUCKS
Jennings powers Milwaukee past Pacers
MILWAUKEE (AP) — Mike Dunleavy
missed the previous seven games because
of a bruised left knee. The way he played
Tuesday night, it was hard to tell.
Dunleavy scored 17 points off the
bench, including grabbing a key rebound
and scoring on a putback after missing a 3pointer with 1:35 left, to help the
Milwaukee Bucks hold off the Indiana
Pacers 98-93.
“It was nice to have him back,” Bucks
coach Scott Skiles said. “It didn’t seem
like he had been out. He’s not known for
being a great athlete. He is really long and
he has a really great basketball set. When
he is around the rim, usually something
good happens.”
Dunleavy said it just felt good to be
back on the court and to contribute to a
win against a Central Division rival.
“I felt very comfortable out there,” said
Dunleavy, who hit 3 of 5 3-pointers. “I feel
like my condition is a little bit down, but I
felt good. I hate missing games, but it’s
good to be back and good to get a win.”
The other star of the game for
Milwaukee was Brandon Jennings, who
scored 34 points, grabbed five rebounds
and handed out six assists.
Jennings scored 13 points in the fourth
quarter.
“Brandon was good from the get-go,”
Dunleavy said. “He made big shots and
very big plays. That’s why he’s Brandon.”
Central Division
W
L
GB
Chicago
Milwaukee
Indiana
Detroit
14
13
13
7
10
10
12
20
—
0.5
1.5
8.5
Cleveland
5
21
10
On Deck
BUCKS AT GRIZZLIES
When: 8:30 p.m., today
Where: Memphis
TV: FSWI
Skiles played Jennings 44 minutes even
though the Bucks play at Memphis on
Wednesday.
“We needed him out there,” Skiles said.
“He was somebody out there knocking
down shots. We needed him in the game.”
Monta Ellis added 19 points for
Milwaukee, which won for the fifth time
in the last six games, despite being outrebounded 51-37.
The loss snapped Indiana’s four-game
winning streak. The Pacers had won 9 of
13 entering the contest against the Bucks.
Pacers coach Frank Vogel was satisfied
with his team’s effort, no the execution.
“We competed our tails off,” he said.
“We had a tough night shooting the basketball. We turned the ball over too much.
We have to take care of the ball better.”
Pacers center Roy Hibbert, who sustained a deep thigh bruise in the first half
of Indiana’s 86-77 win over Detroit
Saturday, was back in the starting lineup
Tuesday. He was held to eight points and
10 rebounds in 28 minutes of playing time.
He was disappointed the Pacers had lost
the first two games of the season series to
Milwaukee.
“We wanted to have this win, but we
have to win the next two against the Bucks
at our place,” he said.
Jennings scored four straight points
midway through the fourth quarter to give
the Bucks an 89-85 lead with 4:10 remaining.
Paul George drove the lane for Indiana
for a dunk to cut the lead to two, but
Jennings responded with a 3-pointer from
the top of the key with 3:30 remaining to
give the Bucks a 92-87 lead.
David West hit one of two free throws,
but Dunleavy rebounded his own miss and
scored to give Milwaukee a 94-88 lead
with 1:35 remaining.
George Hill hit a 3-pointer to cut the
lead to 94-91 with 1:17 remaining.
Jennings then drove the lane and scored
with 1 minute left to boost the lead to 9691 and the Bucks held on for the win.
MADISON
(AP)
—
Wisconsin will hire Utah
State’s
G a r y
Andersen
as head
football
coach to
replace
B r e t
Bielema, according to multiple media reports.
The
Wisconsin
State
Journal was first to report that
Wisconsin athletic director
Barry Alvarez had offered
Andersen the job Tuesday
night. Andersen is in his fourth
year at Utah State and is coming off his best season yet.
The 18th-ranked Aggies
won the Western Athletic
Conference and finished 11-2,
and beat Toledo 41-15 in the
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl on
Saturday.
Utah State lost 16-14 at
Wisconsin earlier this season.
The 48-year-old Andersen
took over in Logan, Utah,
after spending five seasons as
defensive coordinator at the
University of Utah under Kyle
Whittingham.
Bielema left Wisconsin for
Arkansas earlier this month in
a surprising move.
Andersen’s move would
come as a surprise only
because he has so publicly
stated recently that he planned
to stay at Utah State after turning down other offers in the
past month. The Utah native
was a candidate at Colorado,
California and Kentucky.
“Opportunities are wonderful. It was very humbling the
last three or four weeks to go
through that process and be
involved in jobs. You learn a
lot, but you also learn a lot
about yourself and where you
want to be,” Andersen told the
Idaho Statesman last week.
Among the others reportedly considered for the
Wisconsin
job
were
Jacksonville Jaguars defensive coordinator Mel Tucker,
Bowling Green coach Dave
Clawson and Miami’s Al
Golden.
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Albany’s zone
baffles Juda
By Times Staff
JUDA — After losing senior Cassidy Bump early in
the first quarter, the Comets
responded with strong second and fourth quarters to
defeat Juda 34-27.
Bump went down early
with a leg injury and did not
return, Albany head coach
Bryce Pickett said. “I don’t
think it’s going to be anything serious,” he added.
Senior Kirstie Kauk and
freshman Ashley Harris
stepped up for the Comets,
scoring nine and eight points
respectively. All of Harris’
points came in the second
and fourth quarters, in what
was her first conference
game.
“Ashley was kind of our
spark,” Pickett said. “She rattled off five quick points, and
that ended up being our lead
going into halftime. I believe
she is a legitimate scoring
threat.”
Juda
senior
Jessica
Rackow led the Panthers
with 13 points.
Juda coach Curt Brown
said that the biggest problem
for the Panthers was on
offense, where they struggled
against Albany’s zone.
“I just think Albany did a
nice job defensively, in the
second half, especially, when
they went zone,” Brown said.
“We haven’t seen much zone
this year, it’s been mostly
man-to-man. We weren’t
quite as prepared for it as we
should’ve been.”
With the win, Albany
improves to 3-2 (1-1 Six
Rivers East), and they
haven’t even played a home
game yet. However, Pickett
is pleased with his team’s
performance amid the tough
early-season schedule.
“We took on some good
teams on the road,” he said.
“To come out of there 3-2, I
obviously have no complaints about that.”
The Comets will have their
long-awaited home opener
on Friday against Barneveld.
That is, if Thursday’s snowstorm doesn’t linger.
“We’re hoping that the
weather clears up by Friday,”
Pickett said with a chuckle.
“The girls are definitely
looking forward to that home
game.”
BLACK HAWK 45,
RIVER RIDGE 39
SOUTH WAYNE — The
Black Hawk girls basketball
team used a balanced scoring
attack to hold off River
Ridge, winning 45-39.
The leader of the Warriors
offense was reigning Six
Rivers East player of the year
Jen Wellnitz, who scored 14
points. Black Hawk coach
Mike Flanagan said that
Wellnitz’s offensive contribution wasn’t just in the scoring department.
“Jen distributed the ball
pretty well. I think she had
five assists,” he said. “I
thought she found some kids
in good scoring position.
She’s gonna make kids better
by getting it to them in scorSee GIRLS, Page B2
RECORD
A2
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
Police Blotter
NEW GLARUS POLICE
NEW GLARUS — Two people were
arrested and one of them jailed after
police stopped a vehicle at 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 11, on suspicion of the
driver having a suspended license. The
driver, Edward I. Smith, 30, Madison,
fled on foot after officers located marijuana on a passenger, Melvin Brown, 40,
Madison. Officers pursued Smith into a
business in the Industrial Park. He was
arrested and booked into jail on a probation violation and a charge of resisting
arrest. He was also cited for driving with
a suspended license. Brown was cited for
marijuana possession.
■ Melvin W. Lamb, 57, Madison, was
cited for an expired vehicle registration
in the 1000 block of Wisconsin 69 at
6:58 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10.
■ Brett R. Burke, 39, Oregon, Ill., was
cited for speeding in the 1200 block of
Wis. 69 at 10:09 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 11.
■ Charles Juras, 28, Hollandale, was
cited for having illegal window tinting
and no vehicle insurance on 6th Avenue
at Railroad Street at 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 12.
■ Nicholas A. Hedges, 27, New
Glarus, was cited for having illegal window tinting on 6th Avenue at Railroad
Street at 3:29 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13.
■ Kourtney K. Edler, 20, New Glarus,
was cited for driving with a revoked
license after police stopped her for an
equipment violation at 3:58 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 13, on 1st Street at 9th
Avenue.
■ Lukas W. Bright, 18, New Glarus,
was cited for non-registration of a vehicle on 11th Avenue at Railroad Street at
2:07 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15.
■ Karen M. Kittleson, 40, Mount
Horeb, was cited for driving without
vehicle insurance after police stopped her
for a registration violation at 4:33 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15, on 6th Avenue at 2nd
Street.
■ Jessica M. Miller, 19, Albany, was
cited for underage drinking after police
stopped a vehicle for an equipment violation at 9:26 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, on
Wis. 69 at 6th Avenue. Miller was a passenger in the vehicle.
■ Michael J. Meier, 43, Monroe, was
cited for driving without vehicle insurance after police stopped him for an
equipment violation at 4:59 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 16, in the 500 block of Wis. 69.
GREEN COUNTY SHERIFF
MONROE — Steven C. Patzer, 56,
Downers Grove, Ill., was arrested on a
charge on a first-offense charge of driving while intoxicated after a deputy
stopped a vehicle for speeding at 3:52
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 17, in the W5300
block of Wis. 11 in the Town of Monroe.
Patzer was also cited for speeding, then
released pending court.
■ Samuel M. Chicker, 19, Monroe,
was cited for underage possession of
alcohol after a deputy stopped a vehicle
in the 700 block of 8th Street in Monroe
at 3:32 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 16.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY SHERIFF
DARLINGTON — Alyssa L. Connell,
19, Monroe, Christopher R. Olin, 22,
Brodhead, and a 16-year-old juvenile
were arrested on charges of possessing
drug paraphernalia after a traffic stop on
Wis. 11 in the Town of Wayne. The 16year-old is also charged with possessing
marijuana. All were booked into the
Lafayette County Jail and then released.
■ Kayley L. Schoen, 18, Janesville,
was cited for a speedometer violation on
Wis. 81 in the Town of Elk Grove at
11:38 a.m. Friday, Dec. 14.
■ Jacob M. Ziebeis, 19, Cleveland,
was cited for unreasonable and imprudent speeding on West Mound Road in
the Town of Belmont at 12:52 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15.
■ Justin J. Taylor, 29, Belmont, was
cited for failure to stop at a stop sign on
South Galena Road in the Town of Elk
Grove at 8:59 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 15.
■ Kara L. LuGrain, 27, Cuba City, was
cited for driving without vehicle insurance and taken to Southwest Health
Center in Platteville for treatment of nonlife threatening injuries she sustained in a
one-vehicle crash on Saint Rose Road in
the Town of Benton at 6:29 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15. LuGrain was eastbound when she veered across the road,
hit a culvert and then a tree. Her vehicle
Fire/EMS Calls
MONROE POLICE
MONROE — An ambu-
lance was dispatched to the
1100 block of 30th Street at
1:21 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17.
LOTTERY
Mega Millions
Numbers Tuesday were: 1-6-718-29; Mega ball: 16
Badger 5
Numbers Tuesday were: 4-1113-21-30
SuperCash
Numbers Tuesday were: 918-21-22-26-33
Pick 3
Numbers Tuesday were: 7-0-9
Pick 4
Numbers Tuesday were: 2-91-3
Illinois Lottery
Numbers Tuesday were:
Pick Three-Midday: 7-8-5
Pick Four-Midday: 0-7-5-3
My Three-Midday: 6-9-4
Pick Three-Evening: 6-9-5
Pick Four-Evening: 8-2-9-3
My Three-Evening: 5-2-6
Lucky Day Lotto: 01-02-0829-36
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editor@themonroetimes.com
City and business beats
Tere Dunlap, x50
tdunlap@
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and County reporter
Katjusa Cisar, x35
kcisar@themonroetimes.com
News Clerk
Holly Ann Garey, x43
newsclerk@
themonroetimes.com
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Jeremy Pink, x34
jpink@themonroetimes.com
Sports reporter
Mark Nesbitt, x30
mnesbitt@
themonroetimes.com
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Anthony Wahl, x32
photo@
themonroetimes.com
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klee@themonroetimes.com
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Obituaries
caught on fire and became fully engulfed
in flames after hitting the tree. The Cuba
City Police and Fire Departments and
Cuba City EMS assisted at the scene.
■ Benjamin J. Hying, 21, Platteville,
was cited for speeding on Wis. 81 in the
Town of Elk Grove at 9:58 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 15.
■ Ricardo E. Ugaz, 49, Blanchardville,
was cited for driving with an expired
vehicle registration on Wis. 78 in the
Town of Argyle at 11:54 p.m. Saturday,
Dec. 15.
■ Deputies responded to keep the
peace during a civil dispute on County
Shop Road in the Town of Darlington at
1:15 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14.
■ A vehicle theft was reported on
Cottage Inn Road in the Town of
Belmont at 10:45 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 15.
■ Harassment by text messages was
reported on Wildcat Road in the Town of
Darlington at 8:34 p.m. Saturday, Dec.
15.
■ A deputy responded to North Broad
Street in Argyle at 8:37 a.m. Sunday,
Dec. 16, for a complaint of a dog running at large.
■ A theft was reported on West
Moundview Avenue in Belmont at 9:45
a.m. Sunday, Dec. 16.
■ Fence posts were reported stolen on
U.S. 151 in the Town of Belmont at 5:21
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16.
MONROE POLICE
MONROE — On Monday, Dec. 17:
■ John L. Carothers Muszynski, 21,
Janesville, was arrested at 6:54 p.m. in the
1600 block of 12th Street on two outstanding warrants issued by the Lafayette
County Sheriff’s Department. He was
taken to the Green County Jail in Monroe.
At 8:33 p.m., a Lafayette County deputy
met with law enforcement at the county
line to transport Muszynski to the
Lafayette County Jail in Darlington.
■ A resident in the 2500 block of Sunny
Ridge Court reported at 9:36 a.m. that her
husband had lost his heart monitor and the
black bag it’s kept in. She said the bag was
last seen at Swiss Alps, 804 4th Ave. W.
■ Police are investigating a 9:45 a.m.
report of a truant 17-year-old male student
from Monroe High School.
MINNEAPOLIS
Duluth head shop owner
indicted on federal charges
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) —
The owner of a Duluth head
shop and three workers are
charged with selling synthetic drugs that authorities say
were misbranded and marketed as incense, potpourri,
bath salts or glass cleaner,
according to a 54-count federal indictment unsealed
Tuesday.
Prosecutors claim the synthetic drugs, labeled with
names such as “No Name”
or “Smoking Dragon,” are
illegal.
But Last Place on Earth
owner Jim Carlson claims
the products he sells are
legal. Carlson and three of
his employees made their
first appearances Tuesday in
U.S. District Court in
Duluth. They were released
on their own recognizance
and an attorney for Carlson
expected the store to reopen
Tuesday afternoon. Phone
calls to the store went
unanswered.
The indictment, filed
under seal earlier this month,
charges Carlson, 55, of
Superior, Wis., and his
employees with conspiracy
to violate federal regulatory
laws and conspiracy to distribute controlled analogue
drugs. The others charged
are Lava Haugen, 32, of
Superior,
and
Joseph
Gellerman, 34, and Jamie
Anderson, 24, both of
Duluth.
The indictment seeks forfeiture of the Last Place on
Earth property and buildings,
as well as money and other
property derived from the
alleged crimes.
An attorney for Gellerman
did not immediately return a
message seeking comment.
Tigue said Anderson would
be represented by a federal
defender, but the federal
defender’s office said one
had not yet been assigned.
ALMA L. MILLER
Alma L. Miller, age 90, of Monroe, formerly of Iron
Mountain, MI, died on Saturday, December 15, 2012 at Pleasant
View Nursing Home. She was born on July 11, 1922 in Caldwell,
ID, the daughter of William C.
and Maude (Proctor) Rawn.
Alma and Charles A. Mitchell
married in 1941, and she married Fred C. Miller in 1974.
She was affiliated with Fleet
Reserve in Iron Mountain, MI,
the
American
Legion
Auxiliary, Apostolate to the
Handicapped and was a sponsor to the resident at Mount St.
Joseph’s Home for the
Mentally Challenged Adults.
She was a member of St. Clare
of Assisi Parish in Monroe.
Alma was a wonderful wife,
mother, cook and waitress, the family always remembers the
wonderful holiday meals she would make.
She enjoyed sewing, crossword puzzles, crafts but most of all
loved spending time with her grandchildren.
She is survived by her sons, Charles A. Mitchell Jr. of Twin
Lakes; Gilbert (Sharon) Mitchell of McConnell, IL; Gregory
(Nancy) Mitchell of Madison; Roderick Mitchell of Negaunee,
MI; Kevin (Lisa) Mitchell of Iron Mountain, MI; Joseph (Elena)
Mitchell of Modesto, CA; daughters, Suzanne Terrien of
Monticello; and Diane Mitchell, 12 grandchildren, 11 greatgrandchildren, 4 great-great-grandchildren, and her nieces and
nephews.
She was predeceased by her parents, both husbands, 4 brothers, William, Chuck, Leonard and Henry Rawn, daughter-in-law
Carol Mitchell, grandson, Michael Mitchell and granddaughter
Pamela Mitchell.
A Funeral Mass will be held at noon on Friday, December 21,
2012 St. Clare of Assisi Parish at St. Victor Catholic Church,
with Fr. Larry Bakke Celebrant. A visitation will be held Friday,
December 21, 2012 from 11:00 A.M. until the time of Mass.
Burial will be at a later date in Iron Mountain, MI. The ShrinerHager-Gohlke Funeral Home is serving the family. In lieu of
flowers memorials may be made to Apostolate to the
Handicapped or Pleasant View Nursing Home Foundation.
Condolences may be sent to the family at: shriner111.com.
LILLIAN M. STOLL
Lillian M. Stoll age 95 formerly of Blanchardville, Wisconsin
died Monday, December 17, 2012 at New Glarus Home. She was
born October 12, 1917 at Woodford, WI the daughter of Ernest &
Anna (Kaiser) Lisser.
Lillian married Harold G.
Stoll on January 2, 1937 at
Peace Church Parsonage in
Browntown. They retired from
farming and moved to
Blanchardville in 1982. Lillian
was a life-long member of
Peace United Church of Christ
in Browntown.
Surviving are her daughters, Marjorie (Sherwood)
Carlson of Hollandale, Judith
Murray of Darlington, Joan
(Dean) Haas of Merrill, &
Carol (Alois) Mayer of
Monroe; sister, Edna Berg of Monroe; sister-in-law, Imogene
Lisser of Monroe; 10 grandchildren; 24 great-grandchildren; 14
great-great-grandchildren; 3 step-grandchildren; 5 step-greatgrandchildren; and 2 step-great-great-grandchildren. She is predeceased by her husband, Harold in 1988; parents; sisters,
Mathilda Studer, Alice Mayer, & Rose Kahl; brothers, Herman,
Ernest, Jr., Fritz, & brother in infancy; and sons-in-law, Phillip
Miller in 1988 & Donald Murray in 2010.
Funeral services will be held at 1:00 P.M. Friday, December
21, 2012 at Peace United Church of Christ in Browntown with
Rev. William McIntyre officiating. Burial will be in Greenwood
Cemetery in Monroe, WI.
Visitation will be from 11:00 A.M. Friday until time of service
at 1:00 P.M. at the Church.
The family would like to express their heartfelt appreciation to
the New Glarus Home for the quality, loving care they gave to
Lillian and to Monroe Clinic Hospice for their support.
Shriner-Hager-Gohlke Funeral Home is assisting the family.
Condolences may be sent to the family at: shriner111.com.
Deaths
Cindee Lee Sweeney, 41,
South Wayne, died Tuesday,
Dec.18, 2012.
Integrity Funeral Services,
Waterford, is handling the
arrangements.
Traffic Accidents
GREEN COUNTY SHERIFF
MONROE — No injuries
were reported in the following deer vs. vehicle collisions:
■ Gary L. Mosley, 66,
Argyle, in the N6400 block
of County A in the Town of
Adams at 11:57 p.m. Sunday,
Dec. 16. The vehicle was
severely damaged and driven
from the scene.
■ Kathryn C. Kuebli, 63,
rural Monroe, in the N2000
block of Wisconsin 69 in the
Town of Clarno at 5:42 a.m.
Monday, Dec. 17. The vehicle was moderately damaged
and towed.
■ Daniel F. Kinney, 71,
Brooklyn, in the N6100
block of County N in the
Town of Washington at 5:17
p.m. Monday, Dec. 17. The
vehicle was moderately damaged and driven from the
scene.
■ Perry N. Granberg, 40,
Argyle, in the W9400 block
of Disrud Road in the Town
of Adams at 5:45 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 17. The vehicle was moderately damaged
and driven from the scene.
LAFAYETTE COUNTY
SHERIFF
DARLINGTON — On
Monday, Dec. 17:
■ Eric E. Dagle, 46,
Warren, Ill., reported at 7:15
a.m. that he hit a deer on
Wis. 11 in the Town of
Wayne.
■ Clark W. Bennett, 50,
Shullsburg, reported at 8:15
a.m. that he hit a deer on
Wis. 11 in the Town of
Gratiot.
■ Carolyn A. Berns, 73,
Saint Olaf, Iowa, reported at
7:41 p.m. that she hit a deer
on Wis. 81 in the Town of
Argyle. Kurt D. Tollafson,
49, Argyle, also reported hitting a deer in the same location as he attempted to go
around Berns’ vehicle. No
injuries were reported.
Berns’ vehicle was towed.
Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/monroetimes
SPORTS
B2
WRESTLING
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
BOYS BASKETBALL
Sugar River tops Verona Parkview survives Brodhead
By Times Staff
VERONA — The Sugar
River wrestling team won seven
of the final eight matches, en
route to a 45-30 win over
Verona Tuesday night.
The Raiders won just one of
the first six matches, with their
lone win during that stretch
coming by forfeit.
Things turned around at 145
pounds, though, with a pin by
senior Tyler Deshon over
Verona’s Jackson Bryant in
3:32. Sugar River’s next two
wins also came by pin.
Jacob Larson (160) pinned
Verona’s Colin Daniels in 2:25,
and junior Abert Everson (170)
pinned Verona’s Dakin Coons
in 3:45.
Senior Bryan Laube (182)
followed that up with a narrow
7-5 decision over Verona’s
Logan Postweiler. Sugar River
junior A.J. Halbach capped the
night with a pin of Verona’s
Trayvonn Johnson-Cox in 3:31.
Jason Wolf in 1:53. Colin
Novak (113) pinned Ty
Davidson in 3:33, and Jared
Pickett (120) pinned Dan
Trader in 55 seconds.
FENNIMORE 57,
BLACK HAWK 24
FENNIMORE — It was a
night full of pins, as the Black
Hawk wrestling team fell to
Fennimore, 57-24.
The Warriors had four victories — all pins — and
Fennimore collected five.
Dakota Meier (145) got the
first for the Warriors, pinning
Fennimore’s Dillin Aide in 34
seconds.
Joe Quinn (106) collected the
second, pinning Fennimore’s
FENNIMORE 56,
PEC-ARGYLE 24
FENNIMORE — The
Vikings won four matches, collecting three pins along the way,
but ultimately lost to Fennimore
56-24.
Zach White (145) got PecArgyle’s first win, pinning
Fennimore’s Dillin Aide in
1:33. Nick Gilbertson (220) got
the second, pinning Dalton
Miles in 1:04, and Casey
Phillips (106) pinned Jason
Wolf in 1:54.
Cheese
From Page B1
the cold spell. Junior Ellie
Grossen then hit a 3-pointer to
cut the Eagles’ lead to 38-31.
Vetterli grabbed an offensive
rebound on her missed free
throw and she made a pass to
Katzenberger who buried a
jumper to cut the Eagles’ lead
to 41-36 with 6:12 to go in the
fourth quarter. That’s as close
as the Cheesemakers would
get. Sauk Prairie junior
Georgia Breunig scored on
two layups late in the fourth
quarter to help the Eagles seal
the victory. Fox scored a
game-high 18 points to lead
the Eagles. Roach added 14
points and Breunig had 13.
“We still made the effort
and battled,” Mathiason said.
We just needed that extra little
push. Every possession is
important no matter when it
happens.”
Monroe will play at
Stoughton (7-0) on Thursday.
Stoughton has a four-year varsity player in senior Tessa
Mersberger and two juniors in
their third year on the varsity.
“That will be a challenge
for us,” Mathiason said. “They
are playing really well. That
will be a tough one.”
Times photo: Mark Nesbitt
Monroe junior Kirsten Vetterli looks to score down low
in the second half against Sauk Prairie Tuesday night.
Vetterli scored 11 points for the Cheesemakers.
Katzenberger is looking forward to getting back out on
the court to take on Stoughton.
“I think it will be a good
matchup,” she said. “Whether
Taylor or Heather are back or
not, we always play hard and
try to do our best.”
By Times Staff
BRODHEAD — The
Brodhead boys basketball
team suffered a tough 53-44
loss to Parkview Tuesday
night.
Parkview took a 13-8 lead
after the first quarter, and led
Girls
From Page B1
ing position.”
Other leading scorers for
the Warriors included freshman Tatum Jackson (12
points) and senior Abby
Schiferl (nine).
“It was nice to see some
balanced scoring,” he said.
“Getting three kids in double
figures is certainly a goal.”
Another key for the
Warriors was their defensive
performance, especially in
shutting
down
the
Timberwolves’ leading scorer, Meagan Herrick.
“I thought we had better
defense,” Flanagan said. “We
held Herrick to nine, six of
that came in the first. She had
30 against Potosi. We were a
little more solid in our assignments, trying to take away
their best player.”
Black Hawk evened their
record at 3-3 with the loss.
The Warriors return to conference play on Friday against
Monticello.
PLATTEVILLE 58,
DARLINGTON 53
PLATTEVILLE — A
fourth quarter charge came up
just short for the Darlington
girls basketball team, as they
fell to Platteville, 58-53.
Darlington trailed by 10
going into the fourth quarter,
but the Redbirds scored 25
points in the final period, and
took the lead with about a
minute remaining. However,
the Redbirds lost their two
leading scorers in the final
minute, and were unable to
complete the comeback.
Claire Scott scored nine for
Darlington before fouling out.
24-17 at halftime. Brodhead
responded with a strong third
quarter, though, to take a
three-point into the fourth.
The Vikings used a big fourth
quarter to seal the victory,
outscoring the Cardinals 2412 in the final period.
“Having your two
leading scorers out
hurts.”
– Darlington coach
Riley Fitzsimons on
Chambers passing out
and Scott fouling out
Cassidy
Chambers
led
Darlington’s fourth quarter
comeback, scoring 16 of her
20 points in the final period.
But Darlington was forced to
play the final 30 seconds
without their leading scorer,
as she passed out on the way
back to the huddle during a
timeout, with the team trailing by two.
“Having your two leading
scorers out hurts,” Darlington
coach Riley Fitzsimons said.
The key to Darlington’s
fourth quarter run was their
willingness to attack the basket.
“We started to attack the
basket which let our shooters
get open,” Fitzsimons said.
“They play an aggressive
defense. We attacked the basket and their defenders collapsed in, which opened up
our shooters.”
Although the Redbirds
came up short in the end,
Fitzsimons said he was
pleased with the way his team
played.
“I think we played very
well,” he said. “At the end we
showed a lot of resiliency.”
Darlington fell to 6-2 with
the loss. The Redbirds host
SWAL rival Mineral Point on
Thursday.
MONTICELLO 46,
PECATONICA 38
MONTICELLO
—
Coming off just their second
Griffin Day led Brodhead
with 13 points. Other leading
scorers for the Cardinals
were Danny Lewis (11
points) and Josiah DeLorme
(10).
Brodhead fell to 3-5 with
the loss.
loss of the season, the
Monticello girls basketball
team bounced back with a 4638 victory over Pecatonica.
Monticello coach Lori
Brokopp was pleased with the
intensity her team displayed
from the beginning.
“We started the game pretty
up tempo. I thought our intensity was there,” Brokopp said.
Monticello took a twopoint lead into halftime.
Parkview kept the game interesting by scoring 14 in the
fourth quarter, but that number was outdone by a 17-point
quarter from the Ponies.
“Offensively, we clicked in
the fourth quarter,” Brokopp
said. “Some shots that didn’t
fall in the first half fell in the
fourth.”
Brokopp said the difference
between Tuesday night’s
game and the Ponies’ loss on
Saturday was their ability to
handle Pecatonica’s pressure
defense.
“I think we handled the
pressure a little bit better
today,” she said. “We ran our
press break and were able to
break the press a little better.”
Pecatonica was led in scoring by Lizzy Britt, with 12
points. Marissa Berg led the
Ponies with 16.
“(Berg) was pretty consistent throughout the whole
game,” Brokopp said. “She
was taking it to the hole. She
was getting banged up, but
she stuck with it.”
Monticello improved to 6-2
overall and 2-0 in the Six
Rivers East. The Ponies travel
to Black Hawk on Friday for
a clash with the Warriors.
Pecatonica (0-6) will look
to pick up their first win of
the season on Friday, when
they will host Juda.
In other action, Barneveld
defeated Argyle 68-22.
Scoreboard
Prep Basketball
Tuesday’s Scores
Boys Basketball
Aquinas 53, DeForest 32
Clinton 56, Palmyra-Eagle 42
Clintonville 55, Fox Valley Lutheran 38
Columbus Catholic 41, Granton 15
Cuba City 60, Mineral Point 42
Dodgeville 67, Platteville 45
Durand 68, Mondovi 53
East Troy 85, Jefferson 68
Eau Claire Memorial 46, Eau Claire North 45
Eleva-Strum 54, Arcadia 49
Fall Creek 59, McDonell Central 22
Fennimore 52, Riverdale 46
Fond du Lac 42, Oshkosh West 28
Freedom 44, Ripon 36
Gilmanton 77, New Auburn 56
Grafton 63, Hartford Union 58
Iowa-Grant 58, Darlington 46
Janesville Craig 58, Mount Horeb 52
Marathon 75, Assumption 23
Marinette 53, Oconto Falls 29
Marion 56, Tigerton 39
Marquette University 56, West Allis Central 42
Mauston 61, Royall 41
McFarland 67, Edgerton 51
Melrose-Mindoro 69, New Lisbon 51
Parkview 53, Brodhead 44
Pewaukee 68, Brown Deer 44
Whitewater 50, Evansville 41
Girls Basketball
Racine Case 57, Racine Horlick 27
Albany 34, Juda 27
Baraboo 67, Wisconsin Rapids Lincoln 18
Barneveld 68, Argyle 22
Beaver Dam 50, Slinger 19
Black Hawk 45, River Ridge 39
Bowler 53, Gresham Community 40
Braham, Minn. 89, Grantsburg 47
Jefferson 49, Delavan-Darien 39
Kenosha Tremper 63, Racine Park 53
Kettle Moraine Lutheran 51, North Fond du Lac 34
Kiel 39, New Holstein 29
Kimberly 40, Appleton North 34
La Crosse Central 53, Holmen 39
Mauston 58, Wisconsin Dells 50
Mayville 51, Winnebago Lutheran Academy 46
McDonell Central 38, Gilmanton 25
Monticello 46, Pecatonica 38
Mount Horeb 58, Evansville 36
Oregon 62, McFarland 45
Platteville 53, Darlington 50
Sauk Prairie 51, Monroe 40
Sheboygan Falls 54, Two Rivers 42
Pro Football
National Football League
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England10 4 0 .714 506 315
N.Y. Jets
6 8 0 .429 255 320
Miami
6 8 0 .429 264 279
Buffalo
5 9 0 .357 306 402
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Houston 12 2 0 .857 394 280
Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 309 358
Tennessee
5 9 0 .357 285 396
Jacksonville 2 12 0 .143 219 383
North
W L T Pct PF PA
x-Baltimore 9 5 0 .643 348 307
Cincinnati
8 6 0 .571 355 293
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
Washington
Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
y-Atlanta
New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina
y-Green Bay
Minnesota
Chicago
Detroit
x-San Fran
Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona
7
5
7
9
0 .500 302 291
0 .357 280 310
West
W L T Pct PF PA
11 3 0 .786 409 274
5 9 0 .357 299 312
4 10 0 .286 263 402
2 12 0 .143 195 367
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
8 6 0 .571 381 350
8 6 0 .571 327 338
8 6 0 .571 373 304
4 10 0 .286 253 375
South
W L T Pct PF PA
12 2 0 .857 371 259
6 8 0 .429 389 379
6 8 0 .429 354 349
5 9 0 .357 296 319
North
W L T Pct PF PA
10 4 0 .714 344 292
8 6 0 .571 319 308
8 6 0 .571 321 240
4 10 0 .286 330 380
West
W L T Pct PF PA
10 3 1 .750 357 218
9 5 0 .643 350 219
6 7 1 .464 258 315
5 9 0 .357 224 302
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Saturday, Dec. 22
Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 23
Tennessee at Green Bay, Noon
Indianapolis at Kansas City, Noon
New Orleans at Dallas, Noon
Minnesota at Houston, Noon
Oakland at Carolina, Noon
Buffalo at Miami, Noon
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, Noon
New England at Jacksonville, Noon
Washington at Philadelphia, Noon
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, Noon
San Diego at N.Y. Jets, Noon
Cleveland at Denver, 3:05 p.m.
Chicago at Arizona, 3:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Baltimore, 3:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 7:20 p.m.
College Basketball
The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN men’s college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Dec. 16, points based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Duke (30)
9-0 774
2
2. Michigan (1) 11-0 743
3
3. Syracuse
11-0 695
4
4. Louisville
9-1 640
6
5. Arizona
8-0 632
8
6. Indiana
9-1 627
1
7. Ohio State
8-1 595
7
8. Kansas
8-1 552
9
9. Florida
7-1 532
5
10. Illinois
12-0 482
10
11. Cincinnati
10-0 460
12
12. Missouri
8-1 451
11
Local Sports Schedule
Sports on Television
THURSDAY
Boys Basketball: Albany at Pecatonica, 7:30 p.m.; Argyle at
Monticello, 7:30 p.m.; Black Hawk at Orangeville, 7:30 p.m.;
Barneveld at Juda, 7:30 p.m.
Girls Basketball: Brodhead at East Troy, 7:30 p.m.; Mineral
Point at Darlington, 7:30 p.m.; Monroe at Stoughton, 7:30
p.m.; New Glarus at Waterloo, 7:30 p.m.
Wrestling: Edgerton at Monroe, 7:30 p.m.; Brodhead-Juda at
Parkview, 7:30 p.m.; Sugar River at Cambridge, 7:30 p.m.
Hockey: Monroe at Baraboo-Portage, 7:30 p.m.
TODAY
College Basketball: Xavier at Cincinnati, 6 p.m., ESPN2; Mount
St. Mary’s at Indiana, 6 p.m., BTN; North Carolina at Texas, 8
p.m., ESPN2; South Carolina State at Iowa, 8 p.m., BTN
NBA: Nets at Knicks, 6 p.m., ESPN; Bucks at Grizzlies, 8:30
p.m., ESPN
13. Creighton
10-1
14. Gonzaga
10-1
15. San Diego State8-1
16. Minnesota
11-1
17. New Mexico 11-0
18. UNLV
8-1
19. North Carolina 8-2
19. Michigan State 9-2
21. Georgetown 9-1
22. Notre Dame 9-1
23. Kentucky
7-3
24. Oklahoma State8-1
25. Butler
8-2
351
339
296
273
219
216
187
187
180
125
98
94
89
13
14
15
16
20
17
18
19
21
24
22
23
—
Others receiving votes: N.C. State 84, Pittsburgh 74,
Oregon 45, VCU 11, Wyoming 8, UConn 6, Wichita State 5,
Murray State 3, Oklahoma 2.
College Football
College Football FBS Bowl Glance
Saturday, Dec. 15
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State 41, Toledo 15
Thursday, Dec. 20
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
San Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 7 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Dec. 21
Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
Ball State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday, Dec. 22
New Orleans Bowl
East Carolina (8-4) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (7-4), 11 a.m.
(ESPN)
MAACO Bowl
Las Vegas
Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 2:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Pro Basketball
National Basketball Association
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L Pct GB
18
6 .750 —
13 11 .542
5
12 12 .500
6
12 13 .480 6 1/2
7 19 .269 12
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami
16
6 .727 —
Atlanta
15
7 .682
1
Orlando
11 13 .458
6
Charlotte
7 16 .304 9 1/2
Washington
3 19 .136 13
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago
14 10 .583 —
Milwaukee
13 10 .565 1/2
Indiana
13 12 .520 1 1/2
Detroit
7 20 .259 8 1/2
Cleveland
5 21 .192 10
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
Memphis
16
6 .727 1/2
San Antonio
19
8 .704 —
Houston
12 12 .500 5 1/2
Dallas
12 13 .480
6
New Orleans
5 19 .20812 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City
20
4 .833 —
Denver
14 12 .538
7
Utah
14 12 .538
7
Minnesota
12 11 .522 7 1/2
Portland
11 12 .478 8 1/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers
18
6 .750 —
Golden State
17
8 .680 1 1/2
L.A. Lakers
11 14 .440 7 1/2
Phoenix
10 15 .400 8 1/2
Sacramento
7 17 .292 11
Tuesday’s Games
Toronto 113, Cleveland 99
Atlanta 100, Washington 95, OT
Utah 92, Brooklyn 90
Miami 103, Minnesota 92
Chicago 100, Boston 89
New York
Brooklyn
Boston
Philadelphia
Toronto
Milwaukee 98, Indiana 93
Dallas 107, Philadelphia 100
Denver 112, San Antonio 106
Golden State 103, New Orleans 96
Charlotte at L.A. Lakers, late
Today’s Games
Brooklyn at New York, 6 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Utah at Indiana, 6 p.m.
Washington at Orlando, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Boston, 6:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Memphis, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at Sacramento, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Transactions
Tuesday’s Sports Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX—Agreed to terms with RHP Koji
Uehara on a one-year contract.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Named Julio Vinas manager
and Britt Burns pitching coach of Birmingham (SL); Ryan
Newman manager of Winston-Salem (Carolina); Tommy
Thompson manager of Kannapolis (SAL); Pete Rose Jr.
manager of Great Falls (Pioneer); Bobby Magallanes
manager of Bristol (Appalachian); Doug Sisson minor
league outfield/baserunning instructor; and Vance Law
special assistant to player development.
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Agreed to terms with 3B Mark
Reynolds on a one-year contract.
HOUSTON ASTROS—Designated RHP Mickey Storey
for assignment.
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Agreed to terms with 2B Luis
Rodriguez on a minor league contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES—Assigned LHP Josh Spence
outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
MINNESOTA TWINS—Agreed to terms with RHP Mike
Pelfrey on a one-year contract.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Traded OF Collin Cowgill to the
N.Y. Mets for INF Jefry Marte. Agreed to terms with SS
Hiroyuki Nakajima on a two-year contract.
TAMPA BAY RAYS—Agreed to terms with RHP Roberto
Hernandez on a one-year contract.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Agreed to terms with RHP
Ramon Ortiz and OF Ryan Langerhans on minor league
contracts.
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Named Pat Listach minor
league infield coordinator; Todd Takayoshi assistant
minor league hitting coordinator; Rick Knapp minor
league pitching coordinator; John Shoemaker
Camelback Ranch-Glendale coordinator of instruction;
Franklin Stubbs hitting coach of Albuquerque (PCL); Jody
Reed manager, Hector Berrios pitching coach and Orv
Franchuk hitting coach of Chattanooga (SL); Carlos
Subero manager and Johnny Washington hitting coach
of Rancho Cucamonga (Cal); Razor Shines manager, Bill
Simas pitching coach and Mike Eylward hitting coach of
Great Lakes (MWL); Esteban Lopez hitting coach of
Ogden (Pioneer); and P.J. Forbes manager of the Arizona
League Dodgers.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Named Rick Tomlin minor
league pitching coordinator; Bob Skube coach and Aaron
Hoback trainer for Nashville (PCL); Steve Patera trainer
of Huntsville (SL); Tony Diggs manager and Dwayne
Hosey coach of Helena (Pioneer); Nestor Corredor manager and Greg Barajas trainer of the Arizona League
Brewers.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Agreed to terms with LHP
John Lannan on a one-year contract.
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with RHP
Santiago Casilla on a three-year contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
HOUSTON ROCKETS—Recalled F/C Donatas
Motiejunas from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS—Signed OL Kraig Urbik to a contract
extension. Placed LB Arthur Moats on injured reserve
and WR Donald Jones on the reserve/non-football illness
list. Signed WR Chris Hogan and LB Greg Lloyd from the
practice squad.
CHICAGO BEARS—Placed RB Michael Bush on injured
reserve. Signed RB Kahlil Bell.
CLEVELAND BROWNS—Named Alec Scheiner president. Placed LB James-Michael Johnson and DB T.J.
Ward on injured reserve. Signed DB Prince Miller and LB
Adrian Moten. Signed DL Hall Davis from the practice
squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Placed DE Andre Branch
and RB Jordan Todman on injured reserve. Released WR
Quan Cosby and FB Will Ta’ufo’ou. Signed WR Mike
Brown, LB Brandon Marshall and TE Isaiah Stanback
from the practice squad and OL Tommie Draheim and
WR Brittan Golden to the practice squad.
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Claimed DB Dimitri Patterson off
waivers from Cleveland. Placed TE Charles Clay on the
injured reserve list.
NEW YORK GIANTS—Re-signed OL Selvish Capers.
Waived CB Terrence Frederick.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Placed RB Ryan Mathews,
WR Malcom Floyd and T Reggie Wells on injured
reserve. Signed WR Mike Willie and DE Damik Scafe
from the practice squad.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released TE Evan Moore.
Signed TE Sean McGrath from the practice squad.
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
LOCAL/STATE
MADISON
AGENDAS
Thursday, December 20
The Town of Monroe Board
will meet at 1 p.m. at the town
hall. Agenda items include a
discussion on signing a one
year agreement with the
Green County Landfill.
The Green County Traffic
Safety Committee will meet
at 1 p.m. at the highway
department. Agenda items
include a discussion on the
impact of heavy equipment
on rural roads program.
The Lafayette Manor
Committee will meet at 5 p.m.
at the courthouse. Agenda
items include a closed session
discussion to consider financial, medical, social or personal histories.
The Monroe Public Library
Board of Trustees will meet at
7 p.m. at the library. Agenda
items include an update on
the creation of positions.
Friday, December 21
The Memorial Hospital of
Lafayette County Board will
meet at 9 a.m. at MHLC.
Agenda items include a
closed session discussion
concerning the CFO.
Attorney General doubts impact of weapons ban
MADISON (AP) — Wisconsin
Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen
suggested Tuesday that a ban on
assault weapons likely wouldn’t have
prevented the Connecticut school
shootings and urged lawmakers not to
make “knee-jerk” decisions on new
gun-control measures without hard
evidence.
The Republican attorney general
has led state Justice Department
investigators through multiple mass
shootings since he took office in 2007,
including one in August at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek that left six worshippers dead. He told The Associated
Press during an interview no one has
any simple answers for stopping mass
killers.
“We’ve known there are going to be
crazy people who do horrible things
long before I became attorney general, whether you go back to Columbine
or whatever the case may be,” Van
Hollen said, referring to a mass shooting in 1998 at a Littleton, Colo., high
school. “If there were simple solutions we would have come up with
them then.”
Adam Lanza killed 26 people,
including 20 children, at Sandy Hook
Elementary School in Newtown,
Conn., on Friday. Van Hollen said it
may have been impossible to stop him
because Lanza didn’t own any
firearms, killed his mother so he could
steal her guns and then broke a window at the school to get in.
“The argument can be made the
offender in Connecticut never even
owned a firearm so how could he have
been prevented from getting one?”
Van Hollen said. “He actually killed
the owner of the firearm to get it. And
he broke into a building, breaking and
entering to use it. This is one person
who’s misused this firearm versus the
millions who don’t abuse it.”
The Connecticut shootings have
sparked another round of debate on
gun control across the country. A trio
of Democratic legislators announced
Tuesday in Milwaukee that they’re
working on a package of bills that
would ban high-velocity, high damage
ammunition like the rounds Lanza
used. It also would ban assault rifles
and require concealed carry applicants
to undergo psychological evaluations.
Applicants already have to pass a
background check, but Rep.-elect
Evan Goyke said those reviews don’t
reveal the sort of mental instability
that could lead to rampages.
“We believe that law does not go far
enough,” said Goyke, D-Milwaukee.
Republicans control the Legislature
and governor’s office, but the
MONROE — John S. father, Fred Kundert, was one
Kundert was appointed to the of the five original founders of
Board of Directors of Bancorp The Bank of New Glarus.
of New Glarus, Inc.
“We are extremely
and The Bank of
pleased to have John
New
Glarus.
join our board,” said
Kundert filled the
Gregg
Erickson,
vacated seat by John
Bancorp of New
G. Thomson.
Glarus, Inc. and The
Kundert and his
Bank of New Glarus
wife, Laura, live in
chairman. “In addiMonroe with their
tion to his leadership
two
children.
skills and business
Kundert attended the
background,
John
University
of Kundert
shares our commitment
Wisconsin-Madison
to our customers and our
and is employed as the district communities.”
manager of ECP, Inc.,
Other members of the board
Woodridge, Ill.
are Phillip Whitehead, Greg
Kundert and his family have Engen, John Ott, Jane
roots with The Bank of New Phillipson
and
Steven
Glarus. His great-great-grand- Schneider.
MILWAUKEE
19=year-old charged in
basketball court shooting
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A 19-year-old
Milwaukee man is charged in a shooting
at a basketball court that left one man
dead and four other people wounded.
Jovan Dart Newman was charged
Tuesday with first-degree reckless homicide and a misdemeanor count of bail
jumping in the Sept. 29 death of
Alexander Cross.
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
reports Newman is accused of opening
fire with a semiautomatic handgun on a
group of men who were playing basketball. Also injured were three other players and a woman who was watching the
game.
According to the complaint, Newman
began shooting after a fight broke out
involving some of the victims and a
group of men who had had a dispute
with Cross’ family a week earlier.
Online court records do not list a
defense attorney.
MADISON
MILWAUKEE
UW System seeks changes
to law on Internet access
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A
new law restricting how the
University of Wisconsin
System provides Internet
access could make things difficult for students and raise costs
for taxpayers, school officials
told auditors in a report
released Tuesday.
UW schools are members of
WiscNet, a nonprofit cooperative that provides high-speed
Internet services to a majority
of public schools in Wisconsin
and nearly all public libraries.
For many members WiscNet is
able to offer services at half
the cost of commercial
providers, in part because it’s
tax-exempt and also because it
doesn’t have to pay for marketing and other operating
costs.
The
telecommunications
industry lobbied heavily
against the setup, arguing that
WiscNet was using public subsidies to compete unfairly with
the private sector. Lawmakers
passed a law last year that
restricted the UW System’s
involvement in telecommunications services.
UW officials are now left
with limited options they say
will be more expensive and
could possibly leave UW
schools isolated from broader
research networks.
UW System President Kevin
O’Reilly called on the
Legislature to reconsider provisions of the law.
The letter was part of a
report released by the state
Legislative Audit Bureau. The
report made a number of recommendations, including that
UW officials explain by July 1
their plan for obtaining and
providing Internet services.
The auditors said WiscNet
members paid about $500
month for Internet services that
would have cost $1,100 or
more if provided by commercial services.
The audit report also noted
that the UW System paid
WiscNet $2.3 million in prepayments for future service.
The auditors said that setup
could violate statutes generally
prohibiting state agencies from
using annual appropriations to
pay for services in future years.
Reilly said the UW
Administration would recover
the remaining balance by
June 30.
of the Democrats’ bills and whether
they can show the measures would
protect the public. People are throwing the term “assault weapon” around
loosely, he said, adding the public
doesn’t have access to true, fully automatic assault weapons.
The type of weapon investigators
believe Lanza used, an AR-15-style
rifle similar to the U.S. Army’s M-16,
is one of the most popular guns in the
nation, he added, which means many
people are using them legally.
Still, he said the debate over gun
control should continue. Some restrictions on firearms, such as banning
felons from possessing them, are
appropriate as long as they protect the
public, he said.
States might be better served by
investing in more police officers in
schools, where they can act as deterrents to would-be attackers, protect
children and teach them to respect law
enforcement. He also suggested
improving techniques for identifying
the mentally ill and blocking them
from obtaining weapons.
In the end, though, people may
have to accept that horrible things
happen, Van Hollen said.
“As tragic as this was,” the attorney
general said, “sometimes some things
can’t be prevented.”
Wisconsin Briefs
BUSINESS BRIEF
Kundert appointed to
Bancorp Board of Dir.
Democrats said they can’t imagine
anyone voting against rules ensuring
concealed carry permit-holders are
mentally stable.
The Democrats’ moves put the GOP
in a delicate political situation. If they
come out in support of firearm restrictions they risk alienating a broad
swatch of constituents who value their
Second Amendment right to bear
arms. If they don’t do anything, they
could appear unsympathetic to gun
victims.
Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s
spokesman, Cullen Werwie, issued a
statement early Tuesday evening saying Walker plans to focus on how to
better address mental illness in children.
The statement marked the first time
the governor has signaled possible
policy changes since the Newtown
shootings but offered no other details.
Werwie didn’t immediately return
email and telephone messages.
Van Hollen, who holds Wisconsin’s
first concealed carry permit, said he is
reluctant to take any action limiting
freedoms without clear evidence it
would protect the public. When asked
if he opposed banning assault
weapons, he replied, “I just have no
idea.”
He said he’d have to see the details
Eco. development agency
faces additonal problems
MADISON (AP) — A block grant
program that sends millions of dollars to
communities across Wisconsin will no
longer be administered by the state’s
beleaguered quasi-private economic
development agency after the federal
government questioned the legality of
such an arrangement.
The decision was announced Tuesday
at a meeting of the board of the
Wisconsin Economic Development
Corp., which has been beset with problems ever since its creation last year. A
pair of independent reviews of WEDC’s
operations identified a number of problems and issued a series of recommendations, including upgrading computer
software and hiring more people to better
track loans and other financial transactions.
Creating the WEDC to replace the
Department of Commerce was one of
Gov. Scott Walker’s top priorities. It has
a roughly $85 million annual budget and
spearheads Wisconsin’s flagship job-creation efforts. Walker serves as chairman
of the board that includes both state lawmakers and private business leaders, and
promised during his 2010 campaign to
create 250,000 new jobs.
The agency has had high-profile missteps, such as its handling of the
Community Development Block Grants,
since it became operational in July 2011.
The U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development sent the state a letter
in August, saying that WEDC failed to
follow federal law and its own policies
in awarding $9.6 million in CDBG
money to four communities in February.
When the letter became public in
September, Walker tried to downplay
HUD’s concerns as routine.
But on Tuesday, Mike Huebsch, secretary of the Department of
Administration, said his agency would
take over issuing the grants in order to
address the federal government’s concerns. Huebsch said in a memo that
WEDC will continue “communicating,
marketing and serving as a liaison with
communities and businesses on facilitating these grant opportunities.” Anything
that’s done will be with the blessing of
the federal government, he told the
board.
Democratic state Rep. Peter Barca, a
member of WEDC’s board and a frequent critic of how it’s operated, said it
was “very unfortunate” the problem with
issuing the grants wasn’t anticipated
before the agency was created.
GREENDALE
82-year-old woman fatally
struck by delivery driver
GREENDALE (AP) — Police in the
Milwaukee suburb of Greendale are
investigating the pedestrian death of an
elderly woman.
Authorities say the 82-year-old
woman was crossing the street at an
intersection near Southridge mall
Monday night when she was struck and
killed by a Jimmy John’s delivery driver.
The Milwaukee County medical
examiner’s office identifies the victim as
Beatrice Salo of Greendale.
WTMJ-TV says the driver is cooperating with the investigation.
www.themonroetimes.com
MADISON
State vet to retire Jan. 25
MADISON
(AP)
—
Wisconsin’s state veterinarian
is retiring next month after 27
years of state service.
Robert Ehlenfeldt will retire
Jan. 25 as state veterinarian
and division administrator for
the animal health division at
the Wisconsin Department of
Agriculture,
Trade
and
Consumer Protection.
Ehlenfeldt said in a news
release Tuesday he’ll miss the
work, but he says “it’s time.”
He says the division is as solid
as he’s ever seen it.
Ehlenfeldt came to the
department from private practice in 1985 and started as a
district veterinarian in southwest Wisconsin. He was
named state veterinarian in
2003 and reappointed last
January.
Leaving July 25, 2013 and returning August 8, 2013 you’ll tour the heart of
Switzerland including Lucerne, Interlaken, Bern, Brienz, Zermatt and unpack only once.
Tour Preview on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013 @ 2:00 p.m.
Mt. Horeb Methodist Church (corner of Highway 78 & County Highway S)
You can earn an early sign-up discount of $20000 per person if your deposit is
received by January 18, 2013. The deposit of $500 per person is due April 19, 2013.
00
Please call or write for a brochure. Join Us!
Ruth Steinhauer 608-437-5423
3203 State Rd. 78 • Mt. Horeb WI 53572
MT441000
Wednesday, December 19
The Green County
Revolving Loan Fund will meet
at 5 p.m. at the courthouse.
Agenda items include the
review of new requirements
for RLF administration and
amend the Green County RLF
manual.
A3
We would like to send thanks
to all of our friends and family for
their thoughts, prayers, cards, food
and flowers that were given in
honor and sympathy of our
beloved Alfred Aeberhard. We
would also like to extend special
thanks to the staff at the New
Glarus Home, Craig Newcomer
and the Newcomer Funeral
Home, Brooke Hoesly with
Hospice, Pastor Lawrence
Balleine, Pastor Mary Gafner and
Carolyn Hilliard. Al is greatly
missed and would be humbled
and appreciative of all that was
done for him and his family.
With Sincerest Gratitude,
Mary Aeberhard and Family
MT412920
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
FUN & GAMES
Garfield/Jim Davis
B3
Crossword
Today
in History
Today is Wednesday, Dec.
19, the 354th day of 2012.
There are 12 days left in the
year.
On this date:
In 1843, “A Christmas
Carol,” by Charles Dickens,
was first published in England.
In 1910, the artificial fiber
rayon was first commercially
produced by the American
Viscose Co. of Marcus Hook,
Pa.
In 1932, the British
Broadcasting Corp. began
transmitting overseas with its
Empire Service to Australia.
In 1946, war broke out in
Indochina as troops under Ho
Chi Minh launched widespread attacks against the
French.
In 1950, Gen. Dwight D.
Eisenhower was named commander of the military forces
of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization.
In 1971, “A Clockwork
Orange,” Stanley Kubrick’s
controversial movie adaptation
of the Anthony Burgess novel,
had its world premiere in the
U.S.
In 1984, a fire at the Wilberg
Mine near Orangeville, Utah,
killed 27 people.
In 1998, President Bill
Clinton was impeached by the
Republican-controlled House
for perjury and obstruction of
justice (he was later acquitted
by the Senate).
Zits/Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
Baby Blues/Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
DeFlocked/Jeff Corriveau
ACROSS
1 Shirt parts that
cover the wrists
6 Pencil contents
10 Baseball sticks
14 Leaning
15 Jealousy
16 Arkin or Alda
17 Actor Willem
18 Genesis
garden
19 Late Kennedy
matriarch
20 Wool gatherers
22 Clever; sharp
24 Very small
25 Burn after the
flame is out
26 Red tape
29 Task
30 Geisha’s sash
31 Hot bit of coal
33 Old anesthetic
37 __ up with;
tolerates
39 Alpine goatherd
song
41 Record
42 __ wool; Brillo
material
44 Traffic cop’s
device
46 Cheap
container
47 Potato or yam
49 Choose
51 Break into
smithereens
54 Mexican dollar
55 Visitor
56 Not constant;
changeable
60 Prefix for room
or chamber
61 Slightly open
63 “Turkey in the
__”
64 Wild hog
65 __ top;
sleeveless shirt
66 Motif
67 Gentlemen
68 Needle holes
69 Seamstress
DOWN
1 Scoundrels
2 “Beehive State”
Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
21
23
25
26
27
28
29
32
34
35
36
38
40
Small flute
Doesn’t sink
Germfree
Suspicious
Tight __; some
football players
Abbr. in a
street address
Energetic one
Pear variety
Think __; utter
one’s thoughts
1 of 5 senses
Derisive smile
Foe
Miffed
Tear to bits
Jumps
Border on
Location
Fragrant wood
Drill or auger
Despise
“Beowulf” or
the “Aeneid”
Torn apart
Homesteaders
High-powered
surgical beam
(c) 2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
43 Old stringed
instrument
45 Opposes; will
not submit to
48 Bawl out
50 Find disgusting
51 Crusty wound
coverings
52 Asian capital
53
54
56
57
58
Church table
Rosa or Bert
Weathercock
Make tea
Like a poor
excuse
59 Pitcher
62 Blue __; pretty
songbird
Horoscope
Crankshaft/Tom Batiuk and Chuck Ayers
Shoe/Chris Cassatt, Gary Brookins and Susie MacNelly
Tank McNamara/Bill Hinds
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2012
ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Put the past behind you and
look to the future with optimism. You’ll learn from a personal experience you
encounter with someone of
interest. A financial gain will
help you invest in your skills
and endeavors. 3 stars
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don’t look at your failures — enjoy your successes.
A serious outlook is fine, but
not when you should be
enjoying the lighter side of life
with people who normally
only get to see you at work.
Get year-end paperwork out
of the way. 3 stars
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Relationships are key to your
future. Ask for favors or offer
something that will secure a
relationship with someone
special. A problem with
deception must be brought
out into the open before you
can move on. 4 stars
CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Don’t let change cause emotional upset. Do your best to
finish what you start and to
take care of any responsibilities you’ve been given. You will
reap the rewards and be given
the time you need to devote to
home and family. 2 stars
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Personal responsibilities must
be dealt with before you can
relax and enjoy the end-ofthe-year festivities. A close
relationship with someone
will be enhanced. Travel plans
or spending time doing something out of the ordinary will
bring you pleasure. 5 stars
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Face domestic and family
challenges in a practical manner. Judging others will cause
resentment. A social event or
shopping will cost you more
than you anticipate. Don’t
count on a contract unless
you have it signed, sealed and
delivered. 3 stars
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Please those around you and
you will open up new opportunities presented to you by a
friend, relative or someone
who is looking for a partnership. Traveling will lead to conversations with extraordinary
people. 3 stars
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Getting back to your roots
may be interesting, but don’t
believe everything an old
friend tells you. Rely on your
intuition to guide you when
dealing with family and to lead
you in a direction that will
secure your position. 3 stars
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Create change if you
are bored or unhappy in your
current situation. A new year
is about to begin and preparing to wipe your slate clean
and start anew will bring you
greater vitality and a chance
to do things differently. 5 stars
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You may want to help
those less fortunate, but do
so for the right reason.
Offering time, a service or
suggestions will make a difference. An impulsive decision or move will cause emotional stress and can hurt
your reputation. 2 stars
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Strategize and figure out
your best move. Focusing on
what you can do to improve
your chance of getting ahead
personally or professionally
will lead to a plan that will help
build your confidence. 4 stars
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Too much of everything
will be your downfall. Keep
things simple and stick close
to home. Don’t be fooled by
what others say. Avoid a fasttalking sales pitch, suggestions or offers that are too
good to be true. 3 stars
Birthday Baby: You are
determined, ambitious and
changeable. You are curious
and colorful.
— Compiled by Eugenia
Last of Universal Press
Syndicate
Sudoku
Directions
Tuesday’s Answer
8
4
1
5
6
2
7
9
3
9
3
2
8
7
1
4
6
5
Difficulty Level
7
6
5
4
3
9
8
1
2
4
8
3
6
9
5
2
7
1
5
1
7
2
4
3
9
8
6
2
9
6
1
8
7
3
5
4
6
7
4
3
1
8
5
2
9
3
5
8
9
2
6
1
4
7
1
2
9
7
5
4
6
3
8
12/18
1 6
4
8
1
2
6
4
8 9 7
9
1
3
2 3
Difficulty Level
7 2 3 4
1
9
5
9
4
2
5
7
4
12/19
2012 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Marmaduke/Brad Anderson
Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on 9x9
grids with several given
numbers.The object is to
place the numbers 1 to 9 in
the empty squares so that
each row, each column and
each 3x3 box contains the
same number only once.
2012 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Ziggy/Tom Wilson II
By Dave Green
VIEWS
A4
“C
ongress
shall make no
law respecting
an establishment of religion,
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the
press; or the right of the
people peaceably to
assemble, and to petition the
government for a redress of
grievances.”
— First Amendment
THE MONROE
TIMES
Established 1898
1065 4th Avenue West
Monroe, WI 53566
608-328-4202
1-800-236-2240
FAX 608-328-4217
editor@themonroetimes.com
EDITORIAL BOARD
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
STATE VIEW
Building state’s reserve fund a worthy goal
By the Sheboygan Press
One of the major debates sure to
split along partisan lines in the
Legislature early next year is what to
do with an estimated $467 million in
reserves the state treasury is forecasting headed into the 2013-15 state
budget.
At this point, it’s hard to know
which way the Legislature should go
because of what’s going on in
Washington. The “fiscal cliff” of federal tax increases and budget cuts
scheduled to kick in Jan. 1 if
Congress doesn’t act has everyone
waiting and wondering. If those cuts
occur, Wisconsin and every other
state can expect less federal aid next
year. That would mean the $467 million reserve and probably more would
be needed just to maintain the status
quo, never mind giving employees
raises or adding new spending.
But if Congress again kicks the can
Carl Hearing
General Manager
Mary Jane Grenzow
Editor
Jeremy Pink
Night Editor
down the road, then the immediate
crisis is prevented and states will
have more short-term certainty.
The Legislature and Republican
Gov. Scott Walker have two considerations as they start to craft the biennial budget early next year.
First, most state workers haven’t
had a pay raise in four years, during
which they also had to start paying
5.9 percent of their pay toward their
pensions and also saw their health
insurance premiums go up.
Second, Wisconsin has not socked
away enough money during good
times to help weather recessions.
According to the nonpartisan
Wisconsin Taxpayers Alliance, when
the 2007-08 recession started,
Wisconsin was the state with the second-smallest budget reserve relative
to spending (1 percent), better only
than Arkansas, which had no reserve
at all. That compares with Iowa’s 15
percent reserve and Minnesota’s
almost 6 percent. The $467 million
reserve estimate amounts to 3 percent
of the $14.36 billion the state has
budgeted to spend this year, according to the Milwaukee Journal
Sentinel.
Another consideration is Walker’s
desire to further cut local property
taxes and provide some relief in
income taxes as well.
Although Republicans also hold
majorities in both houses of the
Legislature and need not compro-
JOE HELLER
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Mail:
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ONLINE POLL
This Week’s Question
Do you support a ban on
assault weapons?
❒ Yes
❒ No
Last Week’s Results
Do you agree with the National
Transportation Safety Board
that ignition locks should be
used on vehicles for all convicted drunk drivers?
❒ Yes
327 votes 54%
❒ Only for repeat offenders
227 votes 38%
❒ No
46 votes 7%
❒ Not sure
3 votes 1%
Visit
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Wednesday’s Times.
Blossoms & Barbs
■
About Our View: Editorials
represent the majority view
of the Monroe Times editorial board.
TODAY’S QUOTE
“Serious-minded
people have few ideas.
People with ideas are
never serious.”
mise, they should. One message from
the Nov. 6 election is that gerrymandering works when done right. The
other message is that voters want
their lawmakers to work together for
the betterment of all, not just for special interests and narrow agendas.
Yes, we need to build up our
reserves, and Walker’s budget discipline has helped move the needle in
the right direction. But the real lesson
from the last 10 years is that the time
to build a healthy reserve is when the
economy is strong, which Wisconsin
lawmakers of both parties failed to
do.
That requires discipline as well,
because there’s never a shortage of
individuals and groups clamoring for
the state’s money.
Building a reserve is crucial to help
ensure we can continue to provide
health care and education, especially
for the poor, when tax collections go
down and jobless rates go up.
But the real lesson from the last 10 years is that the time
to build a healthy reserve is when the economy is strong,
which Wisconsin lawmakers of both parties failed to do.
AP NEWS ANALYSIS
Congressional backing grows for gun control debate
By Larry Margasak
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Congressional gun rights supporters showed an increased
willingness Tuesday to consider new legislation to control firearms in the aftermath
of the Connecticut school
shootings — provided it also
addresses mental health issues
and the impact of violent
video games.
A former co-chairman of
the Congressional
Sportsmen’s Caucus,
Democratic Rep. Mike
Thompson, D-Calif., and 10term House Republican Jack
Kingston — a Georgia lawmaker elected with strong
National Rifle Association
backing — were the latest to
join the call to consider gun
control as part of a comprehensive, anti-violence effort
next year.
“Put guns on the table, also
put video games on the table,
put mental health on the
table,” Kingston said.
But he added that nothing
should be done immediately,
saying, “There is a time for
mourning and a time to sort it
out. I look forward to sorting
it out and getting past the
grief stage.”
With the nation’s nerves
still raw over the murders of
20 elementary school children
and six teachers, White
House, spokesman Jay
Carney said President Barack
Obama was “actively supportive” of a plan by Sen. Dianne
Feinstein, D-Calif., to introduce legislation to reinstate an
assault weapons ban. While
Obama has long supported a
ban, he exerted little effort to
get it passed during his first
term.
Meanwhile, the National
Rifle Association, silent since
the shootings, said in a statement that it “is prepared to
offer meaningful contributions to help make sure this
never happens again.” There
was no indication what that
might entail. The group, the
best-known defender of gun
rights in America, scheduled a
news conference for Friday.
On Capitol Hill, Feinstein
is likely to become chairman
next year of the Senate
Judiciary Committee, which
may get the first crack at considering firearms legislation.
Carney said the president
also would support legislation
that closes a gun show “loophole,” which allows people to
buy guns from private dealers
without a background check.
And he says Obama would be
“interested in looking at” leg-
islation to restrict high capacity ammunition clips.
The spokesman said
Obama was heartened by
growing support on Capitol
Hill for a national discussion
on gun violence, particularly
from seemingly unlikely lawmakers. The president spoke
on the phone Tuesday with
West Virginia Sen. Joe
Manchin, a conservative
Democrat and avid hunter,
who said after the
Connecticut shootings that
“everything should be on the
table” in those discussions.
Carney sidestepped questions about whether Obama
regrets not having taken
stronger gun control during
his first term, but he said the
president does think more
needs to be down.
“We as a nation — and he,
as a member and leader of the
nation — need to do more,”
he said.
Late Wednesday, the
National Rifle Association,
the most potent pro-gun
group and one that keeps
score of lawmakers’ votes,
explained its silence until
now.
“The National Rifle
Association of America is
made up of four million
moms and dads, sons and
daughters - and we were
shocked, saddened and heartbroken by the news of the
horrific and senseless murders
in Newtown,” the NRA statement said.
“Out of respect for the families, and as a matter of common decency, we have given
time for mourning, prayer and
a full investigation of the
facts before commenting.”
Among members of
Congress, Thompson, the former Sportsmen’s Caucus cochairman, was named to lead
a Democratic task force on
gun violence. He’s a hunter, a
wounded Vietnam veteran
and a conservative Democrat.
“The only experience I’ve
had with assault weapons was
the one that I was trained with
when I was in the Army,” he
said. “I know that this is not a
war on guns. Gun owners and
hunters across this country
have every right to own legitimate guns for legitimate purposes and ... we are not going
to take law-abiding citizens
’guns away from them.”
On Monday, NRA member
Manchin, Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid and Sen.
Charles Grassley, R-Iowa —
senior Republican on the
Judiciary Committee — said
it’s time for a debate that
would include gun control.
Reid previously had taken
pro-gun positions for years.
Not all Republicans were
willing to go as far as
Grassley or Kingston, but
they didn’t rule out tackling
gun control.
Senate Republican leader
Mitch McConnell told
reporters, “The entire
Congress is united in condemning the violence in
Newtown and on the need to
enforce our laws. As we continue to learn the facts,
Congress will examine
whether there is an appropriate and constitutional
response that would better
protect our citizens.”
McConnell added that Reid
controls the Senate schedule.
At a regular House
Republican closed-door meeting Tuesday Rep. Tim
Murphy of Pennsylvania, a
psychologist, led a discussion
on mental illness — which he
described as the primary
cause of mass shootings.
Murphy said he told colleagues that mental illness
was the common link in similar tragic incidents and “we
have to stop pretending it
doesn’t exist. We need to
understand what it is that triggers changes in someone.”
“I see it as the center of the
issue. Get mental illness out
of the shadows.”
ELSEWHERE
B4
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON
NRA speaks on shooting
Unions plan new
offensive after
loss in Michigan
Almost immediately after it
became clear the extent of carnage, the group’s Facebook
page disappeared. It posted no
tweets. It made no mention of
the shooting on its website.
None of its leaders hit the
media circuit Sunday to promote its support of the Second
Amendment right to bear arms
as the nation mourns the latest
shooting victims and opens a
new debate over gun restrictions. On Monday, the NRA
offered no rebuttal as 300 antigun protesters marched to its
Capitol Hill office.
Yet on Tuesday, the NRA reemerged, albeit more slowly
than normal and with its
somber statement.
After previous mass shootings — such as in Oregon and
Wisconsin — the group was
quick to both send its condolences and defend gun owners’
constitutional rights, popular
among millions of Americans.
There’s no indication that the
National Rifle Association is
prepared to weaken its ardent
opposition to gun restrictions
but it did hint it was open to
being part of a dialogue that
already has begun.
Its deep-pocketed efforts to
oppose gun control laws have
proven resilient. Firearms are
in a third or more of U.S.
households and suspicion runs
deep of an overbearing government whenever it proposes
expanding federal authority.
The argument of gun-rights
advocates that firearm ownership is a bedrock freedom as
well as a necessary option for
self-defense has proved per-
suasive enough to dampen
political enthusiasm for substantial change.
Seldom had the NRA gone
so long after a fatal shooting
without a public presence. It
resumed tweeting just one day
after a gunman killed two people and then himself at an
Oregon shopping mall last
Tuesday, and one day after six
people were fatally shot at a
Sikh temple in Wisconsin in
August.
The Connecticut shootings
occurred three days after the
incident in Oregon.
Since the Connecticut
shootings, the NRA has been
taunted and criticized at
length, vitriol that may have
prompted the shuttering of its
Facebook page just a day after
the association boasted about
reaching 1.7 million supporters on the social media network.
Twitter users have been
relentless, protesting the
organization with hashtags like
NoWayNRA.
The NRA has not responded
to them. Its last tweets, sent
Friday, offered a chance to win
an auto flashlight.
Offline, some 300 protesters
gathered outside the NRA’s
lobbying headquarters on
Capitol Hill on Monday chanting, “Shame on the NRA” and
waving signs declaring “Kill
the 2nd Amendment, Not
Children”
and
“Protect
Children, Not Guns.”
“I had to be here,” said
Gayle Fleming, 65, a real
estate agent from Arlington,
Va., saying she was attending
New!
her first antigun rally. “These
were 20 babies. I will be at
every rally, will sign every letter, call every congressman
going forward.”
Retired attorney Kathleen
Buffon of Chevy Chase, Md.,
reflected on earlier mass shootings, saying: “All of the other
ones, they’ve been terrible.
This is the last straw. These
were children.”
“The NRA has had a stranglehold on Congress,” she
added as she marched toward
the NRA’s unmarked office.
“It’s time to call them out.”
The group’s reach on
Capitol Hill is wide as it wields
its deep pockets to defeat lawmakers, many of them
Democrats, who push for
restrictions on gun ownership.
The NRA outspent its chief
opponent by a 73-1 margin to
lobby the outgoing Congress,
according to the nonpartisan
Sunlight Foundation, which
tracks such spending. It spent
more than 4,000 times its
biggest opponents during the
2012 election.
In all, the group spent at
least $24 million this election
cycle — $16.8 million through
its political action committee
and nearly $7.5 million
through its affiliated Institute
for Legislative Action. Its chief
foil, the Brady Campaign to
Prevent Gun Violence, spent
just $5,816.
On direct lobbying, the
NRA also was mismatched.
Through July 1, the NRA spent
$4.4 million to lobby Congress
to the Brady Campaign’s
$60,000.
Cliff talks hit lull with Boehner’s ‘Plan B’
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Just two weeks from an economy-threatening deadline, fiscal cliff talks hit a lull
Tuesday as House Speaker
John Boehner announced that
Republicans would also
march ahead with their own
tax plan on a separate track
from the one he’s been pursuing with President Barack
Obama.
The White House and leading congressional Democrats
immediately
rejected
Boehner’s “Plan B,” which
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Security benefits that have
incensed liberal Democrats.
Just
Monday,
Obama
offered concessions, including
a plan to raise top tax rates on
households earning more than
$400,000 instead of the
$250,000 threshold he had
campaigned on. And the two
sides had inched closer on the
total amount of tax revenue
required to seal the agreement.
Obama now would settle for
$1.2 trillion over the coming
decade while Boehner is offering $1 trillion.
Give a little holiday cheer to the
area’s needy this holiday season
during our canned food drive.
Your caring goes a long way!
We will be collecting until
December 28, 2012 for the
Green County Food Pantry
Bring your donations to:
1065 4th Avenue West
Monroe, WI
MT200448
and
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would extend soon-to-expire
Bush-era tax cuts for everyone
making less than $1 million
but would not address huge
across-the-board spending cuts
that are set to strike the
Pentagon and domestic programs next year.
Boehner’s surprise move
came after significant progress
over the past several days in
talks with Obama — talks that
produced movement on tax
rate hikes that have proven
deeply unsettling to GOP conservatives and on cuts to Social
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LINE411.CO
this year in the state on a failed
effort to enshrine collective
bargaining rights in the
Michigan Constitution.
Unions are gearing up for
another expensive fight in the
state. They hope to collect
enough signatures for a “statutory initiative” that would let
the state’s voters cast a ballot
for or against “right-to-work,”
a measure that would essentially override the substance of the
new law.
But the symbolism of the
law’s enactment in pro-labor
Michigan has given conservatives high hopes they can succeed elsewhere. Mark Mix,
president of the National Right
to Work Committee, said his
group now is eyeing Alaska,
Missouri,
Montana
and
Pennsylvania.
“We think there’s a chance
just about everywhere now,”
Mix said.
So far, the costly battle has
produced mixed results for
organized labor.
But amid the costly battles
over dozens of measures across
the country, overall union
membership has shrunk to just
11.8 percent of the workforce.
It could hit another historic low
this year after public sector
unions lost thousands of members in Wisconsin and in other
states that have turned to layoffs due to budget shortfalls.
WASHINGTON
LOCAL ONLINE
ALTERNATIVE TO
YELLOWPAGES!
W W W. S T A T E
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Blindsided by a new law
weakening union rights in
Michigan, organized labor is
preparing to target Republican
governors in politically important states up for re-election in
2014 — part of a renewed
offensive against perceived
anti-union policies.
While unions fared reasonably well nationally last month
at the ballot box, their struggle
to survive has forced them to
spend staggering sums just trying to hold ground. It is money
not spent on recruiting new
workers to stem a membership
decline that has made unions
more vulnerable than ever.
“It’s unfortunate that that’s
the case,” said Michael
Podhorzer, political director for
the AFL-CIO. “But the reality
of having elected officials who
are so anti-organizing is that
this is the first step to getting to
the point where we can organize workers.”
In Michigan, Gov. Rick
Snyder signed legislation last
week prohibiting unions from
requiring workers to pay dues
or representation fees, even if
they are covered by union contracts.
It was another jarring blow
for unions in Michigan, a cradle of the modern American
labor movement. Unions
already had spent $22 million
MT199912
WASHINGTON (AP) —
After four days of selfimposed silence on the shooting that killed 26 people inside
a Newtown, Conn., elementary
school, the nation’s largest gun
rights lobby emerged Tuesday
and promised “to offer meaningful contributions to help
make sure this never happens
again.”
The
National
Rifle
Association explained its
unusual absence “out of
respect for the families and as
a matter of common decency”
after Friday’s shooting that left
dead 20 children, all ages 6 or
7.
The group — typically outspoken about its positions even
after shooting deaths — went
all but silent since the rampage. As it faced public scrutiny online and in person, the
group left many wondering
how — if at all — it would
respond to one of the most
shocking slayings in the
nation’s history.
“The
National
Rifle
Association of America is
made up of 4 million moms
and dads, sons and daughters,
and we were shocked, saddened and heartbroken by the
news of the horrific and senseless murders in Newtown,” the
organization said in a statement. “The NRA is prepared to
offer meaningful contributions
to help make sure this never
happens again.”
The group said it would
have a news conference to
answer questions Friday, the
one-week anniversary of the
shootings.
COMMUNITY
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
United Methodist Church,
326 W. Pearl St., Belleville.
Alcoholics Anonymous, 8
p.m., St. John’s Church, 1724
14th St., Monroe.
Celebrate Recovery, 12step Christ-centered recovery program, 6:30 p.m., 416
2nd St., New Glarus. All
hurts, habits and hang-ups;
everyone welcome. Info:
(608) 527-5664.
Stories and more, 10 a.m.,
Monroe Public Library, 925
16th Ave., Monroe.
4 Teens program, movie
day, 3:30 p.m., second floor
program room, Monroe
Public Library, 925 16th Ave.,
Monroe.
Monroe Morning Optimist
Club, 6:30 to 7:30 a.m.,
Swiss Alps restaurant, 804
4th Ave. West, Monroe. Guest
speaker: Lynn Wheeler,
Monroe Middle School principle. Topic: new iPad program
in school.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Community Calendar notices are
published for three days prior to the
event. Items must be submitted no
later than 24 hours before they should
appear.
Wednesday, December 19
Alcoholics Anonymous, 6
p.m., United Methodist
Church, 2227 4th St., Monroe.
Alcoholics Anonymous, 7
p.m., Apple Grove Lutheran
Church, 4501 Apple Grove
Church Road, Argyle.
Potluck dinner for WOTM
members, 6 p.m., Monroe
Moose Family Center. A $5
gift exchange will be held for
those who wish to participate. Certificates for 20-, 25-,
30-, 35-, 40-, 45- and 50-year
memberships will be given
out at the meeting.
Annual Christmas barn
service, 7 p.m., Richard
Taylor “Happy Barn,” 7893
McKenna Road, Hollandale.
Food and fellowship follow
the service. Info: Pecatonica
Lutheran Parish Office at
(608) 523-4239.
Births
City Employees Donate
Nick and Emily Bartels,
Monroe, are the parents of
a boy, Landon Irvin Hollis,
born Dec. 17, 2012 at
Monroe Clinic hospital,
Monroe. He joins a sister,
Lexi, 16. Grandparents are
Irvin and Connie Bartels,
Monroe, and Hollis and
Joanne Bausman, Monroe.
Friday, December 21
Alcoholics Anonymous, 7
p.m., Zwingli UCC, 416 E.
Lake Ave., Monticello.
Zilmer-Riley American
Legion Unit No. 84 Friday
night fish fry with sirloin tips
and noodles, pie night, serving 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., 1627
12th Ave., Monroe.
Preschool story time,
“winter,” 9:30 a.m., Albertson
Memorial Library, 200 N.
Water St., Albany.
Holiday concert, presented by Black Hawk High
School music department,
free, 7:30 p.m., high school,
202 E. Center St., South
Wayne.
Thursday, December 20
Alcoholics Anonymous, 10
a.m., United Methodist
Church, 2227 4th St.,
Monroe.
Alcoholics Anonymous, 7
p.m., (Big Book),
Congregational United
Church of Christ, E. 201 23rd
St., Brodhead.
Alcoholics Anonymous, 7
p.m. (Big Book Study), Grace
A5
Photo supplied
New toys were collected and donated by City of Monroe
employees for the Monroe Woman’s Club Christmas
Stocking Project. Pictured in the front row, from left, are
Annaya and Jorianna Gerber, daughters of city
employee Al Gerber. In the back row, from left, are
Engineer Technician Catherine Kehoe, Assistant
Administrator/Safety Director Martin Shanks and Dana
Kehoe, son of Catherine Kehoe. Toys are collected and
donated to area children from families in need along
with coats, shoes, boots and clothes. Area organizations
and businesses provide donations and monetary
support to continue the tradition of helping families
during the Holiday season. Monetary donations can be
mailed to: Christmas Stocking Fund, 901 16th Ave.,
Monroe, WI 53566.
Saturday, December 22
Alcoholics Anonymous, 9
a.m., 1623 22 1/2 Ave.,
Monroe.
Mathew and Jennifer
Wilhelms, Monroe, are the
parents of a boy, Jack
Oliver, born Dec. 13, 2012
at Monroe Clinic hospital,
Monroe. He joins a sister,
Cameron, 2. Grandparents
are Sue Doyle,
Weyauwega; John and
Kathy Doyle, Madison;
Gary and Marsha
Wilhelms, Browntown; and
Georgia Rizzotto, East
Moline, Ill. Great-grandparents are Marie
Wilhelms, Freeport;
Maxine Doyle, Monroe;
Janeth Johansen, Tucson,
Ariz.
Joshua and Rachel
Noriega, Belleville, are the
parents of a girl, Alexis
Sophia, born Dec. 15, 2012
at Monroe Clinic hospital,
Monroe. She joins a sister,
Addison, 2. Grandparents
are Roy and Dawn
Noriega, Belleville, and
Leah Neuenschwander,
Monticello. Great-grandparents are Randall and
Cheryle Nelson, Fond du
Lac; Diana Geishert,
Madison; and William and
Emma Noriega, Monroe.
Ben and Patti Wolff,
Lena, are the parents of
twin boys, Camden Mark
and Cooper Frederick, born
Dec. 12, 2012 at Monroe
Clinic hospital, Monroe.
They join a brother, Chase
Stoerp, 9. Grandparents are
Diane Samelstad, Monroe;
Mark and Roxanne
Samelstad, New Richmond;
and Frederick Jr. and Deb
Wolff, Warren. Greatgrandparents are Donna
Ranum, Monroe; Walter
and Pat Samelstad,
Wisconsin Rapids; Bernie
and Barb Saunders,
Warren; Frederick Sr. and
Fran Wolff, Warren.s
Graduation
WHITEWATER —
Christopher Rygh, son of
David Rygh, Monroe,
received his masters degree
in business and finance
from the University of
Wisconsin-Whitewater on
Dec. 15.
Rygh was also named to
the dean’s list.
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BIG STAGE-Milwaukee
UW
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r Nov.16
ters line
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orial Day
orized to
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ay was
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ley,
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ter, Larrin venison don ase managem state.
tion new handling of stay away person close to
would be er, who plan “We wanted
the
said.
enjomon
atio
best as
bling. Bee
Friday,
probed
postelec
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themonr blican Gov
a
n“Ifor
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fend
ichoo
nses
st and
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f the
by 1
nter, he
ssful hun
l this year
axing.”
BI’s
00the fied
leich
II
Vol . CXI
CIA
Director
s
Petraeu
resigns
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s
approve
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fifth-yea
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sex scan
www.themonroetimes.com
dal
MT784874
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
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Day, week, or month
trailers available. Carter
& Gruenewald Co., Juda, WI. (608)934-5201.
120
ATTENTION
The Monroe Times
Classified Ad
Deadline:
•4pm Monday-Friday
•11am Friday for
Saturday
•4pm Wednesday for
Buyer’s Guide
608-328-4202
themonroetimes.com
254
AIRLINES CAREERS Become an Aviation
Maintenance Tech. FAA
approved training. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM 888-242-3193
GENERAL
EMPLOYMENT
401
COMMERCIAL CLEANING - Monroe part-time
evenings. apply online:
www.petersoncleaning.c
om
NEW GLARUS
BREWING
New Glarus Brewing
Company’s rapid growth
requires permanent full
time Warehouse/production team members. 2nd
shift/afternoon commitment required. Candidates must be able to lift
50 lbs repetitively. Fork
Truck Certification and
Manufacturing Experience required. Join a
fast paced positive team
you can be proud of.
New Glarus Brewing
Company offers a comFOR SALE by sealed
petitive salary, 401K, full
bid: roughly 500 square
medical and retirement
feet of lumber, mixture
benefits, liberal vacation
of woods, some low
as well as a stable and
grade oak, 1 X 6 X 8
clean work environment.
pieces, Contact City of
Monroe Street Dept. at
Applications can be
(608) 329-2490, sealed
found on line at
bids accepted until noon
www.newglarusbrewing.
on Friday, Dec. 21st.
com
Giving away a pet? Return to
Get adopter’s refer- New Glarus Brewing
ences and check them, Company
then deliver the animal PO Box 759
to make sure it’s going 2400 State Hwy 69
New Glarus, WI 53574
to a good home!
Phone, fax and e mail
applications will be discarded
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
309
BUYERS GUIDE and
Monroe Shopping News
carriers needed. Please
contact Sue at 608-3284202 ext. 17 or 815-2354106 ext. 104 for more
information.
501
7 for $7
BUSINESS
SERVICES
104
HOUSES
FOR RENT
ings advertised are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. If
you have a complaint
concerning discrimination in housing call:
(608)266-6860 (State of
Wisconsin)
or
(800)424-8590 (Federal).
Earn extra Christmas cash on all
those unused items around the house.
HAPPY
ADS
CLASSIFIED
HOUSES
FOR RENT
501
3BR WITH 1 car attached garage, $725/mo
plus security deposit. No
pets. Available January
EMPLOYMENT INFOR1st. (608)325-9631.
MATION
Advertisements in this category MONROE: VERY nice
may contain a “1-800” 1BR house, first floor
phone number that re- laundry, available now,
fers you to a “1-900” negotiable. (1313 12th
phone number. Readers Ave). Near Kwik Trip.
should be aware that di- (608)333-7137.
aling the “1-900” number
PUBLISHERS NOTICE
will result in a charge to
All real estate adveryour phone bill. Also,
tised herein is subject
additional charges for into the Federal Fair
formation may be reHousing Act, which
quested. Always remakes it illegal to admember to get complete
vertise any preference,
information and the cost
limitations or discrimiof the call before dialing.
nations on race, color,
religion, sex, handiCLASSIFIEDS
cap, familial status or
CALL: (608)328-4202 national origin, or in-
HOUSES
FOR RENT
501
tention to make any
such preferences, limitations or discriminations. The State of
Wisconsin forbids discrimination in the sale,
rental or advertising of
real estate based on
the following factors in
addition to those protected under federal
law: Age, ancestry,
lawful source of income, sex or marital
status of person maintaining household, and
sexual orientation. We
will not knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is
in violation of the law.
All persons are hereby
informed that all dwell-
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
504
ALPINE
HEIGHTS
Apartments located on
1st Street in Monroe, 2
bedroom $495 one
month’s rent for security
deposit, yearly lease.
Landlord pays: basic cable, water, sewer, and
garbage. Tenant pays:
electric bill. Apartment
has electric heat and
A/C, coin operated laundry on site, off street
parking, no smoking and
no pets. (608)776-3184
COUNTRYVIEW
APARTMENTS: ASK
ABOUT OUR SPECIAL.
APARTMENTS
Large COZY 1BR with
FOR RENT
patio. W/S/G included.
welcome.
1 bedroom apartments Cats
(608)325-7966.
available December 1!
ENJOY LESS BILLS at
Cedar Green Apartments, where all utilities
(except electricity) are
included! Cold weather
ahead + FREE HEAT =
HUGE SAVINGS! We
are pet friendly and accept cats and small to
medium sized dogs! Our
apartments go fast so
call us or stop in today!
(608) 325-5265 Online:
cedargreenapartments.
webs.com or find us on
Facebook.
2BR APTS in Monroe
includes W/S/G, off
street parking, some
pets
accepted.
(608)558-2383.
504
Y
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
B5
504
LET US do the snow removal. Let us pay your
heat. Great move-in
specials. Call (608)325FARM
1663 for a showing.
EQUIPMENT
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your ad using
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Getters!
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to your ad for
only $2.50 per
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Tired of tracking
monthly bills,
writing checks
and
paying postage?
722
EZ Pay
SIOUX GATES, Red
Brand Fencing & Franklin Bale Feeders available at Clarno Lumber &
Supply, (608)325-9421.
LIVESTOCK
FOR SALE
734
WFA CATTLE Sales,
Brooklyn, WI. Thomas
Reilly (608)424-3748 or
(608)516-9096. Dairy
Sale second Thursday
of
each
month.
www.wisconsinfarmauction.com
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608-328-4202 | 1065 4th Ave. West • Monroe, WI 53566
We strive to provide the
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
our customers need.
•Black &
White
Copies
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to
Four-Color
Printing
1065 4TH AVE. W., MONROE, WI
(608) 328-4202
LOCAL/STATE
A6
Snow
LEARN TO DRIVE
From Page A1
Wisconsin
Emergency
Management advises residents
to prepare by getting their
vehicles and home ready. It
suggests:
■ Have an emergency winter
weather survival kit in your
vehicle. Your kit should
include water, snack food such
as energy bars or raisins, first
aid kit and booster cables. If
you have a cell phone make
Take the wheel and take control of your life. We can teach you to drive safely and confidently.
A SAFE & DEFENSIVE DRIVING SCHOOL
Monday thru Thursday for 3-1/2 weeks
Cost $250 - $20 discount if sign up with a buddy
Next class Jan. 7th from 6-8pm • Monthly Classes
safeanddefensive.com
New Location; 1717 11th St. • 558-9816
7/,
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Beginning Jan. 2, most
online content on the website
will be available only to paid
Times subscribers. Non-subscribers will still be able to see
the website; however, readers
will have to log in to click on
headlines and read stories. A
limited amount of content will
remain free for all to access.
This content includes the community calendar; obituaries
and death notices; weddings,
Fire
From Page A1
Voting
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original equipment will be
inspected and replaced as
needed. The $125,000 would
cover the worst case scenario,
he added.
About $70,000 has already
been spent in the past four
years to keep the truck in
working order, but it has
become more unreliable, even
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sure you have a power adapter
you can plug into the lighter.
■ Check the roads and take
your time. You may need to
delay or cancel travel plans on
Thursday. Call 511 or go to
www.511wi.gov for the latest
road
conditions
across
Wisconsin. You can also go to
their website for a regional
travel map which covers North
and South Dakota, Illinois,
Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota,
Michigan, Missouri and
Wisconsin. Make sure you
plan extra time if you travel.
Roads may become icy and
snow packed. Also, keep at
least a half tank of gas in your
vehicle in case of an emergency and let friends and family know where you are traveling to and when you should
arrive.
■ Get supplies for your
home. Make sure your home
emergency kit is stocked with
food that can be stored and
eaten without electricity, in
case there is a power outage.
Also, make sure you have
extra water, flashlights with
extra batteries and medications.
■ Updated info is available
at readywisconsin.wi.gov.
Jan. 11 to submit those plans to
the state. He has asked his staff
to submit ideas by Jan. 4, but
there are already ideas in the
boards’ plans.
“There are some things we
have not been able to do,”
Borremans said, and the award
money will probably go
toward setting up those programs.
Career clustering and career
pathways are important to the
system now, he said. Logistics
in transportation and food processing, specific to dairy, are
already being discussed with
dairy producers, and creating a
set of core competencies “so
we can organize training
around them” may well be
moved into the forefront for
action. Also, designing a system for matching available job
openings in the region with job
seekers may get a boost.
Borremans
said
the
SWWDB contracted with
Manpower about two years
ago to be its service provider
to take care of case management and assessments and to
help job seekers develop an
employability plan.
“The results have been positive,” he said, “and we find out
our performance has exceeded
standards. Of course, our staff
monitors everything to make
sure we are well in position to
out perform standards.”
The Southwest Wisconsin
Workforce
Development
Board is one of Wisconsin's
eleven regional boards established by the Workforce
Investment Act of 1998.
“While all of our regional
workforce partners contribute
significantly as a team in connecting job seekers to jobs, I
am pleased to recognize those
that exceeded expectations in
serving dislocated workers and
other job seekers of all ages,”
Secretary Newson said. “I
challenge those getting the
additional funding to further
invest these resources in efforts
that will continue to yield powerful results in developing our
state’s workforce.”
In accordance with WIA
regulations for statewide activities
funding,
Secretary
Newson awarded $300,000 to
WDBs that exceeded negotiated performance standards during Program Year 2011 in
areas such as average earnings,
job placement and retention,
literacy gains and number of
certifications attained.
Award dollars are available
to the following WDBs:
■ Southwest: $100,666
■ Western: $73,667
■
Waukesha-OzaukeeWashington: $44,500
■ South Central: $38,167
■ Fox Valley: $34,000
■ Southeast: $9,000
anniversaries and engagements; and classifieds. In addition, breaking news stories that
are a matter of public safety
will also be available to nonsubscribers.
The domain name, themonroetimes.com, will remain the
same as the existing site.
Print subscribers who have a
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Subscribers with 11-week or
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Existing print subscribers
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Dec. 28. They can still sign up
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Online-only subscribers can
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site
at
themonroetimes.com.
to the point of breaking down
at the scene of a fire, Rausch
said. Last year the truck racked
up 194 days of repairs.
The city must have a ladder
truck to maintain its solid
Class 3 rating for fire insurances. Without the truck, the
classification drops to a class
5, which would increases people’s fire insurance rates by 14
percent, Rausch said. A new
ladder truck costs about
$900,000, he added.
The city cannot go more
than 90 days without a ladder
truck and still maintain its
Class 3 rating.
So, starting in January, the
truck will be sent out for a 60day refurbishing. During that
time,
Brodhead
Fire
Department will be dispatched
to provide a ladder truck at
any structure fire, Rausch
said.
The
Monroe
Fire
Department is also a part of
MABAS, a mutual aid
response system in which
members share equipment and
personnel as backup.
tendent of the Department of
Public Instruction, told the
board he observed a long line
of people waiting to register at
a Milwaukee polling station in
the Nov. 6 election.
Pridemore told the board he
would be introducing a bill to
address how long it takes to
register at the polls, but did not
give any details about what it
would say.
Others advocated for doing
away with election day registration entirely, saying it
opened the door to voter fraud
and was a distraction for
clerks.
The GAB’s estimated $5.2
million cost for eliminating
election day registration is
“outrageous,” said Ardis
Cerny of Pewaukee, a close
observer of elections and
advocate for requiring photo
identification at the polls to
combat fraud. She said elections board staff complicated
the issue with its report and
questioned the accuracy of its
cost estimates.
The cost is primarily driven
by requirements the state
would face if it were to eliminate election day registration.
MT200334
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extremely upset with talk
about same-day registration
possibly being eliminated.
“We live in a democracy and
we feel our rights are being
chipped away one by one,” he
said. People can be registered
to vote at the polls without
causing long lines, he said.
State Rep. Don Pridemore, a
Republican from Hartford who
is running for state superin-
LIFE
B6
The Monroe Times Wednesday, December 19, 2012
ADVICE
Woman in love triangle has trouble thinking straight
DEAR ABBY: I am a 31-year-old,
never-married mother of two. Last
summer I started having an affair with
“Jordan,” the father
of my first child.
He left me when
our daughter was a
year old and has
been engaged for
three years in an
on-again, off-again
relationship.
I could give you
excuses about why
the affair started up
Dear Abby
again, but the truth
is we both knew it
was wrong and continued to do it anyway. I never stopped loving him and I
thought it would bring him back to me.
Today I found out from Jordan’s
fiancee that they have set their wedding date for next spring. She said
they would like for me to come. As if
it wouldn’t be painful enough to go to
the wedding, his fiancee has also
asked me to do her hair for the occasion. (I’m a hairstylist.)
Abby, Jordan and I are still having
an affair. I want to tell her, but I don’t
want him to hate me. I believe this
wedding is a big mistake for many reasons, not just the obvious. Please give
me some outside advice. — CAN’T
HELP MYSELF IN OHIO
DEAR CAN’T HELP YOURSELF: OK, the first thing to do is
wake up, smell the coffee and accept
that resuming the sexual relationship with Jordan has not had the
desired effect. He WILL be marrying someone else.
Next, concentrate on saving yourself and waste no more of your time
on him — that is, if you would like a
permanent, monogamous relationship with someone. Jordan has given
you ample proof that he is incapable
of being faithful to one woman.
And last, tell his fiancee that you
do not plan to attend the wedding or
do her hair because you are in love
with Jordan and have been sleeping
with him since last summer.
DEAR ABBY: I have known my
husband for seven years and I love
him very much, but I am no longer “in
love” with him. Somehow along the
way the spark has fizzled.
We have a wonderful family and
have been through so much together. I
don’t want a divorce. I want to make
our marriage work, and so does he. So
how do I get my spark back? —
SPARKLESS IN TEXAS
DEAR SPARKLESS: That you
and your husband want your marriage to work means it is capable of
being resuscitated. While you didn’t
give any details, it is possible that you
have been “through so much” that it
didn’t allow you to concentrate on
each other. Exhaustion and distraction can cause a spark to fizzle.
A way to reignite it would be to
spend more time alone together, participate in activities you both enjoy,
and make time on a regular basis to
talk, relax and touch each other.
And if necessary, enlist the services
of a licensed marriage counselor.
DEAR ABBY: My sister relin-
quished custody of her kids in a
divorce 30 years ago. I recently made
contact with them to re-establish lost
ties. The contact I made with the
daughter has been a wonderful success. The other resulted in complete —
and understandable — rejection.
Now my sister, who didn’t want to
open the door, blames me for her
heartache because her son rejected her.
Was I wrong for bringing at least one
of them back into the family? — SISTER IN THE SOUTH
DEAR SISTER: Because you did
it over your sister’s objections, I
think you were. While the daughter
seems interested in establishing contact — at least for now — your sister
has now “lost” her son TWICE. And
if the daughter eventually backs off,
your sister will be zero for two.
— Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear
Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
MOVIES
Robert
De Niro
BY JAY BOBBIN
For all the stunt work, explosions and computer
graphics that movies put forth these days, one of the
most exciting things in cinema is still a performance
that clearly puts an actor on a higher career level.
That actually happens twice in “Silver Linings
Playbook,” the excellent comedy-drama from David
O. Russell, a filmmaker who relishes being on the
edge with his subjects and characters. He’s proven
that with such projects as “The Fighter” and “Three
Kings,” and now, he examines the personal plights
of several people way out of society’s mainstream.
The nasty fellow in “Wedding Crashers”
notwithstanding, Bradley Cooper mostly has built
his career on playing likable nice guys whose flaws
are on the mild side. In this film, he comes out of
the gate charging, like someone who knows he’s
been handed a role that can redefine his image ...
and very smartly, he doesn’t overplay his hand.
The character is a just-released psychiatric patient
hopelessly devoted to his estranged wife, who has
responded by having a restraining order taken out
against him. Home isn’t the healthiest place for him,
thanks especially to a father who has his own issues,
mainly involving football’s Philadelphia Eagles. It’s
a part that demands Robert De Niro to be great
again, and he is.
The other performance that sparks with Cooper’s
is that of Jennifer Lawrence, as a young widow who
has no need to be in the social swim just as much
as he doesn’t. Any image of her from “The Hunger
Games,” she forces away quickly. And thus, the
magic of “Silver Linings Playbook” becomes how
Bradley Cooper stars in
“Silver Linings Playbook.”
these people bring out the best in one another, when
they thought they had no “best” left.
Watching this movie, you see acting jobs that truly
are revelations, and we don’t get all that many of
those anymore. “Silver Linings Playbook” will be a
title on a lot of lips as we get deeper into the filmaward season, so do yourself a favor and get on the
train early. Not only will you look smart for having
done so, you’ll be giving yourself a very big treat in
the process.
“Meet the Parents” (2000): Playing
both family man and no-nonsense government
intelligence veteran, De Niro is hilarious in
straddling the line.
“Analyze This” (1999): De Niro began
to have film fun by sending up his image as a
mobster in need of psychiatric counsel.
“Heat” (1995): With few words and plenty of
attitude, De Niro excels as a master bank robber
– and his tense diner scene with Al Pacino is not
to be missed by any true movie lover.
“GoodFellas” (1990): De Niro is both
paternal and dangerous as the point man in a
mob faction.
“The Untouchables” (1987): He has
relatively little screen time, but De Niro keeps his
presence felt throughout the film as legendary
mob kingpin Al Capone.
“The King of Comedy” (1983): As
excessively devoted talk show fan Rupert Pupkin,
De Niro is any celebrity’s living nightmare.
“Raging Bull” (1980): Arguably at the
peak of his movie work, De Niro won his second
Academy Award in frequent collaborator Martin
Scorsese’s stunning portrait of boxer Jake La
Motta.
“The Deer Hunter” (1978): The Vietnam
War drama gets much of its backbone from
De Niro as the most solid of several steel-town
soldiers.
“Taxi Driver” (1976): De Niro’s versatility
was made clear early by his iconic work for
Scorsese as Travis Bickle, cabbie and selfappointed defender of a young prostitute (Jodie
Foster).
“The Godfather, Part II” (1974): He had
made several other films, but De Niro’s career
really started to crystallize with his Oscarwinning portrayal of the young Vito Corleone in
the flashback sequences of one of the very best
movie sequels.
MOVIE REVIEW
The shtick doesn’t stick in ‘Guilt Trip’
By Todd McCarthy
The Hollywood Reporter
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
“Yentl” goes yenta in “The
Guilt Trip,” a creakily oldfashioned comedy that forgot
to pack the laughs along with
the nudging and kvetching.
Possibly the first American
film in decades in which characters drive cross-country
courtesy of process shots out
the back window, this motherson yakfest blows a gasket and
all four tires before it even hits
the road. With Seth Rogen in
very subdued mode, his fans
will smell this one a mile
away; it might be a movie only
their mothers — or die-hard
Barbra Streisand fans — could
love.
When was the last time an
overbearing Jewish mother
giving her schlemiel of a son a
hard time about not being married was a major component of
a big Hollywood film? This
sort of routine used to pop up
all the time in American comedy but pretty much has vanished in the rearview mirror
since the heyday of Ruth
Gordon. So to behold
Streisand’s New York mom
Joyce Brewster hectoring her
homely visiting son Andrew
(Rogen) about his myriad personal shortcomings is to revisit
a musty mind-set that the
minor updates in Dan
Fogelman’s woeful script can’t
begin to freshen up.
In an effort to connect with
Andrew, Joyce unloads what
she considers a bombshell of a
secret: She actually had a
boyfriend before she met her
husband and loved him so
much she named her only son
after him. Considering it odd
she never tried to look him up
after his dad died, Andrew
does research that reveals he’s
an executive in San Francisco.
With an ulterior motive in
mind, he invites Mom to join
him on a drive across the
country, during which he’ll
make stops in Virginia, Texas,
Santa Fe and Las Vegas to
hawk a nontoxic cleansing liquid product he has created to
potential retailers.
These pitch sessions are
desultory affairs — a salesman
Andrew is not — and Joyce
doesn’t help matters by hovering and carrying on in ways
that scarcely help her son’s
cause. To save a few bucks,
she insists they rent a compact
rather than an SUV, forcing
them to share very close quarters as they listen to Jeffrey
Eugenides’ gender-bending
“Middlesex” on CD. The way
Joyce gets excited about gift
shops and free continental
breakfasts at motels (where
she insists they stay in one
room to save more money),
you’d think she’d never been
out of New York before.
The climactic visit to San
Francisco to track down
Joyce’s former beau predictably plays on, and aims to
stimulate, bittersweet emotions. At the same time, the
easy-to-get point of the enterprise is to stress that the mother and son’s prolonged time
together has forced them to
break through their various
barriers, grudges and expectations to arrive at a more honest
satisfying relationship. Yep,
that’ll do the trick every time.
The Guilt Trip provides
heavy competition with director Anne Fletcher’s previous
films (“Step Up, ”27 Dresses,”
“The Proposal”) as to which is
the most formulaic and conventional, but this one takes
the cake for being the most
visually unimaginative and
clunky. Worse, even the most
easy-to-please audiences will
struggle to find more than a
half-dozen laughs here, so
bereft is the film of fresh
comic ideas.
Rogen — who for some rea-
son sports about a one-day’s
grizzle of beard throughout —
drastically underplays, probably realizing that, with
Streisand emoting so broadly,
it was the only way to go. For
her part, some combination of
cosmetic expertise, cinematic
enhancement and natural
endowment makes Streisand
look more like she’s in her 50s
than in her 70s, which is the
actuality. Those who’ve
always liked the singer-actress
probably won’t mind her here;
for the nonfan, this is not the
film that will change your
mind.
A retinue of terrific character actors could have greatly
enlivened the proceedings, but
Fogelman (“Cars,” “Bolt,”
“Tangled,” “Crazy, Stupid,
Love”) didn’t write the parts
for them.
“Guilt Trip,” a Paramount
release, is rated PG-13 for language and some risque material. 95 minutes.
TODAY’S
BIRTHDAYS
■ Actress Cicely Tyson
is 79
■ Actor Tim Reid is 68
■ Musician John McEuen
of the Nitty Gritty Dirt
Band is 67
■ Actor Mike Lookinland
(“The Brady Bunch”) is 52
■ Actress Jennifer Beals
is 49
■ Actor Scott Cohen
(“Gilmore Girls”) is 48
■ Actor Robert
MacNaughton (“E.T.”) is 46
■ Magician Criss Angel
is 45
■ Actress Kristy Swanson
is 43
■ Model Tyson Beckford
is 42
■ Actress Alyssa Milano
is 40
■ Actor Jake Gyllenhaal
is 32
■ Actress Marla Sokoloff
(“The Practice”) is 32
NEWS
OF THE WEIRD
■ For centuries, some residents of India’s Madhya
Pradesh state have
allowed themselves to be
trampled by garishly
dressed animals in periodic attempts to have their
prayers answered. The
November “Ekadashi” (the
11th day of certain months
of the Hindu calendar) this
year began with prayers,
followed by the liquoring
up of the animals (cows in
Ujjain and buffaloes in
Bhopal, for example) to
“remove their inhibitions,”
according to a
WebIndia123 report. Even
so, according to local
press reports, hardly anyone ever gets hurt.
— Compiled by
Chuck Shepherd for
Universal Press Syndicate
FIGURATIVELY
SPEAKING
■ If one were to assume
that Santa works in the
realm of standard time,
estimated length of time
he would be able to spend
per home, according to
NORAD: 2 to 3 ten-thousandths of a second
■ Estimated age of Santa
Claus: 16,000 years
■ Length of time his
Christmas Eve trip may
seem to us to take, but to
Santa it may last days,
weeks or even months in
standard time because he
functions within a different
time-space continuum
than the rest of us do: 24
hours
— Compiled by
John McIntyre for
Universal Press Syndicate
YOU TELL US
THIS WEEK’S
QUESTION
When does your family
open Christmas gifts?
❍ Christmas Eve
❍ Christmas morning
❍ One or two on
Christmas Eve, the rest in
morning
❍ We celebrate
before/after Dec. 25
To cast your vote in our
survey, visit www.themonroetimes.com and go to
the “Life Headlines” page
by Sunday. The results will
be revealed on Monday’s
page.
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