Public Comment Draft NCC 2019 Volume Three Plumbing Code of

NCC 2019
Public Comment
Draft
For Comment
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Disclaimer
While care has been taken in the preparation of this publication of the National Construction Code 2019
(NCC) Public Comment Draft, the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Building Codes Board as agent
for the Commonwealth of Australia and States and Territories of Australia, does not warrant that any
licensing or registration requirements specified in this publication are either complete or up-to-date for your
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update and amend the NCC in part more often than this. You can ensure that you are using the most up-todate version of the NCC by checking the Australian Building Codes Board website (www.abcb.gov.au).
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Published by:
The Australian Building Codes Board
GPO Box 2013
CANBERRA ACT 2601
Phone: 1300 134 631
Email: ncc@abcb.gov.au
www.abcb.gov.au
NCC 2019 Volume Three – Plumbing Code of Australia
Public Comment Draft
First published: February 2018
Print version: 1.0
Release date: February 2018
Contents and IntroduCtIon
Introduction to the national Construction Code (nCC)
about the nCC
The NCC is Australia’s primary set of technical construction provisions for buildings. As a performance-based code, it sets
the minimum required level for the safety, health, amenity and sustainability of buildings. It primarily applies to the design
and construction of new buildings, and plumbing and drainage systems in new and existing buildings. In some cases it
may also apply to structures associated with buildings and new building work in existing buildings.
The Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB), on behalf of the Australian Government and each State and Territory
government produces and maintains the NCC.
The primary users of the NCC include architects, builders, plumbers, building certifiers / surveyors, hydraulic consultants,
engineers and other building and plumbing related professions and trades.
Components of the nCC
There are three volumes in the NCC. They provide the technical provisions for the design and construction of buildings
and other structures, and plumbing and drainage systems.
NCC Volume One primarily covers the design and construction of multi-residential, commercial, industrial and public
assembly buildings and some associated structures.
NCC Volume Two primarily covers the design and construction of smaller scale buildings including houses, small sheds,
carports and some associated structures.
NCC Volume Three covers the design, construction and maintenance of plumbing and drainage systems in new and
existing buildings.
Each volume contains:
•
•
•
•
Governing Requirements
Performance Requirements
Compliance options to meet the NCC requirements
State and Territory Additions and Variations.
The NCC uses building classifications to identify requirements for different types of buildings. A building classification
relates to the intended use of the building. Information on building classifications is found in Part A6 of the Governing
Requirements.
the role of the nCC
The role of the NCC is for design and construction standards to:
•
•
•
•
•
Have a rigorously tested rationale
Effectively address applicable issues
Create benefits to society that outweigh costs
Consider the competitive effects of regulation
Not be unnecessarily restrictive.
Legislative arrangements and the nCC
Administration of the NCC is the responsibility of the States and Territories under their various building and plumbing Acts
and Regulations. State and Territory Acts and Regulations set out the legal framework to support the design and
construction of buildings. The NCC is given legal effect through State and Territory building and plumbing legislation.
The dates of adoption and amendments of the NCC are determined by State and Territory building and plumbing
administrations.
How to use the nCC
The NCC is split into two main sections:
1.
2.
Administrative requirements contained within the Governing Requirements.
Technical requirements contained within the remaining sections of the NCC.
The Governing Requirements provides the rules and instructions for using and complying with the NCC. They are vital in
understanding how the technical requirements of the NCC should be applied to any particular situation. The Governing
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Contents and IntroduCtIon
Requirements are also important in understanding how the NCC fits with the building and plumbing regulatory framework
within Australia.
nCC supporting materials
The NCC has supporting materials created to make the code easier to understand and apply. These materials are available
from the ABCB website at: www.abcb.gov.au.
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Contents and IntroduCtIon
Introduction to nCC Volume three
about the nCC Volume three
NCC Volume Three contains technical requirements for the design and construction for plumbing and drainage systems
in new and existing buildings. Volume Three applies to these systems in all classes of buildings whenever plumbing work
is carried out.
Components of nCC Volume three
NCC Volume Three comprises of the following Sections:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Section A – Governing Requirements, common across the NCC
Section B – Water services requirements
Section C – Sanitary plumbing and drainage system requirements
Section D – Sound transmission requirements
Section E – People with disability requirements
Schedules – comprising of:
•
•
•
•
State and Territory Variations and Additions;
Abbreviation and symbols;
Reference documents; and
NCC defined terms.
Section A contains the mandatory governing requirements for the NCC. Sections B to E contains mandatory Performance
Requirements and the compliance options to satisfy compliance with the NCC.
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section a
Governing requirements
section a Governing requirements of the nCC
Introduction to this section
The Governing Requirements of the NCC provide the rules and instructions for using and complying with the NCC. It
includes—
•
•
•
•
•
•
Interpreting the NCC
Complying with the NCC
state or territory compliance and application in conjunction with the NCC
applying documents referenced in the NCC
documenting the suitability of the design, construction and/or use of materials to comply with the NCC
Classifying buildings by their use.
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Part a1
Interpreting the nCC
Introduction to this Part
This Part explains important concepts on how the NCC should be interpreted and applied. There are certain conventions
and approaches that need to be taken into account when using the NCC. This includes interpreting specific language and
referenced terms. This is critical in understanding the intended technical and legal meaning aspects of the NCC. This Part
also explains the difference between the legal components of the NCC and parts that are only explanatory or guidance in
nature.
a1.0 Interpretation
(1)
The following are non-mandatory and are only informative and for guidance purposes of the NCC:
(a)
(b)
Content identified as ‘Explanatory information’
The ‘Introduction to this Part or Section’ information, located at the beginning of each Part or Section in the
NCC.
explanatory information
Explanatory information and Introduction to this Part or Section information contained in the NCC are non-mandatory
and are provided for guidance purposes only. Informative and guidance material should be read in conjunction with the
provisions of the NCC. The statements made in the informative and guidance components of the NCC should not be
taken to override the NCC. Unlike the NCC, which is adopted by legislation, the informative and guidance components
are not called up into legislation. The informative and guidance components of the NCC do not cover State and Territory
variations and additions. Because informative and guidance components of the NCC do not have regulatory force, the
ABCB does not accept any responsibility for its contents when applied to specific buildings or any liability which may
result from its use.
(2)
Words in italics must be interpreted in accordance with—
(a)
(b)
definitions provided in Schedule 3, unless the contrary intention appears; and
additional definitions in State or Territory appendices, as appropriate.
explanatory information
Defined words provide the precise meaning of key words and expressions for the purposes of the NCC. Where a word
is not defined in the NCC, the common meaning of the word should be used.
(3)
The NCC must be interpreted and applied in accordance with the following:
(a)
A reference to a building is a reference to an entire building or part of a building (as the case requires).
explanatory information
When the NCC refers to a building, that reference can be to the whole building or any part of the building. Whether this
provision applies depends on the circumstances of that case and the circumstances in which the reference is made.
Generally, a reference to a building is a reference to the whole building, regardless of classification. However, when a
provision is applicable to a specific class or classes of building, that reference to a building may be a reference to the
whole building or part of the building depending on how the building is classified.
For example, where a building has a single classification, a reference to a building in the NCC is understandably a
reference to a whole building. However, where a building has parts of different classification, unless the contrary intention
appears (i.e. there is a specific reference to the whole building), a reference to a building in the NCC is a reference to
the relevant part of the building. This means that each part of the building must comply with the relevant provisions for
its classification.
(b)
(c)
A reference to a plumbing or drainage solution, or product in Volume Three is a reference to an entire installation,
system or product, or part of an installation, system or product (as the case requires).
A reference in a Performance Requirement to “appropriate to” means—
(i)
(ii)
that consideration of all the criteria referred to in the Performance Requirement will determine the outcome
appropriate to the circumstances; and
that in certain cases it may not be necessary to incorporate any specific measures to meet the relevant
Performance Requirement.
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a1.0
explanatory information
A number of the Performance Requirements of the NCC use the expression “to the degree necessary” or “appropriate
to”. These expressions provide flexibility by allowing appropriate authorities to determine the degree of compliance
necessary in a particular case.
For example, an appropriate authority might judge that an item need not be installed, or a particular level of performance
be achieved.
(d)
(e)
(f)
An “Application” statement is provided to specify where and when a requirement or provision applies.
A “Limitation” statement is provided to specify where and when the application of a requirement or provision is
limited to a certain circumstance.
An “Exemption” statement is provided within a requirement or provision and specifies where or when a
requirement or provision does not need to be complied with.
explanatory information
Application, Limitation, and Exemption statements are used to identify provisions which may or may not apply in certain
situations, to varying degrees.
(g)
(h)
A “Note” is part of a provision or requirement and provides additional mandatory instructions.
Figures in the NCC are used to illustrate specific issues referred to in the associated text. They are not to be
construed as containing all design information that is required for that particular building element or situation.
explanatory information
Figures are used to explain the requirements of a particular clause. To ensure the context of the requirement is clearly
understood, adjacent construction elements of the building that would normally be required in that particular situation
are not always shown.
Accordingly, aspects of figures that are not shown should not be interpreted as meaning these construction details are
not required.
(4)
(5)
(i)
A reference to a building class is understood to be a reference to all the sub-classifications of that class.
A reference to—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(6)
The defined symbols and abbreviations listed in Schedule 2.
(d)
Class 1a and 1b are sub-classifications of a Class 1; and
Class 7a and 7b are sub-classifications of a Class 7; and
Class 9a, 9b and 9c are sub-classifications of a Class 9; and
Class 10a, 10b and 10c are sub-classifications of a Class 10.
A reference to a sub-classification is solely to that sub-classification.
explanatory information
Classes 1a and 1b, 7a and 7b, 9a, 9b and 9c, and 10a, 10b and 10c are separate classifications. In the NCC, when the
designation ‘a’, ‘b’ or ‘c’ is not applied, the reference is to all buildings of the general class. For example, ‘Class 9b’
refers only to Class 9b buildings, but ‘Class 9’ refers to Class 9a, Class 9b and Class 9c buildings.
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Part a2
Compliance with the nCC
Introduction to this Part
This Part explains the possible methods of demonstrating compliance with the NCC. It explains the various compliance
pathways within the NCC and the appropriate steps that must be taken for each of these pathways.
a2.0 Compliance
(1)
(2)
Compliance with the NCC is achieved by complying with—
(a)
(b)
the Governing Requirements of the NCC; and
the Performance Requirements.
A2.0(1) is subject to State and Territory variations and additions as described in A3.0.
explanatory information
To comply with the NCC, a solution must achieve compliance with the Governing Requirements and Performance
Requirements. The Governing Requirements contains requirements about how the Performance Requirements must
be met.
Performance Requirements outline the levels of accomplishment different buildings must attain. The Performance
Requirements are the only NCC hierarchy levels that must be satisfied.
In some instances, State and Territory variations and additions may also be applicable to certain Performance
Requirements.
a2.1 Compliance with the Performance requirements
Performance Requirements are satisfied by one of the following as shown in Figure 1:
(1)
(a)
A Performance Solution.
(c)
A combination of (a) and (b).
(b)
A Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution.
Figure 1: nCC Compliance option structure
explanatory information
A solution may be partly a Performance Solution and partly a Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution. However, no matter what
method is chosen, building proponents need to always meet the Performance Requirements of the NCC.
There are three options to comply with the Performance Requirements: Performance Solutions, Deemed-to-Satisfy
Solutions, or a combination of both.
a2.2 Performance solution
(1)
A Performance Solution is achieved by demonstrating—
(a)
(b)
compliance with all appropriate Performance Requirements; or
a solution is at least equivalent to the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions.
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(2)
a2.2
A Performance Solution must comply with the Performance Requirements through one or a combination of the
following:
(a)
(b)
Evidence of suitability that shows the use of a material, product, plumbing and drainage product, form of
construction or design meets a Performance Requirement in accordance with Part A5.
A Verification Method including the following:
(i)
(ii)
The Verification Methods provided in the NCC.
Other Verification Methods, accepted by the appropriate authority that show compliance with the
Performance Requirements.
explanatory information
A2.2(b)(ii) provides for the use of Verification Methods which are not listed in the NCC. A Verification Method may
include—
1.
a calculation, using analytical methods or mathematical models; or
2.
a test, using a technical procedure, either on-site or in a laboratory, to directly measure the extent to which the
Performance Requirements have been met; or
4.
any other acceptable form of certification.
3.
an inspection (and inspection report); or
Any Verification Method used must be acceptable to the appropriate authority.
(c)
(d)
Expert Judgement.
Comparison with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions.
explanatory information
A Performance Solution must comply with all applicable Performance Requirements of the NCC. A Performance Solution
provides a tailored solution to meet the intended objective of the Performance Requirements. A Performance Solution
must comply with all relevant Performance Requirements and must be verified using one or a combination of the
following methods:
•
•
•
•
Evidence of suitability
Verification Method
Expert Judgement
Comparison with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions.
More information on NCC compliance methods is located at www.abcb.gov.au.
For example, building proponents who wish to know what has to be done to satisfy the fire-safety Performance
Requirements of a particular building can either follow the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions or develop a Performance
Solution. For a Performance Solution they might, for example, refer to—
•
•
the International Fire Engineering Guidelines (Edition 2005) published by the Australian Building Codes
Board; or
the Fire Brigade Intervention Model (FBIM) developed by the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service
Authorities Council (AFAC) to assist with determining fire brigade response times.
a2.3 deemed to satisfy solution
(1)
(2)
A solution which complies with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions is deemed to have met the Performance
Requirements.
A Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution can show compliance with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions through one or more of
the following:
(a)
(b)
(c)
Evidence of suitability that shows the use of a material, product, plumbing and drainage product, form of
construction or design meets a Deemed-to-Satisfy Provision in accordance with Part A5.
Expert Judgement.
A Verification Method not included in the NCC which is accepted by the appropriate authority that shows
compliance with the Performance Requirements.
explanatory information
A Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution is achieved by following all appropriate Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions in the NCC. The
Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions are prescriptive (i.e. like a recipe book, they tell you how, what and in which location
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a2.3
things must be done). They include materials, components, design factors, and construction methods that, if used, are
deemed to meet the Performance Requirements, hence the term “Deemed-to-Satisfy”.
A Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution must comply with the relevant Performance Requirements and must be verified using
one or a combination of the following methods:
•
•
•
Evidence of suitability
Expert Judgement
Verification Methods not included in the NCC
More information on NCC compliance methods is located at www.abcb.gov.au.
(3)
For Volume two:
(a)
(b)
(c)
An acceptable construction manual and an acceptable construction practice contained in the same part are
considered to satisfy the same component of a Performance Requirement.
In order to comply with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions it is only necessary to satisfy -
(i)
(ii)
the appropriate acceptable construction manual; or
the appropriate acceptable construction practice.
Where an acceptable construction manual and an acceptable construction practice contained in the same part
are deemed to satisfy different components of a Performance Requirement, compliance with the Deemed-toSatisfy Provisions may require satisfying both the listed acceptable construction manual and the acceptable
construction practice for their specific components.
explanatory information
In Section 3 of Volume Two the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions are divided into two compliance pathways; “acceptable
construction practices” and “acceptable construction manuals”.
•
•
“Acceptable construction practices” are some of the most common forms of national construction practice
and are written into Section 3.
“Acceptable construction manuals” are the deemed-to-satisfy referenced documents.
In general, either an “acceptable construction practice” or an “acceptable construction manual” may be used as options
when proposing a Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution.
(4)
For Volume three:
(a)
(b)
(c)
An acceptable plumbing practice satisfies the Performance Requirement in a detached Class 1 or Class 10
building only.
In order to comply with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions it is only necessary to satisfy -
(i)
(ii)
the appropriate acceptable plumbing manual; or
the appropriate acceptable plumbing practice.
Where the acceptable plumbing manual and an acceptable plumbing practice contained in the same part are
deemed to satisfy different components of a Performance Requirement, compliance with the Deemed-to-Satisfy
Provisions may require satisfying both the listed acceptable plumbing manual and the acceptable plumbing
practice for their specific components.
explanatory information
In Volume Three the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions are divided into two compliance pathways; “acceptable plumbing
practices” and “acceptable plumbing manuals”.
•
•
“Acceptable plumbing practices” are some of the most common forms of national plumbing practice and are
written into Volume Three.
“Acceptable plumbing manuals” are the deemed-to-satisfy referenced documents.
In general, either an “acceptable plumbing practice” or an “acceptable plumbing manual” may be used as options when
proposing a Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution.
explanatory information:
Section B and Section C acceptable plumbing practices are Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions that are considered to be
acceptable forms of plumbing that meet the legislative requirements for Class 1 and 10 buildings only.
There is no obligation to adopt any particular option contained in Section B or Section C, if it is preferred to meet the
Performance Requirement in some other way.
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a2.3
However, if one of the options described in Section B or Section C is not complied with, then the appropriate authority
must be satisfied that the Performance Requirements have been met.
a2.4 a Combination of solutions
(1)
(2)
(3)
A Performance Requirement or Performance Requirements may be satisfied by using a combination of Performance
Solutions and Deemed-to-Satisfy Solutions.
When using a combination of solutions, compliance can be shown through the following:
(a)
(b)
A2.2 for assessment against the Performance Requirements.
A2.3 for assessment against the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions.
In order to comply with A2.4(1), the following method must be used to determine the Performance Requirement or
Performance Requirements relevant to the Performance Solution:
(a)
(b)
Where a Performance Requirement is satisfied entirely by a Performance Solution—
(i)
identify the relevant Performance Requirement from the Section or Part to which the Performance Solution
applies; and
(ii)
identify Performance Requirements from other Sections or Parts that are relevant to any aspects of the
Performance Solution proposed or that are affected by the application of the Performance Solution.
(i)
identify the relevant Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions of each Section or Part that is be the subject of the
Performance Solution; and
(iii)
identify Performance Requirements from other Sections or Parts that are relevant to any aspects of the
Performance Solution proposed or that are affected by the application of the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions
that are the subject of the Performance Solution.
Where a Performance Requirement is satisfied by a Performance Solution in combination with a Deemed-toSatisfy Solution—
(ii)
identify the Performance Requirements from the same Sections or Parts that are relevant to the identified
Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions; and
explanatory information
When designing a building, both Performance Solutions and Deemed-to-Satisfy Solutions can be used to achieve
compliance with Performance Requirement. A combination of solutions may be used to satisfy a single Performance
Requirement. This may include occasions where a specific Performance Requirement covers a number of elements
within a building.
No NCC provision can be considered in isolation. Any departure from the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions for a
Performance Solution needs to be assessed against the relevant Performance Requirements within the relevant NCC
Section or Part. Additionally, the proposed Performance Solution may also impact on other Performance Requirements
in other Sections or Parts. Thus, these additional Performance Requirements need to be considered in relation to the
subject Performance Solution. A2.4 sets out the method of determining which Performance Requirements are relevant.
It is important that a holistic approach is used when determining the appropriate Performance Requirements.
More information on using a combination of solutions approach is located at www.abcb.gov.au.
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Part a3
state or territory compliance and the nCC
Introduction to this Part
This Part explains applying the NCC in accordance with State or Territory legislation. In its own right, the NCC is not a
legal document. It has legal effect through references in relevant State and Territory building and plumbing legislation.
Although the NCC is a nationally consistent code, there are some situations where a State or Territory enforce a variation,
addition or deletion to it. This Part also explains how these variations, additions and deletions apply.
a3.0 state and territory compliance
(1)
For application within a particular State or Territory, the Volumes of the NCC comprises inclusively of—
(a)
Section A to J of Volume One; and
(c)
Section A to G of Volume Three.
(b)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Section 1 to 3 of Volume Two; and
State or Territory variations, additions and deletions must be complied with in conjunction with the NCC.
The NCC is subject to, and may be overridden by, State or Territory legislation.
State or Territory additions are contained in Schedule1.
State or Territory variations and deletions are contained throughout the NCC.
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Part a4
referenced documents
Introduction to this Part
This Part explains how documents referenced in the NCC are applied and adopted. The NCC itself doesn’t contain details
of every design and construction requirement for a building or plumbing or drainage system. As such, the NCC calls upon
or “references” other documents with this information. These are called NCC referenced documents. Examples of these
are Australian Standards, ABCB protocols, ABCB standards and other publications.
There are two types of referenced documents. A primary referenced document is in the Referenced Documents Schedule
of the NCC. A secondary referenced document is one referenced in a primary referenced document.
a4.0 referenced documents
(1)
A reference in the NCC to a document refers to the edition or issue and any amendment listed in Schedule 4.
(3)
Where a new edition, issue or amendment of a primary referenced document is not listed under Schedule 4, the
new edition, issue or amendment is not referenced for the purposes of the NCC.
(2)
(4)
(5)
A document referenced in the NCC is only applicable in the context in which the document is quoted.
Any document referenced in a primary referenced document is known as a secondary referenced document.
A reference to a secondary or other referenced document is a reference to the document as it existed at the time of
publication of the primary referenced document.
exemption 1:
If the secondary or other referenced document is also a primary referenced document, A4.0(5) does not apply.
a4.1 differences between referenced documents and the nCC
(1)
(2)
The NCC overrules in any difference between the NCC and a primary referenced document.
Where a document is referenced in the NCC, any rule, specification or clause within that document cannot vary from
the NCC.
a4.2 adoption of referenced documents
Documents referenced in the NCC exclude the following:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Specification or definition of the rights, responsibilities or obligations between the manufacturer, supplier or purchaser.
Specification of the responsibilities of any trades person or other building operative, architect, engineer, authority, or
other person or body.
Requirement for submission for approval for any material, building component, form or method of construction, to
any person, authority or body other than those empowered under State or Territory legislation to give that approval.
Specification that a material, product, form of construction or design must be submitted to any person, authority or
body for opinion.
Permitting a departure from the NCC, rule, specification or provision at the sole discretion of the manufacturer or
purchaser, or by arrangement or agreement between the manufacturer and purchaser.
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Part a5
documentation of design and construction
Introduction to this Part
This Part explains the documents needed to show that the NCC requirements are met and are ‘fit for purpose’. It covers
the use of materials, products, forms of construction and designs. It details separate requirements for the NCC, BCA and
PCA.
Examples of documents to be prepared and retained include certificates, reports, calculations and any other documents
or information showing compliance with the NCC requirements.
a5.0 suitability
A building and plumbing or drainage installation must be constructed—
(a)
using materials, products, plumbingproducts and forms of construction fit for their intended purpose; and
(b)
in an appropriate manner to meet the Performance Requirements.
(1)
The form of evidence used must be appropriate to the use of the material, product, plumbing product, form of
construction or design to which it relates.
a5.1 evidence of suitability - nCC
(2)
Any copy of documentary evidence submitted, must be a complete copy of the original certificate, report or document.
a5.2 evidence of suitability - BCa
application 1
A5.2 is only applicable to the BCA.
(1)
(2)
For the purposes of A5.0, a material, product, form of construction or design is fit for purpose if is—
(a)
(b)
supported by evidence of suitability in accordance with A5.2(2) to A5.3(3); and
constructed or installed in an appropriate manner.
Subject to A5.1(1), A5.4, A5.5 and A5.6, evidence to support that the use of a material, product, form of construction
or design meets a Performance Requirement or a Deemed-to-Satisfy Provision may be in the form of any one, or
any combination of the following:
(a)
A current CodeMark Australia or CodeMark Certificate of Conformity.
(c)
A current certificate, other than a certificate described in A5.2(2)(a) and A5.2(2)(b), issued by a certification
body stating that the properties and performance of a material, product, form of construction or design fulfil
specific requirements of the BCA.
(b)
(d)
A current Certificate of Accreditation.
A report issued by an Accredited Testing Laboratory that—
(i)
(i)
(e)
sets out the tests the material, product or form of construction has been subjected to and the results of
those tests and any other relevant information that has been relied upon to demonstrate its suitability for
use in the building.
A certificate or report from a professional engineer or other appropriately qualified person that—
(i)
(ii)
(f)
demonstrates that a material, product or form of construction fulfils specific requirements of the BCA; and
certifies that a material, product, form of construction or design fulfils specific requirements of the BCA;
and
sets out the basis on which it is given and the extent to which relevant standards, specifications, rules,
codes of practice or other publications have been relied upon to demonstrate its suitability for use in the
building.
Another form of documentary evidence, such as but not limited to a Product Technical Statement, that—
(i)
(ii)
demonstrates that a material, product, form of construction or design fulfils specific requirements of the
BCA; and
sets out the basis on which it is given and the extent to which relevant standards, specifications, rules,
codes of practice or other publications have been relied upon to demonstrate its suitability for use in the
building.
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GoVernInG requIrements
(3)
a5.2
Evidence to support that a calculation method complies with an ABCB protocol may be in the form of any one, or
any combination of the following:
(a)
(b)
A certificate from a professional engineer or other appropriately qualified person that—
(i)
(ii)
certifies that the calculation method complies with a relevant ABCB protocol; and
sets out the basis on which it is given and the extent to which relevant standards, specifications, rules,
codes of practice and other publications have been relied upon.
Another form of documentary evidence that correctly describes how the calculation method complies with a
relevant ABCB protocol.
a5.3 evidence of suitability – PCa
application 1:
A5.3 is only applicable to the PCA.
(1)
(2)
(3)
Any product that is intended for use in contact with drinking water must comply with the relevant requirements of
AS/NZS 4020 in the form of either—
(a)
(b)
a test report provided by a certification body or accredited testing laboratory, in accordance with AS/NZS 4020;
or
a WaterMark Licence issued in accordance with A5.3(2), if it includes compliance with AS/NZS 4020.
A product of a type listed on the WaterMark Schedule of Products is deemed to be fit for its intended purpose if it
has a WaterMark Licence issued in accordance with the WaterMark Scheme Rules.
A product of a type listed on the WaterMark Schedule of Excluded Products requires evidence of suitability in the
form of—
(a)
(b)
a current certificate issued by a certification body stating that the properties and performance of a product can
meet the requirements of the PCA; or
a report issued by an Accredited Testing Laboratory which—
(i)
(ii)
(4)
(5)
sets out the tests the product has been submitted to and the results of those tests and any other relevant
information that has been relied upon to demonstrate suitability for use in a plumbing or drainage
installation.
Any product that is not covered by A5.3(2) or A5.3(3) must be subjected to a risk assessment in accordance with the
WaterMark Scheme Rules.
Evidence to support that a design or system meets relevant PCA Performance Requirements must be in the form of
any one or any combination of the following:
(a)
(b)
(6)
demonstrates that the product complies with the relevant requirements of the PCA; and
The design or system complies with a Deemed-to-Satisfy Provision within the PCA.
The design or system is a Performance Solution from a Professional engineer or a recognised expert which—
(i)
(ii)
certifies that the design or system complies with the relevant requirements of the PCA; and
sets out the basis on which it is given and the extent to which relevant standards, specifications, rules,
codes of practice or other publications have been relied upon.
Any other form of documentary evidence that—
(a)
(b)
demonstrates that a design or system complies with the relevant requirements of the PCA; and
sets out the basis on which it is given and the extent to which relevant standards, specifications, rules, codes
of practice or other publications have been relied upon.
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GoVernInG requIrements
Part a6
Building classification
Introduction to this Part
The NCC groups buildings and structures by their function and use, assigning each type of building or structure with a
classification. This Part explains how each building classification is defined and used in the NCC.
The building classifications are labelled “Class 1” through to “Class 10”. Some classifications also have sub-classifications,
referred to by a letter after the number (e.g. Class 1a).
Class 2 to 9 buildings are mostly covered by Volume One of the NCC and Class 1 and 10 buildings are mostly covered
by Volume Two of the NCC. Volume Three of the NCC refers to all building classifications.
A building may have parts that have different uses. In most cases, each of these parts are a separate classification. A
building (or part of a building) may also have more than one use and may be assigned more than one classification.
a6.0 determining a building classification
(1)
(2)
The classification of a building or part of a building is determined by the purpose for which it is designed, constructed
or adapted to be used.
Each part of a building must be classified separately and comply with all the appropriate requirements for its
classification.
exemption 1:
For A6.0(1) where a part of a building has different purposes and is less than 10% of the floor area of the storey it is
situated on, the classification of the major use may apply to the whole storey.
Limitation 1:
exemption 1 does not apply where the minor use of a building is a laboratory or Class 2, 3 or 4 part of a building.
(3)
(4)
A room that contains a mechanical, thermal or electrical facility or the like that serves the building must have the
same classification as the part of the building in which it is situated.
Unless another classification is more suitable an occupiable outdoor area must have the same classification as the
part of the building in which it is situated.
a6.1 Class 1 buildings
(1)
A Class 1 building includes the following sub-classifications:
(a)
(b)
Class 1a is one or more buildings, which together form a single dwelling including the following:
(i)
A detached house.
(i)
One of a group of two or more attached dwellings, each being a building, separated by a fire-resisting wall,
including a row house, terrace house, town house or villa unit.
(i)
a boarding house, guest house, hostel or the like that would —
Class 1b is one or more buildings which together constitute —
(ii)
(A)
(B)
Limitation 1:
ordinarily accommodate not more than 12 people; and
has a total area of all floors up to and including 300m2 (measured over the enclosing walls of the
building); or
four or more single dwellings located on one allotment and used for short-term holiday accommodation.
For A6.1, a Class 1 building cannot be located above or below another dwelling or another Class of building, other than
a private garage. See Figures 2, 3 and 4.
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GoVernInG requIrements
a6.1
Figure 2: Identification of Class 1 buildings
Figure 3: typical Class 1 configurations
Figure 4: domestic allotment - Classification of buildings and structures
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a6.2 Class 2 buildings
(1)
(2)
GoVernInG requIrements
a6.2
A Class 2 building is a building containing two or more sole-occupancy units.
Each sole-occupancy unit must be a separate dwelling.
a6.3 Class 3 buildings
A Class 3 building is a residential building which is a place of long-term or transient accommodation for a number of
unrelated persons, including the following:
(a)
(b)
A boarding house, guest house, hostel, lodging house or backpacker accommodation.
A residential part of a hotel or motel.
(c)
A residential part of a school.
(e)
A residential part of a health-care building which accommodates members of staff.
(d)
(f)
Accommodation for the aged, children, or people with disability, or a residential care building.
A residential part of a detention centre.
Limitation 1:
For A6.3, a Class 3 building is not a Class 1 or 2 residential building.
a6.4 Class 4 buildings
Class 4 is a dwelling in a Class 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 building.
application 1:
A6.4 only applies if it is the only dwelling in the building.
a6.5 Class 5 buildings
A Class 5 building is an office building used for professional or commercial purposes.
Limitation 1
For A6.5, a Class 5 building is not a Class 1 or 2 residential building.
a6.6 Class 6 buildings
(1)
(2)
A Class 6 building is a shop or other building used for the retail sale of goods or the supply of services direct to the
public.
A Class 6 building includes a service station.
exemption 1:
A6.6(1) does not apply to a bar area that is in an assembly building.
a6.7 Class 7 buildings
A Class 7 building includes the following sub-classifications:
(a)
(b)
Class 7a is a building which is a carpark.
Class 7b is a building which is used for storage, or display of goods or produce for sale by wholesale.
a6.8 Class 8 buildings
A Class 8 building is defined as the following:
(a)
(b)
A laboratory.
A building in which the production, assembling, altering, repairing, packing, finishing, or cleaning of goods or produce
for sale takes place.
a6.9 Class 9 buildings
A Class 9 building includes the following sub-classifications:
(a)
Class 9a is a building of a public nature that is a health-care building including any parts of the building set aside as
laboratories, and includes a health-care building used as a residential care building.
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GoVernInG requIrements
(b)
a6.9
Class 9b is s a building of a public nature that is an assembly building including a trade workshop or laboratory in a
primary or secondary school.
exemption 1:
A6.9(b) excludes any parts of the building that are of another Class.
(c)
Class 9c is a building of a public nature that is a residential care building.
a6.10 Class 10 buildings
A Class 10 building includes the following sub-classifications:
(a)
(b)
(c)
Class 10a is a non-habitable building including a private garage, carport, shed or the like.
Class 10b is a structure that is a fence, mast, antenna, retaining wall or free-standing wall or swimming pool or the
like.
Class 10c is a private bushfire shelter.
a6.11 multiple classifications
A building (or part of a building) may be designed for multiple purposes and have more than one classification.
application 1:
For A6.11, a building (or part of a building) must comply with all the appropriate requirements that apply to each of the
classifications.
a6.12 united buildings
Buildings are deemed united when two or more buildings adjoining each other form one united building.
application 1:
For A6.12, a building is a united building if it is connected through openings in the walls dividing them and together
comply with all the requirements of the NCC as though they are a single building.
a6.13 alterations in a united building
If, after alterations or any other building work, two or more of the buildings in A6.12 cease to be connected through openings
in the dividing walls, each of those buildings not now connected must comply with all the requirements for a single building.
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Water serVICes
section B
Water services
Part B1
CoLd Water serVICes
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out the requirements for the design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and
maintenance of any part of a cold water service. It covers from the point of connection to the points of discharge.
This part also applies to a rainwater harvesting system which supplies a cold water service.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Bo1
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to the failure of a cold water installation;
and
(c)
conserve water and energy; and
(b)
(d)
(e)
(f)
ensure that a cold water installation (including an installation provided for use by people with a disability) is suitable;
and
safeguard the environment; and
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that a cold water installation is designed and is capable of being maintained so that throughout its
serviceable life it will continue to satisfy Objectives (a) to (e).
FunCtIonaL statements
BF1.1
Sanitary fixtures, sanitary appliances and supply outlets provided with drinking water must have safe and adequate
piped cold water supply.
BF1.2
The cold water service must be conveyed through plumbing installations in a way that minimises any adverse impact
on building occupants, the Network Utility Operator’s infrastructure, property and the environment.
Performance requirements
BP1.1 Water supply
(1)
A cold water service must be connected to a drinking water supply.
application 1:
BP1.1(1) only applies to cold water supplied for human consumption, food preparation, food utensil washing or personal
hygiene.
BP1.2 design, construction, and installation
(1)
A cold water service must ensure the following:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(2)
(d)
Water is provided at required flow rates and pressures for fixtures and appliances to function.
Access for maintenance of mechanical components and operational controls.
The system, appliances and devices can be isolated for testing and maintenance.
The efficient use of drinking water.
A cold water service must avoid failure or uncontrolled discharge.
explanatory information: unintentional heating of cold water services
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Water serVICes
BP1.2
Where installed in locations subjected to extreme summer temperatures (such as the roof space of a building), cold
water services have the potential to become unintentionally heated. This can pose a hazard as the cold water supply
may reach temperatures in excess of 45º Celsius, increasing the potential for scalding.
To reduce the likelihood of unintentional heating of cold water services, the following installation practices should be
considered:
(a)
(b)
avoid long runs of pipework in locations exposed to solar heat gain; or
apply insulation, either directly to the pipework, or by using additional ceiling insulation material between the
pipework and the solar heat source.
Avoidance of unintentional heating of cold water services in known areas of extreme summer temperatures may also
assist in reducing water usage through drawing off of water which has become excessively heated.
Verification methods
There are no Verification Methods for this part.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
B1.1 application
(1)
(2)
Performance Requirement BP1.1 is satisfied if the cold water service is connected to—
(a)
(b)
the Network Utility Operator’s drinking water supply; or
an alternative drinking water supply.
Performance Requirement BP1.2 is satisfied by complying with B1.2 to B1.3 and—
(a)
(b)
B1.4; or
acceptable plumbing practice B1.
B1.2 sanitary Flushing
Qld B1.4(1)
(1)
A cistern or flushing valve used for the purpose of flushing a water closet pan must have a dual flushing mechanism
that, when operated, discharges—
(a)
(b)
(2)
(3)
for a 6/3 litre cistern—
(i)
not less than 5.5 litres and not more than 6.5 litres for a full flush; and
(ii)
not less than 3.0 litres and not more than 3.5 litres for a reduced flush; and
(i)
not less than 4.3 litres and not more than 4.7 litres for a full flush; and
for a 4.5/3 litre cistern—
(ii)
not less than 2.8 litres and not more than 3.2 litres for a reduced flush.
The volume of water discharged to a flush urinal must not exceed 2.5 litres for each—
(a)
(b)
single urinal stall; or
600 mm length of a continuous urinal wall, or part thereof.
Automatic or set-cycle cisterns must not be installed.
explanatory information:
A programmed solenoid operated flushing system may be used if programmed to shut down during extended periods
of non-occupancy of a building. Prior to installing this type of system further advice should be sought from the authority
having jurisdiction. Where sensor control is used for urinal flushing, sensors should be located to avoid unnecessary
‘nuisance’ flushing triggered by pedestrian traffic.
B1.3 maximum flow rate for cold water outlets.
(1)
The outlet of a shower, basin, kitchen sink or laundry trough must have a maximum flow rate of not more than 9
litres per minute.
explanatory information:
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Water serVICes
B1.3
B1.3 applies to outlets which provide cold water only. The Deemed-to-Satisfy Provision for outlets which deliver a
combination of cold water and heated water is B2.4.
acceptable plumbing manuals
B1.4 General requirements
NSW B1.4(1)
Qld B1.4(1)
SA B1.4(1)
(1)
The design, construction, installation, repair, alteration, additions and commissioning of cold water services must be
in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.1.
Qld B1.4(2)
SA B1.4(2)
Tas B1.4(2), (3)
Vic B1.4(2), (3)
exemption 1:
The requirements of B1.4(1) do not apply to a shower intended to provide rapid drenching of a person for emergency
purposes, such as chemical removal.
acceptable plumbing practice B1
1 scope
This acceptable plumbing practice applies to cold water services in detached Class 1 or Class 10 buildings. This acceptable
plumbing practice does not apply to multi-unit developments.
2 Pipe size and flow rates
2.1 General requirements
(1)
(2)
Pipework for a cold water service connection to a single dwelling must have a minimum DN 15 to all fixture branch
lines.
Branch pipework for a fixture must have a minimum DN 10 with a maximum length of 3 m to no more than two
fixtures.
2.2 sanitary Flushing
(1)
A cistern or flush valve used for the purpose of flushing a water closet pan must have a dual flushing mechanism
complying with B1.2.
2.3 static pressure
(1)
Static pressure must not exceed 500 kPa at outlets of fixtures installed inside a building.
(1)
The pressure at the furthermost fixture in a cold water service must be not less than 50 kPa.
2.4 minimum flow rates and pressure
(2)
The flow rates to fixtures and appliances must comply with Table 2.4.
table 2.4
Flow rates to fixtures and appliances
Fixture
Toilet
Bath
minimum flow rate L/s
0.10
0.30
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2.4
Water serVICes
Fixture
Basin
Shower
Kitchen sink
Laundry tub
Washing machine
Hot water unit, mains pressure
Hose cock 15 mm
Hose cock 20 mm
(3)
minimum flow rate L/s
0.10
0.10
0.12
0.12
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.30
A storage tank or pump, or a combination of both, may be used to achieve the pressure and flow rates required by
2.4(1) and 2.4(2).
3 Protection of drinking Water
3.1 Cross-connection control
(1)
Contaminants must be isolated from the drinking water service and/or the Network Utility Operator’s drinking water
supply by an appropriate backflow prevention device in accordance with B5.
explanatory information:
Contaminants may enter a drinking water service or drinking water supply through the following actual or potential
cross-connection or interconnection between the drinking water service including a—
•
•
•
•
•
•
non-drinking water service; or
rainwater harvesting system; or
alternative water supply; or
swimming pool; or
irrigation system; or
pipe, fixture or equipment, including a boiler and pump, containing chemicals, liquids, gases or other
substances which may be harmful to health.
4 Installation
4.1 Pipe supports
(1)
Cold water service pipework must be supported in accordance with—
(a)
(b)
Table 4.1a for vertical pipework; or
Table 4.1b for graded or horizontal pipework.
table 4.1a
support spacing for vertical pipework
Pipe material
Copper
Copper
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (U-
Pipe size (dn)
10 - 20
25
15 - 18
maximum spacing (m), centre to
centre
1.5
2.0
1.2
20–22
1.4
25
1.5
32
1.7
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4.1
Water serVICes
Pipe material
PVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Pipe size (dn)
maximum spacing (m), centre to
centre
table 4.1b
support spacing for graded or horizontal pipework
Pipe material
Copper
Copper
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Pipe size (dn)
10 - 20
25
10
maximum spacing (m) centre to
centre
1.5
2.0
0.5
15 - 18
0.6
20 - 22
0.7
25
0.75
32
0.85
(2)
Cold water service pipework and its supports must be electrochemically compatible.
(1)
Where pipework is to be installed through timber bearers or floor joists, holes must be provided in accordance with
Figure 4.2.
4.2 Installation in timber framing
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Water serVICes
4.2
Figure 4.2 drilling through timber bearers and joists
(2)
(3)
In masonry-veneer construction, pipework may be located in the wall cavity and fixed to the studs with full pipe
saddles and self-drilling screws.
Where the external wall cladding is attached directly to timber studs, pipework can be—
(a)
(b)
(4)
installed over the ceiling; or
suspended under the floor; or
(c)
installed in accordance with 4.2(4).
(a)
The hole diameter must not exceed 1/3 of the width of the stud, except in hardwood studs, where the hole
diameter must not exceed 1/4 of the width of the stud.
Drilling or notching of timber frames, for the purposes of installing pipework, must be within the following limitations:
explanatory information:
The ‘width’ of a stud is its wider dimension. Therefore, for a 90 mm x 45 mm stud, the ‘width’ is 90 mm.
(b)
(c)
Notches must not exceed 20 mm deep.
The distance between holes or notches must be not less than—
(i)
(ii)
2 x pipe diameter in softwood; or
3 x pipe diameter in hardwood.
(4)
Plumbing fittings must be attached to the timber frame in accordance with 4.3(6).
(1)
Where pipework is installed through steel floor joists, all penetrations must comply with Figure 4.3a.
4.3 Installation in steel framing
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Water serVICes
4.3
Figure 4.3a Pipework penetrations in steel framing
(2)
Pipework must—
(a)
(b)
be run through pre-punched holes in steel studs;
where extra holes are necessary, the holes must—
(i)
(ii)
(3)
(4)
(iii)
be located near the centre-line of the stud; and
not reduce the structural integrity of each stud; and
be not more than 10% larger in area than the pre-punched holes.
In masonry-veneer construction, pipework may be located in the cavity and fixed to the studs with full pipe saddles
and self-drilling screws protected against galvanic corrosion in accordance with 4.3(5).
Where the external wall cladding is attached directly to steel studs, piping can be—
(a)
(b)
(c)
installed over the ceiling; or
suspended under the floor; or
installed in accordance with 4.3(2).
explanatory information:
Cold water pipes installed in roof spaces and other concealed locations may be subjected to extreme summer
temperatures (such as behind thin cladding materials of a building), and become unintentionally heated.
The cold water supply to some outlets may reach temperatures in excess of 50°C, and can pose a risk of scalding. As
well as the potential risks, unintentional heating of cold water services leads to loss of amenity and water wastage by
drawing off excessively heated cold water.
The primary cause of unintentional heating of cold water services is the installation of cold water pipework in roof spaces
and other locations exposed to solar heat gain.
(5)
Copper and brass pipes and fittings must be prevented from coming into contact with the steel frame by—
(a)
(b)
the use of a plastic grommet where the pipe passes through a stud; or
lagging the pipe, or isolating it from the steel stud using neoprene sheeting or tape.
explanatory information:
The use of a plastic grommet in accordance with 4.3(5)(a) may also have the effect of securing the pipe against water
hammer.
(6)
Plumbing fittings must be attached by—
(a)
(b)
timber or steel noggins fitted between the studs to support tap sets, baths and sinks; and
where a steel noggin is used, the tap set must be isolated to prevent corrosion by installing, between the tapset and the noggin, a durable non-corrosive material such as timber, fibre cement sheet, or similar in accordance
with Figure 4.3b.
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4.3
Water serVICes
Figure 4.3b Installation and fixing of services
4.4 Protection from damage
(1)
Pipework installed below ground must have the following minimum depths of cover, measured from the top of the
pipe to finished ground level:
(a)
(b)
(2)
Below a driveway, or other paved area that is subject to vehicular traffic: 300 mm.
For other areas not subject to vehicular traffic: 225 mm.
(c)
Under a building concrete slab: 75 mm.
(a)
wrapped with a flexible material; or
Pipework penetrating concrete or masonry must be—
(b)
passed through a sleeve or duct, to allow free movement of the pipe in response to expansion or contraction.
4.5 Protection from freezing
(1)
In areas where freezing of pipework is likely, pipework must be protected as follows:
(a)
(b)
Pipework not within a conditioned space must be insulated in accordance with B1.4.
Buried pipework must be either—
(i)
(ii)
insulated; or
installed to a depth below the level that would be affected by freezing.
4.6 Flushing
(1)
Prior to hydrostatic testing, the pipework must be flushed to remove foreign matter.
(1)
To verify watertightness, the water service must be tested prior to concealment or backfilling of pipework by—
4.7 Watertightness
(2)
(a)
(b)
subjecting the system to a pressure of 1500 kPa for at least 30 minutes at the ambient temperature; and
inspecting the system to identify any leaks.
The system is deemed watertight if no leaks are identified during the inspection.
4.8 Commissioning
(1)
The water service must be commissioned by—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
being fully charged with water, and
having all air purged from the system; and
checking water flow rate and pressure; and
checking operation of all fixtures and outlets.
5 maintenance facilities
(1)
The cold water service must have an isolating valve—
(a)
(b)
where the service enters each building; or
at the point of connection to each flushing appliance or fixture as required.
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6 Bushfire-prone areas
(1)
6
Water serVICes
Exposed pipes above ground in a designated bushfire-prone area must comply with AS 3959.
explanatory information: Cross-volume considerations
nCC Volumes one and two deal with a number of areas of on-site construction which are relevant to cold
water services. these include, but may not be limited to, the following:
Item
nCC Volume one Class 2 to 9
buildings
Excavations for pipework adjacent to B1 Structural Provisions
a building and footings
Termite management for attachments B1 Structural Provisions
to buildings and penetrations through
a slab
Penetrations for pipework through a B1 Structural Provisions
vapour barrier
Pipework in timber bearers and joists B1 Structural Provisions
of solid timber or engineered wood
products
Fittings, fixtures and pipework
B1 Structural Provisions
installations in steel framed
construction
Penetrations through a fire-resisting C3 Protection of Openings
wall or floor
Fixtures or fittings in a wet area
F1 Damp and Weather proofing
Service pipework external to the
G5 Construction in Bushfire Prone
building and penetrations through
Areas
roof cladding in a bushfire prone area
Pipework sound insulation
F5 Sound Transmission and
Insulation
Power supply to boiling and/or chilled J6 Artificial Lighting and Power
water storage units
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
nCC Volume two Class 1 and 10
buildings
3.1.1 Earthworks
3.1.4 Termite Risk Management
3.2.2 Preparation
3.4.0 Framing
3.4.2 Steel Framing
3.7.1 Fire Separation
3.8.1 Wet Areas and External
Weatherproofing
3.7.4 Bushfire Areas
3.8.6 Sound Insulation
Not applicable
Page 37
Water serVICes
Part B2
Heated Water serVICes
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out the requirements for the design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and
maintenance of any part of a heated water service. It covers from the point of connection to the points of discharge.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Bo2
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to the failure of a heated water
installation; and
ensure that a heated water installation (including an installation provided for use by people with a disability) is
suitable; and
conserve water; and
safeguard the environment; and
reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that a heated water installation is designed and is capable of being maintained so that throughout its
serviceable life it will continue to satisfy Objectives (a) to (f).
FunCtIonaL statements
BF2.1
Sanitary fixtures, sanitary appliances and supply outlets provided with heated water must have a safe and adequate
piped heated water supply.
BF2.2
The heated water supply must be conveyed through plumbing installations in a way that—
(a)
(b)
minimises any adverse impact on building occupants, the Network Utility Operator’s infrastructure, property and
the environment; and
facilitates the conservation of water.
BF2.3
To reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to the degree necessary, a heated water service is to—
(a)
(b)
be capable of efficiently using energy; and
obtain its heating energy from—
(i)
a low greenhouse gas intensity energy source; or
(iii)
another process as reclaimed energy.
(ii)
notes:
an on-site renewable energy source; or
The greenhouse gas intensity of energy sources vary. For example, natural gas has a low greenhouse gas intensity
compared with electricity generated from coal.
For the purposes of BF2.3(b), the renewable energy source must be on-site (not GreenPower) and includes, but is not
limited to solar, wind, hydroelectric, wave action and geothermal.
Performance requirements
BP2.1 Water supply
(1)
A heated water service must be connected to a drinking water supply.
application 1
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Water serVICes
BP2.1
BP2.1(1) only applies to a heated water service for human consumption food preparation, food utensil washing or
personal hygiene.
BP2.2 temperature
(1)
Heated water supplied by a new heated water service must be delivered to fixtures and appliances at a temperature
which is unlikely to scald.
application 1
BP2.2(1) only applies to fixtures and appliances used primarily for personal hygiene.
BP2.3 design, construction and installation
(1)
A heated water service must ensure the following:
(a)
(b)
(2)
(c)
Heated water is provided at appropriate flow rates and temperatures for fixtures and appliances to function.
Access for maintenance of mechanical components and operational controls.
The system, appliances and devices can be isolated for testing and maintenance.
A heated water service must be designed, constructed and installed to avoid failure or uncontrolled discharge.
BP2.4 Heated water storage pressure relief
(1)
Containers used for producing and/or storing heated water must—
(a)
(b)
relieve excessive pressure; and
limit temperatures to avoid flash steam production in the event of rupture.
BP2.5 Legionella control
(1)
Heated water must be stored and delivered under conditions which avoid the likelihood of the growth of Legionella
bacteria.
BP2.6 energy use and source
(1)
A heated water service, including any associated distribution system and components, must ensure the efficient use
of energy and water.
explanatory information:
Excessive ‘dead water’ draw-off, i.e. where cooled water from the supply pipe is drained off prior to delivery of heated
water, can result in water and energy wastage.
To improve the efficiency of heated water systems, the design should consider factors such as the number of outlets,
their purpose and expected typical usage, and the distance between the water heater and each of the outlets. The
heated water unit should be positioned nearest to the most used outlets, or installed to provide consistent coverage of
the building. Where this is not viable, the use of an additional unit or flow and return pipe loop may need to be
considered.
Vic BP2.6(1)
(2)
Features in BP2.6(1) must be appropriate to the following:
(a)
The heated water service and its usage.
(c)
The location of the heated water service.
(b)
(d)
The geographic location of the building.
The energy or water source.
explanatory information:
BP2.6(2) permits the energy source of the heated water service to be considered. This means that the net energy
obtained from renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, wind, and biofuels may be considered as ‘free’
energy in calculating the energy consumption. Similarly, heat reclaimed from another ‘free’ source such as a by-product
from co-generation type processes as well as other industrial processes, which could otherwise be rejected from the
building, could be considered as ‘free’ energy in calculating the energy consumption.
(3)
A heated water service, including any associated distribution system and components, must obtain heating energy
from one - or a combination - of the following:
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Water serVICes
(a)
BP2.6
A source that has a greenhouse gas intensity up to and including 100 g CO2-e/MJ of thermal energy load.
An on-site renewable energy source.
(b)
(c)
Another process as reclaimed energy.
application 1
BP2.6(3) only applies to a heated water service in the following:
•
•
New Class 1 buildings.
•
The intent of BP2.6(3) is to constrain the use of a high greenhouse gas intensity source of energy. It does
not prevent the use of electricity because the greenhouse gas intensity is related to the thermal load rather
than the energy consumption which is covered by BP2.6(2). BP2.6(3) also contains the qualification that it
is to be applied ‘to the degree necessary’ allowing electricity to be used, even by low efficiency plant, where
there are no reasonable alternatives.
New Class 10 buildings.
explanatory information:
•
For the purposes of BP2.6(3) the renewable energy must be on-site (not GreenPower) and includes, but is
not limited to, solar, wind, hydroelectric, wave action, and geothermal.
NSW BP2.6(3)
NT BP2.6(3)
Vic BP2.6(3)
Verification methods
BV2.1 Greenhouse gas intensity of a water heater
(1)
(2)
(3)
Compliance with BP2.6(3) for a heater in a heated water supply system is verified when the annual greenhouse gas
intensity of the water heater does not exceed 100 g CO2-e/MJ of thermal energy load determined in accordance
with AS/NZS 4234.
The annual greenhouse gas intensity of the water heater in BV2.1(1) is the sum of the annual greenhouse gas
emissions from each energy source in g CO 2-e divided by the annual thermal energy load of the water heater.
The annual greenhouse gas emissions from each energy source in BV2.1(2) is the product of the—
(a)
(b)
annual amount of energy consumed from that energy source; and
emission factor of—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
if the energy source is electricity, 272 g CO2-e/MJ; or
if the energy source is liquefied petroleum gas, 65 g CO2-e/MJ; or
if the energy source is natural gas, 61 g CO2-e/MJ; or
if the energy source is wood or biomass, 4 g CO2-e/MJ.
explanatory information:
In BV2.1, the symbol “g CO2-e/MJ” means “grams of Carbon Dioxide equivalent per megajoule/s”.
NSW BV2.1
NT BV2.1
Qld BV2.1
Vic BV2.1
SA BV2.201
BV2.2 Heated water storage temperature
(1)
Compliance with Performance Requirement BP2.5 is verified for each heated water storage system when the water
heater is designed such that all water is subjected to a temperature-dependent minimum exposure period as specified
in Table BV2.2 within 7 days before passing through the water-heating appliance’s heated water outlet.
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Water serVICes
table BV2.2
Heated water storage minimum exposure period
temperature
70°C or greater
66°C
60°C
BV2.2
minimum exposure period
1s
2 min
32 min
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
B2.1 application
(1)
(2)
Performance Requirements BP2.1 is satisfied if heated water is supplied by—
(a)
(b)
the Network Utility Operator’s drinking water supply; or
an alternative drinking water supply.
Performance Requirements BP2.2 to BP2.6 are satisfied by complying with B2.2 to B2.8; and
(a)
(b)
B2.9; or
acceptable plumbing practice B2.
B2.2 Water heater in a heated water supply system
(1)
In a new Class 1 or Class 10 building—
(a)
a water heater in a heated water supply system must be—
(i)
a solar heater complying with B2.2(1)(b); or
(ii)
a heat pump heater complying with B2.2(1)(b); or
(iv)
an electric resistance water heater only in the circumstances described in B2.2(1)(d); or
(iii)
(v)
a gas water heater complying with B2.2(1)(c); or
a wood fired thermosiphon water heater or direct fired water heater each complying with AS/NZS 3500.4;
and
Tas B2.2(a)
(b)
a solar heater and a heat pump heater must have—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
for a building with 1 or 2 bedrooms—
(A)
(B)
at least 14 Small-scale Technology Certificates for the zone where it is being installed; or
an energy saving of not less than 40% in accordance with AS/NZS 4234 for a “small” load system;
and
for a building with 3 or 4 bedrooms—
(A)
(B)
at least 22 Small-scale Technology Certificates for the zone where it is being installed; or
an energy saving of not less than 60% in accordance with AS/NZS 4234 for a “medium” load system;
and
for a building with more than 4 bedrooms
(A)
(B)
at least 28 Small-scale Technology Certificates for the zone where it is being installed; or
an energy saving of not less than 60% in accordance with AS/NZS 4234 for a “large” load system;
and
explanatory information:
In colder climates the performance of some heat pumps may diminish.
(c)
a gas heater must be rated not less than 5 stars in accordance with AS 4552; and
(d)
an electric resistance water heater with no storage or a heated water delivery of not more than 50 litres in
accordance with AS 1056.1 may be installed when—
Tas B2.2(c)
(i)
the building has—
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Water serVICes
(A)
(ii)
(iii)
B2.2
not more than 1 bedroom; and
(B)
not more than 1 electric resistance water heater installed; or
(A)
a water heater that complies with B2.2(b) or B2.2(c); and
the building has—
(B)
not more than 1 electric resistance water heater installed; or
the greenhouse gas emission intensity of the public electricity supply is low.
ACT B2.2(e), (f)
SA B2.401
B2.3 Layout of taps
(1)
Where both a heated water tap and a cold water tap are installed, the heated water tap must be installed to the left
of, or above, the cold water tap if—
(a)
(b)
each tap controls a separate outlet; or
both taps control a combined flow of water delivered through a single outlet.
B2.4 maximum flow rates for heated water outlets
(1)
The outlet of a shower, basin, kitchen sink, or laundry trough must have a maximum flow rate of not more than 9
litres per minute.
explanatory information:
A heated water outlet includes an outlet which delivers any combination of heated water and cold water.
exemption 1:
The requirements of B2.4(1) do not apply to a shower intended to provide rapid drenching of a person for emergency
purposes.
B2.5 maximum delivery temperature
(1)
The delivery temperature of heated water at the outlet of each sanitary fixture must be—
(a)
not greater than 45°C in any—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(b)
(iv)
residential part of an aged care building; or
patient care area in a health-care building; or
part of an early childhood centre, or primary or secondary school, that is used by children; or
designated accessible facility in a common area of Class 2 building, or in any part of a Class 3, 5, 6, 7, 8
or 9b building; or
not greater than 50° C in all other cases.
application 1:
B2.5(1) only applies to heated water installations for personal hygiene purposes.
(2)
Each required maximum delivery temperature must be achieved by installing a temperature control device in
accordance with AS/NZS 3500.4.
application 1:
B2.5(1) and B2.5(2) only apply to new heated water installations.
B2.6 temperature control devices
(1)
A temperature control device used to deliver heated water at 45°C must be a—
(a)
(b)
(2)
(c)
thermostatic mixing valve; or
thermostatically controlled tap; or
warm water generator.
A temperature control device used to deliver heated water at 50°C must be a—
(a)
thermostatic mixing valve; or
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Water serVICes
(b)
(3)
(c)
B2.6
tempering valve; or
instantaneous water heater.
Temperature control devices must be installed in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.4.
application 1:
B2.6 only applies to new heated water installations.
B2.7 Heated water storage
(1)
Containers used for producing and/or storing heated water must be provided with temperature and pressure relief
devices in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.4.
B2.8 Legionella control
(1)
Legionella control for heated water systems must be carried out in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.4.
acceptable plumbing manuals
B2.9 General requirements
(1)
The design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and maintenance of a heated water service
must be in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.4
note 1:
There are no Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions, for warm water systems.
(2)
A solar heated water supply system for food preparation and sanitary purposes, where installed in a new building in
climate zones 1, 2 or 3, is not required to comply with Section 8 of AS/NZS 3500.4.
acceptable plumbing practice B2
1 scope
(1)
(2)
This acceptable plumbing practice applies to heated water services in detached Class 1 or Class 10 buildings.
This acceptable plumbing practice does not apply to—
(a)
(b)
wood-fired thermosiphon water heaters; and
direct-fired water heaters.
2 Water Heaters
2.1 supply to a storage water heater
(1)
A storage water heater must be supplied with cold water at a pressure not exceeding its working pressure by means
of a—
(a)
water tank; or
(c)
pressure limiting valve; or
(b)
(2)
(d)
pressure reducing valve; or
mains pressure supply.
Mains pressure storage water heaters must have an isolating valve and a non-return valve installed at the inlet to
the water heater.
explanatory information:
•
•
The purpose of the non-return valve is to prevent the heated water from backflowing into the cold water
service.
Explanatory diagrams showing typical configurations of heated water systems that would comply with Clauses
2.1 to 2.6 are provided below.
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Water serVICes
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
2.1
Page 46
2.1
Water serVICes
2.2 operating devices
(1)
A water heater must have its storage temperature controlled by a thermostat on each heating unit.
explanatory information:
Requirements for minimum storage temperatures to prevent the growth of Legionella are set out in 4.3 of this acceptable
plumbing practice.
(2)
An unvented water heater must have safety devices/valves installed, as specified by 2.3.
(1)
Each safety device must have a flow rate, pressure and diameter that is compatible with the system it serves.
2.3 safety device
(2)
(3)
(4)
A pressure relief valve and expansion control valve must have—
(a)
(b)
a flow capacity that is not less than the pressure of the cold water supply; and
a maximum pressure rating that is not more than the working pressure of the water heater.
An expansion control valve must have a pressure rating that is not less than that of the water supply, but less than
the pressure rating of the relief valve.
For the installation of valves, the following applies:
(a)
A temperature and pressure relief valve must be installed with the probe within the top 20% of the stored water,
but not more than 150 mm from the top of the container.
(c)
A valve must be installed in a way that allows access for replacement, repair or servicing.
(b)
(d)
A pressure relief valve must be located not more than 1 m from the water heater.
There must be no valve or restriction between a relief valve or expansion valve and the water heater.
2.4 safety device drains
(1)
A safety device drain line must be fitted to—
(a)
(b)
temperature/pressure relief valves; and
pressure relief valves; and
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Water serVICes
(2)
(c)
expansion control valves.
(a)
be metallic; and
A relief valve drain line must—
(b)
(c)
(3)
2.4
have no restrictions or valves; and
have a continuous fall from the valve to the point of discharge; and
(d)
have a diameter that is the same as that of the valve outlet.
(a)
3 changes in direction per 9 m length; or
The maximum number of changes in direction greater than 45° along the length of the drain must not exceed (see
Figure 2.4)—
(b)
(c)
(d)
4 changes in direction per 8 m length; or
5 changes in direction per 7 m length; or
6 changes in direction per 6 m length.
Figure 2.4 allowable number of changes in direction per length of drain line (m)
(4)
(5)
Where a drain is serving a maximum of two valves on an individual heater combined, they must comply with 2.4(3).
Combined valve drains must—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(6)
receive discharge from not more than—
(i)
(ii)
one temperature/pressure relief valve; and
one expansion control valve; and
discharge in accordance with 2.5; and
be at least DN 20, or one size larger than the largest relief valve outlet, whichever is the greater; and
(d)
not discharge into a safe tray or safe tray drain.
(a)
with a minimum 75 mm air gap before the drain enters the area subject to freezing; and
A relief valve drain located in an area subject to freezing must discharge over a tundish—
(b)
at least one size larger than the diameter of the outlet of the relief valve.
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2.5
Water serVICes
2.5 safety device drain points of discharge
(1)
(2)
Termination of a drain from safety devices within a building must—
(a)
discharge in a visible location, that does not pose a hazard to persons or to other property, or over a tundish
with an air gap of at least twice the nominal diameter (DN) of the drain; and
(b)
be installed to prevent the operator of the valve from being scalded by the discharge of water or steam when
the safety device is relieved for maintenance purposes.
(a)
discharge above an overflow relief or disconnector gully at a minimum height of 75 mm and a maximum height
of 300 mm; or
Termination of a drain from safety devices outside building must—
(b)
(c)
(d)
discharge above a gravel pit at a minimum height of 75 mm and a maximum height of 300 mm; or
discharge over a tundish with an air gap of at least twice the nominal diameter (DN) of the drain; or
discharge above an unpaved surface at a minimum height of 200 mm and a maximum height of 300 mm.
2.6 access for maintenance
(1)
Each water heater must be installed in a location that enables access for inspection, maintenance or removal of—
(a)
(b)
(2)
(c)
heating units; or
sacrificial anodes; or
pipework connections.
Isolating valves must be readily accessible.
2.7 safe trays
(1)
(2)
(3)
A concealed storage water heater must be installed with a safe tray.
A safe tray must have a drain outlet of 25 mm for safe trays under a sink or 50 mm for all others.
An unconcealed internal storage water heater must be situated on a water resistant floor draining to a floor waste.
2.8 Cross-connection control
A heated water service must be protected from cross-connections—
(1)
(2)
in accordance with acceptable plumbing practice B1, as if the heated water service were a cold water service; and
using a backflow prevention device in accordance with B1.4.
3 Pipe size and flow rates
3.1 General
(1)
Pipework to supply fixtures connected to a heated water service must have a minimum nominal diameter (DN) of 10
mm.
4 storage temperature
(1)
The storage temperature of heated water in a storage water heater must not be less than 60°C.
explanatory information:
Legionella bacteria can become active in standing water below 60°C.
5 Installation
5.1 Pipe supports
(1)
Heated water service pipework must be supported in accordance with—
(a)
(b)
Table 5.1a, for vertical pipework; or
Table 5.1b, for graded or horizontal pipework.
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table 5.1a
support spacing for vertical pipework
Pipe material
Copper
Copper
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
5.1
Water serVICes
Pipe size (dn)
10 - 20
25
15 - 18
maximum spacing (m), centre to
centre
1.5
2.0
1.2
20 - 22
1.4
25
1.5
32
1.7
table 5.1b
support spacing for graded or horizontal pipework
Pipe material
Copper
Copper
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
Unplasticised Polyvinyl Chloride (UPVC), Polyethylene (PE) or
Polybutylene (PB)
(2)
(3)
Pipe size (dn)
10 - 20
25
15 - 18
maximum spacing (m) centre to
centre
1.5
2.0
0.6
20 - 22
0.7
25
0.75
32
0.85
Heated water service pipework and its supports must be electrochemically compatible.
Except where anchor points are required, heated water service pipework must be installed to allow thermal movement
through offsets, loops and bends.
5.2 Installation in timber framing
(1)
Where pipework is to be installed through timber bearers or floor joists, holes must be provided in accordance with
Figure 5.2.
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Water serVICes
5.2
Figure 5.2 drilling through timber bearers and joists
(2)
(3)
In masonry-veneer construction, pipework may be located in the wall cavity and fixed to the studs with full pipe
saddles and self-drilling screws.
Where the external wall cladding is attached directly to timber studs, pipework can be—
(a)
(b)
(4)
installed over the ceiling; or
suspended under the floor; or
(c)
installed in accordance with 5.2(4).
(a)
The hole diameter must not exceed 1/3 of the width of the stud, except in hardwood studs, where the hole
diameter must not exceed 1/4 of the width of the stud.
Drilling or notching of timber frames, for the purposes of installing pipework, must be within the following limitations:
explanatory information:
The ‘width’ of a stud is its wider dimension. Therefore, for a 90 mm x 45 mm stud, the ‘width’ is 90 mm.
(b)
(c)
Notches must not exceed 20 mm deep.
The distance between holes or notches must be not less than—
(i)
(ii)
2 x pipe diameter in softwood; or
3 x pipe diameter in hardwood.
(5)
Plumbing fittings must be attached to the timber frame in accordance with 5.3(6).
(1)
Where pipework is installed through steel floor joists, all penetrations must comply with Figure 5.3a.
5.3 Installation in steel framing
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Water serVICes
5.3
Figure 5.3a Pipework penetrations in steel framing
(2)
Pipework must—
(a)
(b)
be run through pre-punched holes in steel studs; or
where extra holes are necessary, the holes must—
(i)
(ii)
(3)
(4)
(iii)
not reduce the structural integrity of each stud; and
be not more than 10% larger in area than the pre-punched holes.
In masonry-veneer construction, pipework may be located in the cavity and fixed to the studs with full pipe saddles
and self drilling screws protected against galvanic corrosion in accordance with 5.3(5).
Where the external wall cladding is attached directly to steel studs, piping can be—
(a)
(b)
(5)
be located near the centre-line of the stud; and
installed over the ceiling; or
suspended under the floor; or
(c)
installed in accordance with 5.3(2).
(a)
the use of a plastic grommet where the pipe passes through a stud; or
Copper and brass pipes and fittings must be prevented from coming into contact with the steel frame by—
(b)
lagging the pipe, or isolating it from the steel stud using neoprene sheeting or tape.
explanatory information:
The use of a plastic grommet in accordance with 5.3(5)(a) may also have the effect of securing the pipe against water
hammer.
(6)
Plumbing fittings must be attached by—
(a)
(b)
timber or steel noggins fitted between the studs to support tap sets, baths and sinks; and
where a steel noggin is used, the tap set must be isolated to prevent corrosion by installing, between the tapset and the noggin, a durable non-corrosive material such as timber, fibre cement sheet, or similar in accordance
with Figure 5.3b.
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5.3
Water serVICes
Figure 5.3b Installation and fixing of services
5.4 Protection from damage
(1)
Pipework installed below ground must have the following minimum depths of cover, measured from the top of the
pipe to finished ground level:
(a)
(b)
(2)
Below a driveway, or other paved area that is subject to vehicular traffic: 300 mm.
For other areas not subject to vehicular traffic: 225 mm.
(c)
Under a building concrete slab: 75 mm.
(a)
wrapped with a flexible material; or
Pipework penetrating concrete or masonry must be—
(b)
passed through a sleeve or duct, to allow free movement of the pipe in response to expansion or contraction.
5.5 Protection from freezing
(1)
In areas where freezing of pipework is likely, pipework must be protected as follows:
(a)
(2)
Pipework not within a conditioned space must be insulated in accordance with B1.4.
Buried pipework must be either—
(i)
(i)
insulated; or
installed to a depth below the level that would be affected by freezing.
5.6 Flushing
(1)
Prior to hydrostatic testing, the pipework must be flushed to remove foreign matter.
(1)
To verify watertightness, the heated water service (excluding the water heater) must be tested prior to concealment
or backfilling of pipework by—
5.7 Watertightness
(2)
(a)
(b)
subjecting the system to a pressure of 1500 kPa for at least 30 minutes at the ambient temperature; and
inspecting the system to identify any leaks.
The system is deemed watertight if no leaks are identified during the inspection.
5.8 Commissioning
(1)
The heated water service must be commissioned by—
(a)
(b)
being fully charged with water, and
having all air purged from the system; and
(c)
checking hot water unit for leaks; and
(e)
checking operation of all fixtures and outlets.
(d)
checking delivered water temperature and flow rate; and
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 53
6 energy efficiency
Water serVICes
6
6.1 Insulation of pipework
(1)
(2)
Pipework must be insulated in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.4.
Any other container that is used to store heated water must be thermally insulated to R 1.0, unless—
(a)
(b)
it is a water heater; or
It is marked as compliant with either AS 3498 or AS/NZS 2712.
explanatory information:
The intent of 6.1(2)(b) is to ensure thermal efficiency for heated water pressure vessels that are not covered under the
Australian Government’s Minimum Energy Performance Scheme (MEPS).
(c)
Insulation need not be provided—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
on pipework beyond 500 mm of the outlet of the water heater, unless required by 6.1(1); or
on vent pipes beyond 300 mm above the standing water level; or
150 mm downstream of the vertical leg to the heat trap closest to the water heater; or
on drain lines from temperature, expansion and pressure relief valves.
6.2 Heat traps
(1)
Storage water heaters must be provided with a heat trap that—
(a)
(b)
(2)
(c)
is incorporated into the outlet pipework, before the first branch offtake; and
is within 1 m of the water heater outlet; and
includes a drop of at least 250 mm below the outlet.
A heat trap is not required if the water heater has an integral heat trap and is marked accordingly.
6.3 exemption
(1)
The requirements of 6.1 and 6.2 do not apply to a solar water heater installed in climate zones 1, 2 or 3.
7 solar water heaters general requirements
7.1 orientation and inclination
(1)
For a solar water heater, collectors must be installed—
(a)
(b)
(c)
with an orientation not greater than 45° East or West of True North; and
with an inclination that is within +/- 20° of the latitude angle for the site, based on the location of the installation;
and
for thermosiphon systems, with an inclination angle not less than 10°.
explanatory information:
The term ‘inclination’ refers to the angle of the collector, measured from the horizontal, not from the roof pitch.
7.2 Installation
(1)
The installation of solar water heater systems must be in accordance with the following:
(a)
(b)
Containers for solar water heaters must be installed in accordance with 2.1 to 2.8.
Pipework associated with a solar water heater system must be installed in accordance with 5.1 to 5.8.
8 solar water heaters - structural support and weather sealing
8.1 General requirements
(1)
(2)
A solar water heater mounted on the roof must not exceed the load bearing capacity of the roof.
The installation of a solar collector on the roof of a building must not—
(a)
(b)
produce restrictions to rainwater flow that could cause water to accumulate or pond on the roof; or
dent, bend or distort the roof cladding, or cause damage to its protective coating.
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 54
8.1
Water serVICes
(3)
(4)
Solar collectors must be supported—
(a)
(b)
at not less than four points; and
with the outermost support points within 200 mm of the outside edge of the collector.
Roof framing members must not be weakened by the installation of the solar collector.
explanatory information:
8.1(4) is not intended to prevent drilling for bolts or screws necessary to attach the collector.
(5)
(6)
(7)
All screw and bolt fixings into timber framing must be installed in a manner that would not split the timber.
The centre of any fixing must not be less than 10 fixing diameters from the end of a piece of timber.
Roof penetrations must be made watertight using compatible materials.
explanatory information: Cross-volume considerations
nCC Volumes one and two deal with a number of areas of on-site construction which are relevant to heated
water services. these include, but may not be limited to, the following:
Item
nCC Volume one Class 2 to 9
buildings
Excavations for pipework adjacent to B1 Structural Provisions
a building and footings
Termite management for attachments B1 Structural Provisions
to buildings and penetrations through
a slab
Penetrations for pipework through a B1 Structural Provisions
vapour barrier
Pipework in timber bearers and joists B1 Structural Provisions
of solid timber or engineered wood
products
Fittings, fixtures and pipework
B1 Structural Provisions
installations in steel framed
construction
Penetrations through a fire-resisting C3 Protection of Openings
wall or floor
Fixtures or fittings in a wet area
F1 Damp and Weather proofing
Service pipework external to the
G5 Construction in Bushfire Prone
building and penetrations through
Areas
roof cladding in a bushfire prone area
Pipework sound insulation
F5 Sound Transmission and
Insulation
Central heating pipework
J5 Air-conditioning and Ventilation
Systems
Pool and spa heating and pumping – J7 Heated Water Supply and
energy efficiency
Swimming Pool and Spa Pool Plant
Energy consumption monitoring for
J8 Facilities for energy monitoring
water heaters
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
nCC Volume two Class 1 and 10
buildings
3.1.1 Earthworks
3.1.4 Termite Risk Management
3.2.2 Preparation
3.4.0 Framing
3.4.2 Steel Framing
3.7.1 Fire Separation
3.8.1 Wet Areas and External
Weatherproofing
3.7.4 Bushfire Areas
3.8.6 Sound Insulation
3.12.5 Services
3.12.5 Services
Not applicable
Page 53
Water serVICes
Part B3
non-drInKInG Water serVICes
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out the requirements for the design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and
maintenance of any part of a non-drinking water service. It covers from the point of connection to the points of discharge.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Bo3
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to the failure of a non-drinking water
installation; and
ensure that a non-drinking water installation (including an installation provided for use by people with a disability)
is suitable; and
conserve water and energy; and
safeguard the environment; and
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that a non-drinking water installation throughout its serviceable life will continue to satisfy the requirements
of Objectives (a) to (e).
FunCtIonaL statements
BF3.1
Sanitary fixtures, sanitary appliances and supply outlets provided with non-drinking water must be adequate.
BF3.2
Non-drinking water must be supplied through plumbing installations in a way that avoids the likelihood of inadvertent
contamination of any drinking water service, minimise any adverse impact on building occupants, the Network Utility
Operator’s infrastructure, property and the environment.
Performance requirements
BP3.1 Water supply
(1)
A non-drinking water service must only be connected to outlets clearly identified for non-drinking use.
(2)
A non-drinking water service must not have a cross-connection with a drinking water service.
(1)
Pipes, pipe outlets, fittings, storage and holding tanks that are part of a non-drinking water service must be clearly
identified.
BP3.2 Identification
BP3.3 design, construction and installation
(1)
A non-drinking water service must ensure the following:
(a)
(b)
(2)
(c)
Non-drinking water is provided at required flow rates and pressures for fixtures and appliances to function.
Access for maintenance of mechanical components and operational controls.
The system, appliances and devices can be isolated, for testing and maintenance.
A non-drinking water service must be designed, constructed and installed to avoid uncontrolled discharge or failure.
Verification methods
There are no Verification Methods for this part.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 56
B3.1 application
(1)
B3.1
Water serVICes
Performance Requirements BP3.1 to BP3.3 are satisfied by complying with B3.2 and B3.3.
B3.2 distribution of non-drinking water
(1)
A non-drinking water service must not be connected to any outlet that supplies water for—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
human consumption; or
food preparation; or
food utensil washing; or
personal hygiene.
Qld B3.2(j), (k), (l)
acceptable plumbing manuals
B3.3 General requirements
NSW B3.3(1)
Qld B3.3(1)
Vic B3.3(1)
(1)
The design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and maintenance of a non-drinking water service
must be in accordance with Section 9 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
note 1:
The design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and maintenance of a non-drinking water service
used for firefighting purposes must be in accordance with Part B4.
Qld B3.301, Qld B3.302
explanatory information: Cross-volume considerations
nCC Volumes one and two deal with a number of areas of on-site construction which are relevant to nondrinking water services. these include, but may not be limited to, the following:
Item
nCC Volume one Class 2 to 9
buildings
Excavations for pipework adjacent to B1 Structural Provisions
a building and footings
Termite management for attachments B1 Structural Provisions
to buildings and penetrations through
a slab
Penetrations for pipework through a B1 Structural Provisions
vapour barrier
Pipework in timber bearers and joists B1 Structural Provisions
of solid timber or engineered wood
products
Fittings, fixtures and pipework
B1 Structural Provisions
installations in steel framed
construction
Penetrations through a fire-resisting C3 Protection of Openings
wall or floor
Fixtures or fittings in a wet area
F1 Damp and Weatherproofing
Service pipework external to the
G5 Construction in Bushfire Prone
building and penetrations through
Areas
roof cladding in a bushfire prone area
Pipework sound insulation
F5 Sound Transmission and
Insulation
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
nCC Volume two Class 1 and 10
buildings
3.1.1 Earthworks
3.1.4 Termite Risk Management
3.2.2 Preparation
3.4.0 Framing
3.4.2 Steel Framing
3.7.1 Fire Separation
3.8.1 Wet Areas and External
Weatherproofing
3.7.4 Bushfire Areas
3.8.6 Sound Insulation
Page 57
Water serVICes
Part B4
FIre-FIGHtInG Water serVICes
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out requirements for the design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and maintenance
of any part of a fire-fighting water service from the point of connection or other acceptable source(s) of supply to the firefighting equipment, including hydrant, hose reel, sprinkler services and wall drencher systems.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Bo4
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to the failure of a fire-fighting water
installation; and
ensure that a fire-fighting water installation is suitable; and
conserve water and energy; and
safeguard the environment; and
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that a fire-fighting water installation is designed and is capable of being maintained so that throughout its
serviceable life it will continue to satisfy Objectives (a) to (e).
FunCtIonaL statement
BF4.1
Fire-fighting equipment must be provided with adequate water for its intended purpose.
Performance requirements
BP4.1 design, construction and installation
(1)
A fire-fighting water service must ensure the following:
(a)
Water is provided at required flow rates and pressures for the fire-fighting equipment to function.
(c)
The system can be isolated, for testing and maintenance.
(b)
(d)
Access for maintenance of mechanical components and operational controls.
A fire-fighting water service must avoid uncontrolled discharge or failure.
Verification methods
There are no Verification Methods for this part.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
B4.1 application
(1)
Performance Requirements BP4.1 are satisfied by complying with B4.2.
acceptable plumbing manuals
B4.2 General requirements
(1)
(2)
Fire-fighting water services for Class 2 to Class 9 buildings and structures must comply with the requirements of
Part E1 in Volume One of the NCC.
The installation of a fire-fighting water service must be in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.1.
Vic B4.2(2)
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 58
B4.2
Water serVICes
(3)
An automatic fire sprinkler system must be in accordance with—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(e)
AS 2118.1 for the design installation and commissioning of automatic fire sprinklers in buildings and structures;
or
AS 2118.4 for the design installation and acceptance of automatic fire sprinkler systems in accommodation
buildings not exceeding 4 stories; or
AS 2118.5 for the design, installation, commissioning and maintenance of automatic home sprinkler systems;
or
AS 2118.6 for the design, installation commissioning of combined sprinkler and hydrant systems in multistory
buildings greater than 2 stories in height; and
AS 2118.9 for the support and installation of piping for a fire sprinkler system.
A fire hydrant installation must be in accordance with AS 2419.1.
The installation of a fire hose reel system must be in accordance with AS 2441.
Piping for a fire sprinkler system must be in accordance with AS 4118.2.1.
explanatory information: Cross-volume considerations
nCC Volumes one and two deal with a number of areas of on-site construction which are relevant to nondrinking water services. these include, but may not be limited to, the following:
Item
nCC Volume one Class 2 to 9
buildings
Excavations for pipework adjacent to B1 Structural Provisions
a building and footings
Termite management for attachments B1 Structural Provisions
to buildings and penetrations through
a slab
Penetrations for pipework through a B1 Structural Provisions
vapour barrier
Pipework in timber bearers and joists B1 Structural Provisions
of solid timber or engineered wood
products
Fittings, fixtures and pipework
B1 Structural Provisions
installations in steel framed
construction
Penetrations through a fire-resisting C3 Protection of Openings
wall or floor
Fixtures or fittings in a wet area
F1 Damp and Weatherproofing
Service pipework external to the
G5 Construction in Bushfire Prone
building and penetrations through
Areas
roof cladding in a bushfire prone area
Pipework sound insulation
F5 Sound Transmission and
Insulation
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
nCC Volume two Class 1 and 10
buildings
3.1.1 Earthworks
3.1.4 Termite Risk Management
3.2.2 Preparation
3.4.0 Framing
3.4.2 Steel Framing
3.7.1 Fire Separation
3.8.1 Wet Areas and External
Weatherproofing
3.7.4 Bushfire Areas
3.8.6 Sound Insulation
Page 59
Water serVICes
Part B5
Cross-ConneCtIon ControL
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out cross-connection hazards and corresponding Hazard Rating.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Bo5
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to contamination of a drinking water
supply; and
(b)
ensure that a water service installation (including an installation provided for use by people with a disability) is
suitable; and
(d)
safeguard the environment; and
(c)
conserve water and energy; and
(e)
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
(f)
ensure that a water service installation throughout its serviceable life will continue to satisfy the requirements of
Objectives (a) to (e).
FunCtIonaL statements
BF5
Water services must be designed and installed so as to operate in a way that avoids the likelihood of contamination of
any part of the drinking water supply, and minimises any adverse impact on building occupants, the Network Utility
Operator’s infrastructure, property and the environment.
Performance requirements
BP5.1 Contamination control
(1)
Water services must be designed, constructed and installed to avoid contamination.
application 1:
BP5.1(1) applies to cold water, heated water, non-drinking water and fire-fighting water services.
Verification methods
BV5.1 determination of Hazard rating using risk assessment
(1)
Compliance with Performance Requirement BP5.1 is verified for each potential cross-connection or interconnection
when a Hazard Rating is determined in accordance with BV5.1(2) to BV5.1(5).
application 1:
BV5.1(1) can be used to determine the Hazard Rating for the purposes of backflow prevention.
explanatory information:
The intent of this Verification Method is to provide a consistent means of determining Hazard Ratings for situations not
listed in Specification B5.1.
This Verification Method is not intended to enable the lowering of any Hazard Ratings already prescribed in that
Specification.
(2)
In order to determine the likelihood score, assess the site or proposed installation and for each of the following which
is true, assign 1 likelihood score:
(a)
The site or building to which the water service is installed is a Class 5, Class 6, Class 8 or Class 9 building, or
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 60
BV5.1
Water serVICes
(b)
Access to the site is restricted in a way that could limit or prevent future testing or maintenance of a backflow
prevention device.
(e)
When one or more cross-connections is a direct cross-connection, or the water service is connected to a
swimming pool, water tank, or alternative water supply.
(a)
Exposure to a sufficient amount of the potential contaminant could cause a nuisance, endanger health, or cause
death.
The site is likely to undergo frequent changes of use, or its future use is unknown.
In order to determine the consequence score, assess the site or proposed installation and for each of the following
which is true, assign 1 consequence score:
(b)
(c)
(4)
There is at least one drinking water supply and at least one non-drinking water supply available, or the site is
supplied with drinking water or non-drinking water from multiple sources.
(c)
(d)
(3)
is a building within which the processes carried out will involve toxic contaminants.
(d)
The amount of the potential contaminant which could enter a water service or water supply is sufficient to cause
a nuisance, endanger health, or cause death.
The potential contaminant could enter other property via a Network Utility Operator’s water supply or an
alternative water supply.
There is little or no possibility of the occurrence of backflow being detected.
Completing the risk assessment and determining the Hazard Rating must be completed by:
(a)
Adding up the likelihood scores assigned at BV5.1(2) and if the total is—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(b)
3, 4 or 5, the likelihood score is 3.
(i)
0, the consequence score is 0;
Adding up the consequence scores assigned at BV5.1(3) and if the total is—
(iii)
(d)
1, the likelihood score is 1;
2, the likelihood score is 2;
(iv)
(ii)
(c)
0, the likelihood score is 0;
(iv)
1, the consequence score is 1;
2, the consequence score is 2;
3 or 4, the consequence score is 3.
Match the total likelihood score determined at BV5.1(4)(a) with the appropriate row in Table BV5.1.
Match the total consequence score determined at BV5.1(4)(b) with the appropriate column in Table BV5.1.
table BV5.1
Hazard ratings based on scores for likelihood and consequence
Likelihood
Likelihood 3
Likelihood 2
Likelihood 1
Likelihood 0
Consequence 0
Low
Low
Low
No hazard
Consequence 1
Medium
Low
Low
Low
Consequence 2
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Consequence 3
High
High
High
High
(5)
In Table BV5.1, the Hazard Rating is shown in the cell where the likelihood score and the consequence score
intersect.
(7)
Where the Hazard Rating identified in BV5.1(5) is ‘No hazard’, then—
(6)
(8)
Where the Hazard Rating identified in BV5.1(5) is Low Hazard, Medium Hazard or High Hazard, then a backflow
prevention device must be selected according to the Hazard Rating, and installed to meet the relevant Performance
Requirement.
(a)
(b)
for individual protection or zone protection, no backflow prevention device is required; and
for containment protection, a Low Hazard backflow prevention device is required.
For each hazard, a backflow prevention device appropriate to the Hazard Rating assigned in accordance with Table
BV5.1 must be selected and installed in accordance with Section 4 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
explanatory information:
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 61
Water serVICes
BV5.1
For High Hazard and Medium Hazard installations, the authority having jurisdiction may require the backflow prevention
device to be registered and periodically tested.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
B5.1 application
(1)
Performance Requirement BP5.1 is satisfied by complying with B5.2 to B5.4.
acceptable plumbing manuals
B5.2 drinking water service
(1)
A hazard exists wherever it is possible for water or contaminants to enter a drinking water service or supply. This is
via any potential cross-connection between the drinking water service and any of the following:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(2)
(3)
Non-drinking water service.
Rainwater harvesting system.
Alternative water supply.
Swimming pool.
(e)
Pipes, fixtures or equipment (including boilers and pumps) containing chemicals, liquids, gases or other
substances which may be harmful to health or safety.
(a)
be assigned an individual Hazard Rating or zone Hazard Rating in accordance with Clause 4 or Clause 5 of
Specification B5.1; and
Each hazard must—
(b)
be isolated from the drinking water service by an appropriate backflow prevention device which is selected and
installed in accordance with Section 4 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
Where a site is served by a Network Utility Operator’s drinking water supply, appropriate containment protection
must be selected and installed in accordance with Section 4 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
B5.3 non-drinking water service
(1)
(2)
A hazard exists wherever it is possible for water or contaminents to enter a non-drinking water service or supply.
This is via any potential cross-connection between itself and another separate non-drinking water service on the
same site.
Each hazard must—
(a)
(b)
be assigned a containment Hazard Rating in accordance with Clause 6 of Specification B5.1; and
be isolated from the non-drinking water service by appropriate containment protection which is selected and
installed in accordance with Section 4 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
explanatory information:
A separate ‘non-drinking water service’ means one which draws water from a different source. For example, on a site
connected to both recycled water and bore water, both are non-drinking water services, but are drawn from separate
sources. Therefore, each would be a ‘separate non-drinking water service’.
B5.4 Fire-fighting water service
(1)
Each fire-fighting water service must—
(a)
(b)
be assigned a Hazard Rating in accordance with Clause 7 of Specification B5.1; and
be isolated from the drinking water service by an appropriate backflow prevention device which is selected and
installed in accordance with Section 4 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
specification B5.1 Cross connection hazards
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 60
1 scope
(a)
1
Water serVICes
This Specification sets out cross-connection hazards and corresponding Hazard Ratings.
explanatory information:
This Specification only prescribes Hazard Ratings for a limited list of known hazards. It does not cover every potential
cross-connection that may arise from time to time.
Where a situation arises which is not listed in this Specification, the appropriate Hazard Rating may be determined, as
a Performance Solution, by using the risk assessment process provided in BV5.1.
2 application
(a)
The Hazard Ratings prescribed in this Specification must be used for selecting the required backflow prevention
device, for the purposes of compliance with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions.
explanatory information:
The Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions referred to in 2(a) include any relevant Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions set out in Parts
B1, B2, B3, B4 and B5.
(b)
A reference in this Specification to a Type A, B, C or D irrigation system is a reference to such a system as described
in Section 7 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
3 Protection types and Hazard ratings
(a)
(b)
Cross-connection hazards within the site are rated in accordance with—
(i)
(ii)
Clause 4 for individual protection at the point of each individual hazard; or
Clause 5 for zone protection at the point where a group of hazards can be isolated.
The hazard posed by the site to the Network Utility Operator’s drinking water supply must be rated for containment
protection, at the point of connection in accordance with Clause 6.
explanatory information:
In some jurisdictions, regulations issued under a water supply legislation, and/or rules set by a Network Utility Operator,
may prescribe containment protection which differs from this Specification.
If this occurs then those regulations and/or rules should be followed in place of this Specification. This Specification
only applies for the purposes of compliance with Volume Three of the NCC. It is not intended to limit or extend the
application of other regulations.
(c)
(d)
Fire-fighting water services must be rated in accordance with Clause 7.
A risk assessment may be used to determine containment protection, zone protection or individual protection.
4 Individual Protection
(a)
The following are Low Hazard for the purpose of individual protection:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
Carbonated drink dispensing machines.
Coils and jackets in heat exchangers, in sealed and non-toxic environments only.
Dental consoles.
(iv)
Drink dispensing equipment including vending machines and coffee machines.
(vi)
External hose taps.
(v)
Drinking water in reclaimed water plants.
(vii) Fixtures used for ablutions including baths, bidettes, basins and showers.
(viii) Fixtures used for food preparation including sinks.
(ix)
(x)
(xi)
Flexible connections over domestic fixtures.
Food preparation or food storage tanks, vats or vessels (without clean-in-place systems).
Haemodialysis machines.
(xii) Hair salon basins or troughs.
(xiii) Hose taps located within—
(A)
18 m of a Type C irrigation system; or
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 63
4
Water serVICes
(B)
an area provided with zone protection.
(xiv) In-line water softeners and filters.
(xv) Laundry troughs.
(xvi) Photographic developers — water supplying rinse tanks.
(xvii) Photographic processing machines, without developer mixing.
(b)
(xviii) Steam boilers.
The following are Medium Hazard for the purpose of individual protection:
(i)
Chemical dispensers (low toxicity).
(iii)
Coils and jackets in heat exchangers, in unsealed and toxic environments.
(ii)
(c)
Chlorinators.
(iv)
Steam calorifiers.
(i)
Antibiotic injectors (agricultural).
The following are High Hazard for the purpose of individual protection:
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)
Bidets and douche hoses.
Chemical dispensers (high toxicity).
Cooling towers.
Demineralising equipment using ion-exchange resins with acid and alkali regeneration;
Equipment used for handling, mixing, measuring and processing chemical and microbiological substances.
(vii) Fogging and cleaning sprays with chemical injection or additives.
(viii) Food preparation or food storage tanks, vats or vessels (with clean-in-place systems).
(ix)
(x)
(xi)
Mixing of chemicals.
Pan washing apparatus.
Photographic developer mixing facilities.
(xii) Plants with auxiliary non-drinking water supplies.
(xiii) Portable and mobile tankers.
(xiv) Type D irrigation system injected with fertilisers, herbicides, nematicides, insecticides or weedicides.
(xv) Weed and pest spraying and water cartage tanks.
5 zone Protection
(a)
The following are Low Hazard for the purpose of zone protection:
(i)
(ii)
Food storage tanks, vats or vessels.
(v)
Photographic laboratories.
(vi)
Hair salon basins or troughs.
Type B irrigation systems.
(vii) Water filtration equipment.
The following are Medium Hazard for the purpose of zone protection:
(i)
(ii)
(c)
Fire-fighting water storage tanks.
(iii)
(iv)
(b)
Dental and medical surgeries.
Aircraft facilities.
Secondary school laboratories, including fume cupboards.
(iii)
Type C irrigation systems.
(i)
Clean-in-place systems.
The following are High Hazard or the purpose of zone protection:
(ii)
Commercial laundries.
(iii)
Cooling or heating systems with recirculating water.
(v)
Drinking nipples and troughs (agricultural).
(iv)
(vi)
Dockside facilities.
Food preparation or food storage tanks, vats or vessels (without clean-in-place systems).
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Water serVICes
5
(vii) In a Class 9c building—
(A)
(B)
(C)
dissecting rooms; and
utility rooms which contain fixtures other than hand basins; and
operating theatres.
(viii) Industrial and teaching laboratories (except as referred to in 5(b)(ii)).
(ix)
(x)
(xi)
Industrial process water that has been recirculated.
Mortuary equipment used in funeral parlours, mortuaries and autopsy areas.
Sanitary dump points.
(xii) Tanks, vats or vessels associated with electroplating, degreasing, descaling, stripping, pickling, dipping or the
like.
(xiii) Type D irrigation systems injected with fertilisers, herbicides, nematicides, insecticides or weedicides.
6 Containment Protection
(a)
The following are Low Hazard for the purpose of containment protection:
(i)
(ii)
(b)
Premises served by a rainwater harvesting system (which does not include any rainwater storage tanks that
are buried tanks).
(iii)
Premises served by a Network Utility Operator’s recycled water supply.
(i)
Caravan parks.
The following are Medium Hazard for the purpose of containment protection:
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(c)
Class 1a buildings.
(v)
Food and beverage processing plants.
Marinas.
Premises which are also connected to a—
(A)
(B)
grey-water re-use system; or
reticulated and disinfected reclaimed water system.
Public swimming pools.
The following are High Hazard for the purpose of containment protection:
(i)
Abattoirs.
(iii)
Chemical laboratories.
(ii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)
Car and plant washing facilities;
Chemical plants.
Factories using, processing or manufacturing toxic chemicals.
Hospitals, mortuaries, clinics and the like.
(vii) Metal finishing plants.
(viii) Pathology laboratories.
(ix)
(x)
(xi)
Petroleum processing plants or storage plants.
Piers, docks and other waterfront facilities.
Premises where access to conduct inspections is restricted
(xii) Premises with an alternative water supply, except as referred to in 6(a)(ii) or 6(b)(iv) or 6(c)(vi).
(xiii) Sanitary depots.
(xiv) Sewage treatment plants and sewage lift stations.
(xv) Universities.
7 Firefighting Water services
(a)
Fire-fighting water services with—
(i)
(ii)
a direct connection to a Network Utility Operator’s water supply; and
no tank, reservoir, connection to another water supply, antifreeze or other additives, or auxiliary water supply
within 180 m of a fire brigade booster connection,
are Low Hazard.
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Water serVICes
7
note 1:
Fire hose reels located with an area where a cross-connection hazard exists have a Hazard Rating which is the same
as the areas within reach of the hose.
(b)
Any fire-fighting water services not referred to in 7(a) are Medium Hazard.
exemption 1:
The following are deemed Low Hazard:
(a)
(b)
Home fire sprinkler systems.
Fire-fighting water storage tanks.
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Water serVICes
Part B6
raInWater HarVestInG and use
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out the requirements for the design, construction, installation, replacement, repair and maintenance of any
part of a rainwater harvesting system which serves a—
(a)
cold water service; or
(c)
non-drinking water service.
(b)
heated water service; or
This Part does not apply to rainwater harvesting systems which—
(a)
only supply water for fire-fighting or irrigation; or
(b)
collect rainwater from any area other than a roof catchment area.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Bo6
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss of amenity due to the failure of a rainwater harvesting system; and
(b)
conserve water; and
(c)
safeguard the environment; and
(d)
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that a rainwater harvesting system installation throughout its serviceable life will continue to satisfy the
requirements of Objectives (a) to (d).
(e)
FunCtIonaL statements
BF6
Rainwater harvesting systems must be designed and installed so as to operate in a way that avoids the likelihood of
inadvertent contamination of any drinking water service, and minimises any adverse impact on building occupants, the
Network Utility Operator’s infrastructure, property and the environment.
Performance requirements
BP6.1 stored rainwater
(1)
A rainwater harvesting system must be designed, constructed and installed in such a manner as to reduce the
likelihood of stored rainwater becoming contaminated or otherwise posing a hazard to public health.
BP6.2 rainwater harvesting system installation
(1)
A rainwater harvesting system must be designed, constructed and installed in such a manner as to—
(a)
avoid the likelihood of contamination of water within the rainwater harvesting system, the water service, or the
Network Utility Operator’s drinking water supply (if connected); and
(c)
avoid the likelihood of failure and uncontrolled discharges; and
(b)
(d)
(e)
(f)
provide water to fixtures and appliances at flow rates and pressures which are required for the correct functioning
of those fixtures and appliances under normal conditions; and
facilitate the efficient use of drinking water; and
allow access, as required, for maintenance of mechanical components and operational controls; and
allow the system, appliances and backflow prevention devices to be isolated for testing and maintenance, where
required.
BP6.3 rainwater service
(1)
A rainwater service must not have an unprotected cross-connection with any Network Utility Operator’s drinking
water service or with any non-drinking water service.
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BP6.4 Identification
(1)
Water serVICes
BP6.4
Pipes, pipe outlets, storage and holding tanks that form part of a rainwater harvesting system must be clearly
identified.
Limitation:
BP6.4 does not apply if the rainwater harvesting system is the only water supply connected to the site.
Verification methods
There are no Verification Methods for this part.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
B6.1 application
(1)
Performance Requirements BP6.1 to BP6.4 are satisfied by complying with B6.2 to B6.5.
(1)
A rainwater harvesting system must only collect roof water.
(1)
Any top-up line from a Network Utility Operator’s drinking water supply to a rainwater tank must comply with Part
B1.
B6.2 Collection of rainwater
B6.3 top-up lines
acceptable plumbing manuals
B6.4 Buried and partially buried tanks
(1)
For the purposes of Section 16 of AS/NZS 3500.1, the following applies:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
A rainwater tank which is set into and completely covered by earth is a ‘buried tank’.
A rainwater tank which is not in any way set into the ground is an ‘above-ground tank’.
A rainwater tank not matching the description at B6.4(1)(a) or B6.4(1)(b) is a ‘partially buried tank’.
In determining the appropriate description applicable under this clause, access openings, inlets and outlets to
a tank may be ignored.
B6.5 rainwater pipework and outlets
(1)
(2)
Rainwater pipework and outlets must comply with Section 16 of AS/NZS 3500.1.
Identification in accordance with B6.5(1) is not required if the rainwater harvesting system is the only water supply
available on the site.
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
section C
sanitary Plumbing and drainage systems
Part C1
sanItary PLumBInG systems
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out the requirements for the design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and
maintenance of any part of a sanitary plumbing system of a property including from sanitary fixtures and appliances to an
approved disposal system.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Co1
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to the failure of a sanitary plumbing
installation; and
(b)
ensure that a sanitary installation (including an installation provided for use by people with a disability) is suitable;
and
(d)
safeguard the environment; and
(c)
(e)
(f)
conserve water and energy; and
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that a sanitary installation is designed and is capable of being maintained so that throughout its serviceable
life it will continue to satisfy Objectives (a) to (e).
FunCtIonaL statements
CF1.1
Sanitary fixtures and sanitary appliances must be provided with an adequate disposal system that does not impact
adversely on occupants of the premises, property, the environment or the Network Utility Operator’s infrastructure.
Performance requirements
CP1.1 design, construction and installation
(1)
A sanitary plumbing system must ensure the following:
(a)
Sewage or sullage is transferred to a sanitary drainage system or an approved disposal system.
(c)
Ventilation, to avoid hydraulic load imbalance is provided.
(b)
(2)
Access for maintenance of mechanical components, operational controls and for clearing blockages.
(d)
Effective and efficient water use.
(a)
Blockage or uncontrolled discharge.
A sanitary plumbing system must avoid the following:
(b)
(c)
(d)
Entry of water, sewage, sullage, foul air and gases from the system into buildings.
Damage from superimposed loads, ground movement or root penetration.
Entry of stormwater into the system.
explanatory information: non-flushing (waterless) urinals
Where a non-flushing (waterless) urinal is to be installed to a sanitary plumbing system comprising copper, copper alloy
or other metallic piping, undiluted discharge transported through such pipework may increase the likelihood of corrosion.
Practitioners should also be aware that undiluted discharge, transported through pipework of any material, can cause
a build-up of Struvite (ammonium magnesium phosphate) inside the pipework, potentially causing blockage within the
sanitary plumbing system.
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CP1.1
Verification methods
There are no Verification Methods for this part.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
C1.1 application
(1)
Performance Requirement CP1.1 is satisfied by complying with C1.2 and—
(a)
(b)
C1.3; or
acceptable plumbing practice C1.
C1.2 Invert levels
(1)
The invert level of a trap or gully weir must be a minimum of 10 mm higher than the soffit of the pipe to which it
connects.
acceptable plumbing manual
C1.3 General requirements
NSW C1.3(1)
Qld C1.3(1)
SA C1.3(1)
Vic C1.3(1)
(1)
The design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and maintenance of a sanitary plumbing system
must be in accordance with AS/NZS 3500.2.
acceptable plumbing practice C1
1 scope
(1)
This acceptable plumbing practice applies to non-pressure sanitary plumbing systems that—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
serve only a Class 1 or Class 10 building; and
are constructed using pipework with a diameter not greater than DN 100; and
use single stack, single stack modified, or elevated drainage principles; and
use above-ground (gravity flow) sanitary plumbing for buildings having 3 levels or less including sanitary
plumbing within, or on the building, and any basements.
2 Water traps
2.1 Water trap requirements
(1)
(2)
Each sanitary fixture must have a water trap or self-sealing device to prevent foul air from the plumbing system
entering the building.
Water traps must be—
(a)
(b)
(c)
removeable; or
able to be dismantled; or
fitted with an inspection opening or removeable grate.
2.2 Water trap location
(1)
(2)
Water traps and self-sealing devices must be located as close as possible to the outlet of the sanitary fixture they
serve.
The maximum distance from the outlet of a fixture to the surface of the water seal of a trap must be 600 mm, not
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2.2
including floor waste gullies.
explanatory information:
•
•
Waste material may build up on the walls of discharge pipes and may cause offensive odours to enter the
building through the fixture outlet. A short discharge pipe reduces the likelihood of this happening.
Traps may be located under the floor or in ceiling spaces of the floor below.
(3)
Water traps must not be located in a different room to the sanitary fixture they serve.
(1)
A single water trap may serve any one of the following outlet combinations located within the same space, provided
the maximum distance between the outlets does not exceed 1.2 m:
2.3 multiple outlets
(a)
One or two adjacent kitchen sinks together with a dishwashing machine, (see Figure 2.3a).
(c)
One or two adjacent laundry troughs together with a clothes washing machine, (see Figure 2.3c).
(b)
(d)
(e)
One or two adjacent kitchen sinks together with a waste disposal unit, (see Figure 2.3b).
Two adjacent basins, kitchen sinks or laundry troughs.
One or two adjacent kitchen sinks, together with a waste disposal unit and a dishwashing machine fitted with a
DN 50 trap and discharge pipe.
Figure 2.3a two adjacent domestic kitchen sinks and one dishwasher inlet
Figure 2.3b two adjacent domestic kitchen sinks and one disposal unit
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
Figure 2.3c Laundry tub and discharge pipe for clothes washing machine
2.4 Floor wastes
(1)
Floor waste risers must have a removeable grating that is flush with the floor in accordance with Figure 2.4.
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2.4
Figure 2.4 typical connection of waste pipes to a floor waste
(2)
(3)
The floor waste must be charged by a fixture in accordance with Table 2.4 and Figure 2.4 and have a minimum
diameter riser of DN 80 to finished floor level, except in the case where it is in place to dispose of water spillage or
wash down water then the riser may be DN 50.
A floor waste must not be charged by—
(a)
(b)
(c)
table 2.4
a water closet pan; or
a urinal; or
a slop hopper.
Fixture discharge pipe lengths to floor waste
Waste fixture
Basin
Bath, shower/bath
Bidet
Clothes washing machine
Domestic bar sink
Shower
Laundry trough
Refrigerated cabinet
Tundish
(4)
Fixture untrapped (m)
N/A
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
10.0
Fixture trapped (m)
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
10.0
A dry floor waste (a floor waste with no water trap) must not be connected to a drain, and must—
(a)
(b)
discharge to the open air within the property boundary in a location that does not pose a hazard to persons or
other property; and
be fitted with a flap valve.
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3 discharge pipes
3
sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
3.1 Inspection openings for cleaning
(1)
An inspection opening must be provided—
(a)
(b)
at the junction of a soil discharge pipe with a discharge stack; and
at the base of any soil stack at the point of connection to the drain.
3.2 diameter
(1)
(2)
A fixture discharge pipe must have a diameter in accordance with Table 3.2 and must not decrease in size in the
direction of flow.
Where a discharge pipe receives the discharge from more than one fixture, the diameter of the discharge pipe must
not be less than that required in Table 3.2 using:
(a)
(b)
table 3.2
the discharge unit loading to be conveyed, calculated as the sum of the discharge unit loading given in Table
3.2, for all fixtures served; and
the gradient of the discharge pipe.
Fixture discharge pipe sizes and discharge units
sanitary fixture or appliance
Basin
Bath, shower/bath
Bathroom group (water closer pan,
bath and shower, basin and bidet) in
one compartment
Bidet
Clothes washing machine (domestic)
Dishwashing machine (domestic)
Drinking fountain
Kitchen sink (domestic, single or
double, with or without a waste
disposal unit)
Laundry trough (single or double tub,
with or without a clothes washing
machine)
Shower
Water closet pan
3.3 Gradient
(1)
Fixture discharge units
1
4
6
minimum trap and discharge pipe
diameter (dn)
40
40
100
1
5
3
1
3
40
40
50
40
50
5
40
2
4
40
80
The gradient of discharge pipes must not be less than that specified in Table 3.3 for the relevant discharge unit
loading.
explanatory information:
The minimum gradients specified are necessary to avoid the risk of blockage.
table 3.3
Fixture discharge unit loading for stacks and vented graded discharge pipes.
diameter
(mm)
40
maximum
discharge
from any
one floor
2
Vertical
stack (note
1)
6
maximum
gradient of
1:20
6
maximum
gradient of
1:30
5
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
maximum
gradient of
1:40
4
maximum
gradient of
1:50
N/A
maximum
gradient of
1:60
N/A
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3.3
sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
diameter
(mm)
50
65
100
note 1:
maximum
discharge
from any
one floor
5
6
65
Vertical
stack (note
1)
15
18
195
maximum
gradient of
1:20
15
51
375
maximum
gradient of
1:30
10
29
248
maximum
gradient of
1:40
8
21
182
maximum
gradient of
1:50
N/A
N/A
142
maximum
gradient of
1:60
N/A
N/A
115
The total fixture unit loading at the base of the discharge stack.
3.4 Fixture discharge pipes
(1)
(2)
A waste water fixture discharge pipe must discharge to either—
(a)
(b)
a gully trap as shown in Figure 3; or
a discharge stack in accordance with 3.6 and as shown in Figure 6.
A waste water fixture discharge pipe where required to be vented must comply with 4 and Tables 4.13a, 4.13b and
4.13c.
3.5 Fixture discharge pipes serving soil fixtures
(1)
(2)
A waste water fixture discharge pipe serving soil fixtures must discharge—
(a)
(b)
directly to a drain, as shown in Figure 4; or
to a stack, in accordance with 3.6 and as shown in Figures 6 and 7.
Soil fixture discharge pipes must be vented in accordance with 4 and as required by Figures 4 and 5.
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
3.5
Figure 3 Waste pipe discharging to a gully trap
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3.5
Figure 4 soil fixture discharge pipes utilising a drain vent as fixture vent
Figure 5 soil fixture discharge pipes utilising a fixture vent
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3.5
Figure 6 Graded discharge stack
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
3.5
Figure 7 Vertical discharge stack
3.6 discharge stacks
(1)
A discharge stack must—
(a)
have a diameter of not less than that required in Table 3.3 using—
(i)
the fixture discharge unit loading to be conveyed, calculated as the sum of the fixture discharge unit
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
(b)
(2)
(c)
(ii)
3.6
loadings in Table 2.4 for all fixtures served; and
the gradient of the discharge stack; and
for vertical stacks, be extended up past the upper-most branch connection to form a discharge stack vent (see
4 and Figure 7); and
for graded discharge stacks, have a discharge stack vent connected to the graded section of the stack
downstream of the highest fixture, in accordance with 4 and Figure 6.
Where discharge pipe connections to vertical discharge stacks are near the base of a discharge stack, they must
not be connected to the discharge stack or drain within the positive pressure zone as shown in Figure 7.
explanatory information:
Whenever a discharge stack incorporates a bend greater than 45o, a hydraulic jump may occur in the horizontal pipe
downstream of the bend. The hydraulic jump can cause positive pressures in the pipe near the bend. If a branch pipe
is connected to the discharge stack in this zone, these positive pressures may blow out water seals connected to that
branch pipe.
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
Where discharge pipe connections to vertical discharge stacks consist of two branches entering the discharge stack
at the same level, they must have a double 45o junction with either—
(a)
(b)
sweep entries; or
entries with an included angle of 90o, Figure 8(b).
Where discharge pipe connections to vertical discharge stacks are at different levels, they must not be connected
to the discharge stack within the restricted entry zones shown in Figure 8(b), unless the connection method is in
accordance with Figures 8(b) and 8(c)
Where discharge pipe connections are provided to graded discharge stacks they must not enter at opposite positions
and if they are near bends they must not be made within 450 mm of any bend, (see Figure 6).
The change of direction at the base of any vertical section in the discharge stack must incorporate—
(a)
(b)
two nominal 45° bends; or
one nominal 45° bend and a 45° junction.
4 Venting
4.1 Venting requirements
(1)
(2)
Discharge pipes must be vented as specified in 4.2.
Vent pipes that serve fixtures that discharge to a gully trap must be vented independently of any vent pipe system
connected directly to the sanitary drainage system.
explanatory information:
An independent vent pipe system for fixtures discharging to a gully trap is necessary to avoid the risk of sewer gases
escaping through any waste pipes discharging to a gully trap.
4.2 Venting locations
(1)
(2)
All stacks discharging to another stack or to a drain must have an open vent, sized in accordance with Table 4.13b.
Venting with an air admittance valve is permitted only on a second and subsequent stacks. At least one open vent
is required to vent the main drain.
4.3 Venting location
(1)
Where one or more floor levels separate the highest and lowest branch pipe connected to the stack, the stack must
be vented with a relief vent sized in accordance with Table 4.13a.
4.4 Fixtures connected to a stack
(1)
All connections to a vertical stack, except the highest connection, must be vented by either an open vent, or an air
admittance valve, sized in accordance with Table 4.13a.
4.5 soil fixtures connected to an unvented branch drain
(1)
Soil fixtures connected to an unvented branch drain over 10 m long must be vented by either an open vent, or an air
admittance valve, sized in accordance with Table 4.13a.
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4.6
4.6 Fixtures discharging to a floor waste
(1)
(2)
Fixtures connected to a combined waste pipe must be vented by either an open vent, or an air admittance valve,
sized in accordance with Tables 4.13a, 4.13b and 4.13c.
Individual fixture discharge pipes over 3.5 m in length must be vented by either an open vent, or an air admittance
valve, sized in accordance with Tables 4.13a, 4.13b and 4.13c.
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
4.6
Figure 8 restricted zone connection to stacks
4.7 Vent pipes
(1)
Vertical or graded fixture vent pipes must terminate as specified in 4.12 (see Figure 10).
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4.8
sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
4.8 diameter of vent pipes
(1)
Fixture vent pipes, branch vent pipes and discharge stack vents must have a diameter in accordance with Tables
4.13a, 4.13b and 4.13c.
table 4.13a
Vent pipe sizes for fixture vent pipes
diameter of fixture discharge pipe (mm)
40
50
65
80
100
table 4.13b
minimum nominal diameter of fixture vent pipe (dn)
32
40
40
50
50
Vent pipe sizes for branch vent, branch drain vent and discharge stack vent pipes.
maximum fixture discharge units connected to the
discharge pipe
Up to 10
11 to 30
31 to 175
More than 175
table 4.13c
Vent pipe sizes for main drain vents
maximum fixture discharge units connected to the
discharge pipe
No limit
4.9 Gradient of vent pipes
(1)
minimum nominal diameter of open vent pipe (dn)
40
50
65
80
minimum nominal diameter of open vent pipe (dn)
50
Fixture vent pipes must extend upwards from the point of connection to the fixture discharge pipe to the open
atmosphere, or to an air admittance valve, with a gradient of not less than 1:80.
4.10 Connection of vents to fixture discharge pipes
(1)
The fixture vent pipe, other than basins where required by 4.6, must connect to the waste pipe at a point between
75 mm and 1.5 m from the crown of the water trap, as shown in Figure 11b(a).
(3)
If serving a basin or bidet, the fixture vent pipe must connect at a point not closer than 75 mm and (see Figure 11b(a))
not further than 600 mm form the crown of the water trap and before the first bend in the fixture discharge pipe.
(2)
(4)
The fixture vent pipe, specified by 4.4 for fixtures discharging to a stack or directly to the drainage system, must
connect, if serving a water closet pan, to the discharge pipe within 1.5 m of the crown of the trap, and not less than
300 mm above any bend at the base of a vertical drop (see Figure 5).
If serving other fixture discharge pipes, the fixture vent pipe must connect at a point between 75 mm and 1.5 m from
the crown of the water trap, provided that the connection is not less than 300 mm above any bend at the base of the
vertical drop within the fixture discharge pipe (see Figure 11b(b)).
4.11 discharge stack relief vents
(1)
The discharge stack vent, if also acting as a drain vent, must have a diameter not less than 50 mm. Where not acting
as a drain vent, the discharge stack vent must have a diameter not less than that specified in Tables 4.13a, 4.13b
and 4.13c.
4.12 termination of open vent pipes
(1)
Open vent pipes must terminate outside the building—
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(a)
(b)
4.12
not less than 50 mm above the overflow level of the highest sanitary fixture they serve; and
the vent pipe must be capped with a vent cowl which must have an open area not less than 80% of the crosssectional area of the vent pipe it serves.
explanatory information:
The height of 50 mm above the overflow level is to ensure that the vent pipe does not convey sanitary water in the
event of the discharge pipe becoming blocked.
(2)
Open vent pipes serving discharge pipes directly connected to the sanitary plumbing system must terminate (see
Figure 9)—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(3)
(f)
3.0 m above ground; and
for windows and other openings—
(i)
(ii)
600 mm above; and
3.0 m below and horizontally; and
150 mm above roofs; and
3.0 m above, below and horizontally from decking having pedestrian access; and
600 mm above, below and horizontally from eaves or parapets; and
5.0 m in any direction from mechanical air intakes.
Fixture vent pipes serving waste pipes discharging to a gully trap must be vented independently of any vent pipe
system connected directly to the sanitary drainage system.
explanatory information:
•
•
The location of the outlet of the vent pipe serving a waste pipe is less restrictive than the requirements for
vent pipes serving discharge pipes connected directly to the drain. This is permitted because a waste pipe
is not connected directly to the sanitary drainage system, and hence a source of foul air.
An independent vent pipe system for waste pipes is needed to avoid the risk of sewer gases escaping through
a waste pipe to a gully trap.
Figure 9 restricted location for the termination of vent pipes
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4.13
4.13 air admittance valves
(1)
(2)
Air admittance valves may be used as venting where specified in accordance with 4.
Air admittance valves must—
(a)
(b)
have a diameter not less than that required in Tables 4.13a, 4.13b and 4.13c, and not less than the vent pipe
that they serve; and
where an integral part of a fixture trap, only be used as a trap vent.
4.14 Location
(1)
Air admittance valves must be installed in an upright (vertical) position not more than 1 m below the overflow level
of the fixture and in a location which must be—
(b)
where the valve will not be subjected to temperatures below 0oC and above 60oC; and
(c)
protected from likely damage; and
(a)
(d)
(e)
accessible for maintenance and inspection; and
where adequate air can enter the valve; and
ventilated by an opening when installed within a wall space.
explanatory information:
A significant amount of vent pipe and roof penetrations may be avoided with the use of air admittance valves. However
the pipework sizing, whether for individual fixture vents or branch vents, should follow the requirements of this acceptable
plumbing practice. Air admittance valves are intended for anti-siphon situations and may not protect the water seals of
the traps in positive pressure situations.
Figure 10 acceptable methods of vent pipe installation
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4.14
Figure 11a acceptable location for connections of fixture vent pipes to fixture discharge pipes
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4.14
Figure 11b acceptable locations for connection of fixture vent pipes to fixture discharge pipes
5 Installation of PVC-u
5.1 Jointing methods
(1)
Priming fluid and solvent cement must be used when joining PVC-U pipework unless using elastomeric seals.
(1)
Expansion joints must be installed to allow longitudinal movement in pipes resulting from temperature variations.
5.2 thermal movement
(2)
Pipe sleeves or a durable and flexible lagging material must be installed to accommodate movement at supports
and at wall and floor penetrations not incorporating expansion joints.
explanatory information:
•
•
Thermal expansion can cause a 10 m length of PVC-U to extend 0.8 mm for each 1°C rise of pipe
temperature.
Provision for thermal movement by correctly locating expansion joints, with fixed and sliding supports,
prevents damage to pipes and fixtures.
6 testing
(1)
(2)
(3)
To verify that the system is watertight, all sanitary plumbing pipework must be tested using either—
(a)
(b)
a water test, in accordance with 6(2); or
An air test, in accordance with 6(3).
A water test must be conducted in accordance with the following:
(a)
Charge the system with water to not less than 1 m above the highest point of the section to be tested and not
more than 3 m above the lower point of the section being tested.
(b)
Maintain the water level without leaking for not less than 15 minutes.
(a)
Pressurise the pipeline to 15 kPa.
An air test must be conducted in accordance with the following:
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
table 6
Wait more than 3 minutes to ensure temperature stabilisation.
Disconnect the air supply.
Measure the time taken for the air pressure to drop to 10 kPa.
Maintain air pressure at 10 kPa for more than 3 minutes.
maximum distance between supports for PVC-u pipes
Pipe diameter (dn)
40 to 50
65
Vertical pipe (m)
2.0
2.5
explanatory information: Cross-volume considerations
Graded pipe (m)
1.0
1.2
nCC Volumes one and two deal with a number of areas of on-site construction which are relevant to sanitary plumbing services. these include, but may not be limited to, the following:
Item
nCC Volume one Class 2 to 9
buildings
Termite management for attachments B1 Structural Provisions
to buildings and penetrations through
a slab
Penetrations for pipework through a B1 Structural Provisions
vapour barrier
Pipework in timber bearers and joists B1 Structural Provisions
of solid timber or engineered wood
products
Fittings, fixtures and pipework
B1 Structural Provisions
installations in steel framed
construction
Penetrations through a fire-resisting C3 Protection of Openings
wall or floor
Fixtures or fittings in a wet area
F1 Damp and Weatherproofing
Service pipework external to the
G5 Construction in Bushfire Prone
building and penetrations through
Areas
roof cladding in a bushfire prone area
Pipework sound insulation
F5 Sound Transmission and
Insulation
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
nCC Volume two Class 1 and 10
buildings
3.1.4 Termite Risk Management
3.2.2 Preparation
3.4.0 Framing
3.4.2 Steel Framing
3.7.1 Fire Separation
3.8.1 Wet Areas and External
Weatherproofing
3.7.4 Bushfire Areas
3.8.6 Sound Insulation
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Part C2
sanItary draInaGe system
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out the requirements for the design, construction, installation, replacement, repair, alteration and
maintenance of any part of a sanitary drainage system of a property including from sanitary fixtures and appliances to an
approved disposal system.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
Co2
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to the failure of a sanitary drainage
installation; and
ensure that a sanitary drainage installation (including an installation provided for use by people with a disability)
is suitable; and
conserve water and energy; and
safeguard the environment; and
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
(f)
safeguard people from illness caused by the discharge of swimming pool waste water; and
(h)
ensure that a sanitary drainage installation is designed and is capable of being maintained so that throughout its
serviceable life it will continue to satisfy Objectives (a) to (g).
(g)
protect other property from damage caused by the discharge of swimming pool waste water; and
FunCtIonaL statements
CF2.1
Sanitary fixtures and sanitary appliances must be provided with an adequate disposal system that does not impact
adversely on occupants of the premises, property, the environment or the Network Utility Operator’s infrastructure.
CF2.2
Adequate means for the disposal of swimming pool waste water and drainage is to be provided to each swimming pool.
Performance requirements
CP2.1 design, construction and installation
(1)
A sanitary drainage system must ensure the following:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(2)
Sewage is transferred from a sanitary plumbing system to an approved disposal system.
Access for maintenance and clearing blockages.
Ventilation to avoid foul air and gases accumulating in the sanitary drainage and sewerage system.
(d)
Protection against internal contamination.
(a)
Blockage and uncontrolled discharge.
(c)
Entry of water, foul air and gases from the system into buildings.
A sanitary drainage system must avoid the following:
(b)
(d)
(e)
(f)
Damage from root penetration, superimposed loads or ground movement.
Entry of stormwater into the sewerage system.
Damage to existing buildings or site works.
Damage to the Network Utility Operator’s sewerage system or other approved disposal system.
CP2.2 swimming pool drainage
(1)
A swimming pool must have adequate means of draining the pool in a manner which will not—
(a)
cause illness to people; or
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(b)
CP2.2
affect other property.
Verification methods
CV2.1 Flow rate and liquid-to-air ratio
(1)
Compliance with CP2.1(2)(a) is achieved if the sanitary drainage system is designed to operate with—
(a)
(b)
(c)
a liquid-to-air ratio of between 1:1 and 0.65:0.35; and
a minimum flow rate of 0.8 m/s; and
a maximum flow rate of—
(i)
(ii)
2 m/s under normal operating conditions; and
3.5 m/s under surge conditions.
explanatory information:
The symbol ‘m/s’, used in CV2.1, means ‘metres per second’.
CV2.2 Pressure testing
(1)
Compliance with CP2.1(2)(a) is achieved if the sanitary drainage system passes one or more of the pressure tests
set out in Section 15 of AS/NZS 3500.2.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
C2.1 deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
(1)
Performance Requirements CP2.1 and CP2.2 are satisfied by complying with C2.2 to C2.3 and—
(a)
(b)
C2.4; or
acceptable plumbing practice C2.
C2.2 Invert levels
(1)
The invert level of a trap or gully weir must be a minimum of 10 mm higher than the soffit of the pipe to which it
connects.
C2.3 swimming pool drainage
(1)
Where pumped discharge from a swimming pool connects to a gully riser it must be installed in accordance with—
(a)
(b)
AS/NZS 3500.2; or
for swimming pools associated with Class 1 buildings, Section 4 of AS/NZS 3500.4.
acceptable plumbing manuals
C2.4 General requirements
ACT C2.4(1)
NSW C2.4(1)
NT C2.4(1)
Qld C2.4(1)
Vic C2.4(1)
(1)
The design, installation, repair, alteration and additions of a sanitary drainage system must be in accordance with
AS/NZS 3500.2.
Qld C2.4(1)
ACT C2.4(d), (e), (f), (g), (h)
Tas C2.4(d), (e)
Vic C2.4(d), (e)
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sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
acceptable plumbing practice C2
1 scope
(1)
This acceptable plumbing practice applies to non-pressure sanitary drainage systems that—
(a)
(b)
serve only a Class 1 or Class 10 building; and
are constructed using pipework with a diameter not greater than DN 100.
2 design
2.1 Gradient of drains
(1)
(2)
(3)
Drains must be laid with a consistent grade and direction between bends or junctions, both horizontally and vertically.
The minimum diameter of sanitary drainage pipes must be—
(a)
(b)
for a branch, DN 65; and
for the main drain, DN 100.
The gradient of each sanitary drainage pipe must not be less than that required in Table 2.2.
table 2.2
minimum grades of drains according to minimum fixture unit loading
drain purpose
Single fixture
discharge
Multiple fixture
discharge
Branch
Main
3 Layout
Grade = 1:20
6
Grade = 1:40
4
Grade = 1:60
N/A
Grade = 1:80
N/A
60
515
25
255
N/A
165
N/A
120
15
8
N/A
N/A
3.1 Bends
(1)
The sanitary drainage system must—
(a)
(b)
have a layout that minimizes the number of changes in direction; and
use components with a maximum of 90°for a change in direction.
3.2 Junctions
(1)
Any connection to a main drain must be made using a 45o junction, in accordance with Figure 3.2.
Figure 3.2 Connections of drains
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3.3
3.3 overflow relief gullies
(1)
(2)
Each allotment must be provided with at least one external overflow relief gully.
An overflow relief gully must—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
be located so that the discharge is to open air and in a visible location; and
be positioned so that the top of the gully is at least 150 mm below the overflow level of the lowest sanitary
fixture served by the drainage system; and
have a loose fitting grate that will allow surcharge to escape and an overflow level that is—
(i)
(ii)
not less than 25 mm above paved surfaces; and
not less than 75 mm above unpaved surfaces; and
have an outlet pipe not less than DN 100; and
have a water seal depth not less than 65 mm; and
have at least one means of maintaining the water seal which must be achieved by either—
(i)
(ii)
connecting at least one discharge pipe from a waste fixture or pressure relief device, in accordance with
Figure 3.3a; or
where compliance with 3.3(2)(f)(i) cannot be achieved, installing a hose tap directly above the grate, in
accordance with Figure 3.3b; and
explanatory information:
Compliance with 3.3(2)(f)(i) is preferred as maintaining the water seal is not dependent upon manually operating the
tap to recharge the water seal.
(g)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(h)
have the top of the water seal at least 600 mm below the top of the gully riser; and
have not less than 2 m clear access space above the grate.
The invert level of a trap or gully weir must be at least 10 mm higher than the top point of the inside open section of
the pipe (soffit) to which it connects.
An overflow relief gully must be supported by concrete, separate from the building footing, at least 75 mm thick
beneath and surrounding the entire gully, and to a height of 100 mm above the base of the gully in accordance with
Figure 3.3a or Figure 3.3b.
The top of the gully riser must be protected with a concrete surround in accordance with Figure 3.3a or Figure 3.3b.
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3.3
Figure 3.3a Gully riser - method a
Figure 3.3b Gully riser - method B
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3.4
3.4 access for maintenance
(1)
(2)
(3)
Drains must be provided with inspection openings or inspection shafts that will enable cleaning and the clearing of
blockages.
At least one inspection shaft must be installed at the upstream end of each drain.
In addition to (2), inspection openings or inspection shafts must also be installed—
(a)
immediately adjacent to the point of connection; and
(c)
within 2 m of the external wall of the building wherever a drain from a soil fixture enters or exits the underside
of the building.
(b)
at intervals not greater than 30 m on main drains; and
explanatory information
The figures below indicate typical locations of access for maintenance as required by 3.4.
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3.4
4 earthworks
4.1 trench width and proximity to the building
(1)
(2)
The distance from each side of the pipe to the wall of the trench must be not less than 100 mm.
Excavations for a drain must be within the suitable area shown in Figure 4.1 and described in Table 4.1.
Figure 4.1 excavation for drains
table 4.1
excavations for drains - Height to length ratios of suitable area
soil type
Stable rock
Sand
Height to Length ratio for compacted fill
2:3
1:2
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Height to Length ratio for cut site
(H:L)
8:1
1:2
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soil type
Silt
Firm clay
Soft clay
Height to Length ratio for compacted fill
1:4
1:2
Not suitable
4.2 Bedding, placement and compaction
4.1
Height to Length ratio for cut site
(H:L)
1:4
1:1
2:3
(1)
Bedding must be used where the base of the trench is not uniform and be compacted to achieve a uniform trench
base in accordance with Figure 4.3a or Figure 4.3b.
(3)
Where not subject to vehicle loading, overlay material must be laid over the top of the pipe to a depth of not less
than 50 mm, and must be compacted to evenly distribute any superimposed load on the pipe in accordance with
Figure 4.3c.
(2)
(4)
Side bedding must be used where pipe movement is possible and be laid along both sides of the pipe and compacted
in accordance with Figure 4.3a or Figure 4.3b.
Where subject to vehicle loading, overlay material must be laid over the top of the pipe to a depth of not less than
50 mm, and must be compacted to evenly distribute any superimposed load on the pipe in accordance with Figure
4.3d.
4.3 Bedding, embedment and fill materials
(1)
Materials used must be in accordance with Figures 4.3a, 4.3b, 4.3c or 4.3d and use—
(a)
for bedding material, clean, granular, non-cohesive material with a particle size of 60 to 10 mm; and
(c)
for backfilling the trench, the fill material excavated from the trench.
(b)
for embedment material, fine-grained soil or granular material that is free from topsoil and rubble and that has
a particle size no more than 20 mm; and
Figure 4.3a trench filling for a drain laid not subject to vehicle loading
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4.3
Figure 4.3b trench filling for a drain laid subject to vehicle loading
Figure 4.3c trench filling for a drain laid with reduced cover and subject to vehicle loading
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4.3
Figure 4.3d trench filling for a drain laid with reduced cover and not subject to vehicle loading
4.4 Clearance from other services
(1)
Drains must be separated from all other serviced by at least 100 mm.
5 Venting
5.1 General
(1)
(2)
(3)
Venting must be provided in accordance with 5.2 to every main drain and every branch drain more than 10 m long.
Venting must be provided by a drain vent pipe so that the length of the drain upstream of the drain vent connection
is not more than 10 m, in accordance with Figure 5.1a or Figure 5.1b.
To enable regular flushing, the drain vent connection must be located not more than 10 m downstream of the
discharge connection that is closest to the head of the drain, in accordance with Figure 5.1a and Figure 5.1c.
explanatory information:
The head of the drain is the point in the sanitary drainage system that is furthest from the point of connection.
(4)
Any open discharge stack vent that is located less than 10 m from the head of the drain may be used as a drain
vent, in accordance with Figure 5.1a.
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5.1
Figure 5.1a drain vent pipe
Figure 5.1b discharge stack used to ventilate drain
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5.1
Figure 5.1c drain vent connection
5.2 diameter of drain vent pipe
(1)
A main drain vent must—
(a)
(b)
have a diameter not less than DN 50; and
terminate clear of the shaded areas shown in Figure 5.2.
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5.2
sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
Figure 5.2 restricted location for termination of vent pipes
(2)
Each branch drain vent must be sized in accordance with Table 5.2.
table 5.2
Branch drain vent sizes
maximum fixture discharge units connected to the
discharge pipe
Up to 10
11 to 30
31 to 175
More than 175
6 additional provisions
minimum nominal diameter of open vent pipe (dn)
40
50
65
80
6.1 discharge
(1)
(2)
Where pumped discharge from a swimming pool is connected to a gully riser, it must be connected in accordance
with Figure 6.1.
Waste pipes that discharge to an overflow relief gully must be arranged to enable cleaning of the gully.
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6.1
Figure 6.1 Pumped discharge from swimming pool
6.2 drains under buildings
(1)
Drains installed under the building must—
(a)
be straight between bends and of uniform gradient; and
(c)
where they pass through a footing, be sleeved or wrapped in a durable flexible material that allows for expansion
and contraction; and
(b)
(d)
(e)
have not less than 25 mm clearance from the top of the pipe to the underside of the slab; and
have any junctions beneath the building not more than 45°; and
only receive discharges from fixtures within that building.
7 testing
(1)
(2)
(3)
To verify that the system is watertight, all below ground sanitary drainage pipework must be tested using either—
(a)
(b)
a water test, conducted in accordance with 7(2); or
an air test, conducted in accordance 7(3).
A water test must be conducted in accordance with the following:
(a)
Charge the system with water to not less than 1 m above the highest point of the section to be tested and not
more than 3 m above the lower point of the section being tested.
(b)
Maintain the water level without leaking for not less than 15 minutes.
(a)
Pressurise the pipeline to 15 kPa.
An air test must be conducted in accordance with the following:
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Wait more than 3 minutes to ensure temperature stabilisation.
Disconnect the air supply.
Measure the time taken for the air pressure to drop to 10 kPa.
Maintain air pressure at 10 kPa for more than 3 minutes.
explanatory information: Cross-volume considerations
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7
sanItary PLumBInG and draInaGe systems
nCC Volumes one and two deal with a number of areas of on-site construction which are relevant to sanitary drainage systems. these include, but may not be limited to, the following:
Item
nCC Volume one Class 2 to 9
buildings
Excavations for pipework adjacent to B1 Structural Provisions
a building and footings
Termite management for attachments B1 Structural Provisions
to buildings and penetrations through
a slab
Penetrations for pipework through a B1 Structural Provisions
vapour barrier
Pipework in timber bearers and joists B1 Structural Provisions
of solid timber or engineered wood
products
Fittings, fixtures and pipework
B1 Structural Provisions
installations in steel framed
construction
Penetrations through a fire-resisting C3 Protection of Openings
wall or floor
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
nCC Volume two Class 1 and 10
buildings
3.1.1 Earthworks
3.1.4 Termite Risk Management
3.2.2 Preparation
3.4.0 Framing
3.4.2 Steel Framing
3.7.1 Fire Separation
Page 104
exCessIVe noIse
section d
excessive noise
Part d1
exCessIVe noIse
Introduction to this part
This Part sets out the requirements to prevent excessive noise being generated from a plumbing and drainage system
that could cause loss of amenity to occupants in a building.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
do1
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to excessive noise of a plumbing and
drainage system; and
(b)
ensure that a plumbing and drainage system (including an installation provided for use by people with a disability)
is suitable; and
(d)
safeguard the environment; and
(c)
(e)
(f)
conserve water and energy; and
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that a plumbing and drainage system installation throughout its serviceable life will continue to satisfy the
requirements of Objectives (a) to (e).
FunCtIonaL statements
dF1
Plumbing and drainage systems must be designed and installed so as to operate in a way that avoids the likelihood of
excessive noise of any part of the plumbing and drainage system, and minimises any adverse impact on building
occupants, the Network Utility Operator’s infrastructure, property and the environment.
Performance requirements
dP1.1 excessive noise
(1)
Plumbing and drainage systems must be provided with insulation against the transmission of airborne and/or impact
generated sound which may cause illness or loss of amenity to occupants.
application 1:
DP1.1(1) only applies to a plumbing or drainage system that is located in—
(a)
(b)
(2)
a separating wall of a Class 1 building; or
a Class 2, 3 or 9 building that is required to be sound rated.
The required sound insulation of a floor or wall must not be compromised by the incorporation or penetration of a
plumbing or drainage system.
note 1:
Part F5 in Volume One of the NCC contains the Performance Requirements FP5.1 through to FP5.6 which cover sound
transmission and insulation in walls and floors of Class 2, 3 and 9c buildings.
note 2:
Part 2.4 in Volume Two of the NCC contains the Performance Requirement P2.4.6 which covers sound insulation of
walls in Class 1 buildings.
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
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exCessIVe noIse
dP1.1
Verification methods
There are no Verification Methods for this part.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
d1.1 application
(1)
Performance Requirement DP1.1 is satisfied by complying with D1.2.
(1)
If a plumbing or drainage system serves or passes through more than one sole-occupancy unit in a Class 2, 3 or 9c
building, it must be separated from the rooms of any other sole-occupancy unit by construction with an Rw + Ctr
(airborne) not less than—
d1.2 sound Insulation
(a)
(b)
note 1:
40 if the adjacent room is a habitable room (other than a kitchen); or
25 if the adjacent room is a kitchen or a non-habitable room.
Specification F5.2 in Volume One of the NCC lists sound ratings for some common forms of construction. If any of
these common forms of construction are used, the plumbing or drainage system must be installed in accordance with
the requirements of this Specification.
(2)
(3)
In Class 2, 3 or 9c buildings, a flexible coupling must be used to connect a pump to a plumbing or drainage system.
If a plumbing or drainage system is located in (or passes through) a separating wall in a Class 1 building, it must—
(a)
only be installed in discontinuous construction; and
(c)
must have a gap not less than 10 mm between the pipe and a wall of a dwelling that it does not serve; and
(b)
(d)
not be fixed to the wall of a dwelling that it does not serve; and
not be chased in if the separating wall is made of concrete or masonry.
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FaCILItIes
section e
Facilities
Part e1
FaCILItIes
Introduction to this part
This part sets out the requirements to allow people with a disability to use the facilities provided by a plumbing and drainage
system.
explanatory information:
oBJeCtIVe
eo1
The Objective of this Part is to—
(a)
safeguard people from illness, injury or loss (including loss of amenity) due to the facilities of a plumbing and
drainage system; and
(b)
ensure that the facility of a plumbing and drainage system (including an installation provided for use by people
with a disability) is suitable; and
(d)
safeguard the environment; and
(c)
conserve water and energy; and
(e)
safeguard public and private infrastructure; and
ensure that the facility of a plumbing and drainage system installation throughout its serviceable life will continue
to satisfy the requirements of Objectives (a) to (e).
(f)
FunCtIonaL statements
eF1
The facility of a plumbing and drainage system must be designed and installed so as to operate in a way that avoids
the likelihood of people with a disability to use any part of the plumbing and drainage system, and minimises any adverse
impact on building occupants, the Network Utility Operator’s infrastructure, property and the environment.
Performance requirements
eP1.1 Facilities for people with disability
(1)
Where a plumbing and drainage system is provided, supply taps or other operational controls must be accessible
and suitable for use.
Verification methods
There are no Verification Methods for this part.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions
e1.1 application
(1)
Performance Requirement EP1.1 is satisfied by complying with E1.2.
acceptable plumbing manuals
e1.2 General requirements
(1)
Where supply taps or other operational controls are provided in sanitary facilities for people with a disability they
must be in accordance with—
(a)
AS 1428.1 (2001) and AS 1428.2 for all Class 9b and Class 10 public transport buildings; and
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FaCILItIes
(b)
e1.2
AS 1428.1 (2009) for all other buildings.
explanatory information: Cross-volume considerations
Part F2 in Volume One of the NCC sets out the requirements for the design and construction of accessible sanitary
facilities in Class 1b, 2 to 9 and 10a buildings.
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sCHeduLe 2 aBBreVIatIons and symBoLs
schedule 2 abbreviations and symbols
schedule 2 abbreviations and symbols
Abbreviations and Symbols used in the NCC include:
abbreviations
abbreviation
ABCB
AISC
ALGA
AS
ASTM
BCA
BCC
CCT
CHF
CRF
CRI
CSHGC
CSIRO
definition
Australian Building Codes Board
Australian Institute of Steel Construction
Australian Local Government Association
Australian Standard
American Society for Testing and Materials
Building Code of Australia
Building Codes Committee
Correlated Colour Temperature
Critical Heat Flux
Critical Radiant Flux
Colour Rendition Index
Constant for solar heat gain
CU
Commonwealth Scientific
Organisation
Constant for conductance
SHGC
STC
UPVC
U-Value
Solar Heat Gain Coefficient
Sound Transmission Class
Unplasticized polyvinyl chloride
Thermal transmittance
FRL
GRP
ISO
MEPS
NABERS
NATA
NCC
ppm
PCA
PVC
Rw
symbols
abbreviation
dB(A)
°C
°CDB
°CWB
-e/MJ
J
J/kg.K
J/s.m2
and
Industrial
Research
Fire Resistance Level
Glass fibre reinforced polyester
International Organisation for Standardisation
Minimum Energy Performance Standards
National Australian Built Environment Rating System
National Association of Testing Authorities
National Construction Code
Parts per million
Plumbing Code of Australia
Polyvinyl chloride
Weighted sound reduction index
definition
decibels “A” scale weighting network
degree(s) Celsius
degree(s) Celsius Dry Bulb
degree(s) Celsius Wet Bulb
equivalent per Megajoule(s)
Joule(s)
Joules per kilogram per degree Kelvin
Joules per second per square metre
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sCHeduLe 2 aBBreVIatIons and symBoLs
abbreviation
K
kg
kg/m
kg/m2
kg/m3
KJ/hour.m2
km
kPa
kW/m2
kWheating
definition
Kelvin(s)
kilogram(s)
kilogram(s) per metre
kilogram(s) per square metre
kilogram(s) per cubic metre
kilojoules per hour per square metre
kilometre(s)
kilopascal(s)
kilowatt(s) per square metre
kilowatt(s) of heating
L
L/s
L/s.m2
Lumens/W
lx
m
m2
m2.K/W
m3
mcd/m2
MJ/hour
MJ/m2.annum
m/s
m3/s
mm
mm2
μm
MW
N
Pa
W
Winput power
litre(s)
litre(s) per second
litre(s) per second square metre
Lumens per Watt
lux
metre(s)
square metre(s)
Square metre Kelvin(s) per Watt
cubic metre(s)
millicandelas per square metre
Megajoules per hour
Megajoules per square metre annum
metre(s) per second
cubic metre(s) per second
millimetre(s)
square millimetre(s)
micrometre
megawatt(s)
newton(s)
pascal(s)
Watt(s)
Watts of input power
kWr
W/m.K
W/m2
°south
%
>
<
≤
≥
kilowatt(s) of refrigeration
Watts per metre per degree Kelvin
Watts per square metre
degree south
percent
greater than
less than
equal to or less than
equal to or more than
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sCHeduLe 3 deFIned terms
schedule 3 defined terms
schedule 3 definitions
definitions
note: States and Territories may vary or add to the definitions contained in Schedule 3 at the relevant State or Territory
Appendix.
In the NCC unless the contrary intention appears—
accessible means having features to enable use by people with a disability.
accessway means a continuous accessible path of travel (as defined in AS 1428.1) to, into or within a building.
accredited testing Laboratory means—
(a) an organisation accredited by the National Association of Testing Authorities (NATA) to undertake the relevant tests;
or
(b)
(c)
an organisation outside Australia accredited to undertake the relevant tests by an authority recognised by NATA
through a mutual recognition agreement; or
an organisation recognized as being an Accredited Testing Laboratory under legislation at the time the test was
undertaken.
activity traits, for the purposes of Volume One, means the features of the activities that will be undertaken in a habitable
room or space.
activity traits, for the purposes of Volume Two, means the features of the activities that will be undertaken in a room or
space.
explanatory information:
This term is used to describe the characteristics of the activities that will be undertaken in a room or space.
For example, the activities likely to be undertaken in a bedroom, and the associated features are—
•
•
•
•
sleeping — a person laying horizontally; and
resting — a person laying horizontally or sitting upright on the bed; and
leisure activities, such as reading a book — a person sitting upright on the bed, with enough space to
stretch their arms vertically; and
dressing/changing clothes — a person standing with enough space to stretch their arms vertically.
activity support level means the degree to which occupants can undertake activities with respect to the likely activity
traits and occupant traits.
explanatory information:
This term is used to articulate whether the height of a room or space is sufficient and by what degree. This is achieved
by having regard to the room or space’s intended use by occupants, through consideration of the defined terms ‘activity
traits’ and ‘occupant traits’.
administering body means the body responsible for administering the WaterMark Certification Scheme.
aged care building means a Class 9c building for residential accommodation of aged persons who, due to varying
degrees of incapacity associated with the ageing process, are provided with personal care services and 24 hour
staff assistance to evacuate the building during an emergency.
air-conditioning for the purposes of Section J of Volume One, means a service that actively cools or heats the air within
a space, but does not include a service that directly
(a) cools or heats cold or hot rooms; or
(b)
maintains specialised conditions for equipment or processes, where this is the main purpose of the service.
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alpine area,for the purposes of Parts 2.7 and 3.10 of Volume Two, means an area given in Figure 1.1.6 and in Table
1.1.3 for specific locations, and is
(a) likely to be subject to significant snowfalls; and
(b)
(c)
in New South Wales, A.C.T. or Victoria more than 1200 m above the Australian Height Datum; and
in Tasmania more than 900 m above the Australian Height Datum.
Figure 1.1.6
alpine areas
note:
This map in approximate only and altitude above Australian Height Datum shall be used to determine whether the
building falls into an alpine area region.
table 1.1.3 alpine areas where snow loads are significant
Location
New South Wales
Kiandra
Mount Kosiuszko
Perisher Valley
Thredbo
Cabramurra
Charlotte Pass Village
Diggers Creek
Guthega Village
Mount Blue Cow
Victoria
Falls Creek:
Summit Area
map Identifier
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
18
Sun Valley
Village Bowl
Mount Baw Baw
Mount Buffalo:
Location
Mount Selwyn
Perisher Range
Rules Point
Sawpit Creek
Smiggin Holes
Smiggin Range
Three Mile Dam
Wilsons Valley
Mount Hotham:
Davenport
map Identifier
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
22
Village Centre
19
20
Dinner Plain
Lake Mountain
23
24
Tatra
Mount Buller:
21
Mount Stirling
25
Village
Tasmania
Ben Lomond Ski Field
Cradle Valley
26
27
Great Lake Area
Mount Field Ski Field
28
29
Chalet
Dingo Dell
Baldy
explanatory information:
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sCHeduLe 3 deFIned terms
Alpine areas are located in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Alpine areas are areas 1200 m or more above Australian Height Datum (AHD) for New South Wales, Australian Capital
Territory and Victoria, and 900 m or more above AHD for Tasmania, as shown in Figure 1.1.6.
Alpine areas are considered to receive significant snowfalls (snowfalls which result in an average snow accumulation
on the ground of 175 mm or greater). Regions in New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory and Victoria between
600–1200 m AHD are considered to be sub-alpine areas and may receive significant snowfalls, however unlike alpine
area the snow is unlikely to accumulate.
It is recommended that the appropriate authority be consulted to determine whether the building is located in an alpine
area. AS/NZS 1170.3 also contains further detail in the identification of alpine areas and the altitude of the alpine regions
of Australia.
It is noted that in the Australian Capital Territory, the Canberra area is not designed as an alpine area as snow loads
are not considered significant.
alteration, in relation to a building, includes an addition or extension to a building.
ancillary element means an element that is secondary to and not an integral part of another element to which it is
attached.
amenity means an attribute which contributes to the health, physical independence, comfort and well-being of people.
annual greenhouse gas emissions means the theoretical amount of greenhouse gas emissions attributable to the
energy used annually by the building’s services.
appropriate authority means the relevant authority with the statutory responsibility to determine the particular matter.
state and territory variations
For Volume One see (NSW, Appropriate authority)
For Volume Two the definition of appropriate authority has been replaced in New South Wales as follows:
appropriate authority means the relevant authority with the responsibility to determine the particular matter.
appropriately qualified person means a person recognised by the appropriate authority as having qualifications and/or
experience in the relevant discipline in question.
approved disposal system means a system for the disposal of sewage, sullage or stormwater approved by an authority
having jurisdiction.
articulated masonry means masonry construction in which special provisions have been made for movement by
articulation.
assembly building means a building where people may assemble for—
(a) civic, theatrical, social, political or religious purposes including a library, theatre, public hall or place of worship; or
(b)
(c)
educational purposes in a school, early childhood centre, preschool, or the like; or
entertainment, recreational or sporting purposes including—
(i)
a discotheque, nightclub or a bar area of a hotel or motel providing live entertainment or containing a dance
floor; or
(iii)
a sports stadium, sporting or other club; or
(ii)
(d)
a cinema; or
transit purposes including a bus station, railway station, airport or ferry terminal.
state and territory variation
For Volume One see (NSW, Assembly building) and (SA, Assembly building)
assessment method means a method that can be used for determining that a Performance Solution or Deemed-toSatisfy Solution complies with the Performance Requirements.
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sCHeduLe 3 deFIned terms
atrium means a space within a building that connects 2 or more storeys and—
(a) is enclosed at the top by a floor or roof (including a glazed roof structure) which is greater than 50% of the area of
the space measured in plan; and
(b)
(c)
includes any adjacent part of the building not separated by an appropriate barrier to fire; but
does not include a stairwell, rampwell or the space within a shaft.
atrium well means a space in an atrium bounded by the perimeter of the openings in the floors or by the perimeter of the
floors and the external walls.
automatic means designed to operate when activated by a heat, smoke or fire sensing device.
average recurrence interval, applied to rainfall, means the expected or average interval between exceedances for a 5
minute duration rainfall intensity.
average specific extinction area means the average specific extinction area for smoke as determined by AS/NZS 5637.1.
Backflow prevention device means an air gap, break tank or mechanical device that is designed to prevent the unplanned
reversal of flow of water or contaminants into the water service or a Network Utility Operator’s water supply.
Backpressure means a reversal of water flow caused by the downstream pressure becoming greater than the supply
pressure.
Backsiphonage means a reversal of flow of water caused by negative pressure in the distributing pipes of a water service
or supply.
Backstage means a space associated with, and adjacent to, a stage in a Class 9b building for scenery, props, equipment,
dressing rooms, or the like.
Blockage means an obstruction within a drainage system.
Boiler means a vessel or an arrangement of vessels and interconnecting parts, wherein steam or other vapour is
generated, or water or other liquid is heated at a pressure above that of the atmosphere, by the application of fire,
the products of combustion, electrical power, or similar high temperature means, and—
(a) includes superheaters, reheaters, economisers, boiler piping, supports, mountings, valves, gauges, fittings, controls,
the boiler settings and directly associated equipment; but
(b)
excludes a fully flooded or pressurised system where water or other liquid is heated to a temperature lower than the
normal atmospheric boiling temperature of the liquid.
Breaking surf means any area of salt water in which waves break on an average of at least 4 days per week but does
not include white caps or choppy water.
explanatory information:
Breaking surf normally occurs in areas exposed to the open sea. Breaking surf does not normally occur in sheltered
areas, such as that which occurs around Port Phillip Bay, Sydney Harbour, Swan River, Derwent River and similar
locations.
state and territory variation
For Volume Two in South Australia insert brush fence as follows:
Brush fence means a fence or gate that is primarily constructed of Broombrush (Melaleuca Uncinata).
Carpark means a building that is used for the parking of motor vehicles but is neither a private garage nor used for the
servicing of vehicles, other than washing, cleaning or polishing.
Cavity means a void between 2 leaves of masonry, or in masonry veneer construction, a void between a leaf of masonry
and the supporting frame.
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Cavity wall, for the purposes of FV1 in Volume One and V2.2.1 in Volume Two, means a wall that incorporates a drained
cavity.
Certificate of accreditation, for the purposes of Volume One, means a certificate issued by a State or Territory
accreditation authority stating that the properties and performance of a building material or method of construction
or design fulfil specific requirements of the BCA.
Certificate of accreditation, for the purposes of Volume Two, means a certificate issued by a State or Territory
accreditation authority stating that the properties and performance of a building material or method of construction
or design fulfil specific requirements of the Housing Provisions.
Certificate of Conformity means a certificate issued under the ABCB scheme for products and systems certification
stating that the properties and performance of a building material or method of construction or design fulfil specific
requirements of the Housing Provisions.
Certification body means a person or organisation operating in the field of material, product, form of construction or
design certification that has been accredited by the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand (JAZANZ), and is accredited for a purpose other than as part of the CodeMark Australia Certification Scheme.
Characteristic means the occupant data to be used in the modelling of access solutions which define how an occupant
interacts with a building, i.e. occupant movement speeds, turning ability, reach capability, luminance contrast, hearing
threshold.
Circulation space means a clear unobstructed area, to enable persons using mobility aids to manoeuver.
Clad frame means timber or metal frame construction with exterior timber or sheet wall cladding that is not sensitive to
minor movement and includes substructure masonry walls up to 1.5 m high.
Climate zone means an area defined in Figure A1.1 and in Table A1.1 for specific locations, having energy efficiency
provisions based on a range of similar climatic characteristics.
Figure a1.1 — Climate zones for thermal design
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sCHeduLe 3 deFIned terms
notes:
1.
2.
This map can be viewed in enlargeable form on the ABCB website at www.abcb.gov.au.
A Zone 4 area in South Australia, other than a council area, at an altitude greater than 300 m above the Australian
Height Datum is to be considered as Zone 5.
These areas have been defined in an enlarged format on the following maps produced by the Department of
Planning, Transport and Infrastructure:
adelaide Hills Council Climate zone map
Barossa Council Climate zone map
regional Council of Goyder Climate zone map
3.
These maps can be viewed on the Government of South Australia website at www.sa.gov.au
Locations in climate zone 8 are in alpine areas.
table a1.1 Climate zones for thermal design - various locations
Location
northern territory
Darwin, Katherine
queensland
Cairns, Cooktown, Normanton, Townsville, Weipa
Western australia
Broome, Christmas Island, Cocos Island, Derby, Exmouth, Karratha, Port Hedland, Wyndham
new south Wales
Bellingen Shire - Valley & seaboard, Byron Bay, Coffs Harbour, Grafton, Lismore, Lord Howe
Island
queensland
Brisbane, Bundaberg, Gladstone, Southport, Mackay, Hervey Bay, Rockhampton
northern territory
Alice Springs, Elliot, Renner Springs, Tennant Creek
queensland
Birdsville, Cunnamulla, Longreach, Mount Isa, Roma, Hughenden
Western australia
Carnarvon, Halls Creek
new south Wales
Albury, Bourke, Broken Hill, Cobar, Dubbo, Griffith, Ivanhoe, Moree, Tamworth, Wagga Wagga
south australia
Cook, Marree, Oodnadatta, Port Augusta, Tarcoola, Whyalla
Victoria
Echuca, Mildura, Shepparton, Swan Hill
Western australia
Balladonia, Kalgoorlie- Boulder, Meekatharra, Northam, Wagin
new south Wales
Newcastle, Port Macquarie, Sydney East, Williamtown, Wollongong
south australia
Adelaide, Ceduna, Elliston, Leigh Creek, Loxton, Port Lincoln, Renmark
queensland
Toowoomba, Warwick
Western australia
Bunbury, Esperance, Geraldton, Perth
new south Wales
Batemans Bay, Bega, Nowra, Sydney West, Yass
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Climate zone
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
6
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sCHeduLe 3 deFIned terms
Location
south australia
Bordertown, Kingscote, Lobethal, Naracoorte, Mount Gambier, Murray Bridge, Victor Harbour
Victoria
Anglesea, Bairnsdale, Benalla, Bendigo, Colac, Dandenong, Geelong, Horsham, Melbourne,
Portland, Sale, Traralgon, Warrnambool, Wodonga
Western australia
Albany, Pemberton
australian Capital territory
Canberra
new south Wales
Armidale, Bathurst, Bellingen Shire - Dorrigo Plateau, Goulburn, Orange
tasmania
Burnie, Bicheno, Deloraine, Devonport, Flinders Island, Hobart, Huonville, King Island,
Launceston, New Norfolk, Oatlands, Orford, Rossarden, Smithton, St Marys, Zeehan
Victoria
Ararat, Ballarat, Bright, Hamilton, Wangaratta
new south Wales
Perisher Smiggins, Thredbo
Climate zone
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
8
Combustible means—
(a) applied to a material — combustible as determined by AS 1530.1; and
(b)
applied to construction or part of a building — constructed wholly or in part of combustible materials.
Common wall, for the purposes of Volume One, means a wall that is common to adjoining buildings.
Common wall, for the purposes of Volume Two, means a wall that is common to adjoining buildings other than Class 1
buildings.
Condensation means the process used to describe moisture formation on the surface as a result of moist air coming into
contact with a surface which is at a lower temperature.
Conditioned space, for the purposes of Volume One, means a space within a building, including a ceiling or under-floor
supply air plenum or return air plenum, where the environment is likely, by the intended use of the space, to have its
temperature controlled by air-conditioning.
Conditioned space, for the purposes of Volume Two, means a space within a building that is heated or cooled by the
building’s domestic services, excluding a non-habitable room in which a heater with a capacity of not more than 1.2
kW or 4.3 MJ/hour is installed.
Containment protection means the installation of a backflow prevention device at the point of connection of a Network
Utility Operator’s water supply to a site.
Contaminant means any substance (including gases, liquids, solids or micro-organisms), energy (excluding noise) or
heat, that either by itself or in combination with the same, similar or other substances, energy or heat changes or is
likely to change the physical, chemical or biological condition of water.
Construction activity actions means actions due to stacking of building materials or the use of equipment, including
cranes and trucks, during construction or actions which may be induced by floor to floor propping.
Controlled fill means material that has been placed and compacted in layers with compaction equipment (such as a
vibrating plate) within a defined moisture range to a defined density requirement.
Cooling load means the calculated amount of energy removed from the cooled spaces of the building annually by artificial
means to maintain the desired temperatures in those spaces.
Critical radiant flux (CrF) means the critical heat flux at extinguishment (CHF in kW/m 2) as determined by AS ISO
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9239.1.
Cross-connection means any actual or potential connection between a water supply and any contaminant.
Curtain wall means a non-loadbearing external wall that is not a panel wall.
daytime operating building, for the purposes of Section J of Volume One, means a building that is not an overnight
operating building.
damp-proof course (dPC) means a continuous layer of impervious material placed in a masonry wall or pier, or between
a wall or pier and a floor, to prevent the upward or downward migration of water.
deemed-to-satisfy Provisions has the meaning described in A2.3.
deemed-to-satisfy solution means a method of satisfying the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions.
defined flood event (dFe) means the flood event selected for the management of flood hazard for the location of specific
development as determined by the appropriate authority.
defined flood level (dFL) means the flood level associated with a defined flood event relative to a specified datum (see
Figure 1.1.5).
Figure 1.1.5 Identification of defined flood level, flood hazard level and freeboard
designated bushfire prone area means land which has been designated under a power of legislation as being subject,
or likely to be subject, to bushfires.
state and territory variations
For Volume One see (NSW, Designated bushfire prone area)
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For Volume Two the definition of designated bushfire prone area has been replaced in New South Wales as follows:
designated bushfire prone area means land that:
(a)
has been designated under legislation; or
(b)
has been identified under an environmental planning instrument, development control plan or in the course of
processing and determining a development application,
as land that can support a bushfire or is likely to be subject to bushfire attack.
design wind speed means the design gust wind speed for the area where the building is located, calculated in accordance
with AS/NZS 1170.2 or AS 4055 (see Table 1.1.1 for wind classes).
table 1.1.1 Wind classes
non-cyclonic region a and B
Cyclonic region C and d
N1, N2, N3
C1
n4, n5, n6 (these wind classes are covered by Part 3.0, C2, C3, C4 (these wind classes are covered by Part 3.0,
High Wind Areas).
High Wind Areas).
notes:
1.
Wind classification map identifying wind regions is contained in Part 3.0 (see Figure 3.0.1).
2.
Information on wind classes for particular areas may be available from the appropriate authority.
4.
“N” = non-cyclonic winds and “C” = cyclonic winds.
3.
detention centre means a building in which persons are securely detained by means of the built structure including a
prison, remand centre, juvenile detention centre, holding cells or psychiatric detention centre.
direct cross-connection means any cross-connection where backflow may be induced by backpressure or
backsiphonage.
direct fix cladding wall for the purposes of FV1 in Volume One and V2.2.1 in Volume Two, means a wall with cladding
attached directly to the wall framing without the use of a drained cavity.
discontinuous construction means the following:
(a) A wall having a minimum 20 mm cavity between 2 separate leaves, and—
(i)
(b)
(ii)
for masonry, where wall ties are used to connect leaves, the ties are of the resilient type; and
for other than masonry, there is no mechanical linkage between the leaves, except at the periphery.
A staggered stud wall is deemed not to be discontinuous construction.
domestic services means the basic engineering systems that use energy or control the use of energy; and—
(a) includes—
(i)
(ii)
(b)
(iii)
heating, air-conditioning, mechanical ventilation and artificial lighting; and
pumps and heaters for swimming pools and spa pools; and
heated water systems; but
excludes cooking facilities and portable appliances.
drainage means any sanitary drainage, liquid trade waste drainage or stormwater drainage system.
drinking water means water intended primarily for human consumption but which has other domestic uses.
explanatory Information:
See also the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council.
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early childhood centre means any premises or part thereof providing or intending to provide a centre-based education
and care service within the meaning of the Education and Care Services National Law Act 2010 (Vic), the Education
and Care Services National Regulations and centre-based services that are licensed or approved under State and
Territory children’s services law, but excludes education and care primarily provided to school aged children in outside
school hours settings.
state and territory variations
For Volume One see (NSW, Early childhood centre), (Tas, Early childhood centre) and (Vic, Early childhood centre)
effective height means the vertical distance between the floor of the lowest storey included in the calculation of rise in
storeys and the floor of the topmost storey (excluding the topmost storey if it contains only heating, ventilating, lift or
other equipment, water tanks or similar service units).
electric passenger lift means a power-operated lift for raising or lowering people in a car in which the motion of the car
is obtained from an electric motor mechanically coupled to the hoisting mechanism.
electricity network substation means a building in which high voltage supply is converted or transformed and which is
controlled by a licensed network service provider designated under a power of legislation.
electrohydraulic passenger lift means a power-operated lift for raising or lowering people in a car in which the motion
of the car is obtained from the action of liquid under pressure acting on a piston or ram, the pressure being generated
by a pump driven by an individual electric motor.
envelope, for the purposes of Section J in Volume One, means the parts of a building’s fabric that separate a conditioned
space or habitable room from—
(a) the exterior of the building; or
(b)
a non-conditioned space including—
(i)
the floor of a rooftop plant room, lift-machine room or the like; and
(iii)
the common wall with a carpark, warehouse or the like.
(ii)
the floor above a carpark or warehouse; and
envelope, for the purposes of Part 2.6 and Part 3.12 in Volume Two, means the parts of a building’s fabric that separate
artificially heated or cooled spaces from—
(a) the exterior of the building; or
(b)
other spaces that are not artificially heated or cooled.
equivalent means equivalent to the level of health, safety and amenity provided by the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions.
evacuation route means the continuous path of travel (including exits, public corridors and the like) from any part of a
building, including within a sole-occupancy unit in a Class 2 or 3 building or Class 4 part, to a safe place.
evacuation time means the time calculated from when the emergency starts for the occupants of the building to evacuate
to a safe place.
exit means—
(a) any, or any combination of the following if they provide egress to a road or open space—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(b)
(iv)
an internal or external stairway.
a ramp.
a fire-isolated passageway.
a doorway opening to a road or open space.
a horizontal exit or a fire-isolated passageway leading to a horizontal exit.
expert Judgement means the judgement of an expert who has the qualifications and experience to determine whether
a Performance Solution or Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution complies with the Performance Requirements.
explanatory Information:
Contemporary and relevant qualifications and/or experience are necessary to determine whether a Performance
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Solution complies with the Performance Requirements. The level of qualification and/or experience may differ depending
on the complexity of the proposal and the requirements of the regulatory authority. Practitioners should seek advice
from the authority having jurisdiction or appropriate authority for clarification as to what will be accepted.
state and territory variation
For Volume Three see (Tas, Expert Judgement)
external wall, for the purposes of Volume One, means an outer wall of a building which is not a common wall.
external wall, for the purposes of Volume Two, means an outer wall of a building which is not a separating wall.
Fabric means the basic building structural elements and components of a building including the roof, ceilings, walls and
floors.
Façade solar admittance means the fraction of incident irradiance on externally facing wall-glazing construction that
adds heat to a building’s space.
Farming means—
(a) cultivating, propagating and harvesting plants or fungi or their products or parts, including seeds, spores, bulbs or
the like, but does not include forestry; or
(b)
maintaining animals in any physical environment for the purposes of—
(i)
(ii)
(c)
(iii)
breeding them; or
selling them; or
acquiring and selling their bodily produce such as milk, wool, eggs or the like; or
a combination of (a) and (b),
but does not include forestry or maintaining animals for sport or recreational purposes.
state and territory variation
For Volume One see (SA, Farming)
Farm building means a Class 7 or 8 building located on land primarily used for farming—
(a) that is—
(i)
used in connection with farming; or
(iii)
a combination of (i) and (ii); and
(ii)
used primarily to store one or more farm vehicles; or
(A)
(B)
in which the total number of persons accommodated at any time does not exceed one person per 200 m²
of floor area or part thereof, up to a maximum of 8 persons; and
with a total floor area of not more than 3500 m².
state and territory variation
For Volume One see (SA, Farm building)
Farm shed means a single storey Class 7 or 8 building located on land primarily used for farming—
(a) that is—
(i)
used in connection with farming; or
(iii)
a combination of (i) and (ii); and
(ii)
used primarily to store one or more farm vehicles; or
(A)
(B)
(C)
occupied neither frequently nor for extended periods by people; and
in which the total number of persons accommodated at any time does not exceed 2; and
with a total floor area of more than 500 m² but not more than 2000 m².
state and territory variation
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For Volume One see (SA, Farm shed)
Farm vehicle means a vehicle used in connection with farming.
state and territory variation
For Volume One see (SA, Farm vehicle)
Finished ground level, for the purposes of Part 3.2 in Volume Two, means the ground level adjacent to footing systems
at the completion of construction and landscaping.
Fire brigade means a statutory authority constituted under an Act of Parliament having as one of its functions, the
protection of life and property from fire and other emergencies.
Fire brigade station for the purposes of E1.3(a)(ii) and H3.9 in Volume One, means a government-owned premises which
is a station for a fire brigade
Fire compartment means—
(a) the total space of a building; or
(b)
when referred to in—
(i)
(ii)
the Performance Requirements — any part of a building separated from the remainder by barriers to fire such
as walls and/or floors having an appropriate resistance to the spread of fire with any openings adequately
protected; or
the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions — any part of a building separated from the remainder by walls and/or floors
each having an FRL not less than that required for a fire wall for that type of construction and where all openings
in the separating construction are protected in accordance with the Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions of the relevant
Part.
Fire hazard means the danger in terms of potential harm and degree of exposure arising from the start and spread of fire
and the smoke and gases that are thereby generated.
Fire hazard properties means the following properties of a material or assembly that indicate how they behave under
specific fire test conditions:
(a) Average specific extinction area, critical radiant flux and Flammability Index, determined as defined in Schedule 3.
(b)
(c)
Smoke-Developed Index, smoke development rate and Spread-of-Flame Index, determined in accordance with
Schedule 6.
Group number and smoke growth rate index (SMOGRARC), determined in accordance with Specification C1.10 of
Volume One.
Fire intensity means the rate release of calorific energy in watts, determined either theoretically or empirically, as
applicable.
Fire-isolated passageway means a corridor, hallway or the like, of fire-resisting construction, which provides egress to
or from a fire-isolated stairway or fire-isolated ramp or to a road or open space.
Fire-isolated ramp means a ramp within a fire-resisting enclosure which provides egress from a storey.
Fire-isolated stairway means a stairway within a fire-resisting shaft and includes the floor and roof or top enclosing
structure.
Fire load means the sum of the net calorific values of the combustible contents which can reasonably be expected to
burn within a fire compartment, including furnishings, built-in and removable materials, and building elements. The
calorific values must be determined at the ambient moisture content or humidity. (The unit of measurement is MJ.)
Fire-protected timber means fire-resisting timber building elements that comply with Volume One Specification A1.1.
Fire-protective covering means—
(a) 13 mm fire-protective grade plasterboard; or
(b)
12 mm cellulose cement flat sheeting complying with AS/NZS 2908.2 or ISO 8336; or
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(c)
(d)
12 mm fibrous plaster reinforced with 13 mm x 13 mm x 0.7 mm galvanised steel wire mesh located not more than
6 mm from the exposed face; or
other material not less fire-protective than 13 mm fire-protective grade plasterboard, fixed in accordance with the
normal trade practice for a fire-protective covering.
Fire-resistance level (FrL) means the grading periods in minutes determined in accordance with Schedule 5, for the
following criteria—
(a) structural adequacy; and
(b)
(c)
integrity; and
insulation,
and expressed in that order.
note
A dash means that there is no requirement for that criterion. For example, 90/–/– means there is no requirement for an
FRL for integrity and insulation, and –/–/– means there is no requirement for an FRL.
Fire-resisting, for the purposes of Volume One, applied to a building element, means having an FRL appropriate for that
element.
Fire-resisting, for the purposes of Volume Two, applied to a structural member or other part of a building, means having
the FRL required for that structural member or other part.
Fire-resisting construction, for the purposes of Volume One, means one of the Types of construction referred to in Part
C1 of Volume One.
Fire safety system means one or any combination of the methods used in a building to—
(a) warn people of an emergency; or
(b)
(c)
(d)
provide for safe evacuation; or
restrict the spread of fire; or
extinguish a fire,
and includes both active and passive systems.
Fire-source feature means—
(a) the far boundary of a road, river, lake or the like adjoining the allotment; or
(b)
(c)
a side or rear boundary of the allotment; or
an external wall of another building on the allotment which is not a Class 10 building.
Fire wall means a wall with an appropriate resistance to the spread of fire that divides a storey or building into fire
compartments.
Flashover, in relation to fire hazard properties, means a heat release rate of 1 MW.
Flammability Index means the index number as determined by AS 1530.2.
Flashing means a strip or sleeve of impervious material dressed, fitted or built-in to provide a barrier to moisture
movement, or to divert the travel of moisture, or to cover a joint where water would otherwise penetrate to the interior
of a building.
Flight, for the purposes of Volume One, means that part of a stair that has a continuous series of risers, including risers
of winders, not interrupted by a landing or floor.
Flight, for the purposes of Volume Two, means that part of a stair that has a continuous series of risers, including risers
of winders, not interrupted by a landing or floor (see Figure 1.1.7).
explanatory information:
A flight is the part of a stair that has a continuous slope created by the nosing line of treads. The length of a flight is
limited to restrict the distance a person could fall down a stair. Quarter landings, as shown in Figure 1.1.7, are considered
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sufficient to halt a person’s fall and therefore are considered for the purposes of this document not to be part of the
flight.
Figure 1.1.7 Identification of stair flights - plan view
Flood hazard area means the site (whether or not mapped) encompassing land lower than the flood hazard level which
has been determined by the appropriate authority.
state and territory variations
For Volume One see (Vic, Flood hazard area)
For Volume Two in Victoria the definition of flood hazard area is replaced as follows:
Flood hazard area means the site (whether or not mapped) encompassing land in an area liable to flooding within the
meaning of Regulation 802 of the Building Regulations 2006.
Flood hazard level (FHL) means the flood level used to determine the height of floors in a building and represents the
defined flood level plus the freeboard. (see Figure 1.1.5)
Floor area, for the purposes of Volume One, means—
(a) in relation to a building — the total area of all storeys; and
(b)
in relation to a storey — the area of all floors of that storey measured over the enclosing walls, and includes—
(i)
the area of a mezzanine within the storey, measured within the finished surfaces of any external walls; and
(iii)
if there is no enclosing wall, an area which has a use that—
(ii)
(c)
the area occupied by any internal wall or partitions, any cupboard, or other built-in furniture, fixture or fitting;
and
(A)
(B)
contributes to the fire load; or
impacts on the safety, health or amenity of the occupants in relation to the provisions of the BCA; and
in relation to a room — the area of the room measured within the finished surfaces of the walls, and includes the
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(d)
(e)
area occupied by any cupboard or other built-in furniture, fixture or fitting; and
in relation to a fire compartment — the total area of all floors within the fire compartment measured within the finished
surfaces of the bounding construction, and if there is no bounding construction, includes an area which has a use
which contributes to the fire load; and
in relation to an atrium — the total area of all floors within the atrium measured within the finished surfaces of the
bounding construction and if no bounding construction, within the external walls.
Floor area, for the purposes of Volume Two, means in relation to a room, the area of the room measured within the
finished surfaces of the walls, and includes the area occupied by any cupboard or other built-in furniture, fixture or
fitting (see Figure 1.1.1).
Figure 1.1.1 Identification of floor area of a room
Foundation means the ground which supports the building (see Figure 1.1.2)
Figure 1.1.2 Identification of foundation
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Freeboard means the height above the defined flood level as determined by the appropriate authority, used to compensate
for effects such as wave action and localised hydraulic behaviour.
state and territory variations
For Volume One see (Vic, Freeboard)
For Volume Two in Victoria the definition of freeboard is replaced as follows:
Freeboard means the minimum height of the level of the lowest floor of a building above the defined flood level,
regulated by the relevant planning scheme, or specified or otherwise determined by the relevant council under
Regulation 802 of the Building Regulations 2006 (see Figure 1.1.5).
Glazing, for the purposes of Section J in Volume One, means a transparent or translucent element and its supporting
frame located in the envelope, and includes a window other than a roof light.
Glazing, for the purposes of Part 2.6 and Part 3.12 in Volume Two, means a transparent or translucent element and its
supporting frame located in the external fabric of the building, and includes a window other than a roof light.
Green star means the building sustainability rating scheme managed by the Green Building Council of Australia.
Going means the horizontal dimension from the front to the back of a tread less any overhang from the next tread or
landing above (see Figure 3.9.1.4).
Group number means the number of one of 4 groups of materials used in the regulation of fire hazard properties and
applied to materials used as a finish, surface, lining, or attachment to a wall or ceiling.
Habitable room means a room used for normal domestic activities, and—
(a) includes a bedroom, living room, lounge room, music room, television room, kitchen, dining room, sewing room,
study, playroom, family room, home theatre and sunroom; but
(b)
excludes a bathroom, laundry, water closet, pantry, walk-in wardrobe, corridor, hallway, lobby, photographic darkroom,
clothes-drying room, and other spaces of a specialised nature occupied neither frequently nor for extended periods.
Hazard rating means a rating of either Low Hazard, Medium Hazard or High Hazard determined in accordance with—
(a) Verification Method BV1 of Volume Three, wherever BV1 is used as an Assessment Method for a Performance
Solution; or
(b)
Specification B1.4 of Volume Three, for any Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution.
(b)
a nursing home or similar facility for sick or disabled persons needing full-time care; or
Health-care building means a building whose occupants or patients undergoing medical treatment generally need
physical assistance to evacuate the building during an emergency and includes—
(a) a public or private hospital; or
(c)
a clinic, day surgery or procedure unit where the effects of the predominant treatment administered involve patients
becoming non-ambulatory and requiring supervised medical care on the premises for some time after the treatment.
Heated water means water that has been intentionally heated. It is normally referred to as hot water or warm water.
Heating load means the calculated amount of energy delivered to the heated spaces of the building annually by artificial
means to maintain the desired temperatures in those spaces.
High Hazard means any condition, device or practice which, in connection with a water supply, has the potential to cause
death.
High wind area means a region that is subject to design wind speed more than N3 or C1 (see Table 1.1.1).
Horizontal exit means a required doorway between 2 parts of a building separated from each other by a fire wall.
Hours of operation means the hours when the number of occupants of a building is greater than 20% of the design
occupancy.
House energy rating software means software accredited under the Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme and is
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limited to assessing the potential thermal efficiency of the dwelling envelope.
explanatory information:
The Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme (NatHERS) refers to the Australian governments’ scheme that facilitates
consistent energy ratings from software tools which are used to assess the potential thermal efficiency of dwelling
envelopes.
Housing Provisions means the requirements for Class 1 and 10 buildings contained in Volume Two of the National
Construction Code as published by the Australian Building Codes Board.
Illuminance means the luminous flux falling onto a unit area of surface.
Illumination power density (W/m2) means the total of the power that will be consumed by the lights in a space, including
any lamps, ballasts, current regulators and control devices other than those that are plugged into socket outlets for
intermittent use such as floor standing lamps, desk lamps or work station lamps, divided by the area of the space.
explanatory information:
•
•
Illumination power density relates to the power consumed by the lighting system and includes the light
source or luminaire and any control device. The power for the lighting system is the illumination power
load. This approach is more complicated than the lamp power density approach but provides more
flexibility for a dwelling with sophisticated control systems.
The area of the space refers to the area the lights serve. This could be considered a single room,
open plan space, verandah, balcony or the like, or the total area of all these spaces.
Inclined lift means a power-operated device for raising or lowering people within a carriage that has one or more rigid
guides on an inclined plane.
Indirect cross-connection means any cross-connection where it is only possible for backflow to be induced by
backsiphonage.
Individual protection means the installation of a backflow prevention device at the point where a water service connects
to a single fixture or appliance.
Insulation, in relation to an FRL, means the ability to maintain a temperature on the surface not exposed to the furnace
below the limits specified in AS 1530.4.
Integrity, in relation to an FRL, means the ability to resist the passage of flames and hot gases specified in AS 1530.4.
Interconnection means the connection of two or more water systems.
Internal wall, for the purposes of Volume One, excludes a common wall or a party wall.
Internal wall, for the purposes of Volume Two, excludes a separating wall, common wall or party wall.
Interstitial condensation means the condensation of moisture on surfaces between material layers inside the building
component.
Jas-anz means the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand.
Lamp power density (W/m2) means the total of the maximum power rating of the lamps in a space, other than those
that are plugged into socket outlets for intermittent use such as floor standing lamps, desk lamps or work station
lamps, divided by the area of the space.
explanatory information:
•
•
•
lamp power density is a simple means of setting energy consumption at an efficient level for Class 1
and associated Class 10a buildings.
Lamp refers to the globe or globes that are to be installed in a permanently wired light fitting. The
maximum power of a lamp is usually marked on the fitting as the maximum allowable wattage.
The area of the space refers to the area the lights serve. This could be considered a single room,
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open plan space, verandah, balcony or the like, or the total area of all these spaces.
Landing means an area at the top or bottom of a flight or between two flights.
Latent heat gain means the heat gained by the vapourising of liquid without change of temperature.
Lightweight construction means construction which incorporates or comprises—
(a) sheet or board material, plaster, render, sprayed application, or other material similarly susceptible to damage by
impact, pressure or abrasion; or
(b)
(c)
concrete and concrete products containing pumice, perlite, vermiculite, or other soft material similarly susceptible to
damage by impact, pressure or abrasion; or
masonry having a width of less than 70 mm.
Loadbearing means intended to resist vertical forces additional to those due to its own weight.
Loadbearing wall, for the purposes of Part 3.2 in Volume Two, means any wall imposing on the footing a load greater
than 10 kN/m.
Loss means either: physical damage, financial loss or loss of amenity.
Low Hazard means any condition, device of practice which, in connection with a water supply, would constitute a nuisance
by colour, odour or taste but does not have the potential to injure or endanger health.
Low rainfall intensity area means an area with a 5 minute rainfall intensity for an average recurrence interval of 20 years
of not more than 125 mm/hour.
explanatory information:
Rainfall intensity figures can be obtained from Table 3.5.2.1 in Volume Two
Low-rise, low-speed constant pressure lift means a power-operated low-rise, low-speed device for raising or lowering
people with limited mobility on a carriage that is controlled by the application of constant pressure to a control.
Low-rise platform lift means a power-operated device for raising or lowering people with limited mobility on a platform,
that is controlled automatically or by the application of constant pressure to a control.
Luminaire efficacy means the lumens emitted from the luminous face of the whole luminaire including any diffusers,
reflectors or baffles attached to the luminous face divided by the power that is consumed by the whole luminaire
including any light sources, ballasts, drivers, current regulators and control devices.
Luminance contrast means the light reflected from one surface or component, compared to the light reflected from
another surface or component.
massive timber means an element not less than 75 mm thick as measured in each direction formed from solid and
laminated timber.
medium Hazard means any condition, device or practice which, in connection with a water supply, has the potential to
injure or endanger health.
mePs means the Minimum Energy Performance Standards for equipment and appliances established through the
Greenhouse and Energy Minimum Standards Act 2012.
mixed construction means a building consisting of more than one form of construction, particularly in double-storey
buildings.
mezzanine means an intermediate floor within a room.
mould means a fungal growth that can be produced from conditions such as dampness, darkness, or poor ventilation.
naBers energy for offices means the National Australia Built Environment Rating Systems for office energy efficiency,
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which is managed by the New South Wales Government.
network utility operator means a person who—
(a) undertakes the piped distribution of drinking water or non-drinking water for supply; or
(b)
is the operator of a sewerage system or a stormwater drainage system.
explanatory information:
A Network Utility Operator in most States and Territories is the water and sewerage authority licensed to supply water
and receive sewage and/or stormwater. The authority operates or proposes to operate a network that undertakes the
distribution of water for supply and undertakes to receive sewage and/or stormwater drainage. This authority may be
a licensed utility, local government body or council.
state and territory variation
For Volume Three see (Tas, Network Utility Operator)
non-combustible means—
(a) applied to a material — not deemed combustible as determined by AS 1530.1 — Combustibility Tests for Materials;
and
(b)
applied to construction or part of a building — constructed wholly of materials that are not deemed combustible.
non-drinking water means water which is not drinking water.
occupant traits, for the purposes of Volume One, means the features, needs and profile of the occupants in a habitable
room or space.
occupant traits, for the purposes of Volume Two, means the features, needs and profile of the occupants in a room or
space.
explanatory information:
This term is used to describe the characteristics of the occupants and their associated requirements in relation to a
room or space.
For example, in relation to a bedroom, the following occupant characteristics and associated requirements should be
considered:
•
•
Characteristics: height, mobility and how often the space will be used.
Requirements: a sleeping space and a space to undertake leisure activities.
occupiable outdoor area means a space on a roof, balcony or similar part of a building—
(a) which is open to the sky; and
(b)
(c)
to which access is provided, other than access only for maintenance; and
which is not open space.
on-site wastewater management system means a system installed on premises that receives and/or treats wastewater
generated on the premises and applies the resulting effluent to an approved disposal system or re-use system.
state and territory variation
For Volume Three see (Tas, On-site wastewater management system)
open-deck carpark means a carpark in which all parts of the parking storeys are cross-ventilated by permanent
unobstructed openings in not fewer than 2 opposite or approximately opposite sides, and—
(a) each side that provides ventilation is not less than 1/6 of the area of any other side; and
(b)
the openings are not less than ½ of the wall area of the side concerned.
open space means a space on the allotment, or a roof or similar part of a building adequately protected from fire, open
to the sky and connected directly with a public road.
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open spectator stand means a tiered stand substantially open at the front.
other property means all or any of the following—
(a) any building on the same or an adjoining allotment; and
(b)
(c)
any adjoining allotment; and
a road.
outdoor air means air outside the building.
outdoor air economy cycle is a mode of operation of an air-conditioning system that, when the outside air thermodynamic
properties are favourable, increases the quantity of outside air used to condition the space.
outfall means that part of the disposal system receiving surface water from the drainage system and may include a natural
water course, kerb and channel, or soakage system.
overflow devices are devices that provide relief to a water service, sanitary plumbing and drainage system, rainwater
harvesting system or stormwater system to avoid the likelihood of uncontrolled discharges.
overnight operating building, for the purposes of Section J of Volume One, means a building that operates more than
35 hours a week between 6:00 am and 6:00 am.
Panel wall means a non-loadbearingexternal wall, in frame or similar construction, that is wholly supported at each storey.
Patient care area means a part of a health-care building normally used for the treatment, care, accommodation, recreation,
dining and holding of patients including a ward area and treatment area.
Performance requirement means a requirement which states the level of performance which a Performance Solution
or Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution must meet.
Performance solution has the meaning described in A2.2.
Perimeter of building, for the purposes of Part 3.6 in Volume Two, means the external envelope of a building.
Personal care services means any of the following:
(a) The provision of nursing care.
(b)
Assistance or supervision in—
(i)
(ii)
toileting or continence management; or
(iv)
consuming food.
(iii)
(c)
(d)
(e)
bathing, showering or personal hygiene; or
dressing or undressing; or
The provision of direct physical assistance to a person with mobility problems.
The management of medication.
The provision of substantial rehabilitative or development assistance.
Piping, for the purposes of Section J in Volume One or in Volume Two, means an assembly of pipes, with or without
valves or other fittings, connected together for the conveyance of liquids and gases.
Predicted mean Vote (PmV) means the Predicted Mean Vote of the thermal perception of building occupants determined
in accordance with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55.
Plumbing means any water plumbing, roof plumbing, sanitary plumbing system or heating, ventilation and air-conditioning
plumbing.
Plumbing or drainage solution means a solution which complies with the Performance Requirements and is a—
(a) Performance Solution; or
(b)
(c)
Deemed-to-Satisfy Solution; or
combination of (a) and (b).
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Point of connection —
(a) for a heated water service means the point where the water heater connects to the cold water service downstream
of the isolation valve; and
(b)
for sewage disposal means the point where the on-site drainage system connects to the Network Utility Operator’s
sewerage system or to an on-site wastewater management system; and
(d)
for a water service means the point where the service pipe within the premises connects to the Network Utility
Operator’s property service or to an alternative water supply system.
(c)
for stormwater disposal means the point where the on-site drainage system connects to the Network Utility Operator’s
stormwater system or to an approved disposal system; and
Pressure vessel means a vessel subject to internal or external pressure. It includes interconnected parts and components,
valves, gauges and other fittings up to the first point of connection to connecting piping, and—
(a) includes fire heaters and gas cylinders; but
(b)
excludes—
(i)
any vessel that falls within the definition of a boiler; and
(iii)
domestic-type hot water supply heaters and tanks; and
(ii)
(iv)
storage tanks and equipment tanks intended for storing liquids where the pressure at the top of the tank is not
exceeding 1.4 kPa above or 0.06 kPa below atmospheric pressure; and
pressure vessels installed for the purposes of fire suppression or which serve a fire suppression system.
Primary building element, for the purposes of Volume One, means a member of a building designed specifically to take
part of the loads specified in B1.2 and includes roof, ceiling, floor, stairway or ramp and wall framing members
including bracing members designed for the specific purpose of acting as a brace to those members.
Primary building element, for the purposes of Part 3.1.3 in Volume Two, means a member of a building designed
specifically to take part of the building loads and includes roof, ceiling, floor, stairway or ramp and wall framing
members including bracing members designed for the specific purpose of acting as a brace to those members.
explanatory information:
The loads to which a building may be subjected are dead, live, wind, snow and earthquake loads. Further information
on building loads can be found in the 1170 series of Standards.
state and territory variation
For Volume Two in Queensland delete the definition of primary building element and replace with the following:
Primary building element means—
(a)
(b)
a member of a building designed specially to take part of the building loads and includes roof, ceiling, floor, stairway
or ramp and wall framing members including bracing members designed for the specific purpose of acting as a
brace to those members; and
door jambs, window frames and reveals, architraves and skirtings.
Private bushfire shelter means a structure associated with, but not attached to, or part of a Class 1a dwelling that may,
as a last resort, provide shelter for occupants from immediate life threatening effects of a bushfire.
Private garage, for the purposes of Volume One, means—
(a) any garage associated with a Class 1 building; or
(b)
(c)
any single storey of a building of another Class containing not more than 3 vehicle spaces, if there is only one such
storey in the building; or
any separate single storey garage associated with another building where such garage contains not more than 3
vehicle spaces.
Private garage, for the purposes of Volume Two, means—
(a) any garage associated with a Class 1 building; or
(b)
any separate single storey garage associated with another building where such garage contains not more than 3
vehicle spaces.
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Product means plumbing and drainage items within the scope of the PCA including but not limited to:
(a) Materials, fixtures and components used in a plumbing or drainage installation.
(b)
Appliances and equipment connected to a plumbing or drainage system.
(b)
how the use of the building material, product or form of construction complies with the requirements of the NCC
Volume One and Volume Two; and
Product technical statement means a form of documentary evidence stating that the properties and performance of a
building material, product or form of construction fulfil specific requirements of the NCC, and describes—
(a) the application and intended use of the building material, product or form of construction: and
(c)
any limitations and conditions of the use of the building material, product or form of construction relevant to (b).
Professional engineer means a person who is—
(a) if legislation is applicable — a registered professional engineer in the relevant discipline who has appropriate
experience and competence in the relevant field; or
(b)
if legislation is not applicable—
(i)
(ii)
registered in the relevant discipline on the National Engineering Register (NER) of the Institution of Engineers
Australia (which trades as ‘Engineers Australia’); or
eligible to become registered on the Institution of Engineers Australia’s NER and has appropriate experience
and competence in the relevant field.
state and territory variation
For Volume Three see (Tas, Professional engineer)
Public building means a Class 9b assembly building that is predominantly used for—
(a) civic, theatrical, social, or political purposes including a theatre, public hall or the like; or
(b)
(c)
entertainment, recreational or sporting purposes including a cinema, sports stadium, swimming pool, sporting club,
or the like; or
transit purposes, including a bus station, railway station, airport or ferry terminal.
Public corridor means an enclosed corridor, hallway or the like which—
(a) serves as a means of egress from 2 or more sole-occupancy units to a required exit from the storey concerned; or
(b)
is required to be provided as a means of egress from any part of a storey to a required exit.
rainwater harvesting system means a plumbing installation that comprises—
(a) any plumbing that connects a rainwater tank to any drinking water or non-drinking water outlets; and
(b)
any top-up line that conveys drinking water from a Network Utility Operator’s water supply to a rainwater tank.
r-Value (m2.K/W) means the thermal resistance of a component calculated in accordance with NZS 4214.
recognised expert means a person with qualifications and experience in the area of plumbing or drainage in question
recognised by the authority having jurisdiction.
explanatory information:
A recognised expert is a person recognised by the authority having jurisdiction as qualified to provide evidence under
A2.2(b). Generally, this means a hydraulic consultant or engineer, however the specific requirements are determined
by the authority having jurisdiction.
Under A2.2(b) , a report from a recognised expert may be used as evidence of suitability that a product listed on the
WaterMark Schedule of Excluded Products, or a plumbing or drainage system, complies with a Performance
Requirement or Deemed-to-Satisfy Provision.
state and territory variation
For Volume Three see (Tas, Recognised expert)
reference building, for the purposes of Volume One, means a hypothetical building that is used to calculate the maximum
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allowable annual energy load, or maximum allowable annual greenhouse gas emissions and determine the Thermal
comfort level for the proposed building.
reference building, for the purposes of Volume Two, means a hypothetical building that is used to determine the
maximum allowable heating load and cooling load for the proposed building.
reflective insulation,for the purposes of Volume One, means a building membrane with a reflective surface such as a
reflective foil laminate, reflective barrier, foil batt or the like capable of reducing radiant heat flow.
reflective insulation for the purposes of Volume Two, means a building membrane with a reflective surface such as a
reflective foil laminate, reflective barrier, foil batt or the like capable of reducing radiant heat flow.
explanatory information:
(a)
Typical R-Values achieved by adding reflective insulation are given in the explanatory information accompanying
Figures 3.12.1.1, 3.12.1.3 and 3.12.1.4. Information on specific products may be obtained from reflective insulation
manufacturers.
(b)
The surface of reflective insulation may be described in terms of its emittance (or infra-red emittance) or in terms
of its reflectance (or solar reflectance). Generally, for the surface of a particular reflective insulation –
(d)
Some types of reflective insulation may also serve the purposes of waterproofing or vapour proofing.
(c)
emittance + reflectance = 1.
regulated energy means the energy consumed by a building’s services minus the amount of renewable energy generated
and used on site.
reinforced masonry means masonry reinforced with steel reinforcement that is placed in a bed joint or grouted into a
core to strengthen the masonry.
renewable energy means energy that is derived from sources that are regenerated, replenished, or for all practical
purposes cannot be depleted and the energy sources include, but are not limited to, solar, wind, hydroelectric, wave
action and geothermal.
required, for the purposes of Volume One, means required to satisfy a Performance Requirement or a Deemed-to-Satisfy
Provisions of the BCA as appropriate.
required, for the purposes of Volume Two, means required to satisfy a Performance Requirement or a Deemed-to-Satisfy
Provision of the Housing Provisions as appropriate.
required, for the purposes of Volume Three, means required to satisfy a Performance Requirement or a Deemed-toSatisfy Provision of the NCC as appropriate.
residential aged care building means a Class 3 or 9a building whose residents, due to their incapacity associated with
the ageing process, are provided with physical assistance in conducting their daily activities and to evacuate the
building during an emergency.
residential care building means a Class 3, 9a or 9c building which is a place of residence where 10% or more of persons
who reside there need physical assistance in conducting their daily activities and to evacuate the building during an
emergency (including any aged care building or residential aged care building) but does not include a hospital.
resident use area means part of a Class 9c building normally used by residents, and—
(a) includes sole-occupancy units, lounges, dining areas, activity rooms and the like; but
(b)
excludes offices, storage areas, commercial kitchens, commercial laundries and other spaces not for the use of
residents.
resistance to the incipient spread of fire, in relation to a ceiling membrane, means the ability of the membrane to
insulate the space between the ceiling and roof, or ceiling and floor above, so as to limit the temperature rise of
materials in this space to a level which will not permit the rapid and general spread of fire throughout the space.
explanatory information:
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Resistance to the incipient spread of fire refers to the ability of a ceiling to prevent the spread of fire and thermally
insulate the space between the ceiling and the roof or floor above. “Resistance to the incipient spread of fire“ is superior
to “fire-resistance” because it requires a higher standard of heat insulation.
The definition is used in Volume Two for separating floors/ceilings for a Class 1a dwelling located above a nonappurtenant private garage.
retail display glazing, for the purposes of Section J of Volume One, means glazing used for the display of goods in a
shop or showroom.
rise in storeys means the greatest number of storeys calculated in accordance with C1.2 of Volume One.
riser means the height between consecutive treads and between each landing and continuous tread.
roof light, for the purposes of Section J and Part F4 in Volume One, and Parts 2.6, 3.8.4 and 3.12 in Volume Two, means
a skylight, window or the like installed in a roof—
(a) to permit natural light to enter the room below; and
(b)
at an angle between 0 and 70 degrees measured from the horizontal plane.
rolled fill means material placed in layers and compacted by repeated rolling by an excavator.
safe place means—
(a) a place of safety within a building—
(i)
(b)
(ii)
which is not under threat from a fire; and
from which people must be able to safely disperse after escaping the effects of an emergency to a road or open
space; or
a road or open space.
sanitary compartment means a room or space containing a closet pan or urinal (see Figure 1.1.6).
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Figure 1.1.6 Identification of a sanitary compartment
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sarking-type material means a material such as a reflective insulation or other flexible membrane of a type normally
used for a purpose such as waterproofing, vapour proofing or thermal reflectance.
school includes a primary or secondary school, college, university or similar educational establishment.
self-closing, for the purposes of Volume One, applied to a door, means equipped with a device which returns the door
to the fully closed position immediately after each opening.
self-closing, for the purposes of Volume Two, applied to a door or window, means equipped with a device which returns
the door or window to the fully closed and latched position immediately after each manual opening.
sensible heat gain means the heat gained which causes a change in temperature
separating wall means a wall that is common to adjoining Class 1 buildings (see Figure 1.1.3).
Figure 1.1.3 separating wall
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note:
In Volume Two may also be known as a party wall and typically is required to be fire-resisting construction (see Part
3.7.1)
service, for the purposes of Section J of Volume One, means a mechanical or electrical system that uses energy to
provide air-conditioning, mechanical ventilation, heated water supply, artificial lighting, vertical transport and the like
within a building, but which does not include—
(a) systems used solely for emergency purposes; and
(b)
(c)
cooking facilities; and
portable appliances.
service station means a garage which is not a private garage and is for the servicing of vehicles, other than only washing,
cleaning or polishing.
shaft means the walls and other parts of a building bounding—
(a) a well, other than an atrium well; or
(b)
a vertical chute, duct or similar passage, but not a chimney or flue.
shower area means the area affected by water from a shower, including a shower over a bath.
single leaf masonry means outer walls constructed with a single thickness of masonry unit.
site means the part of the allotment of land on which a building stands or is to be erected.
sitework means work on or around a site, including earthworks, preparatory to or associated with the construction,
alteration, demolition or removal of a building.
small-scale technology Certificate means a certificate issued under the Commonwealth Government’s Small-scale
Renewable Energy Scheme.
small-sized, low-speed automatic lift means a restricted use power-operated device for the infrequent raising or lowering
of people with limited mobility on a platform that is controlled automatically but has the capability of being electrically
isolated by a key-lockable control.
smoke-and-heat vent means a vent, located in or near the roof for smoke and hot gases to escape if there is a fire in the
building.
smoke-developed Index means the index number for smoke as determined by AS/NZS 1530.3.
smoke development rate means the development rate for smoke as determined by testing flooring materials in
accordance with AS ISO 9239.1.
smoke growth rate index (smoGra rC) means the index number for smoke used in the regulation of fire hazard
properties and applied to materials used as a finish, surface, lining or attachment to a wall or ceiling.
sole-occupancy unit means a room or other part of a building for occupation by one or joint owner, lessee, tenant, or
other occupier to the exclusion of any other owner, lessee, tenant, or other occupier and includes—
(a) a dwelling; or
(b)
(c)
(d)
a room or suite of rooms in a Class 3 building which includes sleeping facilities; or
a room or suite of associated rooms in a Class 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 building; or
a room or suite of associated rooms in a Class 9c building, which includes sleeping facilities and any area for the
exclusive use of a resident.
spandrel panel, for the purposes of Section J of Volume One, means the opaque part of a façade that is commonly
adjacent to, and integrated with, surrounding transparent or translucent glazed areas (or ‘vision areas’).
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spiral stairway means a stairway with a circular plan, winding around a central post with steps that radiate from a common
centre or several radii (see Figures 3.9.1.2(a) and (b)).
spread-of-Flame Index means the index number for spread of flame as determined by AS/NZS 1530.3.
stage means a floor or platform in a Class 9b building on which performances are presented before an audience.
stairway platform lift means a power-operated device for raising or lowering people with limited mobility on a platform
(with or without a chair) in the direction of a stairway.
standard Fire test means the Fire-resistance Tests of Elements of Building Construction as described in AS 1530.4.
storey means a space within a building which is situated between one floor level and the floor level next above, or if there
is no floor above, the ceiling or roof above, but not—
(a) a space that contains only—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(b)
(iv)
a lift shaft, stairway or meter room; or
a bathroom, shower room, laundry, water closet, or other sanitary compartment; or
accommodation intended for not more than 3 vehicles; or
a combination of the above; or
a mezzanine.
structural adequacy, in relation to an FRL, means the ability to maintain stability and adequate loadbearing capacity as
determined by AS 1530.4.
structural member means a component or part of an assembly which provides vertical or lateral support to a building or
structure.
surface water means all naturally occurring water, other than sub-surface water, which results from rainfall on or around
the site or water flowing onto the site.
swimming pool means any excavation or structure containing water and principally used, or that is designed,
manufactured or adapted to be principally used for swimming, wading, paddling, or the like, including a bathing or
wading pool, or spa.
tapered tread means a stair tread with a walking area that grows smaller towards one end.
tenable environment means, for the purposes of P2.3.5 of Volume Two , an environment within a sealed private bushfire
shelter that will—
(a) prevent an occupant’s core body temperature—
(i)
(b)
(c)
(ii)
rising by more than 2℃; and
reaching 42℃; and
maintain a minimum 17% oxygen content; and
maintain a maximum 3.5% carbon dioxide content.
thermal comfort level means the level of thermal comfort in a building expressed as a PMV sensation scale.
total r-Value (m2.K/W) means the sum of the R-Values of the individual component layers in a composite element
including any building material, insulating material, airspace and associated surface resistances.
total system solar Heat Gain Coefficient (sHGC) means the fraction of incident irradiance on a wall-glazing construction
or a roof light that adds heat to a building’s space.
total system u-Value (W/m2.K) means the thermal transmittance of the composite element allowing for the effect of any
airspaces, thermal bridging and associated surface resistances.
treatment area means an area within a patient care area such as an operating theatre and rooms used for recovery,
minor procedures, resuscitation, intensive care and coronary care from which a patient may not be readily moved.
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uncontrolled discharge includes leakage, seepage and any unintentional release of fluid from a plumbing and drainage
system.
unique wall, for the purposes of FV1 in Volume One and V2.2.1 in Volume Two, means a wall which is neither a cavity
wall nor a direct fix cladding wall.
unobstructed opening, for the purposes of Part 3.6 of Volume Two, means a glazed area that a person could mistake
for an open doorway or clearway and walk into the glazed panel.
unreinforced masonry means masonry that is not reinforced.
Vapour pressure means the pressure at which water vapour is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its condensed state.
Ventilation opening means an opening in the external wall, floor or roof of a building designed to allow air movement
into or out of the building by natural means including a permanent opening, an openable part of a window, a door or
other device which can be held open.
Verification method means a test, inspection, calculation or other method that determines whether a Performance Solution
complies with the relevant Performance Requirements.
Vessel, for the purposes of Volume One and Part 3.8.1 of Volume Two, means an open, pre-formed, pre-finished concave
receptacle capable of holding water, usually for the purpose of washing, including a basin, sink, bath, laundry tub
and the like.
Waffle raft means a stiffened raft with closely spaced ribs constructed on the ground and with slab panels supported
between ribs.
Wall-glazing construction, for the purposes of Section J of Volume One, means the combination of the glazing
components, and external wall components comprising the envelope of a building.
Ward area means that part of a patient care area for resident patients and may contain areas for accommodation, sleeping,
associated living and nursing facilities.
Warm water generator means a water heater that achieves a delivery temperature no greater than 45°C.
Water control layer means a water control membrane or the exterior cladding when no water control membrane is present.
Water control membrane a water barrier as classified by AS 4200.1.
Watermark Conformity assessment Body (WmCaB) means a conformity assessment body registered with and
accredited by the JAS-ANZ to conduct evaluations leading to product certification and contracted with the
administering body to issue the WaterMark Licence.
Watermark Certification scheme means the ABCB scheme for certifying and authorising plumbing and drainageproducts.
Watermark Licence means a licence issued by a WaterMark Conformity Assessment Body.
Watermark schedule of excluded Products means the list maintained by the administering body of products excluded
from the WaterMark Certification Scheme.
Watermark schedule of Products means the list maintained by the administering body of products included in the
WaterMark Certification Scheme, and the specifications to which the products can be certified.
explanatory Information:
The WaterMark Schedule of Products and the WaterMark Schedule of Excluded Products can be viewed on the ABCB
website at www.abcb.gov.au.
Waterproof means the property of a material that does not allow moisture to penetrate through it.
Water resistant means the property of a system or material that restricts moisture movement and will not degrade under
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a1.2
conditions of moisture.
Water sensitive materials means materials that have an inherent capacity to absorb water vapour and include: timber,
plasterboard, plywood, oriented strand board and the like.
Watertight means will not allow water to pass from the inside to the outside of the component or joint and vice versa.
Wet area means an area within a building supplied with water from a water supply system, which includes bathrooms,
showers, laundries and sanitary compartments and excludes kitchens, bar areas, kitchenettes or domestic food and
beverage preparation areas.
Winders means treads within a straight flight that are used to change direction of the stair (see Figure 1.1.7).
Window includes a roof light, glass panel, glass block or brick, glass louvre, glazed sash, glazed door, or other device
which transmits natural light directly from outside a building to the room concerned when in the closed position.
zone protection means the installation of a backflow prevention device at the point where a water service is connected
to multiple fixtures or appliances, with no backflow prevention devices installed as individual protection downstream
of this point.
a1.2 adoption of standards and other references
Where a the NCC references a document, rule, specification or provision, that adoption does not include a provision—
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
specifying or defining the respective rights, responsibilities or obligations as between themselves of any manufacturer,
supplier or purchaser; or
specifying the responsibilities of any trades person or other building operative, architect, engineer, authority, or other
person or body; or
requiring the submission for approval of any material, building component, plumbing or drainage component, form
or method of construction, to any person, authority or body other than a person or body empowered under State or
Territory legislation to give that approval; or
specifying that a material, building component, plumbing or drainage component, form or method of construction
must be submitted to any person, authority or body for expression of opinion; or
permitting a departure from the code, rule, specification or provision at the sole discretion of the manufacturer or
purchaser, or by arrangement or agreement between the manufacturer and purchaser.
a1.3 referenced standards, etc
(a)
(b)
A reference in a the NCC to a document under A1.2 refers to the edition or issue, together with any amendment,
listed in Specification A1.3 and only so much as is relevant in the context in which the document is quoted.
Any—
(i)
(ii)
(c)
(d)
reference in a document listed in Specification A1.3 (primary document) to another document (secondary
document); and
subsequent references to other documents in secondary documents and those other documents,
is a reference to the secondary and other documents as they existed at the time of publication of the primary
document listed in Specification A1.3.
The provisions of (b) do not apply if the secondary referenced document is also a primary referenced document.
Where the NCC references a document under A1.2 which is subject to publication of a new edition or amendment
not listed under Specification A1.3, the new edition or amendment is not referenced for the purposes of the NCC
clauses listed in Table 1 of Specification A1.3.
a1.4 differences between referenced documents and the nCC
The NCC overrules in any difference arising between it and any Standard, rule, specification or provision in a document
listed in Specification A1.3.
a1.5 Compliance with all Performance requirements
Subject to A1.6, Class 2–9 buildings must be so designed and constructed that they comply with the relevant provisions
of Section A and the Performance Requirements of this Volume.
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a1.6
a1.6 application of the nCC to a particular state or territory
For application within a particular State or Territory, this Volume of the NCC comprises—
(a)
(b)
Sections A to J (inclusive); and
the variations, deletions and additions to Sections A to J applicable to that State or Territory specified in the relevant
Appendix.
a1.7 Language
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
A reference to a building in the NCC is a reference to an entire building or part of a building, as the case requires.
A reference in a Performance Requirement of the NCC to “the degree necessary” means that consideration of all
the criteria referred to in the Performance Requirement will determine the outcome appropriate to the circumstances.
These words have been inserted to indicate that in certain situations it may not be necessary to incorporate any
specific measures to meet the Performance Requirement.
A reference to “BCA” in this volume, other than in the Introduction, means “Volume One of the Building Code of
Australia”.
A reference to a Class 1a, 1b, 7a, 7b, 9a, 9b, 9c, 10a, 10b and 10c is a reference to the separate classification.
A reference to—
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
Class 1 — is a reference to a Class 1a and 1b; and
Class 7 — is a reference to a Class 7a and 7b; and
Class 9 — is a reference to a Class 9a, 9b and 9c; and
Class 10 — is a reference to a Class 10a, 10b and 10c.
Interpretation of diagrams
Diagrams in the Housing Provisions are used to describe specific issues referenced in the associated text. They are not
to be construed as containing all design information that is required for that particular building element or situation.
explanatory information:
Diagrams are used to explain the requirements of a particular clause. To ensure the context of the requirement is clearly
understood, adjacent construction elements of the building that would normally be required in that particular situation
are not always shown.
Accordingly, aspects of a diagram that are not shown should not be interpreted as meaning these construction details
are not required.
a1.8 explanatory Information
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
These elements of the BCA are non-mandatory. They are used to provide additional guidance on the application of
the particular Parts and clauses and do not need to be followed to meet the requirements of the BCA.
Explanatory Information identified for cross-volume consideration is provided under certain Deemed-to-Satisfy
Provisions to identify Parts of NCC Volume Three – the Plumbing Code of Australia (PCA) which may be relevant
where the work being undertaken is subject to the requirements of the PCA.
The ABCB gives no warranty or guarantee that the Explanatory Information is correct or complete. The ABCB shall
not be liable for any loss howsoever caused whether due to negligence or otherwise arising from the use of or
reliance on the Explanatory Information.
The ABCB recommends that anyone seeking to rely on the Explanatory Information obtain their own independent
expert advice in relation to building or related activities.
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sCHeduLe 4 - LIst oF reFerenCe doCuments
schedule 4 - List of reference documents
schedule 4 referenced documents
schedule of referenced documents
The Standards and other documents listed in Schedule 4 are referred to in the NCC.
table 1 schedule of referenced documents
no.
AS/NZS ISO 717
Part 1
date
2004
AS ISO 717 Part 2 2004
AS 1056 Part 1
1991
AS/NZS 1158 Part
1
AS/NZS 1170 Part
0
2005
AS/NZS 1170 Part
1
2002
AS/NZS 1170 Part
2
2011
AS/NZS 1170 Part
3
2003
AS 1170 Part 4
2007
AS 1191
2002
2002
title
Volume one
Volume two
V2.4.6, 3.8.6.2
Volume
three
N/A
F5.3, FV5.1
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
B2.2
J6.5
N/A
N/A
B1.2
3.9.1.2, 3.9.1.3,
3.9.2.3, 3.0.3
N/A
B1.2, B1.4, Spec
B1.2, FV1
Schedule 3, V2.2.1,
3.5.1.0, 3.0.3
N/A
B1.2
3.0.3
N/A
B1.2
3.0.3, 3.4.4.1
N/A
Spec F5.5
N/A
N/A
Acoustics — Rating of
F5.2, FV5.1,
sound insulation in
FV5.2, FV5.3,
buildings and of building FV5.4
elements — Airborne
sound insulation
See Note 1
Acoustics — Rating of
sound insulation in
buildings and building
elements — Impact
sound insulation
Storage water heaters
— General requirements
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2, 3, 4
and 5)
Lighting for roads and
public spaces
Structural design actions
— General principles
(incorporating
amendments 1, 3 & 4)
Structural design actions
— Permanent, imposed
and other actions
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Structural design actions
— Wind actions
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2, 3, 4 &
5)
Structural design actions
— Snow and ice actions
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Structural design actions
— Earthquake actions in
Australia (incorporating
amendment 1)
Acoustics — Method for
laboratory measurement
of airborne sound
insulation of building
B1.1, B1.2, Spec
B1.2
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N/A
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sCHeduLe 4 - LIst oF reFerenCe doCuments
no.
date
title
Volume one
Volume two
Volume
three
AS 1273
1991
N/A
3.5.2.2
N/A
AS 1288
2006
Unplasticized PVC
(UPVC) downpipe and
fittings for rainwater
3.6.0, 3.6.1, 3.6.3,
3.9.2.3,
N/A
AS 1289 Method
6.3.3
1997
Glass in buildings —
B1.4, Spec C2.5,
Selection and installation Spec C3.4
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2 & 3)
Methods of testing soils N/A
for engineering purposes
— Determination of the
penetration resistance of
a soil — Perth sand
penetrometer test
(incorporating
amendment 1)
3.2.2.2
N/A
AS 1397
2011
3.4.2.2, 3.5.1.3
N/A
AS 1428 Part 1
2009
AS 1428 Part 1
2001
Continuous hot dip
metallic coated sheet
steel and strip - coatings
of zinc and zinc alloyed
with aluminium and
magnesium
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Design for access and
mobility — General
requirements for access
— New building work
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
AS 1428 Part 1
(Supplement 1)
1993
AS 1428 Part 2
1992
AS 1428 Part 4
1992
AS/NZS 1428.4
2009
elements
Design for access and
mobility — General
requirements for access
— New building work
Design for access and
mobility — General
requirements for access
— Buildings —
Commentary
Design for access and
mobility — Enhanced
and additional
requirements —
Buildings and facilities
Design for access and
mobility — Tactile
ground surface
indicators for orientation
of people with vision
impairment
Design for access and
N/A
Schedule 3,
N/A
D2.10, D2.15,
D2.17, D3.1,
D3.2, D3.3, D3.6,
D3.10, D3.12,
Spec D3.10, E3.8,
F2.4, G4.5
H2.7, H2.8,
N/A
H2.10, H2.15
E1.2
H2.2
N/A
N/A
E1.2
H2.2, H2.3, H2.4, N/A
H2.5, H2.7,
H2.10, H2.11,
H2.12, H2.13,
H2.14
H2.11
N/A
E1.2
D3.8
N/A
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
N/A
N/A
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AS 1530 Part 1
1994
AS 1530 Part 2
1993
AS 1530 Part 4
2014
Part 1
AS/NZS 1530 Part 1999
3
AS 1562 Part 1
1992
AS/NZS 1562 Part 1999
2
AS/NZS 1562 Part 1996
3
AS 1603 Part 1
(R2016)
AS 1603 Part 2
(R2016)
1997
1997
title
mobility — Means to
assist the orientation of
people with vision
impairment — Tactile
ground surface
indicators (incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Methods for fire tests on
building materials,
components and
structures —
Combustibility test for
materials
Methods for fire tests on
building materials,
components and
structures — Test for
flammability of materials
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Methods for fire tests on
building materials,
components and
structures - Fireresistance tests on
elements of construction
Methods for fire tests on
building materials,
components and
structures —
Simultaneous
determination of
ignitability, flame
propagation, heat
release and smoke
release
Design and installation
of sheet roof and wall
cladding — Metal
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2 & 3)
Design and installation
of sheet roof and wall
cladding — Corrugated
fibre-reinforced cement
Design and installation
of sheet roof and wall
cladding — Plastics
Automatic fire detection
and alarm systems —
Heat detectors
Automatic fire detection
and alarm systems —
Volume one
Volume two
Volume
three
Schedule 3
Schedule 3
N/A
Schedule 3
Schedule 3
N/A
Schedule 3,
C3.15, C3.16,
Spec A2.4, Spec
C3.15, Spec
D1.12
Schedule 3, 3.7.1.8
N/A
Schedule 3, Spec Schedule 3
A2.4
N/A
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.1.0, 3.5.3.0
N/A
F1.5
3.5.1.0
N/A
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.1.0
N/A
Spec E2.2d
N/A
N/A
Spec E2.2d
N/A
N/A
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
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AS 1657
2013
AS/NZS 1664 Part 1997
1
AS/NZS 1664 Part 1997
2
AS/NZS 1668 Part 2015
1
AS 1668 Part 2
2012
AS 1668 Part 4
2012
AS 1670 Part 1
2015
AS 1670 Part 3
2004
AS 1670 Part 4
2015
AS/NZS 1680 Part 2009
0
AS 1684 Part 2
2010
title
Point type smoke
detectors
Fixed platforms,
walkways, stairways and
ladders — Design,
construction and
installation
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Aluminium structures —
Limit state design
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Aluminium structures —
Allowable stress design
(incorporating
amendment 1)
The use of ventilation
and air-conditioning in
buildings — Fire and
smoke control in
buildings
The use of ventilation
and air-conditioning in
buildings — Mechanical
ventilation in buildings
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
The use of ventilation
and airconditioning in
buildings — Natural
ventilation of buildings
Fire detection, warning,
control and intercom
systems — Systems
design, installation and
commissioning - Fire
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Fire detection, warning,
control and intercom
systems — Systems
design, installation and
commissioning — Fire
alarm monitoring
Fire detection, warning,
control and intercom
systems — Systems
design, installation and
commissioning —
Emergency warning and
intercom systems
Interior lighting — Safe
movement
Residential timberframed construction —
Volume one
Volume two
Volume
three
D1.16, D1.17,
N/A
D2.18, H1.6, H3.5
N/A
B1.4
3.0.4
N/A
B1.4
3.0.4
N/A
C2.12, C3.15,
N/A
Spec C2.5, D1.7,
Spec E1.8, E2.2,
F4.12, Spec
E2.2b, Spec G3.8
FV4.1, F4.5,
3.8.5.0, V2.4.5
F4.11, F4.12,
JV3, J5.3
F4.11
N/A
N/A
C3.5, C3.6, C3.7, 3.7.2.2
C3.8, C3.11,
D2.21, G4.8,
Spec C3.4, E2.2,
Spec E2.2a, Spec
G3.8
N/A
Spec E2.2a
N/A
N/A
E4.9, Spec G3.8
N/A
N/A
F4.4
3.8.4.3
N/A
B1.4, B1.5, F1.12 3.0.5, 3.2.5.6, 3.4.0.2, N/A
3.4.1.2, 3.4.3.0
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
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AS 1684 Part 3
2010
AS 1684 Part 4
2010
AS 1720 Part 1
2010
AS 1720 Part 4
2006
AS 1720 Part 5
2015
AS 1735 Part 11
1986
AS 1735 Part 12
1999
AS/NZS 1859 Part 2004
4
AS 1860 Part 2
2006
AS 1905 Part 1
2015
AS 1905 Part 2
2005
AS 1926 Part 1
2012
title
Non-cyclonic areas
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Residential timberframed construction —
Cyclonic areas
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Residential timberframed construction —
Simplified — noncyclonic areas
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Timber structures —
Design methods
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2 & 3)
Timber structures — Fire
resistance for structural
adequacy of timber
members
Timber structures —
Nailplated timber roof
trusses
Lifts, escalators and
moving walks — Firerated landing doors
Lifts, escalators and
moving walks —
Facilities for persons
with disabilities
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Reconstituted woodbased panels —
Specifications — Wetprocessed fibreboard
Particleboard flooring —
Installation
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Components for the
protection of openings in
fire-resistant walls —
Fire-resistant doorsets
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Components for the
protection of openings in
fire-resistant walls —
Fire-resistant roller
shutters
Swimming pool safety —
Safety barriers for
swimming pools
Volume one
Volume two
Volume
three
B1.4, B1.5, F1.12 3.0.5, 3.2.5.6, 3.4.0.2, N/A
3.4.1.2
B1.4, B1.5, F1.12 3.0.5, 3.2.5.6, 3.4.0.2, N/A
3.4.1.2, 3.4.3.0
B1.4
3.4.3.0
N/A
Spec A2.3
N/A
N/A
B1.4
3.4.3.0
N/A
C3.10
N/A
N/A
E3.6, H2.6
N/A
N/A
N/A
3.5.3.3, 3.5.3.4
N/A
B1.4
N/A
N/A
C3.6, Spec C3.4
N/A
N/A
Spec C3.4
N/A
N/A
G1.1, G1.3
3.10.1.0
N/A
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
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AS 1926 Part 3
2010
AS 2047
2014
AS 1926 Part 2
2007
AS 2049
2002
AS 2118 Part 1
2017
AS 2118 Part 4
2012
AS 2118 Part 5
1995
AS 2118 Part 9
1995
AS 2159
2009
AS 2050
AS 2118 Part 6
2002
2012
AS/NZS 2179 Part 2014
1
AS/NZS 2269 Part 2012
0
AS 2293 Part 1
2005
title
Swimming pool safety —
Location of safety
barriers for swimming
pools (incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Swimming pool safety —
Water recirculation
systems (incorporating
amendment 1)
Windows and external
glazed doors in buildings
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
See Note 2
Roof tiles (incorporating
amendment 1)
Installation of roof tiles
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Automatic fire sprinkler
systems — General
systems (incorporating
amendment 1)
Automatic fire sprinkler
systems — Sprinkler
protection for
accommodation
buildings not exceeding
four storeys in height
Automatic fire sprinkler
systems — Domestic
Automatic fire sprinkler
systems — Combined
sprinkler and hydrant
systems in multistorey
buildings
Automatic fire sprinkler
systems - Piping support
and installation
Piling — Design and
installation
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Specification for
rainwater goods,
accessories and
fasteners - Metal shape
or sheet rainwater goods
and metal accessories
and fasteners
Plywood — Structural Specifications
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Emergency escape
Volume one
Volume two
3.10.1.0
Volume
three
N/A
G1.1
3.10.1.0
N/A
G1.1
B1.4, FV1, F1.13, V2.2.1, 3.6.0, 3.6.1,
J3.4
3.12.3.3
N/A
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.2.0, 3.5.2.1
N/A
Spec E1.5, CV3
N/A
B4.2
Spec E1.5
N/A
B4.2
N/A
N/A
B4.2
N/A
N/A
B4.2
B1.4
3.2.0
N/A
N/A
3.5.2.2
N/A
N/A
3.5.3.4
N/A
E4.4, E4.8
N/A
N/A
B1.4, F1.5
Spec E1.5
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
3.5.2.0, 3.5.2.1
N/A
N/A
B4.2
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AS 2327 Part 1
2003
AS 2441
2005
AS 2444
2001
AS 2665
2001
AS 2712
2007
AS 2870
2011
AS 2419 Part 1
2005
AS/NZS 2890 Part 2009
6
AS/NZS 2904
1995
AS/NZS 2908 Part 2000
1
AS/NZS 2908 Part 2000
2
AS/NZS 2918
2001
AS/NZS 3000
2018
AS/NZS 3013
2005
title
Volume one
Volume two
Volume
three
Composite structures —
Simply supported beams
Fire hydrant installations
— System design,
installation and
commissioning
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Installation of fire hose
reels (incorporating
amendment 1)
Portable fire
extinguishers and fire
blankets — Selection
and location
Smoke/heat venting
systems — Design,
installation and
commissioning
Solar and heat pump
water heaters - Design
and construction
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2 & 3)
Residential slabs and
footings
Spec A2.3, B1.4
3.0.4
N/A
E1.4
N/A
B4.2
E1.6
N/A
N/A
Spec E2.2c, Spec N/A
G3.8
N/A
N/A
N/A
Acceptable
plumbing
practice B2
F1.10
D3.5
3.1.2.4, 3.1.3.2,
N/A
3.1.3.4, 3.2.0, 3.2.1,
3.2.2.4, 3.2.2.6,
3.2.3.2, 3.2.4.1, 3.2.5,
3.2.5.2, 3.2.5.6
N/A
N/A
F1.9
3.5.3.6
N/A
B1.4, F1.5
N/A
N/A
Schedule 3
Schedule 3, 3.5.3.3,
3.5.3.4, 3.5.3.5
3.7.3.0, 3.7.3.4,
3.7.3.5
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
lighting and exit signs for
buildings - System
design, installation and
operation (incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Parking facilities — Offstreet parking for people
with disabilities
Damp-proof courses and
flashings (incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Cellulose cement
products — Corrugated
sheets
Cellulose cement
products — Flat sheets
Domestic solid-fuel
burning appliances —
Installation
Electrical installations
(known as the
Australian/New Zealand
Wiring Rules)
Electrical installations —
Classification of the fire
and mechanical
C2.12, E1.3
G2.2
Spec E2.2d
C2.13
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
N/A
B4.2
N/A
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AS/NZS 3100
2017
AS 3498
2009
AS/NZS 3500 Part 2003
0
AS/NZS 3500 Part 2015
1
AS/NZS 3500 Part 2015
2
AS/NZS 3500 Part 2015
3
AS/NZS 3500 Part 2015
4
AS 3600
2009
AS 3660 Part 1
2014
AS 3660.3 Part 3
2014
AS/NZS 3666 Part 2011
1
AS 3700
2011
AS 3740
2010
title
performance of wiring
system elements
Approval and test
specification — General
requirements for
electrical equipment
Authorization
requirements for
plumbing products Water heaters and hotwater storage
Plumbing and drainage
— Glossary of terms
Plumbing and drainage
— Water services
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Volume one
Volume two
Volume
three
Spec E2.2d
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Acceptable
plumbing
practice B2
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Plumbing and drainage N/A
— Sanitary plumbing
and drainage
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Plumbing and drainage F1.1
— Storm water drainage
Plumbing and drainage N/A
— Heated water
services (incorporating
amendment 1)
N/A
Concrete structures
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
3.2.2.4, 3.2.3.1,
3.2.5.6
Spec A2.3, B1.4
Termite management — B1.4, F1.9
New building work
Termite management — N/A
Assessment criteria for
termite management
systems
Air handling and water
F2.7, F4.5
systems of buildings —
Microbial control —
Design, installation and
commissioning
Masonry structures
(incorporating
amendments 1 & 2)
Waterproofing of
domestic wet areas
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Spec A2.3, B1.4
F1.7
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
3.1.2.0, 3.1.2.4,
3.5.2.0, 3.5.2.5
N/A
B1.4, B3.3,
B4.2, BV5.1,
B5.2, B5.3,
B5.4,
SPEC5.1,
B6.4, B6.5,
C1.3, CV2.2,
C2.3, C2.4,
N/A
B2.2, B2.5,
B2.6, B2.7,
B2.8, B2.9,
Acceptable
plumbing
practice B2,
C2.3
N/A
3.1.3.2, 3.1.3.3
N/A
N/A
N/A
3.3.1.0, 3.3.2.0,
3.3.3.0, 3.3.4.0
N/A
3.1.3.3
3.8.1.2
N/A
N/A
Page 266
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title
Volume one
Volume two
AS 3786
2014
Smoke alarms using
scattered light,
transmitted light or
ionization (incorporating
amendment 1)
Performance of electrical
appliances — Airconditioners and heat
pumps — Ducted airconditioners and
air-to-air heat pumps —
Testing and rating for
performance
Construction of buildings
in bushfire-prone areas
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2 & 3)
Testing of products in
contact with drinking
water
Spec E2.2a
3.7.2.2
J5.11, Spec JVa
N/A
N/A
G5.2
3.7.4.0
N/A
N/A
Acceptable
plumbing
practice B1
N/A
Schedule 3, 3.0.3
N/A
C3.15
3.7.1.8
N/A
Spec A2.3, B1.4
3.2.5.6, 3.4.2.0,
3.4.4.0
N/A
N/A
B4.2
F1.6
3.5.1.0
N/A
F1.6
3.5.1.0
N/A
N/A
N/A
BV2.1, B2.2
AS/NZS 3823 Part 2012
1.2
AS 3959
2009
AS/NZS 4020
2005
AS 4055
2012
AS 4072 Part 1
2005
AS 4100
1998
AS 4118 Part 2.1
1995
AS/NZS 4200 Part 2017
1
AS 4200 Part 2
2017
AS/NZS 4234
2008
AS 4254 Part 1
2012
AS 4254 Part 2
2012
Wind loads for housing
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Components for the
protection of openings in
fire-resistant separating
elements — Service
penetrations and control
joints (incorporating
amendment 1)
Steel Structures
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Fire Sprinkler Systems
— Piping — General
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Pliable building
membranes and
underlays — Materials
Pliable building
membranes and
underlays — Installation
requirements
Heated water systems
— Calculation of energy
consumption
(incorporating
amendments 1, 2 & 3)
Ductwork for airhandling systems in
buildings — Flexible
duct
Ductwork for airhandling systems in
N/A
Volume
three
N/A
A5.3
Spec C1.10, J5.6 3.7.1.9, 3.12.5.3
N/A
Spec C1.10,J5.6
N/A
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
3.7.1.9, 3.12.5.3
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AS/NZS 4256 Part 1994
1
AS/NZS 4256 Part 1994
2
AS/NZS 4256 Part 1994
3
AS/NZS 4256 Part 1996
5
AS/NZS 4284
2008
AS 4428 Part 6
1997
AS/NZS 4505
2012
AS 4508
1999
AS 4552
2005
AS 4586
2013
AS/NZS 4600
2005
AS 4654 Part 1
2012
AS 4654 Part 2
2012
AS 4426
1997
title
buildings — Rigid duct
Plastic roof and wall
cladding materials —
General requirements
Plastic roof and wall
cladding materials —
Unplasticized polyvinyl
chloride (uPVC) building
sheets
Plastic roof and wall
cladding materials —
Glass fibre reinforced
polyester (GRP)
Plastic roof and wall
cladding materials —
Polycarbonate
Testing of building
facades
Thermal insulation of
pipework, ductwork and
equipment — Selection,
installation and finish
Fire detection, warning,
control and intercom
systems — Control and
indicating equipment —
Alarm signalling
equipment
Garage doors and other
large access doors
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Thermal resistance of
insulation for ductwork
used in building air
conditioning
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Gas fired water heaters
for hot water supply
and/or central heating
Slip resistance
classification of new
pedestrian surface
materials (incorporating
amendment 1)
Volume one
Volume two
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.1.0
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.1.0
N/A
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.1.0
N/A
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.1.0
N/A
FV1
V2.2.1
N/A
Spec E2.2d
N/A
N/A
B1.4
3.0.4
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
B2.2
D2.10, D2.13,
D2.14
3.9.1.4
N/A
3.4.2.0, 3.4.2.1,
3.4.4.0
N/A
3.8.1.3
N/A
3.8.1.3
N/A
N/A
See Note 3
Cold-formed steel
B1.4
structures (incorporating
amendment 1)
Waterproofing
F1.4
membranes for external
above-ground use —
Materials
Waterproofing
F1.4
membranes for external
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
N/A
Volume
three
N/A
N/A
Page 268
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date
AS 4773 Part 1
2015
AS 4773 Part 2
2015
AS/NZS 4859 Part 2002
1
AS 5113
2016
AS 5146 Part 1
2015
AS/NZS 5263.1.2
2016
AS 5637 Part 1
2015
AS ISO 9239 Part
1
2003
AS/NZS ISO 9972
2015
AIRAH-DA09
1998
AIRAH-DA28
Appendix B
2011
Australian Institute 1987
of Steel
Construction
(AISC)
ANSI/ASHRAE
2013
Standard 55
ANSI/ASHRAE
Standard 140
2014
title
above-ground use —
Design and installation
Masonry for small
buildings — Design
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Masonry for small
buildings —
Construction
Materials for the thermal
insulation of buildings —
General criteria and
technical provisions
(incorporating
amendment 1)
Fire propagation testing
and classification of
external walls of
buildings
Reinforced autoclaved
aerated concrete —
Structures
Gas appliances — Gas
fired water heaters for
hot water supply and/or
central heating
Determination of fire
hazard properties - Wall
and ceiling linings
Reaction to fire tests for
flooring — Determination
of the burning behaviour
using a radiant heat
source
Thermal performance of
buildings —
Determination of air
permeability of buildings
— Fan pressurization
method
Air Conditioning Load
Estimation
Building Management
and Control Systems —
HVAC Control Routines
Guidelines for
assessment of fire
resistance of structural
steel members
Thermal environmental
conditions for human
occupancy
Standard method of test
for the evaluation of
building energy analysis
Volume one
Volume two
Volume
three
N/A
3.3.1.0, 3.3.2.0,
3.3.3.0, 3.3.4.0
N/A
N/A
3.3.1.0, 3.3.2.0,
3.3.3.0, 3.3.4.0
N/A
3.12.1.1,3.12.1.5,
3.12.5.1
N/A
CV3
N/A
N/A
B1.4
3.5.3.0, 3.11.6
N/A
J5.9
N/A
N/A
Spec C1.10
N/A
N/A
Schedule 3
N/A
N/A
JV4
V2.6.2.3
N/A
Spec JV
N/A
N/A
Spec A2.3
N/A
N/A
Schedule 3
N/A
N/A
JV1, JV2, JV3
V2.6.2.2
N/A
J1.2, J5.5, J5.8
Spec JVb
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
N/A
N/A
Page 269
sCHeduLe 4 - LIst oF reFerenCe doCuments
no.
date
ASTM D3018-90
1994
ASTM E2073-10
2010
ASTM E72-80
1981
ASTM E695-79
1985
AHRI 460
2005
AHRI 550/590
2003
ABCB
2019
ABCB
2011
CIBSE Guide A
Disability
Standards for
Accessible Public
Transport
Education and
Care Services
National Law Act
(Vic)
European Union
Commission
Regulation
622/Annexx II,
point 2
2015
2002
ABCB
ISO 140 Part 6
2012
2010
2012
1998E
title
computer programs
Class A asphalt shingles
surfaced with mineral
granules
Standard Test Method
for Photopic Luminance
of Photoluminescent
(Phosphorescent)
Markings
Standard method of
conducting strength
tests of panels for
building construction
Standard method of
measuring relative
resistance of wall, floor
and roof construction to
impact loading
Remote mechanicaldraft air-cooled
refrigerant condensers
Water chilling packages
using the vapour
compression cycle
Fire Safety Verification
Method
Volume one
Volume two
B1.4, F1.5
3.5.1.0
Spec E4.8
N/A
N/A
Spec C1.8
N/A
N/A
Spec C1.8
N/A
N/A
J5.12
N/A
N/A
JV3, J5.12/
N/A
N/A
CV4, DV4, EV1.1, N/A
EV2.1, EV3.2,
EV4.2, GV4.1
Protocol for Structural
B1.5
Software, Version 2011.1
Standard for
B1.6
Construction of Buildings
in Flood Hazard Areas,
Version 2012.2
Environmental design
JV3, Spec JVb
H2.1
Schedule 3
Eco-design
J5.7b
requirements for
glandless standalone
circulators and glandless
circulators integrated in
products
Acoustics —
Spec F5.5
Measurement of sound
insulation in buildings
and of building elements
— Laboratory
measurements of impact
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Volume
three
N/A
3.4.0.2
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
3.10.3.0
N/A
Page 270
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no.
date
ISO 540
2008
ISO 8100-32
ISO 8336
2018
1993E
NASH Standard
2014
NASH Standard
2005
NASH Standard
2014
N/A
N/A
NZS 4214
2006
SA TS 101
2015
ISO 25745-2
Part 1
Part 2
2012
TN 61
Notes associated with Table 1:
(1)
Volume one
sound insulation of floors
Hard coal and coke —
Spec C3.15
Determination of ash
fusibility
Lifts and service lifts
J6.7
Fibre cement flat sheets Schedule 3
Energy performance of
lifts, escalators and
moving walks — Part 2:
Energy calculation and
classification for lifts
(elevators)
Steel Framed
Construction in Bushfire
Areas (incorporating
amendment A)
Residential and LowRise Steel Framing —
Design Criteria
(incorporating
amendments A, B & C)
Residential and LowRise Steel Framing —
Design Solutions
(incorporating
amendment A)
Northern Territory
Deemed to Comply
Standards Manual
Methods of determining
the total thermal
resistance of parts of
buildings
Design of post-installed
and cast-in fastenings
for use in concrete
Cement Concrete and
Aggregates Australia —
Articulated walling
Volume two
N/A
Volume
three
N/A
J6.7
N/A
Schedule 3, 3.5.3.3,
3.5.3.4, 3.5.3.5
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
3.7.4.0
N/A
B1.4
3.4.2.0, 3.4.2.1,
3.10.1.0, 3.11.6
N/A
B1.4, B1.5, F1.12 3.4.0.2, 3.4.1.2,
3.4.2.0, 3.4.2.1,
3.10.1.0, 3.11.7
N/A
N/A
3.10.1.0
N/A
J1.2
N/A
N/A
B1.4
3.11.6
N/A
N/A
3.2.1
N/A
N/A
For AS/NZS ISO 717.1:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(2)
title
Test reports based on AS 1276 — 1979 and issued prior to AS/NZS 1276.1 — 1999 being referenced in the
NCC remain valid.
The STC values in reports based on AS 1276 — 1979 shall be considered to be equivalent to Rw values.
Test reports based on AS/NZS 1276.1 prepared after the NCC reference date for AS/NZS 1276.1 — 1999 must
be based on that version.
Test reports based on AS/NZS ISO 717.1 — 1996 and issued prior to AS/NZS ISO 717.1 — 2004 being
referenced in the NCC remain valid.
(e)
Reports based on AS/NZS ISO 717.1 relating to tests carried out after the NCC reference date for AS/NZS ISO
717.1 — 2004 must relate to the amended Standard.
(a)
Tests carried out under earlier editions of AS 2047 remain valid.
For AS 2047:
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
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sCHeduLe 4 - LIst oF reFerenCe doCuments
(3)
(b)
Reports based on AS 2047 relating to tests carried out after the NCC reference date for AS 2047 — 2014
Amendment 2 must relate to the amended Standard.
(a)
Test reports based on the 2004 edition of AS/NZS 4586 and issued prior to the 2013 edition of AS 4586 being
referenced in the NCC remain valid.
For AS 4586:
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Test reports prepared after the NCC reference date of the 2013 edition of AS 4586 must be based on that
version.
For the purposes of assessing compliance, the slip-resistance classifications of V, W and X in reports based on
the 2004 edition of AS/NZS 4586 may be considered to be equivalent to slip-resistance classifications of P5,
P4 and P3 respectively in the 2013 edition of AS 4586.
Test reports based on Appendix D of AS 4586 — 2013 and issued prior to the NCC reference date for AS 4586
— 2013 (incorporating Amendment 1) remain valid.
Test reports based on Appendix D of AS 4586 — 2013 and prepared after the NCC reference date for AS 4586
— 2013 (incorporating Amendment 1) must be based on that version.
state and territory variations for Volume 1—schedule of referenced documents
ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, Tas, Vic Spec A1.3 Table 1
state and territory variations for Volume 2—schedule of referenced documents
table 2 australian Capital territory referenced documents
no.
N/A
date
2014
ISO 10077-1
2006
table 3 new south Wales referenced documents
no.
AS 1603 Part 3
date
1996
NSW Legislation
1979
NSW Legislation
2008
NSW Legislation
1992
table 4 northern territory referenced documents
title
Volume 2
Development Control Code ACT 3.2
for Best Practice Waste
Management in the ACT
Thermal performance of
ACT 7.1.4(a)(ii)
windows, doors and shutters
— Calculation of thermal
transmittance
title
Automatic fire detection and
alarm systems — Heat
alarms
Environmental Planning and
Assessment Act
Swimming Pools Act
Volume 2
NSW 1.1.4
3.7.4.0, NSW P2.6.1, NSW
PART 3.12.1
O2.5, F2.5.2, P2.7.1P2.5.3,
3.10.1.0
Swimming Pools Regulation O2.5, F2.5.2, P2.7.1P2.5.3,
3.10.1.0
no.
BCa 2009
date
May 2009
title
Building Code of Australia
Volume 2
2.6, 3.12
no.
N/A
date
N/A
title
Queensland Government,
Department of Agriculture,
Fisheries and Forestry Construction timbers in
Queensland, Book 1 and
Book 2: Properties and
Volume 2
3.4.3.0
table 5 queensland referenced documents
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
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no.
date
N/A
N/A
table 6south australian referenced documents
title
specifications for
satisfactory performance of
construction timbers in
Queensland - Class 1 and
10 buildings (Houses,
carports, garages,
greenhouses and sheds)
Building Act 1975
Volume 2
title
South Australian Minister’s
Specification — Heating and
cooling loads for elevated
buildings with a lightweight
framed flooring system and
transportable buildings
Design for access and
mobility— General
requirements for access —
New building work
Tests on elements of
construction for buildings
exposed to simulated
bushfire attack — Radiant
heat and small flaming
sources
Tests on elements of
construction for buildings
exposed to simulated
bushfire attack — Large
flaming sources
Guidance on the use of
rainwater tanks
Volume 2
SA 3.12.0.1(a)
O2.5, F2.5.2, P2.7.1P2.5.3,
3.10.1.0
no.
SA 3.12.0.1(a)
date
2012
AS 1428 Part 1
2001
AS 1530.8 Part 1
2007
AS 1530.8 Part 2
2007
enHealth Council,
Department of Health and
Ageing
2004
no.
N/A
date
2008
title
Plumbing Regulations
Volume 2
V2.6.1, 3.12.0
no.
as/nzs 3500.4
date
2003
title
Plumbing and drainage Heated water services,
Amdt 1
Volume 2
WA 2.3.3
table 7Victorian referenced documents
table 8Western australian referenced documents
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
SA 5.2.3
SA 3.7.4.3
SA 3.7.4.3
SA 2.2.4
Page 273
LIst oF amendments
List of amendments
List of amendments - nCC 2019 - Volume three
This set of notes has been prepared by the Australian Building Codes Board to assist NCC users in identifying changes
incorporated in the 2019 edition of Volume Three of the NCC.
The notes provide a description of major technical changes made from the previous edition of Volume Three.
While the Australian Building Codes Board has attempted to include all major changes made from the previous edition of
Volume Three, the Board does not give any warranty nor accept any liability in relation to the contents of this list of
amendments.
General
reference
Throughout
Throughout
Introduction to the nCC
Changes and Commentary
The content of Volume Three has been revised as part of the readability initiative.
Tables have been amended to align with Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).
reference
Changes and Commentary
Introduction to the NCC The introduction to the NCC has been re-written as a part of the initiative to improve the
readability of the NCC.
section a - Governing requirements
reference
Section A
Changes and Commentary
The General Provisions have been replaced with Section A, the Governing Requirements of
the NCC, as part of the initiative to improve the readability of the NCC.
Part B1 - Cold water services
reference
Changes and Commentary
Introduction to this part The reference to “of a property that is connected to the drinking water supply” has been
removed due to the inclusion of the new Part B6 for rainwater harvesting and use.
BP1.2
The content relating to materials and products has been deleted, removing duplicate
Performance Requirements covered by Part A2.
BP1.2
The content relating to contamination of drinking water has been relocated to BP5.1(1).
BP1.2(1)(a)
The content of BP1.2(1)(a) relating to “undue noise” has been relocated to Part D1.
Verification Methods
The duplicated Verification Methods covered by A2.2(2)(b) have been removed.
B1.1(1)(a)
A Network Utility Operator’s drinking water supply has been included due to the inclusion of
the new Part B6 for rainwater harvesting and use.
B1.1(1)(b)
An alternative drinking water supply has been included due to the inclusion of the new Part B6
for rainwater harvesting and use.
B1.1(2)(a)
A reference to acceptable plumbing manuals has been included.
B1.1(2)(b)
A reference to acceptable plumbing practice B1 has been included.
B1.4(1)
Reference to AS/NZS 3500.5, which has been withdrawn, has been removed.
Acceptable plumbing Acceptable plumbing practice has been included as a new compliance pathway.
practice B1
Part B2 - Heated water services
reference
Changes and Commentary
Introduction to this part The reference to “of a property that is connected to the drinking water supply” has been
removed due to the inclusion of the new Part B6 for rainwater harvesting and use.
BP2.3
The content relating to materials and products has been deleted, removing duplicate
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 284
LIst oF amendments
reference
Changes and Commentary
Performance Requirements covered by Part A2.
BP2.3(b)
The content of BP2.3(b) relating to “undue noise” has been relocated to Part D1.
BP2.4
BP2.4 has been amended to harmonise provisions throughout the NCC.
BP2.5
BP2.5 has been amended to harmonise provisions throughout the NCC.
Verification Methods
The duplicated Verification Methods covered by A2.2(2)(b) have been removed.
BV2.2
A new Verification Method has been inserted as a means to verify compliance with BP2.5.
B2.1(2)(a)
A reference to acceptable plumbing manuals has been included.
B2.1(2)(b)
A reference to acceptable plumbing practice B2 has been included.
B2.5
Heated water delivery temperature requirements have been included.
B2.6
Temperature control device provisions have been included.
B2.7
Heated water storage provisions have been included.
B2.8
Legionella control provisions have been included.
B2.9(1)
The reference to AS/NZS 3500.5, which has been withdrawn, has been removed.
B2.9(2)
The reference to AS/NZS 3500.5, which has been withdrawn, has been removed.
Acceptable plumbing Acceptable plumbing practice has been included as a new compliance pathway.
practice B2
Explanatory information: Amended to include Pool and spa heating and pumping – energy efficiency and provide
Cross-volume
reference to Part J7 of NCC Volume One and Part 3.12.5 of NCC Volume Two.
considerations
Part B3 - non-drinking water services
reference
Introduction to this part
BP3.1(1)
BP3.3
BP3.3(1)
Verification Methods
B3.2(1)
Changes and Commentary
The reference to “of a property” has been removed.
Amended to remove reference to B3.2 and harmonise compliance with the NCC.
The content relating to materials and products has been deleted, removing duplicate
Performance Requirements covered by Part A2.
The content of BP3.3(1) relating to “undue noise” has been relocated to Part D1.
The duplicated Verification Methods covered by A2.2(2)(b) have been removed.
Amended to reduce repetition.
Part B4 - Fire-fighting water services
reference
BP4.1
Verification Methods
B3.2(1)
Changes and Commentary
The content relating to materials and products has been deleted, removing duplicate
Performance Requirements covered by Part A2.
The duplicated Verification Methods covered by A2.2(2)(b) have been removed.
Amended to reduce repetition.
Part B5 - Cross-connection control
reference
Part B5
BV5.1
B5.3
Changes and Commentary
The Part has been included to consolidate the cross-connection control provisions with the
introduction of Specification B5.1.
Included to provide a Verification Method to verify compliance with the contamination control
Performance Requirement.
Included to clarify the requirement for backflow prevention to protect non-drinking and drinking
water supplies.
Part B6 - rainwater harvesting and use
reference
Part B6
Changes and Commentary
The Part has been included to operate in addition to Parts B1, B2 and B3 for provisions relating
to rainwater harvesting and use.
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 285
Part C1 - sanitary plumbing systems
reference
CP1.1(1)
Verification Methods
C1.2
Acceptable plumbing
practice C1
LIst oF amendments
Changes and Commentary
The content relating to “undue noise” has been relocated to Part D1.
The duplicated Verification Methods covered by A2.2(2)(b) have been removed.
Included to harmonise the provisions with AS/NZS 3500.2.
Acceptable plumbing practice has been inserted as a new compliance pathway.
Part C2 - sanitary drainage systems
reference
CO2(f) and (g)
CF2.2
CP2.1
Changes and Commentary
Included to harmonise the objectives relating to swimming pools within the NCC.
Included to harmonise the provisions relating to swimming pools within the NCC.
The content relating to materials and products has been deleted, removing duplicate
Performance Requirements covered by Part A2.
CP2.2
Included to harmonise the provisions relating to swimming pools within the NCC.
Verification Methods
The duplicated Verification Methods covered by A2.2(2)(b) have been removed.
CV2.1, CV2.2
Included to provide Verification Methods for verifying compliance of a sanitary drainage system.
C2.2
Included to harmonise the provisions with AS/NZS 3500.2.
C2.3
Included to harmonise the provisions relating to swimming pools within the NCC.
Acceptable plumbing Acceptable plumbing practice has been included as a new compliance pathway.
practice C2
Part d1 - excessive noise
reference
Part D1
Part D1
Changes and Commentary
Part D1 - Roof drainage systems, that existed in PCA 2016, has been removed from the national
provisions and will be included in the relevant State and Territory appendices.
Included to consolidate provisions and operate in addition to Parts B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6, C1
and C2 for provisions relating to excessive noise.
Part d2 - surface and subsurface drainage systems
reference
Part D2
Changes and Commentary
Part D2 - Surface and subsurface drainage systems, that existed in PCA 2016, has been
removed from the national provisions and will be included in the relevant State and Territory
appendices.
Part e1 - Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems
reference
Part E1
Part E1
Changes and Commentary
Part E1 - Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems, that existed in PCA 2016, has been
removed from the national provisions and will be inserted in the relevant State and Territory
appendices.
Included to consolidate provisions and operate in addition to Parts B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6, C1
and C2 for provisions relating to facilities.
Part F1 - on-site wastewater management systems
reference
Part F1
Changes and Commentary
Part F1 - On-site wastewater management systems, that existed in PCA 2016, has been
removed from the national provisions and will be included in the relevant State and Territory
appendices.
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 286
LIst oF amendments
Part F2 - on-site liquid trade waste systems
reference
NA
Changes and Commentary
Part F2 - On-site liquid trade waste systems, that existed in PCA 2016, has been removed from
the national provisions and will be included in the relevant State and Territory appendices.
schedule 2 - abbreviations and symbols
reference
Schedule 2
schedule 3 - definitions
Changes and Commentary
Abbreviations and symbols used in the PCA have been included in Schedule 2 as part of the
readability initiative.
reference
Schedule 3
Changes and Commentary
The definitions previously contained in Part A1 have been included in Schedule 3 as part of
the readability initiative. Schedule 3 includes all defined terms used throughout the NCC.
Aged care building
A new defined term has been included for the purpose of residential specialist services.
Automatic
A new defined term adopted as a part of the harmonised defined terms.
Backflow
prevention A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
device
Blockage
A new defined term inserted that means an obstruction within a drainage system.
Boiler
A new defined term adopted as a part of the harmonised defined terms.
Containment protection A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
Contaminant
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control
Cross-connection
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
Direct cross-connection A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
Hazard rating
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
High hazard
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
Indirect
cross- A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
connection
Individual protection
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
Interconnection
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
Medium hazard
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
Professional Engineer The defined term for Professional Engineer has been amended to include in the relevant
discipline.
Rainwater harvesting A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
system
Separating wall
A new defined term adopted as a part of the harmonised defined terms.
Site
A new defined term adopted as a part of the harmonised defined terms.
Sole-occupancy unit
A new defined term adopted as a part of the harmonised defined terms.
Swimming pool
A new defined term adopted as a part of the harmonised defined terms.
Uncontrolled discharge A new defined term inserted that covers any unintentional release of fluid from a plumbing or
drainage system.
Warm water generator A new defined term inserted that means a point of use device used to heat water to a maximum
of 45°C without storage.
Zone protection
A new defined term inserted for the purpose of cross-connection control.
schedule 4 - documents adopted by reference
reference
AS/NZS 1200
AS 1271
AS 1324.1
AS 1345
AS 1358
Changes and Commentary
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 287
LIst oF amendments
reference
AS 1428.1
AS/NZS 1546.1
AS/NZS 1546.2
AS/NZS 1546.3
AS/NZS 1547
AS/NZS 1571
AS/NZS 1668.1
AS 1668.2
AS 2118.1
AS/NZS 2712
AS 3498
AS/NZS 3500.1
AS/NZS 3500.2
AS/NZS 3500.3
AS/NZS 3500.4
AS/NZS 3500.5
AS/NZS 3666.1
AS/NZS 3666.2
AS 4041
AS 4254.1
AS 4254.2
AS 4426
AS 4508
AS 5601
Changes and Commentary
The 2009 edition of AS/NZS 1428.1—Design for access and mobility - General requirements
for access – New building work (incorporating amendments 1 and 2) has been referenced.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
The 2017 edition of AS/NZS 2118—Automatic fire sprinkler systems - General systems
(incorporating amendment 1) has been referenced.
The 2007 edition of AS/NZS 2712—Solar and heat pump heaters - Design and Construction
(incorporating amendments 1, 2 and 3) has been referenced.
The 2009 edition of AS/NZS 3498—Authorization requirements for plumbing products – Water
heaters and hot-water storage tanks has been referenced.
The 2015 edition of AS/NZS 3500.1—Plumbing and Drainage - Water services (incorporating
amendment 1) has been referenced.
The 2015 edition of AS/NZS 3500.2—Plumbing and Drainage - Sanitary plumbing and drainage
(incorporating amendment 1) has been referenced.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
The 2015 edition of AS/NZS 3500.4—Plumbing and Drainage - Heated water services
(incorporating amendment 1) has been referenced.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
This standard is no longer referenced within the national provisions.
NCC 2019 Volume Three - Plumbing Code of Australia Public Comment Draft
Page 288
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