Pilot’s Handbook
Your source for the insider information on your Flextone II
and the optional foot controllers, Floor Board and FB4.
Rev H. Electrophonic version available at www.line6.com and on accompanying CD.
0
2
10
(DELAY FEEDBACK)
10
MID
(DELAY LEVEL)
0
B
15
18
16
Amp Model
Line 6 Twang
Line 6 Crunch #2
Line 6 Blues
Line 6 Layer
Tube Preamp
Small Tweed #2
Boutique #3
Black Panel #2
Brit Class A #3
Brit Class A #2
California Crunch #1
California Crunch #2
Boutique #1
Rectified #2
Modern Hi Gain #2
Boutique #2
10
0
7
10
(VOLUME BOOST ON/OFF)
(NOISE GATE ON/OFF)
Based on:
Volume Pedal Reverb
Fender Deluxe and Bassman, with more tone control range
Pre
Spring
’68 Marshall Plexi 50 watt with more tone control range
Pre
Room
Marshall JTM-45 meets Budda Twinmaster meets Line 6
Pre
Room
Line 6 Clean meets Psychotic Drive
Post
Room
Tube Instrument Preamp
Post
Room
’60 Tweed Fender Champ
Pre
Room
Budda Twinmaster head
Pre
Room
’65 Blackface Fender Twin
Pre
Spring
’60 Vox AC 15
Pre
Room
’60 Vox AC 30 non-Top Boost
Pre
Room
’85 Mesa Boogie Mark IIc+ Clean Channel
Pre
Spring
’85 Mesa Boogie Mark IIc+ Drive Channel
Post
Spring
Dumble Overdrive Special Clean Channel
Pre
Room
’95 Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Head
Post
Room
’89 Soldano SLO Super Lead Overdrive
Post
Room
Dumble Overdrive Special Drive Channel
Post
Room
19
0
8
10
(HOLD TAP FOR ALTERNATE FUNCTIONS)
TAP
(HOLD)
13
Hold TAP and turn the Amp Models
knob to select Amp Models 17-32.
(PRESENCE ON/OFF)
0
6
SAVE
12
(CAB SELECT)
DELAY
ROTARY SPEAKER 2x12 DELAY/COMPRESSOR
FLANGER 2 9
DELAY/TREMOLO
FLANGER 1
DELAY/CHORUS 1
CHORUS 2
DELAY/CHORUS 2
CHORUS 1
DELAY/FLANGER 1
TREMOLO
DELAY/FLANGER 2
COMPRESSOR 1x8 OFF DELAY/SWELL
BYPASS
EFFECTS
Chorus Speed Range of
choruses
Chorus Speed Range of
choruses
Chorus 1
Delay Time
Delay Swell
FLEXTONE: TAP LIT BUTTON FOR TAP TEMPO / HOLD LIT BUTTON FOR MANUAL
20
Delay Time
Delay
Heavier flange with more feedback
Notes
Turns off the effects
Higher settings "squeeze" your
volume more.
The tremolo was designed with the
characteristic Fender shape.
Square wave LFO, "rack" type chorus
setup; subtler than Chorus 2
Sine wave LFO, approx. 10% feedback;
emulates an old Roland CE-1 for
classic stomp box-type sound.
Light Flange
This emulates a classic spinning
speaker, a la the Leslie
Delay Level Very quick delays will have no repeats
for better slapback
Swell Time Volume swell
Flanger Speed Range of
flangers
Flanger 2
Flanger Speed Range of
flangers
Rotary Speaker Rotary Speed Depth
Flanger 1
Chorus 2
Tremolo Speed Depth
Tremolo
Tweak
n/a
Ratio
Tap
n/a
n/a
Effect
Bypass
Compressor
EFFECT SETUPS
(EFFECT/TAP SPEED)
CHAN VOL REVERB FX TWEAK
D
* Fender, Marshall, Vox, Budda, Dumble, Matchless, Mesa Boogie, Soldano, Roland, Arbiter, and other amplifier and effect models are all trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with Line 6. These trademarks of other manufacturers are used solely for the purpose of describing certain
amplifier tones produced using Line 6's modeling technology. Line 6's modeling technology provides the Flextone with a wide variety of sounds and effects modeled after some of the most popular sounds of these classic amps. Line 6, Flextone, Floor Board, the Line 6 logo and the Flextone logo are trademarks of Line 6, Inc.
14
Based on:
Volume Pedal Reverb
Line 6 21st Century Clean
Pre
Room
Line 6 Thick Grindage
Pre
Spring
Line 6 Industrial Strength OD
Post
Room
Way too many hours of shredding
Post
Room
’87 Roland JC-120
Pre
Spring
’52 Fender Deluxe
Pre
Room
’59 Fender Bassman
Pre
Spring
’65 Fender Deluxe
Pre
Spring
’96 Matchless Chieftain
Pre
Spring
’63 Vox AC 30 with Top Boost
Pre
Room
’65 Marshall JTM-45
Pre
Room
’68 Marshall Plexi 50 watt
Pre
Room
’90 Marshall JCM-800
Post
Room
’94 Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Tremoverb Combo
Post
Room
’89 Soldano X88R Preamp
Post
Room
’60’s Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face
Post
Room
10
TREBLE
0
C
CHANNEL SELECT
Tap plus...
(Line 6 Clean)
(Line 6 Crunch)
(Line 6 Drive)
(Line 6 Insane)
(Jazz Clean)
(Small Tweed)
(Tweed Blues)
(Black Panel)
(Modern Class A)
(Brit Class A)
(Brit Blues)
(Brit Classic)
(Brit Hi Gain)
(Rectified)
(Modern Hi Gain)
(Fuzz Box)
(DISTORTION ON/OFF)
10
BASS
0
5
A
Amp Model
Line 6 Clean
Line 6 Crunch
Line 6 Drive
Line 6 Insane
Jazz Clean
Small Tweed
Tweed Blues
Black Panel
Modern Class A
Brit Class A
Brit Blues
Brit Classic
Brit Hi Gain
Rectified
Modern Hi Gain
Fuzz Box
17
10
DRIVE
0
4
11
AMP MODELS 17-32:*
(AMPS 17-32)
BLACK PANEL
TWEED BLUES
MODERN CLASS A
SMALL TWEED3
BRIT CLASS A
JAZZ CLEAN
BRIT BLUES
LINE 6 INSANE
BRIT CLASSIC
LINE 6 DRIVE
BRIT HI GAIN
LINE 6 CRUNCH
RECTIFIED
LINE 6 CLEAN
MODERN HI GAIN
FUZZ
MANUAL
10
1x12
AMP MODELS 1-16:*
INPUT MASTER VOLUME
1
ToneTransfer Compatible
POD
II
/ Flextone II
AMP MODELS
4x1
2
FLEXTONE II FRONT PANEL:
REDUCED SIZE BACK COVER FOLDOUT FOR ELECTROPHONIC PILOT'S GUIDE
0
4x1
The serial number can be found on the back panel of your
Flextone II. Please note it here for future reference:
SERIAL NO:
WARNING:
To reduce the risk of fire or
electric shock, do not expose this appliance to
rain or moisture.
CAUTION: To reduce the risk of fire or electric shock,
do not remove screws. No user-serviceable parts inside. Refer
servicing to qualified service personnel.
CAUTION:
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device
pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause
harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
The lightning symbol within a triangle means
“electrical caution!” It indicates the presence
of information about operating voltage and
potential risks of electrical shock.
The exclamation point within a
triangle means “caution!” Please
read the information next to all
caution signs.
Flextone II Pilot’s Handbook © 2000, Line 6, Inc. Line 6, Flextone, Floor Board, FB4, POD, POD Pro, Bass POD, AX2, Amp Farm and
Echo Farm are trademarks of Line 6, Inc. All other product trademarks are property of their respective owners.
YOU SHOULD READ THESE IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS
KEEP THESE INSTRUCTIONS IN A SAFE PLACE
Before using your Flextone, be sure to carefully read the applicable
items of these operating instructions and the safety suggestions.
1.
Obey all warnings on the amp and in this Pilot’s Handbook.
2.
Do not place near heat sources, such as radiators, heat registers, or appliances which produce
heat. Keep the rear of the unit at least 3 inches from walls or other items that might block heat radiation.
3.
Do not block any of the ventilation openings or use in an enclosed space.
4.
Guard against objects or liquids entering the enclosure.
5.
Connect only to AC power outlets rated 100-120V or 200-240V 47-63Hz (depending on the voltage range of the
unit; refer to the back panel). Current ratings should be a minimum of 5A for the 120V range and 2.5A for the
240V range.
6.
Do not step on power cords. Do not place items on top of power cords so that they are pinched or leaned on. Pay
particular attention to the cord at the plug end and the point where it connects to the amp.
7.
Unplug the amp when not in use for extended periods of time.
8.
Do not perform service operations beyond those described in the Flextone II Pilot’s Handbook. In the following
circumstances, repairs should be performed only by qualified service personnel:
•liquid is spilled into the unit
•an object falls into the unit
•the unit does not operate normally or changes in performance in a significant way
•the fuse is blown
•the unit is dropped or the enclosure is damaged
9.
Prolonged listening at high volume levels may cause irreparable hearing loss and/or damage. Always be sure to
practice “safe listening.”
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
QUICK START GUIDE or “Manual? I don’t need no stinking manual!”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1•1
INTRODUCTION
Register And Get Great Free Stuff! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Get On-line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flextone! Meet the Flextone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modeling /Amp & Cab Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
There’s Magic in the A.I.R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing your Amp Models and Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ToneTransfer: Exchanging sounds with Flextones and PODs and the Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 2: GRAND TOUR
Front Panel Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dual Mode Direct Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flextone II Flavors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1•1
1•2
1•3
1•3
1•5
1•7
1•7
2•1
2•7
2•9
2•11
CHAPTER 3: MODELED AMPS
Which Amps and Cabs are Modeled? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3•1
Cabinet Model List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3•13
CHAPTER 4: FLEXTONE EFFECTS
Deep Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4•1
Onboard Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4•1
CHAPTER 5: CREATING & STORING SOUNDS
Using the Manual Mode Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Channel Memories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ToneTransfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Edit Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing Amp Models & Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CHAPTER 6: THAT’S USING YOUR FEET
USING THE FLOOR BOARD WITH THE FLEXTONE
Getting Connected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TWO MODES:
I. CHANNEL SELECT MODE
Banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Channel Select. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing & Saving Channels with the Floor Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tap Tempo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wah Pedal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Volume Pedal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2. EFFECT ON/OFF MODE
Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive/Boost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trem/Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reverb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effect On/Off Settings Stored With Programmed Sounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5•1
5•1
5•2
5•4
5•4
5•7
6•1
6•2
6•3
6•3
6•4
6•4
6•5
6•5
6•6
6•7
6•7
6•7
6•8
6•8
6•8
6•8
USING THE FB4 WITH THE FLEXTONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6•9
CHAPTER 7: DEEP EDITING & MIDI CONTROL
MIDI Basics: In/Out, MIDI Channel, MIDI Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flextone II / POD / POD Pro ToneTransfer via MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Backing Up Your Flextone’s Memory to Other Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emagic SoundDiver Software: Editing your Flextone Sounds with a Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Things You Can Do with MIDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step by Step with SoundDiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7•1
7•3
7•5
7•6
7•7
7•9
CHAPTER 8: INSIDE YOUR HEAD (FLEXTONE II HD)
Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effects Loop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Series vs Parallel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Making the Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Effect Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mono/Stereo Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabinet Hookups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Open Back / Closed Back Emulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Take a Load Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8•1
8•1
8•2
8•3
8•4
8•4
8•5
8•6
8•7
APPENDIX
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-F
QUICK START GUIDE:
“MANUAL? I DON’T NEED NO STINKING MANUAL!”
QUICK START GUIDE
or:
“MANUAL? I DON’T NEED NO STINKING MANUAL!”
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Turn the CHANNEL VOLUME and MASTER VOLUME controls all the
way down to zero.
Plug the power cord into the rear POWER CONNECTOR, then plug
the other end into an AC wall socket.
Connect your guitar to the INPUT JACK.
Switch on the POWER.
Select an AMP MODEL.
Set the CHANNEL VOLUME anywhere from 3 to 5 o’clock, adjust the
MASTER VOLUME to a comfortable level, and set the BASS, MID, and
TREBLE to your heart’s desire.
Select your desired EFFECTS setting and adjust the REVERB and
EFFECTS TWEAK so you’re happy with the sound.
Channel A, B, C, D buttons select one of the Flextone’s four
programmable channels. Press SAVE then one of these to save your
own sound to one of these channels.
Press the MANUAL button any time for a “Manual Override” that
gives you where-the-knobs-are-is-how-it-sounds operation.
What number 10? You’re ready to go!
But wait, before you go any further, flip to the inside back cover of this manual and
notice that it folds out. The idea is to have this handy pictorial reference always
opened out while you’re thumbing through the manual. Photocopy the back of it
and you’ll have a handy template for making a note of your favorite settings.
REGISTER AND GET GREAT FREE STUFF!
Included in this manual is a handy, postage-paid card for you to send back to us to
register your purchase, and let us know a little about yourself. It is very important
that you fill that registration card out right now, and send it to us in the mail or
1•1
QUICK START GUIDE:
1•2
GET ONLINE
jump on the internet and register at the Line 6 Support Center – www.line6.com.
How come? Well, for one thing, it gets you all set up for warranty service should
you ever have a problem with your Flextone. (Warranty info is at the end of this
manual.) It also ensures that we will be able to contact you if new software
versions or other enhancements are offered – cutting edge technology and all that.
GET ONLINE
Here at Line 6, our mission is to bring powerful new technologies to musicians. As
part of that mission, we focus great effort on making the Internet a valuable
resource for every one of our customers. You may already have surfed the Line 6
site at http://www.line6.com when you were considering your purchase, and
found all the information already there on Line 6 products and technologies.
The Line 6 web site is one of the most effective ways for us to bring you what you
need. Through the Internet, we can give you instant access to all kinds of great,
free stuff to make you and your Flextone ever more powerful. Like easy email
access to our product support experts, handy tips & tricks, electronic versions of
this and other documentation, the latest news of what’s happening with Line 6
and the products we make for you, and....
Line 6 ToneTransfer and Discussion Forums: Visit the web site, and you’ll
find a powerful way to connect to other Flextone and POD users. Swap sounds, get
and give advice, and generally hang out and get Flextone-a-licious, all from the
privacy of your own comfy computer chair!
Already on the Internet? Great! Visit us often and check out the late-breaking
news and the other resources there. Not on the Internet yet? This may be the time
to make the big jump, and thereby ensure that you will get all the great resources
we can offer for you and your Flextone.
INTRODUCTION:
FLEXTONE! MEET THE FLEXTONE....
INTRODUCTION
FLEXTONE! MEET THE FLEXTONE....
Thank you for buying a Flextone, the flexible Digital Guitar Amplifier System
with the killer tone (and you were wondering how we came up with the name).
There’s a bunch of stuff we have to talk about and only a few pages to do it in, so
let’s get started.
What makes the Flextone so different from every other guitar amp? It’s...
MODELING
Modeling: just what is it, and why is it so important? (By the way, you sent in that
registration card or did it on the web, right? OK, just checking.)
Tubes, we can all agree, are the heart and soul of every legendary guitar amp and
are responsible for the warm, harmonic-rich tone quality of those amps. Solid state
devices (transistors) are simply unable to duplicate tube warmth and performance.
And “hybrids” – a tube in a circuit along with a bunch of transistors – are really a
vain attempt at warming up a transistor-based tone. They fall short in any
comparison to a 100% tube circuit. So that’s it – tubes or nothin’, right? Well, not
any more....
You see, the engineers at Line 6, being an adventurous lot, and totally pumped
about this whole guitar tone thing as well, decided to stock up on the coffee, bust
out the engineering equipment, and get down to learning everything there is to
know about tubes. Riding high on the caffeine wave, they began a three-year
project to analyze and map out exactly how different types of tubes respond under
various conditions typical of guitar amplifier design. How tubes process an input
signal, how the signal is colored and shaped, at what point it begins to distort, the
quality and characteristic of the distortion – complicated stuff, but all analyzable
as electronic data. A guitar pickup output, after all, is an electronic signal, and
tubes are really just a complex form of signal processing.
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INTRODUCTION:
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FLEXTONE! MEET THE FLEXTONE....
The Line 6 engineers also directed their caffeine-enhanced attention to a study of
guitar speaker cabinets, and the important part they play in communicating great
guitar tone.
Having sussed it all out, the Line 6 engineers were then able to apply their digital
expertise to develop software which simulates the tube and other circuitry’s signal
processing entirely within the digital domain. Cool, huh?
This revolutionary DSP (digital signal processing) software-based modeling
technology gives Line 6 the power to create super butt-kickin’ Digital Guitar
Amplifier Systems like the Flextone: value-packed amps with a whole new kind of
tonal flexibility.
AMP & CAB MODELS
This modeling know-how allowed Line 6 to create software Amp and Cab Models
modeled after a collection of amplifiers and speaker cabinets recognized by
guitarists the world over as true “tone classics.” We got these amps and cabs
together, cranked ’em up, and had a look at the electronic data generated by the
tubes, transformers, capacitors, plate and grid voltages, tone control curves – and
the whole mess of components and elements unique to each amplifier design. This
research led to the creation of Line 6’s software Amp and Cab Models. These
models were tweaked up through careful, scientific A/B comparisons to the gear
that inspired them, with an ear open for the effects of different volume levels and
settings of the originals’ tone and gain controls. The gain and equalization
characteristics of the modeled amps were carefully measured so that changes to
amp knobs on the models would mirror the effects of these changes on the
originals as closely as possible. We’re talkin’ major attention to detail here. Tone
control center frequencies, slopes, and cut/boost range were painstakingly
analyzed, and we also carefully attended to the effect of presence switches, “bright”
channels, and other model-specific factors. Not only that, but since these old amps
have highly interactive circuits, we paid careful attention to the way that the
setting of one knob changes the way that another knob on the amp behaves. All
in an effort to make our Amp and Cab Models as much like the amps and cabs we
modeled as possible.
INTRODUCTION:
FLEXTONE! MEET THE FLEXTONE....
The resulting Amp and Cab Models are the foundation of the Flextone guitar
amp. Now, then. Here are a couple of things we want to be crystal clear on:
1. The Line 6 modeling process is a 100% digital software-based technology
exclusive to Line 6.
2. Line 6 Modeling is not sampling, nor is it solid state; no special guitar,
pickup, or cabling is needed.
THERE’S MAGIC IN THE A.I.R.
When you’re ready to do some recording, Flextone delivers its modeling tones
through another innovation: Line 6's A.I.R. direct recording output. The A.I.R.
(acoustically integrated recording) technology is the result of intensive research
and careful study of the tonal characteristics produced by the interaction of
amplifiers, cabinets, speakers, microphones and the recording room during the
recording process.
The direct output of many preamps, amplifiers and direct box-style amp
replacements available today offer some limited form of cabinet simulation or
speaker emulation. Those that happen to be more than simple high end roll offs
have little or no control options. These cabinet simulations cannot reproduce the
markedly different tones of different cabinets which arise from the choice of
speakers, wood, and other design elements. They also fail to reproduce the
significant tonal contribution of microphone selection and placement, and do
nothing to reproduce the subtle ambience of the recording space.
The result is the familiar dissatisfaction with direct recording products – even
those that deliver a reasonably usable basic tone fail to reproduce the “life” of the
guitar sound, and destroy the proper feel in the process. It is as if your guitar strings
became heavier and less responsive, like they just went up a couple of gauges when
you plugged into your direct box. And your sound lost its life.
Flextone’s combination of Amp Models and A.I.R. technology provides superior
direct tones by recreating all the elements contributing to a great recorded guitar
sound, and giving you that tone with the same feel as playing through a real amp
and speaker cabinet:
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INTRODUCTION:
1•6
FLEXTONE! MEET THE FLEXTONE....
• The effect of the guitar amplifier electronics is emulated by the Amp Model you
choose. Each model was developed from extensive study of a classic amplifier
treasured as a tone classic.
• In a guitar amp, once the guitar signal passes through the electronics, it is output
to one or more speakers in a speaker cabinet. The specific design of the speakers,
how many there are, and how they are arranged contributes significantly to your
guitar tone, as does the construction and resulting tone of the wood box itself. A
Marshall head driving a single 12-inch speaker in an open-back cabinet, for
instance, will sound dramatically different from the same head driving a 4x12
closed-back cabinet. Line 6 has carefully constructed virtual software speaker
cabinets that emulate the contribution made by real speaker cabinets to great
guitar sound.
• Once the sound makes it out of the speaker cabinet, the next important link in
the recording system is the microphone that receives that sound. Guitar
recordists select different microphones, and arrange them in different
placements, to get particular sounds. A microphone pointing directly into the
cone of a speaker will hear something different than one positioned off-axis.
Line 6 carefully analyzed the coloring that standard microphones add to the
guitar sound, as well as the effects of different mic placement techniques, and
developed a set of cabinet simulations that give you the tone of great speaker
cabinet and microphone combinations.
• The guitar amp, cabinet, and microphone don't just sit in empty space. The
room that they are in contributes importantly to the guitar sound you will
record. Reverb can be used to capture the basic character of the space,
simulating the effect of the sound reflecting off the room's walls, floors and
ceiling. But there are other subtle details that have more to do with the “spread”
of the sound as it passes through the air between the speaker and microphone.
This final component is the key to the sense that the listener is in one position
in the room, and the guitar sound is in another position, and that the two are
separated by a mass of air that sound spreads through to reach the listener.
All of these important sound-shaping components are accounted for in Line 6's
Flextone. Turn the Amp Model knob to call up the amplifier emulation you want.
Flextone automatically matches that amplifier with an appropriate cabinet and
microphone setup, and gives you the sound of that setup coming through the air of
a recording space. You can add reverb to taste, and start recording incredible mic'd
up sound. The included SoundDiver MIDI-control software lets you use a
Macintosh or Windows computer to do “deep editing” of these and other Flextone
INTRODUCTION:
FLEXTONE! MEET THE FLEXTONE....
parameters. With it, you can design your own custom rig, making new
combinations of Amp Model and cabinet/microphone emulation, and adjusting
the contribution of the “spread” of the sound as well.
The A.I.R. direct recording output is exclusive to Line 6. In combination with
Line 6's Amp Models, it is the key to Flextone’s phenomenally satisfying direct
recording sound.
CUSTOMIZING YOUR AMP MODELS AND EFFECTS
New with version 2.0 software, you can customize the settings for each of
Flextone’s Amp Models and Effects. This way, when you pull up an Amp Model or
Effect via their knobs, you’ll get your very own favorite setting for that amp or
effect, without having to do a lot of knob twiddling. Chapter 5 has all the details.
TONETRANSFER
With your Flextone, you get a constantly-expanding universe of sounds, and the
ability to use those sounds with POD, POD Pro, or any of the Flextone II series
amplifiers. Visit our ToneTransfer Web Library at www.line6.com, or one of the
many other sources popping up for sound exchange. The sounds you collect
transfer seamlessly between POD, POD Pro and Flextone II series amps, so
wherever you go, all your sounds can make the trip.
AND AWAY WE GO....
So, now that you know what’s in store, it’s time to experience all this juicy
Flextone fun for yourself. Grab your favorite axe, plug in to the Flextone, and flip
back to the handy Quick Start Guide on Page 1•1 if you haven’t already been
through that. Then, press ahead with us to the Flextone Grand Tour....
1•7
GRAND TOUR:
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
GRAND TOUR
2•1
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
If you haven’t already done so, turn to the inside back cover of this manual and
notice that it folds out. Ooh, pretty pictures! The idea is to have this essential
pictorial reference always opened out while you’re thumbing through the manual.
And then you can photocopy the back of it, and you’ll have a handy template for
making a note of your favorite settings. The boxed numbers that pop up
throughout the manual correspond to the numbers on the foldout’s illustrations.
If you have a Flextone II HD head, you’ll notice very slight differences with your front
panel – for one thing, the power switch is on the front.
Most of the Flextone controls operate exactly the way you’d expect them to:
1 Input - You plug your guitar in here. (Well, we want the manual to be
complete, don’t we?).
2 Master Volume - Controls the overall output level of the amp. Also
sets the headphone level. This setting is not saved when you store a setup into one
of the Flextone’s memory locations. Unlike many conventional amps, changing the
Master Volume level does not change your tone. So you can get the tone you want
at any volume level.
3 Amp Models - When you spin this knob, it’s essentially like changing
what electronic “circuitry” is running inside the Flextone to make your amp sound
(see Chapter 3 for descriptions of the Amp Models). We’ve arranged the Amp
GRAND TOUR:
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
Models around the knob so you get Line 6’s four custom sounds first. From there,
the models go clockwise from “cleanest” (Small Tweed) to “dirtiest” (Fuzz).
2•2
New with Flextone II, you have a selection of 32 Amp Models from this knob (the
original Flextone could access only 16). To access models 17-32, hold down the
TAP button and turn the Amp Models knob.
When you choose an Amp Model, a Cabinet Model is also loaded automatically.
For instance, when you choose the Brit Hi Gain model (based on the classic
Marshall JCM 800 head), a Cabinet Model based on a Marshall 4x12 will be loaded
with it. You can choose a different cabinet via the Effects/Cab knob (below).
In fact, with Flextone II, all amp-related settings are automatically loaded when
you turn the Amp Models knob. Drive, Bass, Mid, Treble, Cab, Reverb type, etc.
will all be determined by the Amp Model you choose – giving you a ready-to-rock
sound with the turn of just this one knob. Once you get familiar with your
Flextone, you can change these Amp-associated settings to customize the settings
of each of the Amp Models to fit your tastes. Note that when you are in Manual Mode
the Drive, Bass, Middle, Treble, and Channel Volume are set by the knob positions
instead of being automatically set with the amp selection. Complete details are in
Chapter 6.
4 Drive - This knob controls how hard you’re driving the chosen amp
model. Think of it like the input volume control on a non-master volume amp; the
higher the setting, the more “dirt.”
5 Tone Controls - Bass, Mid, and Treble. Just like a regular guitar amp,
only when you change Amp Models, the response and interactivity of the controls
changes too – to act like the tone controls of the original amp that inspired the
Amp Model you’ve selected. The Flextone also has a Presence bump that can be
switched on and off when you hold the Tap Tempo button. The detail is in the Tap
section that begins in just a couple more pages....
GRAND TOUR:
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
6 Channel Volume - This knob controls the relative volume level of the
channel you are playing through. Use this to balance levels between the setups you
store in two different channels (say between your rhythm and lead setups).
2•3
7 Reverb - How much reverb do you want today? Spin this knob to set the
Reverb level. There are two flavors of reverb that live inside your Flextone; a
model of a spring reverb, and a standard digital room reverb tone. Which one you
get depends on which Amp Model you select. Generally speaking, if the amp that
inspired a given Amp Model had a spring reverb, that’s what you’ll get. If the amp
didn’t have a reverb (like the 1968 Marshall “Plexi” which inspired the Brit
Classic model), you’ll hear the room reverb. The back cover foldout, Chapter 4,
and Appendix A run down the details.
8 Effect Tweak - This knob will always change something, but exactly
what it changes will vary depending on which effect you have chosen. Turn it up
and something will go deeper or louder or just plain more. The speed of the effects
(delay, tremolo, chorus, flanger, rotary speaker simulation) is set by the Tap Tempo
switch (see below). For all the inside poop, look at the back cover foldout, see
Appendix B for Effect Parameters, and read the Effects chapter.
9 Effects - Selects which effect or combination of effects you get. Once
again, all the details will be in the Effects chapter.
10 Manual Select Switch - Press this button to light it and activate
Manual Mode. In this mode, wherever the knobs are set is what you’re hearing.
Move knobs around to change sounds. Or....
GRAND TOUR:
2•4
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
11 Channel Select Switches (A, B, C, D) - You use these
buttons to save and recall complete amp-and-effects setups in your Flextone. By
using the four programmable channels, you can save all the details of a complete
Flextone setup for easy, instant recall any time. Thanks to these programmable
channels, you won’t ever have to waste any time when you want to change from
one setup to another, and you’ll never have to lose your “perfect” setups. The
position of every Flextone knob (except the Master Volume) is stored into the
channel memory when you save a channel. You can also save and recall your
Flextone channels hands-free when you use the optional Floor Board (which lets
you save and recall 36 channels) or FB4 foot controllers (see That’s Using Your
Feet in Chapter 6 for more details). Once you get used to the Flextone’s
programmable channels, you’ll wonder how you could ever stand to play an amp
without them!
12
Save - This button saves a complete “snapshot” of all the knob positions
into one of the Channel memories. Chapter 5 explains exactly how it works.
13 Tap - This control sets and displays the current tempo or speed of delay or
tremolo/chorus/flange/rotary speaker. To use the Tap control, just tap the button at
the tempo you want. For Chorus and Flange effects, the speed is actually displayed
by the blinking of the button and set at twice the speed of the effect so you don’t have
to count to 23 between taps if you want to set up a really slow chorus. And for
Tremolo the tapped tempo is displayed and set at half the speed of the Tremolo
effect, so you can get fast tremolo settings even if you can’t tap as fast as Bruce Lee.
You can also simply hold the Tap button and turn the Effect Tweak knob to
change the speed or tempo of your effects. This is especially useful if you are trying
to nudge your Tap setting to just the right value. See the Effects chapter, the back
cover foldout, and Appendix B for Effect Parameters to learn exactly what Tap
controls for each of the Effect settings.
GRAND TOUR:
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
13 Tap (HOLD) Functions - The Tap button also lets you access a
second layer of Flextone features, labeled in gray: Amp Models 17-32, Cab Model
selection, Delay Feedback, Delay Level, a Noise Gate, a Presence Boost, a Volume
Boost, and a Drive Boost. Here’s the detail:
Amp Models 17-32: Hold down, and keep holding down, the Tap button as
you turn the Amp Models knob to select Amp Models 17-32. Appendix A lists
these Amp Models and details about them. Chapter 4 describes them.
Cab Model Select (Effects Knob): Hold down, and keep holding down, the
Tap button as you turn the Effects knob to select Cab Models. The cab models
are labeled in gray. You’ll find a list of the Cab Models at the end of Chapter 4.
Drive Boost On/Off (Drive Knob): Hold down, and keep holding down, the
Tap button as you turn the Drive knob up past twelve o’clock, and you get the
kind of extra ‘dirt’ that you’d expect from a Distortion pedal with the distortion
control set low and the output control set high. It boosts your guitar signal before
it reaches the Amp Model, so that you hit the model harder and get a dirtier
sound. This is just the same as kicking on the Distortion at the Floor Board
(details in Chapter 7). As you do this, the Channel A light comes on if you turn
the Distortion on.
Delay Repeats (Bass Knob): Hold down, and keep holding down, the Tap
button as you turn the Bass knob to set Delay Repeats any time you’re using a
Delay effect. More Delay details are in the Effects Chapter.
Delay Level (Middle Knob): Hold down, and keep holding down, the Tap
button as you turn the Middle knob to set Delay Level any time you’re using a
Delay effect. More Delay details are in the Effects Chapter.
2•5
GRAND TOUR:
2•6
FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
Presence Bump On/Off (Treble Knob): Hold down, and keep holding
down, the Tap button as you turn the Treble knob up past twelve o’clock, and you
get a Presence boost, brightening your tone. Same as the EQ boost on the Floor
Board (details in Chapter 7). As you do this, the Channel C light comes on if
you turn the Presence “circuit” on.
Volume Boost On/Off (Chan Vol Knob): Hold down, and keep holding
down, the Tap button as you turn the Chan Vol knob up past twelve o’clock, and
a Volume Boost kicks in. This boosts volume without extra ‘dirt’ – like for a lead
boost. This is the same as kicking on Drive/Boost at the Floor Board (details in
Chapter 7). As you do this, the Channel B light comes on if you turn the Drive
Boost on.
Noise Gate On/Off (Reverb Knob): Hold down, and keep holding down, the
Tap button as you turn the Reverb knob up past twelve o’clock, and you’ll
activate Flextone’s built-in Noise Gate. Turn below twelve o’clock to turn the
Noise Gate off. As you do this, the Channel D light comes on if you turn the
Noise Gate on.
Effect Speed (Effect Tweak Knob): Hold down, and keep holding down, the
Tap button as you turn the Effect Tweak knob to fine tune the current Effect’s
speed. More Effect details are in the Effects Chapter.
13 Tap (HOLD) Latch Mode - Now that you’ve discovered the
“second layer” of Flextone II features, you’re probably wishing you could tweak
these controls while keeping one hand on your guitar... We heard ya, and your wish
has been granted! We call it Latch Mode, and it allows you to adjust any of the
“hold Tap and tweak...” controls without the use of your best Twister contortions.
Here’s how it works: Press TAP and MANUAL simultaneously to enter Latch
Mode, where all Flextone’s knobs perform their alternate functions, and when
you’re finished tweaking, press any button - except SAVE - to exit.
GRAND TOUR:
REAR PANEL
REAR PANEL
Power Connector - This is where you plug the end of the power cord that
doesn’t connect to the wall socket.
Power Switch - The red button switch by the power connector is the
ultimate digital control; On or Off. Choice is everything. You smart kids will
recognize that this switch is on the front of the Flextone II HD.
Foot Pedal Connector - The jack that looks like a telephone connector
on steroids is where you connect the Floor Board or FB4 foot controller.
MIDI In and Out - Jack your MIDI equipment in here to control channel
selection, alter Flextone parameters, and more. This is also the magic connection
for ToneTransfer and SoundDiver editing – see Chapter 7 for all the details.
Effects Send and Return - The Flextone’s Stereo Effect Send and
Return are pre-Master Volume.
Use The Right Cable! - When hooking up your effect send/return, be sure
to use a stereo cable to connect them to other devices. If you are connecting to a
device with separate left and right inputs or outputs, you’ll want to use a standard
“insert” cable, which gives you a single stereo quarter inch connector for the
Flextone end, and two mono quarter inch connectors for the two ins or outs of your
other device.
Note: If you use a mono cable, you will only get one side of the signal on the send, and
2•7
GRAND TOUR:
REAR PANEL
when using a mono cable for the return, the returned signal will only be fed to one of your
Flextone’s speakers.
2•8
And note: You probably won’t want to use stomp box-type effects in this loop, as they
aren’t usually designed to take line level signals. Most likely you’ll want to plug your
guitar straight into the stomp box, and then go from the stomp box to the Flextone’s input.
And note yet further: Additional details regarding the Flextone II HD’s effect loop
are in the oft-mentioned Chapter 8.
Speaker Outs (Flextone II Plus, XL, and HD) - This is where
you can hook up external cabinets to be run by your Flextone amp. Please note,
the Flextone XL and Plus are designed to be connected to 8Ω speaker
loads only.
Flextone II XL – Plugging into either the Left or Right speaker connection
disconnects the internal speaker and lets you run another 8Ω speaker cabinet
instead.
Flextone II Plus – If you have a Flextone Plus, these jacks will be labeled
Internal and External. Plugging into the Internal connection disconnects the
internal speaker and lets you run another 8Ω speaker cabinet instead. The
External connection is designed for the Flextone Cab. It supplies 50 Watts of
power to the Flextone Cab, to give you a 100 Watt Stereo configuration.
Flextone II HD – Please check out Chapter 8, which describes the whole
speaker out thing for the head in glorious detail.
Headphone Out - Plug your headphones into this jack to silence the
internal speakers, providing you with private listening. (Now you’re ready for some
all night shredding without waking the rest of the family!) The Master Volume
GRAND TOUR:
REAR PANEL
knob controls the output level here, too, so be sure your level isn’t
cranked up too high before strapping on the headphones.
Flextone II – If you have the 1x12 Flextone II, you can also use this jack as a
direct connection to your mixing board or recorder. Plugging into this output turns
on the A.I.R. processing for speaker-mic-room emulation, so no direct box is
needed for recording; just plug into this Direct Out for great sound right out of the
box! The Master Volume controls the output level here, so be sure your level isn’t cranked
up so high that it’s overdriving the input of your recorder when using this as a Direct Out.
Flextone II Plus, XL, and HD – If you have a Flextone Plus, XL or HD, you’ll
want to use the XLR direct outs when recording or playing live....
Plus/XL rear panel shown here. HD jacks and switch are at right side of rear panel
Dual Mode Direct Outs - One of the especially groovy features added to
the Flextone Plus, XL, and HD when they became Flextone IIs is their Dual Mode
Direct Outs. These versatile connections are designed to give you the perfect pair
2•9
GRAND TOUR:
REAR PANEL
of direct connections for live performance and studio recording sessions. They’re
powered by the Line 6 exclusive direct out technology that has made POD the new
standard for guitar recording, and the revolutionary tone-tool for live performance.
2 • 10
Studio Mode – Slide the Live/Studio Switch to the Studio position, and the XLR
Outputs will be +4 line level outputs with A.I.R. speaker-mic-room simulation,
ready to plug right into your recorder to lay down your guitar parts. No hasseling
with microphones (or neighbors annoyed by the ruckus) required! The speakers are
disabled in this mode.
Live Mode – In Live Mode, the XLR Outputs are mic level, ready to plug in to the
mic snakes you’ll probably find at your gigs. The direct out signal is speciallytailored for live sound and the speakers, of course, stay active to rock the house.
Ground Lift – This switch lifts the grounds on the XLRs. Use it to eliminate
ground loops if you get ground hum when connecting to the XLR outputs.
GRAND TOUR:
FLEXTONE FLAVORS
FLEXTONE FLAVORS
In case you haven’t noticed, the Flextone II actually comes in several different
flavors. Here’s what each one’s got:
Flextone II - Mono, 60 watt setup with a single 12-inch speaker.
Flextone II XL - This is the stereo, 100 watt setup (50 watts per side) with a pair
of 12-inch speakers. It includes our unique Dual Mode Direct Outputs, as well as
speaker outputs for connecting external speaker cabinets.
Flextone II Plus - This is the stereo, single 12-inch speaker setup. It includes
our unique Dual Mode Direct Outputs, as well as speaker outputs for connecting
external speaker cabinets. It also includes an extra power amp for powering the
companion Flextone Cab. With no Flextone Cab, you get 60 watts of power. Plug
in the Flextone Cab, and you’ve got 100 watts – 50 watts per side.
Flextone II HD - Rule the world with this stadium-ready, high power head. The
Flextone II HD delivers the power and feel of two 100 Watt tube heads into any
cabinet set-up (full power at 4, 8, or 16 ohms!) Includes Dual Mode direct outs,
and a switchable Series/Parallel Effects Loop.
Flextone Cab - The Flextone Cab is an 8 ohm open-back cabinet loaded with a
custom 12-inch speaker, designed by Line 6 for use with the Flextone Plus.
Connect it to the Plus’s satellite speaker output for 100 Watt, stereo amplification.
Flextone Cab 212S - 2x12” speakers; 150 watts max.; Mono/Stereo operation, 4
or 8 ohms; removable casters. Tone big enough to fill a club, yet small enough to
cart around in a Bug.
Flextone Cab 412S & 412SB - 4x12” speakers; 300 watts max.; Mono/Stereo
operation, 2, 4, 8 or 16 ohm switchable; removable casters, metal handles and
corners. Classic British design and monster tone!
2 • 11
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
MODELED AMPS & CABS
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Note: For the following description of the Line 6 Amp Models, and other references
that you will find throughout this manual, please be aware that Fender, Marshall, Vox,
Boogie, Soldano, Peavey, Roland, Matchless, Arbiter, ADA, Leslie, and other amplifier
model designations, and the names of musical artists and groups, and effects, are all
trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with
Line 6. These marks and names are used solely for the purpose of describing certain
amplifier tones produced using Line 6’s modeling technology. The Line 6 modeling
technology provides Flextone II with a wide variety of sounds and effects modeled after
some of the most popular sounds of the classic amps, effects, and artists mentioned here.
There are 32 Amp Models living within your Flextone II, plus 16 Cab Model
selections. When you turn the Amp Models knob, you select an Amp/Cab
combination. You can then mix ’n’ match different cabs with the amp by holding
the Tap button and turning the Effects knob. Chapter 5 tells you how you can
customize these amp/cab combinations. We list all the Amp Models and the
Cabinet Models below, and describe the original equipment that inspired them:
Line 6 Clean - To create this Amp Model, we essentially grafted the top end
of a JC-120 (Roland’s popular “Jazz Chorus” solid state combo) onto the bottom
end of a classic Marshall JTM-45 tube head, to give you the crisp and clear top end
of a solid state amp, but with a rich, satisfying tube amp-style bottom.
3•1
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Line 6 Crunch - Our “boutique” sound. Not too clean, but not too raging.
We spent some time with a rare Dumble combo, and picked up a few tricks from it
to put together this tone. Great for modern blues or jazz, this sound should be like
a fine cognac, smooth and warm going down, but with a nice kick. The Mid
control is located before the Amp Model’s Drive, but the Bass and Treble
controls are placed after the Drive for maximum range.
3•2
Line 6 Drive - Our version of the modern, super-saturated, high gain, lead
amp; smooth, yet biting. All the tone controls here are post-Amp Model for
maximum control with minimum muddiness. Again, this unique overdrive tone
was created by merging different tone-shaping elements from different high-gain
amps. It’s like playing through a collection of amps simultaneously – a studio
technique that has made possible some of the greatest guitar tones of modern
recordings (Line 6 Layer builds on this idea with even more versatility). With your
Flextone, you can get this same kind of rich, multi-amp tone out of one combo, a
feat that wouldn’t be possible with traditional guitar amps.
Line 6 Insane - Our goal here was to provide you with as much input gain
distortion as possible short of complete meltdown. You get ridiculous, rich tube
drive to shame the distortion of pretty much any amp on the planet (sort of like a
Dual Rectifier on 10 being used as a preamp for a Soldano), while still retaining
tonal definition and character. As a result, you get way lots of bottom end and
cabinet character with tons of wide-ranging tone shaping. Crank up the Drive
control and take no prisoners!
Jazz Clean - This Amp Model is modeled after the classic Roland JC-120.
This transistor amp was known for a strident clean sound and built-in stereo
chorus. When using the Jazz Clean Amp Model, try cranking up the Treble for a
shimmering clean sound that’ll cut through just about any mix. It’s also perfect for
that 80’s “new wave” sound. Alternatively, try backing off on the Treble and turn
up the Bass and Mid for a darker jazz tone. It’ll give you an essentially flat
response, providing a balanced tone across the fret board for jazz chord melodies or
single-line phrasing.
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Small Tweed - Modeled after a 1952 “wide panel” Fender Tweed Deluxe, this
Amp Model will snarl with the best of them. The original amp had only a single
tone control, essentially a Treble roll off. We set up the Treble knob to give you
this Treble roll off when using this Amp Model. Which left us with the Bass and
Mid knobs just sitting there. That just didn’t seem right, so we figured out a way to
put those knobs to work without mucking about with the authenticity of this Amp
Model’s treble tone control. We set up the Bass and Mid as post-Amp Model
controls, which essentially lets you EQ up your tone as you would do on a mixing
console after recording your amp. Set the Bass and Mid knobs at halfway to put
them in “neutral,” and try the Treble knob somewhere above halfway for a classic
Tweed sound.
Tweed Blues - The classic ’59 Fender Bassman 4x10 combo was the amp
that started it all – instant rock and roll tone. Originally a bass guitar amp, the
Bassman became a Blues staple for 6-string guitarists. It has the fat bottom end
you’d expect from a bass amp but also has the Fender twang on the top. The
Bassman was the “blueprint” for Flextone’s Tweed Blues. Incidentally, when Jim
Marshall built his first amps with Ken Bran they were heavily influenced by the
early Bassman. One of the interesting things about the Bassman is just how
interactive the Mid and Treble controls are. The Mid control isn’t a bandpass, as
in most tone control setups. Instead, it’s almost like a second treble control. The
two are additive, so if you’re running the Mid knob higher than halfway up, you’ll
find that the Treble control might give you more bright than you really want. On
the other hand, when you turn the Mid knob down, you’ll probably want to boost
the Treble.
The Bassman, like many of the amps modeled for the Flextone, didn’t have a
master volume. So to get the kind of tone that the Bassman can deliver at higher
gain settings, you had to crank it up loud enough to do some serious damage to
anyone who might be standing close by. With your Flextone, you can get that kind
of tone at a bedroom or studio level – or through your headphones even! Try a
Drive setting of about 4 or 5 – it’s guaranteed to dredge up the best R&B licks you
know.
3•3
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Black Panel - The Holy Grail for many blues, country, and “roots” players
3•4
has been a blackface Fender Deluxe Reverb. (Of course, now that the Flextone’s
here, that may all change.) After listening to quite a few candidates for modeling,
we stumbled upon an extremely cool ’64 Deluxe. Most players love a Deluxe when
it’s turned up to about 7 for a nice gritty sound that cleans up when you back off
your guitar’s volume knob just a little. Notice how the tone control response
changes as this Amp Model’s Drive is changed; clean settings are crisp and
present, while more driven settings will mellow the high end. This is typical of
what you get from a Deluxe, and is nicely captured here.
The Deluxe itself has only Bass and Treble controls. Leaving us, once again, with
the prospect of a knob with nothing to say for itself. But fear not; in this case,
we’ve set up your Flextone’s Mid knob so you can add some post-Amp Model
Midrange contouring for a little more flexibility. Once again, set the Mid knob to
its “neutral” 12 o’clock position for the classic Deluxe sound. Tweaked up right,
this tone will cut through and sing.
Modern Class A - The ’96 Matchless Chieftain, which was studied for the
Modern Class A selection, is a very expensive handmade amp. Originally designed
to sound like a contemporary Vox, the Matchless doesn’t exactly have a Vox
sound, but something unique (largely due to the complicated EQ scheme); the
sound is sort of “future retro.” Its soft clipping is typical of Class A amplifiers;
almost a “hi-fi” sound in a great rock n’ roll amplifier.
Brit Class A - Music was changing in the early 60’s and guitarists were asking
for more brilliance & twang. So the Jennings Company, makers of Vox amps,
decided to add Treble and Bass controls (and an extra 12AX7 gain stage,
incidentally); this additional circuit became known as Top Boost. The AC 30 with
Top Boost was the amp made famous by many British invasion bands. Much of the
unique character of the Vox sound can be attributed to the fact that Class A amps
overdrive in a very different way than Class AB. Brian May of Queen, Mike
Campbell of Tom Petty’s Heartbreakers, and The Edge of U2 have also used classic
AC 30s to make their music. On this Amp Model, your Flextone’s Mid control
acts like the Cut knob on the AC 30. Although usually played fairly clean, a
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
cranked AC 30 has a great saturated lead tone, a la Brian May on the early Queen
albums. A non-Top Boost AC 30 is modeled for your Flextone’s Brit Class A #2
Amp Model, which comes up in a few more pages.
Brit Blues - This Amp Model is based on a circa 1964-65 JTM-45 head with
block logo (predates the “scrolled” Marshall logo), complete with a gold Plexiglas
(Plexi) front panel, although the sound normally associated with Plexi amps
comes from the late 60’s, 50-watt version that was the inspiration for the next in
Flextone’s line up of Amp Models. The JTM-45 marked the beginning of
Marshall’s transition from a mellower Fender-like tone to the distinctive bright
“crunchy” sound of the later Marshalls.
Brit Classic - Modeled after the infamous Marshall Plexi – coveted by tone
connoisseurs the world over. By this time (ca. 1968) Marshall had completely
changed the circuitry away from the Fender 6L6 power tube heritage and moved
to an EL34 tube; another major tone difference was due to the necessary output &
power supply transformer changes. (See, we told you we spent some time looking
into all this stuff.) All this mucking about added up to create a tone forever linked
with Rock Guitar. Amps of this era didn’t have any sort of master volume control,
so to get this sound you’d have to crank your “Mark III Super Amp” to max – just
the thing to help you really make friends with the neighbors. Hendrix used
Marshalls of this era; 20 years later Van Halen’s first two records owed their
“brown sound” to a 100-watt Plexi. In order to get a crunch sound out of a Plexi
you would likely crank up the input volume and the tone controls (to 10!). You’ll
find that the Brit Classic, in keeping with our basic “make-it-sound-a-whole-lotlike-the-original” concept, is set up to do pretty darned near the same thing. Max
out the Mid and Treble knobs and turn Bass to about 9 or 10 o’clock on your
Flextone when using this Plexi-inspired Amp Model and you can treat those nice
neighbors to a tasty slice of fat rock tone.
3•5
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Brit Hi Gain - Turn to this Amp Model to conjure up tones of the coveted
3•6
JCM 800, one of Marshall’s most universally-acclaimed modern amps. This
updated version of the Plexi continued Marshall’s heritage with added gain and
edge for a new generation of rock guitarists. One of the biggest differences here is
that the tone controls are located after the preamp tubes. We worked with a 1990
JCM 800 with Master Volume to develop this model. Incidentally, some versions
of JCM800’s get their distortion from clipping a diode. The amp we modeled uses a
tube for distortion. This is the metal sound Marshall made famous. Although not
many people play Marshalls clean, it’s a great tone, so you should also be sure to
check out this model with a low Drive setting, too. Of course, you can always
pump up the drive and rage....
Rectified - This model is modeled after a 1994 Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
Tremoverb. You can use this Amp Model to get that tight, high gain sound used by
bands like Dream Theater or Metallica. Boogie made their mark in the late 70’s
and early 80’s by adding master volumes and more gain stages to amps with
Fender-style circuitry. You can hear the Fender heritage but with more “punch” in
the mids. The Boogie Dual Rectifier’s tone controls are post-distortion and, as
with the tone sections of most of the amps we based our models on, the individual
controls interact with each other and with the Drive. With high drive settings,
you can scoop the mids and crank the bottom end for some great Seattle grunge
sounds.
Modern Hi Gain - The Soldano sound is intensely overdriven, and also has
EQ after the preamp distortion. This oversaturated tone is well-suited to thrash
metal and grunge bands, but has also been used more subtly by artists like Eric
Clapton. This is a good Amp Model to use if you want to get a current Van Halen
or Joe Satriani sound. The Flextone Modern Hi Gain Amp Model is based on one
of Mike Soldano’s rackmount preamps. Talk about high gain preamp tube
distortion! The X88R we studied to create this Amp Model would have been the
rage for Los Angeles studio use in the late ‘80s.
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Fuzz - Although not technically an amp, we felt that the unique tonal qualities
of the classic 1960’s Arbiter Fuzz Face earned it a place among the amps modeled
to create your Flextone’s Amp Models. This fuzz box used broad frequency
transistor-based clipping. The result is a buzzing kind of distortion that has become
popular again with the alternative and grunge set. Jimi Hendrix was among the
first guitarists to popularize the Fuzz Face in the States, but our model is
considerably dirtier than the tones found on “Are You Experienced.” Try playing
“Satisfaction” by the Stones, or the lead from “American Woman” by The Guess
Who. Liberal use of the Bass, Mid, and Treble controls will let you go beyond the
tones that the Fuzz Face could deliver, enabling you to discover your own unique
recipe for those elusive fuzz tones in your head. Just a note: when recording Purple
Haze, Jimi didn’t even use an amp – he just went straight from a Fuzz Face to an
Orange power amp to a 4x12 cabinet. Which is the same sort of tone you find
here....
Line 6 Twang (Hold Tap + Line 6 Clean) - This model draws on our analysis of
the '60s Fender blackface Deluxe amps and the '50s Fender Bassman. (It includes
the classic Fender glassy high end, plus the snap and bite of these vintage amps.)
Things don’t really get too crunchy until you get to the top range of the Drive
knob. The tone controls provide more range than the blackface Deluxe or
Bassman.
Line 6 Crunch #2 (Hold Tap + Line 6 Crunch) - This sound was crafted
during our studies of the '68 50 Watt Marshall Plexi. But unlike the Plexi, this
Amp Model provides more wide-ranging tone controls. With the Plexi, once
you’re overdriven, the tone controls really don’t do much, but your Flextone will
allow you to scoop out the mids even at the highest Drive settings.
3•7
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Line 6 Blues (Hold Tap + Line 6 Drive) - This tone is based on the '65
Marshall JTM-45 Bluesbreaker but incorporates wider range tone controls. Once
you get into higher Drive settings, this Amp Model begins to transition into a
variant of the Budda Twinmaster (a high end boutique amp) for sweeter overdrive
tonality.
3•8
Line 6 Layer (Hold Tap + Line 6 Insane) - Line 6 Clean meets Line 6 Drive.
As we’ve already mentioned, many guitarists and producers have experimented
with running multiple amps simultaneously, with each amp making a contribution
to the overall tone. Stevie Ray Vaughn, for example, would split his guitar signal
to drive a Marshall, Fender, and Dumble Steel String Singer simultaneously to get
some of the great sounds on his records. This Amp Model was produced by
superimposing a “traditional” clean guitar tone and a particularly tweaked-up
variant of the Line 6 Drive. The Drive knob acts as a blender control – fully left
you’ve got big bottom 21st Century Clean, and fully right you’ve got paint-peeling
Ultra-drive. Set it anywhere in between, and you get to have your cake and smear
it all over your audience, too.
Tube Preamp (Hold Tap + Jazz Clean) - Not even close to being a guitar
amp, but once we got started, we just couldn’t stop ourselves. This Amp Model
was developed for POD. The thinking went like this: ‘Once people get this POD,
it’s gonna be so great that they’re gonna wish they could use it for everything –
warming up keyboards, crunching up drums, fuzzing up vocals. We’ve gotta give
’em something to do that!’ So we did. And we’re giving it to you, too. The Tube
Preamp Amp Model lets you warm up any sound source the way producers and
engineers often do by jamming tracks through a guitar amplifier for playback, or
through some vintage tube gear. For more “edge” on vocals, try running your vocal
tracks through your Flextone. Or punch up (or munch up) a synth bass track by
sending it through your Flextone and cranking up the drive and EQ controls to
suit your taste. Although this is not actually a guitar amp model, you can even get
some great guitar tones out of it. Also try using it as a direct box for bass. When
you do this stuff, you want to use the Drive control like a mix knob on a reverb to
control how much processing you want to hear. You generally don’t want to mix
the pre-Flextone sound with the post-Flextone sound because of the comb filtering
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
that results. Instead, jack the sound source right into Flextone and then only
monitor it post-Flextone processing. With the tone controls at 12 o’clock, the EQ
is “flat.”
Small Tweed #2 (Hold Tap + Small Tweed) - Modeled after a 1960 Tweed
Champ, this is a great sound when the Drive is cranked (not bad clean, either).
These amps were originally designed to be sold to beginners, but rock and rollers
quickly discovered that you could get a great distorted sound at fairly low volume
levels. Many of the classic guitar solos of the 50’s were recorded through a Champ.
The Champ had no tone control, only volume. With your Flextone, it’s easy to get
a classic Champ tone. Just leave all the Bass, Mid, and Treble controls parked at
12 o’clock, which means they are “flat,” making no contribution to the tone.
Still, we’d hate to waste those things, so we figured out a way to put the Bass,
Mid, and Treble controls to work without mucking about with the authenticity of
this Amp Model. When using this Amp Model, all these tone controls are applied
after the Amp Model processing, which essentially lets you EQ up your tone as you
would do on a mixing console after recording your amp. Remember, for the
authentic emulated sound of the Champ, set all the tone controls at 12 o’clock.
Boutique #3 (Hold Tap + Tweed Blues) - This model is based on a Budda
Twinmaster head. The Budda has a great, warm, Class A, sound. This was Budda’s
first offering. The Budda philosophy is all about power tube distortion. Simplicity
is the key. With relatively low front end gain, highly interactive tone controls, and
tube rectifier “sag” it’s great at getting a classic cranked sound for small gigs and
recording. Once again, since the Twinmaster has no mid control, we’ve added a
little bonus in the form of some post-Amp Model mid contouring available via
your Flextone’s Mid control. As usual, set this control to 12 o’clock to get groovy
with the unadorned Budda-style vibe.
Black Panel #2 (Hold Tap + Black Panel) - The classic blackface Fender Twin
(in this case, a 1965 Twin) was a real workhorse. Everybody used it, from jazz and
country players to serious rockers. I remember seeing Johnny Winter at a concert
where both he and Rick Derringer – am I dating myself or what? – were using six
3•9
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Twins stacked in a pyramid each. We were in the second balcony and it was
REALLY loud even all the way back there. The Twin has a lot of tonal flexibility
and is at home in a great many different situations. It never gets extremely
overdriven and dirty, mostly just louder; a lot louder. This is the amp for the classic
surf sound. Dial up the spring reverb, switch on the tremolo, crank up the volume,
and look out for bikinis.
3 • 10
Brit Class A #3 (Hold Tap + Modern Class A) - Here’s another Vox-inspired
Amp Model. This model is based on Channel 1 of a wonderful 1960 AC 15. The
sound is similar to that of the Vox AC 30s that were studied for your Flextone’s
Brit Class A and Brit Class A #2 Amp Models, but this is a smaller amp (one,
instead of two, 12" speakers) with a warmer, more “woody” sound. Once again, the
original amp had only a single tone control – a treble cut. We faithfully modeled
that and then slipped in some post-Amp Model Bass and Mid contouring. Set the
Bass and Mid in neutral (12 o’clock, or halfway up) and play with the Treble
control to get yourself some of those classic British invasion sounds.
Brit Class A #2 (Hold Tap + Brit Class A) - This Amp Model is based on the
Normal Channel of a Non Top Boost Vox AC-30. As we mentioned in reference
to the Vox AC 30 Top Boost, the early Vox amps were the first designed especially
for electric guitar (Hey, some early amps from other manufacturers have
Accordion inputs! Polka, anyone?), and used Class A power amp designs, rather
than the much more common Class AB type. We were lucky enough to find what
we are told was one of Bryan Adams’ favorite AC 30s for recording. Lenny Kravitz
happened to be using it the week before we began testing. It was one of the gems
in a great collection of vintage amplifiers offered for rental in Los Angeles, where
Line 6 is located. We later bought this amp, and continued to hone our emulation
of it to bring you the Amp Model it inspired in the Flextone. This is definitely a
good place to start to get yourself some of those classic British invasion sounds.
Like the AC 15 (above), the AC 30 NTB has only a single treble control, so your
Flextone’s Bass and Mid controls here are set up for boost after the Amp Model
processing to add a little extra flexibility without compromising the accuracy of
the model. The 12 o’clock setting on these controls is flat response.
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
California Crunch #1 (Hold Tap + Brit Blues) -The first of the “boutique”
amp makers was probably Mesa Boogie. Boogie made their mark in the late 70’s
and early 80’s by adding master volumes and more gain stages to amps with
Fender-style circuitry. You can hear the Fender heritage but with more “punch” in
the mids. This model is based on the Clean Channel of the classic Boogie Mark
IIc, with the enhancements of the + version of the Mark IIc circuitry design.
3 • 11
California Crunch #2 (Hold Tap + Brit Classic) - And this Amp Model
emulates the Drive Channel of the IIc+. Try your Santana licks here.
Boutique #1 (Hold Tap + Brit Hi Gain) - Based on the Clean Channel of the
Dumble Overdrive Special. The Dumble Overdrive Special is one of those
incredibly expensive, custom amps that most people never get a chance to actually
get close to in this lifetime. Each incarnation of the Dumble magic is a little bit
different, because each of these amps is hand built for a specific customer, and
voiced to match their playing and desires. With that in mind, we based this Amp
Model on the analysis of several different Dumble Overdrive Specials. Despite this
tuning to the individual owner, these amplifiers tend to have a number of features
in common; the clean channel is very sensitive to attack, and dynamically
responsive, and the drive channel has a thick, liquid, singing sustain that doesn’t
lose string definition when driven hard. Your Flextone’s tone controls on this Amp
Model are quite subtle, like those of the Dumble itself.
Rectified #2 (Hold Tap + Rectified) - This Amp Model is modeled after a
1995 Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier head. As with the Tremoverb combo that was
modeled for the POD Rectified Amp Model, the Dual Rectifier was part of
Boogie’s more modern, high gain approach for that “big hair” sound. In contrast to
the earlier Boogies, the Dual Rectifier’s tone controls have more influence at high
gain settings, so you can scoop the mids and increase the bottom end.
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Modern Hi Gain #2 (Hold Tap + Modern HiGain) - This sound is modeled
after a Soldano SLO – Super Lead Overdrive – head. With snake skin tolex and
everything! Unlike the X88R preamp used for the Flextone Modern Hi Gain Amp
Model, the SLO includes a presence control, plus other little details that give it a
bit of a different sound. With the Drive control cranked way up, you’ll get sustain
for days.... Go out’n’ave a bite – when you come back it’ll still be sustaining!
3 • 12
Boutique #2 (Hold Tap + Fuzz) - Based on the Dumble Overdrive Special
Drive Channel (just described). If you like the Dumble sound, you might also
want to check out the Line 6 Crunch model – it was created to deliver a similar
kind of tone.
MODELED AMPS & CABS:
WHICH AMPS AND CABS ARE MODELED?
Cabinet Models - The following Cabinet Models are available, and are
accessed by holding the Tap button and turning the Effects knob:
1x8
1960 Fender Tweed Champ
1x12s
1952 Fender Tweed Deluxe
1960 Vox AC-15
1964 Fender Blackface Deluxe
Line 6 1x12
2x12s
1965 Fender Blackface Twin
1967 Vox AC-30
1995 Matchless Chieftain
Line 6 2x12
4x10s
1959 Fender Bassman
Line 6 4x10
4x12s
1996 Marshall with Vintage 30s
1978 Marshall with stock 70s
1968 Marshall Basketweave with Greenbacks
Line 6 4x12
No Cab
You will probably want to use this Cabinet model with the
Tube Preamp model for non-guitar sources. It is selected
by default when you pull up the Tube Preamp Amp Model.
The Cabinet Model is automatically selected by the Amp Model. You can
customize these Amp/Cabinet pairings, as described in Chapter 5.
3 • 13
FLEXTONE EFFECTS:
DEEP EDITING
FLEXTONE EFFECTS
DEEP EDITING
For tweak heads and MIDI-philes, we’ve included a handy MIDI editor/librarian
program which is made by emagic, and called SoundDiver. The program runs on
Macintosh and Windows computers, and can turn your computer into a Flextone
command station. It lets you take “remote control,” and do everything that can be
done from your Flextone’s top panel, plus a bunch of other cool stuff like saving
and swapping sounds on the computer, as well as accessing additional effect
parameters that lurk deep within the heart of your Flextone. All the details are in
the Deep Editing & MIDI Control chapter. Once you’ve looked over the basic
information below on the effects, you may want to check out that chapter to find
out about the extras that a Flextone-computer-MIDI connection can bring you.
ONBOARD EFFECTS
In addition to all the great Amp Models built into the Flextone, there are some
great sounding effects. To pick which effect you want to hear, turn the Effects
Knob ( 9 ). When you first select the Effect you want, your helpful Flextone will
preset the effect’s parameters so you’re instantly ready to go with a great sound
(you can also customize this effect “preset” as described in Chapter 6). You can
adjust the character of the effect you’ve chosen by tapping the Tap ( 13 ) control,
and turning the Effect Tweak ( 8 ) knob like so....
4•1
FLEXTONE EFFECTS:
4•2
ONBOARD EFFECTS
Reverbs - Reverb is the effect that makes it sound like something is in a room.
It’s basically a whole bunch of echoes smeared together to give you a sense of
sound in an ambient space. With the Flextone, Reverb is always available. You
control how much with the Reverb knob. There are two basic reverbs in the
Flextone; a model of a spring reverb, and a standard digital room reverb tone.
Which one you get depends on which Amp Model you select. The reverb type is
chosen when you select an Amp Model. (And you can customize this Amp Model/
Reverb Type pairing as described in Chapter 6.) Generally speaking, if the amp
that inspired a given Amp Model had a spring reverb, we give you the spring
reverb. If the amp didn’t have a reverb (like the 1968 Marshall “Plexi” which
inspired the Brit Classic model), we’ve given you the room reverb. The back cover
foldout and Appendix A run down the details on the standard pairings of the
Amp Models/Reverb types.
Compressor - A compressor “squeezes” your sound so that the softer sounds
are louder and the louder sounds won’t be as loud. It helps to even out your
playing, and can also be used to give increased sustain. Compression is often
expressed in ratios, like 2:1 or 5:1. The higher the ratio, the less difference there is
between your softest and loudest playing. The Tweak knob will control the
compression ratio. There are 5 settings: 1.4:1, 2:1, 3:1, 6:1, and :1. (The figure
eight on its side means “infinity.” With Effect Tweak set to max, you get infinite
compression, which is the same as having a limiter.)
The compressor is pre-Amp Model processing, so it’s like having a compressor
pedal as part of your setup.
FLEXTONE EFFECTS:
ONBOARD EFFECTS
Tremolo - Modeled after the classic Fender tremolo. The Effect Tweak knob
controls the depth; Tap controls the speed. The tremolo speed will be twice as fast
as you tap (and twice as fast as the Tap light flashes), allowing you to set fast
tremolos without having to tap like a madman.
Chorus - You’ll find two different chorus sounds in your Flextone. Chorus 1 is
modulated by a square wave, so it sounds more like a “rackmount effect” type chorus.
Chorus 2 is modulated by a sine wave with more feedback, so it has a richer harmonic
content with more movement. Chorus 2 was massaged to closely approximate the
classic tone of an old Roland CE-1 box. The Effect Tweak knob spins you through a
range of chorus settings from subtle to extreme; Tap controls the speed of the effect. By
the way, if you want to get a really slow chorus, you have to tap really slow – try about
6 or 7 seconds between taps. And if you don’t like that, remember that you can always
set your tempo by holding down the Tap button and then twisting the Effect Tweak
knob to wherever you want to go.
Flanger - Flanging is that familiar “jet-plane” whoosh you remember from
recordings of the 70’s. Originally the effect was used rarely, mostly because engineers
had to use finger pressure on one of the tape reels to slow down and speed up the tape
in tiny increments to get this effect. Since the part of the tape reel they pressed on is
called the flange, you can see how the effect got its name. As soon as someone figured
out how to get this effect electronically, it was no longer rare and was probably used a
little too much for the next several years. We’ve got two flavors of flanging available
on your Flextone, both of which closely model the tone of an old ADA flanger stomp
box. Flanger 1 is a light flange with no pre-delay, and is subtler than Flanger 2, which
is inverted, and has a deeper range (depth). The Effect Tweak knob gives you a range
of Flanger effects from just a bit to Holy Cow! Tap dials in the speed.
4•3
FLEXTONE EFFECTS:
ONBOARD EFFECTS
Rotary - This effect simulates the effect of a mic’d, rotating high frequency
speaker horn, like on a Leslie. Rotary speakers have two speeds: slow and fast.
We’ve set up your Flextone’s Rotary Speaker emulation to select a fixed slow speed
if you tap slowly, and a fixed fast speed if you tap quickly. When you switch from
one speed to the other, you’ll notice that the speed doesn’t change immediately,
but gradually changes from one speed to the other, just as a real rotating speaker’s
speed would ramp from one setting to the other. The Effect Tweak knob controls
the amount of Doppler effect (pitch modulation); Tap controls the speed.
4•4
Delay - Sometimes referred to as echo or slap back. The Effect Tweak knob
controls the level; Tap controls the delay time – in other words, how far apart the
echoes are spaced from each other. When you are using quicker delay times, we
cut down the number of repeats so you can get those rockabilly and surf slap back
sounds. You can fine tune the number of delay repeats by holding the Tap button
and turning the Bass knob, set the delay level by holding the Tap button and
turning the Middle knob, and fine tune your delay time by holding the Tap
button and turning the Effect Tweak knob. By the way, we let you set the
maximum delay level high enough that your delay’s echoes can be louder than
your direct signal. You may find this handy for getting delay effect setups like U2’s
The Edge is known for.
If you’re using your Flextone with a Floor Board or MIDI control, the delay is
always available, even when some other effect is selected. Just switch it on from
the Floor Board Delay On/Off switch, or from the Emagic Sound Diver software,
or with a MIDI Controller message (Appendix D lists MIDI Controllers).
FLEXTONE EFFECTS:
ONBOARD EFFECTS
Noise Gate - Your Flextone also includes a built-in noise gate, intended to
reduce the hiss and noise guitar systems tend to put out when you’re not playing,
especially at high gain settings (since high gain means that noise is turned up
along with your guitar sound). The Noise Gate is can be turned on and off by
holding the Tap button, and turning the Reverb knob, as described in Chapter 2’s
section on the Tap (HOLD) functions. Any time you want to disable the noise
gate, hold down the Tap button, and turn the Reverb knob to any position below
12 o’clock. While you’re doing this, the Channel D light will show whether the
gate is on (light on) or off (the light ain’t on). While holding the Tap button, turn
the Reverb knob above 12 o’clock, and the noise gate will kick in and your hiss
magically disappears....
4•5
FLEXTONE EFFECTS:
COMBINED EFFECTS
COMBINED EFFECTS
The rest of the effects are combinations of Delay and one other effect. They
should be fairly self-explanatory. Tap sets the delay speed for all these effects.
Remember that the Delay Repeats (Tap + Bass knob) and Delay Level (Tap +
Middle knob) controls are also available with all these effects. (Details are in the
Tap (HOLD) description in Chapter 2).
4•6
Delay/Compressor - Tweak controls Compression Ratio.
Delay/Tremolo - Tweak automatically controls both speed and depth to
give you a variety of Tremolos. If you want more fine control of the Tremolo, use
the Tremolo (without Delay) effect setting.
Delay/Chorus 1 - Tweak spins you through a variety of chorus settings.
Delay/Chorus 2 - Tweak spins you through a variety of chorus settings.
Delay/Flanger 1 - Tweak spins you through a variety of flanger settings.
Delay/Flanger 2 - Tweak spins you through a variety of flanger settings.
Delay/Swell - Well, here’s one we haven’t explained before. Swell is like an
automatic volume pedal that will give you a very even volume swell with each
note or chord you play. Effect Tweak controls the attack speed of the volume
swell. You can, of course, achieve a similar effect by using a Line 6 Floor Board
with your Flextone, and riding its volume pedal, by using a MIDI pedal or other
controller, or turning the volume knob on your guitar with your the heel of your
picking hand. Or spin the Effects knob here and have your friendly Flextone do
the job for you!
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS:
USING THE MANUAL MODE FEATURES
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS
USING THE MANUAL MODE FEATURES
When you are in the Manual Mode of the Flextone, all of the controls are active
and the sound of the amp always reflects the knob settings. Sounds just like any
ordinary guitar amp, doesn’t it? Who says technology is threatening? You know
you’re in Manual Mode, by the way, whenever the Manual button is lit (but you
probably already figured out that part). Play with the knobs until you get a sound
that you really like. At this point, you can either follow tradition and put tiny
little pieces of tape on the amp or mess it all up with grease pencil to mark your
favorite settings, or you can take a bold step into new technology and save your
sound to one of the Flextone’s memory locations. Which we’re about to tell you
how to do in the next section of the manual, appropriately titled…
USING THE CHANNEL MEMORIES
So, there you are with a sound that you really like – wouldn’t it be nice to be able
to call it up any time you want it? That’s simple once you have it stored into one of
the Flextone channel memories. How do you do it? Just press the Save button
( 12 ). It will start to flash. Press the Channel Select ( 11 ) button (A, B, C, or
D) for the location where you want to store the sound. It will start to flash. Once
you’re finished staring at the flashing lights, press the Save button a second time.
The lights will stop flashing, and the sound is stored at the location you chose.
Doesn’t get much simpler than that. After the sound is stored, you can bring it
back any old time by simply pressing the button for the location where you stored
it. (See Chapter 6 to learn how to do all this with your feet on the Floor
Board).If you decide that you don’t want to store the sound after you’ve got all the
lights blinking, pressing the Tap or Manual or Tuner buttons will abandon the
save. (Save mode will also be canceled if you don’t press any buttons for 5 seconds
after having pressed Save.)
5•1
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS:
TONETRANSFER
TONETRANSFER
Flextone Sounds on the Web
Your Flextone gives you access to a constantly-expanding world of sounds. Visit
the ToneTransfer Web Library at www.line6.com and you’ll find a growing
collection of sounds for your Flextone, created by Line 6 users around the world.
The SoundDiver software included on the CD with this manual will help you
store, organize, and transfer your sounds.
5•2
Your Flextone Sounds Transfer to POD and POD Pro
The sounds of your Flextone are compatible with POD, POD Pro, and of course all
the Flextone II series amplifiers, so you can use your sounds with any of these
products. Use your Flextone for practice sessions and live gigs, and then transfer
your sounds to a POD Pro when you go into the studio. For more information on
POD or POD Pro, visit www.line6.com.
Swapping Flextone Sounds With Friends
OK, so you go over to a friend’s house who also had the good taste and intelligence
to buy a Flextone. He’s created this awesome sound that’s stored in the Channel A
location. You’ve got to have this sound so you can write the song that’s going to
make you rich, but your friend forgot to make a copy of the Sound Programmer’s
Sheet on the back of the Flextone manual and write down his settings. (Perhaps
we can learn a valuable lesson from this: always back up your work!) Do you have
to give up your dreams of rock and roll success and spend the rest of your life
cleaning bird cages to pay the bills? Luckily, we thought this one through in
advance. We provided you with a way to get those settings. Just press and keep
holding the Save button on your friend’s Flextone and turn any one of the
Flextone’s knobs (except the Master Volume knob – that one’s not saved into
programs). You’ll notice the Manual light comes on. Don’t worry, holding down
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS:
TONETRANSFER
the Save button won’t cause your settings to be altered or cause Save Mode to be
entered. Instead, when the knob position exactly matches the stored setting, the
Manual light will turn off. After you’ve done this for every knob and noted the
Tap speed, you can write down the settings on the Programmer’s sheet, take it
home, enter it in your own Flextone, and write the anthem for a future (or past)
generation. And be sure to thank us in the album’s liner notes. To check that
you’ve got everything just right, once the knobs are set, you can also switch to
Manual Mode and see if the sound changes. (It shouldn’t change, unless the Tap
speed is different.)
If that sounds too complicated, and you have a MIDI cable handy, flip ahead to
Chapter 7: “Deep Editing & MIDI Control” to find out how to swap sounds
between two Flextones (or your Flextone and a POD or POD Pro) with MIDI. It’s
also possible to swap Flextone sounds on computer, using the emagic SoundDiver
software – for both Macintosh and Windows computers – that’s included on the
CD with this manual.
5•3
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS:
EDIT MODE
EDIT MODE
5•4
Alright, so let’s say you’ve got that sound you saved in one of the Flextone’s handy
channel memories, and you want to add some more Bass. No problem. If the
channel’s not already selected with its button lit, press that button to recall the
sound. Now, grab the Bass knob and crank it up. The Save button lights up,
letting you know that you’ve made a change to your stored setup, and (if you like
it better that way) you should use the Save button to save it. This is what’s called
Edit Mode since you’ve done just that: edited a stored channel. To commit your
edit to the Flextone’s memory, press Save and then the button corresponding to
the channel you want to save to. But, if you don’t want to save your edit, that’s
OK, too – just ignore the Save button. If you decide not to save after pressing
Save, you can touch the Manual or Tap switch to abandon saving. Keep in mind
that if you switch to another channel without saving your edit, all your sound
changes made during that edit will be forgotten.
CUSTOMIZING AMP MODELS & EFFECTS
New with the II in Flextone II, you can customize the settings that are called up by
the Amp Models and Effects knobs. Using this powerful new feature, you can
pack your Flextone with all the special sound genius that only you possess, and
have this brilliance available instantly at the turn of a single knob. Here’s how it’s
gonna work....
About Customization Mode
Hold (and keep holding) the Save button, then press the Manual button. The
Save, Manual, A, B, C, and D lights will all start a-flashing (and you can let go of
those buttons now). You have entered the Customization Mode where you get to
put your very own stamp on the settings called up by the Amp Models and
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS:
CUSTOMIZING AMP MODELS & EFFECTS
Effects knobs. To understand how this Customization works, we’ll start by
explaining what happens when you turn the Amp Models and Effects knobs:
Turning the Amp Models knob picks an Amp Model, and turning the Effects
knob picks an effect, right? Actually, each of these knobs is setting a number of
parameters behind the scenes. When you pick an Amp Model, your Flextone sets
the following controls to values determined by the Amp Models knobs:
Controls affected by the Amp Models Knob
Amp Model
Cabinet Model
Drive
Drive 2 (if Amp Model is Line 6 Layer) *
Bass
Middle
Treble
Bright Switch (if available on Amp Model) *
Channel Volume
Distortion On/Off (Hold Tap, turn Drive to set)
Volume Boost On/Off (Hold Tap, Turn Channel Volume to set)
Presence Bump On/Off (Hold Tap, Turn Treble to set)
Noise Gate On/Off (Hold Tap, Turn Reverb to set)
Noise Gate Decay Time *
Reverb Type *
Reverb Decay *
Reverb Tone *
Reverb Diffusion *
Reverb Density *
Volume Pedal Location (before or after the Amp Model) *
Volume Pedal Minimum *
Wah Minimum *
Wah Maximum *
*You only get access to these extra controls via the SoundDiver software or MIDI.
5•5
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS:
CUSTOMIZING AMP MODELS & EFFECTS
In the same way, turning the Effects knob sets all the parameters related to the
effect you choose.
Customization allows you to store your own personal favorite adjustments for all
these parameters so they live on the 16 positions of the Amp Models and Effects
knobs. This way, when you turn the Amp Models knob to the Rectifier position,
you’ll get your personal Rectifier, with all the controls in the list above set for your
very own version of the Rectifier. Same thing for the Effects – your Chorus,
Tremolo, etc. is always just one knob click away.
5•6
So where is stuff going to be saved, exactly? If you’re customizing the Amp Model,
then you’ll be saving to the knob position of the selected Amp Model. For
instance, if your sound uses the Rectifier, and you do the Customized Save of the
Amp settings, you will now get those settings whenever you turn the knob to the
Rectifier position. Alternatively, if your sound uses the Small Tweed, then doing
the Customized Save will save your settings there. Your Flextone will choose the
correct place to store the information regardless of the present physical position of the
Amp Models encoder – so don’t worry, you can’t accidentally copy your Modern
HiGain settings to the Small Tweed position. Same deal goes for the effects; your
Flextone knows whether you’re using Tremolo or Rotary Speaker or whatever, and
will save to that knob position.
So what if you’re not sure which Amp Model or effect you are using right now, and
want to find out before you make your Customization? That’s easy, too:
Just press (and keep holding) the Save button and turn the Amp Models or
Effects knob. The Manual light will come on (as described above) if you’ve got
the knob pointing to anything other than the saved position. Once you have them
in the right position, both the Manual light will turn off. The Tap light will also
light solid if your Amp Model is part of the second “layer” of models (17-32).
So, now that you know exactly what you’re getting yourself into, lets get to it:
CREATING & STORING SOUNDS:
MEMORY RESET
Activating Customization Mode
The first thing to do is get an Amp or Effect setting that you really like and want
to store to the Amp Models or Effects knob. This amp or effect setting can come
from a factory preset, one of your own edits, a sound you downloaded off the web,
or a sound you’ve tweaked up in SoundDiver. Whatever its source, all you have to
do is get that sound into your Flextone so it’s active and you’re playing though it.
With that done, you’ll hold (and keep holding) the Save button, then press the
Manual button. The Save, Manual, A, B, C, and D lights will all start a-flashing
(and you can let go of those buttons now). You have entered the Customization
Mode. If you press the A button now, you will instruct your Flextone that you want
to save your present Amp settings to live on the Amp Models knob. If you press
B, your Flextone will understand that you want to save your current effects setting
to the Effects knob. And then you’ll press the SAVE button to finalize your
choice. Got it? Here are the steps in handy list form:
1. Get an amp or effect you love happening on your Flextone.
2. Hold Save, and press Manual. Save, Manual, A, B, C, D lights flash.
3. Press A (Amps) or B (Effects). (Pressing C or D will activate a MIDI
dump, as described in Chapter 7.)
4. Press Save to complete the deed.
MEMORY RESET
If, for any reason, or just for the sheer mad joy of it, you decide you need to reset
your Flextone’s memory to its factory-programmed state, hold down all 4 channel
buttons (A, B, C, and D) and power up the amp. That’ll blow your Flextone’s
memory and reset it just like it was when it left the Line 6 factory.
Warning: This will erase ALL the channels, as well as the custom amp and effect
settings you might have created. So be sure and ask yourself “Do I really want to do
this?” If the answer is yes, go on ahead with your bad self.
5•7
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET
You really get the most out of your Flextone with a foot controller. Two different
foot controllers can be used with your amp: Line 6’s Floor Board and FB4.
FLOOR BOARD
Using the Floor Board with the Flextone lets you access many features of the amp
that are not available otherwise. This all-steel chassis, oh-so-stylish foot control
wonder gives you plenty of stuff: A volume pedal. A wah pedal with a Crybabystyle toe-down on/off switch so you can kick the wah effect in and out. A built-in
chromatic digital guitar tuner. Stomp box-style on/off control of your Flextone’s
effects. Plus, 32 additional channels for storing your programmed sounds. This
brings the total to 36 channels, and, of course, they all come already loaded with
monstrous tones programmed by the incredible tone mavens at Line 6 right after
they finished writing this manual.
If you haven’t already discovered the back panel foldout, get set for a surprise. If
you have, go ahead and jump to the next paragraph. Still here? Alright – flip to
the inside back cover of this manual. Hmm, looks like the cover is all folded up.
Unfold it, and hey, presto! It’s your very own Flextone road map. The idea is to
have this handy pictorial reference always opened out while you’re breezing
through this manual and becoming an expert on all things Flextone. The boxed
numbers throughout the following text refer to the fold out illustration.
Getting Connected
So, how’s that Floor Board work, exactly? Well, the very first thing is to plug it
into your Flextone with the handy cable that came with your Floor Board. We
6•1
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
recommend you turn the Flextone off first, but you do whatever you feel like – it’s
your amp! Then, plug in your guitar, turn on the Flextone (scared you, didn’t we?)
and just press that Volume Pedal on the far right side of the Floor Board ( 19 ) all
the way forward so you can hear something.
TWO MODES
The first thing to know is that the Floor Board has two Modes of operation:
Channel Select Mode, and Effect On/Off Mode. The Mode Select switch ( 14 )
chooses which mode you’re in.
6•2
Mine Looks Funny: Your Floor Board may look a little different than the one illustrated
on the Flextone manual’s fold out back cover. Older Floor Boards have the label Select
Sound instead of Channel Select. We decided to change the name to Channel Select for
this mode, since that’s, in fact, what you do with it. We changed Sound A, B, C, D to
Channel A, B, C, and D, too. However the Floor Board’s decorated, it works the same.
1. CHANNEL SELECT MODE
Let’s start with Channel Select Mode. Note the line that traces from the Mode
Select switch ( 14 ) and points to the two light-up arrows below. The top arrow
lights if you’ve selected Effect On/Off, and the bottom arrow lights if you’ve
chosen Channel Select mode. Give that Mode Select switch a kick if
necessary, and get that lower arrow (Channel Select) lit.
Banks
The two left-most stomp switches on the bottom row ( 15 on your handy back
cover foldout Floor Board diagram) are labeled Bank Down and Bank Up. A
Bank is a section of the Flextone’s memory that holds four channel settings. The
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
Flextone combos have nine memory banks, for a total of 36 channel memories.
These memory locations come pre-loaded with some tasty little tones created at
Line 6, but you can change them into whatever you want, and store those changes
back into one of the memory locations. The Floor Board notes that you can press the
Bank Up & Down buttons at the same time to switch between Preset and User Banks.
This doesn’t apply to Flextone II. (When we added the II, we made all memories usereditable in response to our customer requests for this feature.)
When you’re using a Flextone without a Floor Board, by the way, you’re always in
Bank 1. With the Floor Board, you’ve got a choice of 1 thru 9. You know which
Bank you’ve got because the Floor Board’s display ( 16 ) will show you.
Channel Select
So, now that we’ve got this whole Bank thing down, let’s move onto the other four
switches on the bottom row. These let you pick which of the four channels – A, B,
C, or D – you want to use in the bank you’ve selected. Pick your Bank ( 15 ), hit
one of the Channel Select switches ( 17 ), and you’re ready to roll.
Manual Mode
Hey, what about Manual Mode? Don’t worry – you can get there any time. Let’s
you have a particular Channel selected. The channel’s corresponding light is lit
above its Floor Board Channel Select switch, right? OK, step on this switch a
second time and hold it for at least a second. Boom! You'll find yourself
transported directly to Manual Mode. The Floor Board display will show a zero. To
get back out of Manual Mode, use the Bank Up or Bank Down foot switches
and you’ll be switched right back to wherever you were when you entered.
6•3
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
Editing and Saving Channels with the Floor Board
The basic story on editing channels is in Chapter 5 of this manual. With a Floor
Board you’ll find that the display ( 16 ) will show an E (for “Edited”) whenever
you’ve edited a channel. It will display an S (Save) if you press the Save button
on the Flextone in preparation for saving a channel. When you decide you want
to save an edited channel, you can select any of the locations via the Floor Board
as your destination. Here’s how:
1.
2.
3.
6•4
EDIT A CHANNEL’S SETUP TO YOUR LIKING.
PRESS THE SAVE BUTTON ON THE FLEXTONE.
PICK THE MEMORY BANK YOU WANT TO STORE TO WITH THE BANK UP AND BANK
DOWN SWITCHES ON THE FLOOR BOARD.
4A. ON THE FLEXTONE, PICK THE CHANNEL MEMORY LOCATION (A, B, C, OR D) YOU
WANT TO SAVE TO WITHIN THE SELECTED BANK, AND
5.
PRESS THE SAVE BUTTON TO COMMIT THE SETUP TO THE FLEXTONE’S
MEMORY. OR,
4B. SKIP 4A AND 5, AND JUST KICK YOUR CHOSEN FLOOR BOARD CHANNEL SELECT
SWITCH TWICE TO SAVE THE SETUP INTO THAT CHANNEL.
Tap Tempo
Now, then, how about that handy Tap Tempo thing on your Flextone? Sure would
be nice to be able to change the speed of your effects without taking your hands off
your guitar, wouldn’t it? That’s what the Tap Tempo ( 18 ) foot switch is for. The
light to the left of it (you’ve already probably been entranced by it as it pulses
away), flashes just like the Tap Tempo button on your Flextone to let you know
the speed of your effect. To change this speed, all you’ve got to do is tap on this
Tap Tempo switch.
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
Tuner
Well, Tap Tempo/Tuner switch, really( 18 ). Hold that puppy down for a second
or more and – shazam! Instant digital chromatic tuner. All TubeTone and effects
processing are bypassed so you can hear those questionably-tuned strings clearly,
should you choose to do so. If you’d rather appear more professional, don’t worry;
the volume pedal still works. Play a note on your guitar and the Floor Board will
show you what it is in that handy display ( 16 ). Play that string again, give its
tuning key a spin, and the six LEDs above the bottom row of Floor Board switches
give you a light show. The idea is that the LEDs to the left light if you’re flat. The
LEDs to the right light if you’re sharp. And the two LEDs in the center will light
at the same time when you’ve got it just right. Give any one of the Floor Board’s
switches a stomp and the tuner disappears just as swiftly as it came and you’re right
back to Channel Select Mode. What if you want to tune to a different reference
than A=440Hz? When you’re in the tuner mode, turn the Mid knob on the
Flextone while watching the display on the Floor Board. Hey, it changes! You can
set the reference frequency anywhere from 435-445Hz. This setting is stored so
you don’t have to reset it every time you turn on the amp if you decide you want to
be different (or if that piano in your rehearsal room has decided to be different).
Wah Pedal
So how about that Wah pedal? It’s the one on the left ( 19 ). Get yourself planted
with your foot on there nice and comfortable. Now, press down with your toes, let
go, and do it again. You should see a little light turning on and off to the left of the
Wah pedal. When the light’s on, the wah’s on. When the light’s off, the wah’s off.
Neat. Incidentally, the Flextone Wah is modeled after a late 60’s Vox wah, with
plenty of “growl” in the heel back position. Now then, turn the wah light on,
switch to the Black Panel Amp Model, set your Drive to about 5, and do a little
fast rhythm playing while you rock back and forth to the beat on that wah pedal.
Hang a disco ball, unbutton your shirt to your navel (assuming you don’t have it
that way all the time), hang some gold chains around your neck, and get ready to
party! You can do subtle things with the wah pedal too, like turning it on just a
tiny bit and leaving it there, just barely caressing your sound. But then, that’s not
as much fun as playing the theme to “Shaft,” is it?
6•5
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
Volume Pedal
Not nearly as fun as the wah pedal, but arguably more useful (and it doesn’t
require you to have Very Large Hair to use it convincingly). Put your foot up on
that thing ( 19 ). It’s the one on the far right. Press the volume pedal forward with
your toes for loud, and back with your heel for quiet. The volume pedal is tapered
for a very musical swell. It starts out slow and then gets faster as you move your toe
down, very much like an Ernie Ball volume pedal.
6•6
Many guitarists used to switch potentiometers in their volume pedal if they
wanted to gradually swell an extremely overdriven tone. The Flextone is hip
enough to know about this. When you select a low gain Amp Type (to the lefthand side of the 16-position switch) the Flextone automatically chooses the
normal volume pedal taper and sets up the volume pedal to control the guitar’s
volume before the preamp. Then, when you select a high-gain amp type, the
Flextone changes the taper and re-patches the volume pedal location to be postpreamp, as this is the more valuable position for a volume pedal with this kind of
amplifier tone. Details are in Appendix A.
2. EFFECT ON/OFF MODE
Alright. So that wah pedal was pretty fun, but now you want to get down to some
business with the rest of your Flextone effects. This is where we get to light up that
top arrow of the pair that the Mode Select switch points to. Press the Mode
Select switch ( 14 ) to get that arrow lit.
Now, notice that the six stomp switches that we were using for the Channel Select
Mode also have an alternative set of labels. This top row reads Distortion, Drive,
EQ, Trem/Chorus, Delay, and Reverb (but you’re already seeing that on the
handy fold out illustration and on the Floor Board itself, right? OK, just
checking.... And you sent in your registration card, right? It always makes us really
happy to get those things).
The light above a stomp switch will be on if the Effect that it controls is on. The
light will be off if the effect it controls is off. There goes that easy to use
technology again....
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
Distortion
The Distortion on/off switch works kinda like a distortion pedal. With a
distortion pedal, you kick the Distortion on, and your sound is more distorted. You
kick it off, and your sound is less distorted. Same thing here. What this does in
actuality is increase the Drive of your Flextone. Distortion always can add more
Drive to your sound, even if the Drive ( 4 ) knob is already crammed up to max.
Thus, finally, you can get everything turned up louder than everything else.
Drive/Boost
Depending on when you buy your Floor Board, you may find that the Drive/
Boost switch is just labeled Drive instead. What gives? While the switch does
control Drive on our other Digital Guitar Amplification Systems, on the Flextone
it is actually setup to give you a Volume Boost. Our users asked us to put in this
kind of capability – an easy to use volume boost/cut control – so here it is. The
idea is that you can use this for a “lead boost” when you want to get a bit of extra
volume and jump out over the band, or a “rhythm cut” when you want to drop
your volume back a bit – like when you switch from lead to rhythm parts. With
Drive/Boost on, you’re getting the full, boosted volume. With Drive/Boost off,
your volume is backed off a bit. In light of all this good stuff, newer Floor Boards
label this control Drive/Boost. Of course, we fully expect that those “vintage”
Floor Boards will be highly prized in the future because of this.
EQ
The EQ on/off switch will kick in a presence boost of 3-6 dB, depending on which
amp model is chosen. The abbreviation “dB” stands for decibels, a measure of
sound volume. A “presence boost of 3-6 dB” is just a fancy way of saying your
sound gets a bit brighter. In keeping with our attention to amp tone detail, the
frequency range covered by the presence boost varies according to how the
original amp that we modeled had its presence circuitry set up.
6•7
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
FLOOR BOARD
Trem/Chorus
The Trem/Chorus on/off switch lets you kick your tremolo and pitch mangling
effects (it says chorus, but it’s really chorus, flanger, tremolo or rotary speaker) on
and off. Light on, effect on. Light off, effect off.
Delay
The Delay on/off switch turns your Delay effects on – light on. Or off – light off.
Reverb
6•8
Bet you can guess this one already. Light on – reverb-o-rama. Light off – bone dry.
Effect On/Off Settings Stored With Programmed
Channels
OK, this part’s mostly for the people who fret about all the little details that make
other people think, “Wow, you’re way too concerned about all the little details!”
What happens if you turn some of these handy effects off and on and then you
save your setup into one of your User Channel memories? The effect on/off status
gets stored, too. Cool. Now, what happens when you decide to head over to your
friends’ house to show then how cool your Flextone is, and you jump on your bike,
and decide taking the Floor Board along is too much hassle, so you leave it behind,
pump the pedals while holding your Flextone on the handlebars with your chin,
strut into your friends’ place trying not to look like you’re out of breath, plug in
your Flextone, recall your FAVORITE setup from the handy channel select
buttons, go to play that incredibly classic-sounding Ultimate Tremolo setup that
you know is going to have your friends turning pale and quivery with envy, even if
they do think you're too concerned about all the little details, and then it hits you
– you turned the tremolo off from the Floor Board and stored the setup like that.
Feel foolish, don’t you? Let that be a lesson – never leave your Floor Board behind.
Especially when there are friends to impress. But we hate to see you suffer. So
THAT’S USING YOUR FEET:
USING THE FB4 WITH THE FLEXTONE
here’s how to save your bacon: just grab the Effect Tweak ( 8 ) knob and give it a
spin. Magically, your tremolo is back to make you a hero once again. That’s
because a particular effect’s on/off status is overridden if you tweak that effect’s
setting. So tremolo/chorus on/off comes on when you move the Effect Tweak
knob to change your Tremolo, Chorus, Flanger, or Rotary Speaker setting. Ditto if
it’s Drive or Delay or Reverb. And the opposite is true for Distortion and the EQ
bump – these are automatically switched off if you tweak something related to
them. So if you move the Drive knob ( 4 ), the Distortion turns off. Or if you
move the Bass, Mid, or Treble knob ( 5 ), the EQ bump turns off. But only if the
Floor Board’s not connected. See? A bunch of little details. Getting a headache,
aren’t you? The important thing is, if you save channels with effects on or off and
then you don’t have your Floor Board, no worries – we’ve made sure it doesn’t
cause you problems. That’s it for the Floor Board section. Fun, wasn’t it?
6•9
USING THE FB4 WITH THE FLEXTONE
The FB4 gives you basic control over channel switching on the Flextone. We
tried to make it as simple as possible. Turn off the Flextone. Connect the FB4 to
the Flextone with the thoughtfully-included connection cable. Turn on the
Flextone. Select Sound A, B, C, or D by pressing the appropriate button on the
FB4. The light will come on to indicate that the channel is selected. If you press
and hold down the button at the lit channel for about a second, your Flextone will
switch to Manual Mode. If you tap the button at the lit channel two (or more)
times, it will set the Tap Tempo speed. And finally, if you unplug the FB4 from
your amp and tap on one of its switches, nothing will happen.
Note: For those aware of the extra banks of sounds accessible via the Floor Board, you’ll
want to know that the FB4 is always selecting sounds from Bank 1 – the same four
channels that are accessible from the Flextone itself.
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
MIDI BASICS
DEEP EDITING & MIDI CONTROL
MIDI BASICS
What’s MIDI?
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a communications protocol
designed to let various music-making machines exchange information. It allows
one device to control another, and several devices to all be used together in
coordination.
In/Out
Your Flextone has two MIDI connections: In & Out. You connect your Flextone
to other MIDI devices by connecting MIDI cables to these connections. Each
connection is a one-way street: information flows from the OUT of one device to
the IN of another device. To allow information to flow back, you must connect a
second cable, from IN to OUT.
MIDI Channel
MIDI allows 16 different channels of information to be transmitted and received
through one MIDI cable. The MIDI channel is independent of, and has
nothing to do with, Flextone’s channels for storing individual sound
programs. Flextone is always listening to MIDI Channel 1. Make sure that any
other device you want the Flextone to talk to is tuning into MIDI Channel 1 also.
7•1
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
MIDI BASICS
MIDI Messages
MIDI allows several different kinds of messages, each with a different purpose:
MIDI Program Changes - Program change messages tell a device to switch from
one sound or memory to another. With your Flextone, program changes change
channels. So, for instance, when your Flextone receives program change number
1, it will select Bank 1, Channel A. When it gets program change number 2, it will
select Bank 1, Channel B. And so on, as the chart in Appendix C shows.
7•2
MIDI Controllers - MIDI controller messages allow you to control a device’s
parameters in real time. So, for instance, you can use a MIDI controller to vary the
setting the of your Flextone’s Drive control, or the Reverb level. Each of your
Flextone’s parameters are mapped to a MIDI controller, so you can take full
control of your Flextone. The chart in Appendix D lists each Flextone parameter,
the controller assigned to it, and how that controller affects the amp. Note that
the wah and volume pedals of the Floor Board also transmit MIDI controller
messages via MIDI when used with your Flextone. To minimize “zipper” noise
when controlling parameter changes via MIDI, try making gradual,
rather than sudden changes to Flextone settings.
MIDI Sysex Commands - Sysex stands for “System Exclusive.” Sysex
commands are special commands that only a particular device understands – they
are ‘exclusive’ to that device – as opposed to the more generic kind of program,
controller, and other messages that almost all MIDI devices understand. Your
Flextone uses Sysex to transmit the sounds that are programmed in its memory to
another device, or to receive new sounds from another device. This exchange of
data is typically called a “dump.” The emagic SoundDiver software included on
the CD that accompanies thismanual uses Sysex commands to dump your
Flextone programs to your computer for backup and editing, and to send programs
from your computer to your Flextone. You can also have your Flextone exchange
sounds with a POD, POD Pro, or another Flextone II series amplifier via Sysex
directly, by hooking one to the other with a MIDI cable. The following sections
tell you how all this works.
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
FLEXTONE II / POD / POD PRO TONETRANSFER VIA MIDI
FLEXTONE II / POD / POD PRO
TONETRANSFER VIA MIDI
If you just want to transfer sounds directly from Flextone to Flextone, or between a
Flextone and a POD or POD Pro, follow the directions below. You’ll need a
standard MIDI cable to do the deed. Connect the MIDI OUT of the transmitting
device (Flextone, POD, or POD Pro) to the MIDI IN of the receiving device.
Note the Flextone you are transferring sounds with MUST be a
Flextone II (you’ll know it is if it has both MIDI IN and MIDI OUT jacks).
Transferring All Sounds - To overwrite all sounds in the receiving device with
the sounds in the transmitting device:
7•3
POD or POD Pro is transmitting: make sure that the POD’s MIDI button
is lit up, and press the Save button. The POD’s single digit display will say
“A” which means send All sounds via MIDI, and the Save button will flash as
if to say, “press me again to start sending.” If you do press Save a second time,
the entire memory of the transmitting POD will be dumped into the brain of
your receiving Flextone, making one a virtual clone of the other. Pressing the
Manual button on the transmitting POD will abort the transfer, saving the
receiving Flextone II from the big brainwash.
Flextone is transmitting: (These instructions are also printed on the back of
the Flextone near the MIDI jacks.) Hold the Save button and then press the
Manual button. The Channel A, B, C, D lights will flash on the Flextone.
Press and release D button, then press Save. The entire memory of the
transmitting Flextone will be dumped into the brain of the receiving Flextone
or POD, so it now has all the same sounds as the transmitting Flextone.
Pressing the Manual button on the transmitting Flextone will abort the
transfer, saving the receiving Flextone/POD from the big brainwash.
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
FLEXTONE II / POD / POD PRO TONETRANSFER VIA MIDI
Transferring Only Some Sounds - To transfer only one or more individual
sounds between your Flextone and another Flextone/POD/POD Pro, do like so:
POD or POD Pro is transmitting: Start by having POD in normal
operating mode (no MIDI button lit), and selecting the sound you want to
transfer. You can make edits to it if you like; the POD is about to transfer
whatever settings you make active. So, once you’ve got the sound you want,
press MIDI. Now press Save. Use the Up button to change from “A” to “1”
which means you only want to transfer ONE sound to the receiving POD.
Press Save again to make the transfer, or press the Manual button to abort.
One last important step: your receiving Flextone will now have its Save light
flashing, and has the sound you transferred waiting to be stored into a memory
location. You must press Save on your Flextone, choose a destination, and
then press Save again to confirm that you really want that transferred sound
to get stored at that location in your Flextone.
7•4
Flextone is transmitting: (These instructions are also printed on the back of
the Flextone near the MIDI jacks.) Start by selecting the Flextone sound you
want to transfer. You can make edits to it if you like; your Flextone is about to
transfer whatever settings you make active. So, once you’ve got the sound you
want, hold the Save button and then press the Manual button. The Channel
A, B, C, D lights will flash on the Flextone. Press and release C button, then
press Save again to make the transfer, or press the Manual button to abort.
One last important step: the receiving Flextone will now have its Save light
flashing, or the receiving POD/POD Pro will now have its Edited light lit. In
both cases, the sound you transferred is waiting to be stored into a memory
location. You must press Save on the receiving Flextone/POD/POD Pro,
choose a destination, and then press Save again to confirm that you really
want that transferred sound to get stored at that location in the receiving
Flextone/POD/POD Pro’s memory.
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
BACKING UP YOUR FLEXTONE’S MEMORY TO OTHER DEVICES
BACKING UP YOUR FLEXTONE’S MEMORY TO
OTHER DEVICES
It’s recommended that you backup the sounds programmed into your Flextone so
that you can restore them in case of some future disaster. If you want to transfer
sounds from Flextone to some other MIDI device for backup (like say a MIDI file
player or a hardware sequencer or keyboard workstation), things work pretty much
the same way as they do for Flextone-to-Flextone/POD transfers. But we’ll spell it
out anyway. You’ll need a standard MIDI cable to get everybody talking.
Connect the MIDI OUT of your Flextone to the MIDI IN of the receiving MIDI
devices. Set your MIDI device to receive MIDI CHANNEL 1.
Transferring All Sounds - To dump all the programmed sounds from your
Flextone to your MIDI recorder, hold the Save button on your Flextone and then
press the Manual button. Press D on the Flextone. Start your MIDI recorder.
Now, if you do press Save a second time, the entire memory of your Flextone will
be dumped to the receiving MIDI device. Pressing the Manual button on your
Flextone will abort the transfer. You also probably have to press STOP on your
MIDI recorder once the transfer is complete.
Transferring Only Some Sounds - To transfer only one or more individual
sounds from your Flextone to your MIDI recorder, here’s the procedure. Start by
selecting the Flextone sound you want to transfer. You can make edits to it if you
like; your Flextone is about to transfer whatever settings you make active. So,
once you’ve got the sound you want, hold the Save button on your Flextone and
then press the Manual button. Press C on the Flextone, and your Flextone will
know you only want to transfer ONE sound to the receiving device. Start the
MIDI recorder going, and then press Save again to make the transfer, or press
anything else to abort. Then you probably have to press STOP on your MIDI
recorder. If you want to send another single sound, select it on your Flextone, hold
the Save button on your Flextone and then press the Manual button. Press C on
the Flextone. Set your recorder to receive again. Press Save on your Flextone to
execute the dump. And press STOP on your MIDI recorder.
7•5
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
EMAGIC SOUNDDIVER SOFTWARE
EMAGIC SOUNDDIVER SOFTWARE
The Emagic SoundDiver software included on your the CD-Rom that
accompanies this manual is an editor/librarian program that turns your computer
into a Flextone control station. Check http://www.line6.com for the latest
update for this software. SoundDiver lets you store your Flextone sounds on your
computer and edit your Flextone sounds on-screen, with access to extra
parameters not available when using your Flextone on its own. Included on the
CD are installation instructions and an electronic user guide. Please refer to them
for instruction, and for information on Emagic’s technical support services.
7•6
You will need to have a MIDI interface for your computer in order to use the
SoundDiver software. Emagic makes interfaces, as well as a line of software and
hardware for music recording that you should check out for use with your
Flextone. See the end of this chapter for trouble-shooting help with
SoundDiver setups.
Emagic can be reached in the U.S. by phone at (530) 477-1051, or at their
German headquarters: +49 4101 495-0. They’re also on the internet at
http://www.emagic.de, and can be emailed at info@emagic.de – U.S. customers
note that the web and email addresses are “.de” not “.com” because Emagic is
headquartered in Germany. A list of Emagic distributors is under the Apple Menu
in the SoundDiver Macintosh software Mac. If you’re using Windows, this list is
available from the Welcome Window when you start up SoundDiver, or from the
Help Menu > Emagic Distributors....
MIDI interfaces are also made by Mark of the Unicorn (www.motu.com), MIDI
Man (www.midiman.com) and others.
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
OTHER THINGS YOU CAN DO WITH MIDI
OTHER THINGS YOU CAN DO WITH MIDI
In addition to using the Emagic SoundDiver software on the accompanying CD to
edit and store Flextone sounds, or using a MIDI connection for ToneTransfer
between your Flextone, and other Flextones, PODs, and POD Pros, MIDI also
gives you what you need for:
Changing Flextone Channels via MIDI Program Changes
The most basic thing to do with your Flextone via MIDI is change channels. You
may have a foot controller or other device that sends MIDI program change
messages. Hook its MIDI OUT to your Flextone’s MIDI IN, set the MIDI
Channels of both devices to be the same, and refer to the chart in Appendix C to
see what program number on the foot controller will select which Flextone
Channel. Note that both Manual Mode and the Tuner can be selected with MIDI
Program Change messages. You can also send MIDI Program change messages to
your Flextone from a MIDI sequencer to allow you to change your Flextone sounds
automatically in sync with your sequences. To minimize “zipper” noise when
controlling parameter changes via MIDI, try making gradual, rather
than sudden changes to your Flextone settings.
Tweaking Flextone Sounds with MIDI Controllers
If you have a hardware MIDI “fader box,” assignable MIDI controllers on a
keyboard, or a stand-alone or computer software-based MIDI sequencer, you can
take control of any Flextone parameter via MIDI. The chart in Appendix D lists
which Flextone parameter is controlled by which MIDI Controller. Remember to
make sure that the MIDI controller is transmitting on Channel 1 in order to
control your Flextone.
7•7
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
OTHER THINGS YOU CAN DO WITH MIDI
Full MIDI Automation of Flextone
When you use your Flextone with a MIDI sequencer, you can automate any
Flextone parameter using MIDI Controller messages. The Flextone front panel
knobs all send out appropriate MIDI controllers (as do the wah and volume pedals
of the optional Floor Board foot controller) that you can record into a MIDI track
as you play through your Flextone along with a MIDI sequence.
Hook your Flextone’s MIDI OUT to a MIDI IN on your sequencing setup. Hook a
sequencer MIDI OUT to Flextone’s MIDI IN, and make sure your sequencer is
ready to record and play back the Flextone information on MIDI Channel 1.
7•8
To allow MIDI-controlled automation, you need to set up a MIDI track in your
sequencer to record the data flowing from your Flextone’s MIDI OUT. Set up a
MIDI track to receive your Flextone’s MIDI output, record-enable it, and start the
sequencer recording. Slowly turn Flextone’s Drive knob all the way up and then
all the way down as your sequencer records, and then stop your sequencer. Now,
look at the data that’s been recorded into the Flextone MIDI track on your
sequencer. You’ll see that you’ve recorded MIDI controller #13 messages. This is
the controller that’s assigned to Flextone’s Drive parameter. Play back the
recorded MIDI track as you play through Flextone, and you’ll hear the Drive
changes that you recorded into your MIDI track.
To automate Flextone parameters that aren’t accessible from front panel controls
(like the Reverb Tone), you need to use a hardware MIDI controller, or setup an
on-screen fader or other controller on your software MIDI sequencer to transmit
the correct MIDI Controller number to your Flextone on MIDI Channel 1.
To minimize “zipper” noise when controlling parameter changes via
MIDI, try making gradual, rather than sudden changes to your Flextone
settings.
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
STEP-BY-STEP WITH SOUNDDIVER
STEP-BY-STEP WITH SOUNDDIVER
Step 1 - Hook your Flextone up to your computer’s MIDI interface. Use both the
MIDI IN and MIDI OUT connections for bi-directional communication (so Flextone
can talk to your computer, and the computer can talk to Flextone). Remember that
Flextone’s OUT connects to the computer’s IN, and the computer’s OUT connects to
Flextone’s IN. Make sure Flextone is powered on.
Step 2 - Install the SoundDiver software on your computer. We’ve included
SoundDiver installers on the accompanying CD. We also strongly recommend that
you surf the Support pages at www.line6.com to check for an updated version of the
SoundDiver installer. Run the SoundDiver installer to get SoundDiver installed on
your machine. Now, with your Flextone hooked up to the computer via MIDI and
powered on, launch the newly-installed SoundDiver software.
7•9
Step 3 - First you’ll see the “splash screen” with Emagic’s contact info, including
information on upgrading to the full version of the SoundDiver software. You’ll then
get a dialogue box to select English or German (SoundDiver is made by Emagic, a
German company).
Step 4 (Macintosh) - Then you’ll configure your ports; make sure you are plugged
into the right port on your Mac (Modem, Printer, or USB) and that you’ve checked
the box for this port before hitting the OK button in the Preferences dialogue box.
Step 4 (Windows) - SoundDiver will now probably give you a series of dialogue
boxes to OK regarding MIDI ports. These will say something like “Port XXXX no
longer exists,” and will include an OK button. Typically, you’ll get two dialogues
referring to SoundBlaster ports, and eight referring to Unitor ports (the Unitor is a
particular MIDI interface). Go ahead and OK all these dialogue boxes, and then
SoundDiver should give you the dialogue box we’re about to describe in step 5....
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
STEP-BY-STEP WITH SOUNDDIVER
Step 5 - SoundDiver should now establish communication with your Flextone (like
we said above, make sure you have both MIDI In and MIDI Out connected to allow
this), and will give you a dialogue box asking if you’d like to “Request Device’s
Memories?” OK this dialogue, and SoundDiver sucks all the sounds out of your
Flextone, and opens them in a window titled “Flextone” or something similarly
inventive.
Step 6 - You’ll have a window that looks about
like the one on the left (this particular example
shows a POD 2.0 window, but the one you’ll see
will be just about the same).
7•10
Use your mouse to move your on-screen arrow
pointer to the User Programs header bar as
shown, and click once. The list of all 32 user
memories will then be highlighted to show that
they are all selected (clicking on the header bar
is a handy “select all user memories” command).
Step 7 (Macintosh) - Now, notice that there are two menus in this window: Entry
and Options. From the Entry menu, choose Save as... > Selected Entries, as
shown below:
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
STEP-BY-STEP WITH SOUNDDIVER
SoundDiver will give you a standard Save File dialogue box. A pop-up menu at the top
of the dialogue box will say “Libraries,” letting you know you are about to save your
library to the SoundDiver Libraries folder.
You can click on this “Libraries” pop-up menu to navigate to another place if you want
to save this library file some place else. You can also change the name of your library
by typing one here (we recommend something like “Flextone Factory Sounds”), and
then you complete the Save by clicking Save.
7•11
Step 7 (Windows) - On Windows, the Entry menu is at the top of the screen with
File and the rest of ’em. From it, choose Save as... > Selected Entries. SoundDiver
will give you a standard Save File dialogue box. The SoundDiver software’s Libraries
folder has been automatically selected for you as the destination for your library file.
You can change the name of your library by typing one here (we recommend
something like “Flextone Factory Sounds”), and then complete the Save by clicking
the Save button.
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
STEP-BY-STEP WITH SOUNDDIVER
Step 8 - As a final check to make sure
everything went as it should, choose Open
from the File menu, and open the library
you just saved. You should see a window
similar to the one at the left, listing all 36
of your Flextone’s memories.
Congratulations! You’ve now backed up
the memory of your Flextone, and gotten
started with SoundDiver’s library features
in the process!
7•12
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
STEP-BY-STEP WITH SOUNDDIVER
A Few Other SoundDiver Tips
We’re done with the tutorial on how to save your sounds to the computer, but we
figured we should give you one or two other tips:
Editing a Channel Memory/Program The SoundDiver window shown on the left
shows you the contents of your Flextone’s
memory (OK, it’s a Bass POD’s memory, actually,
but your Flextone’s window will look the same).
To edit any one of your Flextone’s channel
memories (SoundDiver calls these “User
Programs”), just double-click its name in the list,
and you’ll get an editing window.
Transmit/Request The “Transmit” and “Receive” commands are available
in SoundDiver’s MIDI menu. These commands instruct
SoundDiver to Transmit or Receive information to your
Flextone, based on what youhave selected in
SoundDiver. So, for instance., if you click on one of the
channels/programs in the name list of the window
above, and then choose the Transmit command,
SoundDiver will understand you want to Transmit this
sound to your Flextone (in other words, the parameters
that define the sound are sent from the computer to Flextone, so now they both
have the same information – what was in the computer has been copied to the
Flextone as well). If you clicked on one of the names in the list, and then chose
Request, that would instruct SoundDiver to Request this sound from your Flextone
(in other words, the parameters that define the sound are sent from Flextone to
the computer, so now they both have the same information – what was in
Flextone has been copied to the computer as well).
Keep these commands in mind any time your Flextone and computer don’t seem
to be dealing with the same information; you can use Transmit and Request to get
your Flextone and computer back in sync.
7•13
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
SOUNDDIVER SETUP TROUBLE-SHOOTING
SOUNDDIVER SETUP TROUBLE-SHOOTING
There are a couple of considerations with SoundDiver and Windows sound card systems.
Here are some troubleshooting hints, courtesy of Line 6’s own product support hero,
George Van Wagner:
1. SoundBlaster type cards have more than one MIDI driver. The system will
usually default to the driver for the built-in synth on the card, rather than the
external MIDI port. This means that you must select the correct driver, before
SoundDiver can see the Flextone.
7•14
2. MIDI cables must run from out to in and vice versa (don’t connect Flextone’s
MIDI In to your computer’s MIDI In; connect Flextone’s MIDI In to your
computer’s MIDI Out). Think of it in terms of the direction that information is
flowing; out of the Flextone in to the computer. Out of the computer in to the
Flextone.
3. MIDI channels must be set to the same value. The quickest way to ensure
communication is to simply set the Flextone MIDI Channel to A for all (In MIDIese, this is known as Omni mode).
Here are some basic steps to ensure communication with the Flextone:
1. When you get the dialog box stating that no new device is found, click on the
button that says Manually. You will be dropped in the Memory Manager window
of SoundDiver.
2. On the left hand side of the Memory Manager window, you will see a list of
parameters. Make sure that the Out Port is set to the driver for the External
MIDI. As different companies have different driver names, there's no one set
Deep Editing & MIDI Control:
SOUNDDIVER SETUP TROUBLE-SHOOTING
name, but the selection should be fairly obvious.
3. Make sure that the Device ID is set to 1.
4. On the right hand side of the Memory Manager, click on the title bar that says
User Programs. This will highlight all 36 of the user preset locations that are
currently blank.
5. Now click on the left-most icon in the upper left of the Memory Manager. It
should look like a little keyboard with an arrow coming out of it and a small
question mark. This requests the current programs from the Flextone. At this
point, you should see all the patch names fill in, and you’re good to go.
7•15
Inside Your Head:
FRONT PANEL
INSIDE YOUR HEAD
If you’re the proud owner of a Flextone II HD, this chapter’s just for you. While the Flextone
II HD is much like its combo amplifier brethren, there are important features and functions
that set the HD apart. They are detailed herein.
FRONT PANEL
If you look closely, you’ll notice that the illustration on the fold-out back cover of this
User Manual is basically exactly the same as the front panel of your Flextone HD. The
only difference is that the HD has a big light-up power switch on the front panel (the
combos have their power switches rear-mounted).
EFFECTS LOOP
The Effects Loop allows you to hook up external effects and processors to the HD.
Send and Return are both stereo, on tip-ring-sleeve jacks, and you can choose
between Series and Parallel operation.
In case any of that sounds like a foreign language to you, we’ll take a second here to
hip you to some “effect loop application theory,” and details of hooking everything up:
8•1
Inside Your Head:
EFFECTS LOOP
Effects loops let you send sound out of a device (like the HD) to another device (like a
rack mount effects processor), and then loop it back again, feeding the now-processed
sound back into the thing that the unprocessed sound came from. Like when you want
to add an echo to your guitar sound, or maybe you want to compress it.
So, your HD creates the basic tone, and then that tone is sent out to the effects loop
for further “seasoning,” and finally the seasoned sound is returned back to the amp for
final output. In the HD, that seasoning can be applied in two ways: series or parallel...
SERIES VS. PARALLEL
In a series effects loop, all of your guitar signal goes out the “effect send” and into
whatever effect you may be using. The signal is processed by the effect, and then the
signal comes back into the “effect return” for final amplification and output. The effect
is “in series” (comes after) the sound generator (your amp). If you turn the output
volume of your effect to zero, you hear nothing, because all the sound is leaving the
amp and then the effect processor is giving nothing back.
8•2
Now, in a parallel effects loop, only a part of your tone goes out the “effect send” and
into whatever effect you may be using. It’s sort of like you’ve tapped a bit of the signal
off from the main flow, to send it elsewhere (just like a typical effect send on a mixing
board). But in the meantime, the main flow is still going, too, passing through the amp
uneffected. The effect unit processes its parallel signal, and returns it to the amp, where
it gets mixed back in with the uneffected signal.
Why have both? Some effects have to be in series to be effective. Compressors, for
instance, work by taking all of your signal and adjusting its volume as you play.
Similarly, noise reducers need to work on all the signal. Generally, you’d also use EQ
or “exciter” in a series loop.
Other effects can work with only a portion of the guitar signal – in parallel. Reverb,
for instance, or delay, can be driven with just a portion of the guitar signal. Same goes
for chorus.
One reason some people like to use parallel effect loops is that not all of their guitar
tone has to go through the effect box. This can be especially important if you are using
an old, low-resolution piece of gear that tends to suck out the warm details of your
Inside Your Head:
EFFECTS LOOP
tone. By using a parallel effect loop, you get to keep plenty of your pure, unadulterated
tone right inside the amp where it’s safe, and then just mix a bit of the processed sound
in on top for extra flavor.
USING THE EFFECTS
LOOP
The back panel of the HD
shows an illustration of part of
the HD signal flow, including
the Effects Loop. As you can
see, the series/parallel switch
controls whether (1) some sound flows directly through the amp, bypassing the effect
loop (this would be parallel), or (2) the direct path through the amp is interrupted, so
all the guitar signal flows through the effect (this would be series).
Note that the Master Volume control comes after the effects loop; you get the same
signal level flowing to your effect, no matter what Master Volume level you set.
8•3
MAKING CONNECTIONS
Run a cable from the HD effect send to the inputs of your effect unit. This effect
send gives you a stereo, TRS (tip, ring, sleeve) connection. You can use a mono cable
to connect to a mono input effect (in this case, the HD’s left signal will flow to the
effect). For a stereo effect device that has separate left and right input jacks, use an
“insert” cable – it’ll have a TRS connector on one end (that plugs into the HD effect
send), and will fan out to two mono connectors on the other end, (those plug into
your effect unit’s two inputs).
For the return, do the same thing. Generally, you’ll want to use another “insert” cable,
with the two mono connectors plugged into your effect’s left and right outputs, and
the TRS connector plugged into the HD’s effect return. If you use a mono cable for the
return, you will get the looped signal on only one side. If the effect loop is set for series
operation, that means only the left channel of your HD will be heard. In that case,
Inside Your Head:
EFFECTS LOOP
you’ll need to use a mono-to-stereo adapter on the mono cable from the effect, to feed
both the effect return channels of the HD.
SETTING EFFECT LEVELS
The amount of effect you hear is controlled by the output volume of your effect. You
want to turn it up enough to get a good healthy signal into the HD for amplification,
but not so much that it distorts.
If you’re using the effect loop in parallel, be sure to set the mix of
your processor to 100% wet (so that it puts out only effected sound,
with no uneffected “direct” signal mixed in), and then use the processor’s
output level (not the mix control) to set just how much of the effect you
want to hear along with your un-effected guitar signal. Running in parallel with the
mix at less than 100% will cause what engineers call “comb filtering” and
most other people would call “lame tone.”
MONO/STEREO DETAIL
8•4
When using only the Left/Mono speaker output, the effects will be switched to mono.
This also effects the Direct Outputs – they switch to mono, too (meaning the exact
same thing comes out both jacks). If both left and right speaker outputs are in use, or
neither are connected, the effects and direct outputs will be in stereo.
Inside Your Head:
CABINET HOOK-UPS
CABINET HOOK-UPS
In addition to all of the cool stuff like amp and cab modeling, awesome Direct Outs,
and great effects, the Flextone II HD offers unmatched versatility and flexibility for
powering almost any type of speaker cabinet(s). The type and number of speaker cabs
you choose is up to you. Most likely, the cabinets you choose will depend on the
situations you play in – some gigs require more of the closed back grind and thump,
while other gigs will work better with the classic sound of open back speaker cabinets.
Either way, the Flextone II HD has got you covered.
First, some speaker cabinet basics:
•
Be sure to turn the amplifier off when connecting or disconnecting speaker
cables and cabinets. (This protects both the amplifier and the speakers.)
•
Only use heavy gauge, unshielded cables for hooking up speaker cabinets.
(Do not use standard guitar cables to connect your speaker cabinets, as
they will degrade your sound. )
•
Be sure to set the SPEAKER CABINET IMPEDENCE SWITCH to the
setting that matches the cab(s) that are connected to your amp.
VOLUME LEVELS
8•5
When using your Flextone guitar amplification system, be sure to
exercise some common sense about volume levels. The Flextone II HD
is a high-powered head designed to drive up to four 4x12 cabinets per
side. So obviously it’s got enough juice to spare that you could fry the
speakers of most setups if you really tried.
WARNING SIGNS
If you see the speakers practically jump out through the speaker grille, and they’re
making rude noises, back off on the Flextone II HD’s Master Volume a wee bit to get
things back into the realm of reasonable operational levels (note that, for Line 6
speaker cabinets, we’ve included some recommended maximum volume settings with
the hook-up diagrams that follow in this manual). Also understand that Line 6 can
not be liable for replacement of speakers damaged by abuse. So, feel free to crank it up,
but do it with a bit of sense.
Inside Your Head:
CABINET HOOK-UPS
OPEN-BACK / CLOSED-BACK EMULATION
Being one of these modern day technological wonders and all that, we’ve tried to put a
few little refinements into the Flextone Series amplifiers to make them more flexible
than the old technology amps that came before them. One of the things we’ve
included in your HD is a closed-back emulator for use with open-back cabinets. This
lets you get the sound of a closed-back cabinet even when using open-back cabinets.
So, if you use a big multi-stack closed-back cabinet setup on stage, but then you want
to use a little open-back cabinet (like the 1-12" Flextone Cab) for monitoring when
you’re recording in the studio with the Flextone HD’s direct outputs, you can get the
same cabinet tone with both setups.
By default, the Closed-back emulator is switched off. You activate it by following these
easy dance steps:
1. Press and hold the SAVE button while switching on the power
2. Once powered up, press the B button to select “Open Back
Mode”
3. Press SAVE to confirm your decision
8•6
Once you’ve selected it, the emulator will stay on until you clear it with another
power up while holding the SAVE button and selecting the A Button, so don’t forget
to switch it off when you get back to the mondo stack stage setup again!
When you first turn on the Flextone II HD, it will flash the Channel A or Channel B
light briefly to let you know which kind of cabinet it’s expecting to get plugged into:
Channel A will flash briefly for closed-back, Channel B flashes briefly for open-back.
MONO/STEREO DETAIL
Remember that when you use only the Left/Mono speaker output, the effects switch to
mono. This also effects the Direct Outputs – they switch to mono, too (ya get the
exact same thing on both jacks). If both left and right speaker outputs are in use, or
neither are connected, the effects and direct outputs will be in stereo.
Inside Your Head:
CABINET HOOK-UPS
TAKE A LOAD OFF
Operating the Flextone II HD without a load (that means without speakers
attached) is OK! You do not need to have speakers connected to the
amplifier in order to use the balanced Direct Outputs (you wouldn’t want
to run a tube amplifier without a load).
8•7
APPENDIX A: AMP MODELS
Please note that Fender, Marshall, Vox, Boogie, Soldano, Roland, Matchless, Budda, Arbiter, and other amplifier model
designations, and effects, are all trademarks of their respective owners, which are in no way associated or affiliated with
Line 6. These marks and names are used solely for the purpose of describing certain amplifier tones produced using Line 6’s
modeling technology. The Line 6 modeling technology provides Flextone II series amplifiers with a wide variety of sounds
and effects modeled after some of the most popular sounds of the classic amps and effects mentioned here.
Amp Model Name
Based On
Volume
Pedal
Position
Reverb
Type
Bright
Switch
Line 6 Clean
Line 6 Crunch
Line 6 Drive
Line 6 Insane
Jazz Clean
Small Tweed
Tweed Blues
Black Panel
Modern Class A
Brit Class A
Brit Blues
Brit Classic
Brit Hi Gain
Rectified
Modern Hi Gain
Fuzz Box
Line 6 Twang
Line 6 Crunch #2
Line 6 Blues
Line 6 Layer
Tube Preamp
Small Tweed #2
Boutique #3
Black Panel #2
Brit Class A #3
Brit Class A #2
California Crunch #1
California Crunch #2
Boutique #1
Rectified #2
Modern Hi Gain #2
Boutique #2
Line 6 21st Century Clean
Line 6 Thick Grindage
Line 6 Industrial Strength OD
Way too many hours of shredding
’87 Roland JC-120
’52 Fender Deluxe
’59 Fender Bassman
’65 Fender Deluxe
’96 Matchless Chieftain
’63 Vox AC 30 with Top Boost
’65 Marshall JTM-45
’68 Marshall Plexi 50 watt
’90 Marshall JCM-800
’94 Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Tremoverb Combo
’89 Soldano X88R Preamp
’60’s Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face
Fender Deluxe and Bassman, with more tone control range
’68 Marshall Plexi 50 watt with more tone control range
Marshall JTM-45 meets Budda Twinmaster meets Line 6
Line 6 Clean meets Psychotic Drive
Tube Instrument Preamp
’60 Tweed Fender Champ
Budda Twinmaster head
’65 Blackface Fender Twin
’60 Vox AC 15
’60 Vox AC 30 non-Top Boost
’85 Mesa Boogie Mark IIc+ Clean Channel
’85 Mesa Boogie Mark IIc+ Drive Channel
Dumble Overdrive Special Clean Channel
’95 Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Head
’89 Soldano SLO Super Lead Overdrive
Dumble Overdrive Special Drive Channel
Pre
Pre
Post
Post
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Post
Post
Post
Post
Pre
Pre
Pre
Post
Post
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Post
Pre
Post
Post
Post
Room
Spring
Room
Room
Spring
Room
Spring
Spring
Spring
Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
Spring
Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
Spring
Room
Room
Spring
Spring
Room
Room
Room
Room
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
No
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Flex2*Manual*Appendx*-*Rev*H Page 2 Friday, August 18, 2000 11:24 AM
APPENDIX B: EFFECT PARAMETERS
Effect
Tap
Tweak
Notes
Bypass
n/a
n/a
Turns off the effects.
Compressor
n/a
Ratio
There are 5 Compressor ratios: 1.4:1, 2:1, 3:1, 6:1, and
Higher settings “squeeze” your volume more.
Tremolo
Tremolo Speed
Depth
The tremolo was designed with the characteristic Fender
tremolo shape.
Chorus 1
Chorus Speed
Range of
Choruses
Square wave LFO, “rack” type chorus setup; subtler than
Chorus 2.
Chorus 2
Chorus Speed
Range of
Choruses
Sine wave LFO, approximately 10% feedback; emulates an old
Roland CE-1 for classic stomp box-type sound.
Flanger 1
Flanger Speed
Range of
Flangers
Light flange.
Flanger 2
Flanger Speed
Range of
Flangers
Heavier flange; inverted, and with deeper range.
Rotary Speaker
Rotary Speed
Depth
This emulates a classic spinning speaker, a la the Leslie.
Delay
Delay Speed
Delay Level
Very quick delays will have no repeats for better slapback.
Delay/
Compressor
Delay Speed
Compression
Ratio
There are 5 Compressor ratios: 1.4:1, 2:1, 3:1, 6:1, and
Higher settings “squeeze” your volume more.
Delay/Tremolo
Delay Speed
Range of
Tremolos
The delay speed is set for a short slapback (100 ms).
Delay/
Chorus 1
Delay Speed
Range of
Choruses
Chorus 1 uses a Square wave LFO, no feedback. This is the
“rack” type chorus setup.
Delay/
Chorus 2
Delay Speed
Range of
Choruses
Chorus 2 uses a Sine wave LFO, approximately 10%
feedback. This emulates an old Roland CE-1 for classic stomp
box chorus sound.
Delay/Flanger 1
Delay Speed
Range of
Flangers
Light flange.
Delay/Flanger 2
Delay Speed
Range of
Flangers
Heavier flange; inverted, and with deeper range.
Delay/Swell
Delay Speed
Swell Attack
Speed
Automatic volume pedal swells... Swell is a slow ramp-up, or
swell of volume when you play each note.
:1.
:1.
APPENDIX C: MIDI PROGRAM CHANGES
Flextone II channels can be selected via MIDI program changes. Some devices
number programs starting at zero. Some start at one. We start at zero (Manual
Mode) and then work our way along through the channels as shown in this table:
Flextone II Channel
Bank 1
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Bank 2
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Bank 3
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Bank 4
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Bank 5
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
MIDI Program
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Flextone II Channel
Bank 6
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Bank 7
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Bank 8
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Bank 9
Channel A
Channel B
Channel C
Channel D
Manual Mode
Tuner
MIDI Program
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
00
37
APPENDIX D: MIDI CONTROLS
Sound Diver
Parameters
(1 of 3 pages)
Transmitted MIDI
Range
Control
#
Selects Amp Model
0-15 transmitted from
Amp Model knob
12
0 = Tube Preamp,
1-32 = Other Amp Models
>32 treated as 32
Drive
-
0-127
13
0-127
Drive 2 (only if
Amp Type = Layer)
-
NO TRANSMIT
20
0-127
Bass
-
0-127
14
0-127
Mid
-
0-127
15
0-127
Treble
-
0-127
16
0-127
On/Off
Trans: Off=0/On=127
73
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Presence
-
On/Off
(Hold TAP, turn TREBLE)
21
0-127
Channel Volume
-
0-127
17
0-127
On/Off
Trans: Off=0/On=127
22
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Gate Threshold
-
NO TRANSMIT
23
0-127
Gate Decay
-
NO TRANSMIT
24
0-127
0-15
0-15
19
0=Bypass, 1-15 other effects
0-127
1
0-127
Amp Model
Bright Switch
Noise Gate On/Off
Effect Select Knob
Notes
Effect Tweak
Received MIDI Range
Distortion On/Off
Adds Preset Amount of
Drive
FB SWITCH ON=127
OFF=0
(Or hold TAP,
turn DRIVE)
25
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Drive/Boost
4dB Boost of Channel
Volume
FB SWITCH ON=127
OFF=0
(Or hold TAP,
turn CH. VOLUME)
26
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
EQ (presence Bump)
Adds a Presence Boost
FB SWITCH ON=127
OFF=0
(Or hold TAP,
turn TREBLE)
27
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
APPENDIX D: MIDI CONTROLS
Sound Diver
Parameters
Delay (always available)
(2 of 3 pages)
Notes
Transmitted MIDI
Range
Control
#
Received MIDI Range
On/Off
FB SWITCH ON=127
28
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Delay Time
0-3150 mS, 128 equal
steps
NO TRANSMIT
30
0-127
Double-precision
control for Delay Time
with Delay Time,
gives 14 bit precision
NO TRANSMIT
62
0-127
-
0-127
32
0-127
Delay Repeats
Delay Level
-
0-127
34
0-127
On/Off
FB SWITCH ON=127
36
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Spring/Hall
NO TRANSMIT
37
Rcv: 0-63=SPRING, 64127=HALL
Reverb Decay
-
NO TRANSMIT
38
0-127
Reverb Tone
-
NO TRANSMIT
39
0-127
Reverb Diffusion
-
NO TRANSMIT
40
0-127
Reverb Density
-
NO TRANSMIT
41
0-127
Reverb (always available)
Reverb Type
Reverb Level
Compression Ratio
Wah Wah Pedal On/Off
-
0-127
18
0-127
off, 1.4:1, 2:1,
3:1, 6:1, infinity:1
NO TRANSMIT
42
0-21=off, 22-44=1.4:1,
45-67=2:1, 68-90=3:1,
91-113=6:1, 114-127= infinity:1
On/Off
FB SWITCH ON=127/
OFF=0
43
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Wah Pedal
-
0-127
4
0-127
Wah Bottom Frequency
-
NO TRANSMIT
44
0-127
Wah Top Frequency
-
NO TRANSMIT
45
0-127
Volume Pedal
-
0-127
7
0-127
Volume Pedal Minimum
-
NO TRANSMIT
46
0-127
Volume Pedal Location
Pre Tube Drive /
Post Tube Drive
NO TRANSMIT
47
Rcv: 0-63=BEFORE TUBE,
64-127=AFTER TUBE
On/Off
NO TRANSMIT
48
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Volume Swell On/Off
Volume Swell Ramp Time
-
NO TRANSMIT
49
0-127
Tap Tempo
-
TAP BUTTON OR FB
SWITCH TRANSMITS 127
64
64-127= a Tap
APPENDIX D: MIDI CONTROLS
Sound Diver
Parameters
(3 of 3 pages)
Notes
Transmitted MIDI
Range
Control
#
Received MIDI Range
On/Off
FB SWITCH ON=127
50
Rcv: 0-63=OFF, 64-127=ON
Chorus/Flange Speed
-
NO TRANSMIT
51
0-127
Chorus/Flange Depth
-
NO TRANSMIT
52
0-127
Chorus/Flange Feedback
-
NO TRANSMIT
53
0-63 negative, 64-127 positive
Chorus PreDelay
(if type = Chorus)
-
NO TRANSMIT
54
0-127
Slow/Fast
NO TRANSMIT
55
0-63=SLOW, 64-127=FAST
Rotary Max Speed
-
NO TRANSMIT
56
0-127
Rotary Min Speed
-
NO TRANSMIT
57
0-127
Tremolo Speed
-
NO TRANSMIT
58
0-127
Tremolo Depth
-
NO TRANSMIT
59
0-127
Selects Cab Simulation
0-15
71
0 = No Cab,
1-15 = Cab Models
>15 treated as 15
0-127
NO TRANSMIT
72
0-127
Chorus/Rotary/Tremolo
On/Off
Rotary Speed
Cabinet Type
A.I.R. Ambience Level
APPENDIX E: LINE 6 CONTACT
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Hope you enjoy your Flextone II. If you have any questions or comments, our diligent
support staff can be contacted at (805) 379-8900 (weekdays, 8am-6pm Pacific Time), via
our website (www.line6.com,) or via email (support@line6.com). To ensure that your
support experience is a pleasant one, we recommend taking some notes for yourself before
you call. That way, you’ll remember to ask everything you want to ask the first time, and be
able to get back to Flextone-ing ASAP.
OTHER LINE 6 PRODUCTS
We offer a full line of affordable amps that feature amp and cab models, built-in effects,
programmable channels, foot control options, MIDI, and more. We also have POD, POD
Pro, Bass POD, Bass POD Pro, and the Stomp Box Modelers series effect pedals. Learn
about the full line up at the Line 6 web site (www.line6.com) or by contacting our sales or
support staff via email (sales@line6.com or support@line6.com) or phone: (805) 379-8900.
POD Series – POD and POD Pro are ToneTransfer compatible with your Flextone II, and
are ideal when you want your Flextone sounds in a compact carry-along, or rack mount
format. POD Pro also includes digital out. Bass POD and Bass POD Pro are for bass guitar.
Flextone II Series – This line of amplifiers includes 1x12 and 2x12 combos, as well as a
high powered stereo head, plus 1x12, 2x12, and 4x12 speker cabinets.
AX2 212 – The most tweakable Line 6 amplifier, AX2 matches Line 6 modeling
technology with extensive multi-effects in an all-in-one 100 Watt 2x12" combo.
Spider Series – 6 Amp Models and built-in FX in our lowest price amps.
Stomp Box Modelers – A mass of modeled vintage effects in three stomp boxes: Delay
Modeler includes Tape and Analog Delays, 14 Second Loop Sampler and more. Modulation
Modeler includes classic Choruses, Flangers, Phasers, Rotary Speakers, Tremolos and more.
Distortion Modeler brings you a collection of Distotion, Fuzz, and Overdrive models.
Amp Farm & Echo Farm– Plug-in software for Pro Tools TDM systems puts Line 6
modeling right into your high-end computer music system. Requires Pro Tools TDM
hardware. Amp Farm and Echo Farm are distributed by Digidesign; contact them directly for
pre-sales information. Digidesign: Email prodinfo@digidesign.com or telephone
(800) 333-2137 (from USA) or (650) 842-7900. Surf www.digidesign.com.
APPENDIX F: WARRANTY INFO
Line 6 Limited Warranty Information
Sending in your registration card allows us to register key information so that we may handle
problems faster and inform you of advance information, upgrades, and other news. Thanks in
advance for filling out your registration card and sending it to us. And good luck in your music!
Line 6, Inc., warrants this product when purchased at an Authorized Line 6 Dealer in the United States of America or Canada, to be free of defects in
materials and workmanship for a period of one year from the date of original purchase only upon completion and return of the Line 6 Warranty
Registration form within 30 days from date of purchase. Please contact your distributor for information on warranty and service outside USA and Canada.
During the warranty period Line 6 shall, at its option, either repair or replace any product that proves to be defective upon inspection by Line 6. Line 6
reserves the right to update any unit returned for repair, and reserves the right to change or improve the design of the product at any time without notice.
This warranty is extended to the original retail purchaser. This warranty can be transferred to anyone who may subsequently purchase this product within
the applicable warranty period by providing Line 6 with all Warranty Registration information for the new owner and proof of transfer within 30 days of
the purchase. Final determination of warranty coverage lies solely with Line 6.
This is your sole warranty. Line 6 does not authorize any third party, including any dealer or sales representative, to assume any liability on behalf of Line 6
or to make any warranty for Line 6.
Line 6 may, at its option, require proof of the original date of purchase in the form of a dated copy of the original authorized dealer’s invoice or sales receipt.
Service and repairs of Line 6 products are to be performed only at the factory (see below) unless otherwise authorized in advance by the Line 6 Service
Department. Unauthorized service, repair or modification will void this warranty.
To obtain factory service:
Contact Line 6 at (805) 379-8900, 8AM to 5:30 PM Monday through Friday (Pacific Time) and
request the Product Support department (or email support@line6.com). If necessary, you will be
given a return authorization (RA) number. Products returned without an RA number will be
returned to you at your sole expense. Pack the product in its original shipping carton and
attach a description of the problem along with your name and a phone number where Line 6 can
contact you if necessary. Ship the product insured and freight prepaid to:
Line 6 Product Support
6033 De Soto Avenue
Woodland Hills, CA 91367
DISCLAIMER AND LIMITATION OF WARRANTY
THE FORGOING WARRANTY IS THE ONLY WARRANTY GIVEN BY LINE 6 AND IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES. ALL
IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE
HEREBY EXCLUDED. UPON EXPIRATION OF THE APPLICABLE EXPRESSED WARRANTY PERIOD, LINE 6 SHALL HAVE NO FURTHER
WARRANTY OBLIGATION OF ANY KIND, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED. LINE 6 SHALL IN NO EVENT BE OBLIGATED FOR ANY
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES THAT MAY RESULT FROM ANY DEFECT OR WARRANTY CLAIM, EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages or limitation on how long implied warranties last,
so some of the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which
vary from state to state. This warranty only applies to products sold and used in the United States of America and Canada. Line 6 shall not be liable for
damages or loss resulting from negligent or intentional acts of shipper or his contract affiliates. You should contact the shipper for proper claims procedures
in the event of damage or loss resulting from shipment.
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