Canadian Rail_no142_1963

r ----~ar1adia:n.
)ffi~nn
i
NUMBER 142
Issued 11 times yearly by
Canadian Railroad Historical Association.
MARCH 1963
Sweepers in action never failed
to present
a dramatic
They symbolized,
perhaps more
than any other
picture.
type
of equipment,
the struggle
against
the elements.
Above photo and upper picture on Page 48 from the Notman
Colleotion,
oourtesy McGill University.
Other snowfighting illustrations provided by R.M.Binns,
A.Clegg,
and the Montreal Transportation Commission.
Page
Canadian Rail
47
Snow -fighting on the
Transit Lines of Montreal.
I
l
by Richard M. Binns
"V',Iith the exception of Leningrad, Russia, Montreal has a
greater average annual snowfall than any of the world's cities
with a population of one million or over. "
So stated Montreal Tramways Company in a series of informative advertisements pUblished some thirty-five years ago. The Company said that it was well
equipped to meet W inter conditions, its snow fighting equipment being capable of
covering all tracks of the system - almost 300 miles - once every hour.
Without detracting from the difficulties of street railways in smaller cities
of North America and Europe which had a more severe Winter climate, it cannot
be denied that maintaining tramway service during Montreal's winters was a
struggle of great magnitude, carried out at enormous expense.
Many different
devices and types of equipment were developed over the years and met,hods
changed from time to time to meet changing traffic conditions.
With the onrush
of the automobile age, the task of clearing and removing snow from the streets
gradually became the responsibility of the Municipalities rather than that of the
street railway.
Before the advent of electric traction in 1892, Montreal Street Railway abandoned its tracks entirely during Winter, usually from late December to midMarch.
Snow was allowed to accumulate to a considerable depth on the streets
as all movement of people and goods was by horse-drawn sleighs, the Company
providing service with specially-built conveyances mounted on runners. During
the Winter of 1891-92, the Company had eighty-two of these sleighs in service.
It was the snow, perhaps, more than anything else, which engendered great doubts
as to the feasibility of electric propulsion of street cars in Montreal. Many
people, including some Directors and shareholders of the Company, were convinced that it would be foolhardy to attempt to run any kind of wheeled vehicle on
the streets in Winter.
The average annual snowfall was 118 inches, although
there were Winters during which this figure was greatly exceeded -- notably the
Winter of 1886-87, when the fall was 174 inches or almost 15 feet. By February
1887, the streets were said to be in deplorable condition, with drifts as high as
ten feet in some places .
Nevertheless, despite the fears of many, electrification was proceeded with
in 1892 and by the late fall of that year, electric cars were running on about 13
miles of the then thirty-mile horsecar system.
Right from the beginning, the
Company was obliged, by the terms of its contract with the City of Montreal, to
keep its tracks clear of snow and in addition, to pay half the cost of removing
the snow from curb to curb on stree,ts where the cars ran - this to include snow
which was shovelled from the sidewalks and snow which fell from the roofs of
Page 49
Canadian Rail
houses.
This clause was also written into the thirty-five year contract between
Montreal Tramways Company and the City. signed in 1918. In later years . heavy
payments for snow re,noval became a somewhat unfair burden. inasmuch as the
streets had to be cleared for autOinobile traffic anyway and the tramway rider
paid. through his fare. half the cost of this work for the benefit of motorists. In
the beginning however. the charge was not unreasonable. The operation of electric cars in snow-covered streets required that the snow be plowed from the
track close to rail level which. during the course of a Winter. would produce a
deep trench unless the roadway on each side of the track was kept down to a reasonable level. Thus. the Company. because it adopted a vehicle running on rails
in Winter . was obliged to share with the City the additional cost of snow removal
which would not otherwise have been incurred.
For many years. sweepers were the main weapon employed in fighting snow.
Whoever devised this remarkably effective machine succeeded well. because the
basic design remained unchanged throughout the entire tramway era. Sweepers
in action in heavy snow never failed to present a dramatic picture. - almost obscured by clouds of flying snow. and with a most satisfying sound of motors and
whirling brooms. they symbolized. perhaps more than any other type of equipment. the struggle against the elements.
The records show six electric snow
sweepers dated 1892. built by the Toronto Railway Company. Three more were
acquired from the same source in 1893. Altogether there have been 55 sweepers
on the records. the greatest number at anyone time being 42 in 1928.
Up to 1912. all sweepers were of the four-wheel type. In that year. a double
truck "combination locomotive and sweeper" was received from Ottawa Car
Manufacturing Company (No. 40). In the following year. two more were ordered
and another in 1914.
The idea was that the broom supports and mechanism
could be removed in Summer. and by the attachment of standard couplers. the
car could be used as a locomotive.
What actually happened was that No. 41 was
used as a locomotive from May 1913 to November 1913. and No. 40 was similarly employed from March 1914 to December 1916 . Thereafter all these cars became sweepers permanently.
Three more were built in Youville Shops in 1920.
The double -truck sweepers weighed 44.500 Ibs •• and were powerful and efficient
m a chines.
Subsequent sweepers were of the single-truck variety. built by Ottawa j these had higher speed brooms driven by bevel gears instead of chains.
P. system of "sweeper routes" was worked out according to the severity of
the storm. Crews were specially trained to work on sweepers and were subject
to call at any time. preference being given to men who lived near the car barns.
Sweepers carried a three m a n crew: motorman. conductor and a wing operator.
In the early days . two or three ad.ditional men accompanied each sweeper to
pacify and restrain horses. the animals being quite understandably terrified by
these machines. There was a special technique required in operating a sweeper.
particularly in adjusting the height of the brooms to obtain the best results. and
to avoid excessive wear and damage to the bristles.
No satisfactory substitute
was found for the rattan used on the brooms. It was tough. flexible and would not
cause injury or damage if pieces were dislodged.
This material came from
south-e a st Asia and during the last war it was almost impossible to obtain. An
inferior kind of reed called Palmyra stalks was obtained from New York and
mixed with regular rattan in order to make existing stocks last.
In the 1950s.
the number of sweepers had dwindled to sixteen.
With the lib-
Page 50
Canadian Rail
eral application of salt and abrasives to the streets in latter years, and with the
great increase in automotive traffic, snow ceased to be snow.
Damages to
parked cars and to pedestrians' clothing, from being sprayed with this unsavoury mixture, made the use of sweepers undesirable.
In the latter years,
sweepers had limited use, mostly in storage yards and certain outlying areas.
Another device used, probably from the beginning, was a pair of rail scrapers attached to the passenger cars.
There were various patterns but all employed steel bl a des att a ched to a yoke mounted under the front platform.
This
assembly could be lowered by the motorman so that the blades rested on the
rails and threw the snow to each side.
At full speed - and if there was a fair
amount of snow on the rails - an approaching car presented the appearance of
a ship throwing spray from the bows.
The track scrapers also prevented a
build-up of ice, from wheel splash, close to the rails.
Snow clearing also required a g reat deal of hand labour, particularly in the
yards and at station platforms on private rights-of-way.
A familiar sight
throughout the tramway era were the men with a bucket of salt and a broom,
salting and cle a ning the switches. In latter years, this became a hazardous occupation in heavy traffic.
Despite the red lantern and the white cross bands
worn, there were injuries and even fatalities.
Another group of men was employed, during the fall and winter, looking after the hills.
They were known as
"Hillmen" and each was responsible for keeping the tracks in safe operating condition on a particular hill. Usually a small hut was installed nearby where salt,
sand and tools were kept, and at the sa,ne time afforded a shelter for the hillman on duty.
Cana di an Rai 1
Page 51
This brings us to another difficulty of Winter operation which was not caused
directly by snow, but in most cases by the absence of snow - slippery rails. It
is not clear whether the first electric cars were equipped with sand boxes , but
in the minutes of a meeting of the M.S.R. Board of Directors held on November
17th, 1892., we find:
" The Managing Director reported that sand cars being required by the
Company he had ordered from the Toronto Railway Co., six second hand
one-horse cars to be converted . "
It is highly probable that these cars were not converted for electric operation,
but were fitted inside with sand hoppers and towed by a motor car. The earliest
existing M.S.R. records, 1902, show ten cars under the heading of "Sand and Salt
cars".
No data is given; they were all scrapped in 1905. Whether or not some
were the Toronto horse cars acquired in 1902 is not known.
After 1905, a fleet
of about ten "Salt Cars" was maintained, these being invariably old single truck
passenger cars equipped to distribute salt on the rails .
The salt was used to
combat a condition known as "frozen rail" or "black rail". A combination of low
temperature, high humidity and no wind, produced a film of ice mixed with atmospheric dirt on the rails which could virtually paralY2'.e the system.
Braking
required the greatest ot care to avoid an uncontrolled skid and usually a couple
of notches of power were applied with the brakes to keep the wheels turning.
Tests conducted many years ago on SLLawrence Blvd. with a 638 class car during a very severe condition of "black rail" revealed that the coefficient of friction between wheels and rails was so low that it almost equalled the rolling friction of the car, with the result that the car would skid at the slightest application
of brakes.
In other words, the car would slide almost as readily as it would
coast.
The problem of "black rail" was never completely solved. Salt was effective only in temperatures down to about 50 above zero.
The Salt Cars were
also useful at Winter fires to prevent water from the hoses free:dng on the
tracks.
Often at low temperatures the rails in the vicinity of a fire would become covered with ice, and a Salt Car was assigned to run back and forth to keep
the line open.
In 1947, car No. 3021. then used as a tool car, was equipped to carry 1,000
gallons of water in tanks, from which heated solutions of sodium chloride or calcium chloride could be made and dribbled on the rails as the car proceeded. E',xpassenger cars 1175 , 1176 and 1178 were similarly converted.
The chemical
solution used could be altered to give best results within each temperature
range, calcium chloride being used for temperatures below zero.
These brine
cars were quite effective, but there were not enough of them to cover the system
rapidly.
Page 52
Canadian Rail
Upper: The Great Storm in February 1904 brought the
Taunton Plow and a Brill Sweeper to Davidson
and Ontario Streets.
Lower: Wedge Plow by Russell Plow Co. at the Defleurimont SnoVi Dump in March,1916.
Opposite: Single-truck wing plows were effective on
the City Streets. Scene at Craig and Beaver
Hall in January 1948.
Canadian Rail
Page 53
Maintaining service on outside suburban lines in Winter, presented an entirely different problem - high winds and drifting snow.
On exposed lines such
as Cartierville, Back River, St. Michel and the Terminal line, and later Notre
Dame Street East, conditions required the use of rotary plows.
As thes e areas
became inore built up in later years, rotaries were not so often required. In the
early days, however, deep cuts would be formed, with the snow on each side of
the track coming up above window level.
Rotary plows were the only effective
means of keeping the cuts clear of hard packed wind-blown snow.
During one
February, around 1910, a double truck rotary, No.2, was kept on the Cartierville line for about twenty days without going into the shop.
Maintenance crews
were sent out froin St. Denis whenever the car needed servicing or repairs.
The first rotary plow was a single truck machine bought by the Montreal
Park & Island Railway sometime before 1901, from the Peckham Motor Truck
and Wheel Company, Kingston, N. Y.
It was originally MP&I No. 16, becoming
No.1 after 1901. M.S.R. purchased a double truck rotary, No.2, from the same
builder in 1901 and in 1905, another single truck rotary, No.3.
About the same
time the Montreal Terminal Railway purchased a similar plow which became
No.4.
No.5, a double truck rotary was acquired in 1910. The last three were
known as the "Ruggles Rotary Snow Plow", built under license by Peckham.
Most suburban passenger cars were fitted with a steel "V" plow during Winter.
A double end, double truck nose plow was purchased from Taunton Locomotive Works, Taunton, Mass., in 1904. It was designed for single track use and
apparently was not successful as it became a locomotive on the Terminal Ry.
five years later. Replacing it was a self-propelled wedge plow from the Russell
Car and Snow Plow Co., Ridgeway, Pa. This too appears to have had limited use.
In order to reduce the drifting in snow cuts, a flat car was equipped with a long
wing, which could be raised to any angle.
This car was able to shear off the
straight sides of snow cuts to a slope of about 45 0 •
The snow thus pulled down
on the track was thrown into the adjoining fields by a following rotary plow.
Several flat cars were also fitted with side wings for levelling the roadway beside the tracks. These were called "Snow Levellers".
Page 54
Canadian Rail
In 1913 a single truck wing plow was received from Ottawa Car Manufacturing Co.
This had wooden retractable wings on each side. and a wood "V" plow
for the track area.
This plow, No. 10, was obviously intended for use on single
track only. In 1920, it was rebuilt with a shear plow for the track area. It was
renumbered 100 and two similar plows were built in Youville Shops. These
plows were found to be very effective on city lines and by 1944 sixteen were on
hand. Like the sweepers. they carried a crew of three - one man being the wing
operator who in the latter years was kept busy working the wing to avoid striking
parked automobiles.
The side wing was moved in and out by an electric motor
and it could be adjusted vertically by air. The level of the track blade could also
be adjusted pneumatically.
Both the devils trip wing and the side wing had a
wooden "dog" in the supporting mechanism which would break if the wings struck
any fixed object in the street, thereby allowing the wings to swing back to avoid
damage or derailment. The cars originally had hand brakes, but all were equipped with air brakes after the last war.
Ice cutters, a series of hardened steel
teeth, could be fitted to these cars for cutting down ice ruts in the whole track
area including the devilstrip.
Before the volwne of automobile traffic dictated
the present policy of clearing snow down to the pavement, the formation of ice
ruts in or near the track space was a serious Winter problem. The single truck
plows, equipped with ice cutters were capable of dealing with any snow or ice
condition.
Good traction was obtained by the use of a heavy concrete sub-floor.
Weights varied from 38,860 to 41,700 pounds.
After 1944. several more double truck flat cars were converted for snow
fighting by the installation of a "Frink" plow on the front and a levelling wing
on the right side.
Two flat cars, 3053 and 3056, were equipped with "Willitt"
graders.
In 1945-46, the double-truck sweepers were equipped with "Frink"
plows at one endj in this period, sweepers were giving way to more specialized
equipment.
Canadian Rail
Page 55
In order to prevent damage and wear to motor casings caused by riding on
accumulations of snow and ice in the centre of the tracks, the Company developed an ingenious device, about 1917, for attachment to passenger cars. This consisted of a yoke carrying a series of steel teeth, and attached to the rear of the
truck frame.
A few cars on each route were so equipped each Winter.
The
parallel marks in the centre of the tracks made by these scarifiers were a familiar sight in Winter.
Visibility for the motorman was sometimes a problem in Winter operation.
Before about 1925, there appears to have been no mechanical means of keeping
the front window clear.
About 1925, all cars were fitted with a hand-operated
window wiper with blades inside and outside.
In the 1940s, automatic air-operated wipers were installed. A defrosting device for use in freezing rain or sleet
was also developed, consisting of a metal frame with resistance wires between
two pieces of glass.
This could be hung on the outside of the front window and
plugged into an electrical outlet on the dash.
Sufficient heat was generated to
keep the glass clear.
Sleet on the trolley wire was occasionally a serious problem. For this condttion, devices known as "sleet cutters" were attached to the trolley wheels. No
tools or fastenings were required and the device, consisting of a grooved scraper
and a spring, could be quickly attached or removed. It was held in place by looping the trolley rope over a hook at the back of the scraper.
A raised platform
was provided at Cote Street car barn for attaching sleet cutters, quickly without
delay to service.
Occasionally a few cars had to be operated all night on outlying lines to keep ice from building up on the wires.
Page 46- St.Catherine at Peel ---February, 1944.
Page 48 - No.8 was one of the earliest pieces of snow fighting equipment operated by
the M.S.R.
No. 40, the first doubletruck sweeper on Glen Rd.
in 1912. Rattan broom can
be clearly seen.
Page 50 - One of the original Levellers shown on St.Denis St
North, Feb. 2nd, 1910.
Page 51 - Double truck sweeper #- 45,
equipped with Frink Plow,
Ville St.Laurent, Dec.28,
1946.
Many suburban pass'gr.cars
were fitted with "V "plows
during the winter months.
Page 54- Scarifier, applied to rear
of front truck.
Page 55- Business end of a Rotary.
Defrosting device for use
in freezing rain.
Hesistance wires generated
enough heat to keep glass
clear.
Page 56- Winter scene near Vertu OD
the single-track line between St.Laurent and Cartierville, showing nose
plow on 1038, & scarifier
marks in the snow between
rails.
Rotary plows were the effective means of keeping cuts clear of
hard-packed wind-blown snow.
No.2 and No., were fighting to
keep the St.Michel line open when this photo Was taken, Jan.26
1928.
A great deal of extra work was thrown on car barn staffs during the late
Fall in getting the passenger cars ready for Winter.
Fender gates were raised
to seven inches above the rail, truck scrapers and scarifiers were attached and
heater fuses inserted, not to mention putting on the double windows. On the
whole system, some twenty-five thousand double windows were installed in midNovember and removed in mid-March.
It is impossible, in a brief outline such as this, to cover fully the many aspects of operation during the sixty-seven winters of the electric regime in lvlontreal.
Even the most casual examination however, must elicit a tribute to the
hundreds of men, - engineers, shoplnen, operating crews, hillmen and shovellers, - who over the years have worked day and night to keep the cars running,
all in the spirit and tradition of Canadian railroading.
An all-time listing of snow and ice equipment follows.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT: The writer is indebted to Mr. D.E. Blair, Mr.
L. Brook, Mr. J .A. Foisy, Mr. W.P. Kierans and Mr. V.A. Linnell for certain information contained in this article.
R.M.B.
Page 58
Canadian Rail
M.S.R. - M.T.C.
S we e e e r
SNOW AND ICE EQUIPr.1ENT
5 :
No.
~
Builder
Date
Scraeeed
1
2
2/2
3
2/3
4
2/4
5
6
2/6
7
2/7
8
9
2/9
10
ST
Toronto
1892
1919
11
12
2/12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
31
32
34
35
36
37
38
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
50
51
52
53
60
61
II
"II
"
II
"
II
"
Brill
Toronto
Brill
Toronto
Brill
To ronto
II
II
"
Jvl.S.R.
Toronto
N.S.R.
Toronto
II
"
II
II
"
II
"
M.S.R.
Larivi ere
II
II
II
"
"
"
"
""
"II
II
"
"
M.S.R.
Larivi ere
M.S.R.
II
"
"
"
II
Ottawa
McGuire
II
II
11
Brill
"
"II
"
II
II
II
II
II
II
"
"
"
"
DT
"
II
II
"
"
ST
"
II
II
II
"
"
McGuire
II
Brill
Ottawa
II
Lariviere
II
1898
1892
1898
1892
1898
1892
II
1898
1893
1898
1893
II
c1896
1898
c1896
1899
"
"
"11
11
1903
1904
"
"
II
II
"
1929
1938
1938
1950
1948
1950
1948
1950
1948
1938
1950
II
II
"
II
II
II
1908
1910
190 3
1907
11
II
II
1908-Ex Terml.Ry.#l
II
2
"
1901-Ex MP&IRy. #14
II
II
15
1938
"
1950
II
1926
II
II
191 2
1913
"
"
II
Ottawa
1928
"
"
"
1926
1926
II
"
II
1929
II
1914
1920
II
1929
1924
"
1905
"
lVi .T. C.
II
1929
11
II
Ottawa
Burned 1898
* Burned
1898
* Burned 1898
*
Burned 1898
* Burned
1898
*
* Burned 1898
* Burned 1898
1929
II
1898
1894
"
"
"
1914
"
Notes
195 3
"
II
1957
)
"
"
"
)
)
)..
II
)
II
)
)
"
19 57
Frink Plow installed
on one end,
1945-46 .
Preserved.
1957
"
"
"
1935 -Ex Trois Riv. III
rr
II
II
3
fl
I
Canadian Rail
Page 59
Double Truck Flat Cars Converted to Plows and Levellers
No.
30
3050
3051
I
I
Original
Builder
Date
Date
Converted
M.S.R.
1907
1910
1929
Dom. Car
1908
1928
1914
1938
1959
1928
1945
1914
1938
1959
1959
"
1944
1945
1950
1950
1950
1929
1959
1959
1959
1959
1959
1959
"
1929
3052
3053
3054
If
If
If
If
If
If
"
"
If
If
"
If
3055
3056
3057
3096
3097
3150
" F.
C.C.&
3152
"
If
If
1910
If
San d
and
1925
Sal t
Scrapped
Equipped as Leveller, 1910
Re# 3030, 1914.
Leveller.
Leveller, Frink Plow added
in 1944.
Leveller.
\Villet Grader.
Leveller, Frink Plow added
in 1950.
Frink Plow and Leveller.
Willet Grader.
Frink Plow and Leveller.
rr
rr
"
II
Leveller, Frink Plow added
in 1950.
Leveller, Frink Plow added
in 1950. Sold to Cornwall
in 1957.
Car s.
(All former single-truck passenger cars).
No.
Re No.
Date Converted
('fen cars, frior to 1902)
8
18 1914)
1905
If
16
76 (1914)
20
220 (1914),
If
20 (1924)
1925
332 (1932)
48
186
1905
If
188
If
190
198
"
1916
268
1912
274
318
"
1910
332
1905
354
1910
374
1915
432
Br i n e
3021
1175
1176
1178
Retired or
ScrapQed
~
No data.
1905
1948
If
1937
1948
1915
1937
1910
1911
1948
Ex MP&IRy.Psgr.Car #6.
To C.R.H.A., 1950.
1924
1932
1948
1948
1948
Car s
1947
1948
1948
1950
1957
1959
¢
1959
Ex DT Tool Car.
Ex DT Psgr. Car) Built
"
) M.T.C.
) 1943
"
¢- Held for Seashore Electric Railway, Kennebunkport, Me., U.S.A.
~-
Hochelaga Carbarn fire, September 16, 1898.
sue.
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Page
Canad ian Rai 1
P 1
No.
1
2
3
4
5
10
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
0
61
w s:
~
Builder
Date
Scral2lZed
-- before
-- before
Dom. Car
DT DE Nose Plow Taunton
1907
1902
1909
1904
1919
1911
1912
1913
DT DE vvedge "
ST Rotary
DT
"
ST
"II
ST.
DT
ST Wing"
1908
1936
1950
1950
1950
1950
"
II
"
"
II
II
"
Russell
Peckham
"
Ruggles
II
"
Ottawa
r-'l.T .C.
"
"
"
"
"
II
"
"
"
"
Ottawa
II
II
"
"
"
II
"
M.T.C.
"
"
II
1901
1905
1910
1913
1920
1920
1926
1928
1929
"
"
"
II
1932
"
"
II
1944
II
@
1959
II
Notes
Terml.Ry."Snow Car",no data
"Ice Digger", no data.
"Snow Car", no data.
Converted to Locomotive
No.2, 1908.
1901 ex MP&IRy.
1116
1908 ex Term l 1 Ry.
1920-Rebuilt and re# 100.
1958
1959
1957
1958
II
1959
1957
1959
II
1958
1957
"
1959
1957
@- Held for Branford Electric Railway Assln, Branford, Conn. , U.S.A.
C. P. Timetable Changes -- effective October 28. 1962.
Mr. F.A.Kemp, author of "The Winter Timetables" Page 218 last
year, has informed us that, to the best of his knowledge, there were
no changes in Canadian Pacific schedules last October, other than
the routine revisions to adjust to winter conditions.
DIAGBAM
The diagram this month is of Canadian National's S-2-a class,
locomotives 3527 and 3531.
These engines were built in 1923. by
the Montreal LocOI:Jotive Works -- builder's numbers 64477 & 6448l.
They were part of a n order for 35 engines ( 3525 to 3559 inclusive)
but were subsequently modified by the substitution of extra-large
cylindrica l tender s built 1924 by the Canadian Locomotive Company.
At the end of 1952, both units were based at Melville, Saskatchewan
No.3527 was scra pped in April 1960, while 3531 met a similar fate
in Augus t 1961.
(Diagram courtesy C.N.R.)
Canadian Rai 1
Page 62
by Stephen Cheasley
The Membership Committee announces that the following persons were
recently elected to Associate Membership in the CRHA.
Eric Clegg
Peter Lambert
Michael Whitehead
Charles Moore
Eliot Sterling
David Hanson
Robert Bales
Donald Robinson
Norman Morris
George Holman
Edward Emery
Ralph Conrad
James J. Greer
Gerald lapointe
Bernard Patterson
Ernest Holliday
Lindsay Ward
Harvey Dust
Lupher Hay
Mrs. G. Lorin
Harry Vallas
E.C. Eddy
Mrs. J.L.D. Mason
James Shetler
Dav1d Knowles
Douglas Carlyle
Charles Thompson
Anthony Careless
Worden Phi1l1ps
Donald Sm1th
Ronald Ball
James Leworthy
Mrs. E. Bridges
Lyle McCoy
Bruce Ballantyne
G1lle s Dupre
Henry Preble
W1ll1am Rossiter
John Montgomery
Patr1ck H1nd
George Thompson
R1chard V1berg
Robert Sandusky
Charles Massey
Joseph Mold
B. Brant
Co11n Williamson
John Tynan
John Coughlin
Brian McCarrey
James Sandi lands
John Rollit
Peter Hall
Robert Tennant
Albert Bremer
John Eagle
John Jones
Kenneth Godwin
Osborne Taylor
In addition, Mr. Wyatt Webb was elected to Regular Membership.
Continued on Page 64
.! -
Page 63
Canadian Rai 1
New Brunswick Exhibit for Museum.
by Fred Angus.
Saturday, Dec.8, 1962 saw the arrival at Delson on CPR flatcar
300570 of Saint John N.B. streetcar No. 82.
While its appearance
indicated long suffering by vandalism and weather, and the need for
very extensive rebuilding, the main roof and structural members are
in sufficiently good condition to render this task feasable.
No.
82 consists of a body only, but it is planned to use a single truck
and other equipment now being held for the association.
This car was built in 1906 by the Ottawa Car Manufacturing Co.
one of six similar closed cars, Nos. 80-90, even numbers,
ordered
by the Saint John Railway Co.
Twelve open cars built at the same
time, were later converted to closed cars resembling 82, but these
have now completely disappeared.
On one of the bulkheads of No.82
can still faintly be seen the name of the Ottawa Car Mfg. Co.
These cars were all deSigned
the street, as the left hand rule
wick until 1921.
A photo of car
ure clearly, and it is planned to
for operation on the left side of
of tile road prevailed in New Bruns84 taken in 1906 shows this featrestore No.82 in this way.
About 1921 or 1922, 82 and her sisters were rebuilt by the New
Brunswick Power CO' J which had taken over the St. John Ry. in 1917.
Whether this was done concurrently with the change to right hand
operation we do not know: at any rate, the curved wooden sides disappeared under flat sides of sheet metal.
At this time also,these
vehicles were converted to one-man cars, the doors became narrower
and the right hand door at the end away from the motorman was removed and the space filled in.
In this altered form, the 80 class
remained intact until 1948, the year that streetcar service ended
in New Brunswiok, although the last few years saw their use in the
rush hours only -- the base service being provided by the twenty-two
newer cars built between 1914 and 1930.
At the time of abandonment, the trucks of the cars were scrapped, and many of the bodies were sold for use as sheds, chickenbouses, etc.
No.82 left the Wentworth Barn for the last time on June
24th, 1948.
Subsequently, this car was purchased from Fowler's
Transport of Saint John, and on July 17th, it was moved to Rothesay
N.B., where it remained for fourteen years.
In the interim, most
of the other cars had been completely destroyed.
In 1958, No. 82
was donated to the C.R.H.A., in the first week of December four
years later, Fowler'S Transport moved it to Saint John, from whence
it began its rail journey to Delson.
This car is one of the few survivors of Maritime trolleys. The
only other Saint John cars known to exist are six arch roof bodies
of later· vintage, used as sheds.
All the other deck roof cars have
long since gone.
When, eventually, No. 82 is restored to running
order, it should be a unique exhibit in the Transportation Museum.
~
N.B. Power Co's Number 82, shown just prior to its final
departure from the Wentworth Barn, Saint John.
Canadian Rail
Page 64
Association News - (continued)
The followlng persons were recently accepted as Regular Members
the Edmonton Chapter of the CRHA.
Dale Coombe
Peter Portlock
John Slmpson
by
John Ash
All members and subscrlbers to Canadlan Ral1 are reminded that dues
for 1963 are now payable.
You are urged to facilltate our bookkeeplng by sendlng ln the amount indlcated on the lnvoices sent to
you, as soon as possible.
It is hoped that many members and subscrlbers will include with
their dues, some support for the museum's 1963 financial campaign.
You can extend museum trackage one foot for every #10 that you donate.
We hope that you will use this chance to partiCipate in the
museum.
The members of the Building Committee, as well as many other members and guests, were on hand Saturday, November 24, to witness
Quebec North Shore and Labrador locomotive No. 1112 become the
first piece of equipment to enter the museum's first building,
trainshed No.1.
It was a happy moment for the many members who
donated so much time and energy to construct the 1000 feet of track
necessary for the movement.
We congratulate all who took part in
this project.
Actually, the first piece of eqUipment to enter the museum building
was motorlzed section car Kalamazoo from the London and Port Stanley Railway.
Thls dramatlc event took place one week previous at
exactly 5:05 in the afternoon.
Unfortunately, no photographs are
available of this truly historiC event because total darkness was
prevailing at the time.
It is reliably reported that there was
considerable elation in the many members in attendance as engineer
p. !>1urphy and PropulSion Attendant F. Angus guided the vehicle,
under its own power, safely into the building.
Following the arrival of the first englne ln the building,
subsequent weekends saw the placing there of the following:
the
Engine No. 25 from Old Sydney Collleries
Car No. 423 from the Ottawa Transportatlon Commission
Car No.6 from the Ottawa Transportation Commission
Engine No.5 from the Maritime Railway
Car No. 401 from the Quebec Railway Light and Power Company
The construction of trainshed No.1 draws to a close with the completion of the aluminum sheathing on the extension.
The doors are
under construction and when completed will assure complete protection of the exhlblts inside.
The completed building will give protection to 1320 feet of track, i.e. about i-mile of track.
It is
of interest to note that the building is as long as a regulation
Canadian football field.
All members and subscribers, whether in the Montreal area or not,
are invited to visit the museum. It is suggested that you write or
telephone Mr. C.S, Cheasley at 484-6262, in advance, for instructions to get there,
We hope that you will visit the museum this
year.
Page 65
Canadian Ra1l
Notes and News
Edited by W.
L.
Pharoah
* operated
CN's original diesel-electric switcher No. 7700, more recently
under No. 77, was retired from active service at the end
of 1962. The diesel engine, which is not the original powerplant,
will likely be removed for service elsewhere but the locomotive's
frame, cab, and trucks may well be preserved as one of the first
diesel powered units in North America.
(ELM)
* during
CN 4-6-2 No. 5588 was sent to Windsor, Ontario,
December, 1962.
* are
Portland Maine's last railroad station is being
being moved to an adjacent building and the
for preservation
closed. CNoffices
59-year-old stone
station will be sold or leased. The large Union Station which
served the Boston and Maine and the Maine Central was torn down two
years ago and a shopplng centre now oncupies the site.
* Metropolitan
Toronto's transportation problems are not likely to be
solved by railway commuter service in the opinion of Mr. E. Wynne,
CN's Great Lakes Region vice-president. Mr. Wynne said that railway
commuter service would not be practlcal because of the great volume
of passengers that would have to be carried. "one alternative
we are going to look at ls that lt may be pOEslb1e to use the ral1way's right-of-way for rapid translt, but it would have to be on
a separate track. We feel that using our present line for extensive
commuter service would spol1 both our regular operatlons and the
commuter services. I don't think either would be able to operate
on time." (Surprising as this may seem to those who have heard
that the railways' main claim to fame is ability to cope with
high-density traffic! - Ed.)
* occupancy.
"For rent:
one first class railway coach available for immediate
Cost: slightly more than walking," states a release
from CN's public relations office in Montreal, which goes on to say
thls is the latest weapon added to CN's arsenal in its all-out
efforts to attract more travellers to trains. CN ls offering any
group the opportunity to "own" a railway coach for the duration
of a trip, coupled with huge prlce reductions. One example:
sixty persons can charter a coach from Montreal to Toronto and
return for $8.85 per person. The regular coach fare is $24.35.
The scheme is not in effect during peak holiday periods, nor during
the period June 1 - September 30 at which times the Railway is
hard pressed for the equlpment.
* Mr.
V.C. Wansborough, vice-president and managing director of the
Canadian Mining Assoclatlon sald recently that Canadlan railway
engineers are studying routes for a new railway from the Yukon Northweat Territories to the Pacific Coast, sparked by the discovery of a giant hematite iron-ore deposit 320 miles northwest of
Whitehorse.
Page 66
Canadian Rail
From the CREA News Report - March 1953.
Q.N.S.! L.Ry has purchased Ontario Northland Ry. locomotive no.701.
Overhaul of this engine before before shipment started at the ONRy
Shop, North Bay, in January.
Budd RDC-l no. 2960 suffered an unfortunate accident on Saturday,
February 21st, near Mont Laurier, Que. The car is presently under
repair at CPR's Angus Shops.
There have been rumours that either, or both, of the transcontinental railways are contemplating improvements in the transcontinental sohedules.
On Saturday, Feb.14th members and friends of the Associa tion participated in a visit to Angus Shops of the CPR.
During March it is
planned to opera te an excursion in MTC artioula ted "Duplex" 2501.
NO oms an d NEWS -
oon t 'd.
average of eight locomotives per year for the next ten years
will be acquired by the Mexican National Railways from the Montreal
Locomotive Works. The order for eighty diesel-electric units is
part of Mexico's plan for overhauling its railroads. The purchase
will be made through the Canadian Government's Export Credits
Insurance Corp.
;t An
* and
The
Boston & Maine has applied CN passenger tactics of lower fares
imoroved service to its commuter service and has come up with
the same encouraging results. Under the influence o~ more frequent
service coupled with reduced fares, an 18.4 per cent increase in
passengers was reported for the first day of the experiment. Dr.
Joseph F. Maloney, executive director of the Mass. Transportation
Commission which is directing the programme, termed the jump in
B & M commuters "truly amaZing".
a Essex Terminal Railway's locomotive No.9 has finally reached the
end of her line because of natural gas. For five years she prolonged her life by heating the Railway's enginehouse at Windsor,
Ontario. Now, however, the company has switched to natural gas
heaters. For thirty-four years the locomotive pounded the 2l-mile
line between Windsor and the limestone quarries on the outskirts of
Amherstburg.
Photo of Essex Terminal's
No. 9 beSide natural gas heatfrrs which forced locomotive's
final retirement.
A D & H Railroad advertisement
which appeared in the Montreal
Star during January. Will
the public patronize the service?
What do our readers think of
this type of ad?
CAN RAILROAD PASSENGER
SERVICE BE MAINTAINED
BETWEEN MONTREAL AND NEW YORK
.:.
.'
4mf»
Public's Desertion of Trains
for other Modes of Transportation
Threatens Service
It is difficult to im~gine Montreal
and New York, the largest cities in
Canada and the United St;ltes, with the
importam inrcrmetiiarc ciries ;'Inti vil!;,ges, without connecting ';lilroad pas·
senger service. Yet this is a distinct
possibility if the present rate of the
public's desertion of the railroad is nor
on ly stopped, bur reversed.
On the day train. THE LAUREN.
TIAN, it consists of air·conditioned
co;u.:hcs, parlor-ouservation car and a
top·notch dining service. Its night
train, THE iVlONTREAL LIMITED,
offers air·conditioned coaches. roomettes, bedrooms, compartments and
dining service. Special reduced family
and group fares are available.
\-Vhen railroad patronage flour·
ished hetween the two cities there waS
little if any competition from other
modes of transportation . Today . with
900,JJ I automobiles registered in the
Province of Quebec and 4,596.827 in
the State of New Yori<. to mention but
one l)tovince and one sta te. and with
greatly improved highways paralleling
the railroads, the private "utomohi le
h;ls become the railroads' greatesr com·
petitur. Next to it are the airlines.
There are 27 scheduled flights daily
bctweCll Montreal ;lnd New York. the
jets n,"hing the 344 mile trip in 72
Ipinutes. There afe also 14 scheduled
ous rril" a day.
The revenue from tllis operation
during the pm year. including receipts
from m~il and express service, failed
substantiall y to meer the out·of·pocket
expenses of providing it. ("Out-of·
pocket expenses" do not inelude SUell
items "s ntaintenance of roadbed or
srfllccures, interest 911 investment or de ..
preciation on property ,tnd equipment
used in the service, station expenses,
etc. They illclude ouly those expe1/ses
'u)hicb Cfln be emirely eliminated if the
traillS are discolllillued.)
All of this competition h:ls resulted in a reduction of 40 per cent in the
IllIl11ber of pas.."iengcrs· cflrried ill rhis
service bv T he D. & H. Rai lroad since
1955, with the desenion of the trains
incre;l ~ing in rempo c,·ery year. d,C
sharpest losses in p::uronagc occurring
dming the I);ISt t\l'O yeal's.
The D. & H. has striven to attract
Illaintain its passenger business. It
offers what is considered one of th e
finest scenic railroad trips in the United
States along the shores of beautiful and
historic Lal,e Chomplai n and the lordl )'
Hudson River. It uses twO o( the tin·
es{ railro;ld termina ls on the 1\'orrh
Amcric<ltl continent. rhe \Vindsor Sttttion in :\lolltre,,1 and the G rand Cen ·
tral Station in "'ew York Citv. Its
equipment is modern and comfortable.
~nd
These heavy losses cannot be sus·
tained much longer withol!! destroying
the economic health of the railroad.
" 'hether or not railroad service
can be lllaillClincd between these two
great cities is obviously up to the pub·
lic. If it wants and patronizes the serv·
icc ill sufficient numbers (O warrant irs
continu,Hi"n it will be provided. As
railroads were designed and bUlir for
heavy daily lIlass rransportation service
the), cannot be operated economically
with light or sporadic patronage.
l'either can they be maintained as a
stand·by service to be used only when
\l'cather conditions ground the planes
or make highway travel hazardous.
The D. & H . wants to continue
to serve the public with good passenger rrallsl)orr;trion.
The question is nor - Does the
public WANT the railroad' .... but.
will the public PATRONIZE it?
DELAWARE " HUDSON RAILROAD
CORPORATION
The Bridge (ine Connecting the South and West
with New England and Eoste", Canada
"A 40-hour week'd be nice, but what I'd really like to sec the Commission come up with is an answer for me to
give taxidrivcrs who holler 'Take that antique to the museum!' "
-
Doug Wright, Montreal Star
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISrOPJCAL ASSOCIArrON
es/a6lisheJ 1932 • :Box 22 . Sia/io/l :B . :MOIl/real 2 . Q",6ec • 8I1corpora/,J 1941
CANADLAN RAIL:
Published eleven times annually by the Publications
Committee, Canadian Railroad Historical Association.
CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS
COMMITTEE:
David R. Henderson
EDITOR:
ASSISTANT EDITOR:
DISTRIBUTION :
COMMITTEE:
Anthony Clegg
William Pharoah
John W. Saunders
Robert Half yard
Omer S.A. Lavallee
Frederick F. Angus
Peter Murphy
PACIFIC COAST REPRESENTA TIVE:
Peter Cox, 2936 West 28th Avenue,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN REPRESENTATIVE:
William T. Sharp, Apartment 11,
11544 St. Albert Trail, Edmonton, Alta.
SUBSCRIBERS!
BEFORE YOU MOVE-WRITE!
At least 5 'Week!l before you
move, send us a Jetter, a card,
or n poat.olfice chnnge-of.
address form telling us both your
OLD aod your NEW addr ......
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