AOU - PCE Plume Superfund

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Kansas City District
Final
Operation and Maintenance Plan for the Vapor
Mitigation System Building 040-H
Accelerated Operable Unit (AOU) – 1
Time Critical Removal Action and Mitigation System
Installation for the 700 South 1600 East PCE Plume
Superfund Site
VA Salt Lake City Health Care System
Salt Lake City, Utah
MARCH 15, 2017
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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Kansas City District
Final
Operation and Maintenance Plan for the Vapor
Mitigation System Building 040-H
Accelerated Operable Unit (AOU) – 1
Time Critical Removal Action and Mitigation System
Installation for the 700 South 1600 East PCE Plume
Superfund Site
VA Salt Lake City Health Care System
Salt Lake City, Utah
Submitted to:
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District
635 Federal Building
601 East 12th Street
Kansas City, Missouri 64106-9861
Prepared by:
CTI and Associates, Inc.
7280 NW 87th Terrace, Ste. 210
Kansas City, Missouri 64105
CONTRACT NO. W912DQ-15-D-3010 0005
MARCH 15, 2017
REVISION: 00
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PRE-DRAFT O&M PLAN
VA SALT LAKE CITY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
MARCH 2017
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................. 1
1.1
SITE LOCATION ................................................................................................................. 1
1.2
PURPOSE ............................................................................................................................. 2
2.0
OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE .......................................................................................... 4
2.1
INSPECTIONS WITH ROUTINE MAINTENANCE ......................................................... 4
2.2
ANNUAL MAINTENANCE ............................................................................................... 9
2.3
INDOOR AIR SAMPLING ................................................................................................ 13
2.4
SPARE PARTS INVENTORY .......................................................................................... 17
FIGURES
Figure 1
Site Location
APPENDICES
Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C
Appendix D
Appendix E
Site Forms
F1 - Inspection Form
F2 - Annual Maintenance Form
F3 – Sample Collection Form
Annotated Amaircare 10000 Homeowners Manual & Dealer Installation
Instructions
Damper Information
Dwyer Anemometer Manual
Photoionization Detector Manual
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ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
AOU
COC
CQCP
CQCSM
CTI
DCN
DoD
DQCR
ESS
EDD
ER
ITR
MCL
PCE
PE
PG
PGM
PM
QAPP
SOW
SQCM
SSHP
UFP
SVOCs
TCLP
TO
UDEQ
USEPA
USACE-NWK
VIMS
VHA
VOCs
Accelerated Operable Unit
Contaminants of Concern
Contractor Quality Control Plan
Contractor Quality Control System Manager
CTI and Associates, Inc.
Document Control Number
Department of Defense
Daily Quality Control Report
East Side Springs
Electronic Data Deliverable
Engineering Regulation
Independent Technical Review
maximum contaminate level
Perchloroethylene
Professional Engineer
Professional Geologist
Program Manager
Project Manager
Quality Assurance Project Plan
Statement of Work
Site Quality Control Manager
Site Safety and Health Plan
Uniform Federal Policy
Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds
Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure
Task Order
Utah Department of Environmental Quality
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
USACE Kansas City District
Vapor Intrusion Mitigation System
Veteran’s Healthcare Administration
Volatile Organic Compounds
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APPROVAL PAGE
Operation and Maintenance Plan
Accelerated Operable Unit (AOU) – 1
Time Critical Removal Action and Mitigation System Installation for the 700 South 1600
East PCE Plume Superfund Site
VA Salt Lake City Health Care System
Salt Lake City, Utah
CONTRACT NO.: W912DQ-15-D-3010 0005
Submitted to:
Department of Army
Kansas City, Corps of Engineers
635 Federal Building
601 East 12th Street
Kansas City, Missouri 64106-9861
Program
Manager
Christopher Winkeljohn, P.E.
March 15, 2017
Date
Ph: (816) 533-4230
March 15, 2017
Project Manager
Robert Stenson, P.G.
Date
Ph: (920) 482-3902
Plan Preparer
James R. Dickson, P.E.
March 15, 2017
Date
Ph: (920) 560-1820
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1.0
MARCH 2017
INTRODUCTION
Under Contract No. W912DQ-15-D-3010 with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Kansas City
District (USACE), CTI and Associates, Inc. (CTI) has prepared the following Operation and
Maintenance (O&M) Plan for the routine operations of the 040-H vapor mitigation system
associated with the Accelerated Operable Unit (AOU) – 1 Time Critical Removal Action and
Mitigation System Installation for the 700 South 1600 East PCE Plume Superfund Site, VA Salt
Lake City Health Care System Salt Lake City, Utah. This Operation and Maintenance (O&M)
Plan addresses the scope of work requirement for the O&M of the vapor mitigation system in
accordance with the Performance Work Statement (PWS) issued August 3, 2016.
1.1
Site Location
The Site, which consists of Building 040-H, is located in Salt Lake City, Utah (See Figure 1).
The 040-H location is a privately owned residence and is situated within a westward sloping
residential lot of the East Side Springs (ESS) area with visible seeps and springs located in the
eastern and northern portions of the lot. The eastern portion of the lowest level of the house is
below grade, and the western portion of the lowest level is partially below grade, with a partially
below grade living space in the northwest corner of the lowest level and a walkout garage at
grade in the southwest corner of the lowest level. The resident reported that a clay pipe traverses
from east to west within the foundation to convey spring water and groundwater from the wetter
eastern portion of the lot to the western portion of the lot where the clay pipe discharges to a
small pond.
Residence 040-H is located within a PCE plume that is thought to be the western extent of the
700 South 1600 East PCE Plume. Residence 040-H was identified by VA as having the potential
of being adversely affected by the PCE plume through the subsurface to indoor air VI pathway
(Figure 1). Seeps, springs, and groundwater in this area with detections of PCE and TCE are
most likely associated with the 700 South 1600 East PCE Plume. The plume is located within the
Salt Lake City alluvial basin near the Wasatch Mountain front. The Salt Lake City alluvial basin
is bounded to east by the Wasatch Fault and a seismically independent segment of the Wasatch
fault called East Bench Segment Fault. A drop in surface elevation due to the Wasatch fault
scarp has resulted in the development of seeps and springs from groundwater daylighting
between 800 South and Michigan Avenue (approximately 1300 South) and between 1000 East
and 1300 East. This area is within the ESS area. The focus area for vapor intrusion (VI) lies
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within the ESS. Residence 040-H is located in the central portion of the ESS area, south of 900
South and east of 1200 East (Figure 1).
Current land use near residence 040-H includes single family residential properties with several
schools, churches, and small businesses located along the major streets. The few commercial
operations near the residence include an auto repair shop/gasoline station, convenience store, and
coffee shop located near the intersections of 800 South and 900 South with 1300 East.
CTI designed a vapor intrusion mitigation system (VIMS) that consists of an Amaircare 10000
whole house air purifier installed on the suction side of the house furnace. The unit is equipped
with 36 pounds of active carbon using installed optional carbon filters available from the
manufacturer which are required for use as VIMS. This equipment installation was completed
on November 18, 2016 in accordance with the approved work plan and design change notice 1
(DCN-01). DCN-01 added a vacuum induced damper to the suction of the furnace to allow for
additional untreated air to be drawn into the furnace if for some reason the air purifier supply is
insufficient. The damper closes automatically when the ducting is not under a vacuum to allow
for the air purifier to circulate treated air thought out the house supply air ducting.
1.2
Purpose
The installed VIMS needs to be operated and maintained in accordance with this document to
continue to provide adequate capture of contaminants that appear to intrude into the residence.
The purpose of this document is to present specific details on the proper operation, maintenance
and monitoring of the installed VIMS. Proper operation of the VIMS is necessary to maintain
performance of the system to capture potential indoor air contaminants that may enter the
basement from the 700 South 1600 East PCE plume in the vicinity of residence 040-H.
A summary of work includes the following:
•
Routine Inspections:
o Visually inspect equipment for any damage/leaks or other problems;
o Record the electrical meter reading for the air purifier supply;
o Measure air flow at the air purifier intake, discharge to furnace, and furnace
discharge; and
o Measure total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with ppbRae Photoionization
Detector with 10.6 eV bulb (PID).
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•
•
MARCH 2017
Maintenance for the Amaircare 10000 Air Purifier:
o Change pre-filters -when particle buildup on the filter is observed (typically every
3-4 months based on initial year quarterly inspections); and
o Change HEPA filters and carbon filters; (Every 12 months based on
manufacturers recommendations for the optional carbon canisters installed).
Indoor Air Sampling:
o One 24-hour TO15 select ion method (SIM) sample for target analytes will be
collected from each floor of residence 040-H, a duplicate sample will be collected
during each sample event from a random location. Samples events will occur
during each quarter during year one and semiannual for years 2 and 3 to monitor
the performance of the vapor mitigation system during operations;
o All analytical work shall be performed by a National Environmental Laboratory
Accreditation Program (NELAP) accredited laboratory in accordance with the
applicable portions of the AOU1 Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) to the
extent practical; and
o The results will be provided to USACE PM and VA Program Manager.
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2.0
MARCH 2017
OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE
The Amaircare 10000 installed for vapor mitigation operates continuously by running three fans that draw
cold return air from the plenum closet through pre-filters, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters,
and high capacity carbon filters. The treated air is discharged to the suction of the house furnace suction
which directs the treated air throughout the residence’s supply ducts.
The furnace/AC will continue to
operate as normal during heating and cooling months and the Amaircare 10000 will act as an additional
filter to the furnace. If for some reason the furnace controls draw more air than is fed to the intake by the
air purifier forming a suction, additional make up air will be drawn automatically through the static
pressure damper. This condition could occur if the pre-filters begin to foul over time or the furnace
variable speed fan draws more air than the Amaircare 10000 can supply.
2.1
Inspections with Routine Maintenance
The system will be inspected quarterly throughout the initial year of operation. The inspections will
determine the actual pre-filter change out requirements. It has been assumed to be quarterly at this time.
The O&M Inspection Checklist (Form 1) will be completed during every inspection event.
Sequence of events:
1. Calibrate the PID and complete the instrument calibration section of the form (Field or Office)
2. Open the air purification disconnect panel located in the utility room on the wall between the
furnace and the hot water heater. Record the value on the LCD of the power meter located inside.
(See images above)
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3. Measure the average airflow and PID readings on the
inlet of the air purifier. Record the readings on the
form. (See image at right)
4. Remove sample port plug and measure the
average airflow and PID reading on the
discharge of the Amaircare 10000. Record
readings on the form. Replace the sample port
plug once readings have been collected. Ensure
plenum closet door is shut before proceeding to
Step 5. (See image at right)
5. Remove sample port plug and measure the
average airflow and PID readings on the
discharge of the furnace. Record readings on the
form. Replace the sample port plug once
readings have been collected. (See image at
right)
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6. Measure PID readings near the floor in the utility room and record on the form. Ensure the
plenum closet door is closed before taking measurements.
7. Measure PID Readings near the floor in the plenum closet and record on the form.
8. Return to the air purification disconnect panel and
open the breaker that powers the air purifier as
shown. (See image at right)
9. Proceed to the air purifier and open the filter
access cover located on the front of the unit.
First remove and set aside the safety screw on
top. Then place fingers in the finger tabs shown
and lift to remove access panel and set aside.
(See image at right)
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10. Carefully remove and visually inspect the prefilter of each of the three filter units for particle
accumulation and fouling. (See image at right)
11. If pre-filter replacement is required, remove
the filters one at a time. Turn the filter
counter clockwise until the filter is released.
Hold the filter by the edge, pull out and lift to
remove. (See image at right)
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12. Remove clips shown to remove old prefilter from the filter frame. Either dispose
of used filter offsite or wash for future
reuse. Place new/washed filter around
the filter frame and re-affix with clips.
13. Install filter back in the air purification unit by
inserting and applying pressure while turning
clockwise until you feel resistance and stop.
(See image at right)
14. Repeat steps 11 and 12 until filters requiring change-out have been changed.
15. Replace the access panel using the finger tabs and secure with the safety screw.
16. Return to the air purification disconnect panel and turn the breaker back on to re-energize the air
purification system.
17. Visually inspect the system to ensure operations have been restored. Complete the forms to
document observations made and actions taken. In addition, a sticker will be affixed to the front
of the unit during the first inspection with lines and columns for date, work performed, performed
by and signature” to allow for onsite documentation of work. Additional stickers will be added as
necessary.
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Following the inspection, the completed forms shall be transmitted to CTI for review and approval. Once
approved, the forms will be forwarded to the designated VHA Representative for records retention
purposes, with a copy provided to the USACE PM.
2.2
Annual Maintenance
In accordance with the manufacturers recommendations, the entire composite filter will be changed on an
annual basis. This includes the pre-filter, HEPA filter and carbon filter units. This filter change-out
package is available from Allergy Buyers Club (www.allergybuyersclub.com/amaircare-wholerifiers.html). The specific package is “Amaircare Whole House VOC Annual Filter Replacement Kit”
Part AM AP VOCC. This kit contains 9 pre-filters and 3 VOC canisters (each containing 12 pounds of
carbon to be used as a set). The nine pre-filters will allow for up to two additional pre-filter change outs
as routine maintenance between annual maintenance events.
Sequence of events:
1. Open the air purification disconnect panel located in the utility room on the wall between the
furnace and the hot water heater. Record the value on the LCD of the power meter located inside.
(See images above). Once the value has been recorded, open the disconnect on the left side of the
meter shown to power off the unit.
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2. Proceed to the air purifier and open the filter access
cover located on the front of the unit. First remove
and set aside the safety screw on top. Then place
fingers in the finger tabs shown and lift to remove
access panel and set aside. (See image at right)
3. The filters are located inside as show to right.
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4. Remove the filters one at a time. Turn the filter
counter clockwise until the filter is released. Hold
the filter by the edge, pull out and lift to remove.
(See image at right)
5. Remove clips and remove old pre-filter from
filter frame and dispose of offsite. Carefully
remove the endcap shown at right. Place
endcap on new HEPA filter with new O-ring
provided. Dispose of old O-rings off site with
old filters. A diagram of the filter and
installed carbon canister is shown below:
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6. The HEPA filer come with a small cloth
carbon filter installed. This inner carbon filter
must be removed and dispose of properly
before installing the optional carbon canister
required for VOC removal. The optional
carbon canisters are required for this system.
Remove the shrink wrap from the new
optional carbon canister and insert it into the
new HEPA filter as shown (the soft inner
carbon filter discussed above must be
removed or it will jam).
7. When properly installed the carbon canister should fit flush
as shown at the right.
8. Place new pre-filter around the filter and affix with clips as
shown at right. Place the end cap on using the new o-rings
provided.
9. Install filter back in the air purification unit by inserting and applying pressure while turning
clockwise until you feel resistance and stop.
10. Repeat until all three filter units have been changed. Replace the access panel using the finger
tabs and secure with the safety screw.
11. Return to the air purification disconnect panel and turn the breaker back on to re-energize the air
purification system.
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12. Visually inspect the system to ensure operations have been restored. Complete the forms to
document observations made and actions taken. Documentation of work performed will be
completed on the sticker installed on the front of the unit. Additional stickers will be added as
necessary.
Following the filter change, the completed form(s) shall be transmitted to CTI for review. The completed
form(s) will be reviewed for accuracy and completeness by CTI and then forwarded to the designated
VHA representative for records retention purposes, with a copy provided to the USACE PM.
2.3
Indoor Air Sampling
System performance monitoring will be completed using indoor air sampling to confirm that the VIMS is
meeting the Tier 1 removal action levels (RALs) for PCE and its daughter product TCE throughout the
040-H residence. Indoor air sampling frequency will consist of quarterly samples during year one and
semi-annual sampling for years 2 and 3. Samples will be collected from each floor of 040-H, with a
random duplicate sample for quality control purposes.
The indoor air samples will be collected in the two locations of the highest values observed during the
initial characterization of the house. These two identified locations were
•
the lower level bedroom (TCE concentration up to 5.4J ug/m3 [RAL 2.1 ug/m3] and PCE
concentrations up to 78J ug/m3 [RAL 41 ug/m3]), and
•
the breakfast nook in the kitchen located above the crawlspace on the main floor (TCE
concentration of 4.3 ug/m3 [RAL 2.1 ug/m3] and PCE concentrations of 59J ug/m3 [RAL 41
ug/m3]).
An additional monitoring location was established for the third floor during preliminary sampling event
and will be used moving forward to be consistent. The third floor location is the southern bedroom. All
locations are shown in the following images.
All samples will be collected in individually cleaned and certified 6 liter SUMMA canisters equipped
with 24 hour regulators from NELAP accredited laboratory in accordance with the 2016 quality assurance
project plan (QAPP) to the extent practical. Each sample will be analyzed by EPA Method TO-15 SIM
with a target analyte list of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethylene
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(CDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and 1,4-dioxane. The sample canisters will be picked up and delivered
to ALS Environmental Laboratory with chain of custody completed by Sage Environmental.
Basement Floor Sample Location (F1):
F1
Front
Main Floor Sample Lopcation (F2):
F2
Front
Top Floor Sample Locations (F3):
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F3
Front
As identified in the QAPP, one of the three pre-set locations identified above will be duplicated per
sample event and labeled as F4 to provide a blind duplicate to the laboratory.
The attached “air sampling form” will be completed for each sampling event to document the following:
•
Sample ID;
•
Location/Description, including which location sample F4 duplicates;
•
Summa Canister Number;
•
Start Date;
•
Start Time;
•
Starting Vacuum;
•
Stop Date;
•
Stop Time;
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•
Ending Vacuum; and
•
Comments if Applicable.
MARCH 2017
Sample nomenclature shall be as follows:
•
First Floor Sample location F1: A 040H IA 001 mmddyy F1 (where “mm” is two-digit month of
sample collection, “dd” is the two-digit day of sample retrieval and “yy” is two-digit year of
sample collection);
•
Second Floor Sample location F2: A 040H IA 002 mmddyy F2 (as above);
•
Third Floor Sample location F3: A 040H 003 mmddyy F3 (as above); and
•
The duplicate collected from a random floor adjacent to normal sample is F4: A 040H 004
mmddyy F4 (as above and actual location recorded on the air sample form).
When the data is provided by the laboratory, CTI will review and compare to the identified Tier 1 RALs
for the target analytes discussed above. In the unlikely event that an exceedance is observed the USACE
PM and VHA will be notified immediately and a plan of action will be developed and implemented to
remedy the situation. The most likely action anticipated is change out of the carbon filter package with a
follow-up indoor air sample event.
The sample results will be provided in a brief letter report that summarizes the sampling activities,
provides tabulated data compared to applicable tier 1 RALs, and provides recommendations as
appropriate. The actual laboratory level IV report and a validated Lab Spec 7 electronic data deliverable
(EDD) will be appended to the letter report in electronic format. . A letter report will be provided to
USACE PM and VA Program Manager within 20 calendar days after sample results are received
from the laboratory.
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2.4
MARCH 2017
Spare Parts Inventory
In order to have the ability to rapidly respond to system issues, the following spare parts are to be
maintained at the local support contractor’s office/storage area.
•
Item 1: Amaircare VOC Filter Kit with a minimum single complete set of filters:
o
3-Pre-Filters (new or washed);
o
3- HEPA Filters with O-rings (new); and
o
3- Optional VOC (12 pound) Carbon Filters (new).
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FIGURES
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Based on FIGURE 1 SITE MAP from the
Action Memorandum for Residence 0040-H
within Accelerated Operable Unit 1: East
Side Springs 700 South 1600 East PCE Plume,
Salt Lake City, Utah
By:
Figure 1
Date:
JULY 13, 2017
Site Location and Groundwater
Plume Map
CTI and Associates, Inc.
Vapor Mitigation System Design
Building 40-H
AOU-1 Salt Lake City, Utah
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APPENDIX A
O&M FORMS
F1- INSPECTION LOG
F2- ANNUAL MAINTENNCE LOG
F-3 SAMPLE COLLECTION LOG
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F1- Inspection Form
Residence 040-H
Vapor Mitigation System
Operation and Maintenance
Instrument Calibration
Fresh Air Zero:
Span Gas:
Zero/Span Calibration Completed:
Performed By:
0 ppm
10 ppm Isobutalyene
Date:
Time:
Print:
Sign:
Current Conditions
Weather:
Outside Temperature:
Notes:
SYSTEM LOG
Air Purifier Electrical Use Meter Reading:
Unit De-enegized:
Airflow (Air Purifier Inlet):
CFM
PID (Air Purifier Inlet):
ppb
Airflow (Air Purifier Discharge):
CFM
PID (Air Purifier Discharge):
ppb
Airflow (Furnace Discharge):
CFM
PID (Furnace Discharge):
PID (Utility Room Floor):
PID (Plenum Closet Floor):
ppb
ppb
ppb
Time:
Top Pre-FilterInspected:
Middle Pre-Filter Inspected:
Bottom Pre-Filter Inspected:
Unit Re-enegized:
Comments:
KW-HR
Time:
Changed
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Clean Notes
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
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F2-Annual Maintenance Form
Residence 040-H
Vapor Mitigation System
Operation and Maintenance
SYSTEM LOG
Air Purifier Electrical Use Meter Reading:
Unit De-enegized:
Time:
Top Pre-Filter:
Top Pre-Filter HEPA:
Top Large (Optional) Carbon:
Top Filter O-Ring:
Middle Pre-Filter:
Middle Pre-Filter HEPA:
Middle Large (Optional) Carbon:
Middle Filter O-Ring:
Bottom Pre-Filter:
Bottom Pre-Filter HEPA:
Bottom Large (Optional) Carbon:
Bottom Filter O-Ring:
Unit Re-enegized:
Time:
Comments:
Performed By:
KW-HR
Print:
Sign:
Changed
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Yes / No
Notes
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Sample ID
Location/Description
SAGE Environmental, LLC
Air Sampling Form
Summa #
Regulator
#
Start Date
Start Time
Starting
Vacuum
(in. Hg)
Sampler Name:
Sampling Method: Summa cannisters/ TO-15 SIM 5 TAL
Stop Date
Project: Vapor Mitigation System Operations and Sampling
Location: Bldg 40 H
Stop Time
Ending
Vacuum
(in. Hg)
Comments / Notes
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APPENDIX B
ANNOTATED FOR AMAIRCARE 10000
HOMEWOWNERS MANUAL & DEALER INSTALATION INSTRUCTIONS
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AIR CLEANERS/
FILTERS
© 2004 Americair Corporation, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
AMAIRCARE
HEPA BYPASS AIR FILTRATION SYSTEM
HOMEOWNERS MANUAL & DEALER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
FOR MODELS AWW-350, AWW-675, 8500 & 10000
Rules for Safe Installation and Operation
READ AND SAVE
THESE INSTRUCTIONS!
Please read instructions before installing and using the
HEPA Bypass Air Filtration System (HEPA system).
This will help you obtain the full benefit of the HEPA system you have selected. It will also help you to avoid
needless service costs.
Shipping and Packing List
Package 1 of 1 contains:
1
1
1
1
1
4
-
HEPA System
Complete Filter Set (Packed inside Unit)
Installation Instructions (this manual)
Registration Card
Filter Changes Reminder Label
Self Adhesive Rubber Feet (AWW Models only)
HEPA System Models
1. Read this manual carefully. Failure to follow these rules
and instructions could cause a malfunction of the air filter
or unsatisfactory service and could void your warranty.
Model Airwash Whisper-350 (AWW-350) is
designed to filter air up to a rate of 350 cfm.
2. Follow a regular service and maintenance schedule
to ensure efficient operation.
Model Airwash Whisper-675 (AWW-675) is
designed to filter air up to a rate of 675 cfm.
3. For safety and optimized performance of your
HEPA system, all installation and maintenance
must be performed by a professional heating and
ventilation contractor. The installer should be made
aware of your indoor air quality situation and be
familiar with your heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment.
Model 8500 is designed to filter air up to a rate of
850 cfm.
Model 10000 is designed to filter air up to a rate of
1000 cfm.
4. High particulate distribution may occur during initial
start-up of this product after installation or after
scheduled filter changes. Individuals who are highly sensitive to airborne particulates should not be in
the building and allow 24 hours of operation for
removal of particulates from occupied spaces
before re-entry.
!
WARNING
Risk of property damage, injury or death.
Installation, adjustments, alterations, service and maintenance must be performed by a qualified technician.
!
WARNING
Risk of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.
Can cause injury or death.
Do not operate equipment without access panel in
place. Operation of this equipment without all access
panels in place may cause gas fumes from the heating system to be drawn into occupied spaces.
!
WARNING
Electrical Shock Hazard.
Can cause injury or death.
Disconnect all electrical power supplies
before servicing.
Do not operate equipment without
access panels in place
Table of Contents
Rules for Safe Installation and Operation ................1
Shipping and Packing List........................................1
Specifications ..........................................................2
Introduction ..............................................................2
General Information..................................................3
Product Application Guidelines ................................3
Parts Identification ..................................................4-5
Physical Dimensions of Units ................................6-7
Dealer Installation Instructions ..............................8-10
Operation ................................................................11
Maintenance ............................................................12
Filter Change Schedule ....................................12
Filter Changing Guidelines ................................12
Dealer Filter Change Instructions ........................13-14
Dealer Motor Assembly Replacement Instructions ............15
Electrical Diagrams ..............................................16-17
Replacement Parts..................................................18
Specifications
Nom. Air Flow @ 120VAC @ 0.0” E.S.P.
Weight (max - unpackaged)
Supply Voltage
Nom. Measured Power Consumption
Motor Current Draw - Total
Air Intake Collar (max)
Air Outflow Collar (max)
Operating Temp. Range - Return air (ºF)
AWW-350
AWW-675
8500
10000
350 cfm
30 lbs.
120 VAC
125 Watts
1.0 amps
8”-round
6”-round
30 to 95
675 cfm
33 lbs.
120 VAC
225 Watts
1.8 amps
10”-round
8”-round
30 to 95
850 cfm
125 lbs.
120 VAC
360 Watts
3.6 amps
10”x12”
10”x12”
30 to 95
1000 cfm
130 lbs.
120 VAC
600 Watts
4.8 amps
10”x12”
10”x12”
30 to 95
150 Watts
.7 amps
255 Watts
2.0 amps
300 Watts
1.2 amps
HEPA filter efficiency = 99.97% @ 0.3 micron particles
Ambient temperature range: -40ºF to 130ºF
For 220 VAC Units (only sold outside N. America)
Nom. Measured Power Consumption
Motor Current Draw - Total
75 Watts
.34 amps
Introduction
Initially, the HEPA filter’s particulate removal efficiency
improves with use. However, the air flow through the
HEPA filter media will decrease, as dust builds up on
the filter, thus lowering its ability to circulate and clean
as much air as when it was new. If the air flow through
your unit is noticeably reduced, you can inspect the
pre-filter and HEPA filter to see if they should be
replaced. Replacement (or washing if foam) of the prefilter every 3 months will help extend the life of the
HEPA filter.
Congratulations! You will quickly realize that you have
purchased a very effective air cleaning system. It
incorporates state of the art HEPA (High Efficiency
Particulate Air) technology.
Your Amaircare HEPA system comes with a limited
warranty. With proper attention to its care and maintenance, you will receive optimum performance.
If your indoor air has abnormally high concentrations
of particulates, the life span of the filter media may be
shortened. Excessive particulates in the air will reduce
the expected life of the HEPA filter. Under normal conditions the HEPA filter will last from two to five years.
Please contact your local Amaircare dealer regarding
replacement of filter media, warranty information or if
you have any questions or concerns about the performance of your HEPA system.
The optional activated carbon canister has a finite limit
as to the amount of odor or other gaseous volatile
organic compounds (V.O.C.’s) that it can adsorb. The
higher the concentrations, the shorter the expected
life. Higher humidity may shorten the life of the carbon
canister. Under normal conditions, the carbon canister
should last up to 12 months.
NOTE: This filtration system is an ADDITIONAL
filter, and does NOT replace the existing air
handler/furnace system filter.
2
General Information
Media Filters
Media filters strain particulates from the air. The filter
media needs to have tiny holes to allow air to pass
through, but not particulates. Filter types vary for all
sorts of purposes. The most effective and proven filter
media is HEPA. HEPA filter media is 99.97% efficient
at capturing particles which are 0.3 micron in size or
larger.
that is dirty/saturated can be changed. This is more
economical than a system where you need to throw
out two or three filters when only one needs changing.
Carbon Filters
Carbon media is used to capture chemicals and odors,
also referred to as V.O.C.’s. Chemicals and odors
cannot be captured with media type filters. Activated
carbon collects chemicals and odors in a process
called adsorption. If air passes through the carbon filter before particulates are removed, the surface of the
carbon quickly gets covered with particulates, rendering it ineffective at capturing chemicals and odors. If
particulates are removed from the air with a HEPA filter, virtually the entire surface area of the carbon can
be used to capture chemicals and odors. This increases the efficiency and filter life of the carbon filter.
• Stage 1: Pre-filter - The inexpensive pre-filter (foam
or carbon) removes larger particulates from the air,
thus prolonging the life of the HEPA filter.
The HEPA System’s 3 Stage Filtration Process
The 3 stage filtration process is used to create a very
effective filtration system. Each filter is independent
and can be changed individually.
• Stage 2: HEPA - The HEPA filter removes 99.97%
of particulates 0.3 micron and larger. The cleaned air
then passes through the third stage filter.
• Stage 3: Carbon - The carbon filter is about 1/2 an
inch thick to give it plenty of surface area for removing
chemicals and odors from the air. This filter may be
replaced by an optional heavy duty granular carbon
canister available for maximum removal of chemicals
and odors. The clean air is then reintroduced into the
air you breathe.
Separate HEPA and Carbon Filters
HEPA and carbon filters have different life spans. It is
important for a filtration system to keep the filter components independent from each other, so that the filter
Product Application Guidelines
Size of House vs. Air Changes per Hour
Model
Unit
1,000 ft2
(8,000 ft3)
1,200 ft2
(9,600 ft3)
Size of House*
1,500 ft2
1,800 ft2
2,000 ft2
2,500 ft2
3,000 ft2
3,500 ft2
3
3
3
3
3
(12,00 ft ) (14,400 ft ) (16,000 ft ) (20,000 ft ) (24,000 ft ) (28,000 ft3)
Model AWW-350 2.4
2.0
1.6
1.4
1.2
1.0
0.8
0.7
Model AWW-675 5.0
4.2
3.4
2.8
2.5
2.0
1.7
1.5
Model 8500
6.38
5.31
4.25
3.54
3.19
2.55
2.13
1.82
Model 10000
7.5
6.25
5
4.17
3.75
3
2.5
2.14
* Chart based on homes with 8 ft. ceilings.
Notes:
• Industry experience indicates that one (1) air change per hour generally provides adequate air cleaning. Actual
results will depend on multiple factors such as outdoor particulate levels, infiltration rate, indoor activities etc.
• Generally speaking, the more air changes per hour provided, the more effective a HEPA system will be. People
with sensitivities may desire a higher number of air changes per hour for cleaner air.
3
Parts Identification AWW-350 & AWW-675
Inside Cabinet (Filter Section)
Cabinet Parts
Filter Section Access
Panel
Retaining Clips (2)
Intake Collar
Motor/Impeller
Cabinet
Filter Adapter
(threaded)
Outflow Collar
‘O’ Ring
Power Module
Model CM71
Motor Section
Access Panel
Power Cord
figure 1.
figure 2.
Parts Identification 8500 & 10000
Cabinet Parts
Inside Cabinet (Filter Section)
10”x12” Outflow Duct
Variable Speed Switch
10”x12” Intake Duct
Filter Section Access Panel
Motor Section Access Panel
Finger Tabs (4)
Cabinet
Filter Adapter
Motor/Impeller
Filter Retaining Rod Clip
HEPA Cartridge
Filter Cap
Filter Retaining Rod
(3)
(3)
(6)
(3)
(3)
(3)
figure 4.
figure 3.
4
Filter Parts Identification
Optional Carbon Canister AWW-350 & AWW-675
HEPA Cartridge Parts AWW-350 & AWW-675
For third stage increased
removal of chemicals and
odors.
HEPA Filter
Located inside the HEPA
filter.
Pre-Filter - Foam
HEPA Filter Mesh
(Protects HEPA
Filter)
Discard inner carbon filter
when using the optional
carbon canister.
Inner Carbon Filter
figure 5.
figure 6.
Optional Carbon Canister - 8500 & 10000
HEPA Cartridge Parts - 8500 & 10000
For third stage increased
removal of chemicals and
odors.
Inner Carbon Filter
Located inside the HEPA
filter.
HEPA Filter
Pre-Filter - Carbon
Discard inner carbon filter
when using the optional
carbon canister.
HEPA Filter Mesh
(Protects HEPA
Filter)
figure 7.
figure 8.
5
Physical Dimensions of Unit
Model AWW-350 & AWW-675:
A
Filter Section Access Panel
F
Air Intake
H
Air Outflow
Motor Section Access Panel
C
A
A
B
I
B
E
D
J
G
figure 9.
MODEL NO.
Model AWW-350
Model AWW-675
A
14.5
(368)
14.5
(368)
B
27.25
(692)
27.25
(692)
C
7.875
(200)
9.875
(251)
D
5.875
(149)
7.875
(200)
Dimensions in inches (mm)
6
E
16
(406)
16
(406)
F
1.25
(32)
1.25
(32)
G
1.25
(32)
1.25
(32)
H
3
(76)
2
(51)
I
8.5
(216)
6.5
(165)
J
2
(51)
1
(25)
Physical Dimensions of Unit
Models 8500 & 10000:
J
A
E
H
D
I
D
G
G
Air Intake
Air Outflow
A
F
C
B
Filter Section Access Panel
Motor Section Access Panel
figure 10.
MODEL NO.
Models 8500 & 10000
A
17.25
(438)
B
28
(711)
C
D
47.75
10
(1213) (254)
Dimensions in inches (mm)
7
E
F
12
50.25
(254) (1276)
G
2.5
(64)
H
2.6
(66)
I
5.3
(135)
J
0.1
(3)
Dealer Installation Instructions
Forced air handler/furnace systems:
The HEPA system should be installed as a bypass system, with part of the return ducted into the HEPA system. The
filtered air is then rerouted back into the return air, and continues through the system to be heated/cooled.
Typical Return to Return Application
For homes with horizontal forced air handler/furnace
systems. (Air handler/furnace is shown in an typical
attic. See figure 7.)
Typical Return to Return Application
For homes with upflow forced air handler/furnace systems.(Air handler/furnace is shown in a typical basement. See
A
Figure 6.)
Air Handler/
Furnace
Distance between A and B should
be 6' to 16' for best results
A
Distance between
A and B should
be 6' to 16' for
best results
B
Figure 11.
Air
Handler/Furnace
Filter
HEPA System
B
Figure 12.
NOTE: This filtration system is an ADDITIONAL filter, and does NOT replace the existing air handler/furnace system filter.
ble (if the duct runs are too long, reduced CFM
may result).
• If duct is exposed to unconditioned air, externally
insulated flex duct is highly recommended.
• Externally insulated flex duct can also be used for
noise reduction purposes.
• For best indoor air quality, do not use ductboard or
fiberglass inside of ducts.
Electricity:
• The unit must be plugged into a grounded 120V,
60Hz outlet.
Preparation:
Here are some things to consider as you decide where
to install the HEPA system.
Location:
• Make sure there is room to open the HEPA filter
access panel for filter changes/inspections.
• Keep the HEPA system in a location where you
can still access the air handler/furnace filter.
• Keep the HEPA system away from possible water damage.
• Vibration pads will reduce vibration for installations
where the unit is placed on the floor.
• Install HEPA System on floor or suspended platform.
If the unit is suspended, screws must not penetrate
through the cabinet. Make sure that you have the
proper chains/straps/joists and equipment to keep
unit secure.
Intake (Marked as ‘Air In’ on unit):
• Intake ducts should be installed upstream of any
humidifiers and be installed on the main return.
• Intake duct should be installed at least 6 ft. away
from the outflow duct on the main return.
Outflow (Marked as ‘Clean Air Out’ on unit):
• Outflow duct should be installed as close to the air
handler/furnace inlet as possible but not directly
into the return air elbow of the main return.
• If the unit is being installed independently of any
other system, room diffusers are recommended to
help distribute airflow evenly in the occupied space.
Ducting:
• If HEPA system is installed where inlet and outflow
collars face down, metal elbows must be connected
to both inlet and outflow collars.
• Each connection must be sealed with aluminum
tape or mastic, including all take offs.
• Installed duct runs should be as straight as possi-
Required Materials for Installation of Unit:
Items for AWW-350
Flex or rigid duct
8” round & 6” round
(length as required)
Takeoffs
One 8” & One 6”
Items for AWW-675
Flex or rigid duct
10” round & 8” round
(length as required)
Takeoffs
One 10” & One 8”
Items for 8500 & 10000
Flex or rigid duct
10” x 12”
(length as required)
Takeoffs
Two 10”x12”
All Models
Aluminum tape or mastic as required
Misc. hanging materials - field provided
NOTE: Be sure to review ‘Rules for Safe Installation
and Operation’ on page 1 of this document before
start-up of this unit.
8
Dealer Installation Instructions
Forced air handler/furnace system with an HRV/ERV
This application provides filtration of all Outdoor Air (OA) that is brought into the home through the HRV/ERV,
thus reducing the introduction of dust, pollen and mold from the outdoor air. For systems that have HRV/ERV
units installed, we recommend ducting the ‘fresh air’ outflow from the HRV/ERV into the HEPA system. If the
HRV/ERV CFM (cubic feet per minute) rating is lower than that of the HEPA system, an additional return needs
to be installed into the HEPA system (See figure 8.) The outflow air from the HEPA system then needs to be
installed into the main return of the air handler/furnace system. Ensure that you follow the proper installation
instructions as outlined in the HRV/ERV Installation manual(s).
Example of Return to
Return Installation
with an HRV/ERV
For homes with a forced
air handler/furnace system and an HRV/ERV
system.
Preparation:
Here are some things to consider as you
decide where to install the HEPA system
with an HRV/ERV.
Location:
• Make sure there is room to open the
Additional Return
HEPA filter access panel for filter
Air Handler/Furnace
changes/inspections.
Air Handler/Furnace Filter
• Keep the HEPA system in a location
HEPA System
where you can still access the air hanFigure 13.
dler/furnace filter.
• Keep the HEPA system away from
NOTE: This filtration system is an ADDITIONAL filter, and does NOT
possible water damage
replace the existing air handler/furnace system filter.
• Vibration pads will reduce vibration for
• If duct is exposed to unconditioned air, externally
installations where the unit is placed on the floor.
insulated flex duct is highly recommended.
• Install HEPA System on floor or suspended plat• Externally insulated flex duct can also be used for
form. If the unit is suspended, screws must not
noise reduction purposes.
penetrate through the cabinet. Make sure that you
• For best indoor air quality, do not use ductboard or
have the proper chains/straps/joists and equipfiberglass inside of ducts.
ment to keep unit secure.
Electricity:
Intake (Marked as ‘Air In’ on unit):
• Most HRV/ERV systems will not move as much air • The unit must be plugged into a grounded 120V,
60Hz outlet.
as the HEPA system. For these systems, install an
Required Materials for Installation of Unit:
additional return from another treated air source
Items for AWW-350
into the HEPA system.
Flex or rigid duct
8” round & 6” round
• If using an additional return duct, it should be
(length
as
required)
installed upstream of any humidifiers. The fresh
One 8” & One 6”
air outflow of the HRV/ERV should be "Y" connect- Takeoffs
Items
for
AWW-675
ed to the additional return duct then connected to
Flex or rigid duct
10” round & 8” round
the inlet of the HEPA system.
(length
as
required)
• The additional return duct (if any) should be installed at
One 10” & One 8”
least 6 ft. away from the outflow duct on the main return. Takeoffs
Items for 8500 & 10000
• Duct both the HRV/ERV and the additional return
Flex or rigid duct
12” round or 10” x 12”
into the intake of the HEPA system.
(length as required)
Outflow (Marked as ‘Clean Air Out’ on unit):
Two 10”x12”
• Outflow duct should be installed as close to the air Takeoffs
All Models
handler/furnace inlet as possible but not directly
Aluminum tape or mastic as required
into the return air elbow of the main return.
Misc. hanging materials - field provided
Ducting:
• If HEPA system is installed where inlet and outflow NOTE: Be sure to review ‘Rules for Safe Installation
and Operation’ on page 1 of this document before
collars face down, metal elbows must be connectstart-up of this unit.
ed to both inlet and outflow collars.
• Each connection must be sealed with aluminum
tape or mastic, including all take offs.
• Installed duct runs should be as straight as possible (if
the duct runs are too long, reduced CFM may result).
9
Dealer Installation Instructions
Independent Operation:
The HEPA systems can be used independently of any other equipment! The intake and outflow of the filtration
system can be ducted into the same room to create a cleaner environment almost anywhere. The intake or outflow can also be ducted elsewhere. The intake and outflow should be installed on opposite sides of the room;
however, this varies according to your specific needs.
Preparation:
Here are some things to consider as you
decide where to install the HEPA system
independently of other systems.
Example of Single Room Stand Alone System Installation
For single rooms where increased filtration is desired such as a
dedicated ‘smoking room’.
HEPA System
Air should be drawn from
Location:
location B if space is avail• Make sure there is room to open the
able, otherwise, use locaHEPA filter access panel for filter
tion A.
A
changes/inspections.
• Keep the HEPA system away from
possible water damage
• Vibration pads will reduce vibration for
installations where the unit is placed
B
on the floor.
• Install HEPA System on floor or
Figure 14.
suspended platform. If the unit is
suspended, screws must not peneElectricity:
trate through the cabinet. Make sure that you
• The unit must be plugged into a grounded 120V,
have the proper chains/straps/joists and equip60Hz. outlet.
ment to keep unit secure.
Intake (Marked as ‘Air In’ on unit):
Required Materials for Installation of Unit:
• Intake ducts should be installed near the floor for
Items for AWW-350
optimum airflow (see figure 11). If space does not
Flex or rigid duct
8” round & 6” round
allow, then the inlet can be installed in the ceiling.
(length as required)
• Intake duct should be installed at least 6 ft. away
Takeoffs
One 8” & One 6”
from the outflow duct.
Diffusers
One 8” & One 6”
• Intake duct should be installed at opposite end of
the room from the outflow duct(s) if in the same room. Items for AWW-675
Flex or rigid duct
10” round & 8” round
• Diffusers are recommended to help distribute air(length
as
required)
flow evenly.
Takeoffs
One 10” & One 8”
Outflow (Marked as ‘Clean Air Out’ on unit):
Diffusers
One 10” & One 8”
• Outflow(s) should be installed in the ceiling away
Items for 8500 & 10000
from any other air inlet(s)
Flex or rigid duct
10” x 12”
• Room diffusers are recommended to help dis(length as required)
tribute airflow evenly in the occupied space.
Takeoffs
Two 10”x12”
Ducting:
• If HEPA system is installed where inlet and outflow All Models
collars face down, metal elbows must be connected Aluminum tape or mastic as required
Misc. hanging materials - field provided
to both inlet and outflow collars.
• Each connection must be sealed with aluminum
NOTE: Be sure to review ‘Rules for Safe Installation
tape or mastic, including all vent connections.
and Operation’ on page 1 of this document before
• Installed duct runs should be as straight as possible (if
start-up of this unit.
the duct runs are too long, reduced CFM may result).
• If duct is exposed to unconditioned air, insulated
flex duct is highly recommended.
• Externally insulated flex duct can also be used for
noise reduction purposes.
• For best indoor air quality, do not use ductboard or
fiberglass inside of ducts.
10
Operation (8500, 10,000 & AWW Units with on/off toggle switch)
1. Make sure that the unit is plugged into a grounded outflow (120 Volt, 60 Hz).
2. For optimum performance, the HEPA system should operate when the indoor air handler/furnace blower is on.
3. Turn the unit on by rotating the variable speed dial clockwise. The unit starts in High speed, turn all the way
clockwise for low speed.
For units with a n on/off toggle switch, press the switch to the ‘on’ (1) position.
4. To turn the unit off, rotate the variable speed dial counter-clockwise until you feel or hear it click into the ‘off’
position.
For units with an on/off toggle switch, press the switch to the ‘off’ (0) position.
Operation (AWW-350 & AWW-675)
1. Make sure that the unit is plugged into a grounded power source (120 Volt, 60 Hz).
2. For optimum performance, the HEPA system should operate with the indoor air handler/furnace blower on.
3. Turn the unit on by pressing the on/off button and the green power light will illuminate.
For units with a n on/off toggle switch, press the switch to the ‘on’ (1) position.
4. To turn the unit off, press the on/off button and the power indicator light will go out.
For units with an on/off toggle switch, press the switch to the ‘off’ (0) position.
Filter Light Indicators
Your HEPA system is equipped with an electronic filter timer. This timer monitors the life expectancy of each filter in the unit.
By default, the Pre-Filter, HEPA Filter and VOC Blanket lights will turn on when the unit is powered on.
5. If you have upgraded your VOC Blanket to a VOC Canister, you must activate the corresponding timer.
Press and hold the VOC Canister button until the light comes on. The VOC Blanket light will automatically
go off. The control panel will now monitor the life expectancy of the VOC Canister.
6. If you are switching your VOC Canister to a VOC Blanket, you must activate the corresponding timer. Press
and hold the VOC Blanket button until the light comes on. The VOC Canister light will automatically go off.
The control panel will now monitor the life expectancy of the VOC Blanket.
When a filter indicator light flashes, it is time to check and replace that filter.
7. Turn the unit off and see instructions for “filter removal” on pg. 14. to determine if filter replacement is needed. See ‘Maintenance” on next page.
8. Once the filters have been checked or replaced, turn the unit back on and reset the control panel. To reset,
press and hold the flashing filter button until the light is constant.
11
Maintenance
Proper care and maintenance of your HEPA system
will ensure years of service. The unit must be turned
off during service/maintenance or when filters are
being changed.
It is recommended that gloves and a filtered
breathing mask be worn during filter replacement.
!
WARNING
Electrical Shock Hazard.
Can cause injury or death.
Filter Changing Guidelines
Pre-Filter:
Dust and other large particles will collect on the pre-filter over time. The color of the filter will change as particulates build up on the pre-filter. Change the pre-filter when you can see the particulate build up start to
clog up the pre-filter.
HEPA Filter:
As the HEPA filter captures particulates, it will darken
over time. Replace the HEPA filter when it darkens to
the level seen in example D.
Disconnect all electrical power supplies
before servicing.
A. New
B. Used
C. Used
D. Replace
Do not operate equipment without
access panels in place
!
CAUTION
Risk of Sharp Edges Hazard.
Equipment sharp edges can cause injuries.
Avoid grasping equipment edges without protective
gloves.
Filter Change Schedule
Note: Note: Failure to properly maintain your HEPA
system will decrease the efficiency and air flow.
Inner Carbon Filter:
The inner carbon filter will rarely look used. This filter
captures odors and gasses, yet the filter’s appearance
will not change. When this filter has reached it’s maximum adsorbancy of odors and gasses, it will no longer
work. Replace this filter when it no longer seems to
capture odors, or every 3 months (12 months for
optional Carbon Canister), which ever occurs first.
Pre-Filter
Pre-Filter: 3 to 4 months*
HEPA Filter: 2 to 5 years
Inner Carbon Filter: 6 months
Optional Carbon Canister: 12 months
* Foam pre-filters (AWW-350 & AWW-675) can be
washed and reused
HEPA Filter
Inner Carbon Filter
NOTE: Filter life is based on average air content. Some
filters may need to be changed more often due to higher
amounts of dust, humidity, or chemicals found in your
ambient air. Additionally, people who are more sensitive
to these airborne contaminates may desire more frequent
filter changes.
Figure 15.
12
Dealer Filter Change Instructions - AWW-350 & AWW-675
!
WARNING
Electrical Shock Hazard.
Can cause injury or death.
Disconnect all electrical power supplies
before servicing.
Do no operate equipment without
access panels in place
!
CAUTION
Risk of Sharp Edges Hazard.
Equipment sharp edges can cause injuries.
Avoid grasping equipment edges without protective
gloves.
It is recommended that gloves and a filtered
breathing mask be worn during filter replacement
to avoid breathing particulates (dust, mold, pollen,
etc.) captured on the filter that become airborne
during the filter(s) changeout.
The old filters should be wrapped and sealed in
plastic bags immediately upon removal from the
unit to avoid distributing particles throughout the
house during the process of disposal.
1. Accessing the filters
a. Remove safety screw(s) from HEPA filter access panel.
b. Unlatch the two retaining clips and lift off HEPA filter access panel.
c. Bracing the unit so it does not move, turn the
HEPA cartridge counter-clockwise and lift/pull out.
2. Pre-filter Replacement
a. Pull the pre-filter up and off the unit.
NOTE: The pre-filter may contain contaminants,
remove it slowly to avoid releasing particles back
into the air.
b. Foam pre-filters can be washed several times,
wash by hand in warm water. Let it dry completely
before placing it back onto the HEPA cartridge.
b. If replacing the filter, remove plastic shrink wrap
from the new pre-filter.
c. Stretch the new/washed filter around the top of the
HEPA cartridge and slide it down into place
3. Inner Carbon Filter Replacement
a. Look inside the HEPA cartridge to locate the two
ends of the inner carbon filter.
b. Pull one end of the old inner carbon filter in and
bend it into a loose roll so it can be removed.
c. Remove the inner carbon filter from the HEPA cartridge.
d. Remove plastic shrink wrap from the new inner
carbon filter.
e. Unroll the inner carbon filter and roll it up in the
opposite direction (this makes the filter follow a
more contoured profile against the inner HEPA filter surfaces and helps keep it in place), place the
rolled inner carbon filter inside the HEPA cartridge and gently unroll it until the ends ‘butt’
together and the filter is snug against the HEPA
filter.
4. HEPA Filter Replacement
a. If replacing the HEPA filter with a new filter, discard
old HEPA filter and use new when replacing the
HEPA filter into the unit.
b. With each annual filter replacement kit, a new ‘o’
ring is provided. The old one is removed by pinching it between two fingers and pulling it off the collar on the blower deck.
c. Discard old ‘o’ ring.
d. Place the new ‘o’ ring onto the collar and slide it
down to the base of the blower deck.
5. Optional Carbon Canister
a. Remove old carbon canister (if installed) by pulling
it out from the inside of the HEPA filter.
b. If replacing an inner carbon filter with the carbon
canister, remove inner carbon filter by following
the steps a. to c. in section 3.
c. Remove the plastic shrink wrap from the new carbon canister.
d. Slide the carbon canister into the HEPA cartridge, smaller end first. The carbon canister should slide all the way
in until the metal edges at the base meet the HEPA filter.
e. Support the carbon canister with your fingers so it
does not slide out when replacing the HEPA cartridge assembly into the unit.
7. Installing the HEPA Filter Cartridge
a. With the filters changed or inspected, all 3 filters
are ready to be placed back into the unit. Place
the HEPA cartridge gently into the unit (if a carbon
canister is being used, take care not to let it slide
out as it is heavy and could damage the unit)
b. When the HEPA cartridge is in place, brace the unit,
press down and gently turn it clockwise to lock it into
place. If too much force is used, the cartridge may be
difficult to remove!
c. Replace the HEPA filter access panel.
For AWW-350 & AWW-675, latch it with the two
retaining clips.
d. Re-install safety screw(s) into HEPA filter access panel.
e. Plug the unit back into a power outlet and turn it on.
13
Dealer Filter Change Instructions - 8500 & 10000
!
WARNING
3. Inner Carbon Filter Replacement
a. Look inside the HEPA cartridge to locate the two
ends of the inner carbon filter.
b. Pull one end of the old inner carbon filter in and
bend it into a loose roll so it can be removed.
c. Remove the inner carbon filter from the HEPA cartridge.
d. Remove plastic shrink wrap from the new inner
carbon filter.
e. Unroll the inner carbon filter and roll it up in the
opposite direction (this makes the filter follow a
more contoured profile against the inner HEPA filter surfaces and helps keep it in place), place the
rolled inner carbon filter inside the HEPA cartridge and gently unroll it until the ends ‘butt’
together and the filter is snug against the HEPA
filter screen.
Electrical Shock Hazard.
Can cause injury or death.
Disconnect all electrical power supplies
before servicing.
Do no operate equipment without
access panels in place
!
CAUTION
Risk of Sharp Edges Hazard.
Equipment sharp edges can cause injuries.
Avoid grasping equipment edges without protective
gloves.
It is recommended that gloves and a filtered
breathing mask be worn during filter replacement
to avoid breathing particulates (dust, mold, pollen,
etc.) captured on the filter that become airborne
during the filter(s) changeout.
4. HEPA Filter Replacement
a. If replacing the HEPA filter with a new filter, discard
old HEPA filter and use new when replacing the
HEPA filter into the unit.
5. Optional Carbon Canister
a. Remove old carbon canister (if installed) by pulling
it out from the inside of the HEPA filter.
b. If replacing an inner carbon filter with the carbon
canister, remove inner carbon filter by following
the steps a. to c. in section 3.
c. Remove the plastic shrink wrap from the new carbon canister.
d. Slide the carbon canister into the HEPA cartridge.
The carbon canister should slide all the way in
meeting the edges of the HEPA cartridge evenly
on both ends.
e. Keep the HEPA cartridge horizontal and support it
with your fingers to keep it from sliding out when
replacing the HEPA cartridge back into the unit.
The old filters should be wrapped and sealed in
plastic bags immediately upon removal from the
unit to avoid distributing particles throughout the
house during the process of disposal.
1. Accessing the filters
a. Remove safety screw(s) from HEPA filter access panel.
b. Pull the HEPA filter access panel up by the finger
tabs and lift out to remove.
c. Lift the filter retaining rod out from the two clips
holding it into position (some force may be necessary as it is a tight fit to ensure complete seal),
ensure that pressure is kept on the filter cap as it
is the only thing keeping the HEPA cartridge in
place.
d. With the retaining rod removed, pull the HEPA cartridge and filter cap out of the unit.
2. Pre-filter Replacement
a. Locate the clips holding the pre-filter in place.
Remove them and pull the pre-filter off.
NOTE: The pre-filter may contain contaminants,
remove it slowly to avoid releasing particles back
into the air.
b. Remove plastic shrink wrap from the new pre-filter.
c. Wrap the new pre-filter around the HEPA filter,
making sure that the ends overlap.
d. With the clips provided with the new pre-filter,
secure the pre-filter ends together tightly so it keeps
the pre-filter secure against to the HEPA filter.
e. Be sure that all clips are in place.
7. Installing the HEPA Filter Cartridge
a. With the filters changed or inspected, all 3 filters
are ready to be placed back into the unit. Place
the HEPA cartridge gently into the unit (if a carbon
canister is being used, take care not to let it slide
out as it is heavy and could damage the unit)
b. When the HEPA cartridge is in place, place the filter
cap onto the HEPA cartridge and replace the filter
retaining rod by sliding it into it’s two clips. (some
force may be necessary as it is a tight fit to ensure
complete seal)
c. Replace the HEPA filter access panel.
d. Re-install safety screw(s) into HEPA filter access panel.
e. Plug the unit back into a power outflow and turn it
on.
14
Dealer Motor Assembly Replacement Instructions
!
WARNING
Electrical Shock Hazard.
Can cause injury or death.
Disconnect all electrical power supplies
before servicing.
Do no operate equipment without
access panels in place
Do not use this fan with any solid-state
speed control device
!
CAUTION
Risk of Sharp Edges Hazard.
Equipment sharp edges can cause injuries.
Avoid grasping equipment edges without protective
gloves.
3. Installing the new motor assembly
a. Slide the new motor into the motor mount making
sure that the wires go through the smaller hole offset from the center of the bracket.
b. Secure the new motor to the motor mount with the
four screws removed in step 2c.
d. Connect the wires as follows:
- Blue wire from motor to the on/off switch.
- Yellow/green wire from motor to the ground post.
- Brown wire from the motor to a capacitor post.
- Black wire from the motor to the other capacitor post.
- White wire from the on/off switch to the capacitor
via the black wire piggyback post.
- White wire from the power cord to the capacitor
via the other white wire’s piggyback post.
4. Closing the unit
a. Replace the motor section access panel and
secure it with the screws removed in step 1b.
b. Plug the unit into it’s electrical source and turn it on.
1. Accessing the motor assembly
a. Turn the unit off and unplug it from any electrical
source before opening the cabinet.
b. Remove the safety screw(s) from the motor section
access panel.
c. Lift the door up by the finger tabs and pull out to
remove it from the unit.
2. Removing the old motor assembly
a. Disconnect all four motor wires from switch, ground
post and capacitor.
b. Disconnect the two white wires from the capacitor.
c. Separate the motor from the motor mount by
removing the four screws found in figure 19.
d. Slide the motor out from under the motor mount to
remove it from the unit.
Figure 16.
15
Electrical Diagram (AWW-350 & AWW-675)
Figure 17.
Electrical Diagram (AWW-350 & AWW-675 with on/off toggle switch)
Figure 18.
16
Electrical Diagram (8500 & 10,000)
Figure 19.
17
Replacement Parts
Replacement Parts for AWW-350 & AWW-675 (Qty.)
Standard Annual Filter Kit (1 Pre-filter, 2 Carbon)
Plus Annual Filter Kit (1 Pre-filter, 1 VOC Canister)
HEPA, Easy Twist Filter
Motor Assembly - AWW-350 (120V)
Motor Assembly - AWW-350 (220V)
Motor Assembly - AWW-675 (120V)
Motor Assembly - AWW-675 (220V)
Canadian
94004061
94004181
90004437
99001200
99002800
99002400
99003000
U.S.
94014061
94014181
90014437
99011200
99012800
99012400
99013000
International
94014061
94014181
90014437
99011200
99012800
99012400
99013000
Replacement Parts for 8500 & 10,000 (Qty.)
Standard Annual Filter Kit (9 Pre-filters, 6 Carbon)
Plus Annual Filter Kit (9 Pre-filters, 3 VOC Canisters)
HEPA, Moulded Filter (1)
Motor Assembly - 8500 (120V) (1)
Motor Assembly - 8500 (220V) (1)
Motor Assembly - 10,000 (120V) (1)
Motor Assembly - 10,000 (220V) (1)
Canadian
94006221
94006231
90006406
99002600
99003200
99002700
99003300
U.S.
94016221
94016231
90016406
99012600
99013200
99012700
99013300
International
94016221
94016231
90016406
99012600
99013200
99012700
99013300
Use this unit only in the manner intended by the manufacturer. If you have questions, contact Amaircare.
Contact your local Amaircare dealer to order replacement parts.
For the Amaircare dealer near you, dial 1-800-268-7732 or visit us at www.amaircare.com
18
APPENDIX C
DAMPER INFORMATION
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APPENDIX D
INSTRUMENTATION MANUALS
DWYER ANEMEOMETER INFORMATION
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Bulletin TE-471B
Model 471B Digital Thermo Anemometer
®
Specifications - Installation and Operating Instructions
11/32
[8.74]
29/32
[23.00]
PS/2 INPUT
SLIDING
COVER
PS/2 CONNECTOR
16-11/64
[410.61]
2-13/16
[71.59]
6-11/64
[156.92]
6-9/64
[155.82]
PROBE CABLE
APPROX. 2´ LG COILED
APPROX. 6´ LG EXTENDED
6-31/32
[177.13]
1-5/32
[29.36]
The MODEL 471B Digital Thermo Anemometers are versatile dual function
instruments that quickly and easily measure air velocity or volumetric flow plus air
temperature in imperial or metric units. High contrast LCD display shows both selected
readings simultaneously. Convenient backlight provides perfect visibility in low light
conditions. Light automatically shuts off after 2-1/2 minutes to prolong battery life.
Low battery warning is included. Stainless steel probe with comfortable hand grip
is etched with insertion depth marks from 0 to 8 inches and 0 to 20 cm. Extruded
aluminum housing fully protects electronics, yet is lightweight and comfortable to hold
even when taking multiple readings as part of duct traverses. Up to 99 readings may
be stored for later retrieval. An integral sliding cover protects sensors when not in use.
Items included with the 471B are 9 volt alkaline battery, sensing probe, wrist strap and
custom carrying case.
Battery Installation
The unit is shipped with a separate 9 volt alkaline battery which must be installed
before operation. Remove the two screws holding the bottom endcap in place and
remove it. Connect the battery to the enclosed battery clip, observing correct polarity.
Be careful not to trap the wires between the case or foam pad which retains the battery.
This could make it difficult to install the battery or remove it later for replacement.
Be sure the rubber gasket is properly seated in the gasket channel and replace the
endcap. Note that the endcap will only fit one way because the holes are slightly offcenter. Place the “Z” shaped wrist strap clip in one of the screw recesses and replace
the screws. Do not overtighten. Attach the wrist strap to the clip.
When battery replacement becomes necessary, use only 9 volt alkaline type batteries
such as a Duracell® MN1604, or Eveready® 522 or equivalent. Zinc-carbon types,
often labeled Heavy-Duty, are not recommended because of their shorter life and an
increased potential for leakage. Alkaline batteries are a better value because they last
typically up to three times longer in this device.
Low Battery Indicator
A weak battery may cause improper operation or inaccurate measurements. A low
battery indicator (
) is provided on the display to show when the battery needs to
be replaced. Although the unit may appear to function and read properly, the accuracy
of the readings cannot be guaranteed when the (
) indicator is empty of power
segments. Replace the battery with a fresh one. Do not leave an exhausted battery in
the unit due to potential battery leakage.
NOTICE
The side of the probe with dot should face the flow.
SPECIFICATIONS
Service: Air velocity and temperature of clean, dry air.
Temperature Limits: Process Air Velocity: -20 to 212°F (-29 to 100°C); Process
Temperature: -40 to 212°F (-40 to 100°C); Ambient: 5 to 125°F (-15 to 51°C).
Display: 4.5 digit LCD.
Resolution: 0.1%, 0.1°F/°C.
Range Air Velocity: 0 to 6000 FPM (0 to 30 m/s).
Accuracy Air Velocity: ±3% FS within temperature range of 40 to 90°F (4 to 32°C).
Range Volumetric Air Flow: 19,999 in selected flow units.
Range Temperature: -40 to 212°F (-40 to 100°C).
Accuracy Temperature: ±0.5°F (±0.28°C) from 32 to 122°F (0 to 50 °C); ±1.5°F
(±0.83°C) from -40°F to 32°F (-40 to 0°C) & 122 to 212°F (50 to 100°C).
Probe Length: 8˝ (203 mm) insertion.
Cable Length: 28˝ (71 cm) retracted, 6 ft (183 cm) extended.
Power Requirements: 9V alkaline battery included.
Weight: 16 oz (454 g).
Agency Approvals: CE.
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
ON/OFF/LIGHT
A single press turns unit on, and a second press turns unit off. While unit is on, hold for
2 seconds to turn on the backlight. If the light is active, press once to turn the light off
and another to turn the unit off.
HOLD
A single press freezes the current reading and a second press resumes live process
reading.
MENU
A single press will display the menu. Hit MENU while in the main menu to go back to
the home screen or while in the sub-menus to back up one level.
ENTER
When in the home screen, press to cycle through displayed values. While in the menu,
press to enter sub-menus or values. Press and hold for 4 seconds to clear MAX, MIN,
or MEM in their respective menus.
MEMORY/UP
A singles press will retrieve stored data points in the memory. Each successive press
will scroll to the next saved memory location ST01, ST02, etc. While in the menu, it
becomes the UP button.
STORE/DOWN
A single press will store the current reading on the screen. ST01, ST02, etc. shows in
the display to indicate the memory location where the reading was saved. While in the
menu, it becomes the DOWN button.
Duracell® is a registered trademark of The Gillette Company
Eveready® is a registered trademark of Eveready Battery Company, Inc.
DWYER INSTRUMENTS, INC.
P.O. BOX 373 • MICHIGAN CITY, INDIANA 46360, U.S.A.
Phone: 219/879-8000
www.dwyer-inst.com
Fax: 219/872-9057
e-mail: info@dwyermail.com
HOLD
Engineering Units
HOLD will appear on the home screen when the HOLD button is pressed, indicating
the process reading has been frozen.
Press ENTER to see current engineering units. Press MEMORY/UP or STORE/
DOWN to select another unit.
Area
Memory Storage and Retrieval
From the home screen, push MEMORY/UP to view all previously stored values. Cycle
up or down through the stored data with the MEMORY/UP or STORE/DOWN buttons.
From the home screen, press STORE/DOWN to store data points to memory. For both
data storage and data memory retrieval, press MENU to return to the home screen.
MENUS
Maximum
Press ENTER to view the current duct shape setting. rEC for rectangular or CIrCL
for circular will appear. To alter between the two, push the MEMORY/UP button or
STORE/DOWN buttons. If a circle duct shape is selected, press ENTER to see DIAM
the diameter value. If rectangle is chosen, ENTER will allow adjustment of the XdIM
and YdIM of the duct. A numeral position will blink indicating it can be adjusted with the
MEMORY/UPor STORE/DOWN buttons. Hit ENTER to store a value.
Note: In metric mode dimensions will be displayed in mm. Inches will be the value
when using imperial units.
Power Management
Push ENTER to see the maximum recorded reading. When viewing the maximum
recorded reading, hold ENTER for 4 seconds to clear. Press MEMORY/UP or STORE/
DOWN to cycle through parameters.
Pu­­­sh ENTER to see current time off setting. Select 30 or 10 values indicating minutes
for power to automatically shut-off. By selecting 0, the auto shut-off is disengaged and
the unit will only turn off manually by the ON/OFF/LIGHT button.
Minimum
Factory Restore
Push ENTER to see the minimum recorded reading. When viewing the minimum
recorded reading, hold ENTER for 4 seconds to clear. Press MEMORY/UP or STORE/
DOWN to cycle through parameters.
This function allows the user to restore the unit to factory settings. Press ENTER to
view the restore function. CLr will be shown on the display. Press and hold ENTER
for 4 seconds until CLrd is displayed. The unit will then be restored to factory defaults.
Average
MAINTENANCE/REPAIR
Upon final installation of the Model 471B, no routine maintenance is required. The
Model 471B is not field serviceable and should be returned if repair is needed. Field
repair should not be attempted and may void warranty.
Press ENTER to view the AVG function. This function will adjust the process reading
on the home screen to report the average reading over the period of selected time.
Press MEMORY/UP or STORE/DOWN to select between 0, 30, or 60 second values.
Push ENTER to store the desired value.
WARRANTY/RETURN
Refer to “Terms and Conditions of Sales” in our catalog and on our website. Contact
customer service to receive a Return Goods Authorization number before shipping the
product back for repair. Be sure to include a brief description of the problem plus any
additional application notes.
Memory
This product uses FreeRTOS (www.FreeRTOS.org) version 7.0.1. A copy of the original Free RTOS
source shall be provided upon request.
Press ENTER to see CLr. Hold ENTER for 4 seconds to clear all stored memory
locations.
©Copyright 2015 Dwyer Instruments, Inc.
DWYER INSTRUMENTS, INC.
P.O. BOX 373 • MICHIGAN CITY, INDIANA 46360, U.S.A.
Printed in U.S.A. 10/15
FR# 443916-00 Rev. 5
Phone: 219/879-8000
www.dwyer-inst.com
Fax: 219/872-9057
e-mail: info@dwyermail.com
APPENDIX E
INSTRUMENTATION MANUALS
PHOTOIONIZATION DETECTOR (PID) MANUAL
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ppbRAE 3000
User’s Guide
Rev. E
February 2016
P/N 059-4021-000
FCC Information
Contains FCC ID: PI4411B or SU3RM900
The enclosed device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules.
Operation is subject to the following conditions: (1) This device may
not cause harmful interference, and (2) This device must accept any
interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
Wireless Approval For UAE In Middle East
TRA REGISTERED No: ER36153/14 or ER36153/15
DEALER No.: HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL MIDDLE EAST
– LTD – DUBAI BR
Wireless Approval For QATAR In Middle East
ictQATAR
Type Approval Reg. No.: R-4466 or R-4635
© Copyright 2016 RAE Systems by Honeywell
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Contents
Read Before Operating ..................................................................... 5
Special Notes .................................................................................... 6
Warnings .......................................................................................... 7
Standard Contents............................................................................. 9
General Information ......................................................................... 9
Physical Description ....................................................................... 11
Specifications ................................................................................. 11
Charging The Battery ..................................................................... 15
Charging A Spare Rechargeable Battery ................................. 16
Low Voltage Warning ............................................................. 17
Clock Battery ........................................................................... 17
Data Protection While Power Is Off ........................................ 17
User Interface ................................................................................. 18
Display ........................................................................................... 20
Operating The Instrument .............................................................. 21
Turning The Instrument On ..................................................... 21
Turning The Instrument Off .................................................... 22
Operating The Built-In Flashlight ............................................ 22
Pump Status ............................................................................. 22
Calibration Status ..................................................................... 23
Bump Status ............................................................................. 23
Policy Enforcement ........................................................................ 24
Operating Modes ............................................................................ 28
Basic User Level/Hygiene Mode (Default Settings) ...................... 29
Alarm Signals ................................................................................. 31
Alarm Signal Summary ........................................................... 32
Preset Alarm Limits & Calibration .......................................... 33
Testing The Alarm ................................................................... 33
Integrated Sampling Pump ............................................................. 33
Backlight ........................................................................................ 34
Datalogging .................................................................................... 34
Datalogging event .................................................................... 34
Datalogging sample ................................................................. 34
Auto/Manual/Snapshot Datalogging ........................................ 35
Standard Kit & Accessories ........................................................... 36
AC Adapter .............................................................................. 36
1
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Alkaline Battery Adapter ......................................................... 36
External Filter .......................................................................... 36
Optional Accessories ...................................................................... 39
Standard Two-Point Calibration (Zero & Span) ............................ 40
Entering Calibration ................................................................. 40
Zero (Fresh Air) Calibration .................................................... 42
Span Calibration ...................................................................... 44
Exiting Two-Point Calibration In Basic User Level ................ 46
Three-Point Calibration .................................................................. 47
Span 2 Calibration ................................................................... 48
Exiting Three-Point Calibration............................................... 51
Bump Test ...................................................................................... 48
Programming Mode ........................................................................ 51
Entering Programming Mode .................................................. 53
Programming Mode Menus ............................................................ 54
Calibration ............................................................................... 58
Zero Calibration .................................................................... 58
Span Calibration ................................................................... 58
Measurement ............................................................................ 59
Meas. Gas.............................................................................. 59
Meas. Unit............................................................................. 60
Alarm Setting ........................................................................... 61
High Alarm ........................................................................... 62
Low Alarm ............................................................................ 62
STEL Alarm.......................................................................... 63
TWA Alarm .......................................................................... 64
Alarm Type ........................................................................... 65
Buzzer & Light ..................................................................... 66
Datalog ..................................................................................... 66
Clear Datalog ........................................................................ 67
Interval .................................................................................. 67
Data Selection ....................................................................... 68
Datalog Type......................................................................... 69
Manual Datalog..................................................................... 63
Snapshot Datalog .................................................................. 65
Monitor Setup .......................................................................... 71
Op Mode ............................................................................... 71
Site ID ...................................................................................... 71
User ID ..................................................................................... 73
2
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
User Mode................................................................................ 74
Basic...................................................................................... 74
Advanced. ............................................................................. 74
Date .......................................................................................... 75
Time ......................................................................................... 75
Duty Cycle ............................................................................... 76
Temperature Unit ..................................................................... 77
Pump Speed ............................................................................. 77
Language .................................................................................. 78
Radio Power............................................................................. 78
Real Time Protocol .................................................................. 79
Power On Zero ......................................................................... 79
Unit ID ..................................................................................... 80
LCD Contrast ........................................................................... 80
Lamp ID ................................................................................... 78
PAN ID .................................................................................... 78
Mesh Channel .......................................................................... 78
Mesh Interval ........................................................................... 78
Hygiene Mode ................................................................................ 81
Basic User Level & Hygiene Mode................................................ 79
Entering Search Mode From Hygiene Mode.................................. 80
Advanced User Level (Search & Hygiene Mode) .......................... 83
Advanced User Level & Hygiene Mode ........................................ 87
Basic User Level & Search Mode .................................................. 88
Advanced User Level & Search Mode ........................................... 89
Diagnostic Mode ............................................................................ 85
Entering Diagnostic Mode......................................................... 92
Adjusting The Pump Stall Threshold ........................................ 93
Pump High ................................................................................. 93
Pump Low ................................................................................. 93
Exiting Diagnostic Mode........................................................... 93
Transferring Data To & From A Computer ................................... 95
Downloading The Datalog To A PC ......................................... 95
Uploading Firmware To The instrument From A PC................ 96
Maintenance ................................................................................... 97
Battery Charging & Replacement ............................................. 97
Replacing The Li-ion Battery ................................................. 98
Replacing The Alkaline Battery Adapter ............................... 98
PID Sensor & Lamp Cleaning/Replacement ........................... 100
3
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Sensor Components .............................................................. 100
Cleaning The PID Sensor ..................................................... 101
Cleaning The Lamp Housing Or Changing The Lamp ........ 101
Determining The Lamp Type ............................................... 102
Sampling Pump .................................................................... 102
Cleaning The Instrument ...................................................... 103
Ordering Replacement Parts ................................................. 103
Special Servicing Note ............................................................ 104
Troubleshooting............................................................................ 105
Technical Support......................................................................... 106
RAE Systems Contacts................................................................. 107
Controlled Part Of Manual ........................................................... 103
4
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Read Before Operating
This manual must be carefully read by all individuals who have or
will have the responsibility of using, maintaining, or servicing this
product. The product will perform as designed only if it is used,
maintained, and serviced in accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions. The user should understand how to set the correct
parameters and interpret the obtained results.
CAUTION!
To reduce the risk of electric shock, turn the power off before
removing the instrument cover. Disconnect the battery before
removing sensor module for service. Never operate the instrument
when the cover is removed. Remove instrument cover and sensor
module only in an area known to be non-hazardous.
5
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Special Notes
When the instrument is taken out of the transport case and
turned on for the first time, there may be some residual organic
or inorganic vapor trapped inside the detector chamber. The
initial PID sensor reading may indicate a few ppm. Enter an
area known to be free of any organic vapor and turn on the
instrument. After running for several minutes, the residual
vapor in the detector chamber will be cleared and the reading
should return to zero.
The battery of the instrument discharges slowly even if it is
turned off. If the instrument has not been charged for 5 to 7
days, the battery voltage will be low. Therefore, it is a good
practice to always charge the instrument before using it. It is
also recommended to fully charge the instrument for at least
10 hours before first use. Refer to this User Guide’s section on
battery charging for more information on battery charging and
replacement.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
WARNINGS
STATIC HAZARD: Clean only with damp cloth.
For safety reasons, this equipment must be operated and
serviced by qualified personnel only. Read and understand
instruction manual completely before operating or servicing.
Use only RAE Systems battery packs, part numbers 059-3051-000,
059-3052-000, and 059-3054-000. This instrument has not been
tested in an explosive gas/air atmosphere having an oxygen
concentration greater than 21%. Substitution of components may
impair intrinsic safety. Recharge batteries only in non-hazardous
locations.
Do not mix old and new batteries or batteries from different
manufacturers.
The calibration of all newly purchased RAE Systems instruments
should be tested by exposing the sensor(s) to known concentration
calibration gas before the instrument is put into service.
For maximum safety, the accuracy of the instrument should be
checked by exposing it to a known concentration calibration gas
before each day’s use.
Do not use USB/PC communication in hazardous locations.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
AVERTISSEMENT
DANGER RISQUE D'ORIGINE ELECTROSTATIQUE:
Nettoyer uniquement avec un chiffon humide.
Pour des raisons de sécurité, cet équipment doit être utilisé, entretenu
et réparé uniquement par un personnel qualifié. Étudier le manuel
d’instructions en entier avant d’utiliser, d’entretenir ou de réparer
l’équipement.
Utiliser seulement l'ensemble de batterie RAE Systems, la reference
059-3051-000 au 059-3052-000 au 059-3054-000. Cet instrument n’a
pas été essayé dans une atmosphère de gaz/air explosive ayant une
concentration d’oxygène plus élevée que 21%. La substitution de
composants peut compromettre la sécurité intrinsique. Ne charger les
batteries que dans emplacements désignés non-dangereuse.
Ne pas melanger les anciennes et les nouvelles batteries, ou bien
encore les batteries de differents fabriquants.
La calibration de toute instruments de RAE Systems doivent être testé
en exposant l’instrument a une concentration de gaz connue par une
procédure diétalonnage avant de mettre en service l’instrument pour
la première fois.
Pour une securite maximale, la sensibilité du l’instrument doit être
verifier en exposant l’instrument a une concentration de gaz connue
par une procédure diétalonnage avant chaque utilisation journalière.
Ne pas utiliser de connection USB/PC en zone dangereuse.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Standard Contents
Instrument
Calibration Kit
Charging Cradle
AC/DC Adapter
Alkaline Battery Adapter
Data Cable
CD-ROM With User’s Guide, Quick Start Guide, and related materials
General Information
The compact instrument is designed as a broadband VOC gas monitor
and datalogger for work in hazardous environments. It monitors
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) using a photoionization detector
(PID) with a 9.8 eV or 10.6 eV gas-discharge lamp. Features are:
Lightweight and Compact
 Compact, lightweight, rugged design
 Built-in sample draw pump
Dependable and Accurate
 Up to 16 hours of continuous monitoring with rechargeable
battery pack
 Designed to continuously monitor VOC vapor at parts-perbillion (ppb) levels
User-friendly
 Preset alarm thresholds for STEL, TWA, low- and high-level
peak values.
 Audio buzzer and flashing LED display are activated when the
limits are exceeded.
Datalogging Capabilities
 260,000-point datalogging storage capacity for data download to PC
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
The instrument consists of a PID with associated microcomputer and
electronic circuit. The unit is housed in a rugged case with a backlit
LCD and 3 keys to provide easy user interface. It also has a built-in
flashlight for operational ease in dark locations.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Physical Description
The main components of the portable VOC monitoring
instrument include:

Three keys for user to interact with the instrument: 3
operation/programming keys for normal operation or
programming

LCD display with back light for direct readout and calculated
measurements

Built-in flashlight for illuminating testing points in dark
environments

Buzzer and red LEDs for alarm signaling whenever exposures
exceed preset limits

Charge contacts for plugging directly to its charging station

Gas entry and exit ports

USB communication port for PC interface

Protective rubber cover
Specifications
Size:
9.25" L x 3.6" W x 2.9" H
Weight:
28 oz with battery pack
Detector:
Photoionization sensor with 9.8eV or
10.6eV UV lamp
Battery:
A 3.7V rechargeable Lithium-Ion battery
pack (snap in, field replaceable, at nonhazardous location only)
Alkaline battery holder (for 4 AA batteries)
Battery Charging:
Less than 8 hours to full charge
Operating Hours:
Up to 16 hours continuous operation
Display:
Large dot matrix screen with backlight
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Measurement range & resolution
Lamp
Range
Resolution
10.6 eV
1 ppb to 10,000 ppm
1 ppb
9.8 eV
0.01 ppm to 5,000 ppm
10 ppb
Response time (T90):
2 seconds
Accuracy
(Isobutylene):
PID Detector:
10 to 2000 ppm: 3% at calibration point.
Correction Factors:
Over 200 VOC gases built in (based on RAE
Systems Technical Note TN-106)
Calibration:
Two-point field calibration of zero and
standard reference gases
Store up to 8 sets of calibration data, alarm
limits and span values
Flexible 5" tubing
Calibration Reference:
Inlet Probe:
Easy access to lamp and sensor for cleaning
and replacement
Radio module:
Bluetooth (2.4GHz) or RF module (433MHz,
868MHz , 915MHz, or 2.4GHz)
Keypad:
1 operation key and 2 programming keys; 1
flashlight switch
Direct Readout:
Instantaneous, average, STEL, TWA and
peak value, and battery voltage
Intrinsic Safety:
US and Canada: Class I, Division 1, Groups
A, B, C, D
Europe: ATEX (0575 Ex II 2G Ex ia
IIC/IIB T4 Gb)
KEMA 07 ATEX 0127
Complies with EN60079-0:2009,
EN60079-11:2007
IECEx CSA 10.0005 Ex ia IIC/IIB T4 Gb
Complies with IEC 60079-0:2007,
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
IEC 60079-11:2006
(IIC: 059-3051-000 Li-ion bat pack
or 059-3054-000 NiMH bat pack;
IIB: 059-3052-000 alkaline bat pack)
EM Interference:
Highly resistant to EMI/RFI. Compliant with
EMC R&TTE (RF Modules)
Alarm Setting:
Separate alarm limit settings for Low, High,
STEL and TWA alarm
Operating Mode:
Alarm:
Hygiene or Search mode
Buzzer (95dB at 30cm) and flashing red
LEDs to indicate exceeded preset limits, low
battery voltage, or sensor failure
Alarm Type:
Latching or automatic reset
Real-time Clock:
Automatic date and time stamps on
datalogged information
Datalogging:
260,000 points with time stamp, serial
number, user ID, site ID, etc.
Communication:
Upload data to PC and download instrument
setup from PC via USB on charging station.
Wireless Network:
Mesh RAE Systems Dedicated Wireless
Network (or WiFi network for WiFiequipped instruments)
Sampling Pump:
Internally integrated. Flow rate: 450 to 550
cc/min.
Wireless Frequency:
ISM license-free band, 902 to 907.5 MHz
and 915 to 928 MHz, FCC Part 15, CE
R&TTE,
IEEE 802.11 b/g bands (2.4 GHz)
Modulation:
802.15.4 DSSS BPSK
RF Power (Tx):
Temperature:
10dBm
-20º C to 50º C (-4º to 122º F)
Humidity:
0% to 95% relative humidity (noncondensing)
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Housing (including
Polycarbonate, splashproof and dustproof
rubber boot):
Battery can be changed without removing
rubber boot.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Charging The Battery
Always fully charge the battery before using the instrument. The
instrument’s Li-ion battery is charged by placing the instrument in its
cradle. (The battery can also be charged by placing the instrument in
an AutoRAE 2 Cradle.) Contacts on the bottom of the instrument
meet the cradle’s contacts, transferring power without other
connections.
Note: Before setting the instrument into its charging cradle, visually
inspect the contacts to make sure they are clean. If they are not, wipe
them with a soft cloth. Do not use solvents or cleaners.
Follow this procedure to charge the instrument:
1. Plug the AC/DC adapter’s barrel connector into the
instrument’s cradle.
2. Plug the AC/DC adapter into the wall outlet.
3. Place the instrument into the cradle, press down, and lean it
back. It locks in place and the LED in the cradle glow
The instrument begins charging automatically. The “Primary” LED in
the cradle blinks green to indicate charging. During charging, the
diagonal lines in the battery icon on the instrument’s display are
animated and you see the message “Charging...”
When the instrument’s battery is fully charged, the battery icon
is no longer animated and shows a full battery. The message
“Fully charged!” is shown. The cradle’s LED glows
continuously green.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Note: If you see the “Battery Charging Error” icon (a battery outline
with an exclamation mark inside), check that the instrument or
rechargeable battery has been set into the cradle properly. If you still
receive the message, check the Troubleshooting section of this guide.
Note: If the instrument or battery has been in the cradle for more than
10 hours and you see the “Battery Charging Error” icon and a
message that says, “Charging Too Long,” this indicates that the
battery is not reaching a full charge. Try changing the battery and
make sure the contacts between the instrument (or battery) are
meeting the cradle. If the message is still shown, consult your
distributor or RAE Systems Technical Services.
Charging A Spare Rechargeable Battery
A rechargeable Li-ion battery can be charged when it is not inside the
monitor. The charging cradle is designed to accommodate both types
of charging. Contacts on the bottom of the battery meet the contacts
on the cradle, transferring power without other connections, and a
spring-loaded capture holds the battery in place during charging.
1. Plug the AC/DC adapter into the monitor’s cradle.
2. Place the battery into the cradle, with the gold-plated contacts
on top of the six matching charging pins.
3. Plug the AC/DC adapter into the wall outlet.
The battery begins charging automatically. During charging, the
Secondary LED in the cradle blinks green. When charging is
complete, it glows steady green.
Release the battery from the cradle by pulling it back toward the rear
of the cradle and tilting it out of its slot.
Note: If you need to replace the Li-ion battery pack, replacements are
available from RAE Systems. The part number is 059-3051-000.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Note: An Alkaline Battery Adapter (part number 059-3052-000), which
uses four AA alkaline batteries (Duracell MN1500), may be substituted for
the Li-Ion battery.
WARNING!
To reduce the risk of ignition of hazardous atmospheres, recharge
and replace batteries only in areas known to be non-hazardous.
Remove and replace batteries only in areas known to be nonhazardous.
Low Voltage Warning
When the battery’s charge falls below a preset voltage, the
instrument warns you by beeping once and flashing once every
minute, and the “empty battery” icon blinks on and off once
per second. You should turn off the instrument within 10
minutes and either recharge the battery by placing the
instrument in its cradle, or replace the battery with a fresh one
with a full charge.
Clock Battery
An internal clock battery is mounted on one of the instrument’s
printed circuit boards. This long-life battery keeps settings in memory
from being lost whenever the Li-ion battery or alkaline batteries are
removed. This backup battery should last approximately five years,
and must be replaced by an authorized RAE Systems service
technician. It is not user-replaceable.
Data Protection While Power Is Off
When the instrument is turned off, all the current real-time data
including last measured values are erased. However, the datalog data
is preserved in non-volatile memory. Even if the battery is
disconnected, the datalog data will not be lost.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
User Interface
The instrument’s user interface consists of the display, LEDs, an
alarm transducer, and four keys. The keys are:
Y/+
MODE
N/Flashlight on/off
The LCD display provides visual feedback that includes the reading,
time, battery condition, and other functions.
LEDs and flashlight
Display
Y/+ key
N/- key
MODE key
Flashlight
on/off key
In addition to their labeled functions, the keys labeled Y/+, MODE,
and N/- act as “soft keys” that control different parameters and make
different selections within the instrument’s menus. From menu to
menu, each key controls a different parameter or makes a different
selection.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Three panes along the bottom of the display are “mapped” to the
keys. These change as menus change, but at all times the left pane
corresponds to the [Y/+] key, the center pane corresponds to the
[MODE] key, and the right pane corresponds to the [N/-] key. Here
are three examples of different menus with the relationships of the
keys clearly shown:
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Display
The display shows the following information:
Gas info
Tells the Correction Factor and type of
calibration gas
Reading
Concentration of gas as measured by the
instrument
Calibration needed
Indicates that calibration should be
performed
Calibration (or bump) Dark icon indicates that calibration should be
needed
performed; light icon indicates bump should
be performed
Radio power
Indicates whether radio (Mesh wireless or
Bluetooth) connection is on or off
Radio signal
Indicates signal strength in 5-bar bargraph
Battery
Indicates battery level in 3 bars
Pump
Indicates that pump is working
Datalog
Indicates whether datalog is on or off
Y/+
Y/+ key’s function for this screen
MODE
MODE key’s function for this screen
N/N/- key’s function for this screen
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Operating The Instrument
The instrument is designed as a broadband VOC gas monitor and
datalogger for work in hazardous environments. It gives real-time
measurements and activates alarm signals whenever the exposure
exceeds preset limits. Prior to factory shipment, the instrument is
preset with default alarm limits and the sensor is pre-calibrated with
standard calibration gas. However, you should test the instrument and
verify the calibration before the first use. After the instrument is fully
charged and calibrated, it is ready for immediate operation.
Turning The Instrument On
1. With the instrument turned off, press and hold [MODE].
2. When the display turns on, release the [MODE] key.
The RAE Systems logo should appear first. (If the logo does not
appear, there is likely a problem and you should contact your
distributor or RAE Systems Technical Support.) The instrument is
now operating and performs self tests. If any tests (including sensor
and memory tests fail), refer to the Troubleshooting section of this
guide.
Once the startup procedure is complete, the instrument shows a
numerical reading screen with icons. This indicates that the
instrument is fully functional and ready to use.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Turning The Instrument Off
1. Press and hold the Mode key for 3 seconds. A 5-second
countdown to shutoff begins.
2. Once the countdown stops, the instrument is off. Release the
Mode key.
3. When you see “Unit off...” release your finger from the
[MODE] key. The instrument is now off.
Note: You must hold your finger on the key for the entire shutoff
process. If you remove your finger from the key during the
countdown, the shutoff operation is canceled and the instrument
continues normal operation.
Operating The Built-In Flashlight
The instrument has a built-in flashlight that helps you point the probe
in dark places. Press the flashlight key to turn it on. Press it again to
turn it off.
Note: Using the flashlight for extended periods shortens the battery’s
operating time before it needs recharging.
Pump Status
IMPORTANT!
During operation, make sure the probe inlet and the gas outlet are free
of obstructions. Obstructions can cause premature wear on the pump,
false readings, or pump stalling. During normal operation, the pump
icon alternately shows inflow and outflow as shown here:
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
During duty cycling (PID lamp cleaning), the display shows these
icons in alternation:
If there is a pump failure or obstruction that disrupts the pump, you
will see this icon blinking on and off:
If you see this blinking icon, consult the Troubleshooting section of
this guide.
Calibration Status
The instrument displays this icon if it requires calibration:
Calibration is required (and indicated by this icon) if:




The lamp type has been changed (for example, from 10.6 eV
to 9.8 eV).
The sensor has been replaced.
It has been 30 days or more since the instrument was last
calibrated.
If you have changed the calibration gas type without
recalibrating the instrument.
Bump Status
The instrument displays this icon if it requires a bump test:
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
A bump test is required (and indicated by this icon) if:



The defined period of time between bump tests has been
exceeded (bump test overdue).
The sensor has failed a previous bump test.
The sensor(s) should be challenged on a periodic basis.
Policy Enforcement
The ppbRAE 3000 can be configured to enforce a facility/company’s
requirements that calibration and/or bump testing be performed at
specified intervals, and to explicitly prompt the user that
calibration/bump testing is required. Depending on how Policy
Enforcement features are configured, the user may be required to
perform a bump test or calibration prior to being able to use the
instrument. That is, it can be set to not allow normal operation of the
instrument unless calibration or bump testing is performed.
If the instrument has been bump tested and calibrated in compliance
with the policy settings, a check-mark icon is included along the top
of the ppbRAE screen:
If Policy Enforcement is enabled, then after startup the ppbRAE
displays a screen that informs the user that the instrument requires
either a bump test or a calibration. If both are required, then they are
shown in sequence.
Note: Policy enforcement features are disabled by default.
Setting Policy Enforcement
You must use ProRAE Studio II to make changes to Policy
Enforcement settings. You must use an AutoRAE 2 Cradle, a
ppbRAE 3000 Travel Charger, or a ppbRAE 3000 Desktop Cradle.
Policy violations are captured in the datalog.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Using The Travel Charger, Desktop Charger, or
AutoRAE 2 Automatic Test And Calibration System
To program a ppbRAE 3000 via an AutoRAE 2, you need ProRAE
Studio II Instrument Configuration and Data Management Software,
the AutoRAE 2 connected to a power source, and a USB PC
communications cable.
1. Connect a USB cable between a PC with ProRAE Studio II and
the AutoRAE 2 Cradle, Travel Charger, or Desktop Cradle.
2. Apply power to the AutoRAE 2 Cradle, Travel Charger, or
Desktop Cradle.
3. Turn off the ppbRAE 3000 (or put the ppbRAE 3000 into
AutoRAE 2 Mode or Communication Mode) and set it in the
cradle.
4. Start ProRAE Studio II software on the PC.
5. Select “Administrator” and input the password (the default is
“rae”).
6. Click “Detect the instruments automatically” (the magnifying
glass icon with the letter “A” in it). After a few seconds, the
AutoRAE 2 Cradle is found and it is shown, along with its serial
number.
7. Click on the icon to highlight it, and then click “Select.”
8. In ProRAE Studio II, the instrument or AutoRAE 2 Cradle is
shown, including its Serial Number, under “Online.”
9. Expand the view to show the instrument or to show the
instrument in the AutoRAE 2 Cradle by clicking the “+” to the
left of the image of the AutoRAE 2 Cradle.
10. Double-click on the icon representing the PpbRAE 3000.
11. Click “Setup.”
12. In the menu that now appears on the left side, click “Policy
Enforcement.” It is highlighted, and the Policy Enforcement pane
is shown. For “Must Calibrate” and “Must Bump,” you have the
options of no enforcement or enforcement (including “Can’t
Bypass,” and “Can Bypass”).
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Must Calibrate. The user is prompted to calibrate the instrument
when calibration is due (as set by the calibration interval). There are
two programmable options:


Can’t Bypass. Unless calibration is performed, the
instrument cannot be used, and the only option is to turn off
the instrument.
Can Bypass. If calibration is due but the user does not want
to perform a calibration, the instrument can still be used. In
this case, the instrument records that the user has bypassed
the calibration requirement in a Policy Violation report.
Must Bump. The user is prompted to bump test the instrument when
a bump test is due (as set by the bump test interval). There are two
programmable options:


Can’t Bypass. Unless a bump test is performed, the
instrument cannot be used, and the only option is to turn off
the instrument.
Can Bypass. If a bump test is due but the user does not want
to perform one, the instrument can still be used. In this case,
the instrument records that the user has bypassed the bump
testing requirement in a Policy Violation report.
These are the screens that are shown on a ppbRAE 3000 after startup
if “Can Bypass” is selected:
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
If “Can’t Bypass” is selected, the display looks like this, and only
allows the options of performing the test or shutting down:
16. Once you have made your selections in ProRAE Studio II, you
must upload the changes to the instrument. Click the icon labeled
“Upload all settings to the instrument.”
17. A confirmation screen is shown. Click “Yes” to perform the
upload, or “No” to abort.
Uploading takes a few seconds, and a progress bar is shown. You
can abort the upload by clicking “Cancel.”
18. Exit ProRAE Studio II.
19. Press [Y/+] on the ppbRAE 3000 to exit Communication Mode.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Operating Modes
Your instrument operates in different modes, depending on the model
and its factory default settings. In some cases, you can change modes
using a password and using the instrument’s navigation. In other
cases, you must use ProRAE Studio software.
The default setting for your instrument is:
User Level: Basic
Operation Mode: Hygiene
This is outlined in detail on page 83.
The other options, covered later in this guide, are:
User Level: Advanced (page 86)
Operation Mode: Hygiene
User Level: Advanced (page 90)
Operation Mode: Search
Using ProRAE Studio allows access to other options. In addition,
Diagnostic Mode (page 92) is available for service technicians.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Basic User Level/Hygiene Mode (Default
Settings)
The instrument is programmed to operate in Basic User Level/Hygiene Mode
as its default. This gives you the most commonly needed features while
requiring the fewest parameter adjustments.
Pressing [N/-] steps you from one screen to the next, and eventually return to
the main display. If you do not press a key within 60 seconds after entering a
display, the instrument reverts to its main display.
Note: While viewing any of these screens, you can shut off your instrument by
pressing [MODE].
29
Note: Dashed line indicates automatic progression.
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
After the instrument is turned on, it runs through the start-up menu.
Then the message “Please apply zero gas…” is displayed.
At this point, you can perform a zero air (fresh air) calibration. If the
ambient air is clean, you can use that. Otherwise, use a cylinder of
zero air. Refer to Zero Calibration on page 42 for a more detailed
description of zero calibration.
Start zero calibration by pressing Start. You see the message
“Zeroing…” followed by a 30-second countdown.
Note: You can press [MODE] to quit, bypassing the zero air
calibration.
When zero calibration is complete, you see the message:
Zeroing is done!
Reading = 0 ppb
The instrument is now sampling and collecting data.
Note: At the Average & Peak, Date & Time & Temperature, Calibration
Gas & Measurement Gas & Correction Factor, and PC Communications
screens, the instrument automatically goes to the main display after 60
seconds if you do not push a key to make a selection.
Alarm Signals
During each measurement period, the gas concentration is compared
with the programmed alarm limits (gas concentration alarm limit
settings). If the concentration exceeds any of the preset limits, the
loud buzzer and red flashing LED are activated immediately to warn
you of the alarm condition.
In addition, the instrument alarms if one of the following conditions
occurs: battery voltage falls below a preset voltage level, failure of
the UV lamp, or pump stall.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Alarm Signal Summary
Message
Condition
Alarm Signal
HIGH
Gas exceeds “High
Alarm” limit
3 beeps/flashes per second*
OVR
Gas exceeds
measurement range
3 beeps/flashes per second*
MAX
Gas exceeds electronics’
maximum range
3 beeps/flashes per second*
LOW
Gas exceeds “Low
Alarm” limit
2 beeps/flashes per second*
TWA
Gas exceeds “TWA”
limit
1 Beep/flash per second*
STEL
Gas exceeds “STEL”
limit
1 Beep/flash per second*
Pump
icon
flashes
Pump failure
3 beeps/flashes per second
Lamp
PID lamp failure
3 beeps/flashes per second
plus “Lamp” message on
display
Battery
icon
flashes
Low battery
1 flash, 1 beep per minute
plus battery icon flashes on
display
CAL
Calibration failed, or
needs calibration
1 beep/flash per second
NEG
Gas reading measures
1 beep/flash per second
less than number stored in
calibration
* Hygiene mode only. In Search mode, the number of beeps per
second (1 to 7) depends upon the concentration of the sampled gas.
Faster rates indicate higher concentrations.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Preset Alarm Limits & Calibration
The instrument is factory calibrated with standard calibration gas, and
is programmed with default alarm limits.
Cal Gas
(Isobutylene)
ppbRAE
3000
Cal
Span
unit
Low
High
TWA
STEL
10
ppm
10
25
10
25
Testing The Alarm
You can test the alarm whenever the main (Reading) display is
shown. Press [Y/+], and the audible and visible alarms are tested.
Integrated Sampling Pump
The instrument includes an integrated sampling pump. This
diaphragm-type pump that provides a 450 to 550 cc per minute flow
rate. Connecting a Teflon or metal tubing with 1/8" inside diameter to
the gas inlet port of the instrument, this pump can pull in air samples
from 100' (30 m) horizontally or vertically.
Note: In Search Mode, the pump turns on when a sample
measurement is started, and turns off when the sample is manually
stopped.
If liquid or other objects are pulled into the inlet port filter, the
instrument detects the obstruction and immediately shuts down the
pump. The alarm is activated and a flashing pump icon is displayed.
You should acknowledge the pump shutoff condition by clearing the
obstruction and pressing the [Y/+] key while in the main reading
display to restart the pump.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Backlight
The LCD display is equipped with an LED backlight to assist in
reading the display under poor lighting conditions.
Datalogging
During datalogging, the instrument displays a disk icon to indicate
that datalogging is enabled. The instrument stores the measured gas
concentration at the end of every sample period (when data logging is
enabled). In addition, the following information is stored: user ID,
site ID, serial number, last calibration date, and alarm limits. All data
are retained (even after the unit is turned off) in non-volatile memory
so that it can be down- loaded at a later time to a PC.
Datalogging event
When Datalogging is enabled, measurement readings are being saved.
These data are stored in “groups” or “events.” A new event is created
and stored each time the instrument is turned on and is set to
automatic datalogging, or a configuration parameter is changed, or
datalogging is interrupted. The maximum time for one event is 24
hours or 28,800 points. If an event exceeds 24 hours, a new event is
automatically created. Information, such as start time, user ID, site
ID, gas name, serial number, last calibration date, and alarm limits are
recorded.
Datalogging sample
After an event is recorded, the unit records a shorter form of the data.
When transferred to a PC running ProRAE Studio, this data is
arranged with a sample number, time, date, gas concentration, and
other related information.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Auto/Manual/Snapshot Datalogging
The instrument has three datalog types:
Auto
Manual
Snapshot
Default mode. Collects datalog information when the
instrument is sampling.
Datalogging occurs only when the instrument’s
datalogging is manually started (see page 69 for
details).
Datalogs only during snapshot (single-event capture,
initiated by pressing [MODE]) sampling. See page 69
for details.
Note: You can only choose one datalog type to be active at a time.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Accessories
The following accessories are included with the instrument:
 An AC Adapter (Battery Charger)
 Alkaline battery adapter
 External Filter
 Organic Vapor Zeroing kit
Hard-case kits also include these accessories:
 Calibration adapter
 Calibration regulator and Flow controller
Standard Kit & Accessories
AC Adapter (Battery Charger)
WARNING
To reduce the risk of ignition of hazardous atmospheres, recharge
battery only in area known to be non-hazardous. Remove and
replace battery only in area known to be non-hazardous.
Ne charger les batteries que dans emplacements designés nondangereuses.
A battery charging circuit is built into the instrument cradle. It only needs a
regular AC to 12 VDC adapter (wall-mount transformer, part number 5000114-000) to charge the instrument.
To charge the battery inside the instrument:
1. Power off the instrument.
2. Connect the AC adapter to the DC jack on the instrument’s cradle.
If the instrument is off, it automatically turns on.
3. While charging, the display message shows “Charging.” The
Primary LED on the cradle flashes green when charging.
4. When the battery is fully charged, the LED changes to glowing
green continuously, and the message “Fully charged” appears on
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
the display. If there is a charging error, the LED glows red
continuously.
A completely discharged instrument can be charged to full capacity
within 8 hours. Batteries drain slowly even if an instrument is off.
Therefore, if the instrument has been in storage or has not been
charged for several days or longer, check the charge before using it.
The factory-supplied battery is designed to last for 16 hours of normal
operation (no alarm), for a new battery under the optimum
circumstances. As the battery becomes older or is subject to adverse
conditions (such as cold ambient temperature), its capacity will be
significantly reduced.
Alkaline Battery Adapter
An alkaline battery adapter is supplied with each instrument. The
adapter (part number 059-3052-000) accepts four AA alkaline
batteries (use only Duracell MN1500) and provides approximately 12
hours of operation. The adapter is intended to be used in emergency
situations when there is no time to charge the Li-ion battery pack.
To insert batteries into the adapter:
1. Remove the three Philips-head screws to
open the compartment in the adapter.
2. Insert four fresh AA batteries as indicated
by the polarity (+/-) markings.
3. Replace the cover. Replace the three
screws.
To install the adapter in the instrument:
1. Remove the Li-ion battery pack from the instrument by
sliding the tab and tilting out the battery.
2. Replace it with the alkaline battery adapter
3. Slide the tab back into place to secure the battery adapter.
IMPORTANT!
Alkaline batteries cannot be recharged. The instrument’s internal
circuit detects alkaline batteries and will not allow recharging. If you
place the instrument in its cradle, the alkaline battery will not be
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
recharged. The internal charging circuit is designed to prevent
damage to alkaline batteries and the charging circuit when alkaline
batteries are installed inside the instrument. If you try to charge an
alkaline batteries installed in the instrument, the instrument’s display
will say, “Alkaline Battery,” indicating that it will not charge the
alkaline batteries.
Note: When replacing alkaline batteries, dispose of old ones properly.
WARNING!
To reduce the risk of ignition of hazardous atmospheres, recharge the
battery only in areas known to be non-hazardous. Remove and replace
the battery only in areas known to be non-hazardous.
External Filter
The external filter is made of PTFE (Teflon) membrane with a 0.45
micron pore size to prevent dust or other particles from being sucked
into the sensor manifold, which would cause extensive damage to the
instrument. It prolongs the operating life of the sensor. To install the
external filter, simply connect it to the instrument’s inlet tube.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Optional Accessories
Calibration Adapter
The calibration adapter for the instrument is a simple 6-inch Tygon
tubing with a metal adapter on one end. During calibration, simply
insert the metal adapter into the regular gas inlet probe of the
instrument and the tubing to the gas regulator on the gas bottle.
Calibration Regulator
The Calibration Regulator is used in the calibration process. It
regulates the gas flow rate from the Span gas cylinder into the gas
inlet of the instrument during calibration process. The maximum flow
rate allowed by the flow controller is about 0.5L/min (500 cc per
min.). Alternatively, a demand-flow regulator or a Tedlar gas bag
may be used to match the pump flow precisely.
Organic Vapor Zeroing Kit
The Organic Vapor Zeroing Kit is used for filtering organic air
contaminants that may affect the zero calibration reading. To use the
Organic Vapor Zeroing Kit, simply connect the filter to the inlet port
of the instrument.
AutoRAE 2 Automatic Test & Calibration
System
The AutoRAE 2 Automatic Test and Calibration System for RAE
Systems portable gas monitors makes compliance with monitor test
and calibration requirements as easy as pressing a button. Simply
cradle the monitor and the system will take care of all calibration,
testing, and recharging.
The AutoRAE 2 is a flexible, modular system that can be configured
to meet your calibration requirements effectively and efficiently. An
AutoRAE 2 system can be as simple as a single cradle deployed in
standalone mode to calibrate one instrument at a time, or as powerful
as a networked, controller-based system supporting ten monitors and
five distinct calibration gas cylinders.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Standard Two-Point Calibration (Zero &
Span)
Note: Dashed line indicates automatic progression.
The following diagram shows the instrument’s calibrations in
Basic/Hygiene mode.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Entering Calibration
1. Press and hold [MODE] and [N/-] until you see the Password
screen.
2. In Basic User Level, you do not need a password to perform
calibrations. Instead of inputting a password, enter calibration
by pressing [MODE].
Note: If you inadvertently press [Y/+] and change any of the
numbers, simply press [MODE] and you will be directed to
the calibration menu.
The Calibration screen is now visible with Zero Calibration
highlighted.
These are your options:



Press [Y/+] to select the highlighted calibration (Zero Calib
or Span Calib).
Press [MODE] to exit calibration and return to the main
display and resume measurement.
Press [N/-] to toggle the highlighted calibration type.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Zero (Fresh Air) Calibration
This procedure determines the zero point of the sensor calibration
curve. To perform a fresh air calibration, use the calibration adapter to
connect the instrument to a “fresh” air source such as from a cylinder
or Tedlar bag (optional accessory). The “fresh” air is clean, dry air
without organic impurities and an oxygen value of 20.9%. If such an
air cylinder is not available, any clean ambient air without detectable
contaminants or a charcoal filter can be used.
At the Zero Calibration menu, you can proceed to perform a Zero
calibration or bypass Zero calibration and perform a Span calibration.
You may also go back to the initial Calibration menu if you want to
exit calibration.
 Press [Y/+] to start calibration.
 Press [MODE] to quit and return to the main calibration
display.
If you have pressed [Y/+] to enter Zero calibration, then you will see
this message:
1. Turn on your Zero calibration gas.
2. Press [Y/+] to start calibration.
Note: At this point, you may press [MODE] if you decide
that you do not want to initiate calibration. This will take you
directly to the Calibration menu, highlighted for Span
calibration.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
3. Zero calibration starts a 30-second countdown and displays
this message:
Zeroing...
During the zeroing process, the instrument performs the Zero
calibration automatically and does not require any action on your part.
Note: To abort the zeroing process at any time and proceed to Span
calibration, press [N/-] at any time while zeroing is being performed.
You will see a confirmation message that says “Zero aborted!” and
then the Span calibration menu appears.
When Zero calibration is complete, you see this message:
Zeroing is done!
Reading = 0 ppb
The instrument will then show the Calibration menu on its display,
with Span Calib highlighted.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Span Calibration
This procedure determines the second point of the sensor calibration
curve for the sensor. A cylinder of standard reference gas (span gas)
fitted with a 500 cc/min. flow-limiting regulator or a flow-matching
regulator is the simplest way to perform this procedure. Choose the
500 cc/min. regulator only if the flow rate matches or slightly exceeds
the flow rate of the instrument pump. Alternatively, the span gas can
first be filled into a Tedlar bag or delivered through a demand-flow
regulator. Connect the calibration adapter to the inlet port of the
instrument, and connect the tubing to the regulator or Tedlar bag.
Another alternative is to use a regulator with >500 cc/min flow but
allow the excess flow to escape through a T or an open tube. In the
latter method, the span gas flows out through an open tube slightly
wider than the probe, and the probe is inserted into the calibration
tube.
At the Span Calibration menu, you perform a Span calibration. You
may also go back to the Zero calibration menu or to the initial
Calibration menu if you want to exit calibration.



Press [Y/+] to enter Span calibration.
Press [N/-] to skip Span calibration and return to Zero
calibration.
Press [MODE] to exit Span calibration and return to the top
calibration menu.
If you have pressed [Y/+] to enter Span calibration, then you will see
the name of your Span gas (the default is isobutylene) and the span
value in parts per million (ppm). You will also see this message that
prompts you:
1. Turn on your span calibration gas.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
2. Press [Y/+] to initiate calibration.
Note: You may press [MODE] if you decide that you do not
want to initiate calibration. This will abort the span
calibration and take you directly to the Calibration menu for
Zero calibration.
3. Span calibration starts and displays this message:
Calibrating...
During the Span calibration process, there is a 30-second countdown
and the instrument performs the Span calibration automatically. It
requires no actions on your part.
Note: If you want to abort the Span calibration process, press [N/-] at
any time during the process. You will see a confirmation message that
says “Span is aborted!” and then the Zero calibration menu appears.
You can then proceed to perform a Zero calibration, perform a Span
calibration, or exit to the topmost Calibration menu.
When Span calibration is complete, you see a message similar to this
(the value is an example only):
Span 1 is done!
Reading = 10.0 ppm
The instrument then exits Span calibration and shows the Zero
calibration menu on its display.
Note: The reading should be very close to the span gas value.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Exiting Two-Point Calibration In Basic User
Level
When you are done performing calibrations, press [MODE], which
corresponds with “Back” on the display. You will see the following
message:
Updating settings…
The instrument updates its settings and then returns to the main
display. It begins or resumes monitoring.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Three-Point Calibration
For enhanced accuracy, it is possible to perform a second Span
calibration in addition to the Zero and Span calibrations outlined in
the previous section. Your instrument first must be set to allow this
third calibration. This requires using ProRAE Studio software and a
PC, as well as a higher concentration of calibration gas.
Note: Once the third calibration is set, you do not need to use
ProRAE Studio to allow future 3-point calibrations. Also, you can
only disable 3-point calibration capability by using ProRAE Studio
again.
Perform the Zero and Span calibrations. After the first Span
calibration (Span 1) is completed, the display a second Span
calibration (Span 2) can be performed. The process is identical to the
first calibration. As in the Span 1 calibration, you may exit and return
to the Zero calibration screen if you choose not to perform this
calibration or to abort it.
Note: If a bump test is available, it appears after the last calibration in
the menu. See “Two-Point Calibration,” page 38, for details. Also,
refer to page 49 for details on how to perform a bump test.
47
Note: Dashed line indicates automatic progression.
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Span 2 Calibration
A cylinder of standard reference gas (span gas) fitted with a 500
cc/min. flow-limiting regulator or a flow-matching regulator is the
simplest way to perform this procedure.
Note: This gas should be of a higher concentration than the gas used
for Span 1 calibration.
Choose the 500 cc/min. regulator only if the flow rate matches or
slightly exceeds the flow rate of the instrument pump. Alternatively,
the span gas can first be filled into a Tedlar bag or delivered through a
demand-flow regulator. Connect the calibration adapter to the inlet
port of the instrument, and connect the tubing to the regulator or
Tedlar bag.
Another alternative is to use a regulator with >500 cc/min flow but
allow the excess flow to escape through a T or an open tube. In the
latter method, the span gas flows out through an open tube slightly
wider than the probe, and the probe is inserted into the calibration
tube.
At the Span Calibration menu, you perform a Span calibration. You
may also go back to the Zero calibration menu or to the initial
Calibration menu if you want to exit calibration.



Press [Y/+] to enter Span 2 calibration.
Press [N/-] to skip Span calibration and return to Zero
calibration.
Press [MODE] to exit Span calibration and return to the top
calibration menu.
If you have pressed [Y/+] to enter Span calibration, then you will see
the name of your Span gas (the default is isobutylene) and the span
value in parts per million (ppm). You will also see this message that
prompts you:
Please apply gas...
4. Turn on your span calibration gas.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
5. Press [Y/+] to initiate calibration.
Note: You may press [MODE] if you decide that you do not
want to initiate calibration. This will take you directly to the
Calibration menu for Zero calibration.
6. Span calibration starts a 30-second countdown and displays
this message:
Calibrating...
During the Span calibration process, the instrument performs the
Span calibration automatically and does not require any action on
your part.
Note: If you want to abort the Span calibration process, press [N/-] at
any time during the process. You will see a confirmation message that
says “Span is aborted!” and then the Zero calibration menu will
appear. You can then proceed to perform a Zero calibration, perform
a Span calibration, or exit to the topmost Calibration menu.
When Span calibration is complete, you will see a message similar to
this (the value shown here is for example only):
Span 2 is done!
Reading = 1000 ppm
The instrument then exits Span calibration and shows the Zero
calibration menu on its display.
Note: The reading should be very close to the span gas value.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Exiting Three-Point Calibration
When you are done performing calibrations, press [MODE], which
corresponds with “Back” on the display. You will see the following
message:
Updating settings…
The instrument updates its settings and then returns to the main
display. It begins or resumes monitoring.
Bump Test
RAE Systems recommends that a bump test be conducted prior to
each day’s use. The purpose of a bump test is to ensure that the
instrument’s sensors respond to gas and all the alarms are enabled and
functional.


The ppbRAE 3000 must be calibrated if it does not pass a
bump test when a new sensor is installed, after sensor
maintenance has been performed, or at least once every 180
days, depending on use and sensor exposure to poisons and
contaminants.
Calibration and bump test intervals and procedures may vary
due to national legislation and company policy.
To perform a bump test (functional challenge), follow these steps:
1. Select “Bump.”
2. Install the calibration adapter and connect it to a source of
calibration gas.
3. Verify that the displayed calibration value meets the
concentration specified on the gas cylinder.
4. Start the flow of calibration gas.
5. Press [Y/+] to start the bump test.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
6. You can abort the calibration at any time during the countdown
by pressing [N/-].
7. If the calibration is not aborted, the display shows reading and
then tells you whether the bump test passed or failed. If the bump
test failed, then it automatically advances to the Calibration
screen.
A bump test can be performed either manually or using the AutoRAE
2 Automatic Test and Calibration System. When a bump test is done
manually, the instrument makes a pass/fail decision based on sensor
performance, but the user still has the responsibility to make sure all
the alarms are enabled and functional.
Note: Bump testing and calibration can be performed using an
AutoRAE 2 Automatic Test & Calibration System. An AutoRAE 2
bump test takes care of both the sensor and alarm tests. Consult the
AutoRAE 2 User’s guide for details.
The same gas is used for a bump test as for calibration. The
instrument must be connected to a cylinder of calibration gas with
supplied tubing.
IMPORTANT!
If the instrument does not pass a bump test, perform a full calibration.
If calibration also fails, the PID sensor or lamp may require cleaning
or replacement. If the instrument repeatedly fails to calibrate, turn it
off and refer it for servicing.
Important!
Anytime a bump test fails, you should perform a full calibration of the
instrument.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Programming Mode
Programming Mode can be entered from either Hygiene Mode or
Search Mode. If the current user mode is Basic, you must provide a 4digit password to enter.
Entering Programming Mode
1. Press and hold [MODE] and [N/-] until you see the Password
screen.
2. Input the 4-digit password:
 Increase the number from 0 through 9 by pressing [Y/+].
 Step from digit to digit using [N/-].
 Press [MODE] when you are done.
If you make a mistake, you can cycle through the digits by pressing
[N/-] and then using [Y/+] to change the number in each position.
Note: The default password is 0000.
When you have successfully entered Programming Mode, you see
this screen:
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Note: The password can only be changed by connecting the
instrument to a PC running ProRAE Studio software. Follow the
instructions in ProRAE Studio to change it.The Calibration label is
shown and its icon is highlighted, but you can press [N/-] to step from
one programming menu to the next, with the name of the menu shown
at the top of the display and the corresponding icon highlighted. As
you repeatedly press [N/-], the selection moves from left to right, and
you see these screens:
Note: When you reach Monitor Setup and press [N/-], the menu
cycles back to Calibration.
Programming Mode Menus
The Programming Mode allows anyone with the password to change
the instrument’s settings, calibrate the instrument, modify the sensor
configuration, enter user information, etc. Programming Mode has
five menus. Each menu includes several sub-menus to perform
additional programming functions.
The table on the next shows the menus and sub-menus.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Calibration
Zero
Calibration
Span
Calibration
Bump Test
Measurement Alarm
Setting
Meas. Gas
High
Alarm
Meas. Unit
Low
Alarm
STEL
Alarm
TWA
Alarm
Alarm
Type
Buzzer &
Light
Datalog
Clear
Datalog
Interval
Monitor
Setup
Op Mode
Site ID
Data
User ID
Selection
Datalog
User Mode
Type
Date
Time
Pump Duty
Cycle
Pump Speed
Temperature
Unit
Language
Radio Power
Real Time
Protocol
Power On
Zero
Unit ID
LCD Contrast
Lamp ID
PAN ID
Mesh Channel
Mesh Interval
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Once you enter Programming Mode, the LCD displays the first menu,
Calibration. Each subsequent menu is accessed by pressing [N/-]
repeatedly until the desired menu is displayed. To enter a sub-menu
of a menu, press [Y/+].
Exiting Programming Mode
To exit Programming Mode and return to normal operation, press
[MODE] once at any of the programming menu displays. You will
see “Updating Settings…” as changes are registered and the mode
changes.
Navigating Programming Mode Menus
Navigating through the Programming Mode menus is easy and
consistent, using a single interface format of “Select,” “Back” and
“Next” at the top level. The three control buttons correspond to these
choices as shown:
Note: Pressing [MODE] in the Programming Mode’s top level causes
the instrument to exit Programming Mode and return to monitoring.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
The three keys perform the following functions in Programming
Mode:
Key
Function in Programming Mode
[MODE]:
Exit menu when pressed momentarily or exit
data entry mode
[Y/+]:
Increase alphanumerical value for data entry or
confirm (yes) for a question
[N/-]:
Provides a “no” response to a question
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Calibration
Two types of calibration are available: Zero (fresh air) and Span.
Select Zero or Span Calibration by pressing [N/+]. Once your choice
is highlighted, press [Y/+].
Zero Calibration
The procedure for performing a zero calibration is covered on page
40.
Span Calibration
The procedure for performing a basic span calibration is covered on
page 40.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Measurement
The sub-menus for Measurement are Measurement Gas and
Measurement Unit.
Meas. Gas
Measurement gases are organized in four lists:




My List is a customized list of gases that you create. It contains a
maximum of 10 gases and can only be built in ProRAE Studio on
a PC and transferred to the instrument. Note: The first gas in the
list is always isobutylene (it cannot be removed from the list).
Last Ten is a list of the last ten gases used by your instrument.
The list is built automatically and is only updated if the gas
selected from Custom Gases or Library is not already in the Last
Ten. This ensures that there is no repetition.
Gas Library is a library that consists of all the gases found in
RAE Systems’ Technical Note TN-106 (available online at
www.raesystems.com).
Custom Gases are gases with user-modified parameters. Using
ProRAE Studio, all parameters defining a gas can be modified,
including the name, span value(s), correction factor, and default
alarm limits.
1. Scroll through each list by pressing [N/-].
2. Press [Y/+] to select one (My List, Last Ten, Gas Library, or
Custom Gases).
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
3. Once you are in one of the categories, press [N/-] to scroll
through its list of options and [Y/+] to select one. (If you
press [MODE], you exit to the next submenu.)
4. Press [Y/+] to save your choice or [N/-] to undo your
selection.
Leave the sub-menu and return to the Programming Mode menus by
pressing [MODE].
Meas. Unit
Standard available measurement units include:
Abbreviation
ppm
ppb
mg/m3
ug/m3



Unit
parts per million
parts per billion
milligrams per cubic meter
micrograms per cubic meter
Scroll through the list by pressing [N/-].
Select by pressing [Y/+].
Save your selection by pressing [Y/+] or undo your selection by
pressing [N/-].
Leave the sub-menu and return to the Programming Mode menus by
pressing [MODE].
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Alarm Setting
During each measurement period, the gas concentration is compared
with the programmed alarm limits (gas concentration alarm limit
settings: Low, High, TWA and STEL). If the concentration exceeds
any of the preset limits, the loud buzzer and red flashing LED are
activated immediately to warn of the alarm condition.
An alarm signal summary is shown on page 32.
In this menu, you can change the High and Low alarm limits, the
STEL limit, and the TWA. Press [Y/+] to to enter the Alarm Setting
menu. Note: All settings are shown in ppm (parts per million), or
mg/m3 (milligrams per cubic meter), depending on your setting.
1. Scroll through the Alarm Limit sub-menu using the [N/-] key
until the display shows the desired limit to be changed (High
Alarm, Low Alarm, STEL Alarm, and TWA Alarm)
2. Press [Y/+] to select one of the alarm types. The display
shows a flashing cursor on the left-most digit of the
previously stored alarm limit.
3. Press [Y/+] to increase each digit’s value.
4. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
5. Again, use [Y/+] to increase the number.
Repeat this process until all numbers are entered.
Press [MODE] when you are done.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
When all alarm types have been changed or bypassed, press [MODE]
to exit to the Programming Menu.
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High Alarm
You can change the High Alarm limit value. The value is typically set
by the instrument to match the value for the current calibration gas. It
is expressed in parts per billion (ppb). Note: The default value
depends on the measurement gas.
To change the High Alarm value:
1. Press [Y/+] to increase each digit’s value.
2. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
3. Again, use [Y/+] to increase the number.
Repeat this process until all numbers are entered.
When you have completed your selections, press [MODE]. You will
see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the opportunity to register
the new settings or to change your mind and revert to your previous
settings.
Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous settings.
Low Alarm
You can change the Low Alarm limit value. The value is typically set
by the instrument to match the value for the current calibration gas. It
is expressed in parts per billion (ppb). Note: The default value
depends on the measurement gas.
To change the Low Alarm value:
1. Press [Y/+] to increase each digit’s value.
2. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
3. Again, use [Y/+] to increase the number.
Repeat this process until all numbers are entered.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
When you have completed your selections, press [MODE]. You will
see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the opportunity to register
the new settings or to change your mind and revert to your previous
settings.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
STEL Alarm
You can change the STEL Alarm limit value. The value is typically
set by the instrument to match the value for the calibration gas. It is
expressed in parts per billion (ppb). Note: The default value depends
on the measurement gas.
To change the STEL Alarm value:
1. Press [Y/+] to increase each digit’s value.
2. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
3. Again, use [Y/+] to increase the number.
Repeat this process until all numbers are entered.
When you have completed your selections, press [MODE]. You will
see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the opportunity to register
the new settings or to change your mind and revert to your previous
settings.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
TWA Alarm
You can change the TWA (time-weighted average) Alarm limit value.
The value is typically set by the instrument to match the value for the
calibration gas. It is expressed in parts per billion (ppb). Note: The
default value depends on the measurement gas.
To change the TWA Alarm value:
1. Press [Y/+] to increase each digit’s value.
2.
Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
3. Again, use [Y/+] to increase the number.
Repeat this process until all numbers are entered.
When you have completed your selections, press [MODE]. You will
see two choices:


Save
Undo
You have the opportunity to register the new settings or to change
your mind and revert to your previous settings.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
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Alarm Type
There are two selectable alarm types:
Latched
When the alarm is triggered, you can
manually stop the alarm.
The latched setting only controls alarms for
High Alarm, Low Alarm, STEL Alarm, and
TWA alarm.
Note: To clear an alarm when the instrument
is set to “Latched,” press [Y/+] when the
main (Reading) display is shown.
Automatic Reset
When the alarm condition is no longer
present, the alarm stops and resets itself.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one alarm type to the other.
2. Press [Y/+] to select an alarm type.
When you have completed your selections, press [MODE].
You will see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the
opportunity to register the new settings or to change your mind
and revert to your previous settings.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
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Buzzer & Light
The buzzer and light alarms can be programmed to be on or off
individually or in combination. Your choices are:




Both on
Light only
Buzzer only
Both off
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates your selection).
3. When you have completed your selections, press [MODE].
You will see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the
opportunity to register the new settings or to change your mind
and revert to your previous settings.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
Datalog
The instrument calculates and stores the concentration and ID of each
sample taken. In the datalog sub-menu, a user can perform the tasks
and functions shown below.
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1. Scroll through the Datalog sub-menu using the [N/-] key until the
display shows the desired parameter to be changed:
Clear Datalog
Interval
Data Selection
Datalog Type
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection. Exit by pressing [MODE] for
Back.
Clear Datalog
This erases all the data stored in the datalog.
Note: Once the datalog is cleared, the data cannot be recovered.
Press [Y/+] to clear the datalog. The display asks, “Are you sure?”


Press [Y/+] if you want to clear the datalog. When it has been
cleared, the display shows “Datalog Cleared!”
Press [N/-] if you do not want to clear the datalog.
The display changes, and you are taken to the next sub-menu,
Interval.
Interval
Intervals are shown in seconds. The default value is 60 seconds. The
maximum interval is 3600 seconds.
1. Press [Y/+] to increase each digit’s value.
2.
Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
3. Again, use [Y/+] to increase the number.
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Repeat this process until all numbers are entered.
When you have completed your selections, press [MODE].
You will see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the opportunity
to register the new settings or to change your mind and revert to your
previous settings.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
Data Selection
Data Selection allows you to select which types of data are stored and
made available when you offload your datalog to a computer via
ProRAE Studio software.
You can choose any or all of three types of data (you must choose at
least one):



Average
Maximum
Minimum
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next. The highlighter
indicates your choice.
2. Press [Y/+] to toggle your selection on or off (the check box
indicates “on” with an “X”).
3. When you have completed your selections, press [MODE].
You will see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the opportunity
to register the new settings or to change your mind and revert to your
previous settings.


Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous
settings.
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Datalog Type
The instrument has three datalog types:
Auto
Default mode. Collects datalog information when the
instrument is sampling.
Manual
Datalogging occurs only when the instrument’s
datalogging is manually started (see below for
details).
Snapshot
Datalogs only during single-event capture sampling.
Note: You can only choose one datalog type to be active at a time.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates “on”).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
You will see two choices: Save and Undo. You have the opportunity
to register the new settings or to change your mind and revert to your
previous settings.
 Press [Y/+] to save the changes.
Press [N/-] to undo the changes and revert to the previous settings.
Manual Datalog
When the instrument is set to Manual Datalog, you turn datalogging
on and off by stepping through the displays from the Main Display,
and then pressing the keys to select datalog on/off functions.


When you reach the screen that says “Start Datalog?” press
[Y/+] to start it. You see “Datalog Started,” confirming that
datalogging is now on.
When you reach the screen that says “Stop Datalog?” press
[Y/+] to stop it. You see “Datalog Stopped,” confirming that
datalogging is now off.
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Snapshot Datalog
When the instrument is in Snapshot datalogging mode, it captures a
single “snapshot” of the data at the moment of your choosing.
Whenever the instrument is on and it is set to Snapshot, all you have
to do is press [MODE] each time you want to capture a snapshot of
the data at that instant.
When you send the data to a computer using ProRAE Studio, the data
snapshots are uniquely identified by time and other parameters.
Monitor Setup
Many settings can be accessed in this menu, including setting the date
and time and adjusting the pump’s on/off duty cycle.
Op Mode
Under Monitor Setup is “Op Mode.”
Press [Y/+] to select.
You see two options (one is highlighted):
Hygiene
Search
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The current mode is indicated by a dark circle within the circle in
front of either Hygiene or Search.
1. Select Hygiene or Search by pressing [N/-]. The highlighting
changes from one to the other each time you press [N/-].
2. Press [Y/+] to select that mode for the instrument.
3. Press [MODE] when you want to register your selection to
place the instrument in the selected mode.
4. Press [Y/+] to commit the change and exit to the Monitor
Setup screen, or press [N/-] to Undo (exit to the Monitor
Setup screen without changing the Mode).
Site ID
Enter an 8-digit alphanumeric/character Site ID in the programming
mode. This Site ID is included in the datalog report.
1. Press [Y/+] and the display shows the current site ID.
Example: “RAE00001.” Note that the left-most digit flashes
to indicate it is the selected one.
2. Press [Y/+] to step through all 26 letters (A to Z) and 10
numerals (0 to 9).
Note: The last four digits must be numerals.
3. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit. The next digit to the
right flashes.
Repeat this process until all eight digits of the new site ID are
entered.
Press [MODE] to exit.
If there is any change to the existing site ID, the display shows
“Save?” Press [Y/+] to accept the new site ID. Press [N/-] to discard
the change and move to the next sub-menu.
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User ID
Enter an 8-digit alphanumeric User ID in the programming mode.
This User ID is included in the datalog report.
1. Press [Y/+] and the display shows the current User ID.
Example: “RAE00001.” Note that the left-most digit flashes
to indicate it is the selected one.
2. Press [Y/+] to step through all 26 letters (A to Z) and 10
numerals (0 to 9).
3. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit. The next digit to the
right flashes.
Repeat this process until all eight digits of the new User ID
are entered.
Press [MODE] to exit.
If there is any change to the existing User ID, the display shows
“Save” Press [Y/+] to accept the new site ID. Press [N/-] to discard
(undo) the change and move to the next sub-menu.
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User Mode
The instrument has two user modes:
Basic
Basic users can only see and use a basic set of
functions.
Advanced
Advanced users can see all screens and perform all
available functions.
Note: The default value for User Mode is Basic.
To change the User Mode:
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next. The highlighting
changes each time you press [N/-].
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates “on”).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
4. Press [Y/+] to accept the new User Mode. Press [N/-] to discard
the change and move to the next sub-menu.
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Date
The Date is expressed as Month/Day/Year, with two digits for each.
1. Press [Y/+] and the display shows the current date. Note that
the left-most digit flashes to indicate it is selected.
2. Press [Y/+] to step through all 10 numerals (0 to 9).
3. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit. The next digit to the
right flashes.
Repeat this process until all six digits of the new date are
entered.
Press [MODE] to exit.


Press [Y/+] to save the new date.
Press [N/-] to undo the change and move to the next submenu.
Time
The Time is expressed as Hours/Minutes/Seconds, with two digits for
each. The time is in 24-hour (military) format.
1. Press [Y/+] and the display shows the current time. Note that
the left-most digit flashes to indicate it is selected.
2. Press [Y/+] to step through all 10 numerals (0 to 9).
3. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit. The next digit to the
right flashes.
Repeat this process until all six digits of the new time are
entered.
Press [MODE] to exit.


Press [Y/+] to save the new date.
Press [N/-] to undo the change and move to the next submenu.
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Duty Cycle
The pump’s duty cycle is the ratio of its on time to off time. The duty
cycle ranges from 50% to 100% (always on), and the period is 10
seconds. Therefore, a duty cycle of 60% means that the pump is on
for 6 seconds and off for four seconds. Duty cycling is employed by
the instrument to clean the PID. A lower duty cycle has a greater
effect on keeping the PID clean than a higher duty cycle.
Important! Pump duty cycling is interrupted when the instrument
senses a gas. The pump’s duty cycle is disabled when the
measurement is greater than the 2ppm threshold and is re-enabled
when the reading falls below 90% of the threshold (1.8 ppm).
1. Press [Y/+] to increase the value.
2. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
 Press [Y/+] to save the new duty cycle value.
 Press [N/-] to undo the change and move to the next submenu.
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Temperature Unit
The temperature display can be switched between Fahrenheit and
Celsius units.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates “on”).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
 Press [Y/+] to save the new temperature unit.
 Press [N/-] to undo the change and move to the next submenu.
Pump Speed
The pump can operate at two speeds, high and low. Running at low
speed is quieter and conserves a small amount of power. There is
almost no difference in sampling accuracy.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates “on”).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
 Press [Y/+] to save the new temperature unit.
 Press [N/-] to undo the change and move to the next submenu.
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Language
English is the default language, but other languages can be selected
for the instrument.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates “on”).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
 Press [Y/+] to save your new language choice.
 Press [N/-] to undo it and return to the previous language
selection.
Radio Power
The radio connection can be turned on or off.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next (on or off).
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates that the option is selected).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].


Press [Y/+] to accept the new radio setting (on or off).
Press [N/-] to discard the change and move to the next submenu.
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Real Time Protocol
Real Time Protocol is the setting for data transmission.
The choices are:
P2M (cable)
P2P (cable)
P2M (wireless)
Point to multipoint. Data is transferred from the
instrument to multiple locations using a wired
connection. Default data rate: 19200 bps.
Point to point. Data is transferred only between
the instrument and one other location, such as a
computer. Default data rate: 9600 bps.
Point to multipoint, wireless. Data is transferred
wirelessly and can be received by multiple
receivers.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates “on”).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
 Press [Y/+] to save the new real-time communications protocol.
 Press [N/-] to undo the change and move to the next sub-menu.
Power On Zero
When Power On Zero is on, the instrument performs a zero
calibration when it is turned on.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make your selection (the dark circle in the “radio
button” indicates your selection).
3. When you have completed your selection, press [MODE].
 Press [Y/+] to save the change.
 Press [N/-] to discard the change and move to the next submenu.
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Unit ID
This three-digit number keeps data separated by instrument when
more than one instrument is used in a network. If multiple sensing
units are attempting to communicate with the same Host, then the
units must all have a different Unit ID.
1. Press [Y/+] to step through all 10 numerals (0 to 9). If you pass
the numeral you want, keep pressing [Y/+]. After it counts up to
9, it starts counting up from 0 again.
2. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit. The next digit to the right
flashes.
Repeat this process until all three digits of the Unit ID are entered.
3. Press [MODE] when you are done.
 Press [Y/+] to save the change.
 Press [N/-] to discard the change and move to the next submenu.
LCD Contrast
The display’s contrast can be increased or decreased from its default
setting. You may not need to ever change the default setting, but
sometimes you can optimize the display to suit extreme temperature
and ambient brightness/darkness conditions.


The minimum value is 20.
The maximum value is 60.
1. Press [Y/+] to increase the value or [N/-] to decrease the value.
2. Press [MODE] to save your selection.
 Press [Y/+] to save your new contrast value.
 Press [N/-] to undo it and return to the previous value.
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Lamp ID
The ppbRAE 3000 does not automatically identify the type of lamp,
so you must select a lamp type manually.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scroll through the menu by pressing [N/-].
Press [Y/+] to make a selection.
Press [MODE] when you are done.
Press [Y/+] to save your choice or [N/-] to undo your selection.
PAN ID
The ppbRAE 3000 and any other devices that you want to
interconnect wirelessly must have the same PAN ID. You can set the
PAN ID in the instrument or through ProRAE Studio II.
1. Press [N/-] to advance through the digits from left to right.
2. Press [Y/+] to ] to advance through the numbers (1, 2, 3, etc.).
3. Press [MODE] to register your choice when you are done.
Mesh Channel
Note: For mesh radio modems operating at 868MHz, only channel 0
is available. For other frequencies, channels 1 through 10 are allowed.
1. Press [Y/+] to increase the number and [N/-] to advance to
the next digit.
2. After moving to the last digit and making changes, press
[MODE].
 Press [Y/+] to save the change.
 Press [N/-] to undo the change.
Mesh Interval
Set the time interval at which the instrument’s mesh radio sends out a
signal. This can range from once every 10 seconds to once every four
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minutes (240 seconds). The transmission frequency is user-adjustable,
but a rate of at least once every 30 seconds is recommended.
Note: Shorter intervals reduce battery life.
1. Press [N/-] to step from one option to the next.
2. Press [Y/+] to make a selection.
3. When you are done, press [MODE].
Hygiene Mode
The instrument usually operates in Hygiene Mode, which provides
basic functionality. However, it is possible to operate it in a second
mode called Search Mode. Here are the primary differences:
Hygiene Mode: Automatic measurements, continuously running
and datalogging, and calculates additional
exposure values.
Search Mode: Manual start/stop of measurements and display
of certain exposure values.
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Basic User Level & Hygiene Mode
Note: Dashed line indicates automatic progression.
The default setting is navigated in the following way:
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Pressing [N/-] steps you from screen to screen. Options include
clearing the Peak value and turning on the instrument’s PC
Communications for data transfer to a PC.
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Entering Search Mode From Hygiene Mode
In order to change the instrument’s operational mode from Hygiene
Mode to Search Mode, you must enter the password-protected
Programming Mode:
1. Hold [MODE] and [N/-] until you see the password screen.
2. Use [Y/+] to increment to the number you want for the first
digit. (If you pass by the desired number, press [Y/+] until it
cycles through to 0 again. Then press [Y/+] until you reach
the desired number.)
3. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
4. Again press [Y/+] to increment the number.
5. Press [N/-] to advance to the next digit.
Continue the process until all four numbers of the password have
been input. Then press [MODE] to proceed.
The screen changes to icons with the label “Calibration.”
1. Press [N/-] to advance to “Monitor Setup.”
2. Press [Y/+] to select Monitor Setup.
Under Monitor Setup, you will see “Op Mode.”
Press [Y/+] to select.
You will see:
Hygiene
Search
The current mode is indicated by a dark circle within the circle in
front of either Hygiene or Search.
1. Select Hygiene or Search by pressing [N/-].
2. Press [Y/+] to place the instrument into the selected mode.
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3. Press [MODE] when you want to register your selection to
place the instrument in the selected mode.
4. Press [Y/+] to commit the change and exit to the Monitor
Setup screen, or press [N/-] to Undo (exit to the Monitor
Setup screen without changing the Mode).
Advanced User Level (Hygiene Mode Or
Search Mode)
The User Mode called Advanced User Level allows a greater number
of parameters to be changed than Basic User Level. It can be used
with either of the Operation Modes, Hygiene Mode or Search Mode.
Advanced User Level & Hygiene Mode
With the instrument in Operation Mode: Hygiene Mode, enter User
Mode: Advanced User Level (refer to the section called Monitor
Mode for instructions).
Once you are in Advanced User Level and Hygiene Mode together,
you can change the calibration reference and measurement gas, in
addition to performing normal monitoring functions.
Pressing [N/-] progresses through the screens, while pressing [Y/+]
selects options. Pressing [MODE] makes menu choices when it is
shown for “Done” or “Back.” Pressing and holding [Mode] whenever
the circle with a vertical line in the middle is shown activates the
countdown to shutoff.
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Basic User Level & Search Mode
With the instrument in Operation Mode: Search Mode, enter User
Mode and select Basic User Level (refer to the section called User
Mode for instructions).
When the instrument is in Search Mode, it only samples when you
activate sampling. When you see the display that says, “Ready…Start
sampling?” press [Y/+] to start. The pump turns on and the instrument
begins collecting data. To stop sampling, press [N/-] while the main
display is showing. You will see a new screen that says, “Stop
sampling?” Press [Y/+] to stop sampling. Press [N/-] if you want
sampling to continue.
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Advanced User Level & Search Mode
With the instrument in Operation Mode: Search Mode, enter User
Mode and select Advanced User Level (refer to the section called
Monitor Mode for instructions). Operation is similar to Basic User
Level & Sampling Mode, but now allows you to change calibration
and measurement reference gases. Refer to the section on
measurement gases on page 59 for more details.
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Diagnostic Mode
IMPORTANT! Diagnostic Mode is designed for servicing and
manufacturing, and therefore is not intended for everyday use, even
by advanced users. It provides raw data from sensors and about
settings, but only allows adjustment of pump stall parameters, which
should only be changed by qualified personnel.
Note: If the instrument is turned on in Diagnostic Mode and you
switch to User Mode, datalog data remains in raw count form. To
change to standard readings, you must restart the instrument.
Entering Diagnostic Mode
Note: To enter Diagnostic Mode, you must begin with the instrument
turned off.
Press and hold [Y/+] and [MODE] until the instrument starts.
The instrument goes through a brief startup, and then displays raw
data for the PID sensor. These numbers are raw sensor readings
without calibration. The instrument is now in Diagnostic Mode.
Note: In Diagnostic Mode, the pump and lamp are normally on.
You can enter Programming Mode and calibrate the instrument as
usual by pressing both [MODE] and [N/-] for three seconds.
You can enter Monitoring Mode by pressing [MODE] and [Y/+]
together for three seconds.
Once the instrument is started up in Diagnostic Mode, you can switch
between Diagnostic Mode and Monitoring Mode by pressing and
holding [MODE] and [Y/+] simultaneously for two seconds.
In Diagnostic mode, you can step through parameter screens by
pressing [MODE].
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Adjusting The Pump Stall Threshold
If the gas inlet is blocked but the pump does not shut down, or the
pump shuts down too easily with a slight blockage, the pump stall
threshold value may be set too high or too low.
Use the following steps to adjust the pump stall threshold:
Pump High
In Diagnostic Mode, press the [MODE] key until “Pump High” is
displayed. The display shows the maximum, minimum, and stall
values for the pump at its high speed. Write down the “Max” reading.
Block the gas inlet and watch the pump current reading (labeled “I”)
increase. Write down its blocked reading. Note: If the pump current
reading does not increase significantly (less than 10 counts), then
there may be a leak in the gas inlet or the pump is weak or defective.
Add the two readings you wrote down. This is the average of the
maximum block count and the maximum idle count. Divide that
number by 2. Use the [Y/+] or [N/-] key to increase or decrease the
stall value to equal that number.
Press the [MODE] key to exit this display.
Pump Low
In Diagnostic Mode, press the [MODE] key until “Pump Low” is
displayed. The display shows the maximum, minimum, and stall
values for the pump at its low speed. Write down the “Max” reading.
Block the gas inlet and watch the pump current reading (labeled “I”)
increase. Write down its blocked reading. Note: If the pump current
reading does not increase significantly (less than 10 counts), then
there may be a leak in the gas inlet or the pump is weak or defective.
Add the two readings you wrote down. This is the average of the
maximum block count and the maximum idle count. Divide that
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number by 2. Use the [Y/+] or [N/-] key to increase or decrease the
stall value to equal that number.
Press the [MODE] key to exit this display.
Exiting Diagnostic Mode
You can exit Diagnostic Mode and go directly to Programming Mode
or Monitor Mode as outlined above, or you can exit Diagnostic Mode
completely.
To exit Diagnostic Mode so that it cannot be re-entered without a
restart:
Shut down the instrument. When it is off, restart it by holding the
[MODE] key. Diagnostic Mode cannot be entered until the instrument
is restarted as outlined in “Entering Diagnostic Mode.”
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Transferring Data To & From A
Computer
Once you have connected your instrument cradle to the PC, you can
can transfer data, including a download of the datalog to the computer
and updates of firmware to the instrument (should this ever be
necessary).
Downloading The Datalog To A PC
1. Connect the data cable to the PC and the cradle.
2. Place the instrument into its cradle. The charging LED should
be illuminated.
3. Start ProRAE Studio on your PC.
4. From ProRAE Studio, select “Operation” and select Setup
Connection.
5. Select the COM port to establish a communication link
between the PC and the instrument.
6. To receive the datalog in the PC, select “Downlog Datalog.”
7. When you see “Unit Information,” click OK.
During the data transfer, the display shows a progress bar.
When the transfer is done, you will see a screen with the datalog
information. You can now export this datalog for other use or
printing.
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Uploading Firmware To The instrument From
A PC
Uploading new firmware to your instrument requires connecting the
instrument and PC. Follow these steps to make the connection:
1. Connect the data cable to the PC and the cradle.
2. Place the instrument into its cradle. The charging LED should
be illuminated.
3. Start RAEProgrammer 7000 on your PC.
4. From RAEProgrammer 7000, select “Operation” and select
Setup Connection.
5. Select the COM port to establish a communication link
between the PC and the instrument.
6. Select Operation  Download Firmware.
Once communication is established, follow the instructions that
accompany RAEProgrammer 7000 and the firmware to upload the
new firmware to your instrument.
Note: Check for the latest updates to ProRAEProgrammer 7000 at
www.raesystems.com.
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Maintenance
The major maintenance items of the instrument are:

Battery pack

Sensor module

PID lamp

Sampling pump

Inlet connectors and filters
Note: Maintenance should be performed by qualified
personnel only.
NOTE: The printed circuit board of the instrument is connected
to the battery pack even if the power is turned off. Therefore, it is
very important to disconnect the battery pack before servicing or
replacing any components inside the instrument. Severe damage
to the printed circuit board or battery may occur if the battery
pack is not disconnected before servicing the unit.
Battery Charging & Replacement
When the display shows a flashing empty battery icon, the battery
requires recharging. It is recommended to recharge the instrument
upon returning from fieldwork. A fully charged battery runs a
instrument for 16 hours continuously. The charging time is less than 8
hours for a fully discharged battery. The battery may be replaced in
the field (in areas known to be non-hazardous), if required.
WARNING!
To reduce the risk of ignition of hazardous atmospheres, recharge
battery only in area known to be non-hazardous. Remove and
replace battery only in areas known to be non-hazardous.
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Replacing The Li-ion Battery
1. Turn off the instrument.
2. Located on the rear of the instrument is a battery tab. Slide it down to
unlock the battery.
3. Remove the battery pack from the battery compartment by tilting
it out.
4. Replace a fully charged spare battery pack inside the battery
compartment. Make sure the battery pack is oriented properly
inside the compartment.
5. Slide the capture tab back up to its locked position.
Replacing The Alkaline Battery Adapter
An alkaline battery adapter is supplied with each instrument. The
adapter (part number 059-3052-000) accepts four AA alkaline
batteries (use only Duracell MN1500) and provides approximately 12
hours of operation. The adapter is intended to be used in emergency
situations when there is no time to charge the Li-ion battery pack.
To insert batteries into the adapter:
1. Remove the three Philips-head screws to open the
compartment.
2. Insert four fresh AA batteries as indicated by the polarity (+/-)
markings.
3. Replace the cover. Replace the three screws.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
To install the adapter in the instrument:
1. Remove the Li-ion battery pack from the battery
compartment by sliding the tab and tilting out the battery.
2. Replace it with the alkaline battery adapter
3. Slide the tab back into place to secure the battery adapter.
IMPORTANT!
Alkaline batteries cannot be recharged. The instrument’s internal
circuit detects alkaline batteries and will not allow recharging. If you
place the instrument in its cradle, the alkaline battery will not be
recharged. The internal charging circuit is designed to prevent
damage to alkaline batteries and the charging circuit when alkaline
batteries are installed inside the instrument.
Note: When replacing alkaline batteries, dispose of old ones properly.
WARNING!
To reduce the risk of ignition of hazardous atmospheres, recharge the
battery only in areas known to be non-hazardous. Remove and replace
the battery only in areas known to be non-hazardous.
Note: The internal charging circuit is designed to prevent charging to
alkaline batteries.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
PID Sensor & Lamp Cleaning/Replacement
The sensor module is made of several components and is attached to
the lamp-housing unit as shown below.
Sensor Cover
Assembly
Inlet Probe Assembly
PN 023-3012-000
O-ring, 35mm x 2mm
Filter Fixer
Porous Metal Filter
Lamp 1/2" (10.6eV)
PN 050-0000-004
Sensor Detector
PN 023-3010-000
Seal Nut
Teflon O-ring
Stainless Steel Washer
O-ring, 36.5mm x 2.65mm
Sensor Module Assembly
PN 023-3005-400-FRU
THP (temperature, humidity) Sensor Module
PN 023-3011-000-FRU
Sensor Components
Note: The cleaning procedure is not normally needed. Clean the PID
sensor module, the lamp and the lamp housing only when one of the
following has happened:
1. The reading is inaccurate even after calibration.
2. The reading is very sensitive to air moisture.
3. A chemical liquid has been sucked into the unit and damaged
the unit.
Use of the external filter helps to prevent contamination of the sensor.
To access the sensor components and lamp, gently unscrew the lamphousing cap, remove the sensor adapter with the gas inlet probe and
the metal filter all together. Then hold the PID sensor and pull it
straight out. A slight, gentle rocking motion helps release the sensor.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Cleaning The PID Sensor
Place the entire PID sensor module into GC grade methanol. It is
highly recommended that an ultrasound bath to be used to clean the
sensor for at least 15 minutes. Then dry the sensor thoroughly. Never
touch the electrodes of the sensor by hand.
Also use a methanol-soaked cotton swab to wipe off the lamp housing
where it contacts the sensor when the sensor is installed.
Turn over the sensor so that the pins point up and the sensor cavity is
visible. Examine the sensor electrodes for any corrosion, damage, or
bending out of alignment. The metal sensor electrode “fingers”
should be flat and straight. If necessary, carefully bend the sensor
fingers to ensure that they do not touch the Teflon portions and that
they are parallel to each other. Make sure that the nuts on the sensor
pins are snug but not overtight. If the sensor is corroded or otherwise
damaged, it should be replaced.
Cleaning The Lamp Housing Or Changing The Lamp
If the lamp does not turn on, the instrument will display an error
message to indicate replacement of the lamp may be required.
1. If the lamp is operational, clean the lamp window surface and the
lamp housing by wiping it with GC grade methanol using a cotton
swab using moderate pressure. After cleaning, hold the lamp up
to the light at an angle to detect any remaining film. Repeat the
process until the lamp window is clean. Never use water solutions
to clean the lamp. Dry the lamp and the lamp housing thoroughly
after cleaning.
CAUTION: Never touch the window surface with the fingers
or anything else that may leave a film. Never use acetone or
aqueous solutions.
2. If the lamp does not turn on, remove the lamp from the lamp
housing. Place the lamp O-ring onto the new lamp. Insert the new
lamp, avoiding contact with the flat window surface.
3. Reinstall the PID sensor module.
4. Tighten the Lamp Housing Cap.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Determining The Lamp Type
The monitor can accommodate two lamp values: 10.6eV (standard)
and 9.8eV.
There are two ways to determine the lamp type.
1. Turn off the instrument and remove the lamp. Now look at
the serial number. The following identify the lamp type:


10.6eV
9.8eV
SN: 106 2Nxxxxx
SN: 098 2Nxxxxx
2. When the monitor is running, the lamp type is shown along
with the calibration and measurement gas and Correction
Factor:
Note: This screen can be accessed from the reading screen by
pressing [N/-] four times.
Programming The Lamp ID
The correct measurement gas library is used by the instrument when
you ensure that the right lamp value is programmed.
To manually select the Lamp ID:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Enter the Programming menu.
Select Monitor Setup.
Scroll down and select the Lamp ID sub-menu.
Press [N/-] to scroll down to the desired Lamp ID.
Press [Y/+] to select.
Press [MODE] to select Done.
Select “Save.”
Return to the main menu.
Recalibrate the instrument before returning it to service.
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Sampling Pump
When approaching the end of the specified lifetime of the pump, it
will consume higher amount of energy and reduce its sample draw
capability significantly. When this occurs, it is necessary to replace or
rebuild the pump. When checking the pump flow, make sure that the
inlet connector is tight and the inlet tubing is in good condition.
Connect a flow meter to the gas inlet probe. The flow rate should be
above 450 cc/min when there is no air leakage.
If the pump is not working properly, refer the instrument to qualified
service personnel for further testing and, if necessary, pump repair or
replacement.
Cleaning The Instrument
Occasional cleaning with a soft cloth is recommended. Do not use
detergents or chemicals.
Visually inspect the contacts at the base of the instrument, on the
battery, and on the charging cradle to make sure they are clean. If
they are not, wipe them with a soft, dry cloth. Never use solvents or
cleaners.
Ordering Replacement Parts
If you need replacement parts, contact your local RAE Systems
distributor. A list is available online:
http://www.raesystems.com
In the U.S., you can order sensors, replacement batteries, and other
accessories online at:
http://istore.raesystems.com/
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Special Servicing Note
If the instrument needs to be serviced, contact either:
1. The RAE Systems distributor from whom the instrument was
purchased; they will return the instrument on your behalf.
or
2. The RAE Systems Technical Service Department. Before
returning the instrument for service or repair, obtain a Returned
Material Authorization (RMA) number for proper tracking of
your equipment. This number needs to be on all documentation
and posted on the outside of the box in which the instrument is
returned for service or upgrade. Packages without RMA Numbers
will be refused at the factory.
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Troubleshooting
Problem
Cannot turn on power
after charging the
battery
Lost password
Reading abnormally
High
Possible Reasons & Solutions
Reasons:
Discharged battery.
Defective battery.
Solutions:
Solutions:
Reasons:
Solutions:
Reading abnormally
Low
Reasons:
Solutions:
Buzzer
Inoperative
Reasons:
Solutions:
105
Charge or replace battery.
Call Technical Support at +1
408-752-0723 or toll-free at
+1 888-723-4800
Dirty filter.
Dirty sensor module.
Excessive moisture and
water condensation.
Incorrect calibration.
Replace filter.
Blow-dry the sensor
module.
Calibrate the unit.
Dirty filter.
Dirty sensor module.
Weak or dirty lamp.
Incorrect calibration.
Replace filter.
Remove Calibration
Adapter.
Calibrate the unit.
Check for air leakage.
Bad buzzer.
Check that buzzer is not
turned off.
Call authorized service
center.
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Inlet flow too low
“Lamp” message
during operation
Reasons:
Pump diaphragm damaged
or has debris.
Flow path leaks.
Solutions:
Check flow path for leaks;
sensor module O-ring, tube
connectors, Teflon tube
compression fitting.
Call Technical Support at
+1 408-752-0723
or toll-free at
+1 888-723-4800
Lamp drive circuit.
Weak or defective PID
lamp, defective.
Reasons:
Solutions:
Turn the unit off and back
on.
Replace UV lamp
Technical Support
To contact RAE Systems Technical Support Team:
Monday through Friday, 7:00AM to 5:00PM Pacific (US) Time
Phone (toll-free): +1 888-723-4800
Phone: +1 408-952-8461
Email: tech@raesystems.com
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RAE Systems Contacts
RAE Systems by Honeywell
World Headquarters
3775 N. First St.
San Jose, CA 95134-1708 USA
Phone: +1 888-723-4800
E-mail: RAE-tech@honeywell.com
Web Site: www.raesystems.com
RAE Systems Technical Support
Monday through Friday, 7:00AM to 5:00PM Pacific (US) Time
Phone (toll-free): +1 877-723-2878
Phone: +1 408-952-8200
Fax: +1 408-952-8480
Email: RAE-tech@honeywell.com
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Controlled Part Of Manual
Intrinsic Safety:
US and Canada: Class I, Division 1, Groups A,B,C,D T4
Europe: ATEX (0575 Ex II 2G Ex ia IIC/IIB T4 Gb)
KEMA 07 ATEX 0127
Complies with EN60079-0:2009, EN60079-11:2007
IECEx CSA 10.0005 Ex ia IIC/IIB T4 Gb
Complies with IEC 60079-0:2007, IEC 60079-11:2006
Temperature:
Humidity:
-20º C to 50º C (-4º to 122º F)
0% to 95% relative humidity (noncondensing)
Basic Operation
Turning The Instrument On
1. With the instrument turned off, press and hold [MODE].
2. When the display turns on, release the [MODE] key.
The instrument is now operating and performs self tests. Once the self
tests are complete, the display shows a graph or numerical gas
reading. This indicates that the instrument is fully functional and
ready to use.
Turning The Instrument Off
1. Press and hold the Mode key for 3 seconds. A 5-second
countdown to shutoff begins.
2. When you see “Unit off...” release your finger from the [MODE]
key. The instrument is now off.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Note: You must hold your finger on the key for the entire shutoff
process. If you remove your finger from the key during the
countdown, the shutoff operation is canceled and the instrument
continues normal operation.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Alarm Signals
During each measurement period, the gas concentration is compared
with the programmed alarm limits (gas concentration alarm limit
settings). If the concentration exceeds any of the preset limits, the
loud buzzer and red flashing LED are activated immediately to warn
you of the alarm condition.
In addition, the instrument alarms if one of the following conditions
occurs: battery voltage falls below a preset voltage level, failure of
the UV lamp, pump stall, or when the datalog memory is full.
Alarm Signal Summary
Message
Condition
Alarm Signal
HIGH
Gas exceeds “High
Alarm” limit
3 beeps/flashes per second*
OVR
Gas exceeds
measurement range
3 beeps/flashes per second*
MAX
Gas exceeds electronics’
maximum range
3 beeps/flashes per second*
LOW
Gas exceeds “Low
Alarm” limit
2 beeps/flashes per second*
TWA
Gas exceeds “TWA”
limit
1 Beep/flash per second*
STEL
Gas exceeds “STEL”
limit
1 Beep/flash per second*
Pump
icon
flashes
Pump failure
3 beeps/flashes per second
Lamp
PID lamp failure
3 beeps/flashes per second
plus “Lamp” message on
display
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Battery
icon
flashes
Low battery
1 flash, 1 beep per minute
plus battery icon flashes on
display
CAL
Calibration failed, or
needs calibration
1 beep/flash per second
NEG
Gas reading measures
1 beep/flash per second
less than number stored in
calibration
Preset Alarm Limits & Calibration
The instrument is factory calibrated with standard calibration gas, and
is programmed with default alarm limits.
Cal Gas
Cal
Span
unit
Low
High
TWA
STEL
ppbRAE
3000
10
ppm
10
25
10
25
MiniRAE
3000
100
ppm
50
100
10
25
MiniRAE
Lite
100
ppm
50
100
10
25
UltraRAE
3000
100
ppm
50
100
10
25
(Isobutylene)
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Charging The Battery
Always fully charge the battery before using the instrument. The
instrument’s Li-ion/NiMH battery is charged by placing the
instrument in its cradle. Contacts on the bottom of the instrument
meet the cradle’s contacts, transferring power without other
connections.
Note: Before setting the instrument into its charging cradle, visually
inspect the contacts to make sure they are clean. If they are not, wipe
them with a soft cloth. Do not use solvents or cleaners.
Follow this procedure to charge the instrument:
1. Plug the AC/DC adapter’s barrel connector into the
instrument’s cradle.
2. Plug the AC/DC adapter into the wall outlet.
3. Place the instrument into the cradle, press down, and lean it
back. It locks in place and the LED in the cradle glows.
Note: To release the instrument, press down and tilt the top out
of the cradle and lift up.
The instrument begins charging automatically. The LED on the front
of the cradle marked “Primary” blinks during charging. During
charging, the diagonal lines in the battery icon on the instrument’s
display are animated and you see the message “Charging...”
When the instrument’s battery is fully charged, the battery icon is no
longer animated and shows a full battery. The message “Fully
charged!” is shown and the Primary LED on the cradle glows
continuously green.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Note: A spare Li-ion battery (059-3051-000) or NiMH(059-3054000) can be charged by placing it directly in the charging port on the
back of the cradle. It can be charged at the same time as the
instrument. Press the battery in place, sliding it slightly toward the
front of the cradle. This locks it in the cradle. To release the battery,
slide it forward again and tilt it up.
Note: An Alkaline Battery Adapter (part number 059-3052-000),
which uses four AA alkaline batteries (Duracell MN1500), may be
substituted for the Li-Ion battery.
WARNING!
To reduce the risk of ignition of hazardous atmospheres, recharge
and replace batteries only in areas known to be non-hazardous.
Remove and replace batteries only in areas known to be nonhazardous.
Low Voltage Warning
When the battery’s charge falls below a preset voltage, the instrument
warns you by beeping once and flashing once every minute, and the
battery icon blinks once per second. You should turn off the
instrument within 10 minutes and either recharge the battery by
placing the instrument in its cradle, or replace the battery with a fresh
one with a full charge.
Clock Battery
An internal clock battery is mounted on one of the instrument’s
printed circuit boards. This long-life battery keeps settings in memory
from being lost whenever the Li-ion, NiMH, or alkaline batteries are
removed. This backup battery should last approximately five years,
and must be replaced by an authorized RAE Systems service
technician. It is not user-replaceable.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
WARNING
To reduce the risk of ignition of hazardous atmospheres, recharge
battery only in area known to be non-hazardous. Remove and
replace battery only in an area known to be non-hazardous.
Replacing Rechargeable Li-Ion or NiMH
Battery
Caution: Turn off the instrument before removing or replacing the
battery.
Alkaline Battery Adapter
An alkaline battery adapter is supplied with each instrument. The
adapter (part number 059-3052-000) accepts four AA alkaline
batteries (use only Duracell MN1500).
Do not mix old and new batteries or different type batteries.
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ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Troubleshooting
Problem
Cannot turn on power
after charging the
battery
Lost password
Reading abnormally
High
Possible Reasons & Solutions
Reasons:
Discharged battery.
Defective battery.
Solutions:
Solutions:
Reasons:
Solutions:
Reading abnormally
Low
Reasons:
Solutions:
Buzzer
Inoperative
Reasons:
Solutions:
115
Charge or replace battery.
Call Technical Support at
+1 408-752-0723 or tollfree at
+1 888-723-4800
Dirty filter.
Dirty sensor module.
Excessive moisture and
water condensation.
Incorrect calibration.
Replace filter.
Blow-dry the sensor
module.
Calibrate the unit.
Dirty filter.
Dirty sensor module.
Weak or dirty lamp.
Incorrect calibration.
Replace filter.
Remove Calibration
Adapter.
Calibrate the unit.
Check for air leakage.
Bad buzzer.
Check that buzzer is not
turned off.
Call authorized service
center.
ppbRAE 3000 User’s Guide
Inlet flow too low
“Lamp” message
during operation
Reasons:
Pump diaphragm damaged
or has debris.
Flow path leaks.
Solutions:
Check flow path for leaks;
sensor module O-ring, tube
connectors, Teflon tube
compression fitting.
Call Technical Support at
+1 408-752-0723
or toll-free at
+1 888-723-4800
Lamp drive circuit.
Weak or defective PID
lamp, defective.
Reasons:
Solutions:
116
Turn the unit off and back
on.
Replace UV lamp
RAE Systems by Honeywell
World Headquarters
3775 N. First St.
San Jose, CA 95134-1708 USA
Phone: 408.952.8200
Toll-Free: 888.723.4800
Fax: 408.952.8480
E-mail (technical support): RAE-tech@honeywell.com
Web Site: www.raesystems.com
WORLDWIDE SALES OFFICES
USA/Canada 1.877.723.2878
Europe +800.333.222.44/+41.44.943.4380
Middle East +971.4.450.5852
China +86.10.5885.8788-3000
Asia Pacific +852.2669.0828
Rev. E
February 2016
P/N 059-4020-000
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
A GUIDELINE FOR PID INSTRUMENT RESPONSE
CORRECTION FACTORS AND IONIZATION ENERGIES*
Example 1:
RAE Systems PIDs can be used for the detection of a wide variety of
gases that exhibit different responses. In general, any compound with
ionization energy (IE) lower than that of the lamp photons can
be measured.* The best way to calibrate a PID to different compounds
is to use a standard of the gas of interest. However, correction factors
have been determined that enable the user to quantify a large number
of chemicals using only a single calibration gas, typically isobutylene.
In our PIDs, correction factors can be used in one of three ways:
With the unit calibrated to read isobutylene equivalents, the reading
is 10 ppm with a 10.6 eV lamp. The gas being measured is butyl
acetate, which has a correction factor of 2.6. Multiplying 10 by 2.6
gives an adjusted butyl acetate value of 26 ppm. Similarly, if the
gas being measured were trichloroethylene (CF = 0.54), the adjusted
value with a 10 ppm reading would be 5.4 ppm.
1. Calibrate the monitor with isobutylene in the usual fashion to
read in isobutylene equivalents. Manually multiply the reading
by the correction factor (CF) to obtain the concentration of
the gas being measured.
2. Calibrate the unit with isobutylene in the usual fashion to read
in isobutylene equivalents. Call up the correction factor from the
instrument memory or download it from a personal computer
and then call it up. The monitor will then read directly in units
of the gas of interest.
3. Calibrate the unit with isobutylene, but input an equivalent,
“corrected” span gas concentration when prompted for this value.
The unit will then read directly in units of the gas of interest.
* The term “ionization energy” is more scientifically correct and
replaces the old term “ionization potential.” High-boiling (“heavy”)
compounds may not vaporize enough to give a response even when
their ionization energies are below the lamp photon energy. Some
inorganic compounds like H2O2 and NO2 give weak response even
when their ionization energies are well below the lamp photon energy.
RAE Systems by Honeywell 877-723-2878 raesystems.com
Example 2:
With the unit calibrated to read isobutylene equivalents, the reading
is 100 ppm with a 10.6 eV lamp. The gas measured is m-xylene
(CF = 0.43). After downloading this factor, the unit should read about
43 ppm when exposed to the same gas, and thus read directly in
m-xylene values.
Example 3:
The desired gas to measure is ethylene dichloride (EDC). The CF is 0.6
with an 11.7 eV lamp. During calibration with 100 ppm isobutylene,
insert 0.6 times 100, or 60 at the prompt for the calibration gas
concentration. The unit then reads directly in EDC values.
Conversion to mg/m3
To convert from ppm to mg/m3, use the following formula:
For air at 25°C (77°F), the molar gas volume is 24.4 L/mole and the
formula reduces to:
1
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
For example, if the instrument is calibrated with a gas standard in
ppmv, such as 100 ppm isobutylene, and the user wants the display
to read in mg/m3 of hexane, whose m.w. is 86 and CF is 4.3, the
overall correction factor would be 4.3 x 86 x 0.041 equals 15.2.
2.Pressurized gas cylinder (Demand-flow regulator):
A demand-flow regulator better matches pump speed
differences, but results in a slight vacuum during calibration
and thus slightly high readings.
Correction Factors for Mixtures
3.Collapsible gas bag: The instrument will draw the
calibration gas from the bag at its normal flow rate, as
long as the bag valve is large enough. The bag should
be filled with enough gas to allow at least one minute
of flow (~ 0.6 L for a MiniRAE, ~0.3 L for MultiRAE).
The correction factor for a mixture is calculated from the sum
of the mole fractions Xi of each component divided by their
respective correction factors CFi:
Thus, for example, a vapor phase mixture of 5% benzene
and 95% n-hexane would have a CFmix of
CFmix = 1 / (0.05/0.53 + 0.95/4.3) = 3.2. A reading of 100
would then correspond to 320 ppm of the total mixture,
comprised of 16 ppm benzene and 304 ppm hexane.
For a spreadsheet to compute the correction factor and TLV of a
mixture see the appendix at the end of the CF table.
TLVs and Alarm Limits for Mixtures
The correction factor for mixtures can be used to set alarm limits
for mixtures. To do this one first needs to calculate the exposure
limit for the mixture. The Threshold Limit Value (TLV) often defines
exposure limits. The TLV for the mixture is calculated in a manner
similar to the CF calculation:
In the above example, the 8-h TLV for benzene is 0.5 ppm and
for n-hexane 50 ppm. Therefore the TLV of the mixture is
TLVmix = 1 / (0.05/0.5 + 0.95/50) = 8.4 ppm, corresponding to
8.0 ppm hexane and 0.4 ppm benzene. For an instrument
calibrated on isobutylene, the reading corrsponding to the TLV is:
A common practice is to set the lower alarm limit to half the TLV,
and the higher limit to the TLV. Thus, one would set the alarms
to 1.3 and 2.6 ppm, respectively.
4.T (or open tube) method: The T method uses a T-junction
with gas flow higher than the pump draw. The gas supply is
connected to one end of the T, the instrument inlet is connected
to a second end of the T, and excess gas flow escapes through
the third, open end of the T. To prevent ambient air mixing,
a long tube should be connected to the open end, or a high
excess rate should be used. Alternatively, the instrument
probe can be inserted into an open tube slightly wider
than the probe. Excess gas flows out around the probe.
The first two cylinder methods are the most efficient in terms
of gas usage, while the bag and T methods give slightly more
accurate results because they match the pump flow better.
B.Pressure. Pressures deviating from atmospheric pressure
affect the readings by altering gas concentration and pump
characteristics. It is best to calibrate with the instrument and
calibration gas at the same pressure as each other and the
sample gas. (Note that the cylinder pressure is not relevant
because the regulator reduces the pressure to ambient.) If
the instrument is calibrated at atmospheric pressure in one
of the flow configurations described above, then 1) pressures
slightly above ambient are acceptable but high pressures
can damage the pump and 2) samples under vacuum may
give low readings if air leaks into the sample train.
A.Flow Configuration. PID response is essentially
independent of gas flow rate as long as it is sufficient to
satisfy the pump demand. Four main flow configurations
are used for calibrating a PID:
C.Temperature. Because temperature effects gas density and
concentration, the temperature of the calibration gas and
instrument should be as close as possible to the ambient
temperature where the unit will be used. We recommend
that the temperature of the calibration gas be within the
instrument’s temperature specification (typically 14° to 113° F
or -10° to 45° C). Also, during actual measurements, the
instrument should be kept at the same or higher temperature
than the sample temperature to avoid condensation in the unit.
1.Pressurized gas cylinder (Fixed-flow regulator):
The flow rate of the regulator should match the flow
demand of the instrument pump or be slightly higher.
D.Matrix. The matrix gas of the calibration compound and
VOC sample is significant. Some common matrix components,
such as methane and water vapor can affect the VOC signal.
CALIBRATION CHARACTERISTICS
RAE Systems by Honeywell 877-723-2878 raesystems.com
2
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
PIDs are most commonly used for monitoring VOCs in air,
in which case the preferred calibration gas matrix is air.
For a MiniRAE, methane, methanol, and water vapor reduce
the response by about 20% when their concentration is
15,000 ppm and by about 40% at 30,000 ppm. Despite
earlier reports of oxygen effects, RAE PID responses with
10.6 eV lamps are independent of oxygen concentration,
and calibration gases in a pure nitrogen matrix can be
used. H2 and CO2 up to 5 volume % also have no effect.
E.Concentration. Although RAE Systems PIDs have electronically
linearized output, it is best to calibrate in a concentration range
close to the actual measurement range. For example, 100 ppm
standard gas for anticipated vapors of 0 to 250 ppm, and 500 ppm
standard for expected concentrations of 250 to 1000 ppm. The
correction factors in this table were typically measured at 50 to
100 ppm and apply from the ppb range up to about 1000 ppm.
Above 1000 ppm the CF may vary and it is best to calibrate
with the gas of interest near the concentration of interest.
F.Filters. Filters affect flow and pressure conditions and therefore
all filters to be used during sampling should also be in place
during calibration. Using a water trap (hydrophobic filter)
greatly reduces the chances of drawing water aerosols or
dirt particles into the instrument. Regular filter replacements
are recommended because dirty filters can adsorb VOCs
and cause slower response time and shifts in calibration.
G.Instrument Design. High-boiling (“heavy”) or very reactive
compounds can be lost by reaction or adsorption onto materials
in the gas sample train, such as filters, pumps and other
sensors. Multi-gas meters, including EntryRAE, MultiRAE
and AreaRAE have the pump and other sensors upstream of
the PID and are prone to these losses. Compounds possibly
affected by such losses are shown in green in the table, and
may give slow response, or in extreme cases, no response at
all. In many cases the multi-gas meters can still give a rough
indication of the relative concentration, without giving an
accurate, quantitative reading. The ppbRAE and MiniRAE series
instruments have inert sample trains and therefore do not
exhibit significant loss; nevertheless, response may be slow for
the very heavy compounds and additional sampling time up to
a minute or more should be allowed to get a stable reading.
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TABLE ABBREVIATIONS
CF = Correction Factor (multiply by reading to get corrected
value for the compound when calibrated to isobutylene)
NR = No Response
IE = Ionization Energy (values in parentheses are not well
established)
C = Confirmed Value indicated by “+” in this column; all others
are preliminary or estimated values and are subject to change
ne = Not Established ACGIH 8-hr. TWA
C## = Ceiling value, given where 8-hr.TWA is not available
DISCLAIMER
TN-106 is a general guideline for Correction Factors (CF) for use
with PID instruments manufactured by RAE Systems. The CF may
vary depending on instrument and operation conditions. For the best
accuracy, RAE Systems recommends calibrating the instrument to
target gas. Actual readings may vary with age and cleanliness of
lamp, relative humidity, and other factors as well. For accurate work,
the instrument should be calibrated regularly under the operating
conditions used. The factors in this table on the following pages
were measured in dry air (40 to 50% RH) at room temperature,
typically at 50 to 100 ppm. CF values may vary above about 1000 ppm.
Updates
The values in this table on the following pages are subject to change
as more or better data become available. Watch for updates of this
table on the Internet at http://www.raesystems.com.
IE data are taken from the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics,
73rd Edition, D.R. Lide (Ed.), CRC Press (1993) and NIST Standard Ref.
Database 19A, NIST Positive Ion Energetics, Vers. 2.0, Lias, et.al.,
U.S. Dept. Commerce (1993). Exposure limits (8-h TWA and Ceiling
Values) are from the 2005 ACGIH Guide to Occupational Exposure
Values, ACGIH, Cincinnati, OH 2005. Equations for exposure limits
for mixtures of chemicals were taken from the 1997 TLVs and BEIs
handbook published by the ACGIH (1997).
3
Technical Note TN-106 Compound Name
01/16/VK
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
C IE (eV) TWA
75-07-0
C2H4O
NR
+
6
+
3.3
+
10.23
C25
Acetic acid
Ethanoic Acid
64-19-7
C2H4O2
NR
+
22
+
2.6
+
10.66
10
Acetic anhydride
Ethanoic Acid Anhydride
108-24-7
C 4H6O3
NR
+
6.1
+
2.0
+
10.14
5
Acetone
2-Propanone
67-64-1
C 3H6O
1.2
+
0.9
+
1.4
+
9.71
500
Acetone cyanohydrin
2-Hydroxyisobutyronitrile
75-86-5
C 4 H 7 NO
4
+
11.1
C5
Acetonitrile
Methyl cyanide, Cyanomethane
75-05-8
C2H3N
100
12.19
40
Acetylene
Ethyne
74-86-2
C2H2
Acrolein
Propenal
107-02-8
C 3H4O
Acrylic acid
Propenoic Acid
79-10-7
Acrylonitrile
Propenenitrile
Acetaldehyde
Allyl alcohol
Allyl chloride
3-Chloropropene
Ammonia
2.1
+
11.40
ne
3.9
+
1.4
+
10.10
0.1
C 3H4O2
12
+
2.0
+
10.60
2
107-13-1
C 3H3N
NR
+
1.2
+
10.91
2
107-18-6
C 3H6O
2.4
+
1.6
+
9.67
2
107-05-1
C 3 H 5 Cl
9.9
1
7664-41-7
NH 3
NR
+
10.9
+
5.7
+
10.16
25
11
+
2.3
+
0.95
+
<9.9
100
42
4.5
+
+
4.3
0.7
Amyl acetate
mix of n-Pentyl acetate &
2-Methylbutyl acetate
628-63-7
C 7 H14 O 2
Amyl alcohol
1-Pentanol
75-85-4
C 5 H12 O
10.00
ne
Aniline
Aminobenzene
62-53-3
C 6H7N
0.50
+
0.48
+
0.47
+
7.72
2
Anisole
Methoxybenzene
100-66-3
C 7H8O
0.89
+
0.58
+
0.56
+
8.21
ne
Arsine
Arsenic trihydride
1.9
+
9.89
0.05
9.49
ne
9.25
0.5
9.62
ne
7784-42-1
AsH 3
Benzaldehyde
100-52-7
C 7H6 O
Benzene
71-43-2
C 6H6
5
1
0.55
+
0.47
+
0.6
+
Benzonitrile
Cyanobenzene
100-47-0
C 7H5N
1.6
Benzyl alcohol
α-Hydroxytoluene,
Hydroxymethylbenzene,
Benzenemethanol
100-51-6
C 7H8O
1.4
+
1.1
+
0.9
+
8.26
ne
Benzyl chloride
α-Chlorotoluene,
Chloromethylbenzene
100-44-7
C 7 H 7 Cl
0.7
+
0.6
+
0.5
+
9.14
1
Benzyl formate
Formic acid benzyl ester
+
0.73
+
0.66
+
104-57-4
C 8H8O2
0.9
Boron trifluoride
7637-07-2
BF 3
NR
Bromine
7726-95-6
Br 2
NR
Bromobenzene
108-86-1
C 6 H 5 Br
0.6
2-Bromoethyl methyl ether
6482-24-2
C 3 H 7 OBr
0.84
+
NR
+
1.30
NR
+
0.74
+
0.5
ne
15.5
C1
10.51
0.1
8.98
ne
~10
ne
Bromoform
Tribromomethane
75-25-2
CHBr 3
NR
+
2.7
+
0.5
+
10.48
0.5
Bromopropane,1-
n-Propyl bromide
106-94-5
C 3 H 7 Br
150
+
1.5
+
0.6
+
10.18
ne
Butadiene
1,3-Butadiene, Vinyl ethylene
106-99-0
C 4H6
0.8
0.6
+
1.1
9.07
2
Butadiene diepoxide, 1,3-
1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane
298-18-0
C 4H6O2
25
3.5
+
1.2
~10
ne
106-97-8
C 4 H10
67
+
1.2
10.53
800
1.4
9.99
20
9.90
100
9.58
ne
<10
25
Butane
+
Butanol, 1-
Butyl alcohol, n-Butanol
71-36-3
C 4 H10 O
70
+
4.7
+
Butanol, t-
tert-Butanol, t-Butyl alcohol
75-65-0
C 4 H10 O
6.9
+
2.9
+
Butene, 1-
1-Butylene
106-98-9
C 4H8
Butoxyethanol, 2-
Butyl Cellosolve, Ethylene
glycol monobutyl ether
111-76-2
C 6 H14 O 2
Butoxyethyl Acetate, 2-
2-Butoxyethyl acetate; 2-Butoxy- 112-07-2
ethanol acetate; Butyl Cellosolve
acetate; Butyl glycol acetate;
EGBEA; Ektasolve EB acetate
+
0.9
1.2
+
C 8 H16 O 3
1.27
+
123-86-4
C 6 H12 O 2
2.6
+
141-32-2
C 7 H12 O 2
1.6
+
0.6
+
Butylamine, n-
109-73-9
C 4 H11N
1.1
+
1.1
+
0.7
+
Butyl cellosolve see 2-Butoxyethanol
111-76-2
Butyl hydroperoxide, t-
75-91-2
C 4 H10 O 2
2.0
+
1.6
+
Butyl acetate, nButyl acrylate, n-
Butyl 2-propenoate,
Acrylic acid butyl ester
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1.8
+
0.6
+
20
10
150
10
8.71
C5
<10
1
4
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
C IE (eV) TWA
Compound Name
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
Butyl mercaptan
1-Butanethiol
109-79-5
C 4 H10 S
0.55
+
0.52
+
9.14
0.5
Butyraldehyde
Butanal
123-72-8
C 4H8O
1.87
+
9.82
20
CamelinaI HRJ
1.1
+
0.32
+
CamelinaI HRJ/JP-8 50/50
0.89
+
0.41
+
CamelinalHRJ
1.15
+
CamelinalHRJ/JP-8
1.07
+
10.07
10
11.47
5
Carbon disulfide
75-15-0
CS 2
4
+
1.2
+
0.44
NR
+
NR
+
1.7
Carbon tetrachloride
Tetrachloromethane
56-23-5
CCl 4
+
Carbonyl sulfide
Carbon oxysulfide
463-58-1
COS
Chlorine
7782-50-5
Cl 2
1.0
+
11.48
0.5
Chlorine dioxide
10049-04-4
ClO 2
NR
+
NR
+
NR
+
10.57
0.1
10
11.18
Cellosolve see 2-Ethoxyethanol
CFC-14 see Tetrafluoromethane
CFC-113 see 1,1,2-Trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane
Chlorobenzene
Monochlorobenzene
108-90-7
C 6 H 5 Cl
0.44
+
0.55
+
0.39
+
9.06
Chlorobenzotrifluoride, 4-
PCBTF, OXSOL 100
p-Chlorobenzotrifluoride
98-56-6
C 7 H 4 ClF 3
0.74
+
0.63
+
0.55
+
<9.6
Chloro-1,3-butadiene, 2-
Chloroprene
126-99-8
C 4 H 5 Cl
Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane, 1-
HCFC-142B, R-142B
75-68-3
C 2 H 3 ClF 2
NR
NR
NR
12.0
ne
Chlorodifluoromethane
HCFC-22, R-22
75-45-6
CHClF 2
NR
NR
NR
12.2
1000
Chloroethane
Ethyl chloride
75-00-3
C 2 H 5 Cl
NR
10.97
100
Chloroethanol
Ethylene chlrohydrin
107-07-3
C 2 H 5 ClO
10.52
C1
Chloroethanol, 2-
2-Chloroethanol; 2-Chloroethyl
alcohol; Ethylene chlorhydrin
107-07-3
C 2 H 5 ClO
10.5
5
Chloroethyl ether, 2-
bis (2-chloroethyl) ether
111-44-4
C 4 H 8 Cl 2 O
Chloroethyl methyl ether, 2-
Methyl 2-chloroethyl ether
627-42-9
C 3 H 7 ClO
Chloroform
Trichloromethane
67-66-3
CHCl 3
NR
+
NR
+
3.5
+
11.37
10
Chloro-2-methylpropene, 3-
Methallyl chloride, Isobutenyl
chloride
563-47-3
C 4 H 7 Cl
1.4
+
1.2
+
0.63
+
9.76
ne
NR
+
~400
+
7
+
3
8.6
76-06-2
CCl 3 NO 2
o-Chloromethylbenzene
95-49-8
C 7 H 7 Cl
Chlorotoluene, p-
p-Chloromethylbenzene
106-43-4
C 7 H 7 Cl
Chlorotrifluoroethene
CTFE, Chlorotrifluoroethylene
Genetron 1113
79-38-9
C 2 ClF 3
6.7
75-77-4
C 3 H 9 ClSi
NR
108-39-4
C 7H8O
0.57
Chlorotrimethylsilane
Cresol, m-
m-Hydroxytoluene,
3-Methylphenol
Cresol, o-
ortho-Cresol; 2-Cresol; o-Cresylic 95-48-7
acid; 1-Hydroxy-2-methylbenzene;
2-Hydroxytoluene; 2-Methyl
phenol
Cresol, p-
+
NR
+
2.88
+
3.0
+
1.1
+
5
3
Chlorotoluene, o-
Chloropicrin
+
10
ne
0.5
+
3.9
+
NR
+
0.1
0.6
8.83
50
0.6
8.69
ne
1.2
+
9.76
5
0.82
+
10.83
ne
0.57
+
8.29
5
0.50
+
C 7H8O
1
+
8.14
5
para-Cresol; 4-Cresol; p-Cresylic 106-44-5
acid; 1-Hydroxy-4-methylbenzene;
4-Hydroxytoluene; 4-Methyl
phenol
C 7H8O
1.4
+
8.34
5
Crotonaldehyde
trans-2-Butenal
123-73-9
4170-30-3
C 4H6O
1.5
+
1.1
+
1.0
+
9.73
2
Cumene
Isopropylbenzene
+
0.54
+
0.4
+
8.73
50
11.84
ne
98-82-8
C 9 H12
0.58
Cyanogen bromide
506-68-3
CNBr
NR
Cyanogen chloride
506-77-4
CNCl
NR
12.34
C0.3
Cyclohexane
110-82-7
C 6 H12
3.3
+
1.4
+
0.64
+
9.86
300
108-93-0
C 6 H12 O
1.5
+
0.9
+
1.1
+
9.75
50
108-94-1
C 6 H10 O
1.0
+
0.9
+
0.7
+
9.14
25
Cyclohexanol
Cyclohexyl alcohol
Cyclohexanone
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NR
NR
NR
NR
5
Technical Note TN-106 Compound Name
01/16/VK
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
Cyclohexene
110-83-8
C 6 H10
0.8
Cyclohexylamine
108-91-8
C 6 H13 N
1.2
Cyclopentane 85%
2,2-dimethylbutane 15%
287-92-3
C 5 H10
NR
+
15
+
1.1
+
8.95
300
8.62
10
10.33
600
765-30-0
C 3H7N
1.1
+
0.9
+
0.9
+
Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane
541-02-6
C10 H 30 O 5 Si 5
0.16
+
0.13
+
0.12
+
Decamethyltetrasiloxane
141-62-8
C10 H 30 O 3 Si 4
0.17
+
0.13
+
0.12
+
<10.2
ne
Decane
124-18-5
C10 H 22
4.0
+
1.4
+
0.35
+
9.65
ne
10.59
Cyclopropylamine
Aminocyclpropane
C IE (eV) TWA
ne
ne
Diacetone alcohol
4-Methyl-4-hydroxy-2-pentanone 123-42-2
C 6 H12 O 2
Dibromochloromethane
Chlorodibromomethane
124-48-1
CHBr 2 Cl
NR
+
0.7
5.2
+
0.7
+
Dibromo-3chloropropane, 1,2-
DBCP
96-12-8
C 3 H 5 Br 2 Cl
NR
+
1.7
+
0.43
+
Dibromoethane, 1,2-
EDB, Ethylene dibromide,
Ethylene bromide
106-93-4
C 2 H 4 Br 2
NR
+
1.7
+
0.6
+
10.37
ne
Dichlorobenzene, o-
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
95-50-1
C 6 H 4 Cl 2
0.54
+
0.64
+
0.38
+
9.08
25
Dichlorodifluoromethane
CFC-12
75-71-8
CCl 2 F 2
NR
+
NR
+
11.75
1000
NR
ne
0.001
75-78-5
C 2 H 6 Cl 2 Si
1.1
+
>10.7
ne
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
EDC, 1,2-DCA, Ethylene
dichloride
107-06-2
C 2 H 4 Cl 2
NR
+
0.6
+
11.04
10
Dichloroethene, 1,1-
1,1-DCE, Vinylidene chloride
75-35-4
C 2 H 2 Cl 2
0.82
+
0.8
+
9.79
5
Dichloroethene, c-1,2-
c-1,2-DCE, cis-Dichloroethylene
156-59-2
C 2 H 2 Cl 2
0.8
9.66
200
Dichloroethene, t-1,2-
t-1,2-DCE, trans-Dichloroethylene 156-60-5
C 2 H 2 Cl 2
0.45
+
0.34
+
9.65
200
Dichloro-1-fluoroethane, 1,1-
R-141B
1717-00-6
C 2 H 3 Cl 2 F
NR
+
NR
+
2.0
+
ne
442-56-0
507-55-1
C 3 HCl 2 F 5
NR
+
NR
+
25
+
ne
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
78-87-5
C 3 H 6 Cl 2
Dichloro-1-propene, 1,3-
542-75-6
C 3 H 4 Cl 2
1.3
+
0.96
+
Dichloro-1-propene, 2,3-
78-88-6
C 3 H 4 Cl 2
1.9
+
1.3
+
0.7
+
Dichloro-1,1,1- trifluoroethane, 2,2- R-123
306-83-2
C 2 HCl 2 F 3
NR
+
NR
+
10.1
+
Dichloro-2,4,6- trifluoropyridine, DCTFP
3,5-
1737-93-5
C 5 Cl 2 F 3 N
1.1
+
0.9
+
0.8
+
Dichlorvos **
Vapona; O,O-dimethyl
O-dichlorovinyl phosphate
62-73-7
C 4 H 7 Cl 2 O 4 P
0.9
+
Dicyclopentadiene
DCPD, Cyclopentadiene dimer
0.48
+
0.9
+
0.7
+
+
Dichlorodimethylsilane
NR
50
Dichloromethane see Methylene chloride
Dichloropentafluoropropane
AK-225, mix of ~45% 3,3dichloro-1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoropropane (HCFC-225ca) & ~55%
1,3-Dichloro-1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoropropane (HCFC-225cb)
0.7
77-73-6
C10 H12
Diesel Fuel**
0.57
68334-30-5
m.w. 226
Diesel Fuel #2 (Automotive) **
68334-30-5
m.w. 216
Diethylamine
109-89-7
C 4 H11N
1
Diethylaminopropylamine, 3-
104-78-9
C 7 H18 N 2
1.3
1.3
+
0.43
+
0.4
+
10.87
75
<10
1
<10
ne
11.5
ne
ne
<9.4
0.1
8.8
5
11
11
8.01
5
ne
Diethylbenzene see Dowtherm J
Diethyl ether
Diethyl ether; Diethyl oxide; Ethyl 60-29-7
oxide; Ether; Solvent ether
C 4 H10 O
1.74
+
Diethylene glycol butyl ether
2-(2-Butoxyethoxy)ethanol, BDG,
Butyldiglycol, DB Solvent
C 8 H18 O 3
4.6
+
5
Diethylene glycol monobutyl
ether acetate
Butyldiglycol acetate, DB Acetate, 124-17-4
Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether
acetate
C10 H 20 O 4
5.62
+
ne
141-05-9
C 8 H12 O 4
4
111-96-6
C 6 H14 O 3
Diethylmaleate
112-34-5
9.51
400
ne
Diethyl sulfide see Ethyl sulfide
Diglyme see Methoxyethyl ether
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6
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
Compound Name
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
C IE (eV) TWA
Diisobutyl ketone
DIBK, 2,2-dimethyl-4-heptanone
108-83-8
C 9 H18 O
0.71
+
0.61
+
0.35
+
9.04
25
108-18-9
C 6 H15 N
0.84
+
0.74
+
0.5
+
7.73
5
Diisopropylamine
Diisopropylcarbodiimide,N,N’-
DIPC
693-13-0
C 7 H14 N 2
0.42
+
ne
Diisopropylethylamine
‘Hünig’s base’,
N-Ethyldiisopropylamine, DIPEA,
Ethyldiisopropylamine
7087-68-5
C 8 H19 N
0.7
+
ne
Diketene
Ketene dimer
674-82-8
C 4H4O2
2.6
+
2.0
+
1.4
+
9.6
0.5
Dimethylacetamide, N,N-
DMA
127-19-5
C 4 H 9 NO
0.87
+
0.8
+
0.8
+
8.81
10
124-40-3
C2H7N
8.23
5
Dimethyl carbonate
Carbonic acid dimethyl ester
616-38-6
C 3H6O3
NR
+
~70
+
1.7
+
~10.5
ne
Dimethyl disulfide
DMDS
624-92-0
C2H6 S2
0.2
+
0.20
+
0.21
+
7.4
ne
Dimethylethylamine
DMEA
598-56-1
C 4 H11N
1.1
+
1.0
+
0.9
+
7.74
~3
Dimethylformamide, N,N-
DMF
68-12-2
C 3 H 7 NO
0.7
+
0.7
+
0.8
+
9.13
10
Dimethylhydrazine, 1,1-
UDMH
57-14-7
C2H8N2
0.8
+
0.8
+
7.28
0.01
Dimethyl methylphosphonate
DMMP, methyl phosphonic
acid dimethyl ester
756-79-6
C 3H9O3P
NR
4.3
+
0.74
+
10.0
ne
77-78-1
C2H6O4 S
~23
~20
+
2.3
+
67-68-5
C 2 H 6 OS
1.4
+
123-91-1
C 4H8O2
646-06-0
C 3H6O2
Dimethylamine
1.5
Dimethyl ether see Methyl ether
Dimethyl sulfate
+
0.1
Dimethyl sulfide see Methyl sulfide
Dimethyl sulfoxide
DMSO, Methyl sulfoxide
Dioxane, 1,4Dioxolane, 1,3-
Ethylene glycol formal
1.3
4.0
+
2.3
+
1.6
+
9.10
ne
9.19
25
9.9
20
Dowtherm A see Therminol ® **
Dowtherm J (97% Diethylbenzene)**
25340-17-4
C10 H14
DS-108F Wipe Solvent
Ethyl lactate/Isopar H/
Propoxypropanol ~7:2:1
97-64-3
64742-48-9
1569-01-3
m.w. 118
3.3
+
1.6
+
0.7
+
Epichlorohydrin
ECH Chloromethyloxirane,
1-chloro2,3-epoxypropane
106-89-8
C 2 H 5 ClO
~200
+
8.5
+
1.4
+
10.2
0.5
74-84-0
C2H6
NR
+
15
+
11.52
ne
9.6
+
3.1
+
10.47
1000
1.6
+
8.96
3
+
10.51
ne
9.6
5
10.01
400
Ethane
0.5
ne
Ethanol
Ethyl alcohol
64-17-5
C2H6O
Ethanolamine**
MEA, Monoethanolamine
141-43-5
C 2 H 7 NO
Ethene
Ethylene
74-85-1
C2H4
9
Ethoxyethanol, 2-
Ethyl cellosolve, Ethylene
glycol monoethyl ether
110-80-5
C 4 H10 O 2
1.3
Ethyl acetate
Acetic ester; Acetic ether;
Ethyl ester of acetic acid; Ethyl
ethanoate
141-78-6
C 4H8O2
3.8
+
Ethyl acetoacetate
141-97-9
C 6 H10 O 3
1.2
+
1.0
+
<10
ne
Ethyl acrylate
140-88-5
C5H8O2
2.4
+
1.0
+
<10.3
5
141-78-6
C 4H8O2
2.18
+
10.01
400
Ethylamine
75-04-7
C2H7N
8.86
5
Ethylbenzene
100-41-4
C 8 H10
8.77
100
8.6
10
Ethylactate
Acetic ester; Acetic ether;
Ethyl ester of acetic acid; Ethyl
ethanoate
5.6
1.4
+
+
+
0.65
+
0.51
+
+
0.52
+
0.51
+
+
0.8
+
1.0
+
Ethyl octanoate
106-32-1
C10 H 20 O 2
Ethylenediamine
1,2-Ethanediamine;
1,2-Diaminoethane
107-15-3
C2H8N2
(Ethylenedioxy)diethanethiol,
2,2’-
1,2-Bis(2-mercaptoethoxy)ethane, 14970-87-7
3,6-Dioxa-1,8-octane-dithiol
C 6 H14 O 2 S 2
1.3
+
Ethylene glycol**
1,2-Ethanediol
107-21-1
C2H6O2
16
+
Ethylene glycol, Acrylate**
2-hydroxyethyl Acrylate
818-61-1
C5H8O3
8.2
Ethylene glycol dimethyl ether
1,2-Dimethoxyethane, Monoglyme 110-71-4
RAE Systems by Honeywell 877-723-2878 raesystems.com
+
0.8
0.52
Ethyl caprylate
C 4 H10 O 2
4.5
0.9
1.1
1.1
ne
6
+
10.16
C100
≤10.6
0.7
9.2
ne
7
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
Compound Name
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
Ethylene glycol monobutyl
ether acetate
1,2-Dimethoxyethane, Monoglyme
110-71-4
C4H10O2
1.1
60-24-2
C2H6OS
1.5
Ethylene glycol, monothio
C 10.6
C 11.7
1.1
0.7
Oxirane, Epoxyethane
75-21-8
C2H4O
13
+
Ethyl ether
Diethyl ether
60-29-7
C 4 H10 O
1.1
+
Ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate
EEP
763-69-9
C 7 H14 O 3
0.75
+
+
9.2
ne
9.65
Ethylene oxide
1.2
C IE (eV) TWA
3.5
+
10.57
1
9.51
400
ne
109-94-4
C 3H6O2
Ethyl-1-hexanol, 2-
Isooctyl alcohol
104-76-7
C 8 H18 O
1.9
+
Ethyl hexyl acrylate, 2-
Acrylic acid 2-ethylhexyl ester
103-11-7
C11H 20 O 2
1.1
+
0.5
+
Ethylidenenorbornene
5-Ethylidene bicyclo(2,2,1)
hept-2-ene
16219-75-3
C 9 H12
0.4
+
0.39
+
0.34
+
≤8.8
ne
Ethyl (S)-(-)-lactate
see also DS-108F
Ethyl lactate, Ethyl (S)-(-)hydroxypropionate
687-47-8
97-64-3
C 5 H10 O 3
13
+
3.2
+
1.6
+
~10
ne
Ethyl mercaptan
Ethanethiol
75-08-1
C2H6S
0.60
+
0.56
+
9.29
0.5
Ethyl sulfide
Diethyl sulfide
352-93-2
C 4 H10 S
0.5
+
8.43
ne
Formaldehyde
Formalin
50-00-0
CH 2 O
NR
+
NR
+
1.6
10.87
C0.3
Formamide
75-12-7
CH 3 NO
6.9
+
4
10.16
10
Formic acid
64-18-6
CH 2 O 2
NR
+
9
+
11.33
5
0.8
+
9.21
2
<9.5
10
Ethyl formate
NR
+
10.61
100
ne
+
ne
98-01-1
C5H4O2
0.92
+
Furfuryl alcohol
98-00-0
C5H6O2
0.80
+
Gasoline #1
8006-61-9
m.w. 72
0.9
+
Gasoline #2, 92 octane
8006-61-9
m.w. 93
1.3
+
1.0
+
0.5
+
300
C0.05
Furfural
2-Furaldehyde
1.9
300
Glutaraldehyde
1,5-Pentanedial, Glutaric
dialdehyde
111-30-8
C5H8O2
1.1
+
0.8
+
0.6
+
Glycidyl methacrylate
2,3-Epoxypropyl methacrylate
106-91-2
C 7 H10 O 3
2.6
+
1.2
+
0.9
+
Halothane
2-Bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1trifluoroethane
151-67-7
C 2 HBrClF 3
142-82-5
C 7 H16
45
+
2.8
+
0.60
1.8
+
1.3
+
0.2
+
0.6
0.5
11.0
50
+
9.92
400
0.5
+
9.61
ne
0.2
+
~8.6
ne
HCFC-22 see Chlorodifluoromethane
HCFC-123 see 2,2-Dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane
HCFC-141B see 1,1-Dichloro-1-fluoroethane
HCFC-142B see 1-Chloro-1,1-difluoroethane
HCFC-134A see 1,1,1,2-Tetrafluoroethane
HCFC-225 see Dichloropentafluoropropane
Heptane, nHeptanol, 4-
Dipropylcarbinol
589-55-9
C 7 H16 O
Hexamethyldisilazane,
1,1,1,3,3,3- **
HMDS
999-97-3
C 6 H19 NSi 2
Hexamethyldisiloxane
HMDSx
107-46-0
C 6 H18 OSi 2
0.33
+
0.27
+
0.25
+
9.64
ne
110-54-3
C 6 H14
350
+
4.3
+
0.54
+
10.13
50
111-27-3
C 6 H14 O
9
+
2.5
+
0.55
+
9.89
ne
592-41-6
C 6 H12
9.44
30
Hexane, nHexanol, 1-
Hexyl alcohol
Hexene, 1-
0.8
HFE-7100 see Methyl nonafluorobutyl ether
Histoclear (Histo-Clear)
Limonene/corn oil reagent
Hydrazine**
302-01-2
m.w. ~136
0.5
+
0.4
+
0.3
+
H4N2
>8
+
2.6
+
2.1
+
0.01
Hydrazoic acid
Hydrogen azide
Hydrogen
Synthesis gas
1333-74-0
H2
NR
+
NR
+
NR
+
15.43
ne
Hydrogen cyanide
Hydrocyanic acid
74-90-8
HCN
NR
+
NR
+
NR
+
13.6
C4.7
Hydrogen iodide**
Hydriodic acid
10034-85-2
HI
Hydrogen peroxide
7722-84-1
H2O2
NR
+
NR
+
NR
+
10.54
1
Hydrogen sulfide
7783-06-4
H2S
NR
+
3.3
+
1.5
+
10.45
10
818-61-1
C5H8O3
8.2
+
Hydroxyethyl acrylate, 2-
Ethylene glycol monoacrylate
RAE Systems by Honeywell 877-723-2878 raesystems.com
HN 3
ne
8.1
10.7
~0.6
10.39
ne
8
Technical Note TN-106 Compound Name
01/16/VK
Synonym/Abbreviation
Hydroxypropyl methacrylate
Iodine**
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
C IE (eV) TWA
27813-02-1
923-26-2
C 7 H12 O 3
9.9
+
2.3
+
1.1
+
ne
7553-56-2
I2
0.1
+
0.1
+
0.1
+
9.40
C0.1
Iodomethane
Methyl iodide
74-88-4
CH 3 I
0.21
+
0.22
+
0.26
+
9.54
2
Isoamyl acetate
Isopentyl acetate
123-92-2
C 7 H14 O 2
10.1
<10
100
Isobutane
2-Methylpropane
75-28-5
C 4 H10
10.57
ne
Isobutanol
2-Methyl-1-propanol
78-83-1
C 4 H10 O
19
10.02
50
Isobutene
Isobutylene, Methyl butene
115-11-7
C 4H8
1.00
9.24
ne
Isobutyl acetate
2-methylpropyl ethanoate,
β-methylpropyl acetate
110-19-0
C 6 H12 O 2
9.97
150
Isobutyl acrylate
Isobutyl 2-propenoate,
Acrylic acid Isobutyl ester
106-63-8
C 7 H12 O 2
Isoflurane
1-Chloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl
difluoromethyl ether, forane
26675-46-7
C 3 H 2 ClF 5 O
Isooctane
2,2,4-Trimethylpentane
540-84-1
C 8 H18
Isopar E Solvent
Isoparaffinic hydrocarbons
64741-66-8
m.w. 121
Isopar G Solvent
Photocopier diluent
64742-48-9
m.w. 148
Isopar K Solvent
Isoparaffinic hydrocarbons
64742-48-9
m.w. 156
0.9
Isopar L Solvent
Isoparaffinic hydrocarbons
64742-48-9
m.w. 163
0.9
Isopar M Solvent
Isoparaffinic hydrocarbons
64742-47-8
m.w. 191
Isopentane
2-Methylbutane
78-78-4
C 5 H12
8.2
78-59-1
C 9 H14 O
78-79-5
C5H8
0.69
+
0.63
+
0.60
C 3H8O
500
+
4.6
+
2.7
Isophorone
Isoprene
2-Methyl-1,3-butadiene
Isopropanol
Isopropyl alcohol, 2-propanol, IPA 67-63-0
Isopropyl acetate
2.1
1.0
100
+
1.2
+
3.8
+
1.5
+
1.00
+
1.00
2.1
+
1.5
+
0.60
+
NR
+
48
+
NR
+
1.7
+
+
+
1.2
ne
~11.7
ne
9.86
ne
0.8
+
0.8
+
ne
+
0.5
+
0.27
+
ne
+
0.5
+
0.28
+
ne
0.7
+
0.4
+
ne
ne
ne
3
+
9.07
C5
8.85
ne
10.12
200
108-21-4
C 5 H10 O 2
2.6
9.99
100
9.20
250
Isopropyl ether
Diisopropyl ether
108-20-3
C 6 H14 O
0.8
Jet fuel JP-4
Jet B, Turbo B, F-40
Wide cut type aviation fuel
8008-20-6 +
64741-42-0
m.w. 115
1.0
+
0.4
+
ne
Jet fuel JP-5
Jet 5, F-44, Kerosene type
aviation fuel
8008-20-6 +
64747-77-1
m.w. 167
0.6
+
0.5
+
29
Jet fuel JP-8
F-34, Kerosene type aviation fuel
8008-20-6 +
64741-77-1
m.w. 165
0.94
+
0.3
+
30
Jet fuel A-1
F-34, Kerosene type aviation fuel
8008-20-6 +
64741-77-1
m.w. 145
0.67
Jet Fuel TS
Thermally Stable Jet Fuel,
Hydrotreated kerosene fuel
8008-20-6 +
64742-47-8
m.w. 165
0.9
+
34
0.6
+
0.3
+
JP-10
0.7
+
0.5
+
JP5, Petroleum/camelinal
1.05
+
0.98
+
0.33
+
1.5
+
JP5/Petroleum
Limonene, D-
(R)-(+)-Limonene
Kerosene C10-C16 petro.distillate see Jet Fuels
5989-27-5
C10 H16
30
~8.2
ne
~10.8
0.1
9.65
0.2
8008-20-6
MDI see 4,4’-Methylenebis (phenylisocyanate)
Maleic anhydride
2,5-Furandione
108-31-6
C 4H2O3
Mercapto-2-ethanol
β-Mercaptoethanol,
2-Hydroxyethylmercaptan, BME,
Thioethylene glycol
60-24-2
C 2 H 6 OS
Mesitylene
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
108-67-8
C 9 H12
0.36
+
0.35
+
0.3
+
8.41
25
Methallyl chloride see 3-Chloro-2-methylpropene
Methane
Natural gas
74-82-8
CH 4
NR
+
NR
+
NR
+
12.61
ne
Methanol
Methyl alcohol, carbinol
67-56-1
CH 4 O
NR
+
NR
+
2.5
+
10.85
200
Methoxyethanol, 2-
Methyl cellosolve, Ethylene glycol 109-86-4
monomethyl ether
C 3H8O2
4.8
+
2.4
+
1.4
+
10.1
5
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9
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
Compound Name
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
C IE (eV) TWA
Methoxyethoxyethanol, 2-
2-(2-Methoxyethoxy)ethanol
Diethylene glycol monomethyl
ether
111-77-3
C 5 H12 O 3
2.3
+
1.2
+
0.9
+
<10
ne
Methoxyethyl ether, 2-
bis(2-Methoxyethyl) ether,
Diethylene glycol dimethyl ether,
Diglyme
111-96-6
C 6 H14 O 3
0.64
+
0.54
+
0.44
+
<9.8
ne
NR
+
6.6
+
1.4
+
10.27
200
3.7
+
1.2
+
(9.9)
2
8.97
5
0.85
+
0.5
+
9.30
50
0.68
+
7.32
2
79-20-9
C 3H6O2
Methyl acrylate
Methyl 2-propenoate,
Acrylic acid methyl ester
96-33-3
C 4H6O2
Methylamine
Aminomethane
74-89-5
CH 5 N
Methyl amyl ketone
MAK, 2-Heptanone,
Methyl pentyl ketone
110-43-0
C 7 H14 O
Methylaniline, N-
MA; (Methylamino) benzene;
N-Methyl aniline;
Methylphenylamine;
N-Phenylmethylamin
100-61-8
C 7H9 N
Methyl bromide
Bromomethane
74-83-9
CH 3 Br
1.7
+
10.54
1
Methyl-2-butanol, 2-
tert-Amyl alcohol,
tert-Pentyl alcohol
75-85-4
C 5 H12 O
1.62
+
10.16
100
Methyl t-butyl ether
MTBE, tert-Butyl methyl ether
1634-04-4
C 5 H12 O
0.9
+
9.24
40
74-87-3
CH 3 Cl
NR
+
NR
+
0.74
+
11.22
50
107-87-2
C 7 H14
1.6
+
0.97
+
0.53
+
9.64
400
C15 H10 N 2 O 2
Very slow ppb level response
Methyl acetate
1.2
0.9
110
+
+
1.3
+
Methyl cellosolve see 2-Methoxyethanol
Methyl chloride
Chloromethane
Methylcyclohexane
Methylene bis
(phenyl-isocyanate), 4,4’- **
MDI, Mondur M
Methylene chloride
Dichloromethane
75-09-2
CH 2 Cl 2
NR
+
NR
+
0.89
+
11.32
25
Methyl ether
Dimethyl ether
115-10-6
C2H6O
4.8
+
3.1
+
2.5
+
10.03
ne
Methyl ethyl ketone
MEK, 2-Butanone
78-93-3
C 4H8O
0.86
+
1.0
+
1.1
+
9.51
200
Methylhydrazine
Monomethylhydrazine,
Hydrazomethane
60-34-4
C2H6N2
1.4
+
1.2
+
1.3
+
7.7
0.01
Methyl isoamyl ketone
MIAK, 5-Methyl-2-hexanone
110-12-3
C 7 H14 O
0.8
+
0.76
+
0.5
+
9.28
50
Methyl isobutyl ketone
MIBK, 4-Methyl-2-pentanone
108-10-1
C 6 H12 O
0.9
+
0.8
+
0.6
+
9.30
50
Methyl isocyanate
624-83-9
C 2 H 3 NO
NR
+
4.6
+
1.5
10.67
0.02
Methyl isothiocyanate
551-61-6
C 2 H 3 NS
0.5
+
0.45
+
0.4
9.25
ne
74-93-1
CH 4 S
0.65
9.44
0.5
80-62-6
C5H8O2
2.7
9.7
100
Methyl mercaptan
Methanethiol
Methyl methacrylate
0.54
+
0.005
+
0.66
1.5
+
1.2
+
~35
+
Methyl nonafluorobutyl ether
HFE-7100DL
163702-08-7, C 5 H 3 F 9 O
163702-07-6
NR
+
Methyl-1,5-pentanediamine, 2(coats lamp) **
Dytek-A amine, 2-Methyl
pentamethylenediamine
15520-10-2
C 6 H16 N 2
~0.6
+
Methyl propyl ketone
MPK, 2-Pentanone
107-87-9
C 5 H12 O
0.93
+
0.79
Methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, N-
NMP, N-Methylpyrrolidone,
1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinone,
1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone
872-50-4
C 5 H 9 NO
1.0
+
0.8
+
0.9
Methyl salicylate**
Methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate
119-36-8
C 8H8O3
1.3
+
0.9
+
0.9
Methylstyrene, α-
2-Propenylbenzene
98-83-9
C 9 H10
Methyl sulfide
DMS, Dimethyl sulfide
75-18-3
C2H6S
Methyl vinyl ketone
MVK, 3-Buten-2-one
78-94-4
Methyltetrahydrofuran
2-MeTHF, Tetrahydro-2methylfuran, Tetrahydrosilvan
Mineral spirits
Mineral Spirits
<9.0
ne
+
9.38
200
+
9.17
ne
+
~9
ne
8.18
50
8.69
ne
0.5
0.44
+
C 4H6O
0.93
+
9.65
ne
96-47-9
C 5 H10 O
2.44
+
9.22
ne
Stoddard Solvent, Varsol 1,
White Spirits
8020-83-5
8052-41-3
68551-17-7
m.w. 144
1.0
0.69
+
0.38
+
100
Viscor 120B Calibration Fluid,
b.p. 156-207°C
8052-41-3
m.w. 142
1.0
0.7
+
0.3
+
100
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0.49
+
+
0.46
ne
+
10
Technical Note TN-106 Compound Name
01/16/VK
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
C IE (eV) TWA
Monoethanolamine see Ethanolamine
HD, Bis (2-chloroethyl) sulfide
505-60-2
39472-40-7
68157-62-0
C 4 H 8 Cl 2 S
Naphthalene
Mothballs
91-20-3
C10 H 8
Nickel carbonyl (in CO)
Nickel tetracarbonyl
13463-39-3
C 4 NiO 4
0.18
Nicotine
3-(1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidyl)pyridine
54-11-5
C10 H14 N 2
1.98
+
Nitric oxide
10102-43-9
NO
~6
5.2
+
2.8
+
9.26
25
Nitrobenzene
98-95-3
C 6 H 5 NO 2
2.6
1.9
+
1.6
+
9.81
1
Nitroethane
79-24-3
C 2 H 5 NO 2
10.88
100
Nitrogen dioxide
10102-44-0
NO 2
23
9.75
3
Nitrogen trifluoride
7783-54-2
NF 3
NR
NR
13.0
10
Nitromethane
75-52-5
CH 3 NO 2
4
11.02
20
Nitropropane, 2-
79-46-9
C 3 H 7 NO 2
2.6
10.71
10
Nonane
111-84-2
C 9 H 20
9.72
200
Mustard
0.6
0.0005
Naphtha see VM & P Naphtha
0.45
+
+
0.42
+
0.40
+
16
+
NR
10
<8.8
0.001
ne
3
+
8.13
6
+
1.4
Norpar 12
n-Paraffins, mostly C10 -C13
64771-72-8
m.w. 161
3.2
+
1.1
+
0.28
+
ne
Norpar 13
n-Paraffins, mostly C13 -C14
64771-72-8
m.w. 189
2.7
+
1.0
+
0.3
+
ne
Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane
556-67-2
C 8 H 24 O 4 Si 4
0.21
+
0.17
+
0.14
+
Octamethyltrisiloxane
107-51-7
C 8 H 24 O 2 Si 3
0.23
+
0.18
+
0.17
+
Octane, n-
111-65-9
C 8 H18
13
+
1.8
+
Octene, 1-
111-66-0
C 8 H16
0.9
+
0.75
+
0.4
+
23153-23-3
C 3 H 3 Cl 5
1.25
+
109-66-0
C 5 H12
80
+
8.4
+
0.7
+
NR
+
NR
+
2.3
+
ne
50
+
2.5
+
ne
Pentachloropropane
1,1,1,3,3-pentachloropropane
Pentane
ne
<10.0
ne
9.82
300
9.43
75
0.1
10.35
600
Peracetic acid**
Peroxyacetic acid,
Acetyl hydroperoxide
79-21-0
C2H4O3
Peracetic/Acetic acid mix **
Peroxyacetic acid,
Acetyl hydroperoxide
79-21-0
C2H4O3
Perchloroethene
PCE, Perchloroethylene,
Tetrachloroethylene
127-18-4
C 2 Cl 4
0.69
+
0.57
+
0.31
+
Propylene glycol methyl ether,
1-Methoxy-2-propanol
PGME
107-98-2
C 6 H12 O 3
2.4
+
1.5
+
1.1
+
100
Propylene glycol methyl ether
acetate,
1-Methoxy-2-acetoxypropane,
1-Methoxy-2-propanol acetate
PGMEA
108-65-6
C 6 H12 O 3
1.65
+
1.0
+
0.8
+
ne
Phenol
Hydroxybenzene
108-95-2
C 6H6O
1.0
+
1.0
+
0.9
+
8.51
5
Phosgene
Dichlorocarbonyl
75-44-5
CCl 2 O
NR
+
NR
+
8.5
+
11.2
0.1
Phosgene in Nitrogen
Dichlorocarbonyl
75-44-5
CCl 2 O
NR
+
NR
+
6.8
+
11.2
0.1
7803-51-2
PH 3
28
3.9
+
1.1
+
9.87
0.3
0.5
+
0.3
+
Phosphine (coats lamp)
Photocopier Toner
Isoparaffin mix
Picoline, 3-
3-Methylpyridine
108-99-6
C 6H7N
0.9
Pinene, α-
2437-95-8
C10 H16
0.31
+
0.47
Pinene, β-
18172-67-3
C10 H16
0.38
+
0.37
+
0.37
504-60-9
C5H8
0.76
+
0.69
+
74-98-6
C 3H8
NR
+
5.5
Piperylene, isomer mix
1,3-Pentadiene
Propane
9.32
25
ne
9.04
ne
8.07
ne
+
~8
100
0.64
+
8.6
100
1.8
+
10.95
2500
10.22
200
9.73
ne
Propanol, n-
Propyl alcohol
71-23-8
C 3H8O
Propene
Propylene
115-07-1
C 3H6
Propionaldehyde
Propanal
123-38-6
C 3H6O
1.9
9.95
ne
109-60-4
C 5 H10 O 2
3.5
10.04
200
109-60-4
C 5 H10 O 2
2.27
10.04
200
Propyl acetate, nPropyl acetate
Propylacetate; n-Propyl ester of
acetic acid
RAE Systems by Honeywell 877-723-2878 raesystems.com
1.5
+
1.4
1.7
+
+
1.6
+
11
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
Compound Name
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
C IE (eV) TWA
Propylamine, n-
1-Propylamine,
1-Aminopropane
107-10-8
C 3H9N
1.1
+
1.1
+
0.9
+
8.78
ne
62
+
1
+
10.5
ne
4.2
+
1.6
+
<10.2
ne
1.0
+
1.6
+
6.6
+
2.9
+
10.22
20
1.0
+
9.0
2
9.15
ne
Propylene carbonate**
108-32-7
C 4H6O3
Propylene glycol
1,2-Propanediol
57-55-6
C 3H8O2
18
Propylene glycol propyl ether
1-Propoxy-2-propanol
1569-01-3
C 6 H14 O 2
1.3
Propylene oxide
Methyloxirane
75-56-9
16088-62-3
15448-47-2
C 3H6O
~240
Propyleneimine
2-Methylaziridine
75-55-8
C 3H7N
1.5
+
1.3
+
Propyl mercaptan, 2-
2-Propanethiol, Isopropyl
mercaptan
75-33-2
C 3H8 S
0.64
+
0.66
+
110-86-1
C 5H5N
0.78
+
0.7
+
0.7
+
9.25
5
2.1
+
~8.0
ne
Pyridine
+
Pyrrolidine (coats lamp)
Azacyclohexane
123-75-1
C 4H9N
1.3
+
1.6
+
RR7300 (PGME/PGMEA)
70:30 PGME:PGMEA
(1-Methoxy-2-propanol:
1-Methoxy-2-acetoxypropane)
107-98-2
C 4 H10 O 2 /
C 6 H12 O 3
1.4
+
1.0
+
Sarin
GB, Isopropyl
methylphosphonofluoridate
107-44-8
50642-23-4
C 4 H10 FO 2 P
~3
ne
ne
Shell SPK
1.26
+
Shell SPK
1.29
+
0.4
+
Shell SPK 50/50
1.02
+
0.41
+
Shell SPK/JP-8
1.11
+
0.43
+
0.4
+
8.43
20
+
NR
+
Stoddard Solvent see Mineral Spirits
8020-83-5
Styrene
100-42-5
C 8H8
0.45
Sulfur dioxide
7446-09-5
SO 2
NR
NR
12.32
2
Sulfur hexafluoride
2551-62-4
SF 6
NR
NR
NR
15.3
1000
2699-79-8
SO 2 F 2
NR
NR
NR
13.0
5
Sulfuryl fluoride
Vikane
Tabun **
Ethyl N, N77-81-6
dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate
+
C 5 H11N 2 O 2 P
0.8
15ppt
Tallow HRJ
1.09
+
Tallow HRJ
0.95
+
Tallow HRJ/JP-8
1.14
+
0.9
+
Tallow HRJ/JP-8 50/50
Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,1,2-
630-20-6
C 2 H 2 Cl 4
Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2,2-
79-34-5
C 2 H 2 Cl 4
NR
Tetrachlorosilane
10023-04-7
SiCl 4
NR
NR
0.4
0.3
0.36
+
0.39
+
1.3
+
NR
+
~11.1
ne
0.60
+
~11.1
1
15
+
11.79
ne
~11.1
0.008
~9.8
10
Tetraethyllead
TEL
78-00-2
C 8 H 20 Pb
Tetraethyl orthosilicate
Ethyl silicate, TEOS
78-10-4
C 8 H 20 O 4 Si
0.7
Tetrafluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-
HFC-134A
811-97-2
C2H2 F4
NR
Tetrafluoroethene
TFE, Tetrafluoroethylene,
Perfluoroethylene
116-14-3
C2F4
~15
Tetrafluoromethane
CFC-14, Carbon tetrafluoride
75-73-0
CF 4
NR
+
NR
Tetrahydrofuran
THF
109-99-9
C 4H8O
1.9
+
1.7
+
1.0
Tetramethyl orthosilicate
Methyl silicate, TMOS
681-84-5
C 4 H12 O 4 Si
10
+
1.9
+
0.8
+
0.51
+
0.4
+
D-12 **
0.2
+
0.2
+
NR
ne
+
>15.3
ne
+
9.41
200
~10
1
Hydrotreated heavy naphtha
64742-48-9
m.w. 160
Therminol® VP-1 **
Dowtherm A, 3:1 Diphenyl oxide:
Biphenyl
101-84-8
92-52-4
C12 H10 O
C12 H10
Toluene
Methylbenzene
108-88-3
C 7H8
0.54
+
0.45
+
0.51
+
Tolylene-2,4-diisocyanate
TDI, 4-Methyl-1,3-phenylene-2,4- 584-84-9
diisocyanate
C 9H6N2O2
1.4
+
1.4
+
2.0
+
Trichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-
1,2,4-TCB
120-82-1
C 6 H 3 Cl 3
0.7
+
0.9
+
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
1,1,1-TCA, Methyl chloroform
71-55-6
C 2 H 3 Cl 3
NR
+
1
+
Therminol
®
RAE Systems by Honeywell 877-723-2878 raesystems.com
0.33
ne
10.12
+
ne
1
8.82
50
0.002
9.04
C5
11
350
12
Technical Note TN-106 01/16/VK
Compound Name
Synonym/Abbreviation
CAS No. Formula
9.8
C 10.6
C 11.7
C IE (eV) TWA
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
1,1,2-TCA
79-00-5
C 2 H 3 Cl 3
NR
+
NR
+
0.9
+
11.0
10
Trichloroethene
TCE, Trichoroethylene
79-01-6
C 2 HCl 3
0.62
+
0.54
+
0.43
+
9.47
50
Trichloromethylsilane
Methyltrichlorosilane
75-79-6
CH 3 Cl 3 Si
NR
NR
1.8
+
11.36
ne
Trichlorotrifluoroethane, 1,1,2-
CFC-113
76-13-1
C 2 Cl 3 F 3
NR
NR
11.99
1000
Triethylamine
TEA
121-44-8
C 6 H15 N
Triethyl borate
TEB; Boric acid triethyl ester,
Boron ethoxide
150-46-9
C 6 H15 O 3 B
Triethyl phosphate
Ethyl phosphate
78-40-0
C 6 H15 O 4 P
Trifluoroethane, 1,1,2-
430-66-0
C2H3F 3
Trimethylamine
75-50-3
C 3H9N
0.9
Trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5- see Mesitylene
108-67-8
0.95
~50
+
+
0.9
+
0.65
+
7.3
1
2.2
+
1.1
+
~10
ne
3.1
+
0.60
+
9.79
ne
12.9
ne
7.82
5
34
25
Trimethyl borate
TMB; Boric acid trimethyl ester,
Boron methoxide
121-43-7
C 3H9O3B
5.1
+
1.2
+
10.1
ne
Trimethyl phosphate
Methyl phosphate
512-56-1
C 3H9O4P
8.0
+
1.3
+
9.99
ne
Trimethyl phosphite
Methyl phosphite
121-45-9
C 3H9O3P
1.1
+
+
8.5
2
Turpentine
Pinenes (85%) + other diisoprenes 8006-64-2
C10 H16
0.4
+
+
~8
20
Undecane
1120-21-4
C11H 24
9.56
ne
9.19
10
9.80
5
9.99
5
9.83
0.1
0.37
+
0.29
2
Varsol see Mineral Spirits
108-05-4
C 4H6O2
Vinyl bromide
Bromoethylene
593-60-2
C 2 H 3 Br
Vinyl chloride
Chloroethylene, VCM
75-01-4
C 2 H 3 Cl
2.0
+
Vinyl-1-cyclohexene, 4-
Butadiene dimer,
4-Ethenylcyclohexene
100-40-3
C 8 H12
0.6
+
0.56
+
88-12-0
C 6 H 9 NO
1.0
+
0.8
+
Vinyl actetate
1.5
+
1.2
+
1.0
+
0.4
0.6
+
Vinylidene chloride see 1,1-Dicholorethene
Vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone, 1-
NVP, N-vinylpyrrolidone,
1-ethenyl-2-pyrrolidinone
0.9
+
ne
Viscor 120B see Mineral Spirits — Viscor 120B Calibration Fluid
V. M. & P. Naphtha
Ligroin; Solvent naphtha; Varnish
maker’s & painter’s naphtha
64742-89-8
m.w. 111
(C 8 -C 9)
1.7
+
0.97
+
300
Xylene, m-
1,3-Dimethylbenzene
108-38-3
C 8 H10
0.50
+
0.44
+
0.40
Xylene, o-
1,2-Dimethylbenzene
95-47-6
C 8 H10
0.56
+
0.45
+
0.43
Xylene, p-
1,4-Dimethylbenzene
106-42-3
C 8 H10
0.48
+
0.39
+
0.38
+
+
8.56
100
8.56
100
8.44
100
* The term “ionization energy” is more scientifically correct and replaces the old term “ionization potential.” High-boiling (“heavy”) compounds may not vaporize enough
to give a response even when their ionization energies are below the lamp photon energy. Some inorganic compounds like H2O2 and NO2 give weak response even when
their ionization energies are well below the lamp photon energy.
** Compounds indicated in green can be detected using a MiniRAE 3000, UltraRAE 3000 or ppbRAE 3000 with slow response, but may be lost by adsorption on a
MultiRAE, EntryRAE and AreaRAE. Response on multi-gas meters can give an indication of relative concentrations, but may not be quantitative and for some chemicals
no response is observed.
Therminol® is a registered Trademark of Solutia, Inc.
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13
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