standard operation procedures (sop'

STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR
UNDERGROUND STORMWATER
QUALITY STRUCTURES
A GUIDE TO MAINTAINING
PERMANENT STORMWATER QUALITY BEST
MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMP’S)
January 24, 2008
Revised: October 30, 2014
Table of Contents
1.0
INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................... 2
2.0
BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................ 2
3.0
BENEFITS ................................................................................................................... 3
4.0
QUALIFICATIONS OF PERSONNEL ........................................................................... 3
5.0
SAFETY ....................................................................................................................... 3
6.0
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT FACILITY LOCATION(S) ........................................ 3
7.0
ACCESS AND EASEMENTS ........................................................................................ 4
8.0
TYPICAL INSPECTION & MAINTENANCE INTERVALS ........................................... 4
9.0
INSPECTION FORM .................................................................................................... 4
10.0 MAINTENANCE FORM ............................................................................................... 5
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
BaySaver® ...............................................................................................................................................5
CrystalStream™ - Hydrodynamic Separation & Pollutant Screening ......................7
Downstream Defender® .................................................................................................................11
Stormceptor® ......................................................................................................................................12
11.4a
11.4a
11.4c
11.4d
11.5
11.6
11.7
11.8
In-Line Stormceptor® ............................................................................................................. 12
Inlet Stormceptor® .................................................................................................................. 13
Submerged Stormceptor®.................................................................................................. 14
Series Stormceptor® .............................................................................................................. 15
Vortechs™ System - System stormwater quality vault ................................................17
VortSentry™ ........................................................................................................................................19
Snout® .....................................................................................................................................................19
Inlet Filters ..........................................................................................................................................20
11.8a Enviropod™ .................................................................................................................................... 20
11.8b Ultra-Urban® Filter with Smart Sponge® ............................................................... 21
11.8C HYDROSCREEN ................................................................................................................................ 24
12.0 COMMENTS/ADDITIONAL INFORMATION .............................................................. 24
Please Note: All Permanent Underground Stormwater Quality Structures have not been included in this guidance
document. Please consult the internet for a more complete listing of Underground Stormwater Quality Structure
suppliers. The PERMANENT UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES and inspection and maintenance procedure
descriptions contained within this guidance document were supplied by the product manufacturers. The
manufacturers have stated to the City of Loveland that they are capable of providing PERMANENT UNDERGROUND
STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES or Best Management Practices (BMPs) that are designed to improve the water
quality of stormwater runoff. This guidance document is provided as an aid to property owners who have installed
a PERMANENT UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURE on their property. The inclusion of products within this
guidance document does not constitute a recommendation, endorsement, or certification of their qualifications or
performance record, nor does the absence of a product from this guidance document constitute a negative
endorsement. The City of Loveland has incorporated most of these products into Capital Improvement Projects in an
attempt to verify the credentials of these firms, but it is the responsibility of the property owner to be
knowledgeable of the products claims to provide treatment for stormwater runoff and to obtain the requisite
expertise.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page i
1.0
Introduction
You have received this packet of information because the City of Loveland has determined that
you have one or more permanent UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES located
on your property. This packet was prepared to help you identify what type of structure(s) you
have on your property, show you where the structure(s) is/are located, and describe how often
you will need to inspect and perform maintenance on the structure(s) in order to ensure the City
of Loveland that the structure(s) is/are performing as intended.
2.0
Background
In order to improve the water quality of the City’s waterways, in March of 2003 the City of
Loveland was required by the State of Colorado to submit a general permit to discharge
stormwater. The general permit is comprised of six minimum measures and is available for you
to see on the City’s Stormwater website at:
http://www.ci.loveland.co.us/PublicWorks/Stormwater/StormwaterQuality.htm.
The goal and objectives of minimum measure number five of the general permit entitled “POSTCONSTRUCTION STORMWATER MANAGEMENT” is to:
(1). Improve the water quality of stormwater runoff to the Maximum Extent Practicable
(MEP);
(2). Prevent accumulations of soil and debris into the City of Loveland’s storm sewers and
waterways;
(3). Prevent the discharge of chemicals, chemical wastes and other pollutants from
entering the City of Loveland’s storm sewers and waterways;
(4). Protect state waters, waterways and wetlands from damages caused by erosion,
sedimentation, chemicals, chemical wastes and other pollutants, and;
To ensure the structure(s) perform as intended under this minimum measure the City of
Loveland was required to:
(a). Provide a mechanism that ensures the adequate long-term operation and maintenance
of Best Management Practices (BMPs) installed during development, and;
(b). Require regularly scheduled inspections and maintenance of permanent stormwater
quality BMPs to ensure they perform as planned.
Although Proprietary BMPs or UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES are not
officially recognized in the “Urban Storm Drainage Criteria Manual Volume 3 – Best
Management Practices” developed by the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District (UDFCD)
as a permanent stormwater quality BMP they can provide significant stormwater quality benefits
for Non-Point Source Pollution also know as polluted stormwater runoff when used under the
following conditions:
 When they are retrofitted into a highly urbanized basin in which site constraints don’t
allow room for Extended Detention Basins (EDBs) or other nonstructural permanent
stormwater quality;
 When there are numerous existing utilities to work around;
 When the cost to acquire land to construct EDB(s) and/or other nonstructural permanent
stormwater quality BMP(s) is/are prohibitive;
 When there isn’t a viable cost effective alternative for incorporating permanent
nonstructural BMPs into a particular development site, or;
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 2
 As an additional permanent stormwater quality BMP in the treatment train to further
reduce contaminants from stormwater runoff before discharge into an EDB or offsite into
a waterway.
UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES should also be recognized as confined
spaces for the purposes of entry and maintenance, and as potential vector breeding grounds.
If identified as mosquito breeding areas they should be added to the municipal annual mosquito
treatment plan.
3.0
Benefits
Sediment, oils, and greases are the most significant pollutants in stormwater runoff, but
nutrients, pathogens, heavy metals, organics, and organic enrichment also contribute to the
degradation of water quality within our waterways. UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY
STRUCTURES are specifically designed to perform the task of removing these materials from
stormwater runoff.
4.0
Qualifications of Personnel
4.1 Inspectors
Since specialized equipment may be needed to access and properly assess the
condition of the UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES during
inspections, it is highly recommended that inspections be performed by
qualified inspectors.
4.2 Maintenance Personnel
Maintenance personnel must also be qualified to properly maintain
UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES. Inadequately trained
personnel can be injured or killed and cause additional problems resulting in
increased maintenance costs.
5.0
SAFETY
There are many safety concerns to consider when dealing with UNDERGROUND STORMWATER
QUALITY STRUCTURES. These structures are most often located in parking lots or along
roadways. Extreme care needs to be taken to access them. To minimize risks involved when
performing inspections and/or maintenance on UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY
STRUCTURES all personnel should be well trained and have the following certifications:
 Confined Space Training, and;
 Traffic Control.
6.0
Stormwater Management Facility Location(s)
Inspection or maintenance personnel may utilize the stormwater facility map located in
APPENDIX A which contains the location(s) of the UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY
STRUCTURE(S) within this development.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 3
7.0
Access and Easements
Inspection or maintenance personnel may utilize the stormwater facility map located in
APPENDIX A containing the location(s) of the access point(s) and maintenance easements of the
UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURE(S) within this development.
8.0
Typical Inspection & Maintenance Intervals
For the UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES to perform optimally it is essential
that they are properly inspected and maintained per the manufacturer’s specifications. Below is
a list of the most common UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES and the
recommended maintenance intervals to be performed so they perform as intended:
UNDERGROUND STORMWATER
QUALITY STRUCTURES
BAYSAVER®
CRYSTALSTREAM™
DOWNSTREAM DEFENDER®
INLET FILTERS
SNOUT®
STORMCEPTOR®
INSPECTION INTERVAL
SEDIMENT, TRASH & DEBRIS REMOVAL
Quarterly
Annually
When there is 1” of sediment in front
of oil reservoir
Cleaned annually
As needed for sediment & debris
removal. Base cleaning program on
those site-specific situations.
Every 90 days
Inspected & monitored every 6 months
Regularly scheduled inspections to
determine areas with higher accumulations
and/or contaminant potential
Monthly monitoring for the 1st year and at
least quarterly thereafter
Quarterly
VORTECHS™ SYSTEM
Quarterly
VORTSENTRY™
Quarterly
9.0
When the sump is half full
Varies
When sediment depth has
accumulated to within 6 inches of the
dry-weather water surface
elevation.
As Necessary
Inspection Form
An INSPECTION FORM shall be completed by the person(s) actually conducting the inspection. All
the features listed on the form must be identified at the time of the inspection. The INSPECTION
FORM provides a record of each inspection performed during the year. The INSPECTION FORM
shall be filled out for each structure in the field after the completion of the inspection by the
inspector. Each INSPECTION FORM shall be reviewed by an authorized agent of the property
owner. The original INSPECTION FORM shall be kept for a period of five years and a copy of the
INSPECTION FORM shall be submitted to the City of Loveland at the end of each year to the
attention of the Stormwater Quality Specialist at the following address:
Public Works Administration Building
Public Works Department - Stormwater
2525 West 1st Street
Loveland, CO 80537
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 4
10.0
Maintenance Form
A variety of maintenance activities, separated into categories, are identified on the
MAINTENANCE FORM. All maintenance activities performed during the operation must be
identified on the form. These maintenance activities are described in more detail in this Manual.
The MAINTENANCE FORM provides a record of each maintenance operation performed by the
maintenance contractor(s). The MAINTENANCE FORM shall be filled out in the field after the
completion of the maintenance operation by the contractor completing the required
maintenance. The MAINTENANCE FORM shall then be reviewed by an authorized agent of the
property owner. The original MAINTENANCE FORM shall be kept for a period of five years, and a
copy of the MAINTENANCE FORM shall be submitted at the end of each year to the City of
Loveland to the attention of the Stormwater Quality Specialist at the following address:
Public Works Administration Building
Public Works Department - Stormwater
2525 West 1st Street
Loveland, CO 80537
11.0
Underground Stormwater Quality Structures
Although there are many UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES available to
choose from, the inspection & maintenance procedures are very similar for each of them.
Following is a list of some of the more familiar UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY
STRUCTURES and a brief description of the inspection and maintenance procedures
recommended for them.
11.1 BaySaver®
Figure 1: BAYSAVER® SEPARATION SYSTEM
The BaySaver® Separation System is a physical separation
system that meets regulations for non-point source pollution
control. The system operates using gravity flow and density
differences to remove oils, suspended sediments, and
floatables (trash and other floating debris) from stormwater
runoff. Easy to specify, install, inspect, and maintain, the
BaySaver® Separation System helps you avoid using the
valuable acreage necessary for other types of best
management practices (BMPs).
The BaySaver® Separation System is composed of two
standard pre-cast manholes and the BaySaver® Separator
Unit. The two manholes allow the removal and storage of pollutants, while the separator unit
directs the flow of water to provide the most efficient treatment possible. Figure 1 shows a
cutaway view of the complete BaySaver® Separation System.
11.1.1
Inspection Procedures
Inspection can be performed through visual observation and by measuring sediment
levels by removing the manhole covers. The inspector or maintenance contractor can
gain unobstructed access to the bottom of the manholes, making confined space entry
unnecessary. Site-specific inspection scheduling, coupled with maintenance that can be
completed from above grade, results in more efficient maintenance at a lower cost.
Beginning the day that construction is complete, periodic inspection determines the
cleaning frequency. In the first year, the system should be inspected quarterly to
determine pollutant loading rates.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 5
11.1.2 Maintenance Procedures
Most systems require yearly cleaning given normal loadings and sizing. Maintenance is
needed when the sediment accumulation has reached a height of two feet from the floor
in either manhole.
Like any system that collects pollutants, the BaySaver® Separation System must be
maintained for continued effectiveness. Maintenance is a simple procedure and is
performed using a vacuum truck or similar equipment. Access to the contaminant
storage is available through 30” manhole covers in each structure. Vacuum hoses can
reach the entire floor area of both manholes, so all sediments can be evacuated.
The BaySaver® Separation System was designed to minimize the volume of water
removed during routine maintenance, thus reducing disposal costs. The entire
maintenance procedure typically takes from 2 to 4 hours, depending on the size of the
system. The recommended maintenance procedure for the BaySaver® Separation
System follows.
11.1.3 Maintenance Instructions
Maintenance procedures are as follows:
11.1.3.1 Remove the two manhole covers to provide access to the contaminant
storage. Remove all water, debris, oils, and sediment from the storage
manhole using a vacuum truck or other equipment. Using a high pressure
hose, clean the storage manhole and remove the cleaning water using the
vacuum truck.
11.1.3.2
Using a submersible pump, pump the bulk of the water from the primary
manhole into the clean storage manhole. The pump intake must be kept
below the water surface to avoid pumping surface oils, and pumping must
be stopped when the water surface falls to a level one foot above the
accumulated sediments.
11.1.3.3
Remove the remaining water and sediment from the primary manhole
using a vacuum truck or other equipment.
11.1.3.4
Using a high pressure hose, clean the primary manhole and remove the
cleaning water using the vacuum truck.
11.1.3.5
Fill the primary manhole with water to the invert of the BaySaver®
Separator Unit. Fill the storage manhole with water to a depth of 8 feet.
11.1.3.6
Replace the two manhole covers.
11.1.3.7
Dispose of the contaminated water at an approved facility. Local
regulations often prohibit discharge of this material to the sanitary sewer;
the local sewer authority must authorize such a discharge.
This procedure is intended to remove all the collected pollutants from the system while
minimizing the volume of water that must be disposed. Additional local regulations may
apply to the maintenance procedure. Safe and legal disposal of pollutants is the
responsibility of the maintenance contractor; therefore maintenance should be
performed only by a qualified contractor.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 6
11.2
CrystalStream™ - Hydrodynamic
Separation & Pollutant Screening
11.2.1 Inspection Overview
Inspection can be performed through visual
observation and by measuring sediment levels
by removing the manhole covers. The inspector
or
maintenance
contractor
can
gain
unobstructed access to the bottom of the
structure via the manhole(s), making confined
space
entry
unnecessary.
Site-specific
inspection scheduling, coupled with maintenance that can be completed from above
grade, results in more efficient maintenance at a lower cost.
Beginning the day that construction is complete, periodic inspection determines the
cleaning frequency. In the first year, the system should be inspected once every six
months to determine pollutant loading rates.
The unit is designed and specified in most applications to comply with the non-point
source mandates of the Clean Water Act and the NPDES regulations. These regulations
state that any BMP (Best Management Practice) needs to be inspected every 90 days
and cleaned and maintained as needed. Many local regulations have similar
requirements and all federal, state and local requirements must be met. CrystalStream
Technologies recommends visual inspection on a 30-day cycle as well as sediment
depth inspection, during the construction phase. The unit inspection is done to determine
the operational status of the unit and determine if a cleaning cycle is necessary as well
as to meet any jurisdictional ordinance requirements. All inspections must be
documented (Appendix 2). When construction has been completed and the site has
been stabilized, the CST unit should be inspected every 90 days and cleaned when
there is 1” of sediment in front of the oil reservoir.
11.2.2 Inspection Procedures
As per the following:
11.2.2.1 The unit should be visually inspected from the surface to determine the
integrity of access points. Look for broken hinges or broken or missing
handles. A qualified welder should repair any broken hinges immediately.
Inspect bolts on lid angle iron and look for loose red heads on angle iron.
Replace red heads as needed. Re-paint the lid, with a rust resistant paint
as necessary.
11.2.2.2
The access should be opened and secured properly.
11.2.2.3
A visual inspection should be made of the trash basket at the front of the
unit to determine capacity and type of material trapped.
11.2.2.4
A visual inspection should be made of the water surface in the front of the
unit to determine oil sheen or blanket.
11.2.2.5
A visual inspection should be made of the oil and hydrocarbon reservoir to
determine amount of oil/water trapped and the historical high-water level in
the unit.
11.2.2.6
A visual inspection of the water surface in the rear of the unit should be
made and any pollutants noted.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 7
11.2.2.7
Inspect the aluminum mesh in the trash basket. Replace as needed.
Inspect the basket frame for cracks or damage. Repair as needed.
11.2.2.8
A visual inspection should be made of the pipe connections to the unit and
any material decay or improper installation noted. Pipes should be cut flush
with the interior wall of the unit and properly mudded in. If upon
inspection it is noted that the pipes are not cut flush, or are not
mudded in, contact the contractor and require that he correct this
immediately.
11.2.2.9
Inspect baffles to ensure that they are properly seated into the brackets.
Also note if there is any damage to baffles (bowing). Reseat baffles if
necessary.
11.2.2.10 Inspect oil reservoir for cracks or damage. Check the welds around the oil
reservoir for wear or damage and note any repair work necessary. A
qualified welder must perform all repair work to the welds on the oil
reservoir during the routine cleaning.
11.2.2.11 Inspect the riser for cracks in the concrete walls. Repair as required during
the routine cleaning.
11.2.2.12 A silt gauge should be used to determine sediment depth as shown in
Appendix 1. Check the silt/sediment level behind the trash basket and in
front of the oil reservoir.
11.2.2.13 The access for cleaning should be evaluated and documented. The truck
cleaning these units requires a stable roadway capable of withstanding
15,000 pounds.
11.2.2.14 Any changes in the area tributary that are evident should be noted.
11.2.2.15 Replace the access point covers carefully.
11.2.2.16 Note the condition of the area surrounding the unit on the inspection report.
(Example: grass, dirt, rocks, sink holes) and report any hazardous
conditions to the appropriate supervisor.
11.2.2.17 An inspection report should be completed, with a copy staying on site and
a copy being sent to the local jurisdiction.
The inspection procedures for the traffic units are similar to those for the non- traffic units
with the exception of the sediment depth evaluations as shown in Appendix 1 and an
inspection of the grate and Frame and Ring and Cover. Also proper precautions should
be taken in Traffic situations as specified in the Safety section of this manual.
NOTE: When there has been an obvious gasoline spill or other flammable/hazardous
material in the unit, immediate notification should be given to the owner and
jurisdictional authorities. This manual is for routine cleaning of storm water debris
and any unusual occurrences should be left to properly trained and equipped
individuals.
11.2.3 Cleaning Overview
The cleaning of the unit is the essential element to the operational success of the
CrystalStream Device. The pollutant removal capacity of the device will eventually cause
the equipment to fail without proper maintenance and additionally not achieve the goals
of the installation. The cleaning cycle is dependent on a number of factors including
pollutant load, rainfall, and time of year, basin changes, upstream mitigation tactics and
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 8
installation. Based on the variety of factors, a cleaning schedule can be consistent or
vary widely on the same device. This highlights the importance of the inspection process
in the overall maintenance and integrity of the unit. The cleaning is generally done with a
two-person crew and a vacuum pump system. The duration of the maintenance will
depend on a number of factors but can typically be done in about 2.5 hours with properly
trained individuals.
11.2.4
Cleaning Procedures – Surface Cleaning
If the cleaning of the unit is to be preformed from the surface, the operator should expect
a longer cleaning time and the potential for additional disposal charges. The front
chamber of the unit will contain the trash and debris in the trash basket, any floating
hydrocarbons that have not been skimmed into the oil/hydrocarbon reservoir and
accumulated sediment on the bottom of the unit.
Cleaning procedures are as per the following:
11.2.4.1
The unit should be visually inspected from the surface to determine the
integrity of the tread plate lid, Aluminum Hatch or other access.
11.2.4.2
A visual inspection of the unit should be done to evaluate structural
integrity and determine if any impacted material is present in the device. If
there has been a hazardous spill see Section 4.6
NOTE:
When there has been an obvious gasoline spill or other
flammable/hazardous material in the unit, immediate notification should be given to
the owner and jurisdictional authorities. This manual is for routine cleaning of storm
water debris and any unusual occurrences should be left to properly trained and
equipped individuals.
11.2.4.3
The Trash Basket should be cleaned by either using a trash netting system
or vacuum truck. If cleaning using netting system, this material can be
disposed of in trash bags in the normal manner.
11.2.4.4
The surface oil/hydrocarbon separation zone in the front chamber should
be removed either with sorbants or with a vacuum truck.
11.2.4.5
The stormwater contained in the area between the surface water and the
sediment accumulation can be decanted to minimize the amount of
disposal required. Any downstream discharge needs to be after the surface
cleaning and only down to the level of the bottom of the oil/hydrocarbon
reservoir or the top of the sediment accumulation. Any pollutants
discharged downstream are the responsibility of the cleaning operator.
11.2.4.6
The oil/hydrocarbon reservoir needs to be evacuated by the vacuum
equipment.
11.2.4.7
The sediment accumulated in the front and rear chamber can be removed
by the vacuum equipment.
11.2.4.8
The unit should be pressure washed down to remove any pollution
attached to the baffles, walls or hydrocarbon reservoir.
11.2.4.9
All parts should be inspected for wear and tear and documented.
11.2.4.10 A maintenance report (Appendix 3) should be completed, with a copy
staying on site and a copy being sent to the local jurisdiction.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 9
11.2.1 Cleaning Procedures – Confined Space Entry
The cleaning procedures are similar for confined space entries except that the OSHA
guidelines apply and need to be followed. The confined space entry allows the crew to
do a better job of cleaning the unit and allows for the time needed and disposal cost to
be reduced.
As per the following:
CAUTION!
Any inspection done in a traffic area must meet the CDOT
guidelines for roadway work and additional safety procedure
will be necessary.
CAUTION!
All OSHA confined space requirements should be met while
cleaning this unit.
The unit should be visually inspected from the surface to determine the
integrity of the tread plate lid.
11.2.5.2 A visual inspection of the unit should be done to evaluate structural
integrity and determine if any impacted material is present in the device. If
there has been a hazardous spill see section 4.6.
NOTE:
When there has been an obvious gasoline spill or other
flammable/hazardous material in the unit, immediate notification should be given to
the owner and jurisdictional authorities. This manual is for routine cleaning of storm
water debris and any unusual occurrences should be left to properly trained and
equipped individuals.
11.2.5.1
11.2.5.3
A ladder should be inserted on the front side of the unit between the baffles
and a sorbant blanket laid on the surface of the water to collect any free oil
floating on the surface.
11.2.5.4
In most units, the trash basket and baffles can be removed to allow easier
access to the bottom of the unit.
11.2.5.5
Inspect the aluminum mesh in the trash basket. Replace as needed.
11.2.5.6
The Trash Basket should be cleaned and directly disposed of in garbage
bags.
11.2.5.7
The stormwater contained in the area between the surface water and the
sediment accumulation can be decanted to minimize the amount of
disposal required. Any downstream discharge needs to be after the surface
cleaning and only down to the level of the bottom of the oil/hydrocarbon
reservoir or the top of the sediment accumulation. Any pollutants
discharged downstream are the responsibility of the cleaning operator.
11.2.5.8
The unit should be pressure washed down to remove any pollution
attached to the baffles, walls or hydrocarbon reservoir.
11.2.5.9
The ladder can be used to get on to the unit floor and remove the rest of
the water and sediment from the bottom of the unit.
11.2.5.10 The walls should be wiped down in the front with a sorbant blanket.
11.2.5.11 The fresh coconut fiber mesh should be replaced in the frame and the
frame assembly returned to the unit.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 10
11.2.5.12 All parts should be inspected for wear and tear and documented.
11.2.5.13 Remove all equipment from the unit. Replace the manhole cover and the
grate in the concrete lid.
11.2.5.14 A maintenance report (Appendix 3) should be completed, with a copy
staying on site and a copy being sent to the local jurisdiction.
11.3
Downstream Defender®
The Downstream Defender® (Figure 2) is an advanced
Hydrodynamic Vortex Separator that is specifically designed to
provide high removal efficiencies of settleable solids and their
associated pollutants, oil, and floatables over a wide range of flow
rates. Its flow-modifying internal components have been
developed from extensive full-scale testing, CFD modeling and
over thirty years of hydrodynamic separation experience in
wastewater, combined sewer and stormwater applications. These
internal components distinguish the Downstream Defender® from
simple swirl-type devices and conventional oil/grit separators by
minimizing turbulence and head losses, enhancing separation,
and preventing washout of previously stored pollutants. The high
removal efficiencies and inherent low head losses of the
Downstream Defender® allow for a small footprint making it a
compact and economical solution for non-point source pollution.
11.3.1
Figure 2: DOWNSTREAM DEFENDER®
Inspection Procedures
During the first year of operation, the unit should be inspected and monitored every six
months to determine the rate of sediment and floatables accumulation. A probe can be
used to determine the level of solids in the sediment storage facility. This information can
then be used to establish a routine maintenance schedule.
11.3.2
Maintenance Procedures
The Downstream Defender® is designed with no moving parts, requires no external
power source and is fabricated with durable non-corrosive components. Maintenance is
therefore limited to monitoring accumulations of stored pollutants and periodic cleanouts. When sediment has accumulated
to the specified depth, the contents
should be removed by sump vac. In
most situations, it is recommended that
the units be cleaned annually.
In between storm events, the water
level in the Downstream Defender
drains down to the invert of the outlet
pipe (see Figure 2). This keeps the unit
wet so that oil and floatables stored on
the water surface in the outer annulus
are separated from sediment stored
below the benching skirt. Storing oil and
sediment in isolated locations provides
Figure 2: Sump-vac procedure to remove sediment
the option for other disposal methods,
such as adsorbent pads. Additionally, in a wet unit the stored sediment is unable to
solidify which allows for a simple vactor clean-out procedure.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 11
A commercially or municipally owned sump-vac is used to remove captured sediment
and floatables. The frequency of the sump vac procedure is determined in the field after
installation. Monitoring/clean-out ports are located in the top of the manhole and provide
access to the isolated pollutant storage volumes. The floatables access port is above the
outer annular space between the dip plate and the manhole wall, where floatables are
retained. The sediment removal access port is located directly over the hollow center
shaft, which leads to the sediment storage facility below the benching skirt. To prevent
floatables and oils from entering the sediment sump storage volume, removing oil and
floatables prior to removing sediment is recommended.
The vactor procedure for a typical 6-ft diameter Downstream Defender® takes less than
30 minutes and removes about 1240 gallons of water in the process. For pollutant
storage volumes and estimated volumes of water removed for each size model during
clean-out please contact Hydro International and request a copy of the Downstream
Defender® Operation and Maintenance instructions.
This procedure is intended to remove all the collected pollutants from the system while
minimizing the volume of water that must be disposed. Additional local regulations may
apply to the maintenance procedure. Safe and legal disposal of pollutants is the
responsibility of the maintenance contractor; therefore maintenance should be
performed only by a qualified contractor.
11.4
Stormceptor®
The Stormceptor® relies on an inverted siphon concept to convey low flows through a
circular chamber and then back up through an outlet pipe. A small weir captures the low
flows while high flows bypass overtop and continue down the storm sewer system. All of the
treatment occurs within one round manhole. Even during high flow rates that bypass the
weir, some larger bed load sized material may still get captured. Sediment, oil, and grease
are captured and stored beneath the weir structure in the lower part of the manhole.
11.4a
In-Line Stormceptor®
The In-Line Stormceptor® is the most commonly installed model. Each unit is
constructed from pre-cast concrete components and a patented fiberglass insert.
11.4a-1 Normal (Low) Flow Operating Conditions
Under normal operating conditions (more than 90% of
all storm events), stormwater flows into the upper
chamber and is diverted by a u-shaped weir, into the
separation holding chamber. Right angle outlets direct
flow around the circular walls of the chamber. Fine and
coarse sediments settle to the floor of the chamber,
while the petroleum products rise and become trapped
beneath the fiberglass insert.
11.4a-1
In-Line Stormceptor®
Normal (Low) Flow Operation
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 12
11.4a-2 High Flow (By-Pass) Operating Conditions
During infrequent, high flow events (less than 10% of all
storm events), peak stormwater flows pass over the
diverting weir and continue into the downstream storm
sewer system. This by-pass activity creates pressure
equalization across the by-pass chamber, preventing
scouring and resuspension of previously trapped pollutants.
Stormceptor® is the only device with an internal by-pass
that prevents scouring of trapped pollutants.
The In-Line Stormceptor® has been proven in laboratory
and field tests to remove over:
 80% of Total Suspended Solids, and;

95% of free oils and hydrocarbon spills.
11.4a.1
Maintenance Procedures - In-Line
Stormceptor®
11.4a-2
In-Line Stormceptor® High Flow
(By-Pass) Mode Operation
You can inspect and maintain the In-Line Stormceptor® from the surface, without entry
into the unit. Perform maintenance once the stored volume reaches 15% of the
Stormceptor® capacity, or immediately in the event of a spill.
Maintenance intervals vary depending on the application. Therefore, we recommend
quarterly inspections during the first year of installation, so you can accurately establish
the maintenance schedule.
Remove oil and sediment through the 24-inch diameter outlet riser pipe. Alternatively,
you may remove floatables and hydrocarbons through the 6-inch oil inspection port.
The requirements for the disposal from Stormceptor® are similar to that of any other
Best Management Practice (BMP). Consult local guidelines or your Stormceptor® Area
Marketing Manager prior to disposing the separator contents.
The In-Line Stormceptor® has been applied numerous times as an NPDES Phase I
Best Management Practice, and is an ideal solution for communities dealing with the
NPDES Phase II Regulations.
11.4a
Inlet Stormceptor®
The Inlet Stormceptor® is a 48-inch diameter pre-cast concrete structure with a
patented fiberglass insert that takes the place of a traditional inlet structure in a storm
sewer system. The insert extends into the treatment chamber, providing dual wall
containment of hydrocarbons.
11.4b-1 Normal (Low) Flow Operating Conditions
Under normal operating conditions (more than 90% of all storm
events), storm water flows into the upper chamber and is diverted
by a sloped weir into the lower chamber. Flow is diverted by
horizontal outlets around the walls of the lower chamber, settling
out coarse and fine sediments to the floor of the chamber.
Petroleum products rise and become trapped beneath the
fiberglass insert.
11.4b-1
Inlet Stormceptor® Normal
(Low) Flow Conditions
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 13
11.4b-2 High Flow (By-Pass) Operating Conditions
During infrequent, high flow events (less than 10% of all storm
events), storm water flows pass over the diverting weir into the
downstream sewer system, preventing scouring of previously
trapped pollutants. The high flow by-pass prevents previously
collected pollutants from scour and re- suspension.
The Inlet Stormceptor® is an excellent Best Management Practice,
because it saves the designer the cost of providing a traditional inlet
structure upstream of a conventional treatment device in 11.4b-2
small drainage areas. The Inlet Stormceptor® is in use Inlet Stormceptor® High
across North American and Australia as a sediment and Flow (By-Pass) Conditions
spill containment device, and has been successfully used
as an NPDES Phase I tool.
11.4b.1
Maintenance Procedures - Inlet Stormceptor®
You can inspect and maintain the Inlet Stormceptor® from the surface, without entry
into the unit. Perform maintenance once the stored volume reaches 15% of the
Stormceptor® capacity, or immediately in the event of a spill.
Maintenance intervals vary depending on the application. Therefore, we recommend
quarterly inspections during the first year of installation, so you can accurately
determine the maintenance schedule.
The inlet drop pipe has a tapered insert connected to a handle. Once you remove the
handle, remove oil and sediment from the 12-inch diameter inlet drop pipe.
The requirements for the disposal from Stormceptor® are similar to that of any other
Best Management Practice (BMP). Consult local guidelines or your Stormceptor® Area
Marketing Manager prior to disposing the separator contents.
11.4c
Submerged Stormceptor®
The Submerged Stormceptor® is designed to remove total suspended solids, free oil,
and other pollutants from stormwater run-off in partially submerged pipes.
The pre-cast sections are manufactured in easy-to-assemble components. A
customized weir separates the upper (by-pass) and lower (treatment) chambers.
11.4c-1
Normal (Low) Flow Operating Conditions
The Submerged Stormceptor® operates much like the In-Line Stormceptor®. The
submerged design includes a customized weir height (depending
on the average water level in the storm sewer) and two inlet drop
pipes.
11.4c-1
Submerged Stormceptor®
Normal (Low) Flow Conditions
Under normal operating conditions (more than 90% of all storm
events), the Submerged Stormceptor® is effective for free oil and
sediment removal. The lower drop pipe, located at the inlet of the
storm sewer, is always submerged. This drop pipe transports
suspended solids and bed load sediment into the treatment
chamber. The higher drop pipe transports lighter material (free oil)
and floatables into the separation chamber.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 14
11.4c-2
High Flow (By-Pass) Operating Conditions
During infrequent, high flow events (less than 10% of all storm
events), water is conveyed over the internal by-pass weir directly
to the downstream storm sewer. This by-pass activity prevents
high velocities of water from entering the treatment chamber. The
Submerged Stormceptor® is not effective for oil removal under
fully submerged conditions.
11.4c.1
Maintenance Procedure –
Submerged Stormceptor®
11.4c-2
Submerged Stormceptor®
High Flow (By-Pass) Conditions
Inspect and maintain the Submerged Stormceptor® from the surface, without entry into
the unit. Perform maintenance once stored volume reaches 15% of the Stormceptor®
capacity, or immediately in the event of a spill.
Maintenance intervals vary depending on the application. Therefore, we recommend
quarterly inspections during the first year of installation, so you can accurately establish
a maintenance schedule.
Remove oil and sediment through the 24-inch diameter outlet riser pipe. Alternatively,
you may remove floatables and hydrocarbons through the 6-inch oil inspection port.
The requirements for the disposal from Stormceptor® are similar to that of any other
Best Management Practice (BMP). Consult local guidelines or your Stormceptor® Area
Marketing Manager prior to disposing the separator contents.
The Submerged Stormceptor® has been successfully installed in coastal areas and
other submerged pipe conditions.
11.4d Series Stormceptor®
The Series Stormceptor® is designed to treat run-off from larger drainage areas
remove total suspended solids, free oil, and other pollutants from stormwater run-off in
partially submerged pipes.
The Series Stormceptor® consists of two structures. The first structure acts as a flow
splitter, diverting half of the flow into the first treatment chamber, and allowing the
second half of the flow to travel through the unit to the second treatment chamber. The
Series Stormceptor® units contain the patented internal by-pass inherent in all
Stormceptor® designs, preventing scour and resuspension during high flows, which
have hampered the performance of conventional separator systems.
11.4d-1
Normal (Low) Flow Operating
Conditions
Under normal (frequent) operating conditions,
stormwater enters the upper by-pass chamber of the
first structure. Half of the flow is diverted by a u-shaped
weir into the separation/holding chamber of the first
structure. This downward flow is directed, by right-angle
outlets, around the circular walls of the chamber. Fine
and coarse sediment settle to the floor of the chamber,
while the petroleum products rise and become trapped
beneath the fiberglass insert. The half of the flow which
is not diverted in the lower chamber continues through
the first structure to the second structure. This
remaining flow is diverted into the lower chamber of the
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
11.4d-1
Series Stormceptor®
Normal (Low) Flow Conditions
Page 15
second structure. Suspended solids and floatables are separated as they are in the
first chamber.
11.4d-2
High Flow (By-Pass) Operating
Conditions
During infrequent high flow events, peak stormwater
flows will pass over the diverting weirs in the first and
second chamber and continue through the by-pass
chamber into the downstream sewer system. This bypass activity creates pressure equalization across
both units, preventing scouring. A portion of incoming
sediment continues to be diverted by the weirs in 11.4d-2
the first and second structure into the treatment Series Stormceptor®
High Flow (By-Pass) Conditions
chamber.
11.4d.1
Maintenance Procedure – Series
Stormceptor®
You can inspect and maintain the Series Stormceptor® from the surface, without entry
into the unit. Perform maintenance once the stored volume reaches 15% of the
Stormceptor® capacity, or immediately in the event of a spill.
Maintenance intervals vary depending on the application. Therefore, we recommend
quarterly inspections during the first year of installation, so you can accurately establish
the maintenance schedule.
Remove oil and sediment through each of the 24-inch diameter outlet riser pipes.
Alternatively, you may remove floatables and hydrocarbons through the 6-inch oil
inspection port. Both steps must be performed in each of the two structures.
The requirements for the disposal from Stormceptor® are similar to that of any other
Best Management Practice (BMP). Consult local guidelines or your Stormceptor® Area
Marketing Manager prior to disposing the separator contents.
The In-Line Stormceptor® has been applied numerous times as an NPDES Phase I
Best Management Practice, and is an ideal solution for communities dealing with the
NPDES Phase II Regulations.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 16
11.5
Vortechs™ System - System stormwater quality vault
The Vortechs™ System stormwater quality vault is a multi-chambered rectangular vault that
uses a baffle wall, a weir, an orifice, and a circular “swirl concentrator” to remove floating
hydrocarbons, contaminated sediment, debris, trash, oils, and grease from stormwater.
11.5.1 Inspection Procedures
By removing the manhole covers, the inspector or maintenance contractor can gain
unobstructed access to the bottom of the manholes, making confined space entry
unnecessary. Site-specific inspection scheduling, coupled with maintenance that can be
completed from above grade, results in more efficient maintenance at lower cost.
Inspection is the key to effective maintenance and is easily performed on the Vortechs™
System. Vortechnics recommends ongoing quarterly inspections of the grit chamber for
accumulated contaminants. Pollutant deposition and transport may vary from year to
year and quarterly inspections will help ensure that the system is cleaned out at the
appropriate time. Inspections should be performed more frequently where site conditions
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 17
may cause rapid accumulation of pollutants. The Vortechs™ System should be cleaned
when inspection reveals that the sediment depth has accumulated to within six inches of
the dry-weather water surface elevation. This determination can be made by taking two
measurements with a stadia rod or similar measuring device; one measurement from the
manhole opening to the top of the sediment pile and the other from the manhole opening
to the water surface. The system should be cleaned out if the difference between the two
measurements is six inches or less. To avoid underestimating the volume of sediment in
the chamber, the measuring device must be lowered to the top of the sediment pile
carefully. Finer, silty particles at the top of the pile typically offer less resistance to the
end of the rod than larger particles toward the bottom of the pile. In Vortechs™ System
installations where the risk of large petroleum spills is small, liquid contaminants may not
accumulate as quickly as sediment. However, an oil or gasoline spill should be cleaned
out immediately. Motor oil and other hydrocarbons that accumulate on a more routine
basis should be removed when an appreciable layer has been captured.
11.5.2
Maintenance Procedures
One of the advantages of the Vortechs™ System stormwater quality vault is the ease of
maintenance. Like any system that collects pollutants, the Vortechs™ System
stormwater quality vault must be maintained for continued effectiveness.
Maintaining the Vortechs™ System is easiest when there is no flow entering the system.
For this reason, it is a good idea to schedule the clean out during dry weather. Clean out
of the Vortechs™ System with a vacuum truck is generally the most effective and
convenient method of excavating pollutants from the system. If a vacuum truck is not
available, a “clamshell” grab may be used, although it is not as effective. Accumulated
sediment is typically evacuated through the manhole over the grit chamber. Simply
remove the cover and insert the vacuum hose into the grit chamber. As water is
evacuated, the water level outside of the grit chamber will drop to the same level as the
crest of the lower aperture of the grit chamber. It will not drop below this level due to the
fact that the bottom and sides of the grit chamber are sealed to the tank floor and walls.
This “water lock” feature prevents water from migrating into the grit chamber, exposing
the bottom of the baffle wall. Floating pollutants will decant into the grit chamber as the
water level there is drawn down. This allows most floating material to be withdrawn from
the same access point above the grit chamber. If maintenance is not performed as
recommended, sediment may accumulate outside the grit chamber. If this is the case, it
may be necessary to pump out all chambers. It is a good idea to check for accumulation
in all chambers during each maintenance event to prevent sediment buildup in those
areas. To remove oil, grease, and other hydrocarbons, it may be preferable to use
adsorbent pads since they are usually less expensive to dispose of than the oil/water
emulsion that may be created by vacuuming the oily layer. Trash can be netted out if you
wish to separate it from the other pollutants. Manhole covers should be securely sealed
following cleaning activities, to ensure that surface runoff does not leak into the unit from
above.
This procedure is intended to remove all the collected pollutants from the system while
minimizing the volume of water that must be disposed. Additional local regulations may
apply to the maintenance procedure. Safe and legal disposal of pollutants is the
responsibility of the maintenance contractor; therefore maintenance should be
performed only by a qualified contractor.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 18
11.6
Ideally
where
VortSentry™
suited for
stormwater
applications
regulations
5. Flow Partition
At higher flow rates, a portion of the runoff
will be diverted over the flow partition and
around the treatment chamber, while
settleable solids are directed into the
treatment chamber.
1. Inlet
Stormwater runoff is conveyed
into the unit through the inlet.
require that pollutants
2. Inlet Aperture
are reduced to the
At low flow rates, all runoff is
directed through the inlet
maximum
extent
aperture where it enters the
practicable, the
treatment chamber tangentially.
VortSentry™ can be
used as a standalone BMP or as a
pre-treatment system in conjunction
with other stormwater treatment
devices. All
3. Treatment Chamber
Gravitational separation of floating
and sinking pollutants is enhanced by
the gentle swirling motion in the
treatment chamber, which causes the
settleable solids to sink and form a
conical pile in the storage sump.
4. Treatment Chamber Baffle
Trash, hydrocarbons and other
floating debris are retained in the
treatment chamber by the baffle wall,
which extends below the resting
water surface elevation.
7
2
1
5
6
4
3
6. Outlet Flow Control
Flow rates through the
treatment chamber are
limited by the outlet flow
control orifice.
7. Head Equalizing Baffle
The head equalizing baffle allows
operating rates in the treatment
chamber to remain relatively constant
even as flow rates in the inlet
chamber increase substantially, which
minimizes washout potential.
VortSentry™
models
are
configured with a flow partition to ensure that the rate of flow through the treatment chamber
will not cause pollutant re-entrainment, even as the total flow rate through the system
increases. The VortSentry™ features a round concrete manhole structure for easy
installation (often without the use of a crane) and unobstructed maintenance access. With its
small footprint, the VortSentry™ is ideal for tight sites and retrofits.
11.7 Snout®
The SNOUT® is a plastic vented
hood that is a low-cost stormwater
BMP that prevents oil, grit and
floatable debris from polluting our
waterways. The SNOUT® covers
the outlet pipe opening in an inlet
reducing floatable trash and debris,
free oils, and other solids from
stormwater
discharges.
The
SNOUT® hood mounts directly to
the wall, covering the outlet pipe of
a catch basin or other stormwater
quality structure which incorporates
a deep sump. The SNOUT® forms a
baffle in the structure which collects
floatables and free oils on the
surface of the captured stormwater,
while permitting heavier solids to
sink to the bottom of the sump.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 19
Other features include an anti-siphon vent, a watertight access to the outlet pipe for
cleaning, and easy installation. It is also highly corrosion resistant.
As per the following:
11.7.1 Monthly monitoring for the first year of a new installation after the site has been
stabilized.
11.7.2
Measurements should be taken after each rain event of .5 inches or more, or
monthly, as determined by the local weather conditions.
11.7.3
Checking sediment depth and noting the surface pollutants in the structure will be
helpful in planning maintenance. The pollutants collected in the SNOUT®
equipped structures will consist of floatable debris and oils on the surface of the
captured water, and grit and sediment on the bottom of the structure.
11.7.4
It is best to schedule maintenance based on solids collected in the sump.
Optimally, the structure should be cleaned when the sump is half full (e.g. when 2
feet of material collects in a 4 foot sump, clean it out).
11.7.5
Structures should also be cleaned if a spill or other incident causes a larger than
normal accumulation of pollutants in a structure.
11.7.6
Maintenance is best done with a vacuum truck. If oil absorbent hydrophobic
booms are being used in the structure to enhance hydrocarbon capture and
removals, they should be checked on a monthly basis, and serviced or replaced
when more than 2/3 of the boom is submerged, indicating a nearly saturated
state.
11.7.7
All collected wastes must be handled and disposed of according to local
environmental requirements.
11.8
Inlet Filters
“Inlet Filters” are specifically designed to remove debris, trash, sediment, and other
pollutants from stormwater runoff entering the storm drain.
11.8a
Enviropod™
The Enviropod™ fits catch basins and curb inlets to catch
and/or remove a significant portion of trash, debris and other
pollutants from water entering the storm drain. The
maintenance-friendly manhole curb inlet design makes it easy
to access and it has a High flow bypass to prevent flooding.
11.8a.1
Maintenance - Enviropod™
Maintenance is straightforward, efficient and cost-effective
and can be performed using: Stormwater Management staff
(Full Service); working with owners who prefer to perform
their own maintenance (Self Service with Cartridge
Exchange), or; by contracting the maintenance with a third party.
The ENVIROPOD™ is designed to drain over time, eliminating substantial amounts of
standing water. This reduces disposal volume and maintenance time, resulting in
lower maintenance costs. Annual maintenance is typically recommended for
optimum efficiency of all stormwater systems. However, the frequency will ultimately
depend on the site conditions, rainfall patterns and pollutant loading.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 20
11.8a.1.1
Full Service
The Stormwater Management maintenance crew evaluates your system to
ensure that it continues to operate per site-specific design criteria. A Certificate of
Compliance is provided verifying that the system continues to meet the original
design standards whenever maintenance and/or inspections are provided. This
Certificate is sent to the owner and a copy can be sent to the local stormwater
authority upon request.
11.8a.1.2
Self Service with Cartridge Exchange
Stormwater Management provides Operation and Maintenance Guidelines with
each ENVIROPOD™ system, outlining the recommended maintenance procedure.
The Cartridge Exchange program is available for owners who chose to perform
their own maintenance. Fresh cartridges are provided in exchange for empty
ones.
StormFilter maintenance can be performed while the vault is dry, making it
especially easy and cost-effective to maintain.
11.8a.1.2.1
Remove the cartridge hood and either manually or with a
vacuum truck, dispose of the residuals.
11.8a.1.2.2
Clean remaining trash, debris and sediments from the vault.
11.8a.1.2.3
Replace the empty filter cartridge with a recharged cartridge
provided by Stormwater Management that has been pre-filled
with the appropriate filter media.
11.8a.1.2.4
Return the empty cartridge to Stormwater Management, Inc.
11.8b
Ultra-Urban® Filter with Smart Sponge®
Smart Sponge® is an environmental technology
utilized to assist in the conservation of the natural
environment and its most precious resources by
reducing the negative effects of hydrocarbons,
contaminants, and debris that is commonly found in
our stormwater runoff. Smart Sponge® is a unique
molecular structure based on innovative polymer
technology that is chemically selective to
hydrocarbons. Smart Sponge® fully encapsulates
recovered oil, resulting in a substantially more
effective response that prevents absorbed oil from leaching.
Smart Sponge® is capable of removing low levels of oil from water, thereby successfully
removing sheen and remains buoyant in water, permitting it to remain in place until fully
saturated resulting in no wasted product. The Smart Sponge® technology allows for less
expensive and less problematic handling and disposal of the waste product since its
technology transforms liquid oil and other pollutants into a stable solid. The Smart
Sponge® was designed not to deteriorate in water, allowing for a longer product life.
Once oil is absorbed, the Smart Sponge® transforms the pollutants into a stable solid for
easy recycling or disposal, providing a closed-loop solution to water pollution.
The Ultra-Urban® Filter with Smart Sponge® developed and manufactured by AbTech
Industries, is an innovative low-cost BMP that helps meet NPDES requirements with
effective filtration, efficient application, and low maintenance. It is a stormwater filter that
ensures that the water flowing through the system is properly and completely treated.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 21
This solution is used to treat stormwater runoff for new or retrofitted sites by absorbing
oil and grease and capturing trash and sediment.
The filter comes in two standard designs; one a modular unit geared toward curb inlet
openings, and the other, a single unit designed for typical drop-in catch basin drains.
Curb Opening Series
With
Drain Inlet Series
with
OPERATION, MAINTENANCE & CHANGE–OUT
The Ultra Urban Filter should be serviced as needed to remove sediments and debris,
according to expected debris accumulation. The sediment and debris can be quickly
vacuumed out of the modules through the mouth of the drain with conventional
maintenance equipment.
For example, a curb inlet with four to five Ultra-Urban Filter modules can be serviced
within 10 minutes in typical installations. Under normal operating conditions the entire
recyclable Ultra Urban Filter should be replaced every 1–3 years depending on its
deployment and the pollutant (hydrocarbon) loading.
Catch basin cleaning is an integral part of any comprehensive stormwater management
plan where closed drainage systems are present. The frequency with which catch basins
are cleaned should be based on the site specific factors, accumulation volume and
quality.
If a catch basin is located in a residential area with low traffic, good street sweeping,
minimal possibility of illegal dumping etc. then cleaning may not be required for several
months. However, if it is in an urban area with street sanding during winter, high
pedestrian traffic with restaurants (trash etc) and perhaps leaf litter, catch basin cleaning
may be required more frequently.
AbTech suggests customer initiate a plan for regularly scheduled inspections to
determine areas with higher accumulations and/or contaminant potential and base your
cleaning program on those site-specific situations. [I.e. maintenance facilities, loading
docks, intense vehicular-land-use.]
Servicing
The service requirements for the Ultra-Urban Filter center around three activities:
1. The condition of the Ultra-Urban Filter unit itself, structural integrity,
2. The quantity of solid material accumulated in the Smart Sponge filtration media,
3. The condition of the Smart Sponge filtration media, whether the hydrocarbon
absorption capacity is attained.
Most environmental service managers tend to focus upon all three activities when it is
tasked with providing the maintenance.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 22
To vacuum out accumulated debris from the Ultra-Urban Filter, you could consider the
purchase, renting or hiring of a service entity with a solids vacuum cleaning “Vactor” unit.
These are truck mounted units and may provide you with services such as storm drain
maintenance and cleaning. A lower cost option is to purchase, rent trailer or hire
mounted portable units. The Vactor units should have sufficient suction to vacuum wet
debris, the ability to reduce down to 3 – 4 inch diameter hose (to fit below safety bars
that may run across curb opening applications). It should also come with a pressure
washing attachment.
In conjunction with the cleaning activities servicing should also consider the ability to
weigh the filters, and to coordinate events within inspection activities. This will allow for a
physical check of the Ultra-Urban Filter as well as the ability to check the condition of the
Smart Sponge.
How often do the Ultra-Urban Filters need to be changed?
Proper maintenance will prolong the efficiency of the Ultra-Urban Filter. The
recommended change-out is therefore a function of the Smart Sponge saturation rate.
Since every storm drain is different, the best indicators are by visual inspection (the
Smart Sponge filtration media will turn yellow, brown and then black) or by its weight (the
filter will increase in weight equal 1-3 times its initial Smart Sponge weight). This
corresponds to a maximum 40-pound increase in the CO1414 and maximum 60 pound
increase in the weight of the DI2020, excluding sediment, trash and debris. Please
contact AbTech for other sizes. In normal deployments the range is from a 1-3 year life
cycle.
Disposal/Recycling Options
Smart Sponge technology transforms liquid hydrocarbons into a stable solid. The
handling and disposal of this solid waste is less expansive and less problematic than
that of other plastic and organic solvents which will leach and leak hydrocarbons back to
the environment.
The following waste disposal and resource recovery industries will accept spent Smart
Sponge for disposal and/or recycling.
Waste–to-Energy Facilities. A specialized segment of the solid waste industry will
use spent Smart Sponge as an alternative fuel in the production of electricity.
•
WTE is acknowledged at the federal level as a renewable energy source under
the Federal owner Act, Title IV of the Clean Air Act.
•
WTE is a participant in the Department of Energy’s National renewable Energy
Program.
Landfills. The ability of Smart Sponge to transform liquid hydrocarbons into a solid waste
makes for less expensive and easy disposal. Spent Smart Sponge generated from the
AbTech laboratories have been classified as a solid waste and are acceptable at Subtitle
D Landfills.
Footnotes:
Generators of Smart Sponge will need to have their waste analyzed, tested, and
classified to determine the generators particular waste characteristic. According to
testing performed for AbTech Industries, spent Smart Sponge soaked with petroleum
hydrocarbons are transferred into solid wastes. AbTech does not take any responsibility
for the generator’s waste classification for handling, transport and the ultimate disposal
or recycling of the waste. The generator must always classify and characterize its own
waste.
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 23
Spent Smart Sponge generated from the AbTech laboratories with a multitude of liquid
petroleum hydrocarbons have passed the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leachate
Procedures and Paint Filter Test. These tests are used in determining the amount of
liquid waste and any free liquids present that may be released into the landfill
environment.
11.8c
HYDROSCREEN
Curbstop and Parking Lot Inserts
Federal water quality discharge regulations also include the
runoff from streets and smaller impervious surfaces where a
detention pond is not practical. It is imperative that a functional
curb and parking lot insert filtration device be able to function
without cleaning after each storm. By utilizing tilted wire wedge
wire screen this is possible.
11.8c.1
12.0
The device will continue to remove debris,
organics and water until the entire vault is filled
with debris, only then does the unit need
maintenance. Organic rubberizer absorbents are located directly below the
screen to insure that the oils will not pass into the storm sewer. Different
filter media can also be installed to remove selected contaminants.
Comments/Additional Information
(Additional explanations to maintenance activities, and observations about the UNDERGROUND
STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES not covered by the form, are recorded in this section).
STANDARD OPERATION PROCEDURES
FOR UNDERGROUND STORMWATER QUALITY STRUCTURES
Page 24
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