OYLER BARBECUE PIT
MODEL 700E/ 1300E
OPERATIONS AND SERVICE MANUAL
J&R MANUFACTURING, INC.
820 W. Kearney
Suite B
Mesquite, Texas
75149
(972) 285-4855 (Texas)
(800) 527-4831 (50 states & Canada)
(972) 289-0801 (Parts and Service)
(972) 288-9488 (Fax)
SN _______________
WARNINGS!
Disposal of Ashes
Ashes should be placed in a metal container with a tight-fitting lid. J&R offers ash
carts suitable for this purpose. The closed container of ashes should be placed on
a noncombustible floor or on the ground, well away from all combustible materials,
pending final disposal. If the ashes are disposed of by burial in soil or otherwise
locally dispersed, they should be retained in the closed container until all cinders
have thoroughly cooled.
Creosote – Formation and Need for Removal –
When wood is burned slowly, it produces tar and other organic vapors, which
combine with expelled moisture to form creosote. The creosote vapors condense
in the relatively cool chimney flue of a slow-burning fire. As a result, creosote
residue accumulates on the flue lining. When ignited this creosote makes an
extremely hot fire. The chimney connector and chimney should be inspected at
least twice monthly to determine if a creosote buildup has occurred. If creosote
has accumulated it should be removed to reduce the risk of a chimney fire.
Dedicated flue
If this unit is to be directly vented (no exhaust hood) do not connect to a flue serving
another appliance.
DANGER-Risk of Fire or Explosion
Do not burn garbage, gasoline, drain oil or other flammable liquids
WARNING-Risk of Fire
Do not operate with flue draft exceeding 0.03 in. water column.
Do not operate fuel loading or ash removal doors open.
Do not store fuel or other combustible material within marked installation clearances.
Inspect and clean flues and chimney regularly
If the oven temperature reaches 450 degrees F, a high limit thermostat will
temporarily interrupt the temperature control function (it will automatically resume
when it cools down). If this occurs (or if the indicating thermostat shows an
abnormally high temperature) and the front doors feel excessively hot, DO NOT
OPEN THE DOORS, as there may be a grease fire inside. Open the doors only
after it cools down. Contact your supervisor (if applicable) while continuing to
observe the pit. If you observe any flames, or perceive any fire threat,
immediately contact the local fire department.
CAUTION-Hot Surfaces
Keep children away.
Do not touch during operation.
OYLER
BARBECUE PIT
M ODELS 700E
AND
1300E
OPERATIONS AND
SERVICE MANUAL
MANUFACTURED BY:
J & R MANUFACTURING, INC.
Rev. 09-17
CONTENTS
MODEL 700E/1300E COOKING MODES
1
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
4
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
11
MAINTENANCE AND CLEANING
14
TROUBLESHOOTING
17
– SUGGESTED INSTALLATION
22
FIGURE 2
–
MODEL 700E DETAIL SHEET
23
FIGURE 3
–
THROUGH THE WALL INSTALLATION
DIRECT VENT
24
FIGURE 4
–
MODEL 1300E DETAIL SHEET
25
FIGURE 1
DIRECT VENT
FIGURE 5 – SUGGESTED INSTALLATION
EXHAUST HOOD VENT
26
FIGURE 5A EXHAUST HOOD DESIGN
27
FIGURE 5B SMOKESTACK INSTALLATION
28
FIGURE 6
–
COOKING MODE
29
FIGURE 7 –DAMPER ACTUATORS
30
MODEL 700E & 1300E WIRING
SCHEMATICS – 240 VOLT
32
THERMOSTAT, ACTUATOR,
AND TIMER MANUALS
36
WARRANTY
51
WOOD SOURCE
52
OYLER BARBECUE PIT
MODEL 700E / 1300E
COOK MODES
The “E” version of the Oyler Barbecue Pit Model 700/1300 uses electric heating
elements in addition to wood fuel for the cooking heat source. Additional
controls allow the operator to cook in one of two “Cook” Modes, “Standard” or
“Dual Fuel”. In addition, a “Cook and Hold” feature can be utilized in either
mode. The basic operation and use of the Oyler Barbecue Pit has not been
altered. The control design of this unit incorporates the same basic operation
sequencing of the standard 700/1300 series. Therefore, the basic Operating
and Maintenance Instructions apply and should be referred to.
STANDARD COOK MODE
Operation of the 700/1300 “E” Barbecue Pit in this mode is the
same as described on page 8 under the paragraph titled “Start Up”.
Turn the black “COOK/OFF – COOK/HOLD” switch to the “COOK”
position. The yellow “EVAC” switch should be in the “ON” position and the
“HTR.ELM” switch should be in the “OFF” position. Build a fire in the
firebox using fresh cut hardwood.
Please
note:
using
the
“EVAC”
MODE
WILL
ACCELERATE
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A FIRE IN THE FIREBOX. Once an adequate
fire has been established in the firebox, turn the “EVAC” switch to the
“OFF” position and set the thermostat to the desired cooking temperature.
For best results, allow the pit to preheat prior to loading the product.
DUAL FUEL MODE
This mode allows the use of electric heating elements in addition to wood fuel.
Please note: the convection fan is engaged continuously in this mode, so overall
cooking times will be reduced.
Preheat pit in the “Standard Mode”. Load product and allow the pit to return to
the desired cooking temperature. Once the unit has reached desired cooking
temperature, turn the “HTR.ELM” switch to the “ON” position. A time delay
built into the “Dual Fuel” circuitry will allow the wood fuel to be consumed first,
utilizing the electric heating elements to “finish” the product. Used in this
method, the operator can regulate the use of the heating elements (and wood
fuel) in the cook cycle. A fully “stoked” firebox will delay (and may prevent) the
use of the electric heating elements until late in the cook cycle. Consequently,
a very small amount of wood fuel will bring on the elements much earlier. In
either case the electric heating elements will guarantee that the thermostat set
point will be maintained to the end of the cooking cycle.
Optional method for use in the “Dual Fuel” mode: Same as described above, except turn the red
switch labeled “HTR.ELM” to the “ON” position at the beginning of the preheat operation.
Using the pit in this method will allow the time delay for the electric heating elements to “time
out” during preheat and the electric elements will be used simultaneously with the wood fuel
from the beginning of the cook cycle.
1
COOK AND HOLD MODE
The difference between this mode and “Cook” mode (“Standard or “Dual Fuel”)
is the temperature control is shifted away from the primary thermostat to a
fixed secondary (or Hold) thermostat after the operator set timer, located on the
instrument panel, counts down. To utilize this feature, simply switch the black
“COOK/OFF – COOK/HOLD” switch to the “Cook/Hold” position and set the
timer for the amount of time you wish the unit to remain in the “Cook” mode
before going into the “Hold” mode. This feature can be utilized when cooking in
either the “Standard” or “Duel Fuel” modes.
One point to remember when setting the timer, is that there is a slow “rampdown” from the primary (initial) thermostat set point to the secondary (Hold)
thermostat set point (non adjustable: fixed at 150º F). During this “ramp-down”
the product will continue to cook, therefore, setting the timer for the same
amount of time (cook cycle) that you would normally use will produce an over
cooked product.
The timer setting should be significantly reduced to
compensate for this “ramp-down”. Some experimentation by the operator will
be necessary to fine-tune the use of the “Hold” feature.
Example: Primary thermostat set at 200º F for cooking beef brisket. You might
set the timer for 8 hours (assuming a 4 hour “Hold” period).
Please note:
In the “Dual Fuel” mode the convection fan is engaged
continuously. However, when control is shifted to the secondary (Hold)
thermostat in the “Cook and Hold” mode the convection fan will cycle off each
time the fixed thermostat reaches its set point.
IMPORTANT MAINTENANCE NOTE:
In addition to the maintenance procedures described elsewhere in this manual, the electric heating
elements and the convection fan impeller should be inspected regularly, daily if possible, and
cleaned if necessary. If there is a heavy build up of soot or creosote, these surfaces should be
cleaned with a stiff brush. This is especially important if the “Dual Fuel” mode is not used each
cook cycle. Heavy buildup on the elements can create a fire hazard.
NOTE:
Newer units with Idec "RTE" Timers:
Green "PWR" light will remain on, red "Out" light will illuminate when timer has timed out. For these
timers the factory settings are mode: A, scale: 0-10, range: h.
Older units with Omron Timers:
Red light will illuminate, and green light will begin flashing, then the red and green lights will remain
illuminated (steady, not flashing) when the timer times out. For these timers the factory settings are
mode: A, time range: 12, time units: hours.
2
3
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
MODEL 700E AND MODEL 1300E
SHIPPING
The unit will be shipped fully assembled. A Model 700E will weigh 4,200
pounds and a Model 1300E will weigh 6,600 pounds. The meat racks
will be packed inside the cooking compartment. If you ordered a smokestack
kit, it will either be packed inside, or shipped on a separate pallet. There will
be a grease drain valve packed inside the firebox, along with the
firebox door handle.
To move a Model 700E into your building,
you will need a minimum opening of 60 inches in width and 83 inches in
height (60” X 86”). For a Model 1300E, you will need a minimum opening
of 72 inches in width and 92 inches in height (72”X 95”). The height
requirements can be reduced by 3” by removing the damper actuator motors
on the top of the unit.
HANDLING
A Model 700E can be handled with a forklift if the lift has a
6,000 pound capacity. A Model 1300E will require an 8,000 pound lift.
The extra capacity lifts are necessary due to the size of the units.
Whenever possible, the unit should be trucked from the rear. Alternatively,
a crane can be used by rigging onto the four lifting lugs welded onto the top of
the unit.
FOUNDATION
It is recommended that the unit be placed on a four to six inch thick concrete
pad as shown on Figures 1, 3, and 5. This elevates the pit drain valve an
additional four to six inches off the floor and facilitates grease handling. With
a pad, the bottom of the grease drain valve would be nine to eleven inches off
your finished floor versus five inches without a pad. We offer a four or
six inch high structural steel base frame to use in lieu of a concrete pad.
Alternatively, you may use a shallow grease pan, pump the grease to your
storage area, or pipe the grease to an adjacent location where an elevation
difference would permit the use of a deeper pan. Use Figures 2 and 4 to locate
the pit in your building so that the smokestack can be installed vertically
with no offsets (avoiding building structural members). Whether a pad is
used or not, the pit must be installed on a solid, level, non-combustible
surface.
DRAIN
There is one drain connection on the pit. This drain is used for draining the
grease and cleaning the cooking chamber. It extends from the side of the pit
near the center and close to the bottom. Install the drain valve onto the
threaded pipe nipple. If possible, a floor drain should be located near this
drain valve as suggested in Figures 1, 3, and 5. This will be of convenience
when the pit is being cleaned.
4
EXTERIOR INSTALLATION
There are two types of exterior installations. The unit can be placed entirely
outside or you may wish to have only the front part of the unit inside your
building. In either case, the unit should be painted and the top seams sealed
for exterior installation. A non-combustible weather covering (awning, shed,
etc.) must be installed over the portion of the unit that stands outside. Check
with local health codes for details regarding the installation and use of an
outdoor cooking device.
THROUGH THE WALL INSTALLATION
If this type if installation is selected (shown in Figure 3), we recommend that
only the front 2.25 inches of the pit protrude through the finished wall surface
to facilitate wall flashing/trim but to still allow access to the electrical junction
box. The side access panel to the motor/gearbox will be blocked but all
necessary access can be gained through the front access panel.
ELECTRICAL
The pit requires 240 volt, 1 phase, 70 amp electrical service. A switch or circuit
breaker should be installed near the pit. It will be necessary during certain
maintenance procedures to shut off the electrical supply to the pit. It is a good
safety procedure to tag the switch to guard against someone inadvertently reenergizing the circuit. A junction box is secured to the top of the pit near the
front (see Figures 1, 2, and 4). Your electrician should extend a conduit from
the pit junction box to a 240 volt supply in your building using a grounded
circuit. Please refer to your local electrical code for any other requirements.
CONNECT AT JUNCTION BOX ONLY.
CLEARANCES
The unit must be installed to conform to the following minimum clearances
from any combustibles:
ABOVE TOP OF
CASING
12
FROM FRONT
48
FROM BACK
6
FROM SIDES
6
The unit must be installed on a non-combustible floor.
5
FROM CHIMNEY
CONNECTOR
6
Venting Requirements
Our barbecue ovens are listed under multiple standards, including U.L. 737 (Fireplace
Stoves), U.L. 2162 (Commercial Wood-Fired Baking Ovens), and U.L. 391 (Solid-Fuel
and Combination-Fuel Central and Supplementary Furnaces. These listing provide two
alternatives for exhausting our units: direct venting and exhaust hood venting.
In all cases, it is imperative to obtain the approval of the AHJ (Authority Having
Jurisdiction). This will typically be the mechanical inspection department of the
local municipality’s building inspection division and/or the local fire marshal.
Option One: Direct Venting (Figures 1 and 3)
Our listings under U.L. 737 and U.L. 391 permit direct venting and the
ventilation standard cited in each is NFPA 211 (Standard for Chimneys,
Fireplaces, Vents, and Solid-Fuel Burning Appliances). All of our enclosed
ovens are designed to be vented via a smokestack (chimney) with natural draft.
All models incorporate smoke-control (bypass) mechanisms to contain smoke
spillage when the oven doors or firebox doors are opened.
In all cases in which combustible construction is present, a factory-built Type
HT chimney is required (refer to NFPA 211 6.3.1.2 and U.L. 103). Examples of
such chimneys would be Selkirk “Ultra-Temp” and DuraVent “DuraTech”.
If no combustible construction is present (examples: exterior installations or
installations in which the oven is faced into a non-combustible exterior wall
and the chimney is either uncovered or covered with a non-combustible
weather covering), then a single wall metal chimney (Figure 5B) is acceptable
if approved by the AHJ .
The chimney should be a minimum of 10 feet in height (oven top to chimney
top) and 14 to 18 inches in diameter. It should be straight (no offsets) and
vertical. This application falls under the classification of “Low Heat NonResidential Appliance” with continuous outlet flue gas temperatures less than
1000 degrees F. The maximum draft is 0.03 inches water column and a
barometric draft regulator must be used if the draft exceeds that draft at full
firing conditions. This can occur as an example when the chimney is very high
as might be the case in multi-story buildings.
6
Air Balance
The building air balance is very important to the proper operation of your Oyler
Pit. The Oyler design is based on the induction of air into the pit due to the
“stack effect” of the chimney. The “stack effect” is the term used to describe
the upward airflow created in a chimney based on the chimney height and the
temperature difference between the bottom (inlet) and top (discharge). This
“stack effect” induces airflow into the oven chamber via the front door opening
(when the doors are open) and/or into the firebox when either the firebox door
is open along with open bypass dampers or an open exit flue damper, or, if the
firebox door closed, when the firebox combustion air damper is open.
Disruptions of this airflow can be caused by mechanical exhaust fans,
buildings that are too airtight (insufficient openings for incoming air), and
chimney downdrafts created by wind. Such downdrafts are often created by
nearby windbreaks, which are taller than the chimney top. For this reason, the
chimney should be four feet taller than the surrounding rooftop including
nearby parapet walls, and taller than adjacent buildings and trees. If air
balance cannot be achieved by normal means, you should consider using a fan
to assist the stack effect. A fan on the terminus of a chimney can solve the
problem. We recommend fans manufactured by Enervex (www.enervex.com)
such as their Model GSV installed with a variable-speed controller. These fans
are available through J&R and other sources.
Combustion Air
Make sure adequate combustion air is available. Excerpt from NFPA 211 12.3:
“Solid-fuel burning devices shall be installed in a location and manner so as to
provide ventilation and combustion air supply to allow proper combustion of
fuel, chimney draft, and maintenance of safe temperatures… where buildings
are so tight that normal infiltration does not provide the necessary air, outside
air shall be introduced.”
Option Two: Exhaust Hood Venting (Figure 5)
U.L. 2162 cites NFPA 96 (Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection
for Commercial Cooking Operations) as its ventilation standard. While NFPA
96 allows direct ventilation with factory-built grease ducts or properly
constructed welded ducts (with fire-rated enclosures), it also permits the
exhaust hood ventilation option for our units.
7
For proper design of a hood over our ovens, please refer to Figure 5A
(Figures 5 and 5A depict a single canopy hood design).
It is very important that the filter bank be located toward the rear of the
unit (near the chimney connector). This simulates the natural-draft of a
chimney above the chimney connector for which these units were engineered
to control both temperature and smoke.
The recommended exhaust volumes are based on the specifications from the
2009 International Mechanical Code Section 507.13.1 (Extra Heavy Duty
Cooking Appliances, Single Canopy, 700 CFM per linear foot of hood). Wallmounted hoods will require less volume (550 CFM per linear foot). These
drawings specify a 12 inch hood overhang at the front oven doors and the side
containing the fire box door with a 6 inch overhang on the non-active sides (no
oven or firebox doors).
Notes :
1. Exhaust volume should be determined by the exhaust hood
manufacturer based on their products listing and local code
requirements. States such as California, Oregon, Washington, and
Connecticut all have code driven maximum exhaust volumes for specific
equipment. For example: California mandates that solid fuel exhaust
hoods for a wall mounted application can use NO MORE than 385 cfm/lf
for solid fuel.
2.
Spark arrestor type filters are required
3.
Hoods serving solid fuel equipment must be dedicated to solid fuel
only (no gas or electric) with their own dedicated fire protection system.
8
Meat Racks and Hangers
Wire racks & hangers are shipped unassembled so that they may be used where
required in the unit. They must be properly assembled before use to reduce the
possibility of a rack jam.
When installing the racks and hangers, install the 12 hangers and 6
bottom racks first, and then install the upper racks.
Model 1300 E
All Model 1300E rack hangers are “triple” (designed for a set of three racks per pair of
hangers). Each hanger has three pairs of wire loops (see photo on the next page). Each
rack will have corner “voids” through which the wire loops will be inserted. Hangers for
older units (not shown) may have three pairs of ferrules instead of wire loops, and the
racks associated with them will have rings in the corners through which the ferrules are
inserted.
NOTE:
YOU MUST ALWAYS have a rack installed in the lowest position
of the hanger to avoid a rack jam.
Model 700E
The hangers for Model 700Es will be one of the following:
Type 1. Triple hangers with three pairs of wire pegs per hanger (starting mid- 2017:
see photo on the next page.
Type 2. Triple hangers with wire hooks on the lowest level and slide rails for the middle
and upper levels (see photo on the next page). For this style, you must follow
the directions in Illustrations 1 and 2 on the next page. The “nibs” on the
middle and upper racks must be properly secured in the slide rails to prevent
a rack jam.
Type 3. Double hangers with two pairs of hooks on each hanger (see photo on the next
page). For this style you also have to follow the directions in Illustrations 1 and
2 on the next page.
NOTE:
With all three types, YOU MUST ALWAYS have a rack installed in the
lowest position of the hanger to avoid a rack jam. Never mix hanger types (use all
double hangers or all triple hangers).
9
* Remove the nib by using a
large, adjustable wrench.
Tighten the wrench jaws
around the nib and bend the
nib upward and downward
until it snaps off.
Illustration 1
Illustration 2
Lower-most (bottom) racks for hanger types 2
and 3 must have the 4 “nibs” (if present)
removed from the lowest racks.* For Type 3
hangers, the upper rack “nibs” must also be
removed. For Type 2 hangers, leave the
“nibs” in place for the middle and top
positions. For Type 1 hangers, nibs can be left
in place (no removal necessary).
For hanger types 2 and 3 only, the
lowest (bottom) pair of hooks on
each hanger must be bent closed
around the lower rack side rails.
This is not required for Type 1
hangers.
Hooks or
pegs go
here for
Type 1
Corner
“void”
“Nib”
Model 700E Rack
Model 1300E Rack
Model 700E Type 1
Model 700E Type 2
Model 700E Type 3
10
Model 1300E
Here for
Types 2
and 3
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
MODEL 700E AND MODEL 1300E
START-UP
After the pit is installed, leveled, stacked, and connected to the electrical
supply, check for proper operation:
(a) Turn the thermostat set point above and then below the actual
temperature. The combustion air damper on the firebox should open and close.
Open the access door at the rear of the pit and verify that the “exit flue damper”
(see Figure 6) opens and closes in synchronization with the damper on the
firebox door (note: if the internal temperature of the oven is below the
lowest setting on the thermostat, these dampers will remain open).
(b) Energize the Rotisserie (or Roti) switch and push-in and hold the
Rack Advance mushroom switch (green) – the racks should rotate. With the
Rotisserie switch energized, the racks will rotate automatically when the front
doors are closed and latched.
(c) Open the front doors or turn the “EVAC” switch on. Verify that the
two large bypass dampers open (located over the firebox).
BUILDING A FIRE
NEVER USE CHARCOAL LIGHTING FLUID, GASOLINE, OR OTHER
VOLATILE FUELS TO START THE FIRE. Load several small pieces of wood in
the firebox. Open the front oven doors or turn the “Evac” switch on. This
opens two dampers in the rear of the pit and allows the firebox to be vented
directly to the smokestack. Hickory wood is recommended whenever available.
Next in preference is oak or mesquite. Generally, however, any nut or fruit
bearing hardwood would be acceptable. For best results, the wood should be
relatively green (cut within two months). Start the fire by using kindling, or
safe (low volatility) solid fire starting aids. As the fire becomes established, add
more wood to the fire until the firebox is about one-half to three-fourths full.
Since you will probably be cooking every day, subsequent fire starting will be
much easier. Live red coals will last about two days in the firebox, so restarting
a fire is simply accomplished by loading fresh wood onto these live coals. Wood
should be 24 inches long and up to 8 inches in diameter (logs should be split if
larger than 8 inches in diameter).
OPENING THE OVEN DOORS
If the pit is fired-up and operating and the front doors are closed, there will be
dense smoke inside the oven. If you unlatch the doors and open them quickly,
you will get a face full of smoke. Instead, first turn the thermostat down to
close the Firebox damper and then turn the “Evac” switch on or slightly open
the front doors causing the bypass dampers to open and begin venting smoke
up the stack. Wait about 45 seconds (the slightly open doors will help evacuate
smoke by allowing a fresh air entry path into the pit) and then slowly open the
doors.
11
MEAT LOADING
The first time the pit is fired, it is recommended that you allow it to operate
or several hours while empty. This allows any residues (oil, paper, etc.
to be removed. After this is done, you may load meat onto the racks.
Take care when loading to keep the load balanced. Place meat on each
rack so that the rack remains level (does not tilt forward or rearward).
Do not allow meat to extend beyond the rack surface.
Distribute the entire load so that the rotisserie is relatively balanced. In other
words, if you have a pit with six racks, you should distribute about
one-sixth of the entire load on each rack. If you are cooking very large items
such as turkeys, take special care to insure that they cannot shift and roll off the
shelves while cooking. You need to secure these large items to the shelves with
butcher’s string or wire, or “chock” the items with stainless steel or rolled
aluminum foil to prevent movement.
Be sure that there is adequate clearance between the top of the meat items and
the top of the cooking compartment. The most serious problem that can occur
in your unit is a “rack jam”, in which racks become engaged between the
rotisserie wheels and the body of the cooking compartment. If a jam should
occur, the rotisserie wheels will become locked. There is an overload device in
the electrical circuit to protect the motor. This overload device should trip in
the event of a jam but damage to racks and other components may have been
incurred. A jam usually occurs when the pit is improperly loaded. Sometimes
all it takes is for one piece of meat to fall from its rack. This piece can fall onto
other pieces causing them to fall. Soon there is an obstruction large enough in
the bottom of the pit for a rack to hit it and become dislodged from its pins. If
that rack becomes engaged in other racks, or one of the rotisserie wheels, then
a rack jam occurs. By carefully loading your pit, you should never have to
worry about this problem.
After completing the meat loading, always observe at least one full revolution to
make sure that all shelves are properly balanced.
After the meat is loaded, set the thermostat to the desired temperature and
close the oven doors. Refer to the table on the next page for cooking directions.
12
SUGGESTED COOKING TIMES AND
TEMPERATURES
MEAT ITEM
Beef Brisket
(12 – 14 Lbs.)
Pork Shoulder
(12 – 14 Lbs.)
Pork Ribs
(3 and down)
Sausage
Hams (pre-cooked)
Turkeys (whole)
Chicken Halves
TEMPERATURE*
COOKING TIME**
200° F.
14 Hours
200° F.
14 Hours
250° F.
3 Hours
225°
225°
250°
250°
F.
F.
F.
F.
1 Hour
2 Hours
45 Min.per Lb.
2 Hours
*Sensed at the midpoint of the pit.
**These cooking times are based on a full loading in a Models 700E and 1300E
Pits (18 racks) and apply to the meat on the bottom racks. With decreased
loadings, the cooking times should be reduced. The meat on the top racks
will cook in less time.
With the exception of turkeys and ribs, most pit operators do nothing to prepare
meats prior to cooking. Usually, a dry seasoning mix (pepper, paprika, brown
sugar, etc.) is sprinkled or rubbed onto ribs. Sometimes a liquid mixture of
spices is injected beneath the skins of turkeys. Refer to our recipe book for
more detailed information.
For Dual Fuel Mode (using electrical heating elements), please refer to
pages 1 and 2 of this manual.
GREASE
Grease and water from the meat you cook will accumulate in the bottom of the
cooking compartment. This should be drained from the pit daily.
NOTE: Drain all grease and water out of the pit immediately after cooking
poultry or seafood.
FIREBOX ASHES
Remove excess ashes daily to provide good air circulation among the logs in the
firebox. Leave enough live coals in the firebox to ignite a new fire. Most
operators shovel the ashes out of the firebox and into a metal container (such
as a J&R Mfg. ash cart and store this container in a safe location (away from
combustibles).
13
MAINTENANCE AND CLEANING
MODEL 700E AND MODEL 1300E
PIT DESIGN
Smoke and heat from the firebox enter the cooking compartment through
refractory-lined flues.
Smoke exits this area through a separate flue.
Temperature control is effected by regulating the flow of combustion air into the
firebox and the discharge from the cooking compartment. Dampers in the rear
of the pit open in conjunction with the front doors so that smoke is carried out
of the building through the smokestack rather than exiting out the oven doors.
MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
DAILY
1)
Drain liquid from the pit and discard.
2)
Remove excess ashes from the firebox and store/discard safely.
3)
Clean the inside of the front doors and the inside of the firebox
door.
WEEKLY It is recommended that once a week you shut your unit down and
clean it as follows:
Racks: Remove the racks from the pit and either
(a)
Use detergent and hot water to clean them, or
(b)
Use a high pressure hot water cleaning machine, or
(c)
Use a wire brush to remove the residue, or
(d)
If time permits, place the racks in a vat filled with water and a
caustic chemical such as lye (or firebox ashes for economy). The
racks will soak clean in approximately 24 hours.
You may
consider purchasing an extra set of racks so one set can clean
while cooking with the other set.
(e)
Always rinse with clean water after using cleaner or lye.
Oven Interior: After draining all the liquid from the pit, you can either
(a)
Use detergent (or buffered oven cleaner) and high pressure water,
or
(b)
Use a steam cleaning machine, or
(c)
If high pressure water or a steam cleaning machine is not available,
use a high strength buffered oven cleaner and spray it onto the
interior oven surfaces. Dilute the cleaner as directed on the label.
Use some type of pump sprayer to apply the solution onto the oven
interior surfaces. Let the solution set for about 15 minutes and
wash the interior walls with water (hot water, if available), or
(d)
Use a scraper and shovel to remove the residue and flush with
detergent and hot water,or
14
(e)
Leave the racks in place and fill the pit with a hot water/oven
cleaner solution up to the middle of the exit flue opening. Heat the
pit up to 250° and allow the racks to revolve. Continue for at least
4 hours, drain and rinse the pit thoroughly.
Drain the washings from the pit through the drain valve (see Figure 1). If a
floor drain is not adjacent to the drain valve, attach a hose or pipe to the valve
and extend it
over to a suitable drain.
PLEASE NOTE:
Methods (a), (b), and (c) are operable only if pit is cleaned every week. If several
weeks pass between cleanings, the cleaner will not penetrate and remove the
residue.
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE CHECK LIST
EVERY 45 DAYS
BEARINGS Remove the access panel below the front oven doors (or, with
newer units, open the lubrication access door on the access panel). The
rotisserie bearings have lubrication extensions that terminate with grease
fittings locatednear the motor starter enclosure. Use a high temperature
grease (SuperLube Synthetic Grease is recommended) and a cartridge-type
automotive grease gun.NOTE: Low temperature grease will harden at high
temperatures and damage the bearings.
CHAIN Lubricate the chain with the same high temperature grease. Remove
the access cover on the drive side adjacent to the front of the unit, or remove
the front access panel below the pit doors to access the chain. Check the chain
tension and adjust as necessary.
EXIT FLUE CLEANING
Clean this flue thoroughly from inside the cooking
compartment or remove the rear access cover adjacent to the flue and clean it
from the rear of the pit with the flue damper open.
NOTE: If this flue is not kept clean, the solids accumulation can retard the
passage of smoke from the oven to the stack, causing soot and/or
temperature control problems.
EVERY 6 MONTHS
1.
Inspect and repair as needed all gaskets. This includes the front door
gaskets, the two bypass gaskets, and the exit flue gasket.
2.
Inspect and adjust, repair, or replace the front door latch.
3.
Check the temperature control mechanism for proper operation. Cycle
the thermostat and make sure the combustion air damper and exit flue
damper are opening and closing (tightly). Lubricate all linkages at the
rear of the pit. Remove the thermostat faceplate and spray the moving
parts with a spray lubricant.
15
4.
Check the evacuation (bypass) system for proper operation. Open the
front doors and make sure that the bypass dampers operate properly.
They should seal tightly when the front doors are closed and latched (and
the “Evac” switch, if the pit is equipped with one, is off).
5.
Clean excess carbon build-up or residue from the rear area of the pit,
including the inside of the access door above the firebox, the firebox door
and the area around the firebox door.
DOOR GASKETS
The oven door gasket should be smoke-tight. To stop smoke leaks, you may
need to shim the hinge side, the latch side or both. You may also need to
“thicken” the gasketing by using additional RTV silicone between the gasket and
the body of the unit. Gaskets can be checked with a “paper test”. Insert a strip
of paper so that it is between the door and the gasket and extends outside the
pit. Close and latch the door. Pull the paper towards you. It should be very
resistant to your effort. If it seems loose, further adjust the door or the gasket
thickness.
16
TROUBLESHOOTING
1).
PROBLEM
Combustion air damper and exit flue fails to open and close.
CAUSES
(a)
(b)
(c)
One of the following components is inoperative:
the thermostat,
the damper motor, or
the linkage between the motor and the dampers.
PROCEDURE
(a)
Open the access door to flues and dampers. (see Figure 1)
(b)
Make sure that the linkage is attached to the motor and
that all pivot pins are in place. A simple adjustment
may be all that is necessary.
(c)
Inspect the Temperature Control Damper Acuator With a
volt meter, check to see if the actuator motor circuit is live
by turning the thermostat to its highest setting and check
the motor lead-in wires. If 120 volts is present, shut off
the pit electrical supply and replace the motor.* If 120
volts is not present, the problem is in the circuitry between
the actuator and the Main Control Thermostat. Use the volt
meter to trace the control circuit to find the problem, which
might include the High Limit Thermostat.
* If the motor is very warm to the touch, it may be that the
motor is okay but mal-adjusted so that it is going out on its
internal overload. Check for proper adjustment of the linkage
before replacing the motor.
2).
PROBLEM Adequate cooking temperatures
or excessive smoke leakage from the pit.
CAUSES
cannot be maintained and /
One of the following:
(a)
the combustion air damper and exit flue damper are not
opening,
(b)
there is a restriction in the smoke exit system,
(c)
there is excessive heat loss due to the bypass dampers not
sealing properly,
(d)
there is insufficient make-up air supply, or
(e)
there is insufficient wood in the firebox.
17
PROCEDURE
3).
(a)
Proceed as in problem 1, if the combustion damper and exit
flue are not opening.
(b)
Verify that the exit flue is clean.
(b)
If the problem still exists, make sure that the two large
bypass dampers are sealing against their respective gasketed
seats. A problem with these dampers could affect the pit
temperature, but it would not explain a smoke leakage
problem.
(d)
If none of the above problems is evident, then there is
insufficient combustion air for the firebox.
PROBLEM
are open.
Excessive smoke emissions from the oven doors when they
CAUSES
One of the following:
(a)
rear bypass dampers are not opening,
(b)
negative air pressure in room (usually caused by exhaust
fans), or
(c)
insufficient make-up air.
SOLUTION
(a)
Open the access door to the flues and dampers. Inspect the
bypass dampers for proper operation. They should both open
when the front doors are opened.
(b)
If they do not open when the front doors are opened or when
the "Evac" Switch is energized, inspect (and adjust/repair)
the linkages at the rear of the pit. The "Evac" damper
actuator moves the rear damper linkages to open and close
the dampers. It energizes when the front doors open, or
when the “Evac” switch is energized. If the dampers do
not open after checking the linkages, then troubleshoot the
acuator using the same procedure described in Problem 1. If
the actuator has no voltage present, then the problem is in
the circuitry between the actuator and the switches. Check
the wiring, the Rotisserie Switch, the Door Limit Switch and
the Evac Switch.
18
4).
PROBLEM
Rotisserie does not revolve.
CAUSES
One or more of the following:
(a)
motor failure,
(b)
circuit failure,
(c)
gearbox failure,
(d)
broken chain,
(e)
loose sprocket, or
(f)
the overload device has tripped.
PROCEDURE
(a)
Inspect the cooking compartment to be sure that the
rotisserie assembly has not jammed. If the assembly is okay
and the load is evenly balanced, turn the rotisserie switch to
the “off” position and let it sit for about five minutes, then
press the blue reset button on the contactor/overload
assembly and try the rotisserie switch again. If it still does
not revolve, proceed to Step (b).
If there has been a rack jam you will also need to proceed to
the next step. Other damage may have been incurred,
however, such as damaged racks or rotisserie wheel pins, or
rotisserie shaft.
(b)
Make sure that the circuit breaker feeding the pit has not
tripped. If it has, reset it and try to operate the rotisserie. If
it trips again or if the rotisserie shaft still does not rotate,
proceed with the next step.
(a)
Open the motor/gearbox access door. If the gearbox output
shaft is rotating but the sprocket is not, then shut the circuit
off and tighten the sprocket onto the shaft.
NOTE: Make sure the 1/4 inch square key is in place on the
output shaft. If the chain is broken, repair it. If the chain is
moving, check the rotisserie shaft sprocket and make sure
the key is in place in the keyway.
(d)
If the motor is running but the output shaft on the gearbox is
not rotating, proceed to Step (e). If the motor is not running,
proceed to Step (f).
Note: the following steps require a skilled
technician for safety's sake. There are
dangerous moving parts (chain, sprockets,
etc.) which can cause serious injury.
19
5).
(e)
Shut the pit circuit off and remove the motor and gearbox
assembly by removing the bolts holding the gearbox onto the
base plate. Remove the motor from the gearbox and inspect
the coupling between the two. If it is not broken, replace the
gearbox.
(f)
If the motor does not run, shut the electrical supply to the pit
off and remove the gearbox and motor assembly as indicated
above. Separate the two, energize the pit circuit, and turn
the rotisserie switch on. If the motor runs, replace the
gearbox. If it does not run, replace the motor; however,
check the gearbox by rotating the input shaft manually. The
output shaft should rotate (remember the output will rotate
much slower than the input). If it does not rotate, the
gearbox is also defective.
PROBLEM
Black residue (carbon) on the meat after cooking or “creosote” odor
in smoke.
CAUSES
One or more of the following:
(a)
improper wood,
(b)
too much wood in the firebox, or
(c)
improper draft.
PROCEDURE
6.)
(a)
Check smoke exit flue and the stack and clean if necessary to
remove any obstructions.
(b)
If a new supply of wood is being used, check its type and be
sure it is not the problem by using some wood from your
regular supply.
(c)
Too much wood in the firebox can cause this problem. Also,
if your wood is dry, it can occur. Soot is produced when
there is inadequate oxygen available for complete
combustion. When you build a roaring fire in the firebox by
using too much wood or wood that is too dry, there may be
insufficient oxygen available. Reduce the amount of wood
you charge into the firebox when this problem occurs.
PROBLEM
Rotisserie not revolving smoothly.
CAUSES
One or more of the following:
(a)
the chain is loose,
(b)
the gearbox is defective, or one of the sprockets is not secured
to its shaft.
20
PROCEDURE
7).
(a)
Shut the pit circuit off and tag it. Open the motor/gearbox
access door. Inspect the chain. It should not have excessive
slack over or under the gearbox sprocket. If it does, remove
any meat that might be on the racks and loosen the four
bolts securing the gearbox to its base. Pull the gearbox
toward the front of the pit and re-secure the bolts.
(b)
If the chain was not loose, inspect the gearbox sprocket and
rotisserie sprocket to be sure they are secured properly to
their respective shafts.
(c)
If they are, then inspect the gearbox as indicated in the
section discussing a rotisserie that fails to revolve.
PROBLEM
Product is cooking too fast or too slow.
CAUSES
One or more of the following:
(a)
thermostat is out of calibration, or
(b)
the dampers are not functioning properly.
PROCEDURE
(a)
Check dampers as described in Problems 1 and 2.
(b)
Calibrate as follows:
(1)
Use a portable hotplate or other device to safely boil
water in a pan.
(2)
Carefully remove the sensing probe from its mounting
sleeves and insert it into the pan of rapidly boiling
water. The probe must be completely submerged in
the boiling water. The probe should not touch the
sides of the pan. Adjust the thermostat to match the
temperature of boiling water at your elevation.
(3)
Adjust the thermostat indicating pointer as
directed in the thermostat manuals included in
this manual.
21
Oyler Interior Installation with Direct Vent
1
4
2
3
6
12
13
7
8
10
5
11
9
Figure 1
LEGEND
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
RAIN CAP
COUNTER FLASHING
ROOF JACK
SMOKESTACK
ACCESS PANEL TO GEARBOX, MOTOR, GREASE FITTINGS
ACTUATOR MOTORS (6" HIGH)
ACCESS DOORS TO FLUES AND DAMPERS
22
8. FIREBOX DOOR
9. CONCRETE PAD (RECOMMENDED)
4 TO 6 INCHES HIGH OR USE STEEL BASE
10. DRAIN VALVE
11. FLOOR DRAIN (RECOMMENDED)
12. J-BOX FOR ELECTRICAL CONNECTION
13. THERMOSTAT AND CONTROL SWITCHES
23
Oyler Through-the-Wall Installation with Direct Vent
Figure 3
24
25
Oyler With Exhaust Hood Vent
Unit shown is a Model 700-Left Firebox
Figure 5
26
27
Front
Oven
Doors
Make-up air
Typical
Oyler
Oven
Filter Bank
137
1300 Left or Right
4700
5000
4000
4300
SCALE
B
SIZE
1/16
Scott Higgins
DRAWN
Figure 5A
Oyler- Under Hood
DWG NO
SHEET
3/28/2017
DATE
1 OF 1
REV
Exhaust
Volume (cfm)
Oyler Section-Through View - Under Hood
TITLE
79.5
85.5
67.75
73.75
Hood
Width (in.)
J&R Manufacturing, Inc.
152
137
700 Rear
1300 Rear
122
700 Left or Right
Hood
Length (in.)
OUR RECOMMENDATIONS
12 inch overhang at front of unit.
6 inch overhang, non-active sides and rear (no firebox).
12 inch overhang on firebox side (or rear, for rear firebox units).
Filter bank always over chimney connector.
Hood elevation: bottom of hood to be a minimum of 2 inches
above top of oven( including base if any).
Oyler Model/
Firebox Location
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Exhaust Hood Design Parameters for Oyler Ovens
Always verify with hood and fire supression vendors and AHJ
EXHAUST HOOD DESIGN
SMOKESTACK
INSTALLATION
(Single wall smokestackonly for use when no
combustibles are present)
Rain Cap
18” Diameter X 4
Section 3 Required
-
TEK No. 3 Screws
Typical for assembly
:Iu:uIr[i:1IIull:[II:
Section A A
-
Counter flashing
Roof flashing
Roof
Secure Stack to Stack Ring
with TEK No. 5 Screws
Stack Rinq on Pit
(17 3/4” O.D. x 3” High)
28
Figure 5B
29
Oyler Pits utilize two damper actuators, one for temperature control and one for the “ Evac” mode.
Older units have Barber-Colman actuators and newer units have Schneider Electric actuators. They
are identical, other than the name, as Schneider acquired Barber-Colman. Instructions for the actuators
are included in this manual (see the Thermostats and Actuator Manuals section). The model for 120 Volt
units is MA-418.
These actuators are located on the top rear of the pit near the chimney connector. IMPORTANT: When
replacing or adjusting the actuator, it is critical that the motor is energized and allowed to reach its full
stop position before connecting the linkage rod from the dampers to the ball joint on the “crank arm”
(during the power stroke the output shaft travels 180 degrees shaft to reach its stopping point). If the
actuator cannot reach this stopping point, it will overheat and fail. With the actuator energized, the crank
arm should be installed so that it is in the 11 o’clock position or approximately 150 degrees from the
vertically down position (see drawing). After installing the crank arm in the proper position and connecting
the linkage rod (with the associated dampers open*) to the ball joint on the crank arm, the device should
be cycled (off and on) several times to make sure there is no binding in the linkage components which
would shorten the travel of the power stroke. Also, make sure the appropriate dampers fully close when
the actuator is de-energized. It is also recommended that this test phase also include the use of an amp
meter to determine that the actuator has in fact reached its full travel stop position when energized. The
amp reading for 120 Volt units should drop from approximately 0.9 A (running) to 0.3A (stopped or holding).
Actuator is shown in energized mode
(clockwise travel, full stop position) with
crank arm installed in recommended
position. This is the "damper open" position
*Manually open the
dampers so that the
maximum opening is
about 7 " for the
smoke exit flue
damper (in the case
of the temperature
control actuator) or
the oven bypass
damper (in the case
of the "Evac" actuator).
30
31
32
33
34
35
IM800-06
800 Series
Indicating Temperature Controls
Types 800, T800, 802
UNITED ELECTRIC
CONTROLS
Please refer to IMT120 for Explosion Proof Types
820E and 822E
Installation and Maintenance
Instructions
Please read all instructional literature carefully and thoroughly before starting. Refer to the final page for the listing of Recommended
Practices, Liabilities and Warranties.
GENERAL
Temperature variations are sensed by a liquid filled sensing bulb which
hydraulically transmits motion through a mechanism which rotates the indicating pointer and actuates precision snap-acting switch(es). Control set
point(s) are varied by turning the external adjustment knob(s), according to
procedures outlined (See Part II - Adjustments). Thermometer type T800
provides temperature indication only with no snap-acting switch.
(1/4” thick maximum). Locate it where vibration, shock and ambient temperature fluctuations are minimal. It is recommended that mounting the unit with
the conduit connection on the top be avoided.
To Flush Mount
Cut out the panel as shown in Figure 1A. Mount to the panel using the two
holes located on the flange of the enclosure.
MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE: THE HIGHEST TEMPERATURE TO WHICH A
SENSING ELEMENT MAY BE OCCASIONALLY OPERATED WITHOUT ADVERSELY
AFFECTING SET POINT CALIBRATION AND REPEATABILITY. MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE STATED IN LITERATURE AND ON NAMEPLATE MUST NEVER BE
EXCEEDED, EVEN BY SURGES IN THE SYSTEM. OCCASIONAL OPERATION OF
UNIT UP TO MAX. TEMPERATURE IS ACCEPTABLE (E.G., START-UP, TESTING).
CONTINUOUS OPERATION SHOULD BE RESTRICTED TO THE DESIGNATED
ADJUSTABLE RANGE.
Please refer to product bulletins for product specifications. Product bulletins
may be found at www.ueonline.com.
Part I -Installation
I
k,
.D
PUBLISHED
Tools Needed
Phillips screwdriver to secure
customer supplied screws
5/64” Allen Wrench
-
.O
.
PREVENTATIVE
/ PERIODIC
(6
AS DICTATED BY THE ENVIRONMENT) IS NECESSARY TO ENSURE OPERATION
.L
,
,
.
Clearance for #8 screw - (2) places
Figure 1A Flush Mounting
To Surface Mount
Attach 2 mounting ears found in separate package to recessed areas on
back side of enclosure by means of 2 self-tapping screws. Mount to surface
per Figure 1B.
Figure 1B Surface Mounting
Clearance for #10
screw - (2) places
Mounting Bulb and Capillary
Fully immerse the bulb and 6” of capillary in the control zone. For best control it is generally desirable to place the bulb close to the heating or cooling
source in order to sense temperature fluctuations quickly. Be sure to locate
the bulb so it will not be exposed to temperature beyond the instruments
range limits.
Try to place any remaining capillary adjacent to the control head so it will
sense the same ambient temperatures (control is ambient temperature compensated).
When mounting 800 or 802 type controls, it may be necessary to remove
adjustment knob and front cover. The knob is secured with a 5/64” Allen
Setscrew. The cover is secured by four phillips screws at the corners.
Unless otherwise specified, factory calibration, allows for 6” of capillary tube
in the control zone. If longer lengths are required recalibration may be necessary. Follow the procedure outlined in PART II - Adjustments.
Mou
Avoid bending or coiling the capillary tube tighter than 1/2” radius.
Exercise caution when making bends near the capillary ends.
The controller may be mounted in any position to either a surface or panel
If a separable well or union connector is used follow separate instructions
included with them.
IM800-06
www.ueonline.com
36
WIRING
Part II - Adjustments
(Refer to Figure 3)
.
.
.
.
z
14
.
Types 800, 802
Connect the electrical conduit to the case securing it with the grounding
locknut supplied.
Note: Unless control is connected to a metallic conduit, grounding bushing
should be removed from grounding wire. A separate conductor should be provided from grounding system directly to the non-current carrying metal parts of
control (splice the grounding wire).
Conduit opening is available on the left side as standard. It can be supplied on
the right side on request. Wire through the 7/8” conduit hole directly to the
lead-wire(s) provided, color coded as follows, or to the optional terminal block.
Common
Normally Open
Normally Closed
Switch 1
Switch 2
Violet
Blue
Black
Yellow
Orange
Red
N.O.
N.O.
N.C.
ORANGE
RED
YELLOW
VIOLET
BLUE
BLACK
COM.
Figure 2A Dual Switch
COM.
BLUE
BLACK
VIOLET
Figure 2B Single Switch
Plunger
Optional terminal block wiring is available for single or dual switch controls
(option M100). See Figure 2C
DUAL SWITCH
N.O.
N.C.
N.C.
COM.
N.O.
COM.
N.O.
COM.
Figure 2C Terminal Block ption
Plunger
BLUE
BLACK
VIOLET
Connect test lights to indicate switch operation or listen for the individual
switch clicks. The separation between switches is the difference between the
high and low set points. The set points are determined by setting individual
adjustment pointers and may be separated up to 100% of scale range apart.
Replace cover and adjustment knob if removed during installation. Controller
is ready for operation. Turn setting pointer to desired control temperature
and start up the process. To suit particular process conditions or for greater
controller accuracy it may be desirable to make slight alterations to the set
point or indicator reading. Procedures for making these adjustments are
described below.
In-Process Adjustments
Use an accurate test thermometer such as a thermocouple with its probe
mounted directly to the center of the sensing bulb. Before making any
adjustments, allow process temperature to stabilize; i.e., successive on-off
cycles repeated.
Note: Prior to making any controller adjustments, the cover and adjustment
knobs should be removed. The adjustment knob slides off adjustment shaft
for all controls except the 802. The 802 requires a 5/64” allen wrench. When
adjustments are completed, all applicable parts should be replaced.
BLUE
BLACK
VIOLET
ORANGE
RED
YELLOW
SINGLE SWITCH
N.C.
Dual Switch Type 802
Type 802 has a separate knob and pointer for each switch. Turn black knob
for switch #2 and turn green inserted knob for switch #1. Set points are
shown by individual pointers and may be separated up to 100% of dial range
apart, so long as the red pointer is set higher than the green pointer.
Note: Switch #1, green pointer, cannot be set to operate at a higher setting
than switch #2, red pointer.
COM.
N.O.
N.C.
Single Switch Type 800
Move the set point Adjustment Pointer (red) up scale beyond the black
Indicating Pointer. This permits checking the set point by moving the lever
arm upward with a finger or tool simulating thermal assembly movement.
Connect test lights to indicate switch operation or listen for the switch to
click. Loosen adjustment “A” and move the Adjustment Pointer until it
agrees with the Indicating Pointer. When the switch clicks re-tighten the
screw.
To align either switch to the Adjustment Pointer the corresponding adjustment
“A” must be loosened and the Adjustment Pointer set to the Indicating Pointer,
then tighten adjustment “A”.
See wiring Diagrams Figure 2A and 2B.
N.C.
Tools Needed
5/64” Allen Wrench
5/16” Open End Wrench (2 required)
Phillips and slotted tip screwdriver
Correct any difference between the Indicating Pointer and the test thermometer by holding the compensator with a 5/16” wrench while turning the
zero adjustment “C” on the thermal assembly with a second 5/16” wrench,
per Figure 3 until the brown Indicating Pointer reads the same as the test
thermometer. Turning clockwise lowers indicated reading. Compare the process temperature with the set point Adjustment Pointer. Loosen adjustment
screw “A” to align set point Adjustment Pointer with the Indicating Pointer.
Re-tighten screw “A”.
IM800-06
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37
Adjusting Thermometer Type T800
Use the in-process adjustment to check the control. Differences between the
test instrument and the thermometer can be corrected by turning the zero
adjustment “C” per Figure 3 on the thermal assembly. Turning in lowers
indicated reading.
General Layout
SWITCH 1
Note: Indicating Pointer Deflection:
The indicating pointers will read slightly low when the bulb temperature is
15° above the controller setting. This deflection is normal and repeatable
(approximately 0.5% of scale range on single switch models) and is due to
the transference of the switching mechanism load to the thermal system. It
can be measured by moving the setting pointer from the high to the low end
of the scale and observing the resultant indicating pointer deflection.
SWITCH 2
COMPENSATOR
Correction of Capillary
If the length of capillary immersed in the process differs from the amount
immersed at the factory calibration bath, a calibration shift will occur. The
error may be corrected as follows:
Move set pointer to the highest temperature setting. Note indicating scale
reading with the head and sensor at room temperature. Loosen the two
thermal assembly mounting screws. Re-position the housing index against
the calibration on the instrument case (or skeleton casting) at a rate of 1
division line per capillary length listed in the following column. Move to the
left if capillary is to be added to the process, or to the right if capillary is to
be removed from process.
Model Number
Range
Cap Length/Division*
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-180 to 120°F
-125 to 350°F
-125 to 500°F
-40 to 120°F
-40 to 180°F
0 to 250°F
0 to 400°F
50 to 650°F
2 ft
1 1/2 ft
1 ft
4 ft
3 ft
2 1/2 ft
2 ft
2 ft
Figure 3
Dimensions
SET POINT
ADJUSTMENT
POINTER
(RED)
* Added to or taken away from the process.
Tighten the two thermal assembly mounting screws. Note change indicated
scale reading (if any).
Turn zero adjustment “C” to bring indicating pointer reading back to the original reading noted before. Turning in lowers indicated reading.
Note: The thermal assembly can be returned to its original position by aligning its flange with the line scribed on the instrument case.
Figure 4
Model
1BS
2BS
3BS
4BS
5BS
6BS
7BS
8BS
IM800-06
www.ueonline.com
38
Dimension A
Inches mm
3-3/4
2-5/8
2-1/8
6-3/4
5
4-1/2
3
3-1/4
95.3
66.7
54.0
171.5
127.0
114.3
76.2
82.6
39
40
41
42
43
MAx-305 & MAx-318 Series
MAx-405 Through MAx-419
Series
Two-Position Actuators
General Instructions
Application
For two-position operation of dampers, valves, and
other equipment which require the return to normal
position upon power interruption.
Hazardous location models offer a sturdy cast
aluminum case with bolted cover. They have two 3/4"
pipe tapped openings for joints with rigid metal conduit.
All wiring is brought out to separate terminals for ease
of installation. These factory enclosure and actuator
assemblies are Underwriters Laboratories listed.
MA-3xx, MA5-318,
MA-4xx, MA5-419
(Standard)
Features
• Compatible with most SPST control devices
• Spring return
• 24, 120, 208, and 240 Vac models
• Actuators with part number suffix "-500" are
equipped with SPDT auxiliary switch
• Actuator has a rugged die cast aluminum housing
with two 1/2” conduit openings
• Hazardous location actuator housing has two 3/4"
pipe taped openings for rigid metal conduit
connection
MA6-3xx, MA6-4xx, MA7-4xx,
MA8-3xx, MA8-4xx
(Hazardous Locations)
• Oil immersed motor and gear train
Applicable Literature
• Electric/Electronic Products Catalog, F-27382
• Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for BCS-51-185
• Valve Products Catalog, F-27384
Oil (Until March 2002) (MAx-3xx-x-x-3 and
MAx-4xx-x-x-3)
• Cross-Reference Guide, F-26789
• AV-29x Valve Linkage for Hazardous Location Gear
• Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for
Train Actuators General Instructions, F-27441.
BCS-51-185-1 Oil (Current) (MAx-3xx-x-x-4 and
MAx-4xx-x-x-4)
• Apparatus for Hazardous Locations EN-56-2,
F-18451.
• High Temperature Exposure Performance (UL 555S)
MAx-31x-x-x-4, MAx-41x-x-x-4 Series Actuators
Engineering Information EN-216, F-27068
• AV-390 Series, Valve Linkage for Gear Train
Actuators General Instructions, F-24376.
• Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for BCS-51-168
Oil (Until Feb. 1989)
44
SPECIFICATIONS
Actuator Inputs
Connections: Coded screw terminals.
Control Circuit: Two-wire.
Power Input: See Table-1.
Actuator Outputs
Torque: See Table-1.
Shaft Rotation:
MA-305, MA-405, MA6-305, MA6-405, CW 180° when power is applied.
MA-318, MA-41x, MAx-318, MAx-41x, CW 180° when power is applied.
Spring Return: CCW to the original position when the actuator is de-energized.
Auxiliary Switch (-500 Models): SPDT makes (or breaks) the circuit at the powered end of
stroke.
Environment
Ambient Temperature Limits:
Shipping & Storage, -40 to 136 °F (-40 to 58 °C).
Operating, -40 to 136 °F (-40 to 58 °C).
Humidity: 5 to 95% RH, non-condensing.
Location: NEMA Type 4 when used with the gasket (provided) and water-tight conduit
connectors (not provided), optional hazardous location models.
Agency Listings:
US Standard UL 873, Underwriters Laboratories (File #E9429 XAPX, Temperature
Indicating and Regulating Equipment).
Candadian Standard C22.2 No. 24: Underwriters Laboratories (File #E429 Category
XAPX7, Temperature Indicating and Regulating Equipment).
Hazardous Location Models, UL file #E29291. Designed for use in hazardous locations
N.E.C., Class 1, Groups C and D, and Class 2, Groups E, F, and G. Temperature code T6 for
hazardous housing.
Table-1 Model Chart.
Part Number
Power
Supply
Vac
MA-305
MA-305-500
MA-405
MA-405-500
MA-318
MA-318-500
MA-416
MA-416-500
MA-418
MA-418-500
Hz
Yes
60
MA5-419
MA5-419-500
Yes
No
208
Yes
60
No
Yes
No
Yes
240
50
No
VA
Running
Holding
56
56
Rated
Torque
lb-in. (N-m)
25
Yes
MA-419
MA-419-500
No
No
24
120
Input
Watts
No
24
120
Auxiliary
Switcha
70
Running
No Load
Timing in
Seconds at
75 °F (24 °C)b
16 (1.8)
48
48
92
32
104
38
108
42
120
39
Mounting
Application
Any Position
(Horizontal
Output Shaft
Position
Preferred)
Damper
Actuators
Output Shaft
Must Be
Horizontal
Damper
and Valve
Actuators
20
60 (6.8)
25
Holding
Yes
a 4.4 FLA, 26.4 LRA @ 24 or 120 Vac; 2.4 FLA, 13.2 LRA @ 240 Vac.
b Spring return timing with full load opposing spring is approximately 60 sec.
45
TYPICAL APPLICATIONS (Wiring Diagrams)
L1 or H
MA-305
MA-405
Series Actuator
Thermostat
or Switch 1
Motor
Field Coil
L2 or G
2
NC
COM
NO
1
Actuator rotates 180° CW when thermostat or switch contacts are closed.
Actuator spring returns when thermostat or switch contacts are open.
2
Aux. Switch for -500 Models
Figure-1 Typical Wiring for MA-305 and MA-405 Series.
MA-318, MA-416
MA-418, MA-419
Series Actuator
L1 or H
4
NC
COM
Thermostat
or Switch 1
NC
NO
2
NO
3
L2 or G
1 Actuator rotates 180° CW when thermostat or switch contacts are closed.
Actuator spring returns when thermostat or switch contacts are open.
2 High Input (Running)
3 Low Input (Holding)
4 Aux. Switch for -500 Models
Figure-2 Typical Wiring for MA-318, MA-416, MA-418, and MA-419 Series.
46
Table-3 Power Wire Selection.
Actuator Series
MA-305
MA-405
MA-318
MA-416, MA-418, MA-419
Wire Size
AWG
Maximum Run a b
ft (m)
14
122 (37)
12
191 (58)
10
305 (93)
14
2800 (853)
14
44 (13)
12
68 (21)
10
110 (34)
14
950 (290)
12
1580 (482)
a Each run has two wires.
b The length given is for a maximum two-wire run, for one actuator. When multiple actuators are used, determine the
maximum run for each actuator by dividing the number of actuators into the corresponding maximum run.
CHECKOUT
After the entire system has been installed and the actuator has been powered up, perform the
following check for proper system operation. Check for the correct operation of the damper while
the actuator is being stroked.
Note: Smoke control systems must be tested in accordance with NFPA Standard 92A.
1. Verify that the system wiring is properly connected and powered.
2. Be sure the controller (manual or automatic) is operating properly according to system
requirements.
3. When the controller energizes the actuator, the output shaft must run to the end of the stroke
(180° CW).
4. When the controller de-energizes the actuator, the spring will return the output shaft to its
original position.
5. The action of the auxiliary switch (-500 models only) shall be as follows:
a. C makes to N.C. when the actuator is de-energized. Refer to (Figure-8).
b. C makes to N.O. when the actuator is energized and the output shaft reaches the end
of the stroke.
N.C. (Normally Closed)
C (Common)
N.O. (Normally Open)
N.O. makes when actuator is energized and
output shaft reaches end of stroke.
Figure-8 Action of Auxiliary Switch (-500 Models Only).
THEORY OF OPERATION
MA-305 and MA-405 series actuator output shafts rotate 180° clockwise when energized and
spring return counterclockwise to 0° when de-energized.
MA-31x and MA-41x series actuator output shafts rotate 170° clockwise when energized and
spring return counterclockwise when de-energized.
MA-305 and MA-405 series actuator motors are assembled to a gear train and stall at the end of
the power stroke.
MA-318, MA-416, MA-418, and MA-419 series actuators have an end of travel switch which
reduces the running input from 70 watts to 25 watts at the end of clockwise shaft rotation.
47
48
49
H3CR
H3CR
Solid-State Timer
H3CR
■ RANGE SELECTION
Operating mode display window
Power indicator (green LED)
flashes when timer operates,
lit when timer
stops operating
Operation mode selector
A ON-delay
B Repeat cycle/signal OFF start
B2: Repeat cycle/signal ON start
C: Signal ON/OFF-delay
D: Signal OFF-delay
E: Interval
Output indicator
(red LED)
Time
range
1.2
3
12
30
0
Scale range
display windows
Time unit
display window
Time range selector
(1.2, 3, 12 or 30)
Time setting knob
(set time)
Time unit selector
(sec, min, hrs, 10h)
Time units
hrs (hours)
0.12 to 1.2
0.3 to 3
1.2 to 12
3 to 30
sec(onds) min(utes)
0.05 to 1.2 0.12 to 1.2
0.3 to 3
0.3 to 3
1.2 to 12
1.2 to 12
3 to 30
3 to 30
Instantaneous output*
10h (10 hours)
1.2 to 12
3 to 30
12 to 120
30 to 300
* Set to time setting knob below zero.
Specifications
Part number
Supply
AC
voltage
DC
Operating voltage AC
DC
Power
AC
consumption
AC/DC
DC
Timing functions
H3CR-A
H3CR-AS
H3CR-A8
H3CR-A8S
24 V or 100 to 240 VAC, 50/60 Hz
12 V or 24 V
85% to 110% of rated supply voltage
90% to 110% of rated supply voltage at 12 VDC
10 VA
1.5 VA (AC), 0.8 W (DC)
1.3 W
ON-delay, Repeat cycle signal OFF ON-delay, Interval
start, Repeat cycle signal ON start,
Signal ON/OFF delay,
Signal OFF-delay, Interval
H3CR-A8EL/H3CR-A8E
■ H3CR-A, H3CR-AS (SIX-FUNCTION TIMERS)
Mode A
ON-Delay
t
Power (2 and 10)
Signal Start/Signal Reset
Power is applied continuously. Timing starts at the leading
edge of the start input. The output relay is energized when the
accumulated time equals the set time. Subsequent start
signals during or after timing will not be accepted. The output
relay or transistor will remain energized until a reset input is
applied or power is interrupted. The minimum signal input is
0.05 second.
Start (2 and 6)
Reset (2 and 7)
Control output: NC (8 and 11)
NC (1 and 4)
Control output: NO (9 and 11)
NO (1 and 3)
Start signal (remote control possible)
Power indicator
Reset signal
Flashing
(remote control possible)
t = set time
(Power continuously supplied)
50
Lit
Revised
04-01-2017
WARRANTY
J & R MANUFACTURING, INC. warrants its equipment against defective parts and
workmanship under normal use and when installed in accordance with
manufacturer’s recommendations for a period (after date of shipment*) of twelve
(12) months on parts and ninty (90) days on labor with the following provisions:
1. This warranty does not apply if problems or claims are the result of: (a)
damage in transit (equipment becomes owner’s property upon shipment
from factory and owner must file claim with transport company); (b)
misuse, neglect, improper maintenance, and or unauthorized alterations
to equipment; (c) improper installation of exhaust stacks, air supply, and
extraneous exhaust systems; (d) improper voltage hook-up; (e) wind, rain,
hail, fire and acts of God.
2. In-warranty replacement parts will be credited only upon receipt
and inspection of defective parts at the factory. All shipping
charges are the responsibility of the owner, but, at the discretion
of J&R Manufacturing, ground shipping charges may be waived or
credited.
3. Labor to remove, replace, or repair defects under this warranty
must be authorized by factory. Premium time (overtime) and
travel time are not included in the warranty.
4. Sales, excise, and other taxes, food loss, and down-time are
not covered under this warranty.
5. The removal of manufacturer’s nameplate(s) voids the warranty.
It is the aim of J & R Manufacturing, Inc. to build the finest equipment possible and to
facilitate quick solutions to all problems that might arise with the lowest expense
possible to the user(s). To help us achieve this goal, please follow these procedures:
1. Telephone our service department at 972-289-0801 at the first sign of
a problem.
Have ready the Model and Serial Number of your
equipment.
2. Cooperate with our Service Department by making certain visual
checks as requested. Most problems are quick and easy to pinpoint and
resolve.
3. In the event it is necessary to use a service company, the factory will
contact its authorized service agency. If no authorized service agency is
available, please recommend a service company. The use of a service company
not specifically authorized by our Service Department at factory
headquarters may invalidate this warranty.
* or provable start up date, whichever is later (start up must be within 12 months of ship date)
51
Remember to contact J&R for any additional information you need or to
order replacement parts or accessories.
Accessories include:
Ash Carts
Wood Carts
Ash Rakes
Contact J&R:
972-285-4855 (Main)
972-289-0801 (Parts and Service)
800-527-4831 (Toll Free-U.S and Canada)
sales@jrmanufacturing.com
www. jrmanufacturing.com
For firewood, we recommend:
Arnold Bros. Forest Products Inc.
201 N. Beltline Road, Irving, TX
75061 Phone: (972) 986-6339
www.abfpinc.com
Serving the Dallas / Ft. Worth Metroplex’s finest
restaurants, as well as throughout the U.S. and
abroad since 1976.
Cooking woods available:
Oak – Pecan – Hickory – Mesquite
For delivery: Call (972)986-6339
• Commercial: Ask for Rick
52
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