2003 Assessment Report 2003 VCE VET Hospitality GA 2

2003
Assessment
Report
2003
VCE VET Hospitality GA 2: Written examination
GENERAL COMMENTS
Marking policies
Where students provided further information than was necessary, the additional information was not accepted. For
example, if a student was asked to identify three points and gave four points, only the first three points were assessed.
The additional point was not taken into consideration, even if correct.
Students who gave two responses that meant the same thing did not gain marks for both; in this case they were
combined and 1 mark was given for the two similar responses.
In order for assessors to grant full marks all information was required. Where a response was lacking information,
assessors were unable to grant any marks as half marks are not allowed.
SPECIFIC INFORMATION
Section A – Food and Beverage
Part 1 – Multiple choice
This table indicates the approximate percentage of students choosing each distractor. The correct answer is the
shaded alternative.
A
B
C
D
Question
%
13
2
84
1
1
2
0
1
97
2
2
6
6
86
3
1
1
95
3
4
8
90
0
2
5
8
16
75
1
6
97
2
0
1
7
1
2
95
2
8
6
66
15
13
9
44
18
2
36
10
2
22
5
71
11
4
91
1
4
12
4
64
30
2
13
84
12
2
2
14
1
0
92
7
15
1
89
10
0
16
99
1
0
0
17
1
0
46
53
18
6
57
32
5
19
3
1
86
10
20
68
16
3
13
21
0
98
1
1
22
22
61
9
8
23
5
22
66
7
24
0
10
84
6
25
96
2
1
1
26
2
4
91
3
27
97
2
1
0
28
89
3
5
3
29
3
79
8
10
30
Comment on particular questions
Question 10
The correct response is A: the butter. Butter is placed on the table and all other items are served to the guest.
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Question 18
The correct answer is D; C was not correct as it is better to consult with the waiter from that section first to see if some
arrangements have been made. It may annoy the guests to be asked unnecessarily for a drink or service when
instructions may have been organised with their waiter: perhaps they are waiting for another person or have ordered
some drinks and they are still being made.
Part 2 – Short answer
Question 1
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
Average
3.45
3
5
13
25
31
23
%
Correct answers include actions associated with the following items: these items are required to be organised in
preparation for the service of different beverages made at the coffee station.
• crockery – teapots, milk jugs, glassware, under plates
• cutlery – teaspoons, strainers, large spoons
• beverage commodities – coffee, tea, hot chocolate/cocoa, milk and milk alternatives, sugar and sugar alternatives
• stationery – docket books, spike and pens
• miscellaneous – rubbish bin, cleaning cloths, tea towels, napkins, doilies, trays
• petit fours – mints, chocolates or biscuits
Check for cleanliness of crockery, cutlery, small equipment and work area.
Replenish or stock a sufficient quantity for service of crockery, cutlery, beverage commodities, fill up sugar bowls.
Maintenance cleaning designated tasks outlined on a daily cleaning routine and not related to detailed cleaning
procedures of an espresso machine.
Preparation of equipment includes filling the urn or boiled water supply and turning it on, assembling plungers etc.
Most students were able to answer this question quite well.
Question 2
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
2.29
14
16
20
27
23
%
Correct answers included:
• ensuring the cloth was appropriate to use – clean, well pressed, not damaged, correct size
• cloth was placed on a clean table correctly – correct side up, with even hang, creases consistent within the room
• cloth was handled in a hygienic manner.
Most students coped well with this question. Some responses related more to the setting or stabilising of the table and
the proximity of the chairs, which was not relevant to this question and did not score a mark.
Question 3
a
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
2.20
5
14
36
45
%
Correct answers included:
• the number of guests attending
• maximum seats per table
• restaurant layout/space
• allowances made for the head table, fixed fitting, decorations or dance floor
• sufficient space between tables for staff and guests.
b
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.09
21
49
30
%
Correct answers included:
• head table may be seated along one side facing the guests
• guests would be seated on larger tables consistently around the room
• guests may be seated according to a pre-determined seating plan.
Overall this question could have been answered better.
c
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
1.83
13
23
32
32
%
Correct answers included:
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•
•
•
any table decorations appropriate to the wedding occasion such as a disposable camera, confetti or sparkles or gifts
for the guest
fancy or additional table settings such as flower and candle arrangements
menu card or name cards on the table.
Question 4
a
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
2.61
11
15
19
22
20
13
%
Correct answers included questions a customer may ask about:
• additional details about menu items that lacked specific information – what portion of chicken is used, the degree
of cooking with the steak, the type of salad greens served and what variety of vegetables are in the soup
• information relating to the preparation of the dish – temperature of the chicken dish, how is the chicken cooked,
how are the vegetables cooked that are served with the beef, can the beef be served without the mushroom stuffing.
Any guest with a strict dietary requirement would be expected to notify the establishment and pre-arrange their meal to
be catered for and then the staff would be informed of this in the pre-service briefing. Responses such as ‘Is the soup
suitable for a vegetarian?’ scored 1 mark. Questions relating to other special dietary requirements did not gain a mark.
Students did gain points however for any responses that indicated they had investigated the menu to determine if any
dishes contained any known common allergens, e.g. ‘Are there any dishes, other than the fish, that contain nuts?’
Often student responses indicated unfamiliarity with a set function menu and its limitations. Many incorrect answers
were more suited to an ‘a la carte’ menu, e.g. ‘Can I have some chips on the side’ or ‘I don’t like chocolate cake can I
order some fruit and ice cream?’
b
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Average
3.40
1
5
14
30
36
12
2
%
Correct answers related to hygienically cutting and serving the cake. They included:
• personal – wash hands, wear food handling gloves, do not touch skin or hair, do not cough or sneeze over cake
• workplace – ensure cleanliness of utensils and crockery, ensure crockery is free from cracks and chips, use
appropriate utensils and technique to cut and serve cake, prevent contamination by keeping hands clean, use
disposable napkins to wipe knife during cutting.
Most students were able to provide three practices relating to personal hygiene but did not score as well in the work
practices. Often this was because the same comments were repeated and were not applicable or they related more to
safety issues. ‘Tying your hair back’ did not score a mark because this is a requirement of service that should have been
attended to at the beginning and not directly related to this task.
Question 5
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.08
22
47
31
%
• firstly some form of investigation – inquire with the supervisor or host
• secondly confirmation of the guests attendance and action such as removing the setting and informing the guests at
the table.
Question 6
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
5.55
0
0
0
2
7
24
67
%
Correct answers included:
• after welcoming the guest the next tasks would be – direct guests to the table, place napkin in the lap of the guest,
take order for pre-dinner drinks or offer bread and butter
• after presenting the menu and wine list the next tasks would be – take order for pre-dinner drinks or offer bread
and butter, take food order, place food order in the kitchen.
Many students responded correctly to this question. Petit fours was a common response that did not score a mark, as
these would be offered after dessert.
Question 7
a
Marks
0
1
3
21
%
Correct answers included:
Hospitality GA2 Exam
2
30
3
27
4
19
Average
2.37
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
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•
ensure all guests have finished eating, check with the host before clearing, clear all service items – plates, cutlery,
side plates, additional cutlery or items, cruets and butter dish.
Many students either did not provide sufficient details to explain the task or provided responses not relevant to the stage
of service. For example, ‘offer dessert menu’ did not score a mark.
b
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
Average
2.98
7
6
14
27
46
%
Correct answers included:
• offer additional drinks, offer dessert menu, take order, set dessert cutlery and serve dessert, offer coffee.
Question 8
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.59
9
22
69
%
Most students were able to give two advantages of knowing the host and included responses such as:
• knowing which person is the host, the waiter can determine the correct order and timing of service for the table or
may offer the wine list or bill to them.
Question 9
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
1.49
44
12
13
14
17
%
Correct answers included:
• lighting – close blinds during the day and set candles or soft lights at night
• music – appropriate style of music and volume to suit the style of establishment or function as required
• temperature – alter the temperature of the establishment by making it warmer or cooler to ensure the comfort of
guests
• table layout – single tables can be arranged for intimacy as required by spacing them apart and ensuring they are
not placed next to noisy or busy areas. Larger tables are put closer together during a group function or celebration
so people can easily interact with others
• views – a view can be altered by the opening or closing of blinds and curtains and the table arrangements
• décor – linen, flowers, scents, decorations and artwork can easily be altered to accommodate themes and special
occasions.
This question could have been answered better by reading the question properly. Students could identify the factors that
create ambience but did not indicate how the ambience could be adjusted to suit different styles of service.
Question 10
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
2.05
22
19
21
17
12
9
%
Correct answers included:
• a clean warm plate is placed in front of the guest
• the main course items are placed on a platter and served to each guest by the waiter using service gear. Vegetables
served to each guest from another platter. Sauce and condiments offered
• food is served using a large fork and spoon to the left of the guest with the waiter standing on the left side and
serving with the right hand.
Students were quite unfamiliar with silver service procedures. Students often responded with comments relating to the
order of service (e.g. serve host first), or serving techniques (serve from the left and clear from the right) but
unfortunately these were often not specific to silver service procedures.
Question 11
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
2.36
4
9
33
54
%
Correct answers included:
• all dishes for the table are ready before leaving the kitchen
• all plated dishes are consistent with establishment standard for presentation, food quality/portions, garnishes,
sauces and temperature
• food is prepared according to special customer request
• plates are clean and free of cracks, chips and spills.
While students scored well with this question, responses that indicated where the food was to be taken within the
establishment did not score a mark.
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Question 12
a
Marks
0
1
2
Average
1.35
27
10
63
%
Correct answers included a clear indication of:
• knives being placed at right angles under the fork with the fork prongs facing up. Knives and forks should be
collected and positioned on the lower plate.
b
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.60
5
30
65
%
Correct answers included:
• a professional looking, fast and efficient method used to clear a quantity of different items all at the one time
• this method secures the plates and cutlery for safe transportation and allows items to be quickly sorted at the
dishwasher area.
Students provided good responses to this question.
Question 13
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
2.54
2
11
33
37
17
%
Correct answers included:
• offer black pepper or appropriate condiments
• ensure all side dishes, a finger bowl or additional cutlery has also been served/provided
• be attentive to ensure guests are happy with their meals, are commencing to eat their meal with no further requests
• top up wine or water glasses.
Students found it difficult to list four service checks appropriate to the time of service indicated in the question.
Question 14
Marks
0
1
2
3
1
2
13
34
%
Correct answers included examples of:
• an apology
• provide/offer some assistance
• rectify the situation
• follow enterprise policy/inform management
• resume service.
4
50
Average
3.29
Some responses indicated students were not familiar with common industry practices when dealing with this scenario.
Responses were overly generous, too complimentary or put an emphasis on a personal accountability and not on
establishment policy.
Question 15
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.33
11
45
44
%
Many students gave appropriate responses to this question. Examples included:
• speak clearly and slowly or listen carefully to their questions
• indicate key words on the menu and condense your communication
• suggest the house specialty
• dishes might be available in a picture format or examples shown at a nearby table.
Most students scored at least 1 mark; incorrect responses tended to put emphasis on the waiter finding someone else to
deal with this scenario.
Question 16
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.65
5
24
71
%
Correct answers included examples of:
• how it should be stored – covered in an airtight, opaque container and marked with dated information
• where it should be stored – away from light and other odours, in a cool, dry place.
Hospitality GA2 Exam
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
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Students did quite well with this question. Responses were expected to be specific to maintaining the quality of the
coffee. General suggestions such as ‘store at the correct temperature’, did not receive a mark.
Question 17
Marks
0
1
2
3
Average
2.75
2
3
13
82
%
Students did very well answering this question and generally provided correct examples of espresso-style of
coffee/beverage that contains milk. Some examples marked incorrect were: Ristretto, long white, baby chino, Turkish
coffee and Vienna coffee.
Question 18
Marks
0
1
Average
0.59
41
59
%
Assessors were looking for a drink description that indicated a decorated, mixed, non-alcoholic beverage. This was best
described as ‘A non-alcoholic cocktail’. Often responses were not comprehensive enough to score the mark.
Question 19
a
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
Average
2.27
14
14
23
28
21
%
Correct answers included:
• coffee – ensure coffee is ground appropriately for plunger use, use correct ratio of coffee to water, ensure water is
just off the boil when pouring over the coffee
• plunger – thoroughly cleaned, assembled correctly and pre-warmed
• water – just off the boil in temperature, ensure clean, fresh water has been used
• method – water should be placed over coffee, maximum of three minutes time should be allowed for the coffee to
brew before plunging, only push plunger down once.
Procedures related to preparation of tea or methods of preparing espresso coffee, were marked incorrect. ‘Use fresh
coffee’ was marked incorrect as stale coffee would not be appropriate to use at all regardless of the method.
b
Average
Marks
0
1
2
0.86
37
39
24
%
Correct answers included:
• prevent scalds – hold handle of plunger when filling with very hot water, when plunging coffee push down evenly
and slowly and not too close to any person, ensure plunger is assembled correctly, do not overfill with water when
preparing coffee, concentrate on and do not rush the coffee making and serving task
• prevent cuts – do not use force when dismantling, plunging or assembling plunger, discard glass beaker when
cracked or chipped, hold beakers appropriately when cleaning, be alert when handling the broken glass and dispose
of it appropriately.
This question could have been answered better overall, as many students identified safety issues but they were not
practices related to the task indicated in the question.
Question 20
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
3.62
10
0
22
1
42
1
24
%
Correct answers included:
Drink
Glass
Garnish
Lemon lime and bitters Highball or tumbler
Slice of lemon or lime
Any appropriate name Colada
Appropriate garnish to the drink indicated
Virgin or Bloody Mary Highball or tumbler
Celery stick
Drinks named were required to be a mixed drink.
The type of glassware should be appropriate for the drink as used in common industry practice.
Garnishes should be appropriate to the mixed drink and the glassware being used.
To score full marks students were required to provide clear detail when describing a garnish, e.g. a slice of lemon or
lime not ‘lemon’. A straw was not considered a suitable garnish.
Most students found it difficult to name two to three mixed drinks that included both correctly matched glassware and a
suitable garnish.
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Question 21
Marks
0
1
2
Average
1.63
6
24
70
%
Correct answers included:
• nutmeg, chocolate, fancy straws, salt or sugar frosted rims, cream or grenadine, froth, mixer sticks and toys.
Question 22
a
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
2.52
13
14
20
26
18
7
2
%
Correct answers included:
• tea – ensure the correct ratio of tea to water is used for the portion of tea being prepared
• teapot – should be clean and pre-heated
• water – should indicate the water has reached boiling point, ensure clean, fresh water has been used
• method – boiled water should be placed over tea, maximum of three minutes time should be allowed for the tea to
brew before serving, stir tea before serving, serve without delay to ensure it does not stew.
Many students got confused with coffee making procedures.
b
Average
Marks
0
1
2
0.91
25
59
16
%
Correct answers included:
• pot of extra hot water, slices of lemon or tea strainer.
A jug of milk is not required when a person has requested black tea.
Section B – Commercial Cookery
Part 1 – Multiple choice
This table indicates the approximate percentage of students choosing each distractor. The correct answer is the
shaded alternative.
A
B
C
D
Question
%
14
11
73
2
1
20
5
9
66
2
79
5
9
7
3
24
10
62
4
4
1
2
8
89
5
14
19
65
2
6
91
3
0
6
7
11
60
20
9
8
16
65
3
16
9
2
16
10
72
10
77
11
4
8
11
5
4
82
9
12
53
17
20
10
13
4
63
0
33
14
7
11
18
64
15
22
70
0
8
16
9
12
42
37
17
74
5
10
11
18
84
2
10
4
19
8
26
5
61
20
93
3
2
2
21
10
21
31
38
22
14
11
18
57
23
10
25
56
9
24
6
86
3
5
25
13
18
62
7
26
87
4
6
3
27
6
88
1
5
28
62
13
23
2
29
41
5
53
1
30
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Comments on particular questions
Question 17
Egg custards are classified either as set/baked or stirred according to the method used to prepare them. Stirred custards
such as Sauce Anglaise or English custard sauce and crème patissiere are custards that are stirred during the cooking
process and will be of a pouring or spreading consistency. Set custards such as crème caramel and crème brulee are not
stirred as they cook. The custards are poured into moulds, placed in a bain marie then cooked in the oven until firm and
they can be cut.
Question 22
Fusili is a small spiral shaped pasta, farfalle is a type of pasta in the shape of a bow tie or butterfly, rigatoni is a ridged
tube shaped pasta and tagliatelli, the correct answer, is a long, flat and ribbon like shaped pasta.
Question 23
D is correct as globe is not a variety of potato but a type of artichoke.
Question 29
B is the correct answer as canteloupe gives off an odour that can be easily transferred in the moist circulated air to
refrigerated foods such as cream, eggs and cooked food items. Fresh yeast, fresh rosemary and butter portions all
require refrigeration to maintain optimum quality. Canteloupe should be stored at room temperature to fully mature and
develop maximum sweetness before eating.
Question 30
C is the correct answer. A credit note should be requested when goods are returned to a supplier. When goods are
delivered to an establishment, the cost of the goods are detailed on the invoice and the establishment enters an
agreement to pay for them when the invoice is signed, confirming all items have been received. Any delivered items
sent back with the driver requires a credit note to reverse the original charge made to the establishment as the goods are
now back with the supplier.
A requisition form is an internal document used by a kitchen or outlet within a large establishment. It itemises an order
of goods that is required for that outlet and cannot be ordered directly from a supplier. The central store would tally all
the requisition orders and place a combined order to each supplier. Upon receiving the goods the stock would then be
distributed according to each outlet’s requisition order originally supplied.
Part 2 – Short answer
Question 1
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
Average
1.04
43
27
18
8
4
%
Correct answers included:
Two main ingredients were:
• burghul or cracked wheat and parsley or mint.
Two additional ingredients were:
• lemon juice, mint/parsley, tomato, olive oil, salt and pepper.
Very few students were familiar with the ingredients used to make a tabouli salad.
Question 2
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
1.01
33
36
28
3
%
Correct answers included a variety of different vinegars such as:
• white wine
• red wine
• sherry
• champagne
• suitable herb or fruit infused
• cider.
Responses indicated a poor knowledge of basic dressings and the variety of vinegar suitable to use when making them.
Question 3
Marks
0
1
4
18
%
Correct answers included:
• fish goujons
8
2
30
3
25
4
23
Average
2.44
tartare sauce
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
Hospitality GA2 Exam
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•
•
thai fish cakes
vegetable samosa
pork rice paper rolls
sweet chilli sauce
mint yoghurt
hoisin/sweet chilli sauce/plum sauce.
Students scored quite well on this question, though the samosa was commonly mismatched.
Question 4
a–b
Marks
0
1
2
3
Average
1.78
10
23
45
22
%
a
Correct answers included:
• blender or mixer – Hobart, Kenwood, Magi-mix, Robo-coupe or a clear description of a commercial item of
equipment used for mixing.
Student responses that indicated a hand method or the use of a hand-mixer/bamix/stab blender did not score a mark as it
was not suitable for the quantity being made.
b
Making
• wash hands prior to preparation and as required during the task
• ensure all equipment is clean and dry before using
• do not contaminate the mayonnaise by tasting it with fingers or a dirty spoon.
• check egg shells are free of feathers and dirt before cracking
• break each egg open separately to ensure the yolk is checked before adding to the other ingredients.
Storing
• ensure the mayonnaise is securely covered
• mayonnaise should be stored appropriately to prevent contamination, e.g. not under raw meat or seafood
• ensure all storage containers are clean and dry before using
• use a clean spoon each time when removing a portion of mayonnaise for use.
Students were able to provide a good range of correct comments related to hygiene practices.
Question 5
a
Marks
0
1
2
3
10
5
12
38
%
Correct answers included any four of the following:
• knife and board – to prepare chicken
• seasoned flour – plain flour, salt and pepper
• egg wash – whole eggs combined with milk
• bread crumbs – dry or fresh breadcrumbs
• storage plate – a large flat tray.
4
35
Average
2.82
A common response marked incorrect related to how to cut up the chicken into strips.
b
Average
Marks
0
1
0.33
67
33
%
The information given in Q5a should be reflected in the correct order of use:
• knife and board
• flour
• egg wash
• crumbs
• tray.
Students who did not list four correct stations of a crumbing set were not able to score a mark for this question.
c
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.68
7
18
75
%
Correct answers included:
• in single layers
• well covered
Hospitality GA2 Exam
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•
placed in the refrigerator.
Responses suggesting chicken strips were stacked upon each other in a pile was marked incorrect. This would cause the
crumbed coating to stick together and come away from the chicken.
Question 6
a–b
Marks
0
1
2
Average
0.65
48
39
13
%
Brown rice is the most nutritious variety of rice. The absorption method should be used when cooking to retain the
most nutrients.
Question 7
Marks
0
1
2
Average
1.18
21
40
39
%
Correct answers included:
• no sprouting
• no visible signs of deterioration, damage, rot or mould
• firm to touch
• no smell of rot or mould.
Most students managed to provide one or two correct responses; incorrect responses included ‘smell’ or ‘check for
pests’.
Question 8
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
1.89
6
24
45
25
%
Correct answers included:
• canned products have been processed when the fruit is at its best it is of a consistent high standard of quality
• cheaper to purchase
• available all year round
• less labour intensive to prepare as tomatoes have been processed
• can be purchased in bulk
• easily stored
• have a longer storage life
• cooking time is reduced due to processing.
Question 9
a
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
35
36
24
5
0
%
Correct answers included:
Cultivated
• common button/open cup/flat (all the same variety)
• enoki (enokitake)
• oyster/abalone
• swiss brown (portobello)
• shiitake
• shimeji.
Wild
• pine
• field/flat
• slippery jack (bolet)
• cloud ear/wood ear
• black or white fungi
• truffles.
Average
0.99
Student responses clearly reflected a poor knowledge of different mushroom varieties.
b
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.20
18
44
38
%
10
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
Hospitality GA2 Exam
•
•
in a paper bag or cardboard box
in the fridge/stored between 1 to 4°C.
Students answered this question well but included some unusual responses that were marked incorrect; for example,
‘wash first to minimise mould growing’ or ‘store in the crisper part of the fridge’ and ‘Store away from other foods that
smell’.
Question 10
a
Marks
0
1
Average
0.20
80
20
%
The correct answer was foods with high starch content.
Many students incorrectly answered ‘made from flour’ or ‘have high wheat content’.
b
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
Average
1.95
27
8
23
29
12
1
%
Correct answers included:
• pasta
• rice
• vegetables – pulses and potato
• noodles
• tapioca/sago
• dumplings, e.g. gnocchi
• grains (polenta, semolina, couscous, burghul, cracked wheat).
Most students could identify at least two farinaceous food groups.
Question 11
a
Marks
0
1
2
42
51
7
%
• X – thick egg white
• Y – air cell/sac.
b
Marks
0
1
2
60
29
11
%
• X – should be gelatinous and thick
• Y – should be small, less than 3 mm.
Average
0.65
Average
0.50
Students who did not correctly identify the egg parts in Question 11a were unable to score full marks with this question.
Question 12
Marks
0
1
9
16
%
Correct answers included:
• in fresh cold water
• covered
• placed in the fridge.
2
50
3
25
Average
1.90
Question 13
a
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
7
15
28
29
21
%
Correct answers included:
D, F, I and J.
b
Marks
0
1
Average
0.15
85
15
%
The correct response for this question was J, D, F and I.
Hospitality GA2 Exam
Average
2.42
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
11
Question 14
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
Average
1.53
22
24
35
16
3
%
Assessors were looking for a clear description of the preparation of each egg dish.
• Scrambled – whole eggs mixed with milk/cream then stirred in a pan over gentle heat until just cooked
• Sunny side up – a fried whole egg cooked only on one side with the yolk still runny
• Coddled – a whole egg placed into boiled water and left off the heat and covered for 7–8 minutes or steamed for 1
minute; the egg having just slightly cooked whites and yolks. Also accepted was a whole egg broken into a greased
ramekin or coddling dish then placed in bain-marie and baked in the oven
• Over easy – a fried egg cooked in oiled pan on both sides (flipped); yolk usually fully cooked.
Most students were able to gain some marks on this question but could have scored more if the responses provided a
clearer explanation. An example of a poor response is ‘put egg into a pan and cook just a little bit’.
Question 15
Average
Marks
0
1
2
0.34
71
24
5
%
55 and 61 grams. Students gave a wide range of incorrect answers to this question with responses ranging from 2
grams to 120 grams for one egg.
Question 16
a–b
Marks
0
1
2
3
Average
0.54
58
32
7
3
%
a
The correct response was:
• The soup should be cooled sufficiently before covering and placing into cool room for storage.
Students did not score well on this question and responses indicated unfamiliarity with the term ‘fermented’ and its
causes. Fermentation can affect stocks, soups and sauces easily when they are covered and placed into storage before
the core temperature has cooled sufficiently.
b
Correct responses were:
• strain liquids away from solids
• dispose of liquids with running water down the sink
• place well drained solids in the rubbish bin; preferably in a container
• dispose of soup in a waste disposal unit, following manufacturer’s instructions.
Student responses often related to the fermented soup as being toxic and comments often referred to disposing of the
soup in a similar way to a hazardous chemical.
Question 17
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
2
1
6
12
15
%
• A – Veloute and Béchamel
• B – beef glaze, Napoli, demi glace and jus de roti.
5
53
6
10
Average
4.34
Question 18
Average
Marks
0
1
0.76
24
76
%
The correct response was Beurre Manie.
Question 19
Marks
0
1
2
17
45
38
%
Correct answers included:
• frequent skimming
• maintaining simmering temperature.
Average
1.20
A common response that did not score a mark was ‘stirring’.
12
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
Hospitality GA2 Exam
Question 20
Marks
0
1
2
Average
0.86
29
55
16
%
Correct answers included:
• allow to cool then remove solidified layer from the surface
• use a tapped pot to drain away stock from underneath the fat layer
• remove the fat with a baster or ladle
• blot remaining fat with absorbent paper
• decant into a narrow container, then pour or ladle away.
Most students were able to describe one method to remove residual fat. A common response that did not score a mark
was ‘make a raft’ or ‘boil rapidly’ or ‘strain using a cartouche’.
Question 21
a–b
Average
Marks
0
1
2
0.45
66
23
11
%
a
Answer: 10 x 200ml serves (a range of 9 to 11 was accepted). Student responses ranged from 3 to 25 portions.
b
Answer: 70°C to 95°C. Student responses ranged from 5 to 60°C
Question 22
a–b
Marks
0
1
2
3
Average
0.53
64
23
9
4
%
a
The soup should be brought to boiling point (for a few moments ideally) as quickly as possible before serving.
b
• heat soup whilst stirring regularly to prevent soup from catching and burning
• the consistency of the soup may require correction with additional liquid or thickening
• adjust seasonings after reheating.
The responses from students showed a misunderstanding of the word ‘reconstitute’. Students often indicated the soup
should be ‘heated’ but did not clearly indicate just how hot it should be made when dealing with reconstituted soup and
as this was a critical part of the procedure, did not gain a mark.
Question 23
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
2.42
5
5
33
57
%
Correct answers included:
• Add moisture
• Add flavour
• Enhances the appearance/presentation/adds colour or shine
• Increases the richness/contrasting texture
• Provides additional nutrition.
Question 24
Marks
0
1
22
27
%
Correct answers included:
• emulsification – sabayon
• clarification
• enriching
• thickening – liaison.
2
34
3
17
Average
1.47
Question 25
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
5
1.30
28
31
28
10
2
1
%
Correct answers included any five of the following points that related to the task of restocking the flour without
assistance.
• double check replacement stock is same product
Hospitality GA2 Exam
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
13
•
•
•
•
•
•
empty out residual stock to a separate container
clean flour bin if necessary
use a trolley or lifting aid to move the bag close to the bin
decant flour from the new stock into storage bin.
adjust bin card and note the date of new stock
place old stock near the flour bin to ensure it is used first.
This question could have been answered better overall. Common incorrect responses referred to ‘placing the new flour
over the old’ and ‘procedures to follow when lifting the heavy bag’.
Question 26
Average
Marks
0
1
2
1.74
5
16
79
%
Correct answers included:
• small chewed holes/damage to food items or packaging
• droppings
• smell
• nesting or mouse hole damage.
Question 27
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
1.71
12
26
40
22
%
Correct answers included procedures such as:
• ensure cool room door is kept closed
• regular maintenance checks to maintain equipment in good working order
• check that food is not blocking the circulation of cold air
• regular monitoring of temperature control/temperature of food with in cool room
• ensure correct procedures are in place with all staff, e.g. food items are not placed in the cool room.
Often incorrect responses referred to maintaining a good cool room rather than ensuring the cool room is maintained at
the correct temperature range.
Question 28
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
1.97
7
18
45
30
%
Correct answers included procedures such as:
• practice FIFO principles
• store container in suitable location to protect from heat, light moisture or infestation
• store in air tight container
• date and label goods when transferring from packets to containers
• ideally nuts, seeds and spices should be stored in a container that is similar in size to the volume of goods
• some spices should be stored separately to avoid transfer of the smells.
Question 29
Average
Marks
0
1
2
3
4
2.60
6
8
26
40
20
%
Correct answers included quality checks such as:
• correct variety of rice has been received as ordered
• correct weight has been received as ordered
• packaging has not been damaged
• no sign of infestation
• no signs of deterioration, e.g. mould or markings to indicate sack may have been wet
• check date of packaging for best before date.
‘Freshness’ and ‘temperature’ were not acceptable answers.
© VCAA 2003
Published by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority
41 St Andrews Place, East Melbourne 3002
Photocopying: This publication can only be photocopied for the use of students and
teachers in Victorian Schools.
14
VCAA 2003 Assessment Report
Hospitality GA2 Exam
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