A Guide to Air Source Heat Pumps

A fresh approach to people homes and communities
A Guide to Air
Source Heat
Pumps
Barnsley Homes Standard
If you have any comments or suggestion to
improve this booklet please contact Investment
and Regeneration Team on 01226 774348
Page
Revised June 2016
1
Your new heating system
Berneslai Homes will replace your current central heating system with an
Air Source Heat Pump system which will provide both heat and hot water
for your home.
Slimline Cylinder
The system includes:
Air Source Heat Pump
Main Controller
Room Thermostat
Radiators or Hi-Line Heaters
Installing Your New Heating System
It can take up to a week to install your new heating system. All your existing
radiators and pipework, boiler and cylinder will need to be removed before the
new system can be fitted. New electrical wires for this system will be installed.
Your hot water will be turned off for a couple of days. You will have no
central heating for two or three days. We will provide temporary heaters if
needed.
Air Source Heat Pump
An air source heat pump works a
bit like a fridge in reverse. It
absorbs heat from the outside air
and the heat pump compressor
then increases the temperature
of that heat further to create
useful heat. This heat is then
transferred into hot water which
can be pumped around radiators
and your cylinder much like your
current system.
The heat pump will generally go
outside your home in a cage. The
cage must not be covered, air
must be able to circulate all round
it.
The heat pump is not very noisy, it
is fitted with vibration reducing
dampeners.
The pipes at the back go to the
radiators and hot water cylinder.
The heat pump can release steam
that looks like smoke. This is warm
air being blown from the heat pump to
ensure that the internal parts don’t
freeze. It is known as the defrost
cycle. This is normal.
Slimline Cylinder
The Slimline cylinder unit contains a hot water tank and various heating
parts to complete your heating system, such as water pumps and safety
valves.
The slimline cylinder will
go inside your home after
a survey to find the best
place to fit it.
It fits in some existing
airing cupboards, but a
new cupboard may have
to be built for the cylinder
to go in, or your existing
airing cupboard could be
altered.
It is larger than an
average hot water
cylinder and it heats the
water to 60°C. The
larger size ensures that
adequate hot water
storage is maintained.
Radiators
The heat produced is cooler than that from a
conventional boiler, which means it takes longer to
heat up than conventional systems and we may
need to install bigger radiators in your home to get
a comfortable temperature in each room. The
radiators may have double or triple panels or there
could be more radiators than before. They won’t
feel as hot to the touch as you have been used
to. This is perfectly normal. They will still
maintain the correct temperature in your home.
The heating system is intelligent, checking the
temperature outside and inside to maintain the
correct temperature. The radiators will warm up
slowly and provide a consistent level of heating.
This is unlike a standard boiler which operates at
higher temperatures to heat up rooms quickly. It is
a much more efficient way of heating your home
than short bursts of high temperature.
Don’t cover the radiators, this will prevent
the heat from passing to the air in the room.
You must not remove or bleed the radiators as
they contain antifreeze, removing them can
shut the whole system down.
You can use the Thermostatic Radiator Valves (TRVs) to turn individual
radiators up or down, by turning the top of the valve with the numbers on.
The hallway radiator won’t have a TRV,
Hi-Line Heaters
Where there isn’t enough space for a large enough radiator, we may need
to fit a hi-line heater. This is usually in small kitchens or bathrooms.
This is a heater which blows out warm air when the
radiators in your home are on. Sometimes the air
can feel cool when it blows on you, this is because
your body temperature is higher than the
temperature of the air it blows out. It can sound like
a fan while it’s working.
The heater(s) will be fitted with an on/off switch (or pull cord in bathrooms).
Controls – Room Thermostat
You can control the room temperature using the wireless control panel which will be
attached to a wall in your home, usually the hallway.
The bottom temperature tells you what the room temperature is now; the top
temperature is the one you set to the temperature you would like.
The heating can be turned up and down using the arrow buttons on the right.
If you press the tap (hot water button) (top, left) for 3 seconds, the system will
work to get the hot water up to temperature. This takes energy away from heating
the radiators and will just heat the water. It won’t stop until the water is up to
temperature.
Holiday mode (the bottom, left button) turns the system right down so it won’t
heat any water and keeps the heating on a minimum. Press the button for 3
seconds until the display flashes, then press the button again. You can choose to
put up to 72 hours in or you can leave it until you return and press the button for 3
seconds to turn it off.
Main Controls
Your hot water and central heating system is controlled by the main control
panel which is either attached to the front of the cylinder unit or a wall in your
home.
Display
screen
Power /
holiday
button
Menu Confirm (select or save)
Back
(to previous menu)
The display screen shows the target room temperature.
The system will have been programmed by an engineer, but you can change the
schedule.
To set the heating timer:
Press the Menu button.
(Bottom left.)
Press F2 and F3 (the white buttons with arrows above on
the display) to move across the options on the screen to
schedule.
Then press
For heating press
Press F4, all the days of the week should be ticked.
Press
Press F1 for on, off or temperature. The temperature symbol over the black lines is a
thermometer.
Both lines should be black, the heating should always be on at no
less than 16˚c.
Press , the arrows will turn white and you’ll be able to turn the temperature
up and down.
Move the thermometer across and press
to add another temperature in. You can
have up to 4 different settings.
To delete one press the
on it and press F4.
Press F4 to save.
A Guide to
Air Source Heat Pumps
A fresh approach to people homes and communities
Barnsley Homes Standard
This new central heating system has the potential to save you money
each year on your heating costs but this really depends on how you use it.
To make the most of these savings it is important that the electricity you
buy is the lowest price available which may mean looking at other
suppliers. Changing your meter from a pre-payment meter to a standard
one is recommended as pre- payment energy is very expensive.
FAQs:
How does the system work?
The pump operates on electricity but due to its high efficiency it produces
three units of energy for every one unit of energy it uses to run; giving an
efficiency rating of approximately 300%. An A rated gas boiler operates at
an efficiency of 90 to 92%.
An air source heat pump works a bit like a fridge in reverse. The process
consists of an evaporator, a compressor and a condenser. It absorbs heat
from the outside air and the heat pump compressor then increases the
temperature of that heat further to create useful heat. This heat is then
transferred into hot water which can be pumped around radiators and your
cylinder much like your current system.
What happens if there’s a power cut?
As with gas central heating your system will temporarily shut down. It will
automatically restart once the power returns.
Who should I contact if my heating stops working?
You can still ring the Repairs Helpline on 01226 787878.
Will I still need a gas supply?
Your home will no longer use gas for heating but we will not remove any
existing supply to your home so you will be able to continue to use gas for
cooking.
If you have an electric cooker, you won’t need to pay a gas bill. You
should contact your gas supplier and ask them to remove your gas meter
so you don’t have to pay a standing charge.
www.berneslaihomes.co.uk
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