System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown

System i
Systems management
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling
program
Version 6 Release 1
System i
Systems management
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling
program
Version 6 Release 1
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices,” on
page 19.
This edition applies to version 6, release 1, modification 0 of IBM i5/OS (product number 5761-SS1) and to all
subsequent releases and modifications until otherwise indicated in new editions. This version does not run on all
reduced instruction set computer (RISC) models nor does it run on CISC models.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1998, 2008.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Contents
Controlling system shutdown using a
power-handling program . . . . . . . 1
PDF file for Controlling system shutdown using a
power-handling program . . . . . . . . . .
Controlled shutdown concepts . . . . . . . .
Battery backup unit . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling uninterruptible power supply conditions
when no power-handling program exists . . . .
IPL considerations for uninterruptible power
supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-loss controlled shutdown . . . . . . .
Power restore IPL system value (QPWRRSTIPL) .
Uninterruptible power supply . . . . . . .
Uninterruptible power supply delay time system
value (QUPSDLYTIM) . . . . . . . . . .
Uninterruptible power supply message queue
system value (QUPSMSGQ) . . . . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 2008
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Uninterruptible power supply messages . .
Weak battery condition signal from
uninterruptible power supply. . . . . .
Enabling a power-handling program to control
system activity during a power interruption .
Implementing a power-handling program .
Writing a power-handling program . . .
Example: Power-handling CL program .
Example: Testing a power-handling CL
program . . . . . . . . . . .
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Appendix. Notices . . . . . . . . . . 19
| Programming interface information . . . . . . 20
Trademarks . . . .
Terms and conditions .
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System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling
program
Power-handling programs can minimize interruptions during a power loss. You should use a power
protection device, such as an uninterruptible power supply, with your power-handling program.
Power protection (for example, uninterruptible power supply) devices help provide energy to the system
when utility power is temporarily interrupted. The energy that is provided helps prevent system
functions from ending abnormally. The controlled shutdown mechanisms help the system shut down as
smoothly as possible, minimizing adverse impacts on initial program load (IPL) time.
You can tailor the CL program examples to your specific system requirements, as well as test the
power-handling program that you created.
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the Code license and disclaimer
information.
PDF file for Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling
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Controlled shutdown concepts
Before you use a power-handling program to control system shutdown, you may want to familiarize
yourself with related concepts.
Battery backup unit
A battery backup unit provides a safety net for users who do not have an uninterruptible power supply or
those with a failed uninterruptible power supply.
The battery backup unit provides 30 seconds of run time. If ac power is not restored within 30 seconds,
the system immediately goes into a controlled shutdown.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998, 2008
1
Systems 620, 640, 650, 720, 730, 740, 830, SB1, SB2, SB3 are equipped with a battery backup unit.
Handling uninterruptible power supply conditions when no
power-handling program exists
You might need to change some system values when you do not have a power-handling program. These
are considerations when you do not have a power-handling program to handle controlled system
shutdown.
You can specify that you do not have a power handling program by using the default for the
QUPSMSGQ, which is QSYSOPR. When you use the default, the system sends all power-related messages
to QSYSOPR. You should set the QUPSDLYTIM to something other than *NOMAX.
Normally, you do not supply power to the workstation devices. When utility power is interrupted, the
system remains active, but the workstation jobs typically end abnormally. If utility power is restored
while the system is operating on the uninterruptible power supply, the system remains active and the
workstation jobs can be restarted.
If the QUPSDLYTIM timer ends or the weak battery signal occurs, the system saves main storage and
turns off. Select a value for QUPSDLYTIM that is appropriate for your uninterruptible power supply and
your system size.
If the system is powered down while on uninterruptible power supply, the QPWRRSTIPL determines
whether an IPL is performed when utility power is restored. The default is to not perform the IPL.
Related concepts
“Enabling a power-handling program to control system activity during a power interruption” on page
10
System software support is essentially the same for both the battery feature and the uninterruptible
power supply attachment.
“Uninterruptible power supply message queue system value (QUPSMSGQ)” on page 7
The uninterruptible power supply message queue (QUPSMSGQ) system value determines which
message queues the power supply messages are sent to.
“Uninterruptible power supply delay time system value (QUPSDLYTIM)” on page 4
The uninterruptible power supply delay timer (QUPSDLYTIM) controls the length of time that the
system waits before saving main storage and powering down the system.
“Power restore IPL system value (QPWRRSTIPL)” on page 3
This value controls what happens if the system ends when utility power is interrupted and then
restored at a later time.
IPL considerations for uninterruptible power supply
When the system performs an initial program load (IPL), the Licensed Internal Code verifies various
internal switches to see if the system was correctly turned off.
Only the successful completion of the Power Down System (PWRDWNSYS) command causes the system
to be correctly turned off. For any other type of shutdown, the i5/OS® operating system considers the
next IPL to be abnormal. The Licensed Internal Code considers the IPL to be normal if the system saves
main storage and completes the power-down sequence successfully. If neither power-down technique
completes normally, the Licensed Internal Code runs various recovery functions on the next IPL.
When an abnormal IPL occurs, the i5/OS program performs additional recovery functions. In an attended
IPL, you can control some of these functions. In an unattended IPL that is caused by the Power restore
IPL system value (QPWRRSTIPL) or a timed IPL, the system can only use the values that are currently
set.
2
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
If the Power Down System (PWRDWNSYS) command is run while power is supplied by the battery
backup unit or uninterruptible power supply, the system delays writing any job logs until the next IPL.
The system handles this type of PWRDWNSYS so that the amount of processing is minimized. The
system does not perform an IPL while operating on the battery backup unit.
You can perform an IPL on the system if utility power is off and the system is operating on an
uninterruptible power supply. This does not apply to a timed or remote IPL. Only a manually initiated
IPL is allowed when utility power is interrupted.
Related concepts
“Power restore IPL system value (QPWRRSTIPL)”
This value controls what happens if the system ends when utility power is interrupted and then
restored at a later time.
Related reference
“Uninterruptible power supply messages” on page 8
Several error messages are related to uninterruptible power supply.
Power-loss controlled shutdown
The power-loss controlled shutdown mechanism enables the system to shut down in an orderly fashion
following a loss of utility power. The power-loss controlled shutdown mechanism is available only if you
connected the system to an uninterruptible power supply.
If utility power is not restored within the time that is specified by the QUPSDLYTIM system value, the
Licensed Internal Code signals each job to end at the next instruction boundary. Typically a job is at the
next instruction boundary or will be shortly. However, some long running instructions, such as those that
build access paths or create programs, may not complete in the time that is allowed. After a fixed internal
time to reach an instruction boundary, the changed pages in main storage are written to auxiliary storage,
the system shuts down abnormally, and then powers off.
Successfully completing a power-loss controlled shutdown causes the next initial program load (IPL) of
the system programs to be considered normal by the Licensed Internal Code, but not by the operating
system. If the uninterruptible power supply batteries do not hold the system long enough for the
power-loss controlled shutdown to complete, the next IPL will be abnormal from the Licensed Internal
Code viewpoint.
Related concepts
“Uninterruptible power supply” on page 4
An uninterruptible power supply provides a source of ac power if utility power should fail. Typically,
an uninterruptible power supply has a finite backup time.
“Uninterruptible power supply delay time system value (QUPSDLYTIM)” on page 4
The uninterruptible power supply delay timer (QUPSDLYTIM) controls the length of time that the
system waits before saving main storage and powering down the system.
Power restore IPL system value (QPWRRSTIPL)
This value controls what happens if the system ends when utility power is interrupted and then restored
at a later time.
The default is 0 (Not allowed), which prevents the system from performing an IPL when utility power is
restored.
Normally, you will only leave this value set to 0 under one of the following conditions:
v You prefer to manually start the system again.
v You have a power-handling program that determines whether the batteries are recharged enough to
allow another IPL.
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
3
Related concepts
“Handling uninterruptible power supply conditions when no power-handling program exists” on
page 2
You might need to change some system values when you do not have a power-handling program.
These are considerations when you do not have a power-handling program to handle controlled
system shutdown.
“IPL considerations for uninterruptible power supply” on page 2
When the system performs an initial program load (IPL), the Licensed Internal Code verifies various
internal switches to see if the system was correctly turned off.
Uninterruptible power supply
An uninterruptible power supply provides a source of ac power if utility power should fail. Typically, an
uninterruptible power supply has a finite backup time.
An uninterruptible power supply supplies power to the system and all associated disk unit controllers
and devices during a utility power failure. The run time of the uninterruptible power supply should be
sized appropriately for a power-loss controlled shutdown.
Three system values affect an uninterruptible power supply. These system values define the action the
system takes in response to a change in the power supply signal when an uninterruptible power supply
is attached:
v QUPSMSGQ
v QUPSDLYTIM
v QPWRRSTIPL
Related concepts
“Power-loss controlled shutdown” on page 3
The power-loss controlled shutdown mechanism enables the system to shut down in an orderly
fashion following a loss of utility power. The power-loss controlled shutdown mechanism is available
only if you connected the system to an uninterruptible power supply.
“Uninterruptible power supply delay time system value (QUPSDLYTIM)”
The uninterruptible power supply delay timer (QUPSDLYTIM) controls the length of time that the
system waits before saving main storage and powering down the system.
“Weak battery condition signal from uninterruptible power supply” on page 9
When the battery on the system falls below a specific level of charge, the uninterruptible power
supply issues a weak battery condition signal.
Uninterruptible power supply delay time system value (QUPSDLYTIM)
The uninterruptible power supply delay timer (QUPSDLYTIM) controls the length of time that the system
waits before saving main storage and powering down the system.
If utility power is restored before the wait time ends, the system resets the timer. If the wait time is
exceeded, the system begins to save main storage and goes into a controlled shutdown.
The three choices for the QUPSDLYTIM value are as follows:
v *BASIC or *CALC
v A numeric value
v *NOMAX.
The time that is specified by the QUPSDLYTIM system might be one of the following values:
v Infinite if QUPSDLYTIM is set to *NOMAX (must have a power-handling program).
v A fixed internal delay if QUPSDLYTIM is set to *BASIC or *CALC.
4
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
v An alternate value that is specified by QUPSDLYTIM. The value must be a positive number, specifying
seconds (zero means no delay).
If you set QUPSDLYTIM to *NOMAX, the following conditions must be met or the system begins an
immediate shut down:
v The message queue specified in the QUPSMSGQ system value must exist.
v If the message queue is a workstation message queue (or QSYSOPR), it must be in break or notify
mode.
v If the message queue is not a workstation message queue, it must be allocated by a job.
The figure displays these choices and their implications.
Utility failure and
uninterruptible
power supply
operating correctly
Utility failure and
no uninterruptible
power supply
or uninterruptible
power supply failure
Internal
battery
No internal
battery
Utility failure and
uninterruptible
power supply
battery low
QUPSDLYTIM
SETTING
Return
*NOMAX
30 second
delay
Uncontrolled
shutdown
Numeric value
User defined
delay
*CALC or
*BASIC
90 second
shutdown
200 second
delay
Shutdown
RV4N350-03
Figure 1. QUPSDLYTIM values and actions
Notes:
v The default value for QUPSDLYTIM is *CALC. Leaving QUPSDLYTIM set to *CALC may
defeat the purpose of having an uninterruptible power supply. *BASIC and *CALC provide the
same function in systems that are running V3R6 or later releases of the operating system.
v If QUPSDLYTIM is set to *BASIC or *CALC, the system will perform a controlled shutdown
after a fixed interval delay of 200 seconds. If you have an uninterruptible power supply, you
can specify a numeric value.
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
5
The flow chart shows the values and actions of the QUPSDLYTIM system values. The flow chart starts
with three boxes across the top of the chart.
The first box on the top is labeled ″Utility failure and No uninterruptible power supplyor UPS failure.″
Two arrows proceed from this box. One arrow points to a box labeled ″Internal battery.″
The other arrow points to a box labeled ″No internal battery.″ The box that is labeled ″Internal battery
points to another box labeled ″30 second delay.″ The box that is labeled ″30 second delay″ points to a box
that is labeled ″90 second shutdown.″
The box that is labeled ″No internal battery″ points to a box that is labeled ″Uncontrolled shutdown.″
The second box on the top is labeled ″Utility failure and uninterruptible power supplyoperating
correctly.″ An arrow from this box points to another box that is labeled ″QUPSDLYTIM SETTING.″ This
box shows the three settings for the QUPSDLYTIM setting, which are *NOMAX, numeric value, and
*CALC or *BASIC.
If *NOMAX is selected, an arrow points to another box that is labeled ″Return.″ If numeric value is
selected, an arrow from the QUPSDLYTIM SETTING box points to another box that is labeled ″User
defined delay.″ Another arrow from the ″User defined delay box points to a box that is labeled
″Shutdown.″ If *CALC or *BASIC is selected, an arrow from the QUPSDLYTIM SETTING box points to
another box that is labeled ″200 second delay.″ The 200 second delay box points to the box that is labeled
″Shutdown.″
The third box is labeled ″Utility failure and uninterruptible power supplybattery low.″ This box points to
the box that is labeled ″Shutdown.″
Determining the value of QUPSDLYTIM
To determine the value of QUPSDLYTIM, you need to know the following information:
v The hold-up time of your uninterruptible power supply at the given load (the battery-rated time).
v The amount of time it takes your system to save main storage and turn off.
Available battery run time
The available battery run time is a dynamic variable. Evaluate your system’s available battery with these
questions:
v Has the power been fluctuating?
v Has the battery been previously discharged?
v Is the battery fully charged?
The actual battery run time is a function of capacity. Even if the battery is fully charged, it might not
have 100% capacity. A typical battery will lose 20% to 50% of its rated capacity in 4 to 5 years, depending
on ambient room temperatures. Elevated operating temperatures tend to increase the loss of capacity. The
actual battery run time is also a function of the discharge load. The more loads the uninterruptible power
supply serves, the less time it can sustain them. When the battery on the system falls below a specific
level of charge, the uninterruptible power supply issues a weak battery condition signal. The weak
battery condition signal from uninterruptible power supply affects the shutdown mechanisms.
The time it takes to save main storage and power-down is not an exact number. Save time depends on
the number of changes in main storage that have not been written to disk. The number of disk arms
available is also a factor; the more disk arms, the faster the system can write main storage to disk. The
system power-down will also depend on the number of jobs and the average amount of time it takes to
6
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
end them. Typically a job will be close to an instruction boundary; however, some instructions are long
running. The following formula shows a worst case scenario in estimating the number of minutes it will
take to shut down a system:
((0.0554*(MS size in MB))/(# of disk arms)) + 1.6 = # of minutes
Refer to the following table for an estimate of the time required to write main storage to disk on your
particular system. The amount of time required to shut down a system typically is a small percentage of
this value.
Table 1. Time needed in minutes to write main storage to disk
Arms
32MB 64MB
128MB
256MB
512MB
1GB
2GB
4GB
8GB
2
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
58.4
115.1
228.7
4
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
58.4
115.1
228.7
8
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
58.4
115.1
228.7
16
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
58.4
115.1
228.7
32
1.6
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
58.4
115.1
228.7
1.6
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
58.4
115.1
1.6
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
58.4
1.6
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
30.0
64
128
256
512
1.6
1024
16GB
32GB
64GB
128GB
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
15.8
1.6
1.7
1.8
2.0
2.5
3.4
5.1
8.7
Assumes all pages in main storage have been modified and changes have not yet been written to disk. Proportionately less time is
required if fewer pages need to be written to disk.
Related concepts
“Enabling a power-handling program to control system activity during a power interruption” on page
10
System software support is essentially the same for both the battery feature and the uninterruptible
power supply attachment.
“Handling uninterruptible power supply conditions when no power-handling program exists” on
page 2
You might need to change some system values when you do not have a power-handling program.
These are considerations when you do not have a power-handling program to handle controlled
system shutdown.
“Power-loss controlled shutdown” on page 3
The power-loss controlled shutdown mechanism enables the system to shut down in an orderly
fashion following a loss of utility power. The power-loss controlled shutdown mechanism is available
only if you connected the system to an uninterruptible power supply.
“Uninterruptible power supply” on page 4
An uninterruptible power supply provides a source of ac power if utility power should fail. Typically,
an uninterruptible power supply has a finite backup time.
“Weak battery condition signal from uninterruptible power supply” on page 9
When the battery on the system falls below a specific level of charge, the uninterruptible power
supply issues a weak battery condition signal.
Uninterruptible power supply message queue system value
(QUPSMSGQ)
The uninterruptible power supply message queue (QUPSMSGQ) system value determines which message
queues the power supply messages are sent to.
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
7
The system sends messages about the power supply to the system operator (QSYSOPR) message queue
regardless of the value that is specified in the system value. If you specify a different message queue, that
message queue also receives the same power supply messages. Specify a different message queue if you
have one of the following conditions:
v You want another message queue to receive the power supply messages (for example, the data
processing manager’s message queue).
v You have a program that handles events that are related to the uninterruptible power supply.
Related concepts
“Enabling a power-handling program to control system activity during a power interruption” on page
10
System software support is essentially the same for both the battery feature and the uninterruptible
power supply attachment.
“Handling uninterruptible power supply conditions when no power-handling program exists” on
page 2
You might need to change some system values when you do not have a power-handling program.
These are considerations when you do not have a power-handling program to handle controlled
system shutdown.
Uninterruptible power supply messages
Several error messages are related to uninterruptible power supply.
Message ID
Message text
Additional information
CPF1816
System utility power failed at &1.
CPF1817
System utility power restored at &1.
The system power switched to the utility source.
CPF1819
System ending. Power failure
message not monitored.
System ending for reason &3.
Notes:
1. Message queue &1 in library &2 specified by
QUPSMSGQ system value is not allocated to a user
program or workstation.
2. Message queue &1 in library &2 is allocated to a
workstation or is the system operator message queue
(QSYSOPR in library QSYS), but the message queue
is not in *BREAK or *NOTIFY mode.
CPI0961
Uninterruptible power supply no
longer attached.
CPI0962
The uninterruptible power supply is
now attached.
CPI0963
System on auxiliary power.
System is currently running on auxiliary power.
CPI0964
Weak-battery condition exists.
The external uninterruptible power supply or the
internal battery indicates a weak-battery condition. If
utility power fails during this condition, the system may
begin an immediate shut down. See your
uninterruptible power supply manual for more
information.
CPI0965
Failure of battery backup feature in
system unit.
There may be a failure of the battery or the battery
charger for the battery backup feature in the system
unit. Contact your service representative.
CPI0966
Failure of battery backup feature in
expansion unit.
There may be a failure of the battery or the battery
charger for the battery backup feature in the expansion
unit. Contact your service representative.
8
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
Message ID
Message text
Additional information
CPI0973
Weak battery condition no longer
exists.
The weak-battery condition for the external
uninterruptible power supply or the internal battery no
longer exists. See your uninterruptible power supply
manual.
CPI0974
Uninterruptible power supply has
been bypassed.
If a utility power failure occurs, the uninterruptible
power supply cannot supply system power. The system
will end abnormally.
CPI0975
Uninterruptible power supply no
longer bypassed.
The uninterruptible power supply is no longer
bypassed.
CPI0976
Notification of message &1 failed.
Unable to send &1 message to message queue &2 in
library &3 specified in QUPSMSGQ system value.
CPI0981
Automatic IPL not allowed.
Automatic IPL after utility power restored, specified by
system value QPWRRSTIPL, was disabled for one of the
following reasons:
v Utility power failed and the battery weak condition
was detected.
v Utility power failed and the uninterruptible power
supply delay time specified in system value
QUPSDLYTIM was exceeded.
CPI0994
System power is restored.
The system power switched to the utility source at &1.
The utility power failed for &2 seconds. During this
time, the system was not doing any application
processing. If the utility power continues to fail, power
down the system (PWRDWNSYS command).
Related concepts
“IPL considerations for uninterruptible power supply” on page 2
When the system performs an initial program load (IPL), the Licensed Internal Code verifies various
internal switches to see if the system was correctly turned off.
“Weak battery condition signal from uninterruptible power supply”
When the battery on the system falls below a specific level of charge, the uninterruptible power
supply issues a weak battery condition signal.
Weak battery condition signal from uninterruptible power supply
When the battery on the system falls below a specific level of charge, the uninterruptible power supply
issues a weak battery condition signal.
The weak battery signal from the uninterruptible power supply will cause the system to perform a power
loss controlled shutdown if the following conditions are true:
v You have chosen to use the four-wire communication between the System i® product and an
uninterruptible power supply.
v The utility fail signal is active.
The controlled shutdown occurs immediately. If the system is running on utility power and the
uninterruptible power supply sends a weak battery signal, the system remains up and posts a CPIO964
message. However, the system initiates a shutdown mechanism immediately under this condition if
utility power is lost.
A typical factory-preset time for an uninterruptible power supply to send a weak battery signal is with
approximately two minutes of run time remaining. Some uninterruptible power supply models have an
adjustable setting for this time. Ideally, you want to set it for the amount of time it takes for your system
to perform a power-loss controlled shutdown. Do not assume that the factory-preset time on the
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
9
uninterruptible power supply is sufficient for a normal shutdown of your system. Calculate the amount
of time necessary to perform a power-loss controlled shutdown, use an appropriate value for
QUPSDLYTIM, and adjust the time for weak battery signal on the uninterruptible power supply (if
adjustable).
The figure shows the time progression of the QUPSDLYTIM function, from left to right.
Utility power
goes off
Battery rated time
User
program
functions
(if any)
Save of
main storage
and power
down
Safety
factor
QUPSDLYTIM
Time-out
Time
Uninterruptible
power supply or
battery power
unit is active
QUPSDLYTIM
Time-out
Power down
occurs
RV4N353-2
Figure 2. Time line of QUPSDLYTIM function
The time line shows what happens from the time the power goes out to the time the system shuts down.
The duration of the time is the same as the rated life of the battery. The time line starts at the point that
utility power goes off. At the same time the uninterruptible power supply or battery power unit is active.
At this time user program functions (if any) and the QUPSDLYTIM value time-out is in effect. When that
time expires, main storage is saved, then shut down occurs. After that there should be some time left of
battery life as a safety factor.
Related concepts
“Uninterruptible power supply delay time system value (QUPSDLYTIM)” on page 4
The uninterruptible power supply delay timer (QUPSDLYTIM) controls the length of time that the
system waits before saving main storage and powering down the system.
“Uninterruptible power supply” on page 4
An uninterruptible power supply provides a source of ac power if utility power should fail. Typically,
an uninterruptible power supply has a finite backup time.
Related reference
“Uninterruptible power supply messages” on page 8
Several error messages are related to uninterruptible power supply.
Enabling a power-handling program to control system activity during a
power interruption
System software support is essentially the same for both the battery feature and the uninterruptible
power supply attachment.
10
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
In some environments you may want to perform different actions when the uninterruptible power supply
begins supplying power to the system or when power is fluctuating. A power-handling program can use
any of the following methods to handle these situations:
v
v
v
v
Sending specific messages to interactive users
Ending batch jobs and subsystems in preparation for powering down
Dynamically changing the system values that control uninterruptible power supply processing
Issuing the PWRDWNSYS command to shut down the system
To specify that you have power handling programs, change the QUPSMSGQ system value to the name of
a queue you have created. The system will send the same messages to both QSYSOPR and the queue you
specified. Change the QUPSDLYTIM system value to *NOMAX.
The program you use to handle the message queue must be active and must allocate the queue. If a
program has not allocated the queue that is specified in QUPSMSGQ, the system will assume that no
power handling program exists.
Related concepts
“Uninterruptible power supply message queue system value (QUPSMSGQ)” on page 7
The uninterruptible power supply message queue (QUPSMSGQ) system value determines which
message queues the power supply messages are sent to.
“Uninterruptible power supply delay time system value (QUPSDLYTIM)” on page 4
The uninterruptible power supply delay timer (QUPSDLYTIM) controls the length of time that the
system waits before saving main storage and powering down the system.
“Handling uninterruptible power supply conditions when no power-handling program exists” on
page 2
You might need to change some system values when you do not have a power-handling program.
These are considerations when you do not have a power-handling program to handle controlled
system shutdown.
Implementing a power-handling program
When an uninterruptible power supply is attached, you can use a power-handling program for a system.
About this task
This procedure assumes that QCTL is the controlling subsystem.
1. Isolate the objects used by the power-handling program in their own library and secure them from
other users because of the critical nature of a power-handling program.
You can use the following command:
CRTLIB LIB(UPSLIB) AUT(*EXCLUDE) CRTAUT(*EXCLUDE)
2. Create a unique message queue and exclude its use from all other users and general system use
because a power-handling program requires exclusive use of a message queue, as follows:
CRTMSGQ MSGQ(UPSLIB/UPSMSGQ) AUT(*EXCLUDE)
3. Create the CL power-handling program and exclude its use from all other users, as follows:
CRTCLPGM PGM(UPSLIB/UPSPGM) AUT(*EXCLUDE)
4. Create the job description for the power-handling program you want started automatically whenever
the controlling subsystem is started.
CRTJOBD JOBD(UPSLIB/UPSJOBD) JOBQ(QSYS/QCTL2)
JOBPTY(1) RQSDTA('CALL UPSLIB/UPSPGM')
AUT(*EXCLUDE) USER(xxxxx)
Note: You must provide a user profile to use the job description as an auto-start job.
5. Create an alternative controlling subsystem description by making a copy of the current controlling
subsystem description, as follows:
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
11
CRTDUPOBJ OBJ(QCTL) FROMLIB(QSYS)
OBJTYPE(*SBSD) TOLIB(QSYS) NEWOBJ(QCTL2)
6. Change your startup program to start all subsystems. Check to see if system value QCTLSBSD is
equal to QCTL2. See system value QSTRUPPGM for the name and library. If you do not change the
startup program, it cannot check for QCTL2 in QSYS or QGPL, and the startup program ends
without starting the rest of your subsystems.
7. Add the autostart job entry to the alternative controlling subsystem description, as follows:
ADDAJE SBSD(QSYS/QCTL2) JOB(QSYS/QCTL2)
JOBD(UPSLIB/UPSJOBD)
8. Change the controlling subsystem system value to use the alternative controlling subsystem
description, as follows:
CHGSYSVAL SYSVAL(QCTLSBSD) VALUE('QCTL2')
9. Change the system values to allow the program to handle a power outage, as follows:
CHGSYSVAL SYSVAL(QUPSMSGQ) VALUE('UPSMSGQ UPSLIB')
CHGSYSVAL SYSVAL(QUPSDLYTIM) VALUE(*NOMAX)
10. Perform an IPL of the system to have the new controlling subsystem description take effect, as
follows:
PWRDWNSYS OPTION(*IMMED) RESTART(*YES)
Related tasks
“Example: Power-handling CL program” on page 14
The sample power-handling CL program can help you build your own program according to your
specific system requirements.
Writing a power-handling program
You should activate the power-handling program at each initial program load (IPL) and keep it active at
all times. It should be accounted for in the activity level available in work management subsystem
specifications.
The message queue that is specified in QUPSMSGQ is used for uninterruptible power supply message
processing. The program normally allocates the queue by specifying the command:
ALCOBJ OBJ(xxx/yyy *MSGQ *EXCL)
When a message arrives, there are some critical messages to process:
v CPF1816: System utility power failed at &1 (this message applies to the battery feature and full power
supply)
v CPF1817: System power restored at &1 (this message applies to the battery feature and full power
supply)
v CPI0963: System on auxiliary power (this message applies if system power fails during the IPL)
v CPI0994: System power is restored (this message applies to the limited uninterruptible power supply)
You can choose to ignore the other messages.
Your program can handle a brief power interruption without doing any unique processing. For example,
when the CPF1816 message arrives, you can set a switch in your program that indicates that the message
occurred. The program might then perform a RCVMSG with WAIT(10) to cause a time-out in 10 seconds.
If the CPF1817 message is received before the time-out occurs, you can reset the switch and perform no
other action.
Your program can prepare for a normal shut down if power is not restored after a brief time period. For
example, if you have remote workstations that are still active, you may want to send them a message
requesting they sign off quickly. You may want to issue ENDSBS OPTION(*CNTRLD) to prevent new
12
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
workstations from signing on or new batch work from beginning. If you have batch jobs running, you
may want to end them with the following command:
ENDJOB OPTION(*CNTRLD)
This sets an indicator to end the job. Some high-level languages and the control language enable you to
test within a program to see if a controlled end job was specified. If the program does not end itself, the
default on the ENDJOB command (30 seconds) is used.
You can set a second timer in your program, such as RCVMSG WAIT(120). If utility power has not been
restored, you can issue the PWRDWNSYS OPTION(*IMMED) command. The wait time should be
specified based on your battery time and the time that is required for a power-down.
If you name a message queue for the QUPSMSGQ system value and *NOMAX for QUPSDLYTIM, the
following conditions apply:
v The message queue you specify must be allocated by a program when the CPF1816 message occurs.
v If the message queue you specify is a workstation message queue, it must be in a break or notify
mode.
If not, the system assumes that no power handling program exists, and the system will be turned off.
Note: When the system has been placed in a restricted state (for example, ENDSBS *ALL), your
uninterruptible power supply handling program will no longer be active. For this reason, it is
necessary to prepare an alternate method of dealing with your uninterruptible power supply and
any possible power interruptions that may occur while your system is in a restricted state.
For example, when performing a save system (using the SAVSYS command) or reclaim storage (using the
RCLSTG command), your uninterruptible power supply program will no longer be active after all
subsystems have been ended. Only a single workstation job is active. You can perform one of the
following actions as an alternative:
1. After all subsystems have been ended, from the command line change the mode for the message
queue specified in system value QUPSMSGQ to *BREAK. This causes all uninterruptible power
supply messages to be sent as break messages to the user that is signed on to that workstation. This
method enables you to manually decide what to do if a power failure occurs.
2. Change the system value QUPSDLYTIM to some value other than *NOMAX (for example, the number
of minutes you want the uninterruptible power supply to ride out the power failure). This method
will prevent the system from performing an immediate quick shut down. However, if a power failure
occurs, a quick shut down will be performed if the power failure lasts longer than the value specified
for the system value QUPSDLYTIM.
3. Change your existing uninterruptible power supply handling program for use as a BREAK
HANDLING program which may be used while the system is in a restricted state. This can be done
by creating a second version of your uninterruptible power supply program that does not allocate the
message queue specified in system value QUPSMSGQ. (In other words, do not use the ALCOBJ
command.) To utilize this program while in a restricted state, before starting a dedicated function
such as SAVSYS, enter the command:
CHGMSGQ MSGQ(LIB/MSGQ) DLVRY(*BREAK)
PGM(LIB/PGM)
where (LIB/MSGQ) is the name the message queue specified in system value QUPSMSGQ, and
(LIB/PGM) is the name of your modified uninterruptible power supply handling program. Now,
should a power failure occur, the power failure message is handled by the break handling program,
even while a function such as the SAVSYS command is running. To deactivate the break-handling
program, either have the user sign off or enter the following command:
CHGMSGQ MSGQ(LIB/MSGQ) DLVRY(*HOLD)
PGM(*DSPMSG)
After you have deactivated the break-handling program, you should immediately start your
subsystems and your normal uninterruptible-power-supply handling program.
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
13
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 18.
Example: Power-handling CL program
The sample power-handling CL program can help you build your own program according to your
specific system requirements.
About this task
Although this example CL program should work correctly as written, you need adjust it for your specific
system requirements. For example, add additional recovery to the program by monitoring for error
conditions specific to your system. You also need to supply a user-written program that performs the
steps necessary to prepare for a normal shutdown of the system. These steps might include holding job
queues, sending messages, and ending subsystems. The program should restart normal operations if the
power outage ends before the system is turned off.
The program performs the following actions:
1. The power-handling program retrieves the system value QUPSMSGQ into the variables &LIB and
&MSGQ. Although this is not absolutely necessary, it does help to ensure that the correct message
queue is allocated each time the program is started. The program then deletes the message queue (if it
already exists) and then creates it again. This step helps eliminate clearing the message queue or any
problems that might occur if the message queue is damaged.
2. After the message queue has been created, the program must allocate (ALCOBJ command) the
message queue exclusively.
Note: When the system value QUPSDLYTIM is set to *NOMAX, use one of the following methods to
allocate the message queue that is specified for system value QUPSMSGQ:
v Use the command CHGMSGQ MSGQ(UPSLIB/UPSMSGQ) MODE(*BREAK)
v Include the ALCOBJ command within the power-handling program
You may only use one of the methods that are listed.
If a user or a program has not allocated the message queue, and a power outage occurs, the system
performs an immediate quick shut down.
3. At label A in the example power handling program, the Receive Message (RCVMSG) command is
used to determine what message has been sent to the message queue. The RCVMSG command is also
used to determine the amount of wait time (WAIT parameter) throughout the program.
At label A in the example, the value of the WAIT parameter on the RCVMSG command causes the
program to wait 600 seconds (10 minutes). After 10 minutes, the program checks to see if a controlled
end to the job has occurred (using the ENDSBS or ENDJOB command). This prevents the program
from delaying the ENDJOB or ENDSBS command.
If you use ENDSBS *IMMED or ENDJOB *IMMED, then this part of the program can be removed.
You can change the value for the WAIT parameter on the RCVMSG command to *MAX. The
RCVMSG command runs immediately if the system sends a message to the message queue that is
specified on the RCVMSG command. This occurs regardless of the value that is specified for the
WAIT parameter.
4. If the message that is received by the RCVMSG command is CPF1816 (system utility power failed),
the program checks to see if this is a short power failure. The program runs a second RCVMSG
command with a value of ten seconds for the WAIT parameter (you must decide how many seconds
is adequate for your site).
If the message that is received by the RCVMSG command within the specified ten seconds is CPF1817
(system utility power restored), then power was restored. The program returns to label A and starts
the cycle again.
14
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
If the ten second limit is reached and no message is received, then the power failure is longer than ten
seconds and additional steps are necessary. At this point, you can call a user-written program that
performs the following actions:
v The program uses the HLDJOBQ command to hold certain long running batch jobs
v The program notifies unaffected remote users
v The program begins ending jobs and subsystems in an orderly manner
5. At label B, in the example power-handling program, the program attempts to wait-out the power
failure. The program retrieves the present time and places this information into a CL variable that is
named &START. The present time is used to determine how much uninterruptible power supply time
is left.
A third RCVMSG command runs, and a CL variable that is named &WAIT (that was changed earlier
in the program) determines the value for the WAIT parameter. The CL variable &WAIT is the amount
of reserve power the uninterruptible power supply can provide. The value for the &WAIT variable at
label A should be adjusted to the amount of reserve power that the uninterruptible power supply can
provide. (The amount of reserve power is measured in seconds.)
In the example program, the value of the &WAIT variable is set to 1200 seconds (20 minutes). If
message CPF1817 (System utility power restored) is received during that time, then power has been
restored, and another program can be called to restart normal system operations. The program then
returns to label A and starts the cycle again. If message CPF1817 is not sent after 1200 seconds, then
RCVMSG returns a blank message ID (not equal to CPF1817). This indicates that power has not been
restored and an immediate system shut down is started. If a message other than CPF1817 is received
during this 1200 second wait, the following actions occur:
a. The program retrieves the present time, and calculates how much of the 1200 second wait period
has elapsed.
b. The program subtracts the difference, and changes the CL variable &WAIT to reflect that amount.
c. The program returns to label B to use the remaining power that is provided by the uninterruptible
power supply.
This part of the program checks to see if a date change occurs.
Results
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information” on page 18.
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
15
SEQNBR*...+... 1 ...+... 2 ...+... 3 ...+... 4 ...+... 5 ...+... 6 ...
1.00
PGM
2.00
DCL
VAR(&UPSMSGQ) TYPE(*CHAR) LEN(20)
3.00
DCL
VAR(&LIB)
TYPE(*CHAR) LEN(20)
4.00
DCL
VAR(&MSGQ)
TYPE(*CHAR) LEN(20)
5.00
DCL
VAR(&MSGID)
TYPE(*CHAR) LEN(7)
6.00
DCL
VAR(&ENDSTS)
TYPE(*CHAR) LEN(1)
7.00
DCL
VAR(&WAIT)
TYPE(*DEC)
LEN(6)
8.00
DCL
VAR(&HOUR)
TYPE(*DEC)
LEN(6)
9.00
DCL
VAR(&MIN)
TYPE(*DEC)
LEN(6)
10.00
DCL
VAR(&SEC)
TYPE(*DEC)
LEN(6)
11.00
DCL
VAR(&TIME)
TYPE(*CHAR) LEN(6)
12.00
DCL
VAR(&START)
TYPE(*DEC)
LEN(6)
13.00
DCL
VAR(&END)
TYPE(*DEC)
LEN(6)
14.00
DCL
VAR(&RESULT)
TYPE(*DEC)
LEN(6)
15.00
DCL
VAR(&PGM)
TYPE(*CHAR) LEN(10)
16.00
RTVSYSVAL SYSVAL(QUPSMSGQ) RTNVAR(&UPSMSGQ)
17.00
CHGVAR
VAR(&MSGQ) VALUE(%SST(&UPSMSGQ 1 10))
18.00
CHGVAR
VAR(&LIB) VALUE(%SST(&UPSMSGQ 11 10))
19.00
DLTMSGQ
MSGQ(&LIB/&MSGQ)
20.00
MONMSG
MSGID('CPF2105') /* Message queue not found. */
21.00
CRTMSGQ
MSGQ(&LIB/&MSGQ) TEXT('UPS Power handling +
22.00
program message queue') AUT(*EXCLUDE)
23.00
ALCOBJ
OBJ((&LIB/&MSGQ *MSGQ *EXCL))
24.00
25.00 A:
RCVMSG
MSGQ(&LIB/&MSGQ) WAIT(600) RMV(*YES) +
26.00
MSGID(&MSGID)
27.00
IF
COND(&MSGID *NE CPF1816) THEN(DO)
28.00
RTVJOBA
ENDSTS(&ENDSTS)
29.00
IF
COND(&ENDSTS *EQ '1') THEN(GOTO CMDLBL(ENDPGM))
30.00
GOTO
CMDLBL(A)
31.00
ENDDO
32.00
33.00
/* Check to see if this is a short power outage. */
34.00
IF
COND(&MSGID *EQ 'CPF1816') THEN(DO)
35.00
RCVMSG
MSGQ(&LIB/&MSGQ) WAIT(10) RMV(*YES) +
36.00
MSGID(&MSGID) /* Wait ten seconds)
37.00
IF
COND(&MSGID *EQ 'CPF1817') THEN(GOTO CMDLBL(A))
38.00
ENDDO
39.00
40.00
/* Power outage was longer than 10 seconds. */
41.00
CALL
PGM(&LIB/&PGM) /* User program that prepares +
42.00
system for possible shutdown. */
43.00
Figure 3. Power-handling CL program
16
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
44.00
45.00
46.00
47.00
48.00
49.00
50.00
51.00
52.00
53.00
54.00
55.00
56.00
57.00
58.00
59.00
60.00
61.00
62.00
63.00
64.00
65.00
66.00
67.00
68.00
69.00
70.00
71.00
72.00
74.00
75.00
76.00
77.00
78.00
79.00
80.00
81.00
B:
/* Check to
CHGVAR
RTVSYSVAL
CHGVAR
CHGVAR
CHGVAR
CHGVAR
RCVMSG
IF
CALL
GOTO
ENDDO
see if this is a long power outage. */
VAR(&WAIT) VALUE(01200) /* 20 minutes. */
SYSVAL(QTIME) RTNVAR(&TIME)
VAR(&HOUR) VALUE(%SST(&TIME 1 2))
VAR(&MIN)
VALUE(%SST(&TIME 3 2))
VAR(&SEC)
VALUE(%SST(&TIME 5 2))
VAR(&START) VALUE((&SEC) + (&MIN * 60) + +
(&HOUR * 3600))
MSGQ(&LIB/&MSGQ) WAIT(&WAIT) RMV(*YES) +
MSGID(&MSGID)
COND(&MSGID *EQ 'CPF1817') THEN(DO)
PGM(&LIB/&PGM) /* User program that restarts +
system operations. */
CMDLBL(A)
IF
RTVSYSVAL
CHGVAR
CHGVAR
CHGVAR
CHGVAR
COND(&MSGID *NE 'CPF1817') THEN(DO)
SYSVAL(QTIME) RTNVAR(&TIME)
VAR(&HOUR) VALUE(%SST(&TIME 1 2))
VAR(&MIN)
VALUE(%SST(&TIME 3 2))
VAR(&SEC)
VALUE(%SST(&TIME 5 2))
VAR(&END)
VALUE((&SEC) + (&MIN * 60) + +
(&HOUR * 3600))
CHGVAR
VAR(&RESULT) VALUE(&END - &START)
IF
COND(&RESULT < 0) THEN(CHGVAR VAR(&RESULT) +
VALUE(86400 + &RESULT)) /* Check for +
change of day. 86400 = 24 hours. */
IF
COND(&RESULT *GE &WAIT) THEN(PWRDWNSYS +
OPTION(*IMMED) /* uninterruptible power supply +
battery reserve has expired. */
CHGVAR
GOTO
ENDDO
ENDPGM:
VAR(&WAIT) VALUE(&WAIT - &RESULT) /* UPS +
battery reserve has not expired. */
CMDLBL(B)
DLCOBJ
ENDPGM
OBJ((&LIB/&MSGQ *MSGQ *EXCL))
Related tasks
“Implementing a power-handling program” on page 11
When an uninterruptible power supply is attached, you can use a power-handling program for a
system.
Related reference
“Example: Testing a power-handling CL program”
After a power-handling program has been created, you can test it by creating a simple CL program
that uses the Send Program Message (SNDPGMMSG) command and the Delay Job (DLYJOB)
command.
Example: Testing a power-handling CL program
After a power-handling program has been created, you can test it by creating a simple CL program that
uses the Send Program Message (SNDPGMMSG) command and the Delay Job (DLYJOB) command.
Set the DLY parameter value on the DLYJOB command to meet your testing needs.
Note: When testing an uninterruptible power supply program, commands such as PWRDWNSYS,
ENDJOB, and ENDSBS should be replaced with the SNDMSG command to indicate that the
command has run.
Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
17
SEQNBR*...+... 1 ...+... 2 ...+... 3 ...+... 4 ...+... 5 ...+... 6 ...+... 7....
1.00
PGM
2.00
DLYJOB
DLY(120) /* Wait for 2 minutes. */
3.00
SNDPGMMSG MSGID(CPF1816) MSGF(QCPFMSG) +
4.00
TOMSGQ(UPSLIB/UPSMSGQ) /* Power failure +
5.00
message. */
6.00
DLYJOB
DLY(5) /* Wait for 5 seconds. */
7.00
SNDPGMMSG MSGID(CPF1817) MSGF(QCPFMSG) +
8.00
TOMSGQ(UPSLIB/UPSMSGQ) /* Power restored +
9.00
message. */
10.00
ENDPGM
Figure 4. Testing a power-handling program example
Note: By using the code examples, you agree to the terms of the “Code license and disclaimer
information.”
Related tasks
“Example: Power-handling CL program” on page 14
The sample power-handling CL program can help you build your own program according to your
specific system requirements.
Code license and disclaimer information
IBM grants you a nonexclusive copyright license to use all programming code examples from which you
can generate similar function tailored to your own specific needs.
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PROGRAM DEVELOPERS AND SUPPLIERS MAKE NO WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS EITHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR
CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND
NON-INFRINGEMENT, REGARDING THE PROGRAM OR TECHNICAL SUPPORT, IF ANY.
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES IS IBM, ITS PROGRAM DEVELOPERS OR SUPPLIERS LIABLE FOR
ANY OF THE FOLLOWING, EVEN IF INFORMED OF THEIR POSSIBILITY:
1. LOSS OF, OR DAMAGE TO, DATA;
2. DIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR INDIRECT DAMAGES, OR FOR ANY ECONOMIC
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INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO SOME OR ALL OF THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS
OR EXCLUSIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
18
System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
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System i: Systems management Controlling system shutdown using a power-handling program
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