Sun Linux 5.0
User Guide
Copyright © 2002 Sun Microsystems, Inc. 4150 Network Circle, Santa Clara, California 95054, U.S.A. All rights reserved.
Sun Microsystems, Inc. has intellectual property rights relating to technology embodied in the product that is described in this document. In
particular, and without limitation, these intellectual property rights may include one or more of the U.S. patents listed at
http://www.sun.com/patents and one or more additional patents or pending patent applications in the U.S. and other countries.
This document and the product to which it pertains are distributed under licenses restricting their use, copying, distribution and decompilation, and
are for use only with this product. No part of the product or of this document may be reproduced in any form by any means without prior written
authorization of Sun and its licensors, if any.
Third-party software, including font technology, is copyrighted and licensed from Sun suppliers.
Parts of the product may be derived from Berkeley BSD systems, licensed from the University of California. UNIX is a registered trademark in the
U.S. and in other countries, exclusively licensed through X/Open Company, Ltd.
Sun, Sun Microsystems, the Sun logo, SunDocs, SunExpress, Java, JDK, Sun Cobalt, Sun Cobalt RaQ, Sun Cobalt Qube, Sun Cobalt CacheRaQ
and the Sun Cobalt logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States and other countries.
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Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds.
Federal Acquisitions: Commercial Software - Government Users Subject to Standard License Terms and Conditions.
DOCUMENTATION IS PROVIDED AS IS AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED CONDITIONS, REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES,
INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR NONINFRINGEMENT, ARE DISCLAIMED, EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THAT SUCH DISCLAIMERS ARE HELD TO BE LEGALLY INVALID.
Copyright ' 2002 Sun Microsystems, Inc. 4150 Network Circle, Santa Clara, California 95054, U.S.A. Tous droits r serv s.
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d pos e aux tats-Unis et dans d autres pays et licenci e exclusivement par X/Open Company, Ltd.
Sun, Sun Microsystems, le logo Sun, SunDocs, SunExpress, Java, JDK, Sun Cobalt, Sun Cobalt RaQ, Sun Cobalt Qube, Sun Cobalt CacheRaQ et
le logo Sun Cobalt sont des marques de fabrique ou des marques d pos es de Sun Microsystems, Inc. aux tats-Unis et dans d autres pays.
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Linux est une marque de fabrique de Linus Torvalds.
LA DOCUMENTATION EST FOURNIE EN L TAT ET TOUTES AUTRES CONDITIONS, D CLARATIONS ET GARANTIES
EXPRESSES OU TACITES SONT FORMELLEMENT EXCLUES, DANS LA MESURE AUTORIS E PAR LA LOI APPLICABLE, Y
COMPRIS NOTAMMENT TOUTE GARANTIE IMPLICITE RELATIVE ¸ LA QUALIT MARCHANDE, ¸ L APTITUDE ¸ UNE
UTILISATION PARTICULIØRE OU ¸ L ABSENCE DE CONTREFA ON.
Part Number / Num ro de pi ce :
816-5363-10 Rev A
Important Safeguards
For your protection, please read all these instructions regarding your Sun Cobalt™ LX50 server and retain for future
reference.
1. Safety Precautions
For your protection, observe the following safety precautions when setting up your equipment:
•
Follow all cautions and instructions marked on the equipment.
•
Ensure that the voltage and frequency of your power source match the voltage and frequency inscribed on the
equipment’s electrical rating label.
•
Never push objects of any kind through openings in the equipment. Dangerous voltages may be present.
Conductive foreign objects could produce a short circuit that could cause fire, electric shock or damage to your
equipment.
2. Symbols
The following symbols may appear in this book:
Caution: There is a risk of personal injury and equipment damage. Follow the instructions.
!
Warning: Hazardous voltages are present. To reduce the risk of electric shock and danger to
personal health, follow the instructions.
3. Power Source and Power Cords
Ensure that the voltage and frequency of your power source match the voltage and frequency inscribed on the
equipment’s electrical rating label.
Warning: Sun™ products are designed to work with single-phase power systems having a
grounded neutral conductor. To reduce the risk of electric shock, do not plug Sun products into
any other type of power system. Contact your facilities manager or a qualified electrician if you
are not sure what type of power is supplied to your building.
Warning: Not all power cords have the same current ratings. Household extension cords do not
have overload protection and are not meant for use with computer systems. Do not use
household extension with your Sun products.
Warning: Your Sun product is shipped with a grounding type (three-wire) power cord. To
reduce the risk of electric shock, always plug the cord into a grounded power outlet.
Warning: The power switch of this product functions as a standby type device only. The power
cord serves as the primary disconnect device for the system. Be sure to plug the power cord
into a grounded power outlet that is nearby the system and is readily accessible. Do not
connect the power cord when the power supply has been removed from the system chassis.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
iii
4. Lithium Battery
The lithium battery on the system board provides power for the real-time clock and CMOS RAM. The battery has an
estimated useful life expectancy of 5 to 10 years. If your system no longer keeps accurate time and date settings, it
may be time to change the battery. Contact Sun Microsystems™ , Inc. for service information.
Warning: Batteries may explode if mishandled or incorrectly replaced. Do not dispose of the
battery in fire. Do not disassemble it or attempt to recharge it. Replace only with the same or
equivalent type recommended by the equipment manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries
according to manufacturer’s instructions.
5. Electrical Shock
To reduce the risk of electrical shock, do not disassemble or tamper with the power supply assembly. Opening or
removing the power supply may expose you to dangerous voltage or other risks. Incorrect reassembly can cause
electric shock when this product is subsequently used.
6. Top Cover
You must remove the cover of your Sun server appliance to add cards, memory or internal storage devices. Be sure to
replace the top cover before powering on your generic noun for Product.
!
Caution: Do not operate Sun products without the top cover in place. Failure to take this
precaution may result in personal injury and system damage.
7. Modifications to equipment
Do not make mechanical or electrical modifications to the equipment. Sun Microsystems, Inc. is not responsible for
regulatory compliance of a modified Sun product.
8. Ventilation
The fan openings on the Sun Cobalt LX50 server are provided for ventilation and reliable operation of the product,
and to protect it from overheating. The openings must not be blocked or covered, and should be kept free of dust and
debris. Never place a Sun product near a radiator or heat register. Failure to follow these guidelines can cause
overheating and affect the reliability of your product
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server is designed to be a built-in installation, so adequate ventilation is required.
9. Placement of a Sun Product
!
!
iv
Caution: Do not block or cover the openings of your Sun product. Never place a Sun product
near a radiator or heat register. Failure to follow these guidelines can cause overheating and
affect the reliability of your Sun product.
Caution: The workplace-dependent noise level defined in DIN 45 635 Part 1000 must be
70Db(A) or less.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
10. SELV Compliance
Safety status of I/O connections comply to SELV requirements.
11. Regulations and Information
FCC Class A Notice
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
1.
This device may not cause harmful interference.
2.
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However,
there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
•
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
•
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for help.
Shielded Cables: Connections between the workstation and peripherals must be made using shielded cables in order
to maintain compliance with FCC radio frequency emission limits. Networking connections can be made using
unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cables.
Modifications: Any modifications made to this device that are not approved by Sun Microsystems, Inc. may void the
authority granted to the user by the FCC to operate this equipment.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Contents
Contents
Important Safeguards
iii
Figures
xi
Tables
xiii
Preface
xv
1 Introduction
1–1
Differences With Other Linux™ Distributions ....................................................... 1–1
Required Equipment for Sun Linux Restoration ..................................................... 1–1
Conventions Used in this Document ....................................................................... 1–2
Navigating Through the Setup Screens ................................................................... 1–2
Support and Reference Documentation .................................................................. 1–2
2 Hardware and Connectors
2–1
Connecting the Cables ............................................................................................ 2–3
Front-Panel Connectors ................................................................................... 2–3
Front RJ-45 Serial 2 Connector ................................................................ 2–3
USB Connectors ....................................................................................... 2–5
Rear Panel Connectors ..................................................................................... 2–5
RJ-45 NIC 1 and NIC 2 Connectors ......................................................... 2–5
AC Power Connector ................................................................................ 2–6
Rear Panel RJ-45 Serial 2 Connector ....................................................... 2–6
USB 3 and USB 4 Connectors .................................................................. 2–8
PS/2 Keyboard/Mouse Connector ............................................................ 2–8
SCSI Connector ........................................................................................ 2–8
Video Connector ....................................................................................... 2–9
Powering Up the Server for the First Time ............................................................. 2–9
Adding New Hardware ......................................................................................... 2–10
Adding a SCSI HDD ...................................................................................... 2–10
Adding a NIC Card ........................................................................................ 2–11
Configuring The Network with Kudzu .......................................................... 2–12
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Contents
3 Software Setup
3–1
Initial Software Setup ............................................................................................. 3–1
LILO ................................................................................................................ 3–1
Device Setup .................................................................................................... 3–1
Logging in and Creating a Password ............................................................... 3–2
Reconfiguring the Console .............................................................................. 3–2
System Settings ................................................................................................ 3–3
Date/Time ................................................................................................. 3–3
System Services ........................................................................................ 3–3
Server Configuration ....................................................................................... 3–3
DNS Configuration ................................................................................... 3–3
Apache Configuration .............................................................................. 3–3
Firewall Configuration ............................................................................. 3–3
X Configuration ............................................................................................... 3–4
Starting X .................................................................................................. 3–4
Setting Up Your X Windows Configuration ............................................ 3–4
Configure Default Services ...................................................................... 3–5
Sun™ Linux 5.0 Applications ......................................................................... 3–6
Setting Up Sun Linux 5.0 Applications ........................................................... 3–6
Sun ONE Active Server Pages ....................................................................... 3–7
Installing Sun ONE Active Server Pages ................................................. 3–8
Important Notes About Linux Installations ................................................... 3–13
Upgrading an Existing Installation ......................................................... 3–14
Uninstalling ............................................................................................ 3–15
Getting Started with Sun ONE Active Server Pages .............................. 3–16
Documentation ....................................................................................... 3–17
Sample ASP Applications ...................................................................... 3–18
The 10-Step Tour .................................................................................... 3–19
Diagnostics ............................................................................................. 3–19
Customer Support ................................................................................... 3–20
Sun Grid Engine ............................................................................................ 3–20
Installation .............................................................................................. 3–20
Sun™ Streaming Server ................................................................................ 3–21
Installing the RPM Package File ............................................................ 3–22
Starting Sun Streaming Server and Basic Server Operations ................. 3–23
Administration of the Sun Streaming Server .......................................... 3–23
Sun Streaming Server Error and Event Logs ......................................... 3–29
Sun Streaming Server GUI Software ..................................................... 3–31
Access and Error Logs ............................................................................ 3–32
JDK™/Tomcat ............................................................................................... 3–33
Installing the Java Developer Kit (JDK™) and Tomcat Java Server ..... 3–33
Tomcat Server Documentation ............................................................... 3–35
viii
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Contents
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM ................................................................... 3–36
Restore (Standard) ......................................................................................... 3–38
Restore (Custom) ........................................................................................... 3–40
Automatic Partitioning ............................................................................ 3–41
New Partition Setup ................................................................................ 3–43
Edit .......................................................................................................... 3–45
Delete ...................................................................................................... 3–45
Reset ....................................................................................................... 3–45
Make RAID ............................................................................................ 3–45
Manually Partitioning (With Disk Druid) ............................................... 3–46
Partitioning Using Fdisk ......................................................................... 3–46
Linux Rescue Without Restore ...................................................................... 3–47
Using a Remote Console (Monitor) Through a Serial Connection ................ 3–48
Disabling Serial Console Redirection ..................................................... 3–49
Administration ...................................................................................................... 3–50
Managing, Configuring and Validating Server Operation ............................. 3–50
Server Configuration and Management ......................................................... 3–50
Managing the System Event Log ............................................................ 3–51
Managing the Sensor Data Records ........................................................ 3–51
Managing the Field Replaceable Units ................................................... 3–52
Managing Platform Events ..................................................................... 3–52
Configuring Boot Devices ...................................................................... 3–52
Configuring Security .............................................................................. 3–53
Setting User Preferences ......................................................................... 3–53
Server Validation Testing .............................................................................. 3–53
Troubleshooting .................................................................................................... 3–54
Sun Linux Will Not Install from Local CD-ROM ......................................... 3–54
Serial Console Doesn't Work ......................................................................... 3–55
System Initialization Sequence Does Not Display on Remote
Console (Serial Connected) .................................................................... 3–55
startx Does Not Start the X Windows System ............................................... 3–55
Mouse/keyboard Do Not Work ...................................................................... 3–55
Error Messages ............................................................................................... 3–55
ERROR: 84FF:System Event Log Full .................................................. 3–55
System Reports That it Can't Detect a Modem ....................................... 3–55
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Contents
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Figures
Front Panel (bezel removed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
J6A2 Jumper Block Configured for DSR Signal (pin 7 connected to DSR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
J6A2 Jumper Block Configured for DCD Signal (pin 7 connected to DCD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
J6A2 Jumper Block Configured for DCD Signal (pin 7 connected to DCD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
Nautilus GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Tomcat Server Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-34
Boot Device Selection Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-36
Sun Linux Splash Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-37
About to Install Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-38
Installing Packages Progress Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-39
Disk Partitioning Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-40
Automatic Partitioning Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-41
Partitioning Warning Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42
Disk Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-42
New Partition Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-43
Partitioning Configuration Error Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
Partition Editing Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45
RAID Configuration Dialog Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-45
Rescue Installation Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47
Mount Completed Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-47
Rescue Mode Error Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-48
Service Partition Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51
System Utilities Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-51
Multiboot Add-in Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-52
Security Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-53
Platform Confidence Test Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-54
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Tables
Default Settings for the Sun Cobalt LX50 server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
RJ-45 Connector Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Front RJ-45 Serial 2 Port Adapter Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Back Serial 2 Port Adapter Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Applications Loaded On Drive (some require decompression and setup) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Standards Supported by Sun Streaming Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-21
Sun Streaming Server Directory and File Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-22
ismctl Basic Subcommands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
ismctl Server Values Modification Subcommands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-24
ismctl Subcommand Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
Subcommand Modifier Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-25
ismctl set Command Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-26
ismctl get Command Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-27
ismctl unset Command Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-28
Connection Log File Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29
Request Log File Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-29
Session Log File Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-30
Sun Streaming Server GUI Evaluation Software—Directories Created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-31
SSS GUI Administration Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-32
New Partition Configuration Selections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-44
Considerations for Serial Console Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-50
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Preface
This User Guide is for anyone who may need to install, set up and configure Sun Linux on the Sun Cobalt™
LX50 server, or perform a Linux™ rescue operation.
This guide consists of the following chapters:
Chapter 1 — “Introduction” includes an overview of the Sun Cobalt LX50 server and of this guide.
Chapter 2 — “Hardware and Connectors” explains the hardware and connectors on the the Sun Cobalt LX50 server.
Chapter 3 — “Software Setup” describes the procedures for configuring Sun Linux on the Sun Cobalt LX50 server.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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:
xvi
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Chapter 1
Introduction
This document describes the restore process for Sun™ Linux 5.0 on the Sun Cobalt™ LX50 server, and also provides
basic hardware and application setup procedures as a reference. The server comes complete with Sun Linux
pre-installed from the factory, but you may want to re-install or re-configure portions, or perform an emergency
restore in case of hard drive replacement. The procedures and information in this document will guide you through
the re-install/restore process.
The Sun Linux distribution is very similar to conventional, standard Linux™ distributions. The various bundled
applications, such as KDE, Gnome, Apache, and others are similar to other popular Linux distributions. The Sun
Linux installer automates many functions such as partitioning for an automatic, standard installation, or you can
choose to customize it yourself.
Otherwise, general Linux issues are the same as for standard, popular distributions. Linux issues such as access
hierarchy are the same.
Differences With Other Linux™ Distributions
A fundamental difference between Sun Linux 5.0 and other Linux distributions is that Sun Linux 5.0 is configured to
be specific to the Sun Cobalt LX50 server. Accordingly, the setup choices available during the installation process for
other distributions are not necessary and are not present for Sun Linux restore. You can go in later and make changes,
but the restore process is automatic (unless you decide to set up hard-drive partitions yourself) and default settings are
used by the installer.
Required Equipment for Sun Linux Restoration
•
Sun Cobalt LX50 server
•
Sun Cobalt LX50 Server User Guide (for complete hardware information)
•
Sun Linux restore CD ROMs
•
VGA Monitor
•
PS/2-type keyboard (mouse optional.1:2 adaptor required if keyboard and mouse are used), or
USB keyboard (mouse optional).
✍
•
Note: USB support is enabled only after Linux has been loaded. If a keyboard is required prior
to the OS and USB drivers being loaded, i.e., to alter BIOS options, then a PS/2 keyboard is
required.
RJ-45 to DB-9 adaptor for serial console connection to the Sun Cobalt LX50 server (optional)
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
1-1
Chapter 1: Introduction
Conventions Used in this Document
In this document, several conventions are used to indicate actions or designate item types:
•
The use of left and right arrow brackets to indicate a key. For example, <ENTER> for the Enter key.
•
Dashes are used to indicate a keyboard sequence, such as <CTRL>-<ALT>-<DELETE>
•
File locations are shown using the forward slash, such as /usr/local/zeus
•
Names of items listed on setup and install screens, either in list boxes or lists, are italicized, as in the Manually
partition with fdisk item in the Disk Partitioning Setup screen.
•
Filenames and application names are bolded, as in boot.img and Apache. Command line messages are also
bolded.
Navigating Through the Setup Screens
The setup screens and dialog boxes of this installation GUI have various combinations of command buttons, list
boxes and option lists. You can use the arrow keys on the keyboard to change between items, then press <ENTER> to
select, or click on them if you have installed a mouse. This document will assume you have installed a mouse, and
will refer to the action as clicking to mean either method.
Many of the setup screens have “Back” and “Next” command buttons located in the lower right corner. Typically you
make a selection somewhere on that screen, then click the “Next” button to proceed to the next screen. If you click on
the “Back” button, you will return to the previous screen(s).
Support and Reference Documentation
Sun Linux is comparable to other standard releases of Linux. You can access a support and documentation data base
for Sun Linux and other general Linux resources at the following URLs:
http://www.cobalt.com/support/
Sun Resource Center
http://www.tldp.org/
The Linux Documentation Project website
http://linuxtoday.com/
The Complete Linux Guide
http://www.linuxhq.com/
Linux Headquarters
A Web search will readily bring up many other online sources for Linux FAQs, tips, and help on working with
Linux-based applications.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Chapter 2
Hardware and Connectors
This chapter explains the hardware and connectors on the the Sun Cobalt™ LX50 server.
To set up the Sun Cobalt LX50 server, use the following procedure:
•
Add any extra hardware, such as NIC cards to the server (refer to the Sun Cobalt LX50 Server User Guide for
more information on ports and cabling).
•
Install the brackets or slide rails (for your particular rack mount).
•
Connect a VGA monitor (back panel).
•
Connect a PS/2 keyboard and mouse, or a USB keyboard and mouse.
✍
Note: USB support is enabled only after Linux™ has been loaded. If a keyboard is required
prior to the OS and USB drivers being loaded, i.e., to alter BIOS options, then a PS/2 keyboard
is required.
The PS/2 mouse and keyboard use the back-panel PS/2 connector plus a 1:2 divider dongle.
The USB keyboard and mouse plug into the two front-panel USB ports. Front-panel USB
support is BIOS-enabled by default.
•
Connect a serial cable to the serial (RJ-45) connector on the front panel or to the RJ-45 serial comnector on the
back panel.
•
Connect a network cable to the RJ-45 NIC connector on the back panel.
•
Set up X Options.
Table 1 lists the default configuration settings for the Sun Cobalt LX50 server.
Table 1. Default Settings for the Sun Cobalt LX50 server
Item
Default Setting
System Time:
Set to time server at factory
System Date:
Set to time server at factory
Floppy A:
1.44 MB
Hard Disk Pre-delay:
Disabled
Primary IDE Master:
CD-ROM (set to PIO Mode 4)
Primary IDE Slave:
Not Installed
Processor settings
Processor Type:
Intel(R) Pentium(R) III
Processor Post Speed:
Current processor speed (1.20 GHz)
Processor Retest:
Disabled
Processor 1 CPUID:
Current processor
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 2: Hardware and Connectors
Table 1. Default Settings for the Sun Cobalt LX50 server (Continued)
Item
Default Setting
Processor 1 L2 Cache
Current processor
Processor 2 CPUID:
Current processor
Processor 2 L2 Cache:
Current processor
Language:
English
PCI Configuration
USB Function
Disabled prior to OS loading.
Onboard NIC 1
Enabled
Onboard NIC 2
Enabled
Onboard SCSI
Enabled
Onboard Video
Enabled
PCI SLOT 1B ROM
Enabled
PCI SLOT 1C ROM
Enabled
Peripheral Configuration
Serial Port1 Address
3F8
Serial Port1 IRQ
4
Serial Port2 Address
2F8
Serial Port2 IRQ
3
Diskette Controller
Enabled
Legacy USB Support
Disabled
Front Panel USB
Enabled
Serial Port1 Address
3F8
Serial Port1 IRQ
3
Memory Configuration
Extended Memory Test
1 MByte
Bank #1
Reflects either installed or not installed depending on configuration
Bank #2
Reflects either installed or not installed depending on configuration
Bank #3
Reflects either installed or not installed depending on configuration
Memory Retest
Disabled
2-2
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Connecting the Cables
Connecting the Cables
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server has a number of connectors. Some are on the front panel; others are located on the rear
panel. This section summarizes the usage of each connector.
Front-Panel Connectors
To access the front-panel connectors when a front bezel is installed, grasp the bezel on the right side at the finger hole
and gently pull it towards you, unhinging it at the left until it unsnaps from the chassis. Figure 1 shows the front of the
server with the bezel removed.
Figure 1. Front Panel (bezel removed)
There are three connectors on the front panel:
•
Front RJ-45 Serial 2 connector
•
USB 1 connector
•
USB 2 connector
Front RJ-45 Serial 2 Connector
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server provides two common external RJ-45 serial ports, one located on the back of the system
and the other located on the front panel.
The use of RJ-45 connectors for the serial interface is widely becoming a standard for use in the high-density server
market. The intended usage model for the RJ-45 serial connector, on the back of the system, is for use as an interface
to a serial port concentrator allowing for remote access to the server’s Emergency Management Port (EMP). The
serial connector on the front panel can be used as a direct connect to the EMP, allowing for PC-to-PC serial
communications to diagnostics on a server mounted in a rack environment.
Table 2. RJ-45 Connector Usage
Mode
Front
Back
Modem
No
Yes
Serial Concentrator
No
Yes
PC to PC communication
Yes
Yes
Both serial connectors cannot be used at the same time. Logic on the server baseboard determines which connector is
in use.
If the front serial port is in use, the rear panel is automatically disabled. When the front panel serial port connection is
removed, the system automatically re-enables the rear serial port.
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Chapter 2: Hardware and Connectors
The front RJ-45 usage model is intended for PC-to-PC serial communication only. It shares common serial signals
with the RJ-45 serial port, located on the back of the system. However, it will not support a modem as there is no RI
signal. Instead it sets pin #5 to ground, causing logic on the baseboard to disable the rear serial port when a cable or
adapter is plugged into it.
For a direct connect or PC-to-PC serial communication, either an 8-pin RJ45-to-DB9 adapter or a cable supporting
both DB-9 and RJ-45 connectors will be necessary.
Table 3 provides a pinout for the front RJ45-to-DB9 adapter or cable.
Table 3. Front RJ-45 Serial 2 Port Adapter Pinout
Signal Name
RJ-45
DB-9
No connect
N/A
1
SIN
6
2
SOUT
3
3
DTR
2
4
GRND
4
5a
DSR
7
6
RTS
1
7
CTS
8
8
RIN
5
5a
No connect
9
a. The use of a modem on this port cannot be supported due to the lack of an RI signal.
✍
Note: Sun Microsystems offers an accessory kit (order number X5026A) that you can
purchase; the kit contains three RJ45-to-DB9 adapters that can be plugged into the front or rear
EMP connectors.
The cables are:
2-4
•
DSR Peripherals cable (for rear data set ready (DSR) peripherals
•
DCD Modem cable (for rear data carrier detect (DCD) modem)
•
Front EMP cable (for front Emergency Management Port)
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Connecting the Cables
USB Connectors
The USB 1 and USB 2 connectors provide USB functionality. All ports function with identical capabilities and with
the same bandwidth. The industry-standard USB v1.1 specification defines the external connectors.
Rear Panel Connectors
There are 9 connectors on the rear panel; see Figure 2.
•
RJ-45 NIC 2 connector
•
AC Power connector
•
USB 3 connector
•
Back RJ-45 Serial 2 connector (ttyS1)
•
PS2 mouse/keyboard connector
•
RJ-45 NIC 1 connector
•
SCSI connector (SCSI version only)
•
Video connector
•
USB 4 connector
Figure 2. Rear Panel
RJ-45 NIC 1 and NIC 2 Connectors
The server supports two 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX Network Interface Controllers (NICs). The NIC interfaces support
the following features:
•
Glueless 32-bit PCI, CardBus master interface (Direct Drive of Bus), compatible with PCI local Bus
Specification, Revision 2.2.
•
Integrated IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX compatible PHY.
•
IEEE 820.3u auto-negotiation support.
•
Full-duplex support at both 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps operation.
•
Both ports are PXE Boot capable
•
Low power +3.3 V device (Wake-On-LAN support on both rear panel Ethernet ports).
The two NICs drive LEDs located on each network interface connector. The amber LED indicates a network
connection when on, and transmit/receive activity when blinking. The green LED indicates 100-Mbps operation
when lit, and 10-Mbps when off.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
2-5
Chapter 2: Hardware and Connectors
AC Power Connector
This connector is where you plug in the AC power cord.
Warning: Do not attempt to modify or use the supplied AC power cord if it is not the exact
type required.
The power supply cord is the main disconnect to AC power. The socket outlet must be installed
near the equipment and readily accessible.
If the power cord supplied with the system is not compatible with the AC wall outlet in your region, use only one that
meets the following criteria:
•
The cord must be rated for the available AC voltage and have a current rating that is at least 125% of the current
rating of the server.
•
The plug on the power cord that plugs into the wall outlet must be a grounding-type male plug designed for use
in your region. It must have certification marks showing certification by an agency acceptable in your region.
•
The connector that plugs into the AC receptacle on the power supply must be an IEC 320, sheet C13, type female
connector.
•
In Europe, the cord must be less than 4.5 meters (14.76 feet) long, and it must be flexible <HAR> (harmonized)
or VDE-certified cordage to comply with the chassis’ safety certifications.
Rear Panel RJ-45 Serial 2 Connector
The intended use for the RJ-45 serial port, located in the back of the system, is for remote EMP communication by
connecting the port to a serial terminal concentrator. With an optional RJ45-to-DB9 adapter, the serial port can also
be configured for use with a modem. The rear serial port is traditionally referred to as COM2 (DOS, Windows), or
ttyS1 (Linux).
Serial terminal concentrators use one of two serial communication standards. Some terminal concentrators require a
Data Carrier Detect (DCD) signal, while others require a DSR signal. The server baseboard can be configured to
support either of these configurations by setting the appropriate jumper on the jumper block, located directly behind
the RJ-45 serial connector on the baseboard.
The back RJ-45 Serial 2 port can support any standard serial device. An RJ-45 connector was selected to allow for
direct support for serial port concentrators, which typically use RJ-45 connectors and are widely used in the highdensity server market to access the server management features of the server.
To give support for either of two serial configuration standards used by serial port concentrators, the J6A2 jumper
block, located on the baseboard inside the server directly behind the rear RJ-45 serial port, must be jumpered
appropriately according to which standard is desired.
✍
Note: By default, as configured in the factory, the server baseboard has the back RJ-45 serial
port configured to support a DSR signal which is compatible with the Cisco standard.
For serial devices that require a DSR signal (default), the J6A2 jumper block must be configured as follows: the DSR
jumper in position 1 and 2, and the DCD jumper in position 1 and 2. Pin 1, on the jumper, is denoted by an arrow
directly next to the jumper block (seeFigure 3).
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Connecting the Cables
Figure 3. J6A2 Jumper Block Configured for DSR Signal (pin 7 connected to DSR)
For serial devices that require a DCD signal, the J6A2 jumper block must be configured as follows: The DCD jumper
in position 2 and 3, and the DSR jumper in position 2 and 3. Pin 1, on the jumper, is denoted by an arrow directly next
to the jumper block. The jumper block pinout for this configuration is shown in Figure 4.
Figure 4. J6A2 Jumper Block Configured for DCD Signal (pin 7 connected to DCD)
For those serial devices that require a DB-9 type of serial connector, an 8-pin RJ45-to-DB9 adapter must be used.
Table 4 provides the pinout required for the adapter to provide RS232 support.
Table 4. Back Serial 2 Port Adapter Pinout
RJ-45
Signal
Abbr.
DB-9
1
Request to Send
RTS
7
2
Data Terminal Ready
DTR
4
3
Transmitted Data
TD
3
4
Signal Ground
SGND
5
5
Ring Indicator
RI
9
6
Received Data
RD
2
7
DCD or DSR
DCD/DSR
1 or 6a
8
Clear To Send
CTS
8
a. The RJ45-to-DB9 adapter used should match both the signal requirements of the serial device and the
external RJ-45 serial port. The external RJ-45 serial port provides all standard serial port signals, however
having only 8 pins, Pin #7 can be manually configured to support either a DCD or DSR signal by setting the
J6A2 jumper block appropriately.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 2: Hardware and Connectors
For systems configured with both a front and back RJ-45 serial connectors, the adapters used for the back connector
cannot be used with the front connector, as the pinout for both RJ-45 ports are different.
Usage Example: When using an external modem to access the server management features of the server baseboard,
you must first set the J6A2 jumper to support a DCD signal and make or choose the appropriate RJ-45-to-DB9
adapter (see Figure 5).
Figure 5. J6A2 Jumper Block Configured for DCD Signal (pin 7 connected to DCD)
If you choose to develop your own RJ-45-to-DB9 adapter, see Table 4 for the appropriate pinout configuration.
✍
Note:
•
Only the back Serial 2 port has modem support
•
Sun provides an accessory kit (order number X5026A) that can be purchased that contains
all three RJ45-to-DB9 adapters:
•
DSR Peripherals cable (for rear data set ready (DSR) peripherals
•
DCD Modem cable (for rear data carrier detect (DCD) modem)
•
Front EMP cable (for front Emergency Management Port)
USB 3 and USB 4 Connectors
The USB 3 and USB 4 connectors provide USB functionality. All ports function with identical capabilities and with
the same bandwidth. The industry-standard USB v1.1 specification defines the external connectors.
PS/2 Keyboard/Mouse Connector
A single PS/2 port located on the back panel is provided to support a standard keyboard or mouse. A PS/2 Y-cable
adapter is provided with the system to allow simultaneous use of the PS/2 keyboard and mouse.
SCSI Connector
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server includes an onboard Adaptec dual channel Ultra-160 SCSI controller (AIC-7899W)
capable of controlling up to three internally mounted SCSI drives and 15 external SCSI drives at rates up to
160 MB/s. The onboard SCSI controller is connected to a SCSI backplane board inside the server using a 68-pin
SCSI cable. The SCSI backplane provides connections for up to three internally mounted SCA LVDS SCSI drives
with standard 80-pin SCA connectors. Channel B is used exclusively by internal drives while channel A is used for
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Powering Up the Server for the First Time
connecting to external SCSI devices by means of a rear panel high-density SCSI connector. The connector supports a
standard high-density 68-pin connector. Use only shielded Ultra-160 LVDS rated cables for connection to external
SCSI chassis
Caution: If for any reason you open the Server enclosure and access the hard drives or the CD/
FDD module, never hot swap them. The system must be shut down and powered down before
removing or replacing the HDDs or the CD/FDD module.
Video Connector
The server board provides an ATI Rage XL PCI graphics accelerator, along with 8 MB of video SDRAM and support
circuitry for an embedded SVGA video subsystem. The SVGA subsystem supports a variety of modes, up to
1600 x 1200 resolution in 8/16/24/32 bpp modes under 2D, and up to 1024 x 768 resolution in 8/16/24/32 bpp modes
under 3D. It also supports both CRT and LCD monitors up to 100 Hz vertical refresh rate. All of these capabilities
depend on software support.
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server provides a standard 15-pin VGA connector and supports disabling of the on-board video
through the BIOS Setup menu or when a plug-in video card is installed in any of the PCI slots.
Powering Up the Server for the First Time
Before turning your Sun Cobalt LX50 server on for the first time be sure that you have plugged in the following
items:
1.
Power cable.
2.
VGA monitor.
3.
Connect a PS/2 keyboard and mouse, or a USB keyboard and mouse. See the beginning of this chapter for details
about keyboard and mouse connectivity.
4.
An Ethernet cable attached to the RJ-45 Ethernet port [1] located in the back of machine. You may also plug a
cable into the RJ-45 Ethernet port [2] at this time if it will be also be used. See Figure 2 on page 2-5 for the
locations of these ports and refer to the section “RJ-45 NIC 1 and NIC 2 Connectors” on page 2-5. for more
information about these connectors.
Optional Items
•
Serial Cable - Please refer to the sections in this docment on setting up the serial console. The serial cable is
plugged into the server rear panel next to the PS2 connecter.
•
Additional Network cards
5. Turn on the monitor and power on your system. There may approximately a 15 second delay before something
appears on the screen. The LILO: prompt (Linux Loader) will display after the system runs through its initial
setup (see “LILO” on page 3-1 for more information about the Linux loader). Press <RETURN> on the keyboard
to enable the default system, or use the <Tab> key to see other startup options. Pressing <ENTER> will allow the
system to begin loading. If you are setting up via serial console, type in "linux-serial" so that the setup options
get redirected to the serial console.
The system will run a utility called kudzu to set up your ethernet ports and initial network settings. If you don't
respond to this utility within about 30 seconds, it will time out and continue loading your system without configuring
your network. Should this happen, you can run kudzu from the command line after you have logged in and changed
your password. Hit <ENTER> to continue at this screen.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 2: Hardware and Connectors
Adding New Hardware
Adding a SCSI HDD
When adding a scsi disk, you must modify the LILO configuration file to change the sda -> sdx renumbering. This is
done in boot=/dev/sda section of /etc/lilo.conf.
Caution: Once you have modified the LILO configuration file for an additional HDD, do not
run LILO until the additional disk has been physically added to the server.
First make a note of how many hard disks are already installed, how many are to be added, and where you wish to add
additional drives. SCSI drives can be added in two ways:
1.
From the front panel area by removing the combo CD/floppy module.
2.
From the rear through the use of a high-density SCSI connector.
If you add a SCSI drive to the rear, you will need to make some changes to your system before installation as Linux
will renumber the drives in the front of the unit to follow the drives in the rear:
3. Edit /etc/fstab and change /dev/sda and /dev/sdb (if it exists) to accomodate adding the additional drives. here are
some examples:
a) existing two drives (sda and sdb) -> added 3 drives. re-label sda to sdd and sdb to sde.
b) single drive -> added 1 drive. re-label sda to sdb.
4. Shut down the system and attach the additional storage.
5.
Reboot.
6.
Once the system starts booting, go to the Adaptec BIOS screen. Select Configure/View Host Adapter Settings,
and then Boot Device Options. On this screen, verify that the Boot Channel option says “A” First. “A” is the
external SCSI bus adapter which has its connector on the rear. This is the default configuration for the server. If
your Adaptec BIOS is set to the factory default settings, you may skip this step.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Adding New Hardware
Adding a NIC Card
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server supports the following two Ethernet cards:
•
Intel Pro/100 dual-10/100BaseT adapter
•
Intel Pro/1000XT 10/100/1000BaseT adapter
To ensure proper functionality when installing these adapters, please note the following:
The dual-10/100BaseT adapter will re-order your Ethernet ports so that its ports will logically appear before the onboard Ethernet devices (i.e., eth0 becomes eth2 and eth1 becomes eth3). You will need to move your Ethernet cables
to the dual-nic card to restore your network settings.
Kudzu will identify the Intel Gigabit adapter, but it will not configure it properly. The gigabit adapter will be installed
as eth2, but kudzu will attempt to configure eth0 instead. To prevent this from happening, do not configure the
networking setup of the gigabit adapter from within kudzu. Instead, do the following:
1.
Copy /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 to /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth2
2.
Edit ifcfg-eth2 and change the DEVICE to refer to eth2 instead of eth0.
3.
Set up networking parameters to match your desired configuration:
4.
BOOTPROTO=dhcp sets up the Ethernet device to use DHCP
5.
Set up a static IP address by adding the following fields instead:
IPADDR=<ip address>
NETMASK=<netmask in the form of 255.255.0.0>
NETWORK=<network in the form of x.y.0.0>
BROADCAST=<broadcast address in the form of x.y.255.255>
BOOTPROTO=static
6.
Specify ONBOOT=yes if you wish the network device to come up on boot.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 2: Hardware and Connectors
Configuring The Network with Kudzu
Harware configuration files are stored in /etc/sysconfig/hwconf
1. The following information will be displayed:
The following network card has been added to your system:
Intel Corporation:82557 [Ethernet Pro 100]
You can now choose to:
1.
Configure the device.
2.
Ignore the device. If you chose this, then no configuration will be added, but you will not be prompted if the
device is detected on subsequent reboots.
3.
Do nothing. In this case, no configuration will be added. and the device will show up as new if it is detected on
subsequent reboots. Go ahead and tab to highlight Configure, then presss <ENTER> to continue.
You will see a brief message about the system configuring the card. You will then be asked if you would like to set up
networking for this adapter. Use the <TAB> key to highlight Yes and press <RETURN>. If you are on a network with
a DHCP server, you can just press the spacebar to check that box, and the system will fill in the other values for you
after querying your DHCP server. You can also setup your static values here if you know what they are. Use the
<TAB> key to move from field to field on this screen.
Example Network Settings
[ ] Use dynamic IP configuration (BOOTP/DHCP)
IP address:
Netmask:
Default gateway (IP):
Primary nameserver:
192.168.100.100
255.255.255.0
192.168.100.1
192.168.100.2
Use the <TAB> key to highlight Ok and press <RETURN> once you have the entered the correct values. You will
then see that the system has detected a second Ethernet port and will prompt you if you want set this up. Go ahead and
set this as described in Sep1 above.
4. The final step is to configure networking for this port as was done in Step 2 above.
!
Important: If you configure this port to DHCP and you reboot the system without an Ethernet
cable plugged in, the system will hang temporarily. Skip setting up networking for this port if
you will not be using it right now. You can go into the UI and set this up later if necesary.
If you have installed additional network cards you will be asked to configure those too.
The system will now continue loading and eventually display the login prompt.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Chapter 3
Software Setup
This chapter describes the procedures for configuring Sun™ Linux on the Sun Cobalt™ LX50 server.
Initial Software Setup
Sun Linux is loaded on the hard drive of the Sun Cobalt LX50 server from the factory. All packages included with
your system are available without any additional media loading. However, in some cases, the devices or software
packages require some combination of installation or configuration.
The following sections of this manual will guide you through these steps.
The BIOS options of the Sun Cobalt LX50 server are listed at the start of Chapter 1.
LILO
LILO (Linux™ Loader) is configured by default to start automatically. When the server boots, the LILO boot loader
will present you with a prompt that will allow you to select different kernel boot options. When LILO first executes, it
prompts you with:
LILO:
This prompt is output to both the display and the serial port console (if used).
Regardless of the kernel selected, both the display and the serial port receive the kernel boot messages. However,
initialization scripts and some other output are directed to the primary console only. Once the system is fully
initialized, both the serial and display operate as separate login terminals in all configurations.
You may enter the <TAB> key to see a list of choices, or enter one of the choices below.
•
linux. Boot the default Sun Linux kernel. If no string is entered at the LILO: prompt, after five seconds this
option is selected. This kernel is a full-featured SMP kernel configuration. The primary console is the display and
keyboard.
•
linux-serial This boots the same kernel and configuration, but the serial port is the primary console, and so has
all relevant output.
•
linux-up. This is the same as the ‘linux’ option, except that a different kernel which does not support SMP is
booted. This may be useful if multi-processor hardware, or SMP kernel or driver issues are a concern.
•
linux-up-serial. The same as linux-up, except with the serial port as the primary console device.
Device Setup
During the first boot of the Server, or first reboot after an OS Restore operation, some devices will need to be set up.
During the initialization scripts, Sun Linux runs the Kudzu program for this operation.
Kudzu will ask about each device, in turn, that is present on the system and is not yet configured.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
At a minimum, it will ask about configuring the Ethernet devices. It will present eth0 and then eth1, asking for each:
* Would you like to configure this network adapter?
If you say yes, it will create a configuration file for the adapter in the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/
directory. For Ethernet adapter 0, it creates ifcfg-eth0, and for adapter 1 ifcfg-eth1. The contents will be derived
from the questions Kudzu asks next:
[ ] Use dynamic IP configuration (BOOTP/DHCP)
IP address:
Netmask:
____________
____________
Default gateway (IP): ____________
Primary nameserver: ____________
Get the information from your network administrator, type it in, and hit [OK]. This will save the configuration you
specify.
Logging in and Creating a Password
The first time you start up the Sun Cobalt LX50 server, or after a restore of Sun Linux, you will have to log in and
then immediately change the password. The initial login is root, the initial password is admin.
Upon initial login, the following message is displayed:’
You are required to change your password immediately (root enforced). Changing password for
root. (current) UNIX password:
Type in admin again; at the prompt, type in your new password and enter. If it is accepted, you will be prompted to
enter it a second time. You will then be logged in at the root level:
[root@localhost root]#
Reconfiguring the Console
A textmode system setup utility can be used for basic setup for the following items by typing “setup” as root from the
command line. This is handy since you can be remotely telnetted in to run this or also via serial console, although the
features are womewhat limited. The following item can be configured by using this setup utility:
•
Authentication configuration
•
Firewall configuration
•
Keyboard configuration
•
Mouse configuration
•
Network configuration (first port only so use UI if you need to configure more ports)
•
Printer configuration
•
System services (sets which services start automatically - on NEXT boot)
•
Sound card configuration (no sound card included on system)
•
Timezone configuration (use the UI utility if you need more setup)
Lets go into the UI to see where we can setup these things there by typing “startx”. The default desktop environment
is the Gnome desktop. A Start Here window should automatically open with all your basic system setup utilities.
These utilities are fairly self-explainatory. If you do not see the Start Here window, double-click the Start Here icon
on the desktop.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
System Settings
This section describes the system settings that can be configured.
Date/Time
From the Start Here window click System Settings and then click Date/Time Properties to configure system date and
time. Click Apply once you have set all the proper info here. Don't forget to also set up your timezone.
System Services
From the Start Here window click System Settings and then click Service Configuration to setup the services you
wish to start when the system starts. If you make a lot of changes as to what you want to start its easiest to just reboot
once you have things setup the way you want.
Some services can be started through the interface by hitting the start button if it highlightes when you enble a
service. Click save when you are done here.
✍
Note: Enabling a service does not automatically start it.
Server Configuration
This section describes the server configuration settings.
DNS Configuration
From the Start Here window, click Server Configuration and then click DNS Configure to configure your system's
DNS.
Apache Configuration
From the Start Here window, click Server Configuration and then click Apache Configuration to configure your
Apache Web server. Sun Linux 5.0 comes with Apache 1.3.22 installed.
You can also navigate the system via the system menus. Click on the foot icon on the lower left part of the screen to
get access the system menus.
Firewall Configuration
Click Foot->Programs->System->firewall-config to configure your firewall.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
X Configuration
Starting X
After you have logged in at the root level, type startx at the prompt Gnome and the Nautilus GUI will be loaded
(Figure 6). Additionally, you can enable X to start by default by either setting up X (see below) or editing the default
run level in /etc/inittab to be 5.
Figure 6. Nautilus GUI
Setting Up Your X Windows Configuration
Your system comes pre-configured to run at 800x600 16bpp with a ps/2 mouse. If you wish to modify these settings,
you will need to run the setup program. .
✍
Note: If you wish to reconfigure your X Windows configuration, you must do it from the
command line.
1.
From the command line, as root, type “setup” and to display the Text Mode Setup Utility.
2.
Select X configuration to begin the video configuration process. The Welcome screen will be displayed.Press
<ENTER> to continue once you have carefully read the informtion.
3.
The system will probe for a video card and display the results. Use <TAB> to highlight Ok and press <ENTER>
to continue.
4.
Select a monitor from the list that matches your monitor, then press <TAB> to highlight Ok and press <ENTER>
to continue. If your monitor is not in this list you may need to select Custom and define your monitor's
characteristics manually.You will need to refer to your monitor's manual for that information.
5.
Select how much memory the video board has from the list. Select 8MB and then use <TAB> to highlight Ok.
Press <RETURN> to continue.
6.
Select No Clockchip Setting (recommended) then press <TAB> to highlight Ok and press <ENTER>.
7.
Use the <TAB> and <SPACEBAR> keys to select the video mode(s) you need. Use <TAB> to highlight OK and
press <ENTER> once you have finished selecting. The Sun Cobalt LX50 server is capable of 24bbp with a
resolution of 1600x1200, although monitor may not be capable of using these settings.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
8.
A window will now display to inform you that the system will now test your configuration. Press <ENTER> to
begin the test or use <TAB> to Skip and then press <RETURN> return if you don't want to run the test. It is
strongly recommended that you do run the test.
9.
If you can see the Sun Linux image on this screen ,you can click Yes if it look satisfactory. You can click No to go
back and make any changes. This screen will also timeout after 10 seconds and let you go back and try new
settings. There may also instances when it cannot even get to the video mode, in which case an error message
will then be displayed. If this happens, press <ENTER> to go back and try again.
10. You can now choose if you want the system to automatically start in graphic mode when the system boots. Click
Yes or No.
11. A message is now displayed telling you that the new configuration has been saved and the location where it was
saved to.
12. Click OK and X has now been set up.
13. Use <Tab> to Quit, and press <RETURN> to exit the Text Mode Utility.
Configure Default Services
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server ships with a few default services enabled that allow the system to function right out of
the box. Each of the enabled services is listed below with information concerning general configuration to these
services.
INETD
Inetd is a service that allows for dynamically starting services rather than having them running in a daemon mode. For
example, instead of having an ftp server listening on port 21 all the time for connections, inetd (when properly
configured) will listen on port 21 and start up the ftp server for the connection. Sun Linux uses a version of inetd
called xinetd, which is a more configurable version of inetd. A sample configuration file for the ftp service would look
like this:
service ftp
{
socket_type
port
wait
user
server
server_args
disable
}
= stream
= 21
= no
= root
= /usr/sbin/in.ftpd
= -l -a
= no
This file should reside in /etc/xinetd.d. When xinetd is started, it will read all the files in that directory and make the
appropriate connection available. When you make changes to these files, you must restart xinetd by running
'/etc/init.d/xinetd restart'.
PORTMAP
Portmap is a server that tells Remote Procedure Call (RPC) programs what port number they are listening and what
RPC calls the server can process. It must be running in order to make RPC calls. When a client wishes to make an
RPC call to a given program number, it will first contact portmap on the server machine to determine the port number
where RPC packets should be sent.
Portmap must be started before any RPC servers are invoked
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
SSHD
Sshd is the secure shell daemon program that allows for interactive shell sessions over an encrypted channel.
Programs like telnet and ftp use clear text to communicate making your sessions susceptible to being snooped by
other users allowing them obtain sensitive information. The ssh daemon on the LX50 supports both ssh protocol 1
and 2 for compatibility with most ssh client software.
SENDMAIL
Sendmail is a mail transfer agent. It sends a message to one or more recipients through the network connection.
Sendmail also delivers mail to the users on the local system. Sendmail does not provide services such as pop3 or
imap, only the ability transfer mail from one server to another. It can be configured by many different methods, the
most popular being m4. The m4 configuration file for sendmail is located in /usr/share/sendmail-cf/ostype/linux.m4.
By reading /usr/share/doc/sendmail/README.cf, you get a good overview of how to configure sendmail via m4.
✍
Note: Sendmail is set up by default to allow local access only. You will need to reconfigure it to
remove this restriction if you wish to use your system as a mail server.
Sun™ Linux 5.0 Applications
In adddition to the Linux OS and its associated applications, Sun Linux 5.0 has some additional functions that are
loaded onto the server hard drive by the Restore process. Table 5 lists them. They are discussed in more detail in
following sections.
Table 5. Applications Loaded On Drive (some require decompression and setup)
Package
Version
Sun Grid Engine
5.2.3.1
Sun Open Network Environment (Sun ONE)
Active Server Pages
3.6.2
Sun Streaming Server including UI
1.0
MySQL*
3.23.41
Wu-FTPD*
2.6.1
Apache Web Server*
1.3.22
Java 2 Standard Edition SDK
1.4
Tomcat
3.2.1
Setting Up Sun Linux 5.0 Applications
These applications are installed into the root directory, in the path /opt/SunApps/. Some are installed as tar files, and
others in RPM format. You must either untar them and install, or install via rpm then set them up for use.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Sun ONE Active Server Pages
✍
Note: This software was formerly known as Chili!Soft Active Server Pages (ASP). The version
on the Sun Cobalt LX50 server is Chili!Soft ASP v3.6.2.
This section provides system requirements, installation instructions, and basic information about getting started with
Sun Open Net Environment (Sun ONE) Active Server Pages.
Detailed information about configuring, managing, and using Sun ONE Active Server Pages can be found in the
product documentation for Sun ONE Active Server Pages. Application notes and the latest information about this
release is also provided in the Sun ONE Active Server Pages README file. You should review the README file
before proceeding with your installation. The README file can be found in the same directory as this QuickStart
Guide. The README file can also be found on the Sun ONE Active Server Pages Web site at:
http://www.chilisoft.com/caspdoc
ODBC drivers are installed automatically by the Sun ONE Active Server Pages setup program. Following installation,
you must configure the drivers for the data sources being used. For more information, see “Configuring a Database”
in “Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” in the product documentation. For information about accessing the
product documentation, see “Documentation” on page 3-17 of this guide.
✍
Note: To provide remote database connectivity with Microsoft Access and Microsoft SQL
Server 6.5 databases, Sun ONE Active Server Pages includes the client portion of the
DataDirect SequeLink 4.51a software.
On the Windows machine that contains your database, you also must download and install the
server portion of this software from Sun Microsystems.
For more information, see “Configuring SequeLink” in the product documentation
(“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Configuring a Database”).
Java™ Runtime Environment
Sun ONE Active Server Pages includes the Java™ runtime environment (JRE) 1.3.1 for Sun Chili!Beans. While JREs
1.2.x and 1.3.x are supported, and the Java 2 runtime environment can also be used, the use of JRE 1.3.1 is strongly
recommended. Chili!Beans enables you to use Java class files as components called from VBScript or JScript. To use
Chili!Beans, a Java runtime environment must be installed on the machine, and Chili!Beans must be enabled from the
Administration Console. For more information, see “Chili!Beans Component Reference” in “Chapter 5: Developer’s
Reference” in the product documentation.
Microsoft FrontPage 2002 Server Extensions
Sun ONE Active Server Pages enables you to run active server pages generated by Microsoft FrontPage. Microsoft
FrontPage Server Extensions provide services to the Web server that work in conjunction with Sun ONE Active
Server Pages to provide FrontPage functionality to computers not running Microsoft Windows NT or Windows 2000
and Internet Information Services (IIS). FrontPage Server Extensions are no longer installed with Sun ONE Active
Server Pages; you must obtain them from Microsoft.
For more information, see “Enabling FrontPage Publishing” in “Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” in the
product documentation.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Installing Sun ONE Active Server Pages
The setup program takes you through the steps required to install Sun ONE Active Server Pages on Sun Linux 5.0. As
you perform the installation, you have many options to accept default configuration settings or to specify your own.
The setup program installs the following components on the target server:
1.
Sun ONE Active Server Pages server
2.
Sun ONE Active Server Pages Administration Console
3.
Sun Chili!Beans support (the use of Chili!Beans is optional). Sun ONE Active Server Pages includes Java
runtime environment 1.3.1. The use of this specific JRE version is not required, but is strongly recommended.
4.
Sun SpicePack components
5.
Apache Web Server 1.3.19 DSO (“bundled” with Sun ONE Active Server Pages)
✍
Note: If you are upgrading an existing installation of Sun ONE Active Server Pages for Linux,
follow the instructions in “Upgrading an Existing Installation” on page 3-14 of this guide.
First Steps
Before you begin your installation, make sure you meet the following requirements:
•
You are logged in as root.
•
You have 60 MB of hard disk space available to extract the installation files.
•
You know which language you want Sun ONE Active Server Pages to support (English - US, Japanese Shift-JIS,
and so on). You can change the language after installation using the Sun ONE Active Server Pages
Administration Console, as described in “Configuring International Support” in the product documentation
(“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Managing the ASP Server”).
✍
Note: One standard configuration of the Sun Cobalt LX50 server has 256MB of memory
installed. Sun ONE Active Server Pages requires 256 MB of memory space for itself.
This software will run on a server with only 256 MB of memory, but it is not recommended.
If you choose to customize settings for the Sun ONE Active Server Pages Administration Console, you must specify a
username and password for accessing the console. Be sure to specify a password that you can remember, or else plan
to store the password in a secure location. If you forget your password you can run the admtool utility and set a new
one, as described in “Configuring Usernames and Passwords” in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing
Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Using the Administration Console”). If you do not choose the customize settings option, the
username is set as ‘admin’ and the password as ‘root’. To protect the security of your server, you should run the
admtool and change these settings as soon as possible following installation.
To use Chili!Beans, a Java runtime environment (JRE) must be installed on the machine, and Chili!Beans must be
enabled from the Administration Console. During installation, Sun ONE Active Server Pages installs JRE 1.3.1,
unless you choose to install another supported version (1.2.x or 1.3.x). Note that while you have the option to install a
different JRE, and the Java 2 runtime environment can also be used, the use of JRE 1.3.1 is strongly recommended.
Chili!Beans enables you to access Java objects and classes from an ASP script. For more information, see
“Chili!Beans Component Reference” in “Chapter 5: Developer’s Reference” in the product documentation.
If you are upgrading from a previous version of Sun ONE Active Server Pages, you must install Sun ONE Active
Server Pages into the same directory as your previous installation.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Installation Procedure
1.
The installation files are located in /opt/SunApps.ChiliSoft. Use the following command to extract the tar
file:
#> tar -xvf chiliasp-3.6.21-BigBear.1047b.tar
This step creates the following files in the temporary directory, which you can delete after completing the
installation:
2.
•
A QuickStart Guide with installation instructions .
•
A README file containing the latest product information
•
The install.sh installation script * A package/EULA file containing the End-User License Agreement (EULA)
•
A package directory containing files required to install Sun ONE Active Server Pages
Run the install.sh script by using the script located in the /opt/SunApps/chilisoft/ directory.
#> ./install.sh
3.
4.
Review the EULA that displays.
•
Enter ‘yes’ if you agree with its conditions. You must type the entire word, ‘yes’.
•
Enter ‘no’ if you do not agree. If you enter ‘no’, the Sun ONE Active Server Pages setup program quits the
installation.
On the next screen, choose an installation directory:
•
Press <ENTER> to accept the default Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation directory (/opt/casp).
•
Enter the absolute path name of a different installation directory. Make note of this location so you can easily
find the Sun ONE Active Server Pages files at a later time.
✍
5.
Note: To upgrade from the previous version of Sun ONE Active Server Pages, you must
specify the installation directory of your existing installation.
If the setup program detects a previous installation of Sun ONE Active Server Pages in the specified directory,
you will be prompted to uninstall the previous version.
•
Enter ‘n’ (no) to change the installation directory or cancel the installation.
•
Enter ‘y’ (yes) to uninstall the previous installation. You will then be prompted to proceed.
At this confirmation prompt, enter ‘n’ to cancel the installation, or ‘y’ to uninstall the previous version. If
you enter ‘y’, the previous version will be uninstalled by the installer.
Once that process is finished, press <ENTER> to continue.
✍
Note: At the end of the Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation process, you will be
prompted to import your settings.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
6.
Sun ONE Active Server Pages includes a ready-to-run Apache 1.3.19 Web server configured with support for
Microsoft FrontPage 2002 Server Extensions (the extensions themselves are not installed) and EAPI (Extended
API). If you have not yet configured a Web server, you have the option to install this preconfigured Apache Web
server. It is recommended, but not required, that you use preinstalled version 1.3.22.
•
Enter ‘y’ (yes) to install the preconfigured (“bundled”) Apache 1.3.19 Web server; proceed to the next step.
•
Enter ‘n’ (no) if you do not want to install the preconfigured Apache Web server; proceed to Step 8.
✍
7.
The Apache Web server has many settings that you can choose and configure. Select one of the configuration
options for the preconfigured Apache 1.3.19 Web server:
•
Enter ‘1’ (‘Default configuration’) to direct Sun ONE Active Server Pages to automatically configure all
settings for you.
•
Enter ‘2’ (‘Specify only the Web server listen port’) to specify only the port number that the Apache Web
server will listen on, and then specify the port.
•
Enter ‘3’ (‘Customize the configuration’) to specify the configuration of many different settings, and then
respond to the prompts.
✍
8.
9.
Note: It is recommended that you use the Apache Web server that is already installed.
Note: All Apache configuration settings can be changed manually after installation by editing
the Apache configuration file.
On the next screen, choose a language:
•
Press <ENTER> to accept the default language (English - US), or
•
Enter the number of a language shown in the list.
On the next screen, enable or disable Chili!Beans support as desired.
•
Select ‘Use the bundled 1.3.1 JRE’ to enable Chili!Beans support and install JRE 1.3.1 (this is the
recommended JRE), and then respond to the prompts.
•
Select ‘Specify the path to an existing JRE’ to specify the path to an existing JRE (JRE versions 1.2.x and
1.3.x are supported), or type ‘none’ to return to the previous screen, and then respond to the prompts.
•
Select ‘Disable Java support’ to disable Chili!Beans support, and then respond to the prompts.
•
Select ‘Keep your current settings’.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
10. The next screen provides options for choosing the Web server to configure with Sun ONE Active Server Pages.
•
If you want the setup program to search your system and generate a list of installed Web servers from which
to choose, enter the number of the desired search option (1, 2, or 3).
If you select one of these search options, skip to Step 13.
•
If you want to skip this search and provide information about the Web server, enter ‘4’ (‘Don’t search’). The
installer will not search for the Web server, and instead takes you to Step 11.
✍
Note: If you chose to install the preconfigured (“bundled”) Apache 1.3.19 Web server in
Step 6, go to Step 13.
On the next screen, enter the number of the type of Web server to configure: ‘1’ for Apache,or ‘2’ for iPlanet, and
go to Step 12.
To cancel the user-specified Web server configuration, enter ‘4’. If you choose this option, the setup program
returns you to the previous screen. From this screen you can choose another option, as described in Step 13.
11. At the prompts, enter the path of your Web server.
•
If you do not know the correct path, type ‘none’ to cancel (this takes you to Step 13).
•
If you selected Apache in Step 11, you will be prompted for the Web server binary.
After all information has been added correctly, the installer takes you to Step 13. There you will be able to select
the Web server that was just added.
12. On the next screen, enter the number of the Web server you want the setup program to configure to run with Sun
ONE Active Server Pages (if you selected option 1, 2, or 3 in Step 10) and go to Step 14.
To provide information about the Web server to configure, enter the number for the option, ‘Specify the Web
server’. If you choose this option, follow the instructions in Step 11.
To perform another search for installed Web servers, enter the number for the option, ‘Attempt to auto-detect
more Web servers’. If you choose this option, follow the instructions in Step 10.
If you do not want to configure a Web server during installation, enter the number for the option, ‘Do not
configure a Web server’, and then go to Step 16. If you choose this option, the first time you open the Sun ONE
Active Server Pages Administration Console, you will be prompted to configure the ASP Server and a Web
server.
13. On the next screen, verify the information that the setup program displays about your Web server. If the
information is incorrect, the Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation could fail. If the installation does fail, you
can run the installation script again. If you do this, it is recommended that you first run the uninstall script, as
described in section 3.5 of this guide.
•
If the information on the screen is correct, enter ‘y’ (yes) and go to Step 15.
•
If the information is incorrect, enter ‘n’ (no). The setup program returns you to the previous screen (Step 13).
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
14. On the next screen, choose a configuration option for the ASP Server:
•
Enter ‘1’ to choose a default configuration, and go to Step 16.
•
Enter ‘2’ to choose a custom configuration, and enter the following information at the prompts:
•
‘Enable samples on this Web server?’ Enter ‘y’ (yes) if you want the setup program to install and
configure the Sun ONE Active Server Pages samples on your Web server, or enter ‘n’ (no).
•
‘Enable documentation on this Web server?’ Enter ‘y’ (yes) if you want the setup program to enable the
Sun ONE Active Server Pages documentation on your Web server, or enter ‘n’ (no).
If you enter ‘n’, the documentation will be available from the Administration Console, but not from the
Sun ONE Active Server Pages Start Page.
•
•
‘Start the ASP Server on system boot?’ Enter ‘y’ (yes) if you want the setup program to start Sun ONE
Active Server Pages automatically each time you start the computer, or enter ‘n’ (no).
•
‘Would you like this [Web server] restarted?’ Enter ‘y’ (yes) if you want the setup program to
automatically restart the Web server after completing Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation, or enter
‘n’ (no).
Enter ‘3’ to choose another Web server to configure for Sun ONE Active Server Pages, and follow the
instructions in Step 10.
15. On the next screen, select a configuration option for the Administration Console.
When you choose ‘Default configuration’, the setup program configures the console using default settings. With
this option, it specifies the username as ‘admin’ and the password as ‘root’. To protect the security of your server,
it is strongly recommended that you change these settings as soon as possible. For information about doing this,
see “Configuring Usernames and Passwords” in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun
Chili!Soft ASP” => “Using the Administration Console”).
If you choose ‘Custom configuration’, enter the following information at the prompts:
•
‘Administration Console port number’: Enter the number of the port on which the Web server should listen
for requests for the Administration Console, or press ‘Enter’ to accept the default.
•
‘Automatically start the Administration Console on system startup’: Enter ‘y’ (yes) if you want the Sun ONE
Active Server Pages Administration Console to start automatically each time you start the computer, or enter
‘n’ (no).
•
‘Type the username’: Enter the administrator username.
•
‘New password’: Enter the administrator password, which is required to access the Administration Console.
Be sure to make note of this password, because you cannot access the Administration Console without
providing it.
•
‘Confirm password’: Reenter the password.
16. The next screen provides summary information about your Administration Console configuration. Be sure to
make note of this information or else print this screen for future reference.
When finished, press ‘Enter’ to complete the installation.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
17. If you are upgrading from the previous version for Linux, and the setup program was able to export the settings
from your previous installation, you will be prompted to import these settings into your new installation.
•
Enter ‘y’ (yes) to import your settings.
•
Enter ‘n’ (no) if you do not want to import your settings.
The setup program then completes the installation and writes a summary file to:
[C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR]/logs/install_summary
where [C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR] is the directory in which you installed Sun ONE Active Server Pages (/opt/casp
by default). Be sure to print the information contained in the install_summary file for future reference.
Before running your installation of Sun ONE Active Server Pages, see “Important Notes About Linux Installations”
on page 3-13 of this guide. If you are upgrading from a previous version of Sun ONE Active Server Pages for Linux,
see “Getting Started with Sun ONE Active Server Pages” on page 3-16 of this guide.
Important Notes About Linux Installations
Before running your installation of Sun ONE Active Server Pages, review the following information:
If you chose the default configuration for the Administration Console, the setup program configured the username as
‘admin’ and the password as ‘root’. To protect the security of your server, it is strongly recommended that you change
the username and password as soon as possible. For more information, see “Configuring Usernames and Passwords”
in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Using the Administration Console”).
You use the Administration Console to start and stop the Sun ONE Active Server Pages server and to change
configuration settings. You can access the Administration Console by typing the following URL in your Web browser
address bar:
http://[HOSTNAME]:[PORT]
where [HOSTNAME] is the valid DNS name or IP address of the Apache Web server running the Sun ONE Active
Server Pages Administration Console, and [PORT] is the port on which the Administration Console is configured to
run (5100 by default). The URL for accessing the Administration Console is provided in the following file:
[C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR]/logs/install_summary
where [C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR] is the directory in which you installed Sun ONE Active Server Pages (/opt/casp by
default).
If you did not configure a Web server to run with Sun ONE Active Server Pages during installation, the first time you
open the Administration Console you will be prompted to install a Web server.
The Sun ONE Active Server Pages setup program makes certain changes to the configuration files for the associated
Web server. For more information, see “Changes to Web Server Configuration Files” in the product documentation
(“Chapter 2: Installing and Configuring Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Installing and Uninstalling Sun Chili!Soft ASP”).
You can change some of the options that were configured during installation, such as the Web server with which Sun
ONE Active Server Pages is configured to run, and the status of Java support (enabled or disabled). For more
information, see “Changing Installation Options after Installation” in the product documentation (“Chapter 2:
Installing and Configuring Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Installing and Uninstalling Sun Chili!Soft ASP”). * To use
Chili!Beans, a Java runtime environment must be installed on the machine, and Chili!Beans must be enabled from the
Administration Console (JRE 1.3.1 is included with Sun ONE Active Server Pages and is the recommended version).
If you did not install a Java runtime environment during the installation of Sun ONE Active Server Pages, you can do
so by following the instructions in “Enabling Java Support” in the product documentation (“Chapter 2: Installing and
Configuring Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Installing and Uninstalling Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Changing Installation
Options after Installation”).
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
After you have installed Sun ONE Active Server Pages, use the diagnostic applications to verify that your installation
is working correctly. You can access the diagnostics from the following URL:
http://[HOSTNAME]/caspsamp/diagnostics.htm
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of the Web server configured to run with Sun ONE Active Server Pages.
Important summary information about the installation is located in the following file:
[C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR]/logs/install_summary
where [C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR] is the directory in which you installed Sun ONE Active Server Pages (/opt/casp by
default). Be sure to print this information for future reference.
Certain Sun ONE Active Server Pages settings have important implications for the security of the Sun ONE Active
Server Pages server. To ensure that the settings are appropriately configured for your specific environment, see
“Securing the Server” in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Managing the
ASP Server”).
Upgrading an Existing Installation
Sun ONE Active Server Pages 3.6.2 automatically upgrades many of your settings from an existing installation. To
perform an upgrade from Sun ONE Active Server Pages 3.6 to Sun ONE Active Server Pages 3.6.2, follow the
instructions in sections 3.1 and 3.2 in this guide. In addition, review the information listed below and take any
necessary steps.
The Sun ONE Active Server Pages 3.6.2 setup program preserves the settings from your Sun ONE Active Server
Pages 3.6 installation, and then imports those settings into your new Sun ONE Active Server Pages 3.6.2 installation.
The settings imported from your existing installation will override the settings that you configure during installation,
with the exception of Sun ONE support. During installation, you must configure Sun ONE support and select the
option for the bundled JRE 1.3.1 (or specify a path to a different JRE). While JREs 1.2.x and 1.3.x are supported, and
the Java 2 runtime environment can also be used, the use of JRE 1.3.1 is strongly recommended. Java support must be
configured, even if it was enabled in the installation you are upgrading.
✍
Note: SpicePack settings and Sybase DSNs are not migrated when upgrading to Sun ONE
Active Server Pages 3.6.2.
The new installation will completely overwrite your existing installation. If there are any files
in your current Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation directory that you want to preserve,
copy them to another location. Otherwise, they will be lost.
If necessary, upgrade your Web server to meet the requirements listed in “Adding New Hardware” on page 2-10 of
this guide.
Back up your existing installation prior to beginning the upgrade.
Do not upgrade a mission-critical production server. Performing the upgrade and taking the additional configuration
steps required might keep your server offline for an unacceptably long period of time. If possible, you should mirror
the production server to a non-production server, perform the upgrade, and then test and debug the upgraded server
before deploying it in your production environment.
When the setup program has completed the installation, do the following:
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Verify that any system DSNs defined for your previous installation are working correctly. For more information, see
“Testing a DSN” in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Configuring a
Database” => “Configuring Data Source Names”). If system DSNs are not functioning you can create or edit them as
needed, as described in the same section in the product documentation. You can find the configuration information for
the system DSNs that were defined for your previous installation in the following file:
[C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR]/casp/INSTALL/settings.import
where [C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR] is the path name of the Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation directory.
Uninstalling
You uninstall Sun ONE Active Server Pages by running the script named ‘uninstall’ located in the Sun ONE Active
Server Pages installation directory. When you run the uninstall program, you can delete all of the directories and files
contained in the Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation directory. Before you run the uninstall program, make
copies of any files contained under this directory that you do not want to lose.
✍
Note: To perform this procedure, you must be logged in as root on the computer running Sun
ONE Active Server Pages.
To uninstall Sun ONE Active Server Pages
1.
From the Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation directory (/opt/casp by default), type the following
command:
#> ./uninstall
2.
Choose the number of the desired uninstall method.
•
Choose ‘1. Uninstall the entire product’ to remove all Sun ONE Active Server Pages components and all files
and directories under the installation directory. If you choose this option, go to Step 5.
•
Choose ‘2. Perform a stage-based uninstall’ to select which components to uninstall. If you choose this
option, go to Step 3.
•
Choose ‘3. Cancel the uninstall’ to stop the uninstall without removing any files.
3.
If you chose option ‘2. Perform a stage-based uninstall’, you are prompted to select the components to uninstall.
At the prompts, enter the number of the component(s) to remove.
4.
Uninstall the Web server-Sun ONE Active Server Pages association, responding to the prompts as desired.
5.
Delete the directories and files in the Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation directory.
Before deletion you are prompted to stop the uninstall and make backup copies of any files. To perform this
action, enter ‘y’ (yes). To continue the uninstall and delete the directories and files, enter ‘n’ (no).
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Getting Started with Sun ONE Active Server Pages
The resources described in this section will help you get started with Sun ONE Active Server Pages.
Your primary resource is the product documentation for the Sun ONE Active Server Pages software (see
“Documentation” on page 3-17).
There are two versions of this documentation: one in HTML format that includes dynamic index and search
functionality, and one in Adobe PDF format. To view and print the PDF version, Adobe Acrobat Reader must be
installed. To obtain a free copy of Acrobat Reader, go to:
http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html
In addition to the product documentation, the following resources will help you learn more about Sun ONE Active
Server Pages:
•
Sample ASP applications demonstrate the basics of building Sun ONE Active Server Pages applications (see
“Sample ASP Applications” on page 3-18).
•
The 10-Step Tour provides a basic introduction to Sun ONE Active Server Pages technology (see “The 10-Step
Tour” on page 3-19).
•
Diagnostic applications verify that the features of your ASP environment are working correctly (see
“Diagnostics” on page 3-19).
✍
Note: To use ASP functionality in the diagnostics, the 10-Step Tour, and the sample
applications, ‘Allow session state’ must be set to ‘yes’ on the ‘Server Settings’ page in the
Administration Console. For more information about this setting, see “Enabling Session State”
in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Managing the
ASP Server”).
You can access these resources from the Sun ONE Active Server Pages Start Page at:
http://[HOSTNAME]/caspsamp
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of your Web server.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Documentation
The Sun ONE Active Server Pages product documentation includes information about installing, configuring, and
using Sun ONE Active Server Pages for Linux. It introduces the basics of building Sun ONE Active Server Pages
applications, and provides reference information about using scripting languages, connecting to databases, and
developing and using components. The product documentation is structured so you can easily find the information
you need. The contents of each chapter are described below.
“Introduction: About this Documentation”: Provides an overview of the Sun ONE Active Server Pages product
documentation and other Sun ONE Active Server Pages resources.
“Chapter 1: About Sun Chili!Soft ASP”: Describes what’s new in this release. Also provides an introduction to
ASP technology, and describes the Sun Chili!Soft implementation of ASP.
“Chapter 2: Installing and Configuring Sun Chili!Soft ASP”: Tells you how to install Sun ONE Active Server
Pages on your server, and describes changes the setup program makes to your Web server configuration files.
Also provides instructions for performing basic server-configuration tasks and enabling users to publish ASP
applications to the Web server.
“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP”: Provides information about administering Sun ONE Active Server
Pages, including changing ASP Server configuration settings, configuring security, optimizing server
performance, and troubleshooting server problems.
“Chapter 4: Building a Sun Chili!Soft ASP Application”: Introduces the basics of developing ASP applications:
creating an ASP page, adding scripts and server-side includes, and defining the application on the server. Also
discusses extending ASP applications by using objects and components, and connecting to databases. This
chapter concludes with information about publishing a Sun ONE Active Server Pages application.
“Chapter 5: Developer’s Reference”: Provides reference information about using built-in ASP components,
additional “off-the-shelf” ASP components, and custom components. Also provides a scripting reference for
VBScript and JScript, and reference information about using ActiveX Data Objects (ADO), Sun Chili!Beans,
and Sun SpicePack components.
“Appendix A: Error Messages”: Explains error messages you might encounter when using Sun ONE Active
Server Pages.
“Appendix B: Troubleshooting”: Provides troubleshooting tips for problems you might encounter when running
Sun ONE Active Server Pages.
“Appendix C: Glossary”: Contains a glossary of terms you might encounter when administering Sun ONE
Active Server Pages and developing ASP applications.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
You can access the product documentation in a number of ways:
•
Following installation, you can access the product documentation from the Administration Console by clicking
the ‘documentation’ link in the left navigation pane.
•
The Sun ONE Active Server Pages setup program gives you the option to enable the product documentation on
your Web server. If you choose this option, when your Web server is running, you can also access the HTML
version of the documentation at:
http://[HOSTNAME]/caspdoc/
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of your Web server.
•
From the first page of the HTML documentation, you can click a link to open the version in PDF format. To
access the PDF version directly, use the following URL:
http://[HOSTNAME]/caspdoc/pdf/chilisoft_asp_docs.pdf
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of your Web server.
•
You can access the product documentation from the Sun ONE Active Server Pages Web site at:
http://www.chilisoft.com/caspdoc/
•
When your Web server is running, you can access the product documentation from the Sun ONE Active Server
Pages Start Page at:
http://[HOSTNAME]]/caspsamp/
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of your Web server.
Sample ASP Applications
The Sun ONE Active Server Pages setup program gives you the option to enable the sample applications on the
computer running Sun ONE Active Server Pages. The sample applications demonstrate the basics of building Sun
ONE Active Server Pages applications.
✍
Note: To use the sample applications, ‘Allow session state’ must be set to ‘yes’ on the ‘Server
Settings’ page in the Administration Console. For more information about this setting, see
“Enabling Session State” in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft
ASP” => “Managing the ASP Server”).
You can access and view samples in a number of ways:
•
When your Web server is running, you can access the samples from the Sun ONE Active Server Pages Start Page,
at:
http://[HOSTNAME]]/caspsamp/
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of your Web server.
•
You can access the samples from the Sun ONE Active Server Pages Web site at:
http://www.chilisoft.com/caspsamp/
•
You can view a list of installed sample ASP applications on the ‘ASP Applications’ page of the Sun Chili!Soft
Administration Console, as described in “Adding an ASP Application” in the product documentation (“Chapter
3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Managing the ASP Server” => “Configuring ASP Applications”). The
sample applications are located in your file system at:
/caspsamp=”[C-ASP_INSTALL_DIR]/caspsamp”
where /caspsamp is the directory alias (virtual directory) for the caspsamp sample application, and
[C-ASP_INSTALL DIR] is the path name of the Sun ONE Active Server Pages installation directory.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
The 10-Step Tour
If you are new to Sun ONE Active Server Pages technology, we recommend that you take our 10-Step Tour, which
provides a basic introduction to Sun ONE Active Server Pages.
✍
Note: To use Active Server Pages functionality in the 10-Step Tour, ‘Allow session state’ must
be set to ‘yes’ on the ‘Server Settings’ page in the Administration Console.
For more information about this setting, see “Enabling Session State” in the product
documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Managing the ASP Server”).
When Sun ONE Active Server Pages is installed and your Web server is running, you can
access the tour from the Sun ONE Active Server Pages Start Page at:
http://[HOSTNAME]/caspsamp/
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of your Web server.
Diagnostics
Diagnostics allow you to verify that various features of your Sun ONE Active Server Pages environment are working
correctly. The diagnostic applications listed below are installed with Sun ONE Active Server Pages.
✍
Note: To use the diagnostics, ‘Allow session state’ must be set to ‘yes’ on the ‘Server Settings’
page in the Administration Console. For more information about this setting, see “Enabling
Session State” in the product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” =>
“Managing the ASP Server”).
•
HELLO: Tests the functionality of ASP and VBScript by using a simple “Hello World” script.
•
SERVER: Tests the ASP Server-to-Web server connection by retrieving the standard Web server variables.
•
JSCRIPT: Tests the functionality of JScript.
•
COMPONENTS: Tests the functionality of additional components installed with Sun ONE Active Server Pages.
•
ADO: Accesses ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) from VBScript. It connects to a sample database by using ODBC
(Open Database Connectivity) to test the functionality of ADO and the dBASE ODBC driver. I
✍
•
Note: JSADO: Performs the same test as the ADO test, but accesses ADO from JScript rather
than VBScript.
SQLEXECUTE: Uses ADO to execute an SQL statement and display the results. To use this application, you
must first create a system DSN for your database on the ASP Server, as described in “Adding a DSN” in the
product documentation (“Chapter 3: Managing Sun Chili!Soft ASP” => “Configuring a Database” =>
“Configuring Data Source Names (DSNs)”).
When your Web server is running, you can access the diagnostic applications from the Sun ONE Active Server Pages
Start Page at:
http://[HOSTNAME]/caspsamp/
where [HOSTNAME] is the hostname of your Web server.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
3-19
Chapter 3: Software Setup
Customer Support
Use one of the following methods to contact Sun Customer Support:
•
Web form: http://www.chilisoft.com/support/chili.eval.asp
•
Support Forum: http://www.chilisoft.com/forum/
Following the installation of Sun ONE Active Server Pages, you can also contact Customer Support from the Sun
ONE Active Server Pages Administration Console. Click the ‘customer support’ link in the left navigation pane, and
then click the ‘Submit a question’ tab.
Sun Grid Engine
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server comes with Sun Grid Engine 5.2.3 software loaded on the server. Sun Grid Engine
software helps enable technical Sun Grid Computing, and provides a resource rich environment designed to
maximize the available power of the local network to increase productivity, improve product quality, reduce the time
to market and increase ROI. Sun Grid Engine software supports one of the most complete and scalable hardware,
software and services models for Grid Computing.
For more information on the Sun Grid Engine, see:
http://www.sun.com/software/gridware/
The documentation for the Sun Grid Engine is available at:
http://www.sun.com/products-n-solutions/ hardware/docs/Software/Sun_Grid_Engine/index.htmlid
For more information about becoming certified on the Sun Grid Engine software, see:
http://m1.eng.sun.com/software/gridware/certification/
For more information on the Open-source Grid Engine Project, see:
http://gridengine.sunsource.net/
Installation
Change to the /opt/SunApps/grid directory and extract the tarred files:
#
#
#
#
cd/opt/SunApps/grid
tar -zxvf sge-5_2_3_1-bin-glinux[1].tar.gz
tar -zxvf sge-5_2_3_1-common[1].tar.gz
tar -zxvf sge-5_2_3_1-doc[1].tar.gz
These commands expand everything needed to continue with the installation.
Then follow the instructions in the Sun Grid Engine pdf manual, located in the /opt/SunApps/grid/doc directory
file named SGE523Man_US.pdf. The Sun Grid Engine Manual contains a Quick Start Guide, Installation and
Administration Guide, User’s Guide and Reference Guide Manual.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Sun™ Streaming Server
For more information on the Sun™ Streaming Server, see:
http://www.sun.com/wireless/streaming
The Sun Streaming Server is a high-performance, open-standards-based multimedia streaming server. Designed to be
deployed as part of a scalable, cost-effective streaming-media environment, Sun Streaming Server adheres to the
ISMA 1.0 specification allowing it to be out-of-the box compatible with other products, such as clients, encoders and
caches that adhere to the ISMA 1.0 specification.
Sun Streaming Server provides a simple, flexible and reliable platform for deploying value-added streaming services
in a network environment. It is built on top of standard Internet protocols such as RTSP, RTP/RTCP, HTTP, SDP, the
ISO MPEG-4 standard, and other defacto open standards, such as ELF and the Apple QuickTime file format. Using
the open standards listed in Table 6, Sun Streaming Server can deliver stored and live ISO MPEG-4 or Apple
QuickTime content to open-standards-based clients.
Table 6 lists the default settings for the Sun Cobalt LX50 server.
Table 6. Standards Supported by Sun Streaming Server
Standard
Description
3GPP TS 26.234 V4.0.0
3rd Generation Partnership Project; Technical Specification Group Services and System
Aspects; Transparent end-to-end packet switched streaming service; Protocols and codecs
3GPP TS 26.233 V4.0.0
3rd Generation Partnership Project; Technical Specification Group Services and System
Aspects; Transparent end-to-end packet switched streaming service; General Description
RFC 1945
Hypertext Transfer Protocol – HTTP/1.0
RFC 2616
Hypertext Transfer Protocol – HTTP/1.1
RFC 1889
RTP: Real-Time Transport Protocol; RTCP: Real-Time Control Protocol
RFC 2326
RTSP: Real Time Streaming Protocol
RFC 2327
SDP: Session Description Protocol
ISO/IEC-14496
MPEG-4 graphics and video compression algorithm standard, based on MPEG-1, MPEG-2,
and Apple QuickTime technology.
ELF
Extended Log File Format
ISMA 1.0
The Internet Streaming Media Alliance (ISMA) has developed and published ISMA 1.0, an
implementation specification designed to accelerate existing IETF and MPEG standards for
streaming over the Internet.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Installing the RPM Package File
The Sun Streaming Server software consists of the ism-2.0RC1-1.i386.rpm package located in the
/opt/SunApps/ism directory.
Complete the following steps to install the Sun Streaming Server RPM package file:
1.
At the command prompt, log in to the Sun Cobalt LX50 server as ‘root’.
login: root
Password: your_password
2.
Change to the /opt/SunApps/ism directory:
# cd /opt/SunApps/ism/
3.
Use the rpm -Uvh ism-2.0RC1-1.i386.rpm command to install SSS on the system:
# rpm -Uvh ism-2.0RC1-1.i386.rpm
Preparing... ############################## [100%]
warning: group admin does not exist - using root
warning: group admin does not exist - using root
warning: group admin does not exist - using root
1:ism ################################# [100%]
If you receive the above results installation of the Sun Streaming Server is complete.
Table 7 lists the Sun Streaming Server directory and the file locations.
Table 7. Sun Streaming Server Directory and File Locations
Directory
Description
/opt/ism
Main server install directory. The installation files are stored here.
/opt/ism/movies
Default content root directory. Media content files are stored here by default and sample movie
files (sample.mov and sample.mp4).
/opt/ism/lib
ism-qt-plugin.so.1, server daemon (ismd2), and ismcf utility.rnel 2.4.9-3
/opt/ism/sbin
ismctl (server administration tool)
/opt/ism/etc
Directory contains the ism.cf (configuration file) and ism.cf.default (install time default
configuration file)
/opt/ism/man
The directory for the ismctl man page.
/var/log/ismd
Contains connection, request and session log files.
/etc/init.d
Contains the start/stop/restart ism script file.
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Initial Software Setup
Starting Sun Streaming Server and Basic Server Operations
There are two methods for starting the Sun Streaming Server.
•
Reboot the Sun Cobalt LX50 server and Sun Streaming Server starts up automatically in Linux. Run levels 2, 3,
and 5 from the
/etc/rc.d/init.d/ism script.
•
You can also use the following command to manually start the Sun Streaming Server:
# /opt/ism/sbin/ismctl start
As superuser, type the following commands to start, stop, restart or check the server status:
# /opt/ism/sbin/ismctl [start|stop|restart|status]
Verifying the Installation
To verify that the installation is correct, follow the steps below:
1.
Start the server using the command listed in “Starting Sun Streaming Server and Basic Server Operations”.
2.
Bring up a client application.
An example of a client application is QuickTime Player version 4.0 or higher. If QuickTime Player is used, it
must be configured to use RTP/UDP as the transport protocol.
3.
Open the following URL:
rtsp://<hostname>or<IP_address>:554/sample.mov
where <hostname> is the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) or the IP address of the machine on which SSS is
installed and the default installation port.
If you are able to view the sample movie file, the Sun Streaming Server has been installed successfully.
If you cannot view the movie, look in the /var/log/messages files and grep for ism daemon to see if there are
error messages.
# cat /var/log/messages | grep ism
Administration of the Sun Streaming Server
This section describes the ismctl tool, which allows administration, tuning, and configuration of the Sun Streaming
Server. ismctl is a command-line utility that uses subcommands to perform operations on the server or on
configuration data used by the server. The functionality includes setting and retrieving configuration parameters,
starting, stopping, restarting the server, and so on.
•
The start, stop, restart, and status subcommands perform a specific, predefined task on the server to
control its operation or to report its running status.
•
The get, set, and unset subcommands operate on keys and values, allowing the user to access and modify
configuration information. Modifiers are allowed with the get, set, and unset subcommands so that additional
values or relationships can be represented.
Command Interface
This section briefly describes the ismctl command syntax:
ismctl <subcommand> [modifier] [key] [value]
The ismctl -h command prints the usage message and a brief listing of all supported subcommands.
Detailed descriptions of the options, subcommands, modifiers and keys are given in Table 8, Table 9, Table 10, and
Table 11.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Basic Sun Streaming Server Subcommands
Table 8 shows the basic Sun Streaming Server commands for starting, stopping, and restarting the server, along with
checking the status and version.
Table 8. ismctl Basic Subcommands
Subcommand
Description
start
Starts the server. The running process daemon can be looked up using the ps -ef | grep ism
command.
stop
Stops the Sun Streaming Server server.
restart
Restarts the Sun Streaming Server server. Running RTSP sessions will be terminated.
status
Returns the current state of the server and any resources needed to use by logging to /var/log/
messages file.
version
Returns the version of the Sun Streaming Server server.
Modify Server Values
The subcommands listed in Table 9 along with descriptions modify Sun Streaming Server values.
The modifiers and keys for these ismctl subcommands are shown in Table 10 and Table 11, respectively.
In Table 12 through Table 14, each ismctl subcommand usage is shown and described.
Table 9. ismctl Server Values Modification Subcommands
Subcommand
Description
set [modifier] <key> <value>
Sets the value of the given key. Some values do not take effect until the server has been
restarted.
get [modifier] <key>
Prints the value of the specified key to stdout.
unset [modifier] <key>
Sets the value of the key to the default value as listed in the
/opt/ism/etc/ism.cf.default file. If the value did not exist by default, it removes
the value.
help [subcommand | key]
If no subcommand or key is specified, the output is the same as ismctl -h. If a
subcommand or key is specified, then more details are provided for.
✍
3-24
Note: get and unset can take the special key all. When all is used, the given subcommand
applies to all relevant keys. If used in conjunction with a modifier, the relevant keys are a
subset of the available keys.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Modifiers
Table 10 lists the modifiers for the subcommands shown in Table 9.
Table 11 lists the subommand modifier keys.
The -i modifier applies only to the set and unset subcommands, while the -e and -v modifiers apply only to certain
keys.
Table 10. ismctl Subcommand Modifiers
Modifier
Purpose
-i <set or unset> <key>
Forces ismctl command to indicate whether server restart is necessary for the set value to take
effect. ismctl prints a message to stdout indicating whether a server restart is necessary or not.
-e <extension>
Allows an extension to be specified for or associated with the given MIME type. An example is:
ismctl set -e mov mimetype video/quicktime.
The -e can be set to -e all so that the command applies to the .mov, .qt, .mp4, and .sdp.
-v <domain>
Allows a specific domain to be associated with its own content root. An example is: ismctl
set. -v domain.com /opt/domain.com/movies.
The -v can be set to -v all so that the given command applies to all domains.
Table 11. Subcommand Modifier Keys
Key
Meaning
user
Sets the user Sun Streaming Server runs as. If an incorrect value is specified, the default user, daemon,
is used. If the user is changed, make sure that log file /var/log/ismd directory is writable by the
configured user.
rtspport
Port ism listens for RTSP requests. Any unused TCP port is valid. The server does not start if an invalid
port is used. Default is 554.
sesslimit
Maximum number of concurrent sessions. Default is 2000.
connlimit
Maximum number of concurrent client connections. Default is 2000.
cliconnlimit
Maximum number of concurrent connections from a single client IP address. Default is 100.
mimetype
Maps an extension to a MIME type. The extension (specified with -e) should not include the leading
dot and are not case sensitive. QuickTime files must have type video/quicktime. SDP files must have
type application/sdp. MPEG-4 files must have type application/mpeg4. The default MIME type
mappings are:
movvideo/quicktime
qtvideo/quicktime
mp4application/mpeg4
sdpapplication/sdp
contentroot
Maps a hostname in the requesting URL to the content path. Enables each “virtual” domain (specified
with the -v) to have a separate path for content.
The default is /opt/ism/movies. The value applies to all domains.
Note that “partial hostnames” are not matched. For example, ‘my_domain’ is not matched to
‘www.my_domain.com’.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Table 11. Subcommand Modifier Keys (Continued)
Key
Meaning
contentprofile
A tuning parameter for optimizing the server for the type of content that is going to be streamed. The
primary values are low, medium, high, and mixed, as follows:
low (< 64 Kbps)
medium (< 500 Kbps)
high (> 500 Kbps)
mixed (all bit rates mixed together)
The default value is mixed.
disks
The number of disks used for storing content. Used for optimizing the Sun Streaming Server to the
machine. Default is 1. Set to the number of hard disks attached to the machine
all
A special keyword supported in the ismctl get and unset subcommands to indicate that the
subcommand should apply to all relevant keys.
If all is used in conjunction with a modifier, the relevant keys are a subset of the available keys. For
example, ismctl get -v www.sun.com all, returns the values for all the keys for the domain
www.sun.com that have been modified by the -v modifier.
Subcommand Syntax
Table 12 lists the ismctl set command usage. The following sections show the syntax for each of the
subcommands. The general syntax of the set subcommand is:
ismctl set [modifier] <key> <value>
Table 12. ismctl set Command Syntax
Command syntax for
ismctl set...
Sets the...
user <user>
User that the server runs as
rtspport <port>
Port the server listens to.
sesslimit <limit>
Maximum limit of concurrent sessions.
connlimit <limit>
Maximum limit of concurrent connections.
cliconnlimit <limit>
Maximum limit of concurrent connections per client.
-e <extension> mimetype <type>
File <extension> to a given MIME type.
contentroot <path>
Global content root path for the server.
-v <domain> contentroot <path>
Content root for <domain> to <path>.
contentprofile <profile>
Content profile to <profile>.
disks <n>
Number of disks to <n>.
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Initial Software Setup
Get Subcommand
Table 13 lists the ismctl get command usage. The general syntax of the get subcommand is:
ismctl get [modifier] <key>
Table 13. ismctl get Command Syntax
Command Syntax for
ismctl get ...
Returns the ...
user
Current user server run as rtspport Port which the server listen to
sesslimit
Maximum limit of concurrent sessions.
cliconnlimit
Maximum limit of concurrent connections per client.
connlimit
Maximum limit of concurrent connections.
-e <extension> mimetype
MIME type mapped to the given extension
contentroot
Content root of the server
-v <domain> contentroot
Content root of the virtual host
contentprofile
Content profile of the server
disks
Disk count of the server
all
Values of all the ismctl configured parameters.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Unset Subcommand
Table 14 lists the ismctl unset command usage. The general syntax of the unset subcommand is:
ismctl unset [modifier] <key>-v <doma
Table 14. ismctl unset Command Syntax
Command Syntax for
ismctl unset -i ...
Sets...
user
User the server runs to default value (daemon).
rtspport
RTSP listen port to the default value (554).
sesslimit
Maximum limit of sessions to the default value (2000).
connlimit
Maximum limit of connections to the default value (2000).
cliconnlimit
Maximum limit of connections per client to the default value.
-e <extension> mimetype
Unmaps <extension> from its MIME type. Sets it to the default value, if <extension> is the
default extension.
contentroot
Top level content root to the default installed path: /opt/ism/movies
-v <domain> contentroot
No default values set, removes the virtual host for <domain>
contentprofile
Contentprofile to the default value mixed
disks
Disk count to the default value 1
all
All keys to default values and erases modified keyword items added after the default settings.
Server and Client Interaction Logs
The Sun Streaming Server maintains transactional log files that reflect the interaction between the server and clients.
These log files store information regarding connections, requests, and sessions handled by the server. Transactional
log files are created in the /var/log/ismd directory in Extended Log File Format (ELF).
The log files cycle after the size limit of 512 kB is reached. At any one time, a maximum of five log files of each type
exists. For example, when the session.log file reaches its size limit, the file is renamed session.log.0, and a new
session.log file is created. If there is a session.log.4 when session.log becomes full, session.log is renamed to
session.log.0, session.log.0 is renamed session.log.1, and so on until session.log.3 is renamed
session.log.4. The old session.log.4 is deleted.
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Sun Streaming Server Error and Event Logs
Sun Streaming Server logs error messages to the /var/log/messages file. These error messages reflect any problems
the server is experiencing. In addition, events such as starting the server and loading plug-ins are logged.
Connection Log File
The connection log records all the connections and disconnections that have been made to or from the server. The log
includes date, time, IP address received from the client, connect or disconnect events and protocol.
Table 15 lists the fields in the connection.log file.
Table 15. Connection Log File Fields
Field
Description
date
Date connection was made.
time
Time connection was made.
cs-ip
IP address sent from the client to server.
event
Either a CONNECT or a DISCONNECT.
protocol
Protocol used to communicate with the server (for example, RTSP).
Request Log Files
The request log records the date and time of each request, the different RTSP requests (“GET,” “DESCRIBE,”
“SETUP,” “PLAY,” and “PAUSE”) made to the server. It also includes the Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) from
the client and the RTSP status code sent from the server to the client.
Table 16 lists the fields in the request.log file.
Table 16. Request Log File Fields
Field
Description
date
Date request was made.
time
Time request was made.
cs-method
RTSP method requested by the client (for example, GET, DESCRIBE, PLAY, PAUSE, and so on).
cs-uri
The URI sent from client to server specifying the URI of the stream received by the client.
cs (range)
The RTSP range header sent from the client to the server. This value indicates the specific time range
of the stream that should be played.
cs (user-agent)
RTSP User-Agent header sent by the client to the server. This is dependent on the client, often
includes the version and name of the client application being streamed to.
c-ip
The IP address of the client.
sc-status
RTSP status code sent from the server to the client. See RFC2326 for more information.
sc (session)
The RTSP session identifier. A series of random letters and numbers that identify the session.
sc (transport)
The RTSP Transport header sent from the server to the client. Specifies the transport, client and
server ports, whether multicast or unicast should be used, and so on.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Session Log Files
The session log contains information about each streaming session, the file that was streamed, the total number of
packets sent, the number of packets lost, the protocol used, the average bandwidth, and so on.
Table 17 lists the fields in the session.log file.
Table 17. Session Log File Fields
Field
Description
date
Date of the session.
time
Time of day the session occurred.
protocol
Protocol used to communicate with the server (typically RTSP).
transport
The lower-level transport being used (for example, UDP or TCP).
avgbandwidth
Average bandwidth in bits per second, calculated based on the session length and the number of
bytes streamed.
cs (user-agent)
RTSP User-Agent header sent by the client to the server. This is dependent on the client, often
includes the version and name of the client application being streamed to.
cs-uri-stem
Specifies the URI of the stream that the client is receiving.
c-ip
IP address sent from the client to the server.
c-jitter
Jitter value that the client sends.
Jitter, according to RFC 1889 is “An estimate of the statistical variance of the RTP data packet
interarrival time, measured in timestamp units.”
cs (user-agent)
RTSP User-Agent header sent by the client to the server. This is dependent on the client, often
includes the version and name of the client application being streamed to.
c-pkts-lost-net
Total number of packets lost.
c-pkts-received
Total number of packets received by the client.
c-starttime
Start time of the session sent by the client.
sc-bytes
Number of bytes sent from the server to the client.
c-pkts-lost-net
Total number of packets lost.
s-pkts-sent
Number of packets the server sent.
s-pkts-lost-net
Number of packets lost due to network errors or a lack of network capacity on the server.
s-pkts-lost-drop
Number of packets the server dropped (usually due to CPU limits).
s-pkts-lost-skip
Number of packets the server skipped (usually due to disk limits).
x-duration
The length of the entire RTP session in seconds.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Sun Streaming Server GUI Software
In the /opt/SunApps/ism directory, there is a stream_ui-2.0- RC1.1.i386.rpm package that contains an
evaluation copy of the Sun Streaming Server graphical user interface (GUI). The stream_ui-2.0-RC1.1.i386.rpm
package installs the Sun Streaming Server GUI front-end for some of the ismctl command/subcommands
combinations.
Installing the Evaluation Software
To install the Sun Streaming Server GUI software package:
1.
In the console change to /opt/SunApps/ism.
# rpm -Uvh stream_ui-2.0-Eval.i386.rpm
The following messages appear:
Preparing...############################## [100%]
1:stream_ui ########################## [100%]
Stopping ISM Server
stopping server...
Adding streamui user to the system
Changing ownership of /opt/ism/movies directory
Changing ownership of /opt/stream directory
Changing ownership of /etc/init.d/streamui_httpd
Adding streamui to /etc/sudoers file
Adding Symbolic link in apache directory
Starting ISM Server
server starting...
Starting StreamUI Server
Table 18 lists the directories and files created during the rpm installation.
Table 18. Sun Streaming Server GUI Evaluation Software—Directories Created
Directories in
/opt/stream
Contents
apache
Apache Web server program for the SSS GUI software, keeping the software independent from
the system Web server.
pass streampass
File holding the user name and encrypted password combination for logging into the Sun
Streaming Server GUI.
php
php files for configuring the Sun Streaming Server server.
web
Web page rendering files for the Sun Streaming Server GUI.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Starting and Stopping the Sun Streaming Server GUI
The evaluation Sun Streaming Server administration GUI is designed to be modular and uses its own Apache Web
server program installed with the package. Starting, stopping, and restarting the SSS administration is done with the
command:
/etc/rc.d/init.d/streamui_httpd [start|stop|restart]
Sun Streaming Server GUI Administration
Access the Sun Streaming Server GUI from a Web browser using port 10002 and the URL, for example:
http://www.<hostname>or<IP_address>:10002/.
This brings up the login screen and login using the default username admin, with the password demo.
✍
Note: For security reasons, it is recommended that you change the default password demo after
logging into the Sun Streaming Server GUI for the first time.
The Sun Streaming Server GUI Administration screen will be displayed.
Table 19 lists the administration functions available through the Sun Streaming Server GUI.
Table 19. SSS GUI Administration Functions
Menu Item
Administration Function
Manage Files
Upload and rename movie files
Create directories
View available disk space
RTSP Port
Change the Sun Streaming Server port (default 554)
Client Control
Change Maximum Connections
Change Maximum Client Connections
MIME Types
Change the MIME type program associations
Start/Stop Server
Start, Stop and Restart the Sun Streaming Server
Password
Change the admin password
Logout
Logout of the Sun Streaming Server GUI administration
Access and Error Logs
The Sun Streaming Server GUI uses the standard Apache Web server access_log and error_log files for logging
Web server access and errors located in the /opt/stream/apache/logs directory.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
JDK™/Tomcat
Installing the Java Developer Kit (JDK™) and Tomcat Java Server
This version 1.4 of the Java 2 SDK, on the Sun Cobalt LX50 server is supported on x86-compatible platforms
running the Linux kernel v2.2.12 and glibc v2.1.2-11 or later. It requires a minimum of 32 MB RAM, 16-bit color
mode with KDE or the Gnome desktop in conjunction with displays set to local hosts.
To install the Java 2 SDK, version 1.4:
1.
Log in as root, change to the /opt/SunApps/jdk directory.
2.
Run the rpm command to install the Java 2 SDK packages:
# cd /opt/SunApps/jdk
# rpm -ivh j2sdk-1_4_0-fcs-linux-i386.rpm
The following messages appear:
Preparing...################################# [100%]
1:j2sdk################################# [100%]
The Java 2 SDK packages are now installed into /usr/java/j2sdk1.4.0.
To install and configure the Tomcat server for Java version 1.4:
1.
Change to the /opt/SunApps/tomcat directory and list the rpms. Run the rpm command:
# cd /opt/SunApps/tomcat
# ls -al
ant-1.4.1-4.noarch.rpm
ant-javadoc-1.4.1-4.noarch.rpm
ant-manual-1.4.1-4.noarch.rpm
ant-optional-1.4.1-4.noarch.rpm
...p<‹
2.
Install the tomcat rpms using the rpm -ivh *.rpm command:
# rpm -ivh *.rpm
The following messages appear:
Preparing...################################### [100%]
1:regexp################################### [ 6%]
2:xerces-j################################# [ 12%]
3:servletapi4############################## [ 18%]
4:tomcat4################################## [ 25%]
....
3.
Change to the /etc/tomcat4/conf directory, open the tomcat4.conf file for editing, and modify the
JAVA_HOME variable to point to the JDK™1.4 directory (/usr/java/j2sdk1.4.0), save and exit the file:
# cd /etc/tomcat4/conf
# vi tomcat4.conf
:%s#/opt/IBMJava2-13/bin/java#/usr/java/j2sdk1.4.0#g
qw
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
To start and verify installation of the Java 2 SDK and the Tomcat server:
1.
Start the Tomcat server:
# tomcat4 start
Using CATALINA_BASE:/var/tomcat4
Using CATALINA_HOME:/var/tomcat4
Using CATALINA_TMPDIR:/var/tomcat4/temp
Using JAVA_HOME:/usr/java/j2sdk1.4.0
Take note of the CATALINA_BASE:, CATALINA_HOME:, CATALINA_TMPDIR:, and JAVA_HOME: directories listed.
These directories are important to remember when navigating the Tomcat server.
2.
Open a Web browser and type: http://<localhost>:8180/ where <localhost> is your system name.
The Tomcat server page appears; see Figure 7.
Figure 7. Tomcat Server Page
3.
To verify the proper installation of the Java 1.4 SDK and Tomcat Java Server click Servlets Examples, located in
the left hand side of the browser. Execute the examples to make sure they function properly.
Tomcat Log Files
The Tomcat server log files for logging, debugging, and error messages are located in the /var/tomcat4/logs
directory. The log file formats can be configure by modifying the logger elements in
/var/tomcat4/conf/server.xml.
For more information on log files see the Tomcat Server Configuration Reference Guide, which is part of the installed
documentation described in “Tomcat Server Documentation” or see the Apache Tomcat documentation reference in
the “Additional Resources”.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Initial Software Setup
Tomcat Server Documentation
Along with the installation of the Tomcat server is the documentation located in the
/var/tomcat/webapps/tomcat-docs directory. To access the documentation, click the Tomcat Documentation link
located in the left-hand side of the browser shown in Figure 7.
Getting Started Documentation
The following documents will assist you in downloading and installing Tomcat 4, and building a distribution from the
source code.
•
Introduction - A brief, high level, overview of Tomcat.
•
README.txt - Describes the contents and directory structure of a Tomcat 4 binary distribution.
•
RUNNING.txt - Documents the steps necessary to download, install, start and stop a Tomcat 4 server.
•
BUILDING.txt - Details the steps necessary to download Tomcat 4 source code (and the other packages that it
depends on), and build a binary distribution from those sources.
Administrators Documentation
The Administrator documents are aimed at System Administrators who are responsible for installing, configuring,
and operating a Tomcat 4 server and include:
•
Server Configuration Reference - Reference manual that documents all available elements and attributes that may
be placed into a Tomcat 4 conf/server.xml file.
•
Class Loader HOW-TO - Information about class loading in Tomcat 4, including where to place your application
classes so that they are visible.
•
JNDI Resources HOW-TO - Configuring standard and custom resources in the JNDI naming context that is
provided to each Web application.
•
Manager App HOW-TO - Operating the Manager Web app to deploy, undeploy, and redeploy applications while
Tomcat is running.
•
Proxy Support HOW-TO - Configuring Tomcat 4 to run behind a proxy server (or a Web server functioning as a
proxy server).
•
Realm Configuration HOW-TO - Description of how to configure Realms (databases of users, passwords, and
their associated roles) for use in Web applications that utilize Container Managed Security.
•
Security Manager HOW-TO - Configuring and using a Java Security Manager to support fine-grained control
over the behavior of your Web applications.
•
SSL Configuration HOW-TO - Installing and configuring SSL support so that your Tomcat will serve requests
using the https protocol.
Application Developers Documentation
The following documents are aimed at Application Developers who are constructing Web applications or Web
services that will run on Tomcat.
•
Application Developer's Guide - An introduction to the concepts of a Web application as defined in the
Servlet 2.3 Specification. Covers basic organization of your Web application source tree, the structure of a Web
application archive, and an introduction to the Web application deployment descriptor (/WEB-INF/web.xml).
•
Servlet/JSP Javadocs - The Servlet 2.3 and JSP 1.2 API Javadocs.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Catalina Developers
The following documents are for Java developers who wish to contribute to the development of the Catalina servlet
container portion of Tomcat itself, or to better understand its internal architecture and operation.
•
Functional Specifications - Requirements specifications for features of the Catalina servlet container portion of
Tomcat 4.
•
Javadocs - Javadoc API documentation for the Catalina servlet container portion of Tomcat 4.
Jasper Developers
The following documents are for Java developers who wish to contribute to the development of the Jasper JSP
container portion of Tomcat itself, or to better understand its internal architecture and operation.
•
Javadocs - Javadoc API documentation for the Jasper JSP container portion of Tomcat 4.
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
Sun Linux is restored locally from the CD-ROM drive on the Sun Cobalt LX50 server. Consult the server hardware
manual before installation to familiarize yourself with the hardware capability, and with the location and types of
connections such as USB, Ethernet, serial and VGA output as necessary.
Turn on power to the Sun Cobalt LX50 server. As the system is booting, press the <ESC> key. After a short delay
while the BIOS searches for SCSI devices, the boot device selection menu (Figure 8) will be displayed. In the boot
device selection menu, select the CD-ROM, with the Sun Linux OS Restore CD disc 1 in the CD-ROM drive.
✍
Note: To restore Sun Linux 5.0, you must have the CD-ROM set and restore locally using the
server’s CD-ROM drive. You also must connect a VGA monitor to the server, plus a PS/2 or
USB keyboard, at a minimum.
Figure 8. Boot Device Selection Menu
If the CD-ROM does not appear as a selection, it might not be set up in the BIOS or there may be a problem with the
ROM/FDD module. . Refer to the “Troubleshooting” section of this document for more information, or if you
experience difficulty. You can access BIOS setup during startup if necessary.
After the BIOS bootstrap sequence finishes, you will see a command line “boot” prompt displayed along with the
message:
- To re-install press the <ENTER> key (default after 10 seconds).
- For rescue mode, type: linux rescue <ENTER>
boot :
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
You then have the choice of restoring Sun Linux, or going to Linux Rescue mode.
•
If you choose to restore, the start sequence continues with several screens of system checks. The Sun Linux
installer will start; it takes about 45 seconds to go through its startup process.
•
If you choose linux rescue, refer to “Linux Rescue Without Restore” on page 3-47 of this document for more
information.
Warning: An automatic or rescue re-install will cause previous partitions and configurations to
be overwritten. If this is not what you want to do, be sure to select, when presented, the option
to save some partitions.
The Sun Linux splash screen is displayed (Figure 9).
Figure 9. Sun Linux Splash Screen
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
After about 20 seconds, the About to Install screen is displayed; see Figure 10.
Figure 10. About to Install Screen
This screen offers you two choices:
•
an automatic restore, where all data on the server hard drive will be overwritten and a fresh standard disk
partitioning and OS restore will occur
•
a custom partition/restore (SAVE some disk partitions). The custom install allows you to save disk partitions that
contain data you want to keep.
Click on the command button you want to start the process. The Sun Installer will be invoked; skip the next section
(“Rescue”) and proceed to “Restore (Standard)” or “Restore (Custom)”.
Restore (Standard)
The screen displays the Installing Packages screen (see Figure 11) and then begins formatting the hard drives. This
process takes about three minutes; during which time it will appear that nothing is happening if two drives are
installed in the server.
The “Package Progress” status bar then begins changing to track the progress of the install for each package, as well
as the total installation. The names of the installed files and packages are displayed in the top left corner of the install
screen as they are being installed. The file or package size, and a brief description or summary of the contents is also
displayed.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
Figure 11. Installing Packages Progress Screen
You will be prompted for CD number two; simply change to CD number 2 and the re-install continues automatically,
and so on with number 3. The entire process takes about 30 minutes.
As soon as all packages and files are installed, the system configuration will be completed in about one more minute.
You should see the following final output displayed:
unmounting filesystems...
/mnt/runtime done
disabling /dev/loop0
/proc/bus/usb done
/proc done
/dev/pts done
/mnt/sysimage/boot done
/mnt/sysimage/dev/pts done
/mnt/sysimage/diag done
/mnt/sysimage/home done
/mnt/sysimage/proc/bus/usb done
/mnt/sysimage/proc done
/mnt/sysimage/var done
/mnt/sysimage done
/mnt/source done
ejecting /tmp/cdrom...
System halted. You may now power-down.
The above messages indicate a successful OS restore. Now power-down the server.
The default restore/re-install configures LILO to run automatically upon power-up, so that LILO wil run the next time
the server is booted and thereafter. Upon the first boot after a restore, Kudzu will run and report devices that are not
already configured as “new”, then give you the option to configure. Otherwise, startup will continue. When complete,
the Localhost Login prompt will be displayed on the command line.
See “Logging in and Creating a Password” on page 3-2 for login and password setting information.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Restore (Custom)
If you choose the “SAVE some disk partitions” command button in the Install screen, the Disk Partitioning Setup
screen (Figure 12) will be displayed next.
Figure 12. Disk Partitioning Setup Screen
You have three options on this screen:
•
Have the installer automatically partition (highly recommended)
!
Caution: Do not select this choice if you have existing extra partitions on the hard drive(s) of
the Sun Cobalt LX50 server, and you want to save them. Choosing this option causes the
installer to repartition the hard drive(s), destroying all existing data.
If you want to save some partitions, choose the next option (manual partitioning).
•
Manual partition using the Disk Druid utility (next best choice)
•
Manual partition using fdisk (for experts only)
Use the keyboard arrows to highlight an item and then press <ENTER>, or use the mouse and click on a choice to
select it. An item is selected when the arrow on the left is turned upward and it is surrounded by a border.
Once you have made the choice, click on the “Next” command button in the lower right of the screen. The next screen
displayed depends on the choice you made.
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
Automatic Partitioning
If you have selected installer automatic partitioning (recommended method), the Automatic Partitioning screen is
displayed (Figure 13).
Figure 13. Automatic Partitioning Screen
Using this screen, you can:
•
Remove all Linux partitions on the selected drive. Non-Linux partitions will not be affected.
•
Remove ALL partitions (destroys ALL data on drive).
•
Leave the existing partitioning alone and create additional partitions in free space.
You can also select the drive(s) to partition by clicking on it in the list box. Once you have made your selections, click
on the “Next” button to proceed.
✍
Note: It is recommended that you check the box (lower portion of window) to enable the
Review; this allows you to view and change the automatic partitioning results.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
If you selected the first or second option listed above, a warning dialog box (see Figure 14) is displayed.
Figure 14. Partitioning Warning Dialog Box
Click the “Yes” button to proceed. The Installing Packages screen (see Figure 11 on page 3-39) is displayed, and the
re-install of the packages proceeds in the same manner as described earlier in this document (see “Restore
(Standard)” on page 3-38).
If you chose to remove all partitions, after the warning dialog box, the Disk Setup screen see (Figure 15 on page 3-42)
is displayed, showing the new configuration that the installer recommends. The Sun Linux 5.0 installer must create
partitons for the following:
Mount Point
/boot
/diag
/swap
/var
/home
Minimum Size
128 MB
128 MB
5.5 GB
1.0 GB
1 MB
(expands to fill free space on the disk)
You must choose to create this filesystem, unlike other Linux distributions.
Figure 15. Disk Setup Screen
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
This screen contains graphical and tabular displays of information for hard drives installed in the Sun Cobalt
LX50 server. Each installed drive is graphically shown in the top part of the screen with partitions shown by vertical
lines or marked with text. Those partitions correspond to entries in the table in the bottom half of the screen. If you
click on one of the areas in the graphic, the corresponding table entry is highlighted; the reverse is also true.
By selecting areas, and then clicking on the various command buttons located across the middle of the screen, you
can configure new partitions, edit existing ones, remove them, reset them to their original state (the state they were in
before you began making changes in this screen) or designate them as RAID.
You can use the <Tab> key to select the command buttons, or the partitions listed in the bottom half of the screen and
shown graphically in the top half of the screen. Continue pressing the <Tab> key until the partition you wish to select
is highlighted. Hit <ENTER>, then tab through the command buttons in the middle of the screen. Note that their
borders will be selected when highlighted, until you have selected the action you want (Edit, Delete).
When an item is selected, it is highlighted with a border, or the color of the shading changes slightly. Once an item is
selected, press <ENTER>. If you have installed a mouse, you can also just click on an item to select it.
When you select one of the disk lines displayed in the lower half of the screen, the corresponding entry in the
graphical displays at the top of the screen is also highlighted. You can use the Up/Down keyboard arrow keys to
navigate through the entries in the table until the one you want is highlighted (and active). If you are using a mouse,
just click on the menu item or item you wish to select and modify.
New Partition Setup
Once you have selected a disk area, click on the New button to display the screen shown in Figure 16.
✍
Note:
1.
If you create additional partitions, it is recommended that you use the fixed-size option for
the additional partitons.
2.
Do not perform partition setup unless you are very familiar with and understand all of the
issues involved.
Figure 16. New Partition Setup Screen
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
This screen contains a number of list boxes and other selections for configuring the partition. Table 20 describes these
selections.
Table 20. New Partition Configuration Selections
Item
Description
Mount Point
Selects where in the Linux file system the partition will be mounted
Filesystem Type
Allows you to designate it as vfat, software RAID, ext, or swap
Allowable Drives
Lists installed drives that can be partitioned
Size (MB)
Enables you to choose the size of this partition
Additional Size Options
Provides more choices for partition size and use
Force to be a primary partition
Checkbox, enabled when it appears as a larger-sized box
Check for bad blocks.
Checkbox, enabled when it appears as a larger-sized box. Invokes a function that prevents
data from being written to bad blocks by scanning the hard drive and mapping out bad
blocks (this will take some time).
Once your selections have been made, click OK to save them and close the screen, or Cancel to exit without saving.
If you have made selections that are errors, the screen does not let you save the changes; instead, an error dialog box
is displayed. An example is shown in Figure 17.
Figure 17. Partitioning Configuration Error Message
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
Edit
Clicking the Edit button, with a disk area selected, displays a dialog box (see Figure 18) with selections for
modifying the selected partition.
Figure 18. Partition Editing Screen
In this screen you can change the Mount Point, or change the type of file system (RAID, vfat, ext, or swap).
Click OK to save and exit.
Delete
Clicking on a defined partition in the table, or disk graphic, and then clicking on the Delete command button removes
the partition completely and makes the space available to other partitions.
Reset
Clicking the Reset command button resets the partition configuration of the entire disk drive to its original state (what
the setup was before you began modifying it). This is a valuable tool to use in case you have modified partitions but
encounter errors, or simply change your mind.
Make RAID
Selecting a disk area and then clicking on the RAID command button displays the RAID Configuration dialog box
(see Figure 19).
Figure 19. RAID Configuration Dialog Box
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Use the selections in this box to set up this RAID partition. RAID 1 is the default setting for a two-drive Sun Cobalt
LX50 server. Obviously, the server must have two hard drives installed in order to use RAID.
The last choice to make from the Automatic Partitioning screen (Figure 13 on page 3-41) is “Keep all partitions and
use existing free space”. Select this option and then click the Next button.
Manually Partitioning (With Disk Druid)
Disk Druid is a graphical partitioning configuration utility.
Select this option in the Disk Setup screen (Figure 15 on page 3-42) to go right to the Disk Setup screen (Figure 16 on
page 3-43). This screen has the same function, and is used the same way, as discussed in previous sections. Disk
Druid is used for partitioning by the Sun Linux 5.0 installer to perform automatic partitioning, or you can use it
manually.
In order to create a partition manually, you must create the following partitions::
/ partition
/var partition
/home partition
swap partition
✍
Note: Do not format any exisiting partitions that you want to save
Partitioning Using Fdisk
Selecting the Manually partition with fdisk item in the Disk Partitioning Setup screen (Figure 12) brings up another
screen that allows you to select the drive on which fdisk will operate (if you have more than one drive installed) by
clicking on a command button. Doing so then displays a window containing a command line for the fdisk utility.
Fdisk runs from this command line in much the same way as it does from a DOS command line, with all of the
typical menu items.
Enter <q> to quit when finished.
✍
3-46
Note: Partitioning using fdisk is not recommended. It is a much less user-friendly tool and is
more difficult to use in this environment, with the installer, than Disk Druid.
User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
Linux Rescue Without Restore
If you typed linux rescue and entered it at the boot: prompt the Sun Linux Installer will run and the Rescue screen
(see Figure 20) will be displayed after the installer starts.
✍
Note: Sun Linux 5.0 does not support the use of additional driver disks during the restore
process. Such disks can only be used after Sun Linux is booted from the hard disk of the Sun
Cobalt LX50 server.
Figure 20. Rescue Installation Screen
The Rescue screen gives you the choice of attempting to make changes to your system installation through the
sysimage file, or going to a command shell.
If you choose Continue, the Installer will mount the Linux image so that it can load at next reboot. If this operation is
successful, the screen shown in Figure 21 will be displayed.
Figure 21. Mount Completed Screen
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
If the operation is unsuccessful, the screen shown in Figure 22 will be displayed. Press <ENTER> to exit the screen
and go to the shell (command line prompt). You can then manually attempt to solve the problem.
Figure 22. Rescue Mode Error Screen
You can press <ENTER> and go to the shell, or power-down and perform a Restore operation. If you intend to use
automatic restore and let the Installer handle all partitioning and setup for you, that might be the easiest way to
proceed at this point.
If you had chosen the Skip command button in the Rescue Installation screen (Figure 20), and the system is located
and a system image (sysimage) is created, you will go right to the shell and the prompt shown below will be
displayed. You can perform any necessary operations at this time:
When finished please exit from the shell and your system will reboot.
sh-2.05#
When you are finished, type exit at the prompt and <RETURN> to exit the shell. When the message System Halted.
You may now-power down is displayed, power down the Server. Upon power up the system will boot and run LILO.
Using a Remote Console (Monitor) Through a Serial Connection
You can connect a remote console, for example a laptop PC, through a serial port to the LX50 server. Using a remote
terminal emulation application, such as Hyperterminal, you can implimenet Linux rescue, or view log information
output from the server over the serial port duirng the restore process.
You will need the RJ45-to-DB9 adaptor. You will also need a serial cable. The serial port on the front panel of the
Server is accessible through the RJ-45 connector located at the top right corner of the panel, or you can connect to the
RJ-45 serial connector on the back panel (see Chapter 2 of this document for a diagram of the rear panel connections).
When a device is plugged into the front panel, the rear port is automatically disabled. Connect to an available serial
port on the PC, then start a terminal communications utility program, such as Hyperterminal, to make a serial
connection and display the console output. Table 21 lists settings and other considerations for serial console use.
The Serial Console Redirection is enabled by default. To change the default Serial Console settings in BIOS do the
following steps:
1.
During the initial boot up sequence press key <F2>
2.
In the BIOS Setup Utility menu, use the arrow keys and select the Server option
3.
Select Console Redirection option from the Server menu, and hit enter
4.
From the Console Redirection menu the following settings can be changed:
- Enable/Disable the Serial Console Redirection;
- Serial Port: COM2 IRQ3 by default
- Baud Rate: 9600 by default
- Flow Control: No Flow Control
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Restoring Sun Linux From CD-ROM
5.
Select F10 / Yes
6.
The machine will reboot with the new settings. If you modify the baud rate setting, you will need to make
changes to the following files from within Linux:
/etc/inittab
- change the 9600 in the following line to match your baud rate:
7:12345:respawn:/sbin/mgetty -s 9600 -r -b ttyS1
/etc/lilo.conf
- change occurences of 9600 with the baud rate specified in the bios
6.
Run the LILO command at the command prompt
7.
Reboot
Disabling Serial Console Redirection
You may wish to disable the serial console redirection if you want to attach a device (e.g., modem) to the serial port.
1.
Complete the first part of the previous section and select Disable for Serial Console.
2.
Redirection.
- reboot the machine after the BIOS settings was saved
- on the command prompt log in as root
- edit the /etc/inittab file
- comment out the following line by putting the ‘#’ character in front of it:
#
7:12345:respawn:/sbin/mgetty -s 9600 -r -b ttyS1
- save the changes and exit your editor
3. Edit the /etc/lilo.conf file.
- modify the line that reads “default=linux” to “default=linux-serial”
- save the changes and exit your editor
4. Run the lilo command on the command prompt.
5.
Reboot.
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Table 21. Considerations for Serial Console Use
Item
Comments
Remote Terminal Settings
Set the Terminal emulation for ANSI emulation, 9600 BAUD, 8 - N- 1. No flow control.
Linux Rescue or Restore
(log view) Command Line
Ebtries
To use the serial console in Linux Rescue mode, let the server boot from the CD-ROM with the
Sun Linux Restore CD #1 in the CD-ROM drive. Enter, at the boot prompt, the following
information:
boot: linux rescue console=ttyS1,9600
To use the serial connection to view log information during the Restore process, enter:
Making Server BIOS
Setup Changes
When using Minicom or Kermit, keyboard function key F10 does not save BIOS changes and exit,
as it should.
In Hyperterminal, F10 also does not save and exit.
Server Power-down While
Using Linux Serial Mode
If you use the LILO option for Linux serial, you must have an active RS-232 connection made to
the server. If you do not, the server will not power down until an active connection is made.
Closing Serial Port
Session
From the perspective of the server, the serial session will not close automatically if the RS-232
cable is unplugged. Therefore, you must close the connection in your terminal problem when
finished to avoid leaving the session active and the server port open.
Administration
Managing, Configuring and Validating Server Operation
The built-in service partition on the hard disk of the Sun Cobalt LX50 server allows you to perform server
management, configuration and validation testing. To bring up the service partition, reboot and press the <F4>
function key when the first BIOS screen appears.
Any configuration changes (CPU, memory, hard disk, add in PCI cards, and so forth) causes the Sun Cobalt
LX50 server to revert to its factory-default state, regardless of how the server boot options have been set up using
System Setup Utility (SSU) or the BIOS setup.
Server Configuration and Management
This section provides an overview as to what options and settings are available from the service partiton, using SSU
and SCB2.
SSU allows you to manage the following:
•
System Event Log (SEL)
•
System Data Records (SDR)
•
Field Replaceable Units (FRU)
•
Platform Events
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Administration
SSU allows you to configure the following:
•
User Preferences
•
Boot devices
•
Security
Server configuration and management is done from the sevice partition. You can access the service partition by
pressing <F4> during startup. After a short delay, the Service Partition Menu will be displayed. Use arrow keys and
<ENTER> to choose the Create Diskettes or System Utilities functions. Use the <ESC> key to back out of menus or
selections.
Figure 23. Service Partition Menu
Figure 24. System Utilities Menu
Choose the “Quit to DOS” menu item. Then:
1.
When the service partition DOS prompt (C:) appears, change directories to SSU:
cd SSU
2.
Enter one of the following commands at the prompt:
C:\SSU SSU (graphics mode, easiest to use if you have a mouse connected), or
C:\SSU /t (text mode, suitable for HyperTerminal, for example)
Managing the System Event Log
The server maintains a system event log in non-volatile memory. The log can be viewed and cleared using the SSU.
To manage the log, double-click the SEL Manager menu item on the Available Tasks pane of the main SSU window.
The System Event Log appears, and you can use the menu bar at the top of the log window to save the log, open a log,
clear the log, reload the log, and sort the log.
Managing the Sensor Data Records
The Sensor Data Record (SDR) Manager allows you to view the current sensor data for the system, save the SDR data
to a file, and view SDR information previously saved to a file. The SDR data is saved in standard SDR format. To
manage the SDR data, double-click the SDR Manager menu item on the Available Tasks pane of the main SSU
window. The SDR Manager main window appears, and you can use the menu bar at the top of the window to manage
SDR data.
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Managing the Field Replaceable Units
The Field Replaceable Unit (FRU) Manager allows you to view the FRU information stored in the Sun Cobalt
LX50 server. The FRU records contain information about the system components, such as manufacturer’s name,
product name, part number, version number and asset tags. This information may prove useful when troubleshooting
faults in the server.
To manage the FRUs, double-click the FRU Manager menu item on the Available Tasks pane of the main SSU
window. The FRU Manager main window appears, and you can use the menu bar at the top of the log window to
manage FRU information.
✍
Note: Only two fields can be changed. These are accessed from the service partition menu
system. You can change the system serial number from the chassis and asset tracking number.
Both of these are customer-optional fields that are left blank when the system is shipped from
the factory
Managing Platform Events
The Platform Event Manager (PEM) allows you to configure and manage Platform Event Paging (PEP), BMC-LAN
Configuration, and the Emergency Management Port (EMP).
To use PEM, double-click the Platform Event Manager menu item on the Available Tasks pane of the main SSU
window. The Platform Event Manager main window appears. You can click on the buttons in this window to perform
platform management.
Configuring Boot Devices
The Multiboot Add-in (MBA) feature of the SSU allows you to select the boot order for all bootable peripheral
devices. To select the boot device priority, double-click the MBA Boot Devices menu item in the Available Tasks pane
of the SSU main window. The Multiboot Options Add-in window appears (see Figure 25).
To change boot priorities, select a boot device and use the Move Down and Move Up buttons move the device boot
priority.
Figure 25. Multiboot Add-in Window
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Administration
Configuring Security
The Password Authorization feature of the SSU allow you to set BIOS passwords and other security options. To
configure server security, double-click the PWA Security menu item in the Available Tasks pane of the SSU main
window. The main Security window appears (see Figure 26).
Use the Admin Password, User Password and Options buttons to configure the security options.
Figure 26. Security Main Window
Setting User Preferences
The following user preferences may be set from the main SSU window:
•
Color (foreground and background)
•
Mode (expert, intermediate, novice)
•
Language
•
Status Bar Display
Server Validation Testing
Server Validation testing is also performed from the service partition. Follow the directions listed in the Server
Configuration and Management section of this document to access the service partition. To perform server validation
testing, follow these steps:
1.
When the service partition DOS prompt (C:) appears, change directories to SCB2TEST:
cd SCB2TEST
2.
Enter the following command at the prompt:
C:\SCB2TEST> RUNTEST
The Sun Cobalt LX50 server BYO Platform Confidence Test main menu appears, as shown in Figure 27. You can
use this menu to perform various platform tests.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
Figure 27. Platform Confidence Test Window
Troubleshooting
This section covers basic troubleshooting information.
Sun Linux Will Not Install from Local CD-ROM
Three things must occur in order to install from the CD-ROMs:
1.
The system BIOS must detect the installed CD-ROM drive.
2.
The BIOS must be setup to boot from the CD-ROM drive.
3.
A valid bootable CD-ROM must be installed in the drive.
If you power up the server and then press <F2> at the bootup screen, the server enters BIOS setup mode. Navigate to
the BOOT screen, then to the boot priority list. Select either the 1st or 2nd order in the list. You should then be able to
select the CD-ROM drive. If you cannot get the CD-ROM selection to display, something is wrong with the hardware.
If the floppy/CD-ROM module has power, then check the data connector.
Once the BIOS detects the presence of the CD-ROM drive, select it as either the 1st or 2nd boot device. It is
suggested that you select Removable Device (floppy drive) as the first boot priority, in case you need to boot from a
floppy later. Make the CD-ROM the 2nd order device, then the hard drive 3rd.
After you verify the BIOS is correctly setup, make sure the installed CD-ROM is the correct one. It should have the
boot.img, bootnet.img, or pcmcia.img (and other) image files in the images directory. If it is the correct disk but will
not boot and install, the disk may be damaged.
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Troubleshooting
Serial Console Doesn't Work
1.
Check if the cable is plugged in.
2.
Check if the Serial Console is Disabled.
3.
Check if the Baud Rate for your tool is set up also to 9600 (or whatever you have the serial console set up as).
4.
Reboot the system if you unplugged the Serial Console cable while you have the Serial Console connection open,
because the port session does not disconnect when the serial cable is removed.
System Initialization Sequence Does Not Display on Remote Console
(Serial Connected)
Make sure that you either have Linux-serial set up as a default LILO setting, or that you have entered it in at the LILO
boot prompt.
startx Does Not Start the X Windows System
X Windowsmay not start correctly if your keyboard, mouse, or monitor aren't correctly recognized. Rerun the setup
utility to make sure that X Windows is configured properly. If you are using a USB mouse, make sure that it was
plugged in when you started up your system. Otherwise, you will need to reboot it to get it to recognize it correctly.
Mouse/keyboard Do Not Work
Check to see if your mouse and keyboard are plugged in. If you need to use both PS/2 keyboard and mouse at the
same time, use the PS/2 splitter.
✍
Note: Legacy USB support is not enabled by the BIOS. As a result, USB keyboards and mice
will not be recognized until after the Linux operating environment has loaded. In particular,
selecting different options in LILO will not work with a USB keyboard.
You may have trouble with your keyboard if the keyboard has different keymap setting. Run ‘setup’ to reconfigure
your keyboard. Similarly, you can run ‘setup’ to reconfigure your mouse if your settings have changed.
Error Messages
ERROR: 84FF:System Event Log Full
This is simply a notification during bootup that the BIOS Event Log file on the Sun Cobalt LX50 server is full and
should be cleared. The log has a 400-message size limit.
If the Event Log is not read periodically and cleared, it will eventually fill. You can proceed with the install and ignore
this by pressing the <F1> key. The event log can be accessed and read from BIOS setup, or using the System Setup
Utility (SSU). See the Server Configuration and Management section of this chapter for more information on SSU.
You can also configure the event log to clear upon bootup. At startup, press <F2> to enter BIOS setup. Navigate to the
Server tab, then to the Event Log Configuration item. Select the Clear All Event Logs item and press <ENTER>.
Select YES and press <ENTER> again. Exit BIOS setup while saving the changes.
System Reports That it Can't Detect a Modem
You probably still have serial redirection enabled. Disable it before attaching a modem.
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Chapter 3: Software Setup
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User Guide—Sun Linux 5.0
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