teacher resource - Eco-Schools Northern Ireland

Keystages 1
&
Teaching the 3
Reduce, Reuse
2
An Eco-Schools
Production
Rs:
, Recycle
A
r
TEACHER RESOURCE
Teaching the 3 Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Keystages 1 & 2
First published 2011
Published by:
Eco-Schools Northern Ireland
Bridge House
2 Paulett Avenue
Belfast BT5 4HD
Copyright © TIDY Northern Ireland and The Department of the Environment
Author: Mike Fleming
Illustrator: Mark Reihill
Designer: Richard Ryan
ISBN: 978-0-9572044-3-0
www.eco-schoolsni.org
www.rethinkwasteni.org
Contents:
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
How your school can become an Eco-School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Reduce Reuse Recycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
ACTIVITIES & RESOURCES
Activity 1 - What is waste?
................................................................................
6
Activity 2 - What happens to all our rubbish?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Activity 3 - How can we reduce the amount of waste we create?. . . . . . . . . . 12
Activity 4 - Reduce Litter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Activity 5 - Reduce Paper Waste. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Activity 6 - Art Exhibition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Activity 7 - Class Recycling Scheme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Activity 8 - How to Change a Banana into a Carrot!!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Waste Free Classroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Rubbish Monster Activities & how they
relate to the NI Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Waste Fact Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Local Government Contacts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Web Activities / Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Introduction
The aim of the eight activities outlined in this resource is
to help pupils discover what waste is and what happens
to it; how much we as individuals create and what we can
do to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. Pupils are encouraged
to look at their own habits and to consider how these can
be changed.. Through these activities it is hoped that the
pupils develop a sense of personal responsibility with
regard to waste and its environmental impact. We intend
not only to establish a waste free classroom but habits
that last a lifetime.
The activities are based on eight main themes and build
on the pupil’s existing knowledge.
Activities have been designed to suit the mixed abilities
across the Key Stages and are integrated into the ‘Rubbish
Monster’ books, forming the backbone of the stories.
The overarching aim of the programme is to create a
generation of advocates for the Reduce, Reuse and
Recycle mantra through fun, educational stories
and interesting activities.
1.
Eco-Schools is an international
How does the Eco-Schools
award programme that guides
programme work?
schools on their sustainable
Children are the driving force behind Eco-Schools.
journey, providing a framework to They lead the Eco-Committee and help carry out
an audit to assess the environmental performance
help embed these principles into
of their school.
the heart of school life.
Through consultation with the rest of the school
Eco-Schools is one of five environmental
education programmes run internationally by
the Foundation for Environmental Education
or FEE. In Northern Ireland the Eco-Schools
programme is operated by Tidy Northern Ireland,
an environmental charity.
Once registered, schools follow a
simple seven-step process which
helps them to address a variety of
environmental themes, ranging from
litter and waste to healthy living and
biodiversity.
What are the main steps
in the process?
rt
He
re..
a
St
Joining the Eco-Schools
programme is free to schools
and it makes tackling sustainable
issues manageable and easy for
all schools. Studying many of
the topics can also help your
school save money.
and the wider community it is the pupils that
decide which environmental themes they want to
address and how they are going to do it.
Measuring and monitoring is an integral part of
the Eco-Schools programme, providing schools
with all the evidence they need to really shout
about their environmental success.
.
Eco- Code
Informing &
Involving
Form a
Committee
Conduct an
Environmental
review
Monitor &
Evaluate
Develop an
Action Plan
Curriculum
2.
There is lots more information and support on the Eco-Schools programme on our website
www.eco-schoolsni.org Here you can also find templates, teaching resources, information on our
delivery partners and information on competitions and events.
Becoming an Eco-School
1. Set up an
Action team/
Eco-Committee
The Pupils can be selected by peers or pupils can nominate adults
within the school community to be on the committee. Pupil members
of the committee are responsible for taking ideas from the rest of the
pupils and reporting back results of committee meetings to all the
classes or forms in the school.
2. Conduct an
Environmental
review
This can be completed using the Eco-Schools simple environmental
review sheet (for bronze and silver) and formal environmental review
sheet for Green Flag. Doing the environmental review should enable
the Eco-Committee to highlight areas within the school that need
addressed such as litter or energy.
3. Make an
Action Plan
The Action plan should be included in your School Development Plan.
The Pupils on the Eco-Committee take responsibility for leading some
action areas. The Action Plan prioritises targets i.e. those areas that
need work that have been highlighted by the school’s Environmental
Review. The Action Plan should include how activities will be
monitored and evaluated when the time frames have been completed.
Schools must cover one major topic (in depth) and two additional
minor topics.
4. Integrate the
programme
into the
curriculum
The school has a curriculum plan integrating a range of ESD issues
into the curriculum across all year groups in all subjects. Aspects
of Eco-Schools activities integrated into a range of subjects across
the curriculum via ESD for the majority of year groups. Issues
surrounding sustainable development are explored through
curriculum activities in many year groups.
5. Monitor and
Evaluate
This section is about collecting information and relating it to
targets set out on your action plan. The Eco-Committee ensures that
monitoring of action is on-going and that some of it is carried out by
the pupils. The Eco-Committee meets to review progress and analyse
the data collected.
6. Inform the
whole school
and the wider
Community
Eco-Schools activities are displayed for the local community.
e.g. noticeboard/ website. The whole school engages in a Day of
Action (or similar action). The wider community (can include
Non-Government Organisations, parents, community groups,
businesses etc.) are involved in the activities going on in the school.
Pupils can also write reports of activities for the local press.
7. D
evelop an
Eco-Code
The whole school is given the opportunity to make suggestions
for what they believe should be included in the Eco-Code. The EcoCommittee draws up a code from suggestions collected and presents
it to the school for approval. The Eco-Code is displayed on the EcoSchools notice-board and in all classrooms. The Eco-Code is reviewed
by the whole school every year to make sure it remains relevant.
3.
There are three great ways YOU can eliminate waste and protect your
environment! Waste, and how we choose to handle it, affects our world’s
environment -- that’s YOUR environment, everything that surrounds you
including the air, water, land, plants, and man-made things. The waste we
create has to be carefully controlled to be sure that it does not harm both
our health and also the environment.
What exactly is “waste”?
Simply speaking, waste is anything discarded, rejected, abandoned, or
otherwise released into the environment in a manner (or quantity) that
could have an impact on that environment.
How can you help?
You can help by learning about and PRACTISING the three R’s of waste
management: Reduce, reuse, and recycle! Practising all three of these
activities every day is not only important for a healthy environment, but it
can also be fun.
Reduce
Reduce/Reduction: to make something smaller or use less, resulting in
a smaller amount of waste. “Source reduction” is reducing waste before
you purchase it, or by purchasing products that are not wasteful in their
packaging or use. A key part of waste “reduction” is “conservation” - using
natural resources wisely, and using less than usual in order avoid waste. You
can practice reduction by selecting products that do not have to be added to
landfills or the waste stream in general. How can you reduce?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Buy products with little or minimal packaging
Try to avoid single serve containers
Instead buy large recyclable bottles
Reuse water bottles each time you go to the gym etc
Buy in bulk and then divide the goods into smaller portions
Buy concentrates rather than diluted products
Refuse store bags, take your own
Say No to Junk mail contact the Mail Preferencing service to have Junk
mail stopped
• Grow your own fruit and vegetables
4.
Reuse
You can “reuse” materials in their original form instead of throwing
them away, or pass those materials on to others who could use them too!
Remember, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure! Here are some
examples of how to reuse ...
• T
ake along washable cups or travel mugs instead of disposables; a lot of
restaurants and stores will be glad to fill or refill your own mug
• When you do use disposables like plastic cups, plates, utensils, and
plastic food storage bags, don’t throw them away! Wash and reuse them!
• If you are replacing household items donate the old items to charity
shops so that someone else may get use from them
• Use cloth gift bags and stop ripping the paper off gifts! If you remove the
wrapping paper carefully, you can use it again!
• Use washable table napkins instead of paper napkins
• Buy washable cotton nappies instead of single use ones
Recycle
Recycling occurs when you save and take reusable materials to places where
they can be remade into either the same product or new products, rather
than to just toss them away. Making new items from recycled ones also
takes fewer energy and other resources than making products from brand
new materials. Your recycling mission is not impossible! In fact, it is very
simple: Don’t throw away anything that can be recycled!
These are some things that can be recycled:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Acid Batteries
• Aluminium Cans
Cardboard • Chemicals Glass (particularly bottles and jars) Magazines • Metal
Oil
• Paint
Plastic Bags • Plastic Bottles Tyres
• Writing/Copy Paper
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Building Materials
Electronic equipment
Lead Newspapers Paper Steel Cans Garden Waste
Some of the items listed above will require special handling procedures
and special recycling places just ask your local recycling office or council
representative.
WASTE HIERARCHY
Most favoured option
REDUCE Lowering the amount of waste produced
REUSE using materials repeatedly
RECYCLE using materials to make new products
RECOVERY recovering energy from waste
LANDFILL safe disposal of waste to landfill
least favoured option
5.
Activity 1
What
is waste?
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Understand the importance of reducing waste
• Develop a personal sense of responsibility for
reducing waste
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy - Talking and listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: Mathematics and Numeracy - Number.
Thinking Skills & Personal Capabilities:
Thinking, problem-solving and decision making,
self-management.
Cross-Curricular Skills:
Communication, Using Mathematics.
Eco-Schools
Links to Eco-Schools topic of waste, climate
change and litter.
Reduce Activity
6.
TV’s
cookers
fridges
HOUSEHOLD
MACHINES
waste
banana
skins
crisp bags
sweet wrappers
FOOD
apple cores
LITTER
‘carry out’
remains
Clas
acti s
vity
Conc
ept M
:
w
a
hite b
p–W
phras oard and rite the w
e
o
a
on th s they ass sk pupils rd ‘waste’
e boa
ociat
to ca
on th
ll
e
r
e
This
shou d linking with ‘was out word
ld lea
s and
conn
te’. R
smal
ect
eco
dt
lg
to be roups or o further ed words rd these
gin a
as a c
discu
with
ar
ss
Kla
Teach
ing A W-L grid ss. To ena ion either rows. (
b
ctivit
i
s
ies fo ee Active le the cla n
ss
r Key
Learn
stage
i
s 1&2 ng and
CCE
Key Stage 1:
A)
Read ‘Does the Rubbish Monster live in your
house?’ book to your class, stop at appropriate places to ask
“would you ever be like this? If your pupils had a rubbish monster
in their shoes what sort of things would they do? In groups have
them make a list using the Time sheet on p8 to help.
Group/
individual
activity:
Key Stage 2:
Read the Rubbish Monster book to your
class, Ask your pupils to produce a diary
entry using the time sheet on p8 as a guide
to showing the waste they create on an
average day.
For those pupils who find the
above suggestions difficult:
After reading the Rubbish Monster book
provide a range of waste resources and ask
your pupils to produce a group collage. Ask
each child to show what they put on the
collage and why.
Finally:
Ask pupils to complete the sentence:
Something I have learned ......
and one change I am going to make this week .......
Use maths skills to estimate how much waste an
individual pupil generates in one day, if appropriate.
7.
A day in the
life
of a r
7am
9AM
11AM
1PM
3PM
5PM
7PM
9PM
11PM
Activity 2
What
happens
to all our
rubbish?
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Evaluate the impact of waste they create in
their environment
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy - Talking and
listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: The World Around Us - Geography
(environmental awareness); Science and
Technology (properties and characteristics of
materials).
Thinking Skills & Personal Capabilities:
Thinking, Problem-Solving and decision
making.
Cross-Curricular Skills:
Communication.
Eco-Schools
Links to Eco-Schools waste, litter and climate
change topics.
Reduce Activity
9.
Class y:
activbirting to school an ite.mMtahkeeysure
Group/
individual
activity:
ould
he bin
se of in t
Pupils sh
o
p
is
d
y
uall
would us ems are clean!
e it
s
er each
that the
nd consid ou
a
le
b
a
t
a
y
items on
s – would
Place the questions such a at home? How
in
ing
item ask row this in your b ade of?
h
m
t
is
y
ll
it
norma
you think
o
d
t
a
h
often? W
board.
he white
t
n
o
s
r
e
answ
all this
Write the
ey think
h
t
e
r
e
h
w
away?
y takes it
he pupils
r
t
r
k
lo
s
a
in
n
b
e
Th
the
oes when
rubbish g
fills. ct of land
je
b
u
s
e
h
et
Introduc
Pupils are going to create their own
mini landfill by burying items of the
rubbish they brought into school. These
items will be then checked after two weeks and one month.
Choose a selection of items from those provided by the pupils e.g.. a
plastic bottle, a milk carton, a sheet of newspaper, a crisp packet, and
some bread crusts.
Key Stage 1:
Ask the pupils to record their predictions for each item – rot or not?
Key Stage 2:
Ask the pupils to record their predictions for each item – will it decompose? If not, why not?
For those pupils who find the above suggestions
difficult:
Pupils are given a list or symbols of the items beside which are two
columns labelled (with words or symbols) rot or not. The pupils are
asked to place a tick in the column that they think applies to each
individual item. Alternatively, they could sort a selection of waste
materials into two boxes labelled with symbols rot or not.
Finally:
Pupils will be given the opportunity to discuss their
findings and explore the implications to the environment.
10.
r
ROT or NOT Item
ROT or NOT
What will happen?
What Actually happened?
Activity 3
How can
we reduce
the amount
of waste
we create?
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Know and understand alternative ways of
dealing with waste
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy - Talking and
listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: Mathematics and Numeracy - Number; shape and space.
KS1&2: The World Around Us – Geography
(environmental awareness).
Thinking Skills & Personal Capabilities:
Thinking, Problem- Solving and decision
making, Being Creative.
Cross-Curricular Skills:
Communication, Using Mathematics.
Eco-Schools
This activity could help monitor the amount of rubbish in your school and could be used as a baseline as part of the EcoSchools programme or also as a curriculum
activity for the topic of waste. (Eco-Schools
methodology Step 5)
Reduce Activity
12.
Clas
acti s
vity
Pupi
ls sho
:
u
t
Group/
individual
activity:
Using the items of waste brought into
school by the pupils:
ld bri
hey w
n
bin. M ould usua g to scho
l
ol a
l
a
y
k
d
e sur
clean
e tha ispose of n item
!
t thes
i
e item n the
s are
Intro
d
Redu uce the co
ce, R
n
euse cept of
, Rec
ycle.
Key Stage 1:
Divide the pupils into small groups and ask them to come up
with (and briefly note with key words) some ideas how they could
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Identify how some of these ideas can be
incorporated into classroom life.
Key Stage 2:
Divide the pupils into small groups and ask them to come up with
and record some ideas how they could Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.
Identify how some of these ideas can be incorporated into
classroom life.
For those pupils who find
the above
suggestions
difficult:
Graph3D Drink Carton
Divide the children into
practice.
groups and ask them
Putting ideas into
to come up with some
ideas how they could
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. The teacher or classroom
assistant should record
these ideas and also
verbally reinforce them.
rtons
ash their drinks ca
w
d
an
ep
ke
to
ls
Ask the pupi
rtons to
day attach these ca
ch
ea
en
Th
y.
da
each
a graph.
cardboard to form
inks cartons
pils how many dr
pu
e
th
ow
sh
ill
w
This
k.
landfill each wee
they send to the
?
this be in one year
How many would
acked in the
ount look like if st
am
is
th
ld
ou
w
t
ha
W
playground?
asked to bring
e pupils should be
th
y,
da
al
fin
e
th
r
Fo
containers.
drinks in reusable
ect the graph?
How does this aff
waste
having a week of
of
e
ng
le
al
ch
a
ls
Set the pupi
free breaks!
of the week.
review at the end
Discuss ideas and
Activity 1
W-L grid begun in
Ke
th
to
d
ad
to
Continue
13.
How I Will Reduce Reuse and recycle
Reduce
TODAY!!
Re-Use
Recycle
Activity 4
Reduce
Litter
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Recognise the consequences of dropping litter
• Develop a sense of responsibility and reduce
anti-social behaviour
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy – talking and
listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: The World Around Us – Geography
(environmental awareness).
KS1&2: The Arts – Art and Design; Music and
Drama.
KS1&2 PD&MU – learning to live as members of
the community.
Thinking Skills & Personal Capabilities:
Being Creative.
Cross-Curricular Skills:
Communication, Using ICT.
Eco-Schools
This lesson can be used as a curricular link if
your school is using litter as a focus topic on the
Eco-School’s Programme.
Reduce Activity
15.
Activity 4 - REDUCE LITTER
1.
I drop
l itter
Bag blows into
nearby field.
cow eats it and
chokes
Rats
gather
to look
for food
People annoyed
about state
of footpath
Consequence wheel
step by step.
cow dies
2.
Bag blows into
nearby field.
cow eats it and
chokes
farmer loses
money
Rats
gather
to look
for food
Danger of rats
getting into
houses
I drop
l itter
People annoyed
about state
of footpath
Children afraid
to play outside
16.
I drop
l itter
Gardens
become
untidy
because
litter
blows in
House
prices
drop in the
area and
no-one wants
to live there
3.
Group activity:
(The ideas explored in the Consequence Wheel below and the complexity of these ideas can be
adapted to reflect the age and ability of the group.)
Consequence Wheel – following the initial
discussion ask pupils to consider a chain
of events created by the dropping of litter.
Use the examples in the illustrations of
Consequence wheels to help you. In the initial
stages teachers may need to give pupils
direction. For example, what might happen
to other people, animals, the environment,
health and vermin?
have them complete a third associated
consequence and then suggest they
complete the chain by suggesting further
consequences and recording them in the third
circle – two for each of the consequences they
recorded in the second circle. It is possible
to continue the concentric circles recording
further consequences or to change the initial
statement in the central circle.
Key Stage 1:
For pupils who find the above
suggestions difficult:
Draw two concentric circles on the white
board. In the centre of the first write ‘I drop
litter…’ and ask for suggestions of possible
consequences and reasons. When one
suggestion is given encourage pupils to think
of an associated consequence and reason.
Write both suggestions in the second circle
putting divisions between them as in the
illustrations. Depending on the ability of
the class, pupils may be able to look at each
suggestion in turn and form two further
consequences for each. A useful question to
encourage thinking is, ‘And then what might
happen?’
Key Stage 2:
As with Key Stage 1 use the illustrations to
guide you to draw three concentric circles
on the white board with three sections in the
second circle and six in the third circle. Write
‘I drop litter..’ in the first circle and encourage
pupils to Think, Pair, Share suggestions for a
consequence and the reason for one section
of the second circle, followed by an associated
consequence and reason for the second
section. Provide pupils with a paper copy of the
Consequence Wheel and ask them to
record suggestions so far.
In groups
Clas
acti s
vity
Discu
:
“Wha
ssion
t is lit
:
ter?”
Refer to their class walk and demonstrate
how you can record their discussion of
consequences using the Consequence Wheel.
Draw two concentric circles, each with one
section and no divisions. Alternatively you
may decide to use a visual flow chart.
Group/
individual
activity:
(The ideas explored in the Consequence Wheel
below and the complexity of these ideas can be
adapted to reflect the age and ability of the group.)
Consequence Wheel
Consequence Wheel – following the initial
discussion ask pupils to consider a chain of
events created by the dropping of litter. Use the
examples in the illustrations of Consequence
wheels to help you. In the initial stages
teachers may need to give pupils direction. For
example, what might happen to other people,
animals, the environment, health and vermin?
:
st the
Finallye together to compareparniodritcoisnintrga in
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and
ity in
Pupils can s of dropping litter
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17.
Activity 5
Reduce
Paper
Waste
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Become aware of the advantages for the
environment of reducing our use of trees
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy - talking and
listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: The World Around Us – Geography
(environmental awareness).
Thinking Skills & Personal Capabilities:
Thinking, problem solving and decision making,
working with others.
Cross-Curricular Skills:
Communication, Using Mathematics, Using ICT.
Eco-Schools
This activity could be used if your school is
focusing on the topic of waste. Pupils may come
up with alternatives to using paper and therefore
in turn create less waste in the classroom.
Reduce &
18.
Reuse Activity
=
Class/group ac
tivity:
Pupils can either wa
lk or look around th
e room and identify
items that are mad
e from paper e.g. ca
rdboard, tissue, bo
oks.
Key Stage 1: The pu
pils may collect thes
e items for a circle tim
discussion.
e
Key Stage 2: The pu
pils may make a note
of these items, and
suggest others that
may be used in scho
ol, for a class discus
sion.
For pupils who find
the above suggestio
ns difficult: The pupils may each
collect one item they
have identified for
whole class discussio
n
Classroom paper audit:
Key Stage 1:
Ask pupils for suggestions how their discussion could be recorded to
show the paper products, their use and how the amount could be reduced.
Encourage them to think of using ICT or a computer package. The Resource
on p20 may be used as a guide. They should print a copy of their work.
Key Stage 2:
Ask pupils to create a way of recording their discussion using an ICT
format to collate the data collected. Their record should:
•
Be structured and easily read Identify the products, use, ways to reduce
and/or environmentally friendly options.
•
edit print and save their work.
For pupils who find the above suggestions difficult:
Should use a suitable computer package and work with a teacher or other
classroom assistant to record their discussion in stages; products, use, ways
to reduce or other environmentally friendly alternatives. Ask pupils to
recall what has been recorded and provide clues where necessary.
Feed Back:
Use a decision diagram to explore the various
options created by looking at the advantages and
disadvantages of each. Together decide on an action
plan to implement their prioritised ideas in the
classroom.
19.
REDUCE PAPER WASTE
Paper used today in school
Used for
Non- paper alternatives
Activity 6
Art
Exhibition
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Explore their perception of waste
• Identify creative and fun ways to reuse rubbish
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy – talking and listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: Mathematics and Numeracy – measure; number.
KS1&2: The Arts – Art and Design
Thinking Skills & Personal Capabilities:
Working with others, being creative.
Cross-Curricular Skills:
Communication, Using Mathematics, Using ICT.
Eco-Schools
This is a great activity if your school is focusing
on the topic of waste. It is helping pupils in your
school to understand how waste products can
be recycled and reused and thus reducing the
amount of waste going to landfill. Also links to
topic of Climate Change.
Reuse &
Recycle Activity
21.
Activity 6 - Art Exhibition
Group
Class
activity:
The teache
r should pro
vide
pupils with
the basic
knowledge
of how pap
er
is made and
its impact o
n
natural reso
urces..
Key Sta
g
e 1:
Pupils s
ho
items o uld work in gr
f rubbis
oups to
hc
for
Waste p
aper sh an be used to c m ideas of how
ould be
reate w
can wri
or
on
te these
ideas on e element. Th ks of art. et
the whi
Key Sta
te board eacher
ge 2:
.
The pu
pils wil
l be ask
of rubb
ed
ish can
be used to form ideas o
paper s
f ho
to c
ho
researc uld be one elem reate works of w items
ha
ar
e
(e.g. Tra rtists who inclu nt. The pupils t. Waste
s
cey Em
hould
d
e rubbi
in) and
sh in th
u
s
eir work
e this to
For pup
inspire
i
l
s
t
hem.
w
h
sugge
o find
stions d
Group
activity:
activi
ty:
the abo
ve
ifficult:
The tea
cher or
cla
with pu
pils how ssroom assist
ant sho
items o
create t
uld d
f ru
he
recorde ir own works o bbish can be u iscuss
d on the
f art. Th
s
ese idea ed to
w
the end
s should
of the s hite board and
ession.
b
read ou
t aloud e
at
Key Stages 1&2:
Adapt the following suggestions according to the ability
of your class; In groups ask pupils to decide on a subject and plan
an artwork for their group incorporating the use of paper. A range of
waste materials should be made available including those brought
from home. After an appropriate allocation of time have each group
present their work for others to guess its representation. For example
an animal, scene, vehicle or object. Encourage each group to identify
any difficulties and how they were overcome.
For pupils who find the above suggestions difficult:
Have pupils decide what they would like to make
using waste materials for example an animal or
garden scene. Help them to select appropriate
materials to complete their work.
Finally:
Have each group explain their roles within
their group and the contributions each made
to their group, evaluating how successful
their work was.
22.
Activity 7
Class
Recycling
Scheme
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Know products made from recycled materials
• Understand the importance of recycling
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy - Talking and
listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: Mathematics and Numeracy - Measure;
number.
KS1&2: The Arts – Art and Design
KS1&2: The World Around Us - Geography
(environmental awareness); Science and
Technology (properties and characteristics of
materials).
Thinking Skills & Personal Capabilities:
Working with others, managing information.
Cross-Curricular Skills:
Communication, Using ICT.
Eco-Schools
Eco-Schools topics of Waste and Climate
Change – use towards 7 steps of environmental
review and action plan when completing audit
activity.
Reduce &
Recycle Activity
23.
Activity 7 - Class Recycling Scheme
Group
activity:
Key Stage 1:
Class
discuss
io
n:
Use an inte
ractive whit
e board
or supervis
e pupils to
research
the range o
f products m
ade from
recycled ma
terials.
As a class the pupils should be asked by
the teacher to suggest ideas for an Action Plan
to promote recycling in the classroom. This may include an audit
(either hand written or on computer) of all those things in the classroom
that could be recycled; deciding where these items could be collected in the
classroom; a rota of pupils responsible for the collection bins etc. Teachers
can record the ideas on a white board for all to see and together they agree
to a workable Action Plan, using the resource on p26 as a guide.
Key Stage 2:
In teams the pupils should be asked to form an Action Plan to promote
recycling in the classroom. This may include an audit (either hand written
or on computer) of all those things in the classroom that could be recycled;
deciding where these items could be collected in the classroom; a rota of
pupils responsible for the collection bins etc. The teams can then compare
their ideas and agree to a plan that will work for the whole class, looking at
the advantages and disadvantages of each and then together agree a plan
that will work for the class using the resource on p26 as a guide.
For pupils who find the above suggestions difficult:
Pupils should be given a resource sheet that has random recyclable items
pictured on the left hand side and the items they can be recycled into
randomly pictured on the left. Ask pupils to draw a connecting line from the
items on the left to the appropriate one on the right.
Pupils should be encouraged in further ownership of the scheme by making
and decorating the collection bins out of rubbish. A list of things that can be
recycled can be attached to the outside of the bins.
Before the scheme begins a note will be made of how much waste the class
would normally dispose of in a day, and this can later be compared to
the amount of rubbish sent to the landfill site after the scheme has been
established.
24.
Class
discuss
io
n:
Prompt dis
cussion and
record the p
ideas on th
up
e white boa
rd for the cla ils’
see by askin
s
s to
g questions
such as:
What are th
e advantag
es of recyc
ling?
What prod
ucts can be
recycled?
What prod
ucts are ma
de from
recycling?
Individual
activity:.
Key Stage 1:
Pupils should find out more about the subject by being
directed towards appropriate resources in the library and the
Internet.
Key Stage 2:
Pupils should be given time to research the subject using the
Internet and library.
For pupils who find the above suggestions
difficult:
Should find out more about the subject by being given
appropriate resources from the library and the Internet
Finally:
Have the class continue to contribute to
the K-WL grid begun in activity 1
25.
our recycling action plan
Our Goals are:
Actions -
Timeframe -
1.
1.
2.
2.
3.
3.
4.
4.
5.
5.
What must be done to achieve the goals?
When will each action will happen
Who is responsible for ensuring that the goal is achieved?
What will happen if we succeed
Activity 8
Magic
Trick…
How to Change
a Banana into
a Carrot!!
Suggested Learning Intentions:
Pupils will:
• Learn to make compost
• Learn about and experience growing their
own plants
Connected Learning Opportunities:
KS1&2: Language and Literacy – talking and
listening; reading and writing.
KS1&2: The World Around Us – Geography
(environmental awareness); Science
(decomposition of organic material; life cycle of
plant).
Cross-Curricular Skills
Communication.
Eco-Schools
This is a great activity if your focus topic on the
Eco-School programme relates to improving
school grounds, waste and healthy living. The
pupils can learn to make their own compost
from food waste and then also use the compost
to help with growing plants and vegetables in
the school grounds.
Recycle Activity
28.
Group
:
organic
activity
old rubbish is
h
se
u
o
h
f
o
n
ad,
ortio
in, bre
ngle p
elings, fruit sk
The largest si
e
p
le
b
ta
e
g
e
n and
as v
y breaks dow
ll
material, such
ra
tu
a
n
h
ic
s etc, wh
grass cutting
.
nts to the soil
returns nutrie
Key Stage 1:
together in
pils can work
u
p
e
th
,
n
o
ti
think
rma
bish that they
b
With this info
ru
ld
o
h
se
u
te the ho
groups to no
rots.
aks down or
naturally bre
Key Stage 2:
Class
activity:
Show pupils a banana and a carrot.
Ask if they have any ideas how to
change the banana into a carrot.
Introduce a sample of compost,
allowing pupils to touch it. Explain
the process of how the organic
matter, like the banana skin, breaks
down to make compost. Have some
seed trays filled with compost and ask the
pupils to plant some carrot seeds.
together in
pils can work
u
p
e
th
,
n
o
ti
bbish that
rma
f household ru
o
With this info
st
li
a
e
il
p
to com
small groups
mposes.
naturally deco
suggestions
e
v
o
b
a
e
th
d
ho fin
For pupils w
gether
difficult:
nt can work to
ista
rally
classroom ass
r/
e
ch
a
te
d
ey think natu
n
th
a
t
a
th
h
Pupils
is
b
b
This should
household ru
al examples.
ic
to record the
ct
ra
p
g
n
si
gree.
or rots u
eryone can a
ev
t
a
breaks down
th
so
p
to the grou
be read aloud
Explain the care needed to allow the seeds to
grow, and ask the pupils to draw up a rota to
look after the seedlings. When the carrots have
grown arrange to have them cooked or help
pupils prepare them as a salad or carrot cake to
be enjoyed by the class.
Reinforce the message that as an alternative to
sending organic waste material to the landfill
site, it could be used in composting, which in
turn helps the natural environment.
Finally:
Have the groups compare and
complete their list and complete
their K-W-L and first begun on
Activity 1
29.
The Waste Free Classroom
Teaching any subject becomes much easier if the pupils can relate to the subject
matter. The following themes and activities are designed to encourage the
pupils to think about how they could reduce, reuse and recycle in the classroom
they spend several hours in each day. Using real, tangible examples in context
helps to bring home the reality of the waste debate.
A Waste Free Lunch
Plan your own healthy packed lunch so that there is nothing to throw in the
rubbish bin when you have finished. Think about how you are going to keep the
food fresh and what sort of wrapping or containers you are going to use. Explain
what you propose to do. You may wish to:
•
Use refillable bottles or flasks rather than cans or cartons
•
Put sandwiches in a reusable container rather than a bag, cling film or foil
•
Avoid food that has lots of packaging - bring fruit or vegetables instead and
compost the leftover cores and skins
•
Use a decision diagram to explore the advantages and disadvantages of each
•
Alternatively, investigate the possibility of having a school dinner instead
Mathematical Waste
•
Compare the cost of your normal lunch with a waste free lunch
•
Estimate the total weight of rubbish thrown away by your class in a day
•
Calculate how much this is per child in your class
•
Calculate how much it would be for all the pupils in your school
•
Compare the waste produced in your class with waste produced in the staffroom
Packaging Audit
Research the types of packaging used in your classroom. Look at everything that
may be packaged for example, lunches or new resources. Count the number
of layers and the type of packaging. Design a data collection sheet (using ICT)
to record your results. Use headings such as product, No of Layers, and type of
packaging. You may decide to add further headings to record individual types of
packaging eg card, paper, plastic, aluminium foil, glass. You could also record if
the packaging could be recycled , reused or neither.
After a week collect all the data collection sheets and as a class find out
•
Which products in your class are packaged
•
Which packaging material is used most often
•
How much of the packaging can be recycled
•
How much of the packaging can be reused
Examine your class waste and separate it into 3 categories etc (from
mathematical/waste section)
30.
Display the results as graphs:
Teachers can extend this activity by asking the pupils to analyse what is
brought into their homes in an average week. Inform parents that they will be
looking at all items brought into the house for a week. As a class design a table
to record results. Display collated results in graph form.
Extension Activities:
•
Discuss what over-packaging means?
•
How many examples of over-packaging did your class find?
•
Estimate what percentage of your weekly household waste is packaging?
•
Why is packaging important?
•
Can you think of items where increasing the packaging decreases the
amount of overall waste?
•
Find out what (if anything) industry is doing to reduce the amount of
packaging waste
•
What happens to the waste that cannot be recycled or reused?
•
List ways in which you could reduce the amount of packaging waste thrown
away each week by your class or in your home
Organise a trip to a local shop. Look at the various types of packaging. Choose
one example of a product you feel is over packaged. Ask pupils to write
about why they think it is over packaged. Why do manufacturers use so much
packaging? A good example might be ‘Dairylea Lunchables’ or a box of fruit.
How did people package things 50 years ago or 100 years ago?
Individual Pledges
Encourage the class to sign up to a class pledge about how they are going to
work towards their Waste Free Classroom by completing a pledge sheet. Pupils
should work out exactly what pledges they are going to make individually and
as a class. These could include having a waste free lunch, taking school lunch,
switching off lights, using less paper, recycling ink cartridges and composting
biodegradable waste. This can be displayed in the classroom.
31.
CLASS PLEDGE
We the undersigned will:
1.
2.
3.
Turn off taps in the toilets to save water while we wash our hands
4.
Keep windows and doors closed when the heating is on. If it is too hot,
we will turn the thermostats down
5.
Make sure that lights are not left on in an empty classroom and we will
ask the caretaker to replace the light bulbs with energy efficient ones
6.
Ask the Principal if we can use more sustainable green electricity from
Northern Ireland Electricity.
7.
Ensure that we minimise the amount of waste we produce by
REDUCING, REUSING and RECYCLING as much as possible
8.
We Will.............................................................................................................
Turn off computer when not in use to reduce our use of electricity
Ask our parents if we can walk, cycle or take the bus to school to
reduce pollution
Signed:
32.
..........................................................................................................................
Waste MANAGEMENT ideas
Ideas to help integrate waste management into your teaching/after school clubs
are available to view at:
www.rethinkwasteni.org/in-education
Here are some further ideas for activities to help you integrate waste
management into your teaching/after school clubs:
Green Waste
•
Waste material leaf bird – Build a bird out of a combination of waste
cardboard and natural
•
litter e.g. leaves, feathers, grasses
•
Build a compost heap or wormery - suitable for both Science and Maths
to show how organic waste can be recycled, producing free compost.
(Information on composting can be found at http://www.rethinkwasteni.org/
in-education/resources/how-to-compost/ )
Paper Waste
•
Bridge it with waste paper - a Science/Technology challenge to build a
bridge out of used A4 pages, second-hand, washed and dried vending cups
and sand.
Metal Waste
•
Design a Can Crusher - design on paper or make one in Technology. Use
Business skills to market the invention.
•
Pebble shaker - experiment with different sized tins and pebbles to make
different sounds or combine with other recycled instruments to make a
‘Recycled Band’
•
Tambourine - experiment with different sizes of used, washed metal food
containers and pebbles to create different sounds. Use Art and Craft skills
to decorate the new instruments. Use the instruments to accompany other
waste activities listed below.
Glass Waste
•
Smash Crash Poetry - Language and literacy skills can be combined with
Music skills to write a poem, then turn it into a ‘rap’ possibly accompanied
by the Recycled Band.
33.
Textile Waste
•
Catwalk display - reuse old clothes and materials to make costumes or create
fashion designs. Put on a Drama or display to music using recycled pebble
shakers and tambourines (see above)
•
Textile relay - as an indoor PE activity race against the clock or have a relay
race to put on/take off items of clothing, hats etc. that are outgrown or no
longer needed.
Plastic Waste
•
Bottle Bowling - this indoor or outdoor PE activity reuses old plastic bottles
as pins.
•
Bird Feeders - these reuse yoghurt pots and margarine tubs in a way that will
help wildlife and improve your school environment.
General Waste
34.
•
Home/School waste diary questionnaire - promotes numeracy and
surveying techniques.
•
Packaging Audit - this activity combines numeracy skills with Geographical
issues i.e. carbon footprints and Science issues relating to seasonal food.
Rubbish Monster
✓
✓
2.
What happens to all our rubbish?
✓
3.
How can we reduce the amount of waste we create?
✓
4.
Reduce Litter
✓
✓
5.
Reduce Paper Waste
✓
✓
6.
Art Exhibition
✓
✓
7.
Class Recycling Scheme
✓
✓
8.
Magic Trick… How to Change a Banana into a Carrot!!
✓
PD&MU
What is waste?
The Arts
Mathematics and numeracy
1.
ACTIVITY - Key Stages 1&2
The World Around Us
Language & Literacy
Activities & how they
relate to the NI Curriculum
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
✓
35.
WCL001
waste
Northern Ireland Waste
what's it all
about?
In Northern Ireland around 928,122
tonnes of household waste were
produced in 2007/2008. Each
household in Northern Ireland
contributes around 1.29 tonnes of
waste per year 25kg per week and
this amount is increasing!
Our current lifestyle, based on
convenience and over packaged
products, means we are producing
more waste than ever. At the
moment the most common way of
managing waste in Northern Ireland
is through landfill. 71% of municipal
waste in 2007/08 has gone into
landfill.
what can i do ?
Not only are we running out of space
in landfill sites, but new legislation from
Europe is obliging us to and better
ways of dealing with waste. Northern
Ireland has developed a Waste
Management Strategy.
As part of implementing this Strategy
the 26 councils formed 3 Sub Regional
Groups.These groups developed joint
waste management plans for their
area to meet European and strategy
targets for managing waste better,
using the principles of the waste
hierarchy.
This shows that the best way to
manage waste is not to produce it
at all, or at least reduce the amount
which needs disposed of. Final
disposal should be a last resort.
Arc 21 Ballymena,
Larne, Newtownabbey,
Carrick, Antrim,
Lisburn, Down, North
Down, Castlereagh,
Ards, Belfast.
North West Region
Waste Management
Group Moyle,
Ballymoney,
Coleraine, Limavady,
Derry, Strabane,
Magherafelt.
Southern Waste Management
Partnership (SWaMP) Armagh,
Banbridge, Cookstown, Craigavon,
Dungannon, Fermanagh, Newry &
Mourne, Omagh
36.
You can adapt these principles
for use in your home or at work!
You can also contact your local
council and speak to their Recycling
Officer to find out what facilities are
available in your area.
why is it
important?
Waste represents the squandering
of our natural resources, it is
unsightly and costly to remove or
dispose of. The majority of waste
goes to landfill, where materials
with the potential for reuse or
recycling are lost.
While the waste which is buried in
landfill breaks down it begins to
release methane gas. Methane is
a harmful greenhouse gas. A liquid
called leachate is also produced.
This leachate has the potential to
pollute our ground water. Here in
Northern Ireland, In 2009/10 33% of
household waste was recycled or
composted and 29% of municipal
waste recycled or composted.
In 2009/10 332,392 tonnes of
municipal waste was sent for
recycling or composting.
This must continue to grow or the
future for Northern Ireland could
be bleak.
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DOE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
Campaign’ The NIEA website is at www.ni-environment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel. 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print other factsheets.
www.recycledproducts.org.uk has some information on products made
from recycled materials.
WCL002
waste
Waste Reduction
what's it all
about?
why is it so
important?
Waste Reduction Is.....
Currently the majority of our waste
goes to landfill which is not ideal
as…
• Reduction or elimination of the
amount of waste produced in the
first place
• Being economical with materials,
energy and money
• Development of products or
production techniques to minimise
waste generation
• Reprocessing waste material for
reuse
38.
• It is a waste of resources that
could be reclaimed for reuse
• It is potentially damaging to the
environment
• We are running out of locations
suitable for waste disposal and
the amount of waste we produce
is increasing every year
what can
i do?
Take a good look at the waste you
produce and ask yourself a few
simple questions:
• Is there anything which may be of
use to someone else?
• Is there anything which may be of
use with a little modification?
• There are many different ways to
minimise your waste at home, at
work or at school.
at home
• Take your own bags to the
supermarket (reuse plastic bags
or use a bag for life)
• Get milk delivered in glass bottles
which may be returned, washed
and reused
• Buy goods with less packaging
at work
• Print and photocopy on both sides
of paper where possible.
• Carry out a simple waste audit.
• Where is the waste produced in
your workplace and how could
you reduce it?
• Use e-mail instead of leaving
paper notes.
• Take lunches in a reusable box
instead of using sandwich bags.
• Provide recycling facilities for
waste paper, cans, glass, etc.
• Use ‘junk’ (egg cartons, yoghurt
pots etc) for craft work.
A number of Northern
Ireland households
entered a recent
competition stating
their ‘top 20’ ideas for
waste reduction Here
are some of the tips
they came up with…
• Old T- shirts make great dusters
or cloths
• Share trips to the recycling
centre with another family
• Buy loose fruit and veg
• Give old toys to the local
playgroup
• Don’t impulse buy
• Inner packets of cereal boxes
can be used for your packed
lunch
• Swap books with friends
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DOE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
Campaign’ The NIEA website is at www.ni-environment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel. 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print other factsheets.
www.recycledproducts.org.uk has some information on products made
from recycled materials.
39.
WCL003
waste
reduce, reuse & recycle
Every one of us generates waste each day and with our
current consumer driven lifestyle the volume of this waste
is growing every year.
waste...
• squanders our natural resources and energy
• costs money to remove and disposal
• is harmful to the environment
but... There are a few simple measures we can all take at home, at work
and when out shopping that will reduce, reuse and recycle waste allowing
us to minimise environmental impact and save money!
what’s it all about?
The ‘Waste Hierarchy’ lists the best ways of managing wastes from the most
to the least desirable
reduce
not producing waste in the first place
reuse
waste products which could be reused without a great deal of reprocessing
recycle
waste is processed into new products
why is it important?
In Northern Ireland every household produces over 1.29 tonnes of
waste each year. That’s enough to cover the whole country in waste!
Only around 35% of this waste is currently being recycled. Our
landfills cannot sustain this amount of waste indefinitely.
40.
There are lots of
things you can
do at home to
practice the 3 r’s
reduce ideas
• Say ‘no thanks’ to a carrier
bag when out shopping: take
your own
• Choose products with minimal
packaging or packaging that
can be returned for recycling
• Buy refillable bottles that can
be used again
• Buy in bulk to reduce
packaging waste
• Sign up with the mailing
preference service or put a
sign on your door requesting
no junk mail
• Have your milk delivered in
returnable bottles: plastic
coated cartons are difficult to
recycle
• Use reusable boxes for
packaged lunches
• Choose clothes and
household items of good
quality that will last longer
reuse ideas
• Glass jars can be used again
for storage
• Cover or paint cardboard
boxes for storage
• Send unwanted but still good
clothes to charity shops
• Cut up worn clothes into
dusters and cleaning clothes
• Use a charger and
rechargeable batteries
instead of single use ones
• Use old carrier bags as bins or
to take shopping
• Old furniture and household
appliances can be refurbished
and passed on to community
groups or those in need
what is being done?
in Europe - Directives have been drawn up to ensure all European
countries develop better waste management in their national waste
policies.
in Northern Ireland- In 2006, the Government produced the
Northern Ireland Waste Management Strategy. The aim of the Waste
Management Strategy is to help us manage waste and resources
effectively. This means using material and resources in a way that reduces
the quantities of waste produced and, where waste is generated,
to manage it in a way that minimises its impact on the environment
and public health and contributes positively to economic and social
development. Since the publication of the first Waste Management
Strategy in 2000, significant progress has been made in improving waste
management in Northern Ireland.
local council-Your local council in partnership with other councils in
the region has produced a plan for better waste management at a local
level.
strategy targets- The waste management strategy team has
set a household waste target of 50% by 2020. Recycling of waste is
becoming much more common in N. Ireland. The Northern Ireland waste
management strategy (2006) set a target that 35% of household waste
should be recycled or composted by 2010. In 2009/10 36% of household
and municipal waste was sent for recycling including composting.
recycling ideas
• C
ollect glass, plastic, paper,
cans etc. separately and take to
your local recycling centre
• Turn vegetable and garden
waste into fertiliser with a
compost bin or heap
• Worn out clothes collected by
charities can be sold on for
reprocessing into fibres and
industrial rags
• C
ollect oil from DIY car
maintenance and take to your
local civic amenity site: it can
be recycled into
• boiler fuel and lubricant
• Take left over tins of paint to
your local re-paint scheme
• Buy recycled products: they are
of good quality and support the
market for raw materials from
waste
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DOE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
Campaign’ The NIEA website is at www.ni-environment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel: 028 905 46615
Talk to your local council recycling or waste disposal department about
recycling issues. See the Rethink Waste website for contact details and
locations. You could also try the following bodies that offer information on
environmental issues Bryson House is a charity involved in recycling schemes
www.rubbish2resource.com Tel: 028 9032 5835
The Mailing Preference service Tel: 020 72913300 www.mpsonline.org.uk
ENFO are based in Dublin Tel: 00 232 (1)890 200194 www.enfo.ie
www.raceagainstwaste.com is the Irish governments waste awareness
campaign
41.
WCL004
waste
Plastic
In Northern Ireland there are over 12,000 tonnes
of plastic bottles in our waste stream, and this is
increasing each year. In N. Ireland the average
person uses 95 plastic bottles per year. In the UK in
general there is 58,000 tonnes of plastic bottles that
enter into the waste stream. All plastic bottles can
be recycled.
Recycling one
plastic bottle
saves enough
energy to power
a 60 watt light
bulb for 6 hours.
what’s it all about?
Over the last few years, due to a number of changes in society and
lifestyle, more and more waste plastic has been produced. Plastic is the
fastest-growing component of the solid waste stream. The world’s annual
consumption of plastic materials has increased from around 5 million tonnes
in the 1950s to nearly 100 million tonnes today. Every square mile of ocean
contains on average of 46,000 pieces of plastic which can choke and
entangle seabirds. The world-wide production of plastic is currently at 35
kilogram per year per person.
On average, it is increasing by 3% per year. This is due to manufacturers
and retailers exploiting the fact that plastics are light, highly versatile,
shatter resistant, durable, resistant to chemicals and water and inexpensive.
Also, due to changes in lifestyle, we are more likely to buy items such as
convenience foods which come packaged in plastic which is discarded
after use.
why is it important?
It is important to recycle as plastics degrade very slowly in our landfills. 75%
of post consumer plastic waste is sent to landfill. It is estimated that 4 out
of 5 plastic bottles end up in landfill. In Northern Ireland we use 230 million
plastic carrier bags each year most of which end up in landfill. Not only is
this occupying valuable space but it is a waste of the plastic resource which
could be recycled into other useful products. Plastic production uses 8%
of the world’s oil production, so recycling will conserve a non-renewable
fossil fuel. Producing new bags from recycled plastic can cut energy
consumption by one third and
reduce the emission of harmful
gases.
what can i do?
wash and squash
Collect all your plastic bottles, remove
the lids, wash and squash before placing in a plastic bottle bank or
for collection through your local recycling scheme.
reuse
plastic bags when you go to the supermarket or give
them to charity shops. Use yoghurt pots for growing seedlings.
refill
Some shops sell containers or take the containers back to
be recycled
buy
items with less packaging or those which are made from
recycled materials where possible.
42.
There are many
different types of
plastic which can be
separated into about
50 different families.
There are 7 main types.
Recycling plastics can
be quite difficult as
used plastics may be
contaminated or soiled
and mixed types cannot
be processed. That is why
this numerical code was
devised to try and ease
separation of the different
types of plastics. All plastic
bottles can be recycled.
Other plastics are generally
not recycled except in
specific small projects.
Polythylene
Terephthalate
Fizzy drink and water bottles, oven ready meal
trays, waterproof packaging may all be made
from PETE. This type of plastic may be recycled
to make polyester carpets, fibre filling for
pillows, quilts and jackets, ribbon for VCRs or
reused in the bottle market.
High Density
Polytehylene
Milk, detergent and oil bottles are all made
from HDPE, as are some toys and plastic bags.
This type of plastic can be recycled into plastic
pipes, plastic lumber, flowerpots and rubbish
bins.
Vinyl/Polyvinyl
Chloride
The majority of plastic bags, shrink wrap and
garment bags are all made from LDPE. This
plastic can be recycled into plastic bags,
tubing, agricultural film and plastic lumber.
Low Density
Polyethylene
Refrigerated containers, some bags, most
bottle tops, some carpets and some food
wrap are all examples of PP. This plastic can be
recycled into items such as flower pots and car
components e.g. wing mirrors and bumpers.
Polypropylene
Examples of PS include throwaway utensils,
meat packaging or protective packaging. This
can be recycled into coat hangers, furniture
and television parts.
Polystyrene
Desk accessories, cafeteria trays, plastic
utensils, toys, video cassettes and cases,
clamshell containers, packaging peanuts,
and insulation board and other expanded
polystyrene products (e.g., Styrofoam)
Other (including
This is usually layered or mixed plastic which
is not easily recycled. Bottles, plastic lumber
applications, Headlight lenses, and safety
shields/glasses
acrylic, acrylonitrile
butadiene styrene,
fiberglass, nylon,
polycarbonate, and
polylactic acid)
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DOE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
Campaign’ The NIEA website is at www.ni-environment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel. 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print other factsheets.
www.recycledproducts.org.uk has some information on products made
from recycled materials.
43.
WCL005
waste
Composting Waste
Much of our household waste is organic and can be
recycled into compost.
what's it all
about?
how do i
start?
Composting is an ancient
technology. It was introduced by
the Romans about 2000 years ago
as a way to build up the fertility of
the soil.
Compost can be made by leaving
material in a heap or in a bin. The
method you choose may depend
on the size of your garden, the
amount of material you have to
compost or the amount of compost
you require.
• C
ompost is an essential
ingredient for good soil.
• it brings fertility to the soil
• improves structure of the soil
• improves the drainage
• breaks up clay
• binds sand
8.3 million tonnes of food is thrown
away by households in the UK
each year. If this waste is thrown
straight into the bin its potential
Wasting food costs
the average
family with children
£680 per year.
value is lost and it will go straight
to landfill where it will not only take
up valuable space but it will also
decompose releasing gases and
liquids which have the potential to
harm the environment.
Our organic waste is a valuable
commodity which may be used in
the production of a prime quality
compost.
44.
A compost heap should be at least one
metre square and one metre high.
If possible it should be enclosed
with brick or timber and covered to
keep the rain out. Space should be
left at the front, giving room to turn
the heap.
Compost bins are a better option
for smaller gardens. They may be
purchased from garden centres.
Many local councils may offer them
at a subsidised price. The bin is open
ended to allow earth worms to
enter the material and help speed
up the process.
If neither of these is a feasible
option, our local council may run
a community composting scheme
where you can take your waste
along to a massive compost heap
which is managed by your local
council. Your compost heap should
be easily accessible, for example
it may be
convenient
to have two
compost
areas, one
near the
back door
for kitchen
waste and one in
the garden to collect material
there.
what should i put in my
compost bin/heap?
For best results a good mixture of waste is needed and any
large woody material should be chopped up.
✔DO put in
•
•
•
•
lawn and hedge
clippings
shredded stalk and
vegetable peelings
cut flowers and leaves
teabags and egg shells
✘DO NOT put in
•
•
•
•
•
diseased plants and
weeds
plastic and glass
cooked food including
meat and fish
coloured glossy paper
pet droppings
the composting
process
There are three types of organisms
involved in the composting process;
Fungi, bacteria and actinomycetes
(bacteria that branch).
These organisms begin to grow
all over the material and their
biological activity begins to break
down the waste. This produces
heat, further increasing the activity
of the bacteria. Once the bacteria
have used up all the starch and
sugars the temperature begins to
fall again, creating an environment
more favourable for the fungi,
which then begin breaking down
any woody material. Composting
can take weeks or months
depending on how much air and
moisture are present. The compost
is ready to use when it is crumbly
in appearance and has a slightly
earthy smell.
Your compost can then be used
in your garden, improving plant
health, growth and, increasing
yields of fruit, vegetables, flowers
and herbs. By using compost you
have helped the environment
by reducing the need for toxic
chemicals and pesticides and
increased the nutritional value of
home grown foods. You have also
helped save our natural bogland
which is a finite resource used in
the commercial production of
compost, and finally you have, of
course, saved yourself money.
Need to find
out more?
For further information...
The NIEA www.rethinkwasteni.org is the
DoE website for the Rethink Waste
campaign.The NIEA website is at www.
ni-environment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and
legislation
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can
download or print other factsheets.
www.recycledproducts.org.uk has some
information on products made from
recycled materials.
www.wrap.org.uk has information on
composting organic material and
standards.
www.compost.org.uk The Compost
Association web site
45.
WCL006
waste
Paper
The average Family throws away 6 trees worth of paper into their household
bin in a year. Initially the paper was made entirely by hand and mainly from
cloth fibres. Machines were then developed to produce the paper in large
quantities to keep up with demand. It was only 100 years ago that they
began to make paper on a large scale from wood pulp.
what’s it all about?
Paper is one of the most important and diverse consumer materials with
approximately 7000 different types, each with very different uses.
There are 6 main types:
• newspaper
• printing and writing paper
• case making materials
• packaging papers and boards
• household and toilet tissues
• industrial and special purpose papers
These different types of paper may have to be segregated for recycling
depending on the preprocessor’s end product.
For example, if the end product is grey, rough material, such as a drinks
tray or egg box it is not necessary to segregate paper waste. But if the end
product is to be of higher quality, office waste paper or unprinted news
sheet may be used.
why is it important?
The ‘Waste Hierarchy’ lists the best ways of managing
wastes from the most to the least desirable Making new
paper requires pulp obtained from trees. Paper and card
make approximately ¼ of our waste.
However, used paper may be placed in a large vat of
water and mixed to create the pulp, therefore reducing
the need to use trees. Recycling waste paper also reduces
energy consumption, and water use (a lot of the water
which is used may be recycled back into the system).
It takes
24 trees
to make
1 ton of
newspaper.
Paper recycling can reduce volumes of landfilled waste and may generate
revenue from the sale of good quality paper to a reprocessor. Paper and
card make up approximately one third of our waste, with the majority of this
being newspapers and magazines.
Paper is one of the easiest materials to recycle, and may be recycled up
to 8 times before the cellulose fibres begin to deteriorate. 70% less energy is
required to recycle paper compared with making it from raw materials.
46.
what can i do?
First and foremost it is important to Reduce the amount of paper you
use, print on both sides, any unused side can be used to jot down notes.
The average
household
receives 224
items of Junk
mail per year.
If you receive a lot of junk mail you can register with the mail preference
service online at mpsonline.org.uk to reduce the amount delivered to
the door. Reuse wrapping paper, paper bags and envelopes. Set
up recycling containers at home, at work and at school especially
beside printers, fax machines and photocopiers.
Councils throughout Northern Ireland are in the process of issuing
containers to all households. Use them wisely.
Your local council will be able to advise you on what you may
put in. “When leaving paper for recycling make sure there are no
contaminants”
If there is contamination a whole lorry full of paper may have to
be diverted to landfill. All small contaminants such as magazine staples,
paper clips, sticky tape, food remnants, metal foil or plastic.
Recycled paper can be used to make new paper products, moulded
packaging for eggs, fruit etc, plaster board production, thermal
insulation for buildings, cat litter, shredded for animal bedding, moulded
disposable hospital produce. Buying products made from recycled
paper stimulates the market making recycled paper a more valuable
resource.
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DoE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
campaign’. The NIEA website is at www.nienvironment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel: 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print other factsheets.
www.recycledproducts.org.uk has some information on products made
from recycled materials.
47.
WCL007
waste
Cans
Every year in N. Ireland we use more 600 million aluminium cans If they
were placed end to end they would stretch around the coast of Ireland 7
times. These cans are worth around £1million.
what’s it all about?
Steel cans have been used for packaging since 1810 when a Frenchman,
Nicholas Appert was challenged by Napoleon to invent a method of
preserving food for the French Army. His invention was the steel can.
The steel can produced today has progressed, and is a lot lighter than that
of many years ago. Aluminium cans have also come on
the market. These are light, easy to transport and keep
One recycled tin
products fresh, making them very desirable for many
manufacturers.
can would save
24 million tonnes of aluminium is produced annually,
51,000 tonnes of which ends up as packaging in the UK.
Aluminium cans can be recycled and ready to reuse in
just 6 weeks.
why is it important?
Both aluminium and steel are very valuable resources.
Extraction of the raw materials for the manufacture of new
cans can result in pollution and habitat destruction.
Recycling cans reduces the use of finite resources such
as bauxite, iron ore and materials which are mined
to produce iron and aluminium. By using scrap steel
instead of iron ore energy savings are over 70%, and
emissions can be reduced by about 30% to air and by
60-70% to water. Recycling Aluminium cans saves 95%
of energy used to make a can from raw material.
48.
enough energy to
power a television
for 3 hours.
why is it so important?
Producing new steel and aluminium is a costly business! BUT it takes only
5% of the energy to produce an aluminium can from recycled material
than from raw material, and 25% of the energy compared to producing
steel from raw materials.
why recycle?
• d
rinks cans, food cans and pet food tins can all be taken to your
nearest bank
• where possible, crush (not aerosols) and was cans before putting
them into recycling banks. It takes up less space
• which means more cans can be collected
• clean aluminium foil, including foil foodtrays, can also be deposited in
can banks for recycling
• cash for cans schemes - groups may collect cans and sell them on to
a processor
what happens next?
The cans are collected from the recycling facilities and taken to
reprocessing plants. The aluminium cans are separated from the steel
cans with a magnet, the steel cans stick.
The aluminium cans are melted down to make big blocks of
aluminium which are then rolled to make aluminium sheet which
is then used to make new cans. Aluminium foil is separated and
reprocessed into new foil.
Steel cans have the tin coating taken off first and then are melted
down to make steel ingots which are used to make construction
materials, appliances and new cans.
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DoE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
campaign’. The NIEA website is at www.nienvironment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel: 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print other factsheets.
www.recycledproducts.org.uk has some information on products made
from recycled materials.
Alupro scheme www.alupro.org.uk or the Alcan scheme
www.cashforcans.co.uk
Both these websites provide information on collection and recycling of cans.
49.
WCL008
waste
Glass
The average person in N. Ireland uses about 140 glass bottles per year.
Glass is 100% recyclable and can be used again and again.
Recycling just four glass bottles saves one litre of oil.
what’s it all about?
Glass is manufactured by a process which has remained
unchanged for centuries. Raw materials (sand, soda ash
and limestone) are heated together in a furnace at up to
1500°C to form glass. This is either moulded into shapes or
undergoes further processing. Across Europe 75% of glass
produced is used in the packaging of drinks. The average
glass bottle contains over 25% recycled glass.
Glass is
potentially
100%
recyclable.
why is it important?
Glass makes up 6.9% of the household waste stream here in Northern
Ireland. The cost of transporting and landfilling this volume of material is
considerable.
Producing glass from raw materials uses a lot of energy, and requires
quarrying of raw materials Currently we landfill around 1,400,000 tonnes of
glass in the UK each year. 52,000 tonnes of glass are landfilled each year
in N. Ireland. This waste stream could be cut by a third if each person in
Northern Ireland recycled just 20 bottles.
recycling will...
• r educe disposal costs - any increase in recycling saves on collection
and disposal costs
• s ave energy - the energy needed to melt recycled glass is much less
than that needed to melt virgin raw materials
• c
onserve the environment - recycled glass saves using raw materials.
This reduces costs and the need to quarry new materials
• r educe volumes to landfill - about 1.5 million tonnes of glass goes to
landfill each year. This is not biodegradable and takes up landfill space
what can i do?
Firstly Think about reducing the amount of Glass waste you produce. Buy
products in bulk reducing the weight and quantity of glass i.e. buy one large
bottle of juice not several small ones.
What about re-using glass? Take refillable containers back or reuse glass
containers such as jam jars around the house or at work.
Think about recycling!
When buying products, choose those packaged in glass that can be recycled
at your local recycling centre.
50.
Recycling tips
• Locate your nearest bottle bank by contacting your local council
• y
ou can recycle most types of jars including jam jars, drinks bottles, coffee
jars and sauce bottles.
• Y
ou cannot place Pyrex, crystal, plate glass or ceramics in a bottle bank
as they have a higher melting point than glass and will upset the recycling
process. Any Banks with these items found in them may lead to all the
contents being rejected and potentially landfilled.
• Try and incorporate visiting the bottle bank with another journey i.e. going
to the supermarket
• There may be bottle banks for each colour of glass
• wash bottles before depositing
The first
bottle bank
was introduced in the
UK in 1977
• remove metal/ foil caps and rings and any shrink wrap
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DoE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
campaign’.
The NIEA website is at www.ni-environment.gov.uk and contains information
on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel: 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print other factsheets
www.naturalcollection.com contains many products made from recycled
materials
www.britglass.co.uk/recycling UK Glass Federation
51.
WCL009
waste
What happens to our waste
“Waste: any substance or object ....which the holder
discards or is required to discard” (European Waste Framework Directive)
what’s it all about?
Local Authorities have the responsibility for managing, collecting and
disposing of a wide range of waste in Northern Ireland. Wheelie bins are
collected from outside our door and the contents are tipped into a lorry
leaving them free to be filled again.
What happens to the rubbish in the Lorry?
The lorries take this rubbish to the local landfill site. In some areas, this is a
giant hole (perhaps an old quarry) that has been specially lined to prevent
direct contamination of the surrounding land. The waste is dumped, buried
in more waste and eventually covered with clay and soil. In general the
waste we put in our wheelie bins is made up of food waste, dust, paper and
card, glass, metals and textiles. Here in Northern Ireland approximately 85%
of our household waste goes to landfill.
Some of this waste will decompose fairly rapidly. Kitchen and garden waste
is biodegradable but as it begins to decompose it releases a gas called
methane and a putrid liquid. Both of these are potentially harmful to the
environment. Although the waste that does not decompose may not
release by-products it takes up space and will be around for hundreds of
years (see table below).
52.
Item
Time for
biodegradation
Newspaper
6 weeks
Apple core
8 weeks
Natural fibre rope
14 months
Plastic bag
10-2 years
Aluminium can
80-100 years
Glass bottle
up to 500 years
Plastic bottle
indefinite
what can i do?
We can reduce the amount of waste going to landfill by reducing the
amount of waste produced in the first place:
•
avoid buying disposable items
•
say no to plastic bags - use reusable bags or bags for life
•
buy things with as little packaging as possible
•
reuse items such as bags, lunch boxes, glass milk bottles and jam jars
•
reuse envelopes by covering the old address with a sticker
•
give unwanted toys and clothes to someone else or a charity shop
we can recycle things!
Contact your local authority to find out what recycling and composting
facilities are available in your area and make use of them!
In some areas councils have started collecting dry recyclables from
households on a regular basis.
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DoE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
campaign’.
The NIEA website is at www.ni-environment.gov.uk and contains information
on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation Tel: 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print other factsheets
www.useitagain.org.uk has some information on products made from
recycled materials
53.
WCL0010
waste
Energy From Waste
Every household in Northern Ireland produces at least one tonne of
waste. This waste is known as municipal waste. Specialised wastes are also
produced from places such as hospitals, farms and other industries. At the
moment the majority of our municipal waste is landfilled. This has to change.
Landfill space is running out!!
what’s the solution?
The waste hierarchy is the best way to address the problem.
We can use
the energy
held in waste
to generate
power and
heat.
Create less waste, recycle more rubbish and dispose of the
remainder in a safe, environmentally friendly way. Any solution
should not undermine the prevention or minimisation of waste.
Heat value of waste is about one third that of coal.
how?
A number of
techniques have
been created to
produce energy from
waste.
Landfill Gas:
One of the main gas emissions
from landfill is methane, a potent
greenhouse gas. This gas may be
collected and burnt to produce
energy which can create heat and
electricity. Combustion of landfill
gas therefore reduces volumes of
methane which would otherwise be
emitted.
54.
Mass Burn Combustion:
This is one of the oldest and
simplest methods of producing
energy from waste.
Untreated waste is incinerated.
Steam is produced and passed
through a turbine to create
electricity and low temperature
heat, which can then be used
in nearby buildings.
Refuse Derived Fuel:
Waste is treated by separating
the combustible waste from
the non combustibles such as glass
or metals. These may then be sent
to be recycled. This leaves plastics,
paper, wood etc which can be
shredded and compacted making
it more efficient to burn and easier
to transport. As the waste has been
separated before incineration,
there will be less chance of noxious
gasses such as heavy metals being
released. An average dustbin could
create enough energy for 500
baths, 3,500 showers or 5,000
hours of TV.
At least 0.55 million
tonnes of combustible
waste is generated each
year in Northern Ireland
which if burnt would be
equal to burning about
0.6 million tonnes of coal
per year.
The use of waste as an energy
resource frees up a lot of space in
our landfills and puts less of a strain
on the world’s finite resources such
as oil, coal and natural gasses.
Anaerobic digestion:
Kitchen waste (raw vegetables,
peelings etc) or agricultural waste
(dairy, beef and sheep slurry or
chicken litter) is placed in a heated
airtight container where bacteria
start to break down the material
converting it to
Biogas - used to generate heat
and/or electricity which may be
used on site or the electricity may
be sold to the national grid
Fibre – can be used as a soil
conditioner
Liquor – may be pasteurised and
used as a liquid fertiliser.
Gasification:
This is a thermo-chemical process
in which waste is heated in an
environment with a limited amount
of oxygen. A low-energy gas is
produced containing hydrogen,
carbon monoxide and methane
which can then be used as a fuel in
a turbine or combustion engine to
generate electricity.
Pyrolysis:
Waste is treated in the complete
absence of oxygen. Gas, often
liquid and char are produced in
various quantities. The gas and
oil can be processed, stored
and transported, if necessary
and combusted in an engine,
gas turbine or boiler. Char can
be recovered from the residue
and used as a fuel, or the residue
passed to a gasifier and the char
gasified.
This process is used successfully in
Germany and Denmark and now
the first ‘Centralised Anaerobic
Digestion Plant’ has been set up in
Devon, England.
Need to find out more?
For further information...
www.rethinkwasteni.org is the DoE website for the ‘Rethink Waste
campaign’.
The NIEA website is at www.ni-environment.gov.uk and contains
information on the NI Waste Strategy and legislation
Tel: 028 905 46615
www.wastewatch.org.uk you can download or print
other factsheets
www.useitagain.org.uk has some information on products made from
recycled materials
55.
Council Contacts
If there is any further information or assistance you might require
within your schools or ideas to help promote, reducing, reusing
and recycling you can contact your council representative at the
details given below:
Antrim Borough Council
Address: Antrim Civic Centre, 50 Stiles
Way, Antrim, BT41 2UB
Phone number: 028 9446 3113
Fax: 028 9448 1324
Email address: info@antrim.gov.uk
Website: www.antrim.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Ards Borough Council
Address: 2 Church Street, Newtownards,
County Down, BT23 4AP
Phone number: 028 9182 4000
Fax: 028 9181 9628
Email address: ards@ards-council.gov.uk
Website: www.ards-council.gov.uk/
Opening Hours: Monday to Thursday 9.00
am to 5.00 pm, Friday 9.00 am to 4.30 pm
Armagh City and District
Council
Address: Council Offices, The Palace,
Demesne, Armagh, BT60 4EL
Phone number 028 3752 9600
Fax: 028 3752 9601
Email address: info@armagh.gov.uk
Website: www.armagh.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Ballymena Borough Council
Address: Ardeevin, 80 Galgorm Road,
Ballymena, BT42 1AB
Phone number: 08456 581581
Fax: 028 2566 0400
Email address: council.reception@
ballymena.gov.uk
Website: www.ballymena.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 1.00 pm, 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm
Ballymoney Borough Council
Address: Riada House, 14 Charles Street,
Ballymoney, Co Antrim, BT53 6DZ
Phone Number: 028 2766 0200
Fax: 028 2766 0222
Email address: info@ballymoney.gov.uk
Website: www.ballymoney.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Thursday 9.00
am to 5.00 pm, Friday 9.00 am to 4.30 pm
Banbridge District Council
56.
Address: Civic Building, Downshire Road,
Banbridge, County Down, BT32 3JY
Phone number: 028 4066 0600
Fax: 028 4066 0601
Email address: info@banbridge.gov.uk
Website: www.banbridge.com/
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Belfast City Council
Address: Adelaide Exchange, 24-26 Adelaide
Street, Belfast, BT2 8GD
Phone number: General enquiries
028 9032 0202
Email address: generalenquiries@
belfastcity.gov.uk
Website: www.belfastcity.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Carrickfergus Borough Council
Address: Carrickfergus Museum and Civic
Centre, 11 Antrim Street, Carrickfergus,
County Antrim
BT38 9DG
Phone number: 028 9335 8000
Fax: 028 9336 6676
Email address: info@carrickfergus.org
Website: www.carrickfergus.org
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Castlereagh Borough Council
Address: Civic Centre, 1 Bradford Court,
Upper Galwally, Castlereagh,
Belfast, BT8 6RB
Phone number: 028 9049 4500
Fax: 028 9049 4515
Email address: council@castlereagh.gov.uk
Website: www.castlereagh.gov.uk
Coleraine Borough Council
Address: Cloonavin, 66 Portstewart Road,
Coleraine, Northern Ireland, BT52 1EY
Phone number: 028 7034 7034
Fax: 028 7034 7026
Email address: info@colerainebc.gov.uk
Website: www.colerainebc.gov.uk
Cookstown District Council
Address: Burn Road, Cookstown,
County Tyrone, BT80 8DT
Phone number: 028 8676 2205
Fax: 028 8676 4360
Email address: info@cookstown.gov.uk
Website: www.cookstown.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 1.00 pm and 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm
Craigavon Borough Council
Address: Civic Centre, PO Box 66, Lakeview
Road, Craigavon, Co Armagh, BT64 1AL
Phone number: 028 3831 2400
Text phone Minicom: 028 3832 9757
Fax: 028 3831 2444
Email address: info@craigavon.gov.uk
Website: www.craigavon.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 8.45 am
to 5.15 pm
Derry City Council
Magherafelt District Council
Down District Council
Moyle District Council
Address: 98 Strand Road, Derry, BT48 7NN
Phone number: 028 7136 5151
Fax: 028 7126 4858
Email address: info@derrycity.gov.uk
Website: www.derrycity.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Address: 24 Strangford Road, Downpatrick,
County Down, BT30 6SR
Phone number: 028 4461 0800
Fax: 028 4461 0801
Email address: council@downdc.gov.uk
Website: www.downdc.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Dungannon and South Tyrone
Borough Council
Address: Council Offices, Circular Road,
Dungannon, County Tyrone, BT71 6DT
Phone number: 028 8772 0300
Fax: 28 8772 0368
Email address: info@dungannon.gov.uk
Website: www.dungannon.gov.uk
Fermanagh District Council
Address: Townhall, Enniskillen, County
Fermanagh, BT74 7BA
Phone number: 028 6632 5050
Text phone: 028 6632 7969
Fax: 028 6632 2024
Email address: fdc@fermanagh.gov.uk
Website: www.fermanagh.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Larne Borough Council
Address: Smiley Buildings, Victoria Road,
Larne, County Antrim, BT40 1RU
Phone number: 028 2827 2313
Fax: 028 2826 0660
Email address: admin@larne.gov.uk
Website: www.larne.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday
Limavady Borough Council
Address: 7 Connell Street, Limavady, County
Londonderry, BT49 0HA
Phone number: General enquiries
028 7772 2226
Fax: 028 7772 2010
Email address: info@limavady.gov.uk
Website: www.limavady.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9.00 am
to 5.00 pm
Lisburn City Council
Address: Lagan Valley Island, Island Civic
Centre, The Island, Lisburn, County Antrim,
BT27 4RL
Phone number: 028 9250 9250
Text phone: 028 9250 9508
Fax: 028 9250 9288
Email address: enquiries@lisburn.gov.uk
Website: www.lisburncity.gov.uk
Address: 50 Ballyronan Road, Magherafelt,
BT45 6EN
Phone number: 028 7939 7979
Email address: info@magherafelt.gov.uk
Website: www.magherafelt.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday
9.00 am to 1.00 pm and 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm
Address: Sheskburn House, 7 Mary Street,
Ballycastle, County Antrim, BT54 6QH
Phone number: 028 2076 2225
Fax: 028 2076 2515
Email address: info@moyle-council.org
Website: www.moyle-council.org
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday
9.00 am to 5.00 pm
Newry and Mourne District
Council
Address: Monaghan Row, Newry, BT35 8DJ
Phone number: 028 3031 3031
Fax: 028 3031 3077
Email address: administration@
newryandmourne.gov.uk
Website: www.newryandmournedc.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday
9.00 am to 5.00 pm
Newtownabbey Borough
Council
Address: Mossley Mill, Newtownabbey,
County Antrim, BT36 5QA
Phone number: 028 9034 0000
Fax: 028 9034 0200
Email address: info@newtownabbey.gov.uk.
Website: www.newtownabbey.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday
9.00 am to 5.00 pm
North Down Borough Council
Address: Town Hall, The Castle, Bangor,
County Down, BT20 4BT
Phone number: 028 9127 0371
Fax: 028 9127 1370
Website: www.northdown.gov.uk
Omagh District Council
Address: The Grange, Mountjoy Road,
Omagh, County Tyrone, BT79 7BL
Phone number: 028 8224 5321
Fax: 028 8224 3888
Email address: info@omagh.gov.uk
Website: www.omagh.gov.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday
9.00 am to 5.00 pm
Strabane District Council
Address: 47 Derry Road, Strabane,
County Tyrone, BT82 8DY
Phone number: 028 7138 2204
Fax: 028 7138 1348
Email address: info@strabanedc.com
Website: www.strabanedc.org.uk
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday
9.00 am to 5.00 pm
57.
Useful Links:
For more information about all of the subjects touched
on in this resource booklet, the following websites
are an excellent source of information and extension
activity ideas.
rethinkwasteni.org
ni-environment.gov.uk
rubbish2resource.com
raceagainstwaste.com
mpsonline.org.uk
swamp2008.org.uk
recyclenowpartners.org.uk
lovefoodhatewasteni.org
wastewatch.org.uk
eco-schoolsni.org
energysavingtrust.org.uk
recyclenow.com
wrapni.org.uk
58.
Acknowledgements:
We would like to thank the following people for
their help and assistance in putting together
this teaching resource:
• S
abrina Mc Cartney , Naomi Foss, Jennifer Hargan and Joanna Mc Donnell from the Eco-Schools team.
• T
he staff at Tidy Northern Ireland for their great ideas
and suggestions.
• D
r. Ian Humphrey’s Chief Executive of Tidy Northern
Ireland.
• A
nne Hayes, Head of Education, Interpretation &
Design at the Department of the Environment for
all her help and assistance in pooling together the
factsheets.
• Kathryn Edgar from CCEA for her help and advice
• M
ike Fleming for all the resources and lessons
devised in this resource booklet
• T
he Papermouse team, Richard, Mark and Una for their
fantastic support and creativity in the illustration and
design of this teacher resource.
59.
ISBN: 978-0-9572044-3-0
9
780957
204430
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