T940X Process Supervisor Handbook

T940X Process Supervisor
Handbook
HA028225
February 2012 (issue 8)
© 2012
All rights are strictly reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, modified, or transmitted in any
form by any means, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system other than for the purpose to act as an aid in
operating the equipment to which the document relates, without prior written permission of the
manufacturer.
The manufacturer pursues a policy of continuous development and product improvement. The
specifications in this document may therefore be changed without notice. The information in this document
is given in good faith, but is intended for guidance only. The manufacturer will not accept responsibility for
any losses arising from errors in this document.
®
E U ROT H E R M ®
Declaration of Conformity
Manufacturer’s name:
Eurotherm Limited
Manufacturer’s address:
Faraday Close, Worthing, West Sussex,
BN13 3PL, United Kingdom
Product type:
Process Supervisor
Models:
T940X Processor module (Status level A1 or higher)
T320 Connection Module(Status level T12 or higher)
T310 Backplane
(Status level T11 or higher)
Safety specification:
BS EN61010-1: 2001-02
EMC emissions specification: BS EN61326 2002-02
EMC immunity specification: BS EN61326 2002-02
Eurotherm Limited hereby declares that the above products conform to the safety and EMC
specifications listed. Eurotherm Limited further declares that the above products comply
with the EMC Directive 89 / 336 / EEC amended by 93 / 68 / EEC, and also with the Low
Voltage Directive 73 / 23 / EEC.
Signed:
Dated:
Signed for and on behalf of Eurotherm Limited
William Davis
(General Manager)
IA249986U610 Issue 2 Aug 04
© 2011 Eurotherm Limited
All rights are strictly reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, modified, or transmitted in any
form by any means, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system other than for the purpose to act as an aid in
operating the equipment to which the document relates, without the prior written permission of Eurotherm
limited.
Eurotherm Limited pursues a policy of continuous development and product improvement. The specifications
in this document may therefore be changed without notice. The information in this document is given in good
faith, but is intended for guidance only. Eurotherm Limited will accept no responsibility for any losses arising
from errors in this document.
®
E U ROT H E R M ®
processs supervisor handbook
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
LIST OF CHAPTERS
Section
Title
ContentsContents
Chapter 1
Introduction
Chapter 2
Installation
Chapter 3
User interface
Chapter 4Start-up
Chapter 5Configuration
Chapter 6
Error conditions and diagnostics
Chapter 7
Task Scheduling and Tuning
Chapter 8Service
Chapter 9Specification and order codes
Annex A
Terminal configurator
Index
Index
EFFECTIVITY
This manual refers to software version V5.2 for Process Supervisor units of the status levels listed below.
Please see earlier issues of this manual for instruments with earlier status levels. The status level appears as a
two or three character group, enclosed in parentheses ((T13) for example), at the end of the serial number.
T940X Processor unit
(G6 or higher)
T320 Connect module
(T11 or higher)
T310 Backplane
(T11 or higher)
See The Modbus/Profibus manual (HA028104) for details of serial communications.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Contents
Page i
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
LIST OF CONTENTS
SectionPage
Contents
Page ii
GLOSSARY OF TERMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
1.1 MANUAL CONTENTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
1.2 OTHER INFORMATION SOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
1.3 THE PROCESS SUPERVISOR UNITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
1.3.1 Typical applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
1.3.2 Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
LIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
MODBUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
PROFIBUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
REDUNDANT PROCESSOR MODULES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
AUTOMATIC TAKE-OVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY CONNECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
LIVE PROCESSOR REPLACEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
DIAGNOSTICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
FRONT PANEL ANNUNCIATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
CONTINUOUS HEALTH MONITORING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
WATCHDOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
CONFIGURATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
BLOCK STRUCTURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
ST USER ALGORITHMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
BLOCK SUPPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
ENCLOSURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Chapter 2 INSTALLATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
2.1 SAFETY AND EMC INFORMATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
2.1.1 Installation requirements for EMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
2.1.2 Installation safety requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
PERSONNEL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
HAZARDOUS VOLTAGES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
CONDUCTIVE POLLUTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
VENTILATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
PRECAUTIONS AGAINST ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
2.1.3 Keeping the product safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
MISUSE OF EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
SERVICE AND REPAIRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
2.2 UNPACKING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
2.2.1 Handling precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
2.2.2 Package contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
PRODUCT LABELLING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
2.3 MECHANICAL LAYOUT AND INSTALLATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
2.3.1 Layout drawings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
2.3.2 Removal of modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
2.3.3 Fitting of modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
2.4 BACKPLANE SWITCHES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
2.4.1 Location. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
HA028225
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processs supervisor handbook
LIST OF CONTENTS (Cont.)
SectionPage
2.4.2 Switch functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
SW1: LIN ADDRESS SETTING SWITCH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Sw2: OPTIONS SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
WDR (WATCHDOG RETRY). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
MDB (MODBUS ENABLE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
SRD (REDUNDANCY DISABLE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
2.5 CONNECTIONS AND WIRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
2.5.1 Connect module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
COMMUNICATIONS CONNECTORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
ELIN CONNECTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
ALIN CONNECTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
ELIN HUBS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
ALIN HUBS (ACTIVE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13
ALIN HUBS (PASSIVE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
DAISY-CHAIN LAYOUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
CABLING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14
DC SUPPLY WIRING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
RELAY WIRING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
2.5.2 Processor module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
CONFIGURATION OF CONTROL STRATEGIES AND SEQUENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
TERMINAL CONFIGURATOR RESTRICTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
2.5.3 Safety earth connection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19
2.5.4 Transparent Modbus Access (TMA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
Chapter 3 USER INTERFACE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
3-1
3.1 INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
3.2 POWER MONITORING LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
3.2.1 A and B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
3.2.2 ext . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
3.2.3 int. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
3.3 ALARM LEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
3.4 COMMS LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
3.4.1 System A/B, i/oA, i/oB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
3.4.2 Exp1 tx/rx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
3.4.3 Exp2 tx/rx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
3.5 CHANGEOVER LEDs AND SWITCHES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
3.5.1 Primary LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
3.5.2 Standby LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
3.5.3 Sync/changeover switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
3.5.4 Desync switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
3.5.5 Processor module Synchronisation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
TIME TO SYNCHRONISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
3.6 STARTUP LEDS AND SWITCHES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
3.6.1 wdog LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
3.6.2 Duplex LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
3.6.3 Restart switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
3.6.4 Halt switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Contents
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SectionPage
3.6.5 Start up mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
HOT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
COLD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
HOT/COLD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
TEST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Chapter 4 START-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
4.1 REDUNDANCY MODES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
4.2 START-UP MODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
4.2.1 Hot start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
4.2.2 Hot/cold start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
4.2.3 Cold start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
4.2.4 Test start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
4.2.5 Reset Data Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
4.3 STARTING A SINGLE (NON REDUNDANT) PROCESSOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
4.3.1 Start-up sequence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
OFF STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
STARTING STATE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
PRIMARY UNSYNCH STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
4.3.2 Watchdog indications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
4.3.3 Watchdog relay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
4.4 STARTING UP A PAIR OF PROCESSORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
4.4.1 Redundant mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
PRIMARY/SECONDARY CRITERIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
AUTOSYNCHRONISATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
SYNCHRONISATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
TIME TO SYNCHRONISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
4.4.2 Non-redundant mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
4.5 LED FAULT INDICATIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
POWER A/B LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
WATCHDOG LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
PRIMARY LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
COMMS LEDs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
SYSTEM AND I/O LEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
EXP1, EXP2 LEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
DUPLEX LED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
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Chapter 5 CONFIGURATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
5.1 THE TERMINAL CONFIGURATOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
5.1.1 Configuration Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
5.1.2 Connecting to a PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
5.1.3 Running the configurator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
INITIAL MENU ACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
THE INITIAL MENU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
QUITTING THE TERMINAL EMULATION PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
5.1.4 Database configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
UTILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
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5.2 LINTOOLS ON-LINE RECONFIGURATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
5.2.1 On-line Reconfiguration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
5.2.2 Preparing to run LINtools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
CONNECTING TO A COMPUTER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
CREATING A PROJECT FOLDER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
5.2.3 Running LINtools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
UPLOADING AN INSTRUMENT CONTROL STRATEGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
DOWNLOADING AN INSTRUMENT CONTROL STRATEGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
RECONFIGURING INSTRUMENT CONTROL STRATEGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
5.3 MODBUS TOOLS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
5.3.1 Preparing to run Modbus Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
5.3.2 Running Modbus Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Chapter 6 ERROR CONDITIONS & DIAGNOSTICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
6.1 ERROR INDICATION TYPES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
6.2 PROCESSOR MODULE FRONT PANEL ERROR DISPLAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
6.2.2 Processor failure modes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
6.2.3 Power failure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
PRIMARY PROCESSOR MODULE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
SECONDARY PROCESSOR MODULE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
6.2.4 Watchdog failure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
6.2.5 ICM (Inter-CPU Messaging for redundancy) failure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
ACTION IN THE EVENT OF ICM FAILURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
6.2.6 LIN failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
EFFECT OF LIN FAILURE ON REDUNDANCY MODE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
6.2.7 Database stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
6.2.8 I/O Comms failure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
6.3 POWER-UP FAILURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
6.3.1 Processor unit power-up routine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
6.4 POSTs (POWER ON SELF TESTS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
ERROR TYPES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12
6.5 DIAGNOSTIC BLOCKS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12
6.6 ERROR NUMBERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
6.6.1 Error number structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
RUNNING PACKAGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
6.6.2 Error messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
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Chapter 7 TASK ORGANISATION & TUNING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
7.1 TASK SCHEDULING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
7.1.1 Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
7.1.2 Priorities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
7.1.3 Task Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
NETWORK TASK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
NFS TASK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
USER TASKS 1 TO 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
CACHE SYNC SERVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
CACHE CONN SERVER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
LLC TASK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
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LOAD TASK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
BGND TASK (Scan) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
IDLE TASK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
7.2 USER TASKS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
7.2.1 Terminology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
USER TASK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
SERVER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
7.2.2 User task servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
SERVER INTERACTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
USER TASK SERVER OPERATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
7.3 USER TASK TUNING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
7.3.1 Repeat times & execution times. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
7.3.2 Automatic dynamic tuning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
7.3.3 Manual tuning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
7.4 DATA COHERENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
7.4.1 Data flow between tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
CONNECTIONS INTO TASKS (FROM OTHER TASKS IN THE SAME INSTRUMENT (NODE))
7-6
CONNECTIONS INTO THIS TASK (FROM OTHER TASKS IN ANOTHER INSTRUMENT)
7-6
CONNECTIONS OUT OF THIS TASK TO ANOTHER NODE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Chapter 8 SERVICE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
8.1 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
8.2 REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
8.2.1 Chassis fan filter replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
8.2.2 Chassis Fan replacement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
8.2.3 Capacitor board / capacitor board fan replacement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
8.2.4 Battery fitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
PROCEDURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
8.2.5 Flash card Replacement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
8.2.6 Firmware upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
8.3 PHYSICAL ARRANGEMENT INSIDE PROCESSOR MODULE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
8.4 THE MONITOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
8.4.1 Top level (main) menu access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
8.4.2 Quit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
8.4.3 Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7
8.4.4 Display saved system features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
8.4.5 Diagnostics menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8
AUTOMATIC TEST SEQUENCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
PSE COMM TEST MENU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
PSE COMM TEST (Cont.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
NET MENU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
PROFIBUS TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10
PROFIBUS TEST (Cont.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
MASTER DATA SCREEN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
PROFIBUS TEST (Cont.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
SLAVE DATA SCREEN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
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8.4.6 Manual set-up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
8.4.7 Automatic set-up. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
WATCHDOG RELAY TEST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
RL1 RELAY TEST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
RL2 RELAY TEST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
COMMUNICATIONS HARDWARE CHECK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-15
8.4.8 The ‘S’ Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16
S MONITOR ACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16
QUIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16
HELP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-16
DISPLAY BASIC MACHINE STATUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
DISPLAY EXTENDED MACHINE STATUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
DIAGNOSTICS MENU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
MEMORY STATUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
SHOW BOOT INFO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
DATE /TIME SET. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-20
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Chapter 9 SPECIFICATION AND ORDER CODES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
INSTALLATION CATEGORY AND POLLUTION DEGREE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Installation category II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Pollution degree 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
9.1 SPECIFICATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
9.1.1 General specification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
9.1.2 Backplane specification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
9.1.3 Connect module specification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
9.1.4 Processor Module specification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
9.1.5 Software specification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
9.2 ORDER CODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
9.2.1 Instrument order code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
9.2.2 Spares and accessories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
9.3 COSHH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
9.3.1 Lithium thionyl chloride batteries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
ANNEX A CONFIGURATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
A.1 TOOLS: THE CONFIGURATOR AND LINTOOLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
A.2 CONFIGURABLE ITEMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
A.2.1 Configuration Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
A.3 PREPARING TO RUN THE CONFIGURATOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
A.3.1 Connecting to a PC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
A.3.2 Setting the control efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
NON-REDUNDANT (SIMPLEX)SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
REDUNDANT (DUPLEX)SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
A.4 RUNNING THE CONFIGURATOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
A.4.1 Initial menu access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
IP SUBNETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
A.4.2 The Initial menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
A.4.3 Quitting the terminal emulation program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Contents
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PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
LIST OF CONTENTS (Cont.)
SectionPage
A5 DATABASE CONFIGURATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
A.5.1 MAKE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
BLOCK OVERVIEW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
CONNECTION TYPES IN A PROCESSOR MODULE DATABASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11
A.5.2 COPY command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
A.5.3 DELETE command. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13
A.5.4 INSPECT command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13
A.5.5 NETWORK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13
A.5.6 UTILITIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-14
START, STOP COMMANDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-14
SAVE COMMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-14
LOAD COMMAND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
FILE COMMAND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
TRY/UNTRY CHANGES COMMAND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
APPLY/UNDO COMMAND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
APPLY/UNDO COMMAND (Cont.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-16
ELIN SETUP PAGE COMMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-16
ELIN SETUP PAGE COMMAND (Cont.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17
LOCAL IP SETUP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17
ELIN PARAMETERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17
A.5.7 ALARMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-17
A.6 MODBUS CONFIGURATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18
A.6.1 MODE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18
A.6.2 SETUP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18
A.6.3 Tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19
TABLES LIST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19
TABLE MENUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20
A.6.4 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-22
INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Contents
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processs supervisor handbook
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Items in italics in the descriptions below also appear as glossary items in their own right
2500
ALIN
ALIN bridge
Application
ARCNET
I/O sub-system for use with Process Supervisor units
Local Instrument Network (LIN) protocol on ARCNET
LIN to ALIN network link
A LIN database and associated SFCs
A single non-branching, masterless network, running at 2.5MBaud allowing peer-to-peer
communications and file transfer up to 100 metres.
Baud
Used to describe transmission speeds over communications links. (9600 baud = approximately 1000 ASCII characters per second)
Brown-out
A brown-out is a transient power variation or partial power failure severe enough to
prevent continuation of the process until the process supervisor has been re-initialised.
Cold start
A Cold start is where the instrument starts with the last-loaded database loaded using
either default parameters or parameters held in the cold start parameter file. See also
Hot Start
Cold Start time
The Cold Start time is a pre-set duration, following power off, after which a Hot Start is
not possible, and a Cold Start must be initiated instead.
Configuration
The process of specifying the components of an application.
Control strategy
A control strategy is the overall programmed function of the LIN database within an
instrument, ready to act upon a real life process.
CIDRClassless Inter-domain Routing. A standard for IP addressing.
COSHHControl of Substances Hazardous to Health legislation
CSPCold Start Primary - the left-hand processor module. Applies to redundant mode systems
only.
CSSCold Start Secondary - the right-hand processor module. Applies to redundant mode systems only.
DRAMDynamic Random Access Mamory
Duplex
Twin synchronised processors capable of operating in redundant mode
EDB
External database
EEPROM
Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory
ELIN
Local Instrument Network (LIN) protocol on Ethernet
EMC
Electro-magnetic compliance
Eurotherm Project Studio
A suite of programs for building, testing and configuring programs and systems for process control and I/O.
e-Suite
A control/monitoring/configuration system for use with process supervisor units.
FB
Function block.
FBD
Function Block Diagram - a programming language.
Function block
A unit of software that performs a named function. It can be linked to other function
blocks to build a LIN database and hence a control strategy for an instrument.
GSD file
A GSD (Gerätestammdaten) file contains instrument parameter information, which a
Profibus master needs in order to communicate with the instrument.
Hot start
After a power loss, the instrument attempts to re-start with the current database still
loaded and with all parameters and values for that application still at the values they
held when processing stopped. If the restart fails the processor enters an idle state.
Hot & Cold start:
After a power loss, the instrument attempts to re-start with the current database still
loaded and with all parameters and values for that application still at the values they
held when processing stopped. If the restart fails the processor attempts a cold start.
ICM
Inter-CPU Messaging for redundancy.
Idle
A state in which the processor module is powered up, but with an empty database. This
state is entered as a result of ‘test’ being selected as start-up mode, or if a hot start or
cold start is not successful.
IP
Internet Protocol.
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PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
iTools
A Eurotherm utility for configuring networks of Eurotherm I/O controllers.GLOSSARY
(Cont.)
LIN
Local Instrument Network, a Eurotherm proprietary system for networking process monitoring and control instruments.
LIN database
The LIN database is a set of software function blocks that constitute the control strategy
of a LIN instrument.
LIN protocol
The communications protocol employed to control instruments linked by a LIN.
LINtools
A Eurotherm utility for configuring networks of LIN instruments.
Modbus®
A proprietary communications protocol (Gould-Modicon Modbus RTU).
Non-redundant mode
One or more processors running but not synchronised.
PALProgrammable Logic Array.
Primary
In a Redundant mode system, the primary is that processor which is in control. The other
processor is called the secondary processor.
Processor module The process supervisor consists of a backplane fitted with one or two Processor Modules
and a connection module. ‘Processor Module’ should not be confused with Central Processor Unit (CPU) which is electronics hardware contained within the Processor module.
Process variableCharacteristics of a process - such as temperature, pressure and valve aperture - that can
change value.
Profibus
A communications standard.
PSUPower supply unit.
Redundant mode
Two synchronised processor modules (the primary and secondary). The secondary processor tracks the primary in every respect so that it can take command should the primary (or the supply power to it) fail.
RFIRadio frequency interference.
Secondary
In a Redundant mode system, the primary is that processor which is in control. The other
processor is called the secondary processor and it continuously tracks the primary, so
that it can assume control should the primary fail.
SynchronisedDuring the start up sequence in redundant mode, once the primary processor is running,
it copies database and function block data to the secondary. Once this is complete, and
the database is running in both processor modules, the processor modules are said to be
synchronised.
SFCSequential Function Chart. An SFC monitors key variables and parameters and, on the
basis of the values it finds, decides which route through a flowchart the application
should follow.
Simplex
A processor working alone i.e in non-redundant mode.
SLIN
LIN protocol on a serial link (point-to-point).
Tepid StartSimilar to a hot start, but with a only limited amount of database information.
Test startOnce started, the processor module enters an idle mode, with an empty data base
loaded.
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PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION
The process supervisor is one part of a complete control system. The entire package is described in the System Configuration Manual HA028314.
1.1 MANUAL CONTENTS
This manual is divided into the following chapters:
Chapter 1. Introduction
Chapter 2. Installation
Chapter 3. User Interface (explaining the front panel LEDs and switches)
Chapter 4.Start Up (step-by-step instructions on how to start up or re-start the instrument)
Chapter 5.Configuration (how to configure, or more typically re-configure, control strategy and communications protocols on site, usually to match changes in the plant being controlled). (Initial configuration, to Customer Specification, is normally carried out prior to delivery.)
Chapter 6.Diagnostics (how to diagnose faults that could develop in the instrument, by recognising fault
indications)
Chapter 7. Task Organisation and tuning
Chapter 8.Service
Chapter 9. Technical Specification and order codes
Annex AConfiguration (Full configuratioln)
1.2 OTHER INFORMATION SOURCES
For details of (LIN) based function blocks, their parameters and input/output connections refer to the LIN
blocks reference section of the LIN product manual (HA082375U003) which explains how control strategy
LIN blocks are selected, interconnected etc. The creation and monitoring of databases and communications
configurations is described in the Eurotherm Project studio documentation. The configuration of Sequential
Function Charts (SFCs) is described in the LINtools Online help file (RM263001U055) to be found in ‘on-line
books’ in the LINtools application directory. Modbus and Profibus implementations are discussed in the Communications Manual (HA028014).
1.3 THE PROCESS SUPERVISOR UNITS
Process supervisor
Connect
e
Processor
Power
system
A
B
in
out
e
Process supervisor
EUROTHERM
24V
A
B
in
out
A
B
int
ext
EUROTHERM
Alarms
24V
rl2
A
B
int
ext
EUROTHERM
Alarms
rl1
battery
Comms
i/oA
Power
rl1
battery
e
Process supervisor
Processor
rl2
Comms
system
A
B
tx
exp1
system
exp2
i/o
rx
i/o
exp1
A
B
tx
rx
exp2
i/oB
in
out
in
primary
out
primary
standby
sync
changeover
standby
sync
changeover
exp1
in
out
in
out
in
out
in
out
desync
exp2
rl1
-
rl2
wdog batt
+
-
alarms
+
+
rl1
24V
A
left processor
rl2
+
-
wdog batt
-
desync
Restart
wdog
+
hot
hot/cold
cold
test
+
halt
duplex
config
Restart
wdog
halt
duplex
hot
hot/cold
cold
test
config
24V
B
A
B
right processor
An Invensys company
An Invensys company
Figure 1.3 Connect module (left) and dual processor modules (centre and right) on the backplane
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PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
1.3.1 Typical applications
The process supervisor is designed to control processing plants using distributed input/output modules, interconnected using networks. A number of process supervisors can be networked together, allowing thousands
of I/O points to be monitored and controlled.
1.3.2 Features
The main features of the process supervisor are as follows
LIN
A LIN-based network using either ALIN or ELIN. This allows communications with I/O modules and the wider
network via either a ‘daisy-chain’ configuration (ALIN only) or a central ALIN or ELIN ‘hub’. See Chapter 2,
figure 2.5.
MODBUS
The Unit supports Modbus comms via the connect module exp1 (master) and exp 2 (slave) ports if so configured. Modbus-tcp-slave is also supported.
PROFIBUS.
The Unit supports Profibus communications via the connect module i/oB port.
REDUNDANT PROCESSOR MODULES
The processors can be set up for redundant or non-redundant operation. When operating in redundant
(duplex) mode, a high speed data link (ICM) between the primary and secondary processor units provides
exact tracking of the control database, allowing bumpless takeover by the secondary unit should the primary
processor fail.
Note: See the ‘Important Information’ leaflet (HA028256) for any backwards compatibility details.
AUTOMATIC TAKE-OVER
Takeover of control by the secondary processor in the event of primary failure is automatic, with no loss of
I/O states and no need to re-initialise I/O points. Revalidation of all attached LIN nodes is automatic.
REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY CONNECTION
Two independent power connectors for each processor unit, plus external battery for memory backup ensures
full redundancy. An internal battery supports the data in SRAM (if fitted) and the real-time clock for a minimum of 72 hours.
LIVE PROCESSOR REPLACEMENT
Live replacement of a failed processor can be carried out, with no wiring disconnections. The replacement
unit loads its strategy and current status from the active processor. Full hardware and software status indication allows rapid verification and diagnostics.
DIAGNOSTICS
Automatic health checks, self-testing, and initialisation on power-up.
FRONT PANEL ANNUNCIATION.
Front panel LEDs are provided for communications and processor status. Control switches are also fitted on
each processor module.
CONTINUOUS HEALTH MONITORING
Extensive on-going diagnostics and health monitoring of communications and I/O status.
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1.3.2 FEATURES (Cont.)
WATCHDOG
Watchdog relay for each processor, with Connect module front-panel AND/OR connections.
I/O
Distributed I/O is networked using serial communications links.
CONFIGURATION.
Strategies and sequences configured/downloaded/monitored with Eurotherm Project Studio or the resident
configurator (needs external terminal).
BLOCK STRUCTURE.
Continuous strategies are built up by interconnection of fixed function blocks from a comprehensive library of
analogue and logic elements, common to all LIN based instruments.
ST USER ALGORITHMS
Special ACTION blocks support user-algorithms written in ST (Structured Text) and are well-suited to implement plant logical devices.
BLOCK SUPPORT
All standard LIN data base function blocks are supported in redundant mode. Special diagnostic blocks are
available for hardware and software status reporting.
ENCLOSURES
Process supervisor units can be supplied in a range of enclosures, both wall-mounted and floor-standing.
Power supplies, standard terminations, transmitter power supplies, and I/O modules can all be fitted within
these enclosures, and if required, a visual supervisor unit can be door mounted to allow a visual representation of process variables.
I/O
racks
(multiple)
Process
supervisor
Battery
unit
PSUs
Figure 1.3.2c Typical installations
Note: The process interface i/o modules can be mounted vertically as shown in the sides of the single
bay enclosure, or horizontally as shown in the two-bay version.
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Chapter 2 INSTALLATION
This chapter presents safety and EMC information and describes the mechanical and electrical installation of
the instrument. The main topics covered are as follows:
1.Safety & EMC information (section 2.1)
2. Unpacking (section 2.2)
3. Mechanical layout (section 2.3)
4.Set-up switch definition (section 2.4)
5.Connections and wiring (section 2.5)
2.1 SAFETY AND EMC INFORMATION
This unit meets the requirements of the European Directives on Safety and EMC as detailed on the Declaration of conformity IA249986U610, a copy of which appears at the beginning of this manual. It is, however, the
responsibility of the installer to ensure the safety and EMC compliance of any particular installation.
Note: In order to comply with the Low Voltage Directive quoted in the Declaration of Conformity at
the beginning of this manual, neither the positive nor the negative supply line may exceed 40V peak,
with respect to Safety Earth potential.
2.1.1 Installation requirements for EMC
This unit conforms with the essential protection requirements of the EMC Directive 89/336/EEC, amended by
93/68/EEC. It also satisfies the emissions and immunity standards for industrial environments.
To ensure compliance with the European EMC directive certain installation precautions are necessary as follows:
1 General guidance. For general guidance refer to the EMC Installation Guide (HA025464).
2Relay outputs. When using relay outputs it may be necessary to fit a filter suitable for suppressing conducted emissions. The filter requirements will depend on the type of load.
3Routing of wires. To minimise the pick-up of electrical noise, low voltage DC connections and sensor
input wiring should be routed away from high-current power cables. Where it is impractical to do this,
shielded cables should be used, with the shield grounded at both ends.
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2.1.2 Installation safety requirements
PERSONNEL
Installation must be carried out only by authorized personnel.
HAZARDOUS VOLTAGES
Caution
In order to comply with the requirements of BS EN61010, the voltage applied between any I/O terminal
and safety earth may not exceed 30V ac or 50 V dc.
Caution
The configuration port is not isolated - see section 2.5.2.
CONDUCTIVE POLLUTION
Electrically conductive pollution (e.g. carbon dust, water condensation) must be excluded from the enclosure
in which the unit is mounted. To ensure the atmosphere is suitable, an air filter should be installed in the air
intake of the enclosure. Where condensation is likely, a thermostatically controlled heater should be included
in the enclosure.
VENTILATION
Ensure that the enclosure or cabinet housing the unit provides adequate ventilation/heating to maintain the
operating temperature of the unit within the limits indicated in the Specification (see Chapter 9).
PRECAUTIONS AGAINST ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE
Caution
Circuit boards inside the units contain components which can be damaged by static electrical discharge.
Before any circuit board is removed or handled it should be ensured that the handler, the instrument
and the circuit board are all at the same potential.
2.1.3 Keeping the product safe
To maintain the units in a safe condition, observe the following instructions.
MISUSE OF EQUIPMENT
If the equipment is used in a manner not specified in this handbook or by Eurotherm Ltd., the protection provided by the equipment may be impaired.
SERVICE AND REPAIRS
Except for those parts detailed in Chapter 8, the Process Supervisor has no user-serviceable parts. Contact the
nearest manufacturer’s agent for repair.
2.2 UNPACKING
The instrument and accessories should be carefully unpacked and inspected for damage. The original packing materials should be retained in case re-shipment is required. If there is evidence of shipping damage, the
supplier or the carrier should be notified within 72 hours and the packaging retained for inspection by the
manufacturer’s and/or carrier’s representative.
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PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.2.1 Handling precautions
Caution
Circuit boards inside the units contain components which can be damaged by static electrical discharge.
Before any circuit board is removed or handled it should be ensured that the handler, the instrument
and the circuit board are all at the same potential.
2.2.2 Package contents
Note: The process supervisor may form part of a larger assembly, and/or may be housed in a floor or
wall-mounted enclosure. If so, the documentation that accompanied those items should be referredto.
The package contents should be checked against the order codes, using the labels on the components. Order
codes are listed in Chapter 9 of this handbook.
PRODUCT LABELLING
Product labelling includes:
1.Sleeve label. On the outside of the processor and connect module sleeves, showing the model number ,
serial number, and hardware build level.
2.Backplane label. On the edge of the backplane, showing the model number, serial number, and hardware build level.
3. Label showing software and hardware build level.
4. Flash memory card label showing version and issue number.
5.Safety earth symbol adjacent to safety earth stud.
2.3 MECHANICAL LAYOUT AND INSTALLATION
Figure 2.3.1a shows two processor modules and a connect module mounted on the backplane. Remote I/O
modules (described in the 2500 Installation and wiring instructions, HA027773) are connected to the processor modules using the i/oA and/or i/oB communications sockets of the connection module. Figures 2.3.1b and
2.3.1c show front views of the modules.
When only a single processor is fitted, it is recommended that a blanking plate (BA260496) be fitted to the
vacant slot, to maintain EMC emission/immunity specifications.
The processor modules can operate either independently (simplex), or else in ‘redundant’ (duplex) mode in
which case one of the processors acts as a primary, backed up by the other processor (the secondary), which
can take over from the primary at any time.
Power is supplied to each processor module by one or two external 24V (nom.) power supplies. The two supplies are effectively OR’d together within the processor module, so they can run in parallel, thus ensuring that
the processor continues to operate even if one of the supplies fails.
A separate plug is available to allow the connection of an external battery (2.4 to 5.0 V), to maintain the realtime clock (RTC) during shut down. An internal battery can be fitted to maintain the RTC for 10 years. Chapter 8 gives installation/replacement procedures for the internal battery, and Chapter 9 gives details of suitable
batteries, both internal and external.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-3
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.3.1 Layout drawings
8.5
150
±1
210
±1
Tolerance = ± 0.5mm,
except where shown
otherwise
120
Process supervisor
Connect
e
Process supervisor
EUROTHERM
Processor
Power
system
ø12
A
B
in
out
24V
A
B
in
out
battery
A
B
int
ex
t
A
B
e
EUROTHERM
Power
24V
battery
Comms
system
i/o
A
rl2
Comms
i/oA
Process supervisor
Processor
Alarms
rl1
exp1
tx
rx
e
EUROTHERM
Alarms
B
rl1
Earth stud
(M4)
in
t
ex
t
A
B
rl2
system
exp2
10
362±1
ø6.5
120
241±1
i/o
exp1
tx
rx
exp2
125
180
182
120
i/oB
in
out
in
out
in
out
in
out
primary
primary
standby
sync
changeover
standby
sync
changeover
exp1
exp2
+
-
in
wdo batt
g
24V
+
-
A
B
left processor
10
Restart
out
rl2
alarms
+
rl1
+
-
24V
wdog
hot
hot/cold
cold
test
out
rl2
config
Restart
wdog
hot
hot/cold
cold
test
config
wdog batt
A
duplex
halt
+
B
An Invensys company
right processor
halt
duplex
20
in
rl1
desync
50
desync
An Invensys company
382
402
Figure 2.3.1a Dimensions (mm)
Process Supervisor
Process Supervisor
Connect
Processor
Power
A
24V
battery
Alarms
B
rl1
int ext
system
rl2
A
B
in
out
in
out
Comms
i/o
A
B
primary
tx
rx
hot
hot/cold
cold
test
halt
in
out
in
out
in
out
changeover
exp1
wdog
in
out
in
out
exp2
config
duplex
An Invensys company
Figure 2.3.1b Processor module front panel layout
Chapter 2
Page 2-4
out
i/oB
desync
Restart
in
exp2
standby
sync
B
i/oA
exp1
system
A
rl1
rl2
+
-
alarms
wdog batt
+
-
A
left processor
B
rl1
+
24V
A
rl2
wdog batt
+
B
right processor
Figure 2.3.1c Connect module front panel layout
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.3.2 Removal of modules
It is recommended that power be removed and all wiring be disconnected from the connection module, before it is removed from the backplane.
Although Processor Modules are designed to be removed/replaced with power applied, the life of the connector will be maximised if they are removed with power off.
Note: Figure 2.3.2 shows a connection module. The procedure is identical for processor modules.
To remove a module:
1Remove wiring, by disconnecting connectors
2 Unscrew both retaining screws (anticlockwise) to jack the unit out of its connector.
3 Lift the unit off its retaining catch.
3 Lift unit off the catch
2 Undo jacking
screws
1 Remove wiring
Figure 2.3.2 Module removal
2.3.3 Fitting of modules
1
Lift the module onto its retaining catch, and gently push the module towards the backplane to mate the
connector.
Caution
Do not force the unit onto its connector or damage will occur
2Re-engage and tighten both retaining screws a few turns each at a time, to a maximum torque of 2.5 Nm.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-5
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.4 BACKPLANE SWITCHES
2.4.1 Location
The backplane switches for setting communications addresses and for selecting options on and off are revealed (figure 2.4.1) when the right-hand processor module or the cover plate is removed from the back
plane.
2.4.2 Switch functions
SW1: LIN ADDRESS SETTING SWITCH
Figure 2.4.2a below shows the LIN address-setting switch SW1 (located on the backplane as shown in figure
2.4.1). The figure shows a sample set up for address pair 7A/7B.
Whenever there are two processor modules fitted to the backplane and working in non-redundant mode, the
left-hand processor unit is allocated the even address (Bit 0 = 0) and the right-hand processor is allocated the
odd address (Bit 0 = 1).
When working in redundant mode, the primary processor is initially the left-hand (even address) unit and the
secondary is initially the right-hand (odd address) unit. Should it prove necessary for the secondary to take
over, and become the primary, it will also take over the even address.
Note: In redundant mode, a single processor module running on its own in the chassis never adopts
the odd address as it is always the primary controller. It is strongly recommended that this odd address
be kept ‘spare’ and not allocated to another instrument on the same LIN segment. This avoids address
clashes if a second processor module is subsequently added to the backplane.
Sw1: LIN Address
7
On (1)
MSB
SW1 ADDRESS
MSB
ON
OFF
Push left
for 'ON'
LSB
8
7
SRD 6
MDB 5
4
ON
3
2
WDR 1
OFF
SW2 OPTIONS
Figure 2.4.1 Location of backplane switches
Chapter 2
Page 2-6
LSB
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
Bit 7
A/B
0 1 1 1 1 0 1X
Bit 1
X
Example of how to set address pair 7A/7B
(Bit 0 automatically set to 0 (thus 7A) for left
processor and to 1 (7B) for right processor)
Addresses 00, FE and FF are reserved and
MUST NOT be used.
Binary Hex
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
Figure 2.4.2a LIN address setup example
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.4.2 BACKPLANE SWITCH FUNCTIONS (Cont.)
Sw2: OPTIONS SWITCH
Figure 2.4.2b, below, shows the Options switch SW2 (located on the backplane as shown in figure 2.4.1,
above).
Off (0)
8
7
SRD 6
MDB 5
4
3
2
WDR 1
Sw2 Options
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Not used
Not used
Redundancy disable
Modbus enable
Not used
Not used
Not used
Watchdog retry enable
Figure 2.4.2b Option switch layout
WDR (WATCHDOG RETRY)
Setting this switch segment ‘on’ (slide to the left) causes the processor to try to start again after any watchdog
failure. Setting the segment ‘off’ (slide to the right) disables the re-try and the processor will need manual
restart after a watchdog failure.
MDB (MODBUS ENABLE)
Setting this switch segment ‘on’ (slide to the left) enables Modbus communications (if fitted). Setting the segment ‘off’ (slide to the right) disables Modbus Communications.
SRD (REDUNDANCY DISABLE)
Setting this switch segment ‘off’ (slide to the right) selects redundant mode, with two processors defined initially as ‘primary’ (left-hand processor) and ‘secondary’ (right-hand processor). Setting the segment ‘on’ (left)
disables redundancy mode, and both processors (if two are fitted) run independently.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-7
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5 CONNECTIONS AND WIRING
Units may be supplied mounted in an enclosure, together with the appropriate termination assemblies — either fitted in the enclosure or supplied in kit form. Please refer to the documentation that was supplied with
the enclosure for details of the connections and wiring.
If you are assembling the system yourself, you should refer to the relevant I/O Modules Reference Manual,
the LIN/ALIN/ELIN Installation & User Guide (HA082429U005) and the Communications Manual (HA028014)
for advice on connections and wiring to the I/O modules.
Figure 2.5 below shows simplified overall connection diagrams for a control system using a) an ALIN hub
and b) an ELIN hub. Hubs are useful for individual line lengths of up to 100 metres. For line lengths greater
than this one or more pairs of hubs with fibre-optic connections is recommended. As detailed later in this
chapter, it is also possible (with ALIN systems) to connect local items together in series, using a daisy-chain
technique, rather than in a star layout using a Hub.
pc
project studio
pc
scAdA
ALIN hub
(ArcNet)
visual
supervisor
ALin
Terminator
ALin
ALin
ALin
ALin
process supervisor
I/o A
(Unused ports need terminators)
I/o b
EIA232
EIA232
comms
Isolator
profibus
psU and relays
profibus
EIA232
I/o sub-system
comms
Isolator
EIA232
I/o sub-system
configuration
Terminal
configuration
Terminal
I/o sub-system
I/o sub-system
Terminator
a) ALIN connection
process
process
pc
project studio
pc
scAdA
process supervisor
Ethernet
(ELIN) hub
profibus
I/o sub-system
profibus
EIA232
psU and relays
comms
Isolator
I/o sub-system
EIA232
I/o sub-system
I/o sub-system
configuration
Terminal
Terminator
b) ELIN connection
process
process
Figure 2.5 Typical overall connection diagrams
Chapter 2
Page 2-8
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 Connect module
The RJ45 connectors on the front panel can be wired for ELIN, ALIN, Modbus or Profibus use, according to
specification at time of order. The pairs of connectors on the left hand side of the module are assigned to
the left hand processor; the right hand connectors to the right-hand module. Each pair of connectors (except
system A/B) is wired in parallel to provide for easy daisy chaining.
Plug-in modules to provide biassing components to terminate the transmission line, are available from the
manufacturer. Such terminators are required only at the final node of the transmission line.
Note: Terminators are not required for ELIN systems
Process Supervisor
Connect
ELIN
system
A
B
ALIN
A
B
in
out
in
out
in
out
in
out
i/oA
in
out
in
out
Profibus
i/oB
Modbus
Master
exp1
in
out
Modbus
Slave
exp2
in
rl1
out
rl2
+
-
alarms
wdog batt
+
-
A
left processor
B
rl1
+
24V
A
rl2
wdog batt
+
B
right processor
Figure 2.5.1a Connect module front panel
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-9
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 CONNECT MODULE (Cont.)
COMMUNICATIONS CONNECTORS
Figure 2.5.1b shows the connector pinouts for Modbus (EIA422 or EIA485), Profibus and LIN standards. For the
pinout for the processor CONFIG port, see section 2.5.2 below.
pin 8
pin 1
RJ 45 plug: View on underside
1
2
EIA422/485
(5-wire)
TxB
TxA
3
Signal common
4
6
5
7
8
1
2
EIA485
(3-wire)
EIA485B
EIA485A
3
Signal common
Not used
4
Signal common
6
Not used
RxB
RxA
5
7
8
1
2
EIA422/485
(5-wire)
RxB
RxA
3
Signal common
Not used
4
Not used
Signal common
6
Signal common
Not used
Not used
Not used
5
Not used
TxB
7
8
TxA
Plug shroud to cable
screen
Slave device
exp1/2
Plug shroud to cable
screen
Master/slave device
exp1/2
Plug shroud to cable
screen
ELIN
ALIN
Profibus
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Tx+
1
Tx-
2
Rx+
3
Not used
5
Not used
Rx-
Not used
Not used
4
6
7
8
Not used
Not used
Master device
exp1/2
1
2
EIA485 B
EIA485 A
Not used
3
Signal common
4
ALIN B
5
Not used
Not used
6
+5V (for pull-up)
Not used
8
ALIN A
Not used
Not used
7
Not used
Not used
Plug shroud to cable
screen
Plug shroud to cable
screen
Plug shroud to cable
screen
SystemA
ioA
ioB
Figure 2.5.1b Pinout for Connect module RJ45 type plugs
Chapter 2
Page 2-10
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 CONNECT MODULE (Cont.)
ELIN CONNECTORS
The Connect module contains two pairs of RJ45 type connectors called system A/B. The left-hand pair is for
the left-hand processor; the right-hand pair for the right-hand processor.
Note: System B connectors not supported at time of print.
Connection with an ELIN hub is made using a RJ45-to-RJ45 cable assembly. When connecting to the ELIN
Hub, a ‘straight-through’ cable is used. When connecting directly, a ‘cross-over’ cable is required. Figure
2.5.1c shows the connections.
SHROUD/SCREEN
Tx+
1
Tx-
2
Rx+
3
4
5
Rx-
White/Orange
1
2
Orange
White/green
3
Blue
4
Blue/white
6
5
6
Green
White/Brown
7
8
7
8
Brown
(8-Way RJ45)
(8-Way RJ45)
Screen
White/Orange
Orange
White/green
Blue
Blue/white
Green
White/Brown
a) Straight-through version
Brown
View on rear of connectors
(Straight-through cable)
1
8
1
8
SHROUD/SCREEN
White/Orange
1
2
5
2
Orange
White/green
3
4
1
3
Blue
4
Blue/white
6
7
8
5
6
Green
White/Brown
7
8
Brown
(8-Way RJ45)
(8-Way RJ45)
Screen
White/Orange
Orange
White/green
Blue
Blue/white
Green
White/Brown
b) Cross over version
Brown
8
1
View on rear of connectors
(Cross over cable)
8
1
Figure 2.5.1c ELIN connection details
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-11
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 CONNECT MODULE (Cont.)
ALIN CONNECTORS
The Connect module contains two pairs of ALIN RJ45 type connectors called i/oA. The left-hand pair is for
the left-hand processor; the right-hand pair for the right-hand processor. The two sockets making up each
pair are connected in parallel to allow easy daisy-chaining.
Connection with an ALIN hub, or a PCI ArcNet card (also fitted with 8-way RJ45 connectors) can be made using an RJ45-to-RJ45 cable assembly available from the manufacturer under part number S9508-5/2RJ45. This
cable has all eight connections made at both ends, thus making it suitable for all applications, not just ALIN
which uses only a single twisted pair). Fig 2.5.1d is a schematic showing the connections.
Notes:
1 The Rx and Tx legends apply to Modbus master connectors. Slave connections have Tx and Rx reversed as shown in figure 2.5.1b above.
2 Wire colours shown may not be correct for your cable form
SHROUD/SCREEN
TxB (5 -wire)
EIA485B (3-wire)
TxA (5-wire)
EIA485A (3-wire)
0V
(ALIN phase A)
White/Orange
1
2
(ALIN phase B)
5
0V
6
RxB (5-wire)
7
RxA (3-wire)
8
2
Orange
White/green
3
4
1
3
Blue
4
Blue/white
5
6
Green
White/Brown
7
8
Brown
(8-Way RJ45)
(8-Way RJ45)
Screen
White/Orange
Orange
White/green
Blue
Blue/white
Green
White/Brown
Brown
8
1
View on rear of connectors
8
1
Figure 2.5.1d S9508-5/2RJ45 connection details
Chapter 2
Page 2-12
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 CONNECT MODULE (Cont.)
ELIN HUBS
The use of standard ‘off-the-shelf’ Ethernet hubs is recommended, using ‘Straight-through’ cables (figure
2.5.1c). For further details, the LIN/ALIN/ELIN installation and user guide (HA082429U005) should be referred
to.
ALIN HUBS (ACTIVE)
Figure 2.5.1e shows a simple ALIN hub layout, and figure 2.5.1f a daisy-chain layout. The hub layout is preferred in cases where the integrity of the ALIN network is considered to be susceptible to lengths of daisychain becoming inoperative due to cable breakage or individual hardware faults.
ALIN Network
ALin
ALin
Process supervisor
Terminator
Profibus
PC
Eurotherm
Project Studio
I/O A (Unused ports
I/O B need terminators)
Remote I/O
Terminator
Figure 2.5.1e ALIN Hub layout
ALIN Hub
(Arcnet)
Terminator
Terminator
ALin
ALin
Profibus
PC
ALin
Eurotherm
Terminator
Project Studio
ALin network
Process supervisor
I/O A (Unused ports
I/O B need terminators)
Remote I/o
Terminator
Figure 2.5.1f Daisy-chain layout
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-13
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 CONNECT MODULE (Cont.)
ALIN HUBS (PASSIVE)
Mechanically, a passive ALIN hub consists of a metal box with 12 RJ-45 type connectors and one RJ11 connector (for earlier equipment). Electronically, the hub consists of a resistor network designed to allow each of the
12 ports to be connected to a single unterminated- node, using a cable up to three metres in length. Cable
termination is provided by each port, and vacant ports must be left unterminated. This system ensures survival with one port short circuited and any number (up to the maximum) of open-circuit ports.
DAISY-CHAIN LAYOUT
This method of connection is the preferred method where the integrity of the network is certain. Further
details are to be found in the LIN/ALIN/ELIN Installation and user guide HA082429U005.
CABLING
Shielded RJ45 connectors and screened Category 5 cables are widely available. Note, however, that specifications vary and not all components are suitable for reliable ALIN operation. In view of the problems that can
arise with inadequate cabling, it is strongly recommended that ready-made interconnecting cables are ordered
from the manufacturer.
Chapter 2
Page 2-14
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 CONNECT MODULE (Continued)
DC SUPPLY WIRING
Each processor has two 24V supply connections (A and B) near the bottom of the Connect module front
panel. The unit will operate on any dc voltage between 18V and 36V at a maximum power requirement of
50W per processor module. In addition to this, a separate connector allows an external battery of between
2.5 and 5.0V to be connected to maintain the real-time clock. Typical drain currents are 0.2 mA at 2.5V and
0.3 mA at 3.4V.
Recommended power supply units and batteries are listed in Chapter 9.
A lithium thionyl chloride battery can be fitted inside each processor unit to maintain the Real-time clock
data for 10 years, should an external battery not be available during power down, or if the Connect module is
removed from the backplane.
Figure 2.5.1g shows the locations of the connectors and gives recommended conductor sizes based on current
carrying capability and connector capacity.
Note: In order to comply with the Low Voltage Directive quoted in the Declaration of Conformity at
the beginning of this manual, neither the positive nor the negative supply line may exceed 40V peak,
with respect to Safety Earth potential.
FUSES
All positive supply lines must incorporate a fuse. Suitable types are 3A Type T for 24 Volt supplies and 0.5V
Type T for each external battery fitted.
exp2
in
rl1
out
rl2
+
-
in
– ++
wdog batt
24V
A
– +
alarms
+
-
out
rl1
rl2
+
-
wdog batt
+
+
-
24V
B
A
left processor
B
right processor
Recommended wire sizes
DC supply (single wire):
0.2mm2 to 2.5mm2
Relays /battery(single wire): 0.14mm2 to 1.5mm2
(20 awg to 14 awg)
(25 awg to 16 awg)
Fuse types (fuses to be fitted in positive supply line)
24V supply = 3A Type T; External battery = 0.5A Type T
Figure 2.5.1g DC and relay connection details
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-15
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.1 CONNECT MODULE (Cont.)
RELAY WIRING
There are three relays associated with each processor module, and the common and normally open terminals of these relays are wired to the front of
the Connect module as shown in figures 2.5.1h and 2.5.1i. The contact ratings (resistive loads) for the relays are 30V ac / 50V dc at 0.5A.
Relay
(Power off
state)
Com
NO
The operational strategy of relays 1 and 2 (rl1 and rl2 respectively) is entirely software controlled and is set up during configuration.
The watchdog relay is under system control; a number of health checks
being made, before the relay is operated. If during operation any of the
health checks fail, the relay goes into its alarm (power-off) state. See Chapter 3 (User Interface) for full details of the watchdog system.
Rl1, Rl2
or wdog
Coil energisation
under software
control
Figure 2.5.1h Relay wiring
The relays can be wired in series or in parallel. When in parallel, both Processors have to fail, before the alarm
becomes valid. When in series, the alarm becomes valid if either processor fails. Figure 2.5.1i shows the relays
wired in series to a 24V dc ‘healthy’ lamp. Figure 2.5.1j shows a parallel configuration, using an auxiliary relay
to display both healthy and warning states.
Note: For all relays, the common and normally open contacts are open circuit during power-off, and
remain so for some seconds at power-up, until software control has become established. After that,
the contacts are short circuit when the relay coil is energised, and open-circuit when the coil is not
energised.
'Healthy' lamp
(12 Watts max.)
+24V dc
0V
wdog
alarms
left processor
wdog
right processor
Figure 2.5.1i Example wiring for watchdog relays in series
+24V dc
+240V ac
(Line)
Mains relay
Com
NO
wdog
left processor
alarms
NC
Healthy
wdog
right processor
Fail
0V
Neutral
Figure 2.5.1j Example wiring for watchdog relays in parallel
Chapter 2
Page 2-16
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.2 Processor module
The processor module contains one user connection, an RJ11-type plug for the connection of a configuration
terminal for on-line monitoring and minor configuration editing. It is possible to configure a whole system
from such a terminal, but is not recommended because of the complexity of most systems.
It is recommended that a Communications isolator be connected between the processor module and the
terminal. Figure 2.5.2a gives a pinout for such a unit. Figure 2.5.2b shows cables for connecting the processor
config port directly to a PC’s EIA232 port, both 9-way and 25-way versions.
Communications parameters should be set up as listed below, from the Properties/Connect-to/Configure connection menu:
Baud Rate
Nº of data bits
Nº of start bits
Parity
Nº of stop bits
9600
7
1
Even
1
porT 2
6-way
EIA232 connections
2TX
2RX
1TX
1RX
EXE
PWR
UNIVERSAL
INTERFACE
CONVERTER
porT 1
(8-way)
signal
communications isolator
processor
etc.
port 1
(8-way)
port 2
(6-way)
port 1
rJ11
config port
rJ11
rX Input
3
3
5
5
TX output
1
1
4
4
signal ground
6
6
3
3
rTs
5 (input)
supply +
7
supply +
8
Notes: 1 For isolators with a dIp switch adjacent to port 2,
set all elements off for EIA232 comms.
2 The rJ11 connector is in parallel with port 1
(signals only - not power)
3 For recommended isolators and suitable made-up
cables, refer to the ordering guide in chapter 10.
4 supply power range is 7 to 35vdc. Worst case
inrush current = 660mA at 4v.
Figure 2.5.2a Isolator wiring details
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Chapter 2
Page 2-17
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
2.5.2 PROCESSOR MODULE (Cont.)
(N.C.)
1
1
(N.C)
(N.C.)
2
2
Rx
0V
3
3
Tx
Tx
4
4
DTR
Rx
5
5
0V
(N.C.)
6
6
DSR
7
RTS
8
CTS
9
(N.C)
(6-Way RJ11 Male
to Processor module)
9-Way D-type socket
(To PC RS232 port)
6
1
REAR VIEW
5
9
1
(N.C.)
1
1
(N.C.)
2
2
Tx
0V
3
3
Rx
Tx
4
4
Rx
5
5
(N.C.)
6
6
7
(6-Way RJ11 Male
to Processor module)
0V
25
25-Way D-type socket
(To PC RS232 port)
6
1
REAR VIEW
1
14
7
13
25
Figure 2.5.2b Direct connection between CONFIG port and PC
Chapter 2
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2.5.2 PROCESSOR MODULE (Cont.)
CONFIGURATION OF CONTROL STRATEGIES AND SEQUENCES
You can configure control strategies and sequences for the Process Supervisor using either an external PCbased graphical software package (Eurotherm Project Studio), or with the simpler inbuilt configurator and a
dumb terminal.
EUROTHERM PROJECT STUDIO
Control strategies and sequences to be run in a Process Supervisor may be configured and downloaded (ALIN
or ELIN connection required) using the Eurotherm Project Studio, which is fully described in the documentation supplied with it. Information is also available via the Eurotherm network explorer. The LIN Product
Manual (Part no. HA082375U003) should be consulted for details of the function blocks that can run in the
Process Supervisor.
TERMINAL CONFIGURATOR RESTRICTIONS
The use of the configurator is restricted according to the operating mode of the Process Supervisor in the following ways:
1. The terminal configurator can be used only on the primary processor module.
2. The database must not be running if you want the full capability to create blocks, databases, edit field
values, and modify pool data (e.g. engineering units). If it is running, the configurator can write only to
the normally runtime-writeable fields: e.g. block names cannot be edited, but new blocks may be added
and new ‘wires’ can be made on-line.
These restrictions prevent files or edits occurring in the primary database that cannot be tracked by the secondary database.
Note: When the database is started after the terminal configurator has been used, an automatic
database save is performed. This ensures that any changes are notified to the secondary CPU during
synchronisation.
2.5.3 Safety earth connection
As shown in figure 2.3.1a, an M4 earth stud connection is provided on the back plane metalwork. This stud
should be bonded to a good local earth using multistrand tri-rated 1.5mm2 (21A) green/yellow earth cable,
with ring terminals for security.
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2.5.4 Transparent Modbus Access (TMA)
This feature allows the use of the Eurotherm iTools package to configure Model 2500 controllers without having to disconnect them from the Process Supervisor.
As depicted in figure 2.5.4, below, the 2500s are ‘daisy-chained’ from the Instruments’s Modbus Master port
(Exp 1) or the Profibus port (I/O B) via an EIA422 link. The PC is connected to the Exp 2 port via an EIA232
link, or to the System A port via an Ethernet link. With the iTools package running on the PC, the 2500s can
then be configured by ‘talking through’ the Process Supervisor.
Notes:
1. In order for TMA to work, the database must contain a Gateway file (.GWF) to configure the slave
port with the same name as the database file (.dbf).
2. If the Profibus port is used, the 2500 unit(s) must support Profibus DP-V1.
3. Instead of using PC/iTools via an occasional EIA232 link, a SCADA facility can be used via a permanent EIA422 (exp2 port) or Modbus TCP link (System A port).
4.PC/iTools can also be connected to the Modbus port, but needs an EIA422/485 convertor. For an
occasional link it is normally considered more convenient to use the CFG port on the front panel as
described above.
OR
iTools
Modbus
(Master)
Exp
2
iTools
Ethernet
TCP/IP
Process Supervisor
System
A
Modbus switch
Modbus switch
Profibus (DCM) (Master)
Note:
The Modbus switches are controlled via the _system.opt file
as described in the Comms
Manual HA028014
I/O B
Exp 1
Modbus (DCM)
(Master)
2500 (Slave)
2500 (Slave)
2500 (Slave)
2500 (Slave)
Figure 2.5.4 TMA schematic
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Chapter 3 USER INTERFACE
3.1 INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the functions of the processor module LEDs and switches.
As shown in figure 3.1, the items are arranged in groups on the processor module front panel, and each group
is described in turn below. Table 3.1 (below) is a concise list of the LEDs and their functions.
Process Supervisor
Processor
Section 3.3
Section 3.2
Section 3.4
Section 3.5
Section 3.6
Figure 3.1 Processor module front panel
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3.1 INTRODUCTION (Cont.)
Power
Power A
Power B
backup ext
Alarms
backup int
rl1
rl2
System A
Comms
System B
I/O A
I/O B
Green...................... Main power input valid
Off........................... Main power input failed
Diagnostic
Value (Ch. 6)
Green...................... Auxiliary power input valid
Off........................... Auixiliary power input failed
Green...................... External battery power valid Off until start-up
Off........................... External battery power failed
complete
Green...................... Internal battery power valid Off until start-up
Off........................... Internal battery power failed
complete
Yellow..................... Alarm active
Off........................... Alarm not active
Yellow..................... Alarm active
Off........................... Alarm not active
Green...................... I/O B communications valid
Flashing Green/off.. Remote unit fault (Profibus comms. only)
Red......................... I/O B communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... I/O B communications cable fault
Off........................... I/O B communications not in use
Exp2 Tx / Rx Intermittent yellow... Communications taking place
Startup
Standby
wdog
Duplex
04
Green...................... System A communications valid
Red......................... System A communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... System A communications cable fault
Off........................... System A communications not in use
Green...................... System B communications valid
Red......................... System B communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... System B communications cable fault
Off........................... System B communications not in use
Green...................... I/O A communications valid
Red......................... I/O A communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... I/O A communications cable fault
Off........................... I/O A communications not in use
Exp1 Tx / Rx Intermittent yellow....Communications taking place
Primary
08
Green...................... This CPU is primary
Off........................... This CPU is not primary
Flashing...................Powered up but no database is running
Yellow......................This CPU is secondary and synchronised
Off........................... This CPU is not secondary synchronised
Flashing...................Synchronisation process in progress.
Rx = 20
Tx = 10
Rx = 80
Tx = 40
02
01
Green
Red
Red 25% Grn 75%
Red 75% Grn 25%
Normal running (including system boot)
Watchdog failure; CPU in reset
Instrument starting - system healthy
Instrument starting - system unhealthy (low supply
voltage or fan failure).
Orange
Instrument too hot
Green...................... Redundancy communications valid
Off........................... System in non-redundant mode
Red 50%/Grn 50%.. Inter CPU communications failed
Table 3.1 LED functions
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3.2 POWER MONITORING LEDs
Power
24V
battery
A
B
int
ext
Figure 3.2 Power monitoring LED group
This group of LEDs, located near the top left of the processor module front panel, shows the status of the
power inputs wired to the Connect module, and of the internal battery.
3.2.1 A and B
For each processor, two independent sources of 24V power (A and B) can be wired to the Connect module.
The LEDs labelled A and B, illuminate green if power supply inputs A and B respectively are greater than 14V.
All sources must be fused (3 A type T) in the positive supply line.
3.2.2 ext
Each processor unit can be backed-up by an external battery wired to the 8-way terminal blocks on the Connect module. This maintains the data in the real-time clock for a period that depends on the Ampere-hour
(Ah) rating of the battery. Typical load currents are 200 µA at battery voltage of 2.4V and 300 µA at 3.4V.
Once the start-up sequence is complete, the ‘ext’ LED illuminates continuously green if the battery voltage is
greater than approximately 2.6V, and 24V supply power is available. When 24V power is not available the LED
is not illuminated.
External battery supplies must be fused (0.5 A type T) in the positive supply line.
3.2.3 int
A further backup for the real-time clock can be provided by an optional internal battery. The ‘int’ LED operates for this battery in the same way as described above for ‘ext’, except in that the internal battery voltage
must be greater than approximately 3V for the LED to be illuminated. Battery life = 10 years.
Note: Recommended power supply and battery units are listed in chapter 9 of this manual.
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3.3 ALARM LEDS
Alarms
rl1
rl2
Figure 3.3 Alarm Relay LEDs
This pair of LEDs is located near the top right of the processor module front panel, and indicates the status
of the relay outputs ‘rl1’ and ‘rl2’ available at the 8-way terminal blocks on the Connect module. Each LED
illuminates yellow if its associated relay is in alarm state (coil not energised). This happens both in alarm and
during start-up.
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3.4 COMMS LEDs
Comms
exp1
system
i/o
A
B
tx
rx
exp2
Figure 3.4 Communications LEDs
This group of eight LEDs is located just above the centre of the control panel.
3.4.1 System A/B, i/oA, i/oB
These LEDs all operate in a similar way to one another, to indicate the status of the various communications
systems associated with the Process Supervisor. Table 3.4.1 below, explains the interpretation of these LEDs,
together with individual error weights which are used in redundant systems to determine what action to take
in case of error - see section 4.8.
I/OB LED
Steady
green
Description
Communications running successfully.
The unit is running Profibus and successfully
Flashing
communicating with at least one slave, but
green
(i/oB only) other slaves are not responding. This fault
cannot appear on a Redundant Secondary as
the necessary information is not available to it.
Flashing
red
Steady
red
Off
The unit is running, but it cannot communicate
(e.g. because of a cable break).
Process Supervisor hardware fault
The relevant comms system is not running
State
All
OK
Error
weight
2
Faulty
slave
2
Faulty
network
1
Faulty
hardware
1
Not
running
0
System A = ELIN; System B = ELIN; I/OA = ALIN; I/OB = Profibus
Table 3.4.1 System and i/o LED interpretations and error weights
3.4.2 Exp1 tx/rx
This pair of LEDs indicates communications activity at the ‘exp1’ (expansion 1) port of the Connect module.
When working correctly, the LEDs flicker yellow at varying rates according to processor receive (rx) and transmit (tx) activity.
3.4.3 Exp2 tx/rx
This pair of LEDs indicates communications activity at the ‘exp2’ (expansion 2) port of the Connect module.
When working correctly, the LEDs flicker yellow at varying rates according to processor receive (rx) and transmit (tx) activity.
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3.5 CHANGEOVER LEDs AND SWITCHES
The sync and desync switches are set behind the panel, and should be operated, when necessary, by a blunt,
plastic tool such as the recessed end of a trim-pot adjuster.
primary
standby
sync
changeover
desync
Figure 3.5 Changeover LEDs and switches
This group of components is located slightly below the centre of the processor front panel, and is used to
monitor and control the redundant / non-redundant mode selection. The group consists of two LEDs ‘Primary’ and ‘Standby’ and two membrane switches ‘sync’ and ‘desync’. Section 3.5.5, below, gives a brief description of synchronisation.
3.5.1 Primary LED
This LED is illuminated green if this processor module is currently the primary processor. During start up, this
LED flashes on and off, until a database has been loaded and is running successfully.
The LED is off, if this processor is not the primary.
3.5.2 Standby LED
This LED is illuminated yellow continuously if this processor module is currently the secondary module of a
synchronised redundant system, and is thus able to take over from the primary if required
If this processor is the secondary, the LED will flash whilst the processors are synchronising. This normally
happens during start up, but can be forced by operation of the primary ‘sync’ push switch.
3.5.3 Sync/changeover switch
Operation of the primary processor’s ‘sync/changeover’ switch causes the secondary module to start synchronising with the primary module. The secondary’s ‘Standby’ LED flashes during this synchronising process.
Once synchronisation is complete, operation of the secondary processor’s ‘sync’ switch causes primary/secondary changeover.
3.5.4 Desync switch
Operation of the desync push-switch causes synchronised processors to de-synchronise.
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3.5.5 Processor module Synchronisation
Applicable only to redundant systems, synchronisation means the bulk transfer of all relevant data from that
processor which is designated the primary processor to that which is designated the secondary, followed by
continuous maintenance of this copied data. This allows the secondary processor to take over from the primary should the primary fail.
This synchronisation process takes place automatically, if both processor modules are powered-up together,
and have previously been run as a redundant synchronous pair. Should either of the above conditions not be
met, then, at power-up the primary and secondary processors adopt unsynchronised states (Primary unsynch
and Secondary unsynch). In such a case, the secondary module cannot take over from the primary in the
event of failure.
To synchronise the processors, the primary’s ‘sync’ push switch must be operated.
Once synchronisation has been achieved, the processors are said to be in primary synch state and secondary
synch state, and the secondary is able to take over from the primary if required.
Note: With some peripherals, comms failures may be reported during the synchronising process.
TIME TO SYNCHRONISE
The time taken to complete the synchronisation process varies according to the complexity of the control
strategy and on how heavily the Flash file system is used. Typically, the ‘Load and Run’ part of the procedure
takes a number of seconds, and the file transfer can take some minutes. During this period, the primary processor runs the control process as normal.
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3.6 STARTUP LEDS AND SWITCHES
The Restart and halt switches are set behind the panel, and should be operated, when necessary, by a blunt,
plastic tool such as the recessed end of a trim-pot adjuster.
Restart
wdog
halt
duplex
hot
hot/cold
cold
test
config
Figure 3.6 Startup control and monitoring
This group of components is located near the bottom of the processor module front panel and consists of two
LEDs, two push switches and a four-position rotary switch.
3.6.1 wdog LED
This LED gives information about how start-up is progressing (see chapter 4 for details) and, about what faults
might have occurred to cause a processor module to stop running the data base.
If the LED is flashing red/green, the module is in start-up mode. A ratio of 25% red:75% green means that the
system is healthy. A ratio of 75% red:25% green means that the input voltage is too low, or that one or both
fans have failed.
If the LED is illuminated continuously green, the processor module is running normally as far as the software is
concerned, and there are no detectable hardware errors.
If the LED is illuminated continuously red, the processor module is in reset, as a result of one or more of the
following errors having been detected:
1.One of the cooling fans has failed during start up. (If a fan fails at any other time, an alarm is set in the
header block)
2. The processor circuits have overheated, but have now cooled down.
3. The processor clock is not running.
4.Halt switch has been operated.
5. A software fault has forced a ‘Halt’.
If the LED is illuminated continuously ‘orange’, the instrument is too hot.
As shown in Chapter 2, (figure 2.4.2b) sliding segment 1 of SW2 to the left will cause the processor repeatedly
to try to re-start after a watchdog failure. Sliding the segment to the right disables this re-try facility, and the
processor has to be re-started by the user.
3.6.2 Duplex LED
This LED is illuminated green, if the inter-processor communications are valid, and successful data transfers are
taking place between the two processor modules. Applies only to redundant systems.
The LED flashes red/green if the inter-processor communications have failed.
The LED is off if the system is not running in redundant mode.
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3.6.3 Restart switch
Operation of this push switch causes the relevant processor to restart in the mode selected on the rotary
mode switch immediately below it.
Used after a watchdog failure has occurred.
3.6.4 Halt switch
Operation of this switch for more than four seconds causes a watchdog failure to stop the processor. In a
redundant system, ‘Halt’ on the primary processor causes the secondary to take over. This function is normally
used only during commissioning or servicing.
3.6.5 Start up mode
This is selected at an eight-position rotary switch, with its positions labelled: Hot, Hot/cold, Cold and Test.
(180˚ switch actuator positions are wired identically such that position 1 = position 5, position 2 = position 6
and so on.) A full discussion of start-up modes is given in chapter 4.
HOT
A time-out period can be configured by the user for hot start, and this period varies from application to application. The time out period is defined as ‘that period (after the database has stopped running) within which
the data base can be re-started without noticeably degrading or endangering the control process. If a restart
is requested within this time, and the database is still valid, the processor will restart, using the last known
data base. If the data is not valid, the last-loaded database file, overlaid with ‘tepid data’ (stored at the end
of each iteration), is used. If the timeout has been exceeded, the processor will not attempt to restart, but will
clear the memory and create an empty data base. This is called the ‘idle’ state.
Note: Tepid data is discussed in section 4.2.1, below.
COLD
If cold start is requested, the processor will attempt to start from the default data base. If this is not possible,
the processor will enter ‘idle’ mode.
HOT/COLD
With the switch set to this position, if a hot start is not possible, a cold start will be attempted.
TEST
This is normally used only during commissioning or servicing, for example under the following conditions:
1. First-time start up.
2.Start-up after a new version of system software has been installed.
3. Memory configuration has been changed.
4. If the processor is to start-up, but is not yet to run a data base.
The memory is cleared, and a blank data base is created.
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Chapter 4 START-UP
This chapter describes the start-up sequence for the unit. Topics covered include the differences between
redundant and non-redundant systems and start-mode (hot/cold etc.).
4.1 REDUNDANCY MODES
Redundant (duplex) mode is where two processor units are fitted and are required to act in such a way that
one can take over from the other in case of failure. In such a case, one processor unit (normally the left-hand
one) is called the ‘primary’ and the other the ‘secondary’. The secondary tracks the primary so that it can take
over with minimum disturbance to the controlled system.
Non-Redundant (simplex) mode is where a) there is only one processor or b) there are two processors fitted
which act independently of one-another (either intentionally, or because one has failed).
Redundant/non-redundant mode is selected using the options switch (SW2) on the back plane, as shown in
section 2.4 of this manual.
4.2 START-UP MODES
The required start-up mode is selected using the eight-way rotary switch located near the bottom left of the
processor front panel. This allows ‘Hot’, ‘Hot/cold’, ‘Cold’ or ‘Test’ to be selected. (Each start mode has two
positions on the switch, 180˚ apart.) Figures 4.2a and 4.2b, below, show a simplified flow diagram for the different modes.
Was this
Y
unit secondary
unsynch?
N
Hot start
requested?
N
Y
Hot/cold start
requested?
Y
Run hot
start routine
(fig 4.2.1b)
Run hot
start routine
(fig 4.2.1b)
Was
hot start
successful?
Y
N
N
Was
hot start
successful?
Y
Cold start
requested?
Test
start
N
Y
N
Try to get .DBF file
that matches .RUN
file in Flash
Was
cold start
successful?
N
Y
Create
empty
database
Run data base
Idle
Figure 4.2a Simplified start-up flow diagram
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4.2 START-UP MODES (Cont.)
Entry from Hot or Hot/Cold start routine see figure 4.2a, above.
Hot start called
Try to get .DBF file
that matches .RUN
file, from FLASH
Attempt
successful?
N
Y
Overlay
Tepid data
Reset data set
Is the
N
root block valid?
Y
Is the
N
real-time clock
valid?
Y
Is the
N
root block clock
healthy?
Y
Extract last known
status from
memory
Cold start
Y
time exceeded?
N
Brown-out
Y
time exceeded?
Set Brownout
alarm in root block
N
Return success
Return Fail
Figure 4.2b Hot/Tepid start flowchart
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4.2.1 Hot start
A Hot start means that the instrument re-starts from where it stopped.
In the T940X, a hot start overlays “tepid data” to the last loaded database. The fields and blocks included in
this “tepid data” overlay are defined as the reset data in the in the Cold Start Parmater file (.CPF). Refer to section 4.2.5 Reset Data Set.
At the end of each task iteration, a package of “tepid data” is assembled in RAM, ready to be written to nonvolatile memory should a power-down occur. The tepid data is defined by the reset data set.
A suitable time period (Cold Start Time) is configured in the root block of the control data base, and if this
period is exceeded after the data base stops running, then a hot start is not permissible. The Cold Start Time
for any process can be defined as: That period, after the database stops running, within which the database
can be restarted from where it left off without degrading or endangering the control process to an unacceptable degree.
A brownout time can be set in the root block, and if power to the unit is lost for this duration or longer, the
brownout alarm will be set (also in the root block).
If the hot start fails (because the database is corrupted or because the Cold Start Time has been exceeded)
the data base will be cleared and the processors will enter an ‘Idle’ state and remain there until physically
restarted. (See also Hot/Cold start.)
4.2.2 Hot/cold start
This setting causes the unit to attempt a hot start. If the hot start fails, however, instead of going straight into
idle state as with ‘hot start’, the unit attempts to carry out a cold start. Refer to the next section for details on
cold start.
4.2.3 Cold start
Cold start means that the instrument re-starts with the previous database loaded, but with all parameters
and values set to starting values appropriate to the process (that is, re-initialised) as manually defined by the
configuring engineer. If the cold start fails the data base is cleared and the processors enter an ‘Idle’ state and
remain there until physically restarted.
In the event of a cold start, the instrument searches for a file with the same name as the .DBF file, just loaded,
but with the extension .CPF. If such a file is found it is executed to define initial configuration values.
Refer to section 4.2.5 Reset Data Set below for details on the contents and syntax of the .CPF file.
4.2.4 Test start
Test start means that the instrument starts up with that part of the memory, which holds the database, cleared
(set to zero throughout).
A test start is typically run when:
1
2
3
4
5
6
at the very first start up in the life of an instrument
when no automatic re-start is required
when the start-up preconditions for a redundant system are to be modified
when a new version of software has been loaded
when there have been modifications in the instrument hardware.
in order to clear redundancy start-up data from memory
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4.2.5 Reset Data Set
The reset data set is defined in the Cold Start Parameter (.CPF) file. The reset data set is used in three different
scenarios:
•
Defines the Cold Start Parameters. During a cold start, the .CPF file is used to define a set of initial values
to specified blocks and fields.
When Options.SaveDBF becomes true during runtime. In this case, the values of parameters listed in the
reset data set are not overwritten in the .DBF file during the Options.SaveDBF function.
Defines the “tepid data” set. The “tepid data” set is a list of parameters whose values are stored in nonvolatile memory during a power failure so that the values can be restored during a hot start.
•
•
The maximum number of fields listed in the .CPF file is 2560. Included in this 2560 are the default fields (PID.
xx, etc), plus the date, time and an automatically generated checksum field.
The syntaxes supported by the .CPF file are as follows:
• Block.Field[.Subfield]:=Value;
These are the defined values used each time the instrument cold starts. The instrument uses the specified
value and overlays it on the defined (sub)field regardless of what the (sub)field value is in the database.
• >Block.Field[.Subfield]:=Value;
This is used in the same manner as above but overlays a value on a (sub)field which is normally read-only
(for example, setting a totalisation to a specific value). The defined value is only used during the first scan
of the database, after which the (sub)field is updated at each block execution.
• Block.Field[.Subfield];
This syntax adds the (sub)field to the reset data set for this instrument,. It is used to:
•
automatically restore (sub)field values during a hot start after a power failure.
•
prevent the defined subfield being saved when Options.SaveDBF in the header block is set True.
• -Block.Field[.Subfield];
This syntax removes the (sub)field from the reset data set for this instrument. This means the (sub)field:
•
is not retained through a hot start, and
•
is saved when Options.SaveDBF in the header block is set True.
A .CPF file can also include ST comment lines, such as (* Comment *). An example .CPF file is shown below:
(* Production plant Cold Start Initialisation --- .CPF file *)
(* Ensure no automatic control until started *)
XCV-124.Mode := “Manual”;
(* Ensure vent valve open *)
XCV-123.Demand := “False”; (* Open *)
(* Initialise totalisation block*)
>COUNT-01.NTotal := 10;
>COUNT-01.NTotFrac := 0.5;
(* Reset data preserved for hot start, not initialised at cold start*)
Totaliser.total;
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4.3 STARTING A SINGLE (NON REDUNDANT) PROCESSOR
4.3.1 Start-up sequence
Figure 4.3.1 shows the locations of the various LEDs.
Process Supervisor
Processor
Figure 4.3.1 Processor module front panel
OFF STATE
In the Off state, all LEDs are extinguished.
STARTING STATE
When power is applied, the relevant Power LED(s) illuminate green immediately.
The Basic I/O System diagnostic LEDs (rl1, rl2, exp1 rx, exp1 tx, exp2 rx, exp2 tx, Primary and Standby) flash intermittently until the processor is initialised, at which point they all switch off. (See chapter 6 for more details
of these LEDs).
‘Wdog’ flashes green/red until the sequence is complete and the CPU has started running the applications
software, after which it is illuminated continuously green. See section 4.3.2 below, for further details.
The start-up procedure concludes with the processor attempting to establish Ethernet (ELIN) or Arcnet (ALIN)
communications, depending on whether an ARCNET card is fitted, and whether ‘ELIN = On’ in the network
.unh file. During this period, the Primary LED flashes on and off.
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4.3.1 START UP SEQUENCE (Cont.)
PRIMARY UNSYNCH STATE
When the start-up sequence is complete, then as a minimum, the Power and wdog LEDs are illuminated continuously green. The primary LED will be illuminated continuously if a data base is running, or it will flash if a
data base is not running
The COMMS system LEDs will also be illuminated green if the associated comms links are operating correctly,
or Red (steady or flashing) if not.
In addition, if any other communications are in progress, the relevant LEDs will be illuminated, either continuously or intermittently. See Section 3.4 for more details of the communications LEDs.
If back-up batteries are fitted, the ‘int’ and ‘ext’ LEDs are illuminated as appropriate.
4.3.2 Watchdog indications
The watchdog LED has four modes of operation:
1.Steady green In this state, either the processor is running with no detectable hardware or software faults,
the cooling fans are working and the processor temperature is within its working range, or one of the
Monitors has been accessed - see section 4.6.
2.Steady Red When continuously red, a hardware or software fault has developed - see section 4.5, below
3. Long red/short green flash. This occurs at the beginning of the start-up procedure, whilst the status of the
fans and the temperature of the central processing unit are checked.
4. Long green/short red flash. This indicates that the fan status and temperature measurement were acceptable, and initialisation is continuing correctly. This mode remains active until the start-up process is
complete, after which the LED stops flashing and is illuminated continuously green.
4.3.3 Watchdog relay
For primary or simplex units, the watchdog relay is in its alarm state until the Primary LED is continuously illuminated. For secondary units, the watchdog relay comes out of alarm when the database is started, part way
through the synchronisation sequence.
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4.4 STARTING UP A PAIR OF PROCESSORS
4.4.1 Redundant mode
This start-up sequence is similar to that described for a single processor (section 4.3 above) except in the control and action of the Standby and Duplex LEDs. Figure 4.3.1 (above) shows the locations of the various LEDs.
Powering up decisions
Figure 4.4.1 shows the states possible with a pair of processor units in redundant mode.
Off
Starting
Primary?
N
Secondary
Y
Auto
synchronise?
Y
N
Auto
synchronise?
Primary
unsynch
Y
LEDs: Power, Watchdog
Primary, Comms
Secondary
unsynch
LEDs: Power, Watchdog
Comms
Primary
synching
Secondary
synching
Primary
synch
Secondary
synch
LEDs: Power, Watchdog
Primary, Comms
N
LEDs: Power, Watchdog
Standby, Comms
Figure 4.4.1 Power-up redundancy states for a pair of processor units in redundant mode
PRIMARY/SECONDARY CRITERIA
With processor units in redundant mode, it is necessary that one be defined as the primary; the other as the
secondary. As described above in section 4.1 of this chapter, the primary unit initially assumes control and
the secondary tracks the primary such that it can assume control should the primary unit fail. Which of the
processors powers-up as the primary is determined as follows:
1
2
3
If both processors are powered-up ‘simultaneously’ from their as-delivered default states, the left hand
PROCESSOR MODULE (as viewed from the front) attempts to assume primary status.
If both processors are powered-up ‘simultaneously’ from other than default state, further tests must be
made on the basis of ‘last time’s’ information held in battery-backed memory. This information contains
data relating to whether this processor was primary or secondary prior to the last power off. If both
processors were primary or both secondary last time, or if the data is inconclusive, then the left hand
processor will attempt to assume primary status this time, otherwise they will power-up according to lasttime’s status.
If the processors are powered-up sequentially, then the first-powered will attempt to assume primary
status.
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4.4.1 REDUNDANT MODE (Cont)
AUTOSYNCHRONISATION
Once the primary/secondary status of the processors has been determined, the system must decide whether
synchronisation of the primary and secondary should be automatic or whether it should proceed only after a
request from the operator (sync switch). This decision is made as follows:
If the processors are powered-up within 1 second of one another, AND they were running as a synchronised
pair prior to power-down (data held in battery-backed memory), then synchronisation will take place without
operator intervention.
If either of the above conditions is not met (or if the battery-backed data is not available) then both units will
enter unsynchronised states in which case the secondary cannot take over from the primary. This state will
continue until the ‘sync’ switch on the primary processor is operated.
SYNCHRONISATION
During synchronisation (automatic or manual), the primary processor carries out the following:
1. The transfer of any cold or hot start data base files to the secondary.
2. It instructs the secondary to load the relevant database.
3.Once this is complete, transfers current block data to the secondary.
During the synchronisation process, the ‘Standby’ LED on the secondary processor front panel flashes. Once
synchronisation is complete, the Standby LED is continuously illuminated yellow, the ‘Duplex’ LED is illuminated green and redundant operation starts, with the processors in their synchronised states. In these states, the
secondary continuously tracks the primary by receiving data from it including attachments, input reads, block
execute synchronisation commands, check sums, block data and health data.
Notes:
1.During synchronisation, some peripherals may report a comms failure. Such failures are transient
and clear within approximately two seconds.
2. In redundant operating mode, the secondary refuses any ALIN messages other than identity requests. All database related comms and file system comms are handled by the primary processor.
TIME TO SYNCHRONISE
The time taken to complete the synchronisation process varies according to the complexity of the control
strategy and on how heavily the Flash file system is used. Typically, the ‘Load and Run’ part of the procedure
takes a number of seconds, and the file transfer can take some minutes.
Where primary and secondary databases have substantial differences (e.g. when attempting synchronisation
for the first time), multiple syncs may be required to copy all the files to the secondary. When such is the
case, it can be detected from the Red_Ctrl block sync fields.
4.4.2 Non-redundant mode
Starting a pair of processors in non-redundant (simplex) mode is the same as starting a single processor.
Whether the units power up in redundant or non-redundant mode depends on the setting of the SRD element
of the Options switch (SW2) on the back plane - see Section 2.4 in Chapter 2 of this manual.
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4.5 LED FAULT INDICATIONS
The Alarm, Comms and Primary and Standby LEDs are illuminated in various patterns during the first part of
the start-up sequence. Should the sequence stop at this time, the pattern of these LEDs give diagnostic information as follows:
POWER A/B LEDs
If either of the Power LEDs fails to light green on power-up there is a fault in the relevant power supply or the
Connect module has been removed. If the Connect module is correctly fitted, isolate the power supply unit
and remedy the fault.
WATCHDOG LED
If the Watchdog LED changes from short green/long red to steady red, the hardware has failed the temperature and fan tests. Switch off and remedy the fault.
If the LED changes from long green/short red to steady red, one or more components of the software have
not loaded properly. Switch off, switch on, and if still unsuccessful, contact a service engineer.
If the LED changes from steady green to red, an operational fault has developed.
If the LED illuminates steady orange, the unit has overheated.
PRIMARY LED
If this LED is off, power to the processor module is off or the processor module is not the primary. If the LED
is flashing green/off, there is no database running, either because the unit is still starting up, or because a
I/OB LED
Steady
green
Flashing
green
Flashing
red
Steady
red
Off
Description
State
The unit is running Profibus and successfully
communicating with all slaves. For a redunAll
dant Secondary this means only that it can
OK
communicate with the primary, as this is the
only node it may communicate with.
The unit is running Profibus and successfully
communicating with at least one slave, but
Faulty
other slaves are not responding. This fault
slave
cannot appear on a Redundant Secondary as
the necessary information is not available to it.
The unit is running Profibus, but it cannot
Faulty
'see' any slaves (e.g. because of a cable
network
break).
The unit is unable to start the Profibus
Faulty
because the Profibus circuit board is faulty. hardware
The Profibus is not running because there is
Not
no data base running, no Profibus port is conrunning
figured or there is a configuration error preventing the Profibus from starting.
Error
weight
2
2
1
1
0
database has not been loaded or has failed to start.
COMMS LEDs
The comms protocol (e.g. Modbus, ALIN etc.) associated with any one comms connector is configurable, and it
is therefore not possible to be more specific about failure indication than the following:
SYSTEM AND I/O LEDS.
If a system or I/O comms LED does not light green, the processor module has not yet established communications. If the LED is illuminated continuously red, there is a hardware fault. If the LED is flashing between red/
off, there is a cable or connector fault. See also section 3.4.
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EXP1, EXP2 LEDS.
These LEDs remain off until the processor module has established communications, at which time the LEDs
flicker, thereby indicating communications activity.
DUPLEX LED
Break 2
I/O unit 1
I/O unit 2
Break 1
Break 3
Processor Processor
1
2
Break
point
Processor reaction
Break 1
Break 2
Break 3
Processor 1 (P) can see no slaves. Processor 2 (S) cannot see the primary. Both report 'faulty
network' (I/OB LEDs flash red). Processors change over. Processor 2 (P) now sees all slaves
and reports 'OK' (LED steady green). Processor 1 (S) cannot see Processor 2 and reports 'Faulty
network' (LED flashes red). Units desynchronise, with processor 2 the primary.
Processor 1 (P) can see some slaves and reports 'faulty slave'. (LED flashes green). Processor
2 (S) cannot see the primary and reports 'faulty network' (LED flashes red). Units desynchronise,
with processor 1 remaining the primary.
Processor 1 (P) can see all slaves and reports 'OK' (LED steady green). Processor 2 (S) cannot see the primary and reports 'Faulty network' (LED flashes red). Units desynchronise, with
processor 1 remaining the primary.
(P) = primary; (S) = secondary. Processor 1 initially primary; processor 2 initially secondary
If this LED is illuminated green,
inter-processor communications have been successfully established
Break
point
Break 2
Break 1
I/O unit 1
Break 1
I/O unit 2
Break 2
Break 3
Processor Processor
1
2
Break 3
Processor reaction
Processor 1 (P) can see no slaves and reports 'Faulty network'. I/OB LED flashes red. Processor 2 (S) can see the primary and reports 'OK' (LED steady green). Units remain
synchronised.
Processor 1 (P) can see some slaves and reports 'faulty slave' (LED flashes green). Processor
2 (S) can see the primary and reports 'OK' (LED steady green). Units remain synchronised.
If processor 1 is the primary, Processor 1 (P) can see all slaves and reports 'OK' (LED steady
green). Processor 2 (S) cannot see the primary and reports 'Faulty network' (LED flashes red).
Units desynchronise, with processor 1 remaining the primary.
If processor 2 is the primary, processor 2 (P) can see no slaves and processor 1 (S) cannot see
the primary. Both report 'faulty network' (LEDs flash red). Processors change over. Processor
1 (P) now sees all slaves and reports 'OK' (LED steady green). Processor 2 (S) cannot see Processor 1 (P) and reports 'Faulty network' (LED flashes red). Units desynchronise, with processor 1 the primary.
(P) = primary; (S) = secondary. Processor 1 initially primary; processor 2 initially secondary
and are running.
If the LED is flashing green/red communications have been established,
but are not running (usually after a de-synch. request).
If the LED is off, no interprocessor communications have been established, usually because the system is nonredundant.
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Chapter 5 CONFIGURATION
The main topics of this chapter are:
5.1 The Terminal Configurator
5.2 LINtools online reconfiguration
5.3 Modbus tools
5.1 THE TERMINAL CONFIGURATOR
This section explains how the IP Address and subnet mask parameters are configured for the unit, and how
ELIN parameters are accessd for edit, using the Terminal Configurator resident within the processor unit(s).
(In redundant mode the Terminal Configurator is accessible only on the Primary processor.)
For full details of the Terminal configurator, see Annex A. The remainder of section 5.1 is an extract from this
annex, concentrating on the configuration of ELIN parameters.
5.1.1 Configuration Access
The Configurator is accessed by connecting the instrument from its Configuration port on the front panel, to a
‘VT100’ compatible terminal (for example, an IBM-compatible PC running a terminal emulation package).
5.1.2 Connecting to a PC
The CONFIG port on the primary processor front panel should be connected to the PC EIA232 port using a
cable fitted with an RJ11 connector at one end and (typically) a 9-way ‘D-type’ connector at the other. The
connector pinouts are detailed in Chapter 2, Installation. If further details are required, refer to the documentation supplied with the PC.
Notes:
1. To configure a redundant-mode instrument (dual synchronised processors), the terminal PC must be
linked to the primary processor, not the secondary.
2. It is recommended that the CONFIG port be isolated from the PC or other communications equipment by means of a communications isolator (see section 2.5.2 for details). The manufacturer accepts no responsibility for any damage, either to the Process Supervisor or to any associated equipment, which is caused by not using such an isolator.
5.1.3 Running the configurator
This section describes accessing and quitting the Configurator using HyperTerminal®. If a different terminal
program is being used, its user documentation should be consulted (if necessary) for the equivalent procedures.
Which screen appears at start-up depends on whether the Instrument is running before HyperTerminal ®
is running or, as described below, it is switched on after HyperTerminal®. In the former case, the ‘sign-on’
screen described below does not appear, neither does the 1 ANSI-CRT message. To get to the initial menu,
type <1> (one) and wait for the menu to be displayed.
Note: The sign-on screen also appears when quitting the terminal configurator.
® Hyperterminal is a trademark of Hilgraeve Inc.
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5.1.3 RUNNING THE CONFIGURATOR (Cont.)
INITIAL MENU ACCESS
Note: The detail of the following procedure varies according to the Windows version in use.
1Power up the PC and start Hyperterminal® (All Programs/Accessories/Communications/Hyperterminal®).
After entering a name for the link (if necessary) and defining the computer port (e.g. COM1) enter the
port settings tab and set up the communications parameters as follows:
Baud rate = 9600, Data bits = 7, Stop bits = 1, Parity = ‘Even’, Flow control = Xon/Xoff.
2 When the hyperterminal starts, go into the file menu and click on ‘Properties’. In the ‘Settings’ tab select
‘Emulation’ = ‘VT100’, then click OK.
3.Power up the instrument. The sign-on screen appears. Figure 5.1.3a, below shows a typical display. Type
<1> to call the ‘initial menu’.
T940X Process Supervisor - V5/1 - 51M at 266 MHz
(Hardware Build: 00001)
Profibus card: PB-COMBIC104-PB Version: T01.069a14.09.02
Ethernet (MAC) address = 00:30:59:01:86:E9
IP address = 10.1.1.2
Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0
Default gateway = 149.121.164.253
POST result (0000) = SUCCESS
Hotstart failed because: Warmstart switch is disabled
Last shutdown because: Successful Power Down
1 ANSI-CRT
>>>
Figure 5.1.3a Typical sign-on screen
Ethernet (MAC) address Shows the address of the Ethernet interface. This value is unique and is permanently
fixed for an individual instrument.
IP address Gives the IP address currently assigned to this instrument. This address must be entered
manually.
Subnet Mask Gives the subnet mask currently assigned to this instrument. An IP host uses the subnet
mask, in conjunction with its own IP address, to determine if a remote IP address is on
the same subnet (in which case it can talk directly to it), or a different subnet (in which
case it must talk to it via the Default Gateway). Please see ‘IP Subnets’, below.
Default Gateway Gives the IP address of the Default Gateway. It is the address via which this instrument
must talk in order to communicate with IP addresses on other subnets. If undefined then
this instrument can talk only to other IP hosts on this same subnet.
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5.1.3 RUNNING THE CONFIGURATOR (Cont.)
INITIAL MENU ACCESS (Cont.)
If Modbus is enabled, the configurator Initial menu appears, as shown in figure 5.1.3b. If Modbus is disabled,
the Main menu appears instead, as shown in figure 5.1.4a. (Modbus in enabled/disabled by means of the Options switch (SW2) on the backplane as described in section 2.4.2.)
INIT
Choose option
(Running)
>DATABASE - General configuration
GATEWAY - MODBUS configuration
Figure 5.1.3b
Configurator initial menu
Note: If the Initial or Main menu appears, this indicates that the Processor module has entered configuration mode.
Locate the cursor (>) at a menu item using the cursor keys, then press <Enter> to display the next level in
the menu hierarchy. This is called selecting an item. In general, to access the next lower level of the menu
hierarchy <Enter> is pressed. To return to the next higher level menu or close a ‘pop-up’ options menu the
<Escape> key is pressed. <PageUp> and <PageDown> allow hidden pages in long tables to be accessed.
For keyboards without cursor-control keys, equivalent ‘control’ character combinations may be used, as indicated in Table 5.1.3a. To use these, the <Ctrl> key is held down and the specified character typed.
Key combination
Function
Clear screen
<Ctrl> + W
Cursor Up
<Ctrl> + U
Cursor Down
<Ctrl> + D
Cursor Left
<Ctrl> + L
Cursor Right
<Ctrl> + R
Page Up
<Ctrl> + P
Page Down
<Ctrl> + N
Stop automatic update
<Ctrl> + V
Table 5.1.3a
Cursor-control — equivalent key combinations
Some tables allow a value to be entered directly, or via a called-up menu. For direct entry, the first
character(s) of the chosen option is (are) typed, followed by <Enter>. Alternatively, the menu can be accessed
with <Enter> or <Tab> as the first character after the field is selected.
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5.1.3 RUNNING THE CONFIGURATOR (Cont.)
INITIAL MENU ACCESS (Cont.)
IP SUBNETS
The current IP address system is known as Classless Inter-domain Routing (CIDR). The process supervisor predates this standard and divides the internet address space into a number of classes (see table 5.1.3b, below).
For this type of addressing the subnet masks are on byte (as opposed to bit) boundaries. Therefore a subnet
mask for a class C address such as 255.255.252.0 is converted to 255.255.255.0. In order to avoid misinterpretation of the information in the NETWORK.UNH always use valid pre-CIDR subnet masks.
Class
A
B
C
D
Address
0
network: 7 bits; host: 24 bits
10
network: 14 bits; host: 16bits
110 network: 21 bits; host: 8 bits
1110 multicast group ID: 28 bits
Example
90.1.2.3
128.0.1.2
192.0.0.1
224.0.0.1
Default subnet mask
255.0.0.0
255.255.0.0
255.255.255.0
None
Table 5.1.3b Address space class definitions
THE INITIAL MENU
The Initial menu (figure 5.1.3a, above) lists two options viz ‘Database’ and ‘Gateway’. Database allows access to
the Main menu for configuring a LIN database as described in section 5.2, below. Gateway allows access to the
Gateway menu, for setting up a Modbus configuration. It is recommended that this configuration be carried
out via the PC configuration program, as described in section 5.3.
QUITTING THE TERMINAL EMULATION PROGRAM
Exit from configuration mode must be done from the terminal by pressing <Escape> repeatedly until the following text appears.
...Do you really want to quit terminal configurator?
...Enter y or Y to quit or any other character to come back to the main menu
...?
<Y> or <y> takes the processor out of configuration mode. Any other key returns the user to the main menu.
Note: It is not possible to stop/start/download/upload files via Network explorer (E-suite package) for
a processor in configuration mode. Any attempt to do so results in error 8333 (‘Configurator in use’)
being reported. Processor configuration mode must be quitted before these operations are attempted.
Caution
Always quit the primary processor from configurator mode after use. If this is not done, an operator
unaware that the Processor module is still in configurator mode might subsequently plug in a terminal
and type <Enter> <Enter> — hoping to see the version and power-up/shutdown messages. The result
could be totally unexpected because the configurator would react according to where it was left, e.g. if
last used to start a database it would execute the start sequence (twice).
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5.1.4 Database configuration
Figure 5.1.4a shows the Main menu.
MAIN MENU Select option
(Running)
> MAKE
COPY
DELETE
INSPECT
NETWORK
UTILITIES
ALARMS
-
Figure 5.1.4a
Create block
Copy block
Delete block
Inspect block
Network setup
Engineering utilities
Current Alarms
Configurator Main menu
Annex A describes all of the above menu items. For convenience, UTILITIES is described below, as it is from
here that the ELIN parameters are accessed.
UTILITIES
Allows program control, I/O calibration, and filing. Select UTILITIES from the main menu to display the Utilities options, shown in Figure 5.1.4b.
UTILITIES Select option
> START
STOP
SAVE
LOAD
FILE
TRY
UNTRY
APPLY
UNDO
ELIN
Figure 5.1.4b
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Start runtime system
Stop runtime system
Save database
Load database
File page
Try Changes
Untry Changes
Apply changes
Undo changes
Elin Setup
UTILITIES options menu
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5.1.4 DATABASE CONFIGURATION (Cont.)
UTILITES (Cont.)
ELIN SETUP PAGE COMMAND
This page allows the instrument’s network.unh file to be configured.
Note: The network configuration can be edited using the Instrument Properties dialogue via the
Project Environment or the instrument folder. The ‘network.unh’ file can also be edited using an appropriate text editor, e.g. ‘notepad.exe’.
Elin Setup (network.unh file)
--------------------------------------------------------------------
|
LIN PROTOCOL SETUP
| REMOTE SUBNET NODE LIST
|
Protocol Name
RKN
| 149.121.173.1
All Subnet Enable OFF
|
Elin Only Enable ON
|
LOCAL IP SETUP |
Get Address Method Fixed
|
IP Address
149.121.128.209 |
Subnet
255.255.252.0
|
Default Gateway 149.121.128.138 |
ELIN PARAMETERS
|
Unack Timeout
100 msec
|
Rmt Unack Timeout 1000 msec
|
No of retries
3
|
EDB Timeout used
5 sec
|
EDB Timeout Unused 30 sec
|
DBM Timeout TX conf2000 msec
|
LIN PROTOCOL SETUP
This area of the screen allows specification of those items in the “[LIN]” section of
the network.unh file.
LOCAL IP SETUP
Allows the specification of those items in the “[IP]” section of the network.unh file.
The IP address etc. is entered using data obtained from the network administrator.
ELIN PARAMETERS
Allows ELIN timeout and retry parameters to be edited. These parameters allow
ELIN to be set up to run using slow networks such as radio MODEMs. Contact the
Process Supervisor manufacturer for more details.
REMOTE SUBNET NODE LIST
Allows the user to enter the IP addresses of all the nodes with which it is required
to communicate. (The “[PR]” section of the network.unh file.)
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5.1.4 DATABASE CONFIGURATION (Cont.)
ELIN SETUP PAGE COMMAND (Cont.)
Once all the required entries have been made, the ESC key should be operated. A confirmation message asks
if the network.unh file is to be updated. If ‘Y’, the file is updated and a power cycle is requested.
CROSS SUBNET WORKING
With ‘All Subnet Enable’ set ‘OFF’ (default), the instrument will not communicate ELIN cross subnet. This can
be overridden in the network.unh file by setting ‘All Subnet Enable’ to ‘ON’. This defines the behaviour when
the Process Supervisor powers on. The ability to communicate cross subnet can be modified at run time by
using the “Options.AllSubnt” bit in the instrument’s header block. Set to TRUE, this bit enables cross-subnet
working. When set to FALSE, cross-subnet working is disabled.
Note: This bit may be set FALSE, remotely, from a cross-subnet connection. If this is done, communications will be lost, and it will thus not be possible to reset it to TRUE from the cross-subnet connection.
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5.2 LINTOOLS ON-LINE RECONFIGURATION
Note: The recommended method of editing a LIN Database is via the LINtools software.
LINtools provides the user with a view of control strategy components, such as those listed below, and an easy
way to manage those components.
Databases (Function Block Diagram - FBD, file extension .dbf)
Sequences (Sequential Function Chart - SFC, file extension .sdb)
Action block methods (Structured Text - ST, and Ladder, file extension .stx and .sto)
Modbus Gateway configurations (file extension .ujg and .gwf)
In summary, LINtools:
1.Provides a simplified view of the instrument configuration
2.Provides Build and Download functions
3. Assigns LIN names and node addresses to external databases
4.Provides On-line Reconfiguration to a running LIN Database only
Notes:
1. External databases (EDBs) are LN Databases running in other LIN instruments.
2.On-line Reconfiguration does not apply to other files, e.g. Modbus Gateway file (.gwf), Sequential
Function Chart file (.sdb) etc.
5.2.1 On-line Reconfiguration
On-line Reconfiguration of an I/O system may involve adding and editing blocks and wires in a running control
strategy.
Changes, such as adding new function blocks and wires are automatically made as ‘Tentative’. However, when
using on‑line reconfiguration, LINtools will not permit changes to certain fields of I/O channel blocks unless
specific criteria are met. To ensure that changes made to function block fields do not impact on the running
control strategy until rwequired, the function block is detached from the control strategy.
On-line Reconfiguration allows the user to make ‘Tentative’ changes to a running control strategy before applying them. During on-line reconfiguration, the user can edit a LIN Database loaded in LINtools, and ‘Try’
changes in the instrument to ensure they have the desired affect. The user can then either ‘Apply’, ‘Discard’ or
‘Untry’ the changes.
‘Apply’ makes the changes permanent. both in LIN tools and in the instrument.
‘Discard’ restores the strategy to the preious saved state.
‘Untry’ removes the changes from the live instrument, but retains them in the host Computer, so that the
changes can be edited in LINtools before tryng again.
Caution
Any changes made directly to a running block cannot be ‘Tried/Untried’, but are applied immediately
(e.g. changing a function block value).
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5.2.1 ONLINE CONFIGURATION (Cont.)
In order to make ‘Tentative’ changes to a running function block, the user must first ‘Unlink’ that function
block in LINtools, so any changes are not directly applied to the function block in a running control strategy.
The user can then ‘Try’ the changes as normal. The instrument creates a new copy of the function block, with
all the changes, and runs it in place of the original.
At this point the instrument will be running the altered LIN Database, however, the original function block is
still present in the LIN Database, thus allowing it to be restored if ‘Untry’ or ‘Discard’ is selected. The user can
also ‘Re-link’ the function block, discarding all changes made to it, by selecting ‘Undo Unlink’ on the function
block.
5.2.2 Preparing to run LINtools
Getting ready to run LINtools consists of two procedures:
1.Connecting the instrument to a Computer.
2.Creating a Project folder.
CONNECTING TO A COMPUTER
The instrument can be accessed over the Ethernet network via an Ethernet hub/switch connected to the ‘config’ port on the primary T940 module and to the Ethernet port on the computer.
Note To configure a redundant mode instrument, the computer must be linked to the primary processor.
CREATING A PROJECT FOLDER
A New Project folder is created via the ‘New Project’ wizard, started from the ‘Start/Programs/ ... /New
Project’ command. Thereafter the context-sensitive menus are used to create the required Network and Instrument folders.
Note ‘...’ indicates the file path of the installed software.
Each Network folder represents a network and type defined via the ‘New Network’ wizard and contains all the
Instruments within that network. Each Instrument folder represents a type of instrument defined via the ‘New
Instrument’ wizard and contains all the files required for the successful operation of the control strategy by
the instrument at the specified address.
If the manufacturer’s Project structure software is being used, then when all the Networks and Instruments
have been created, the Build ‘Project Name’ command is used to enter all the configured project information
into the Project database.
Notes:
1. Any automatically generated LIN Database can be saved to the correct Instrument folder using
LINtools.
2. The Build command can be used at any time, but Networks must be built before Instruments.
project folder path name
project folder
Additional folder (added for clarity)
ELIN1 Network folder
Instrument folder
ELIN2 Network folder
Lintools Function block
diagram (Fbd) files
Figure 5.3.2 Project directory structure
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5.2.3 Running LINtools
An empty LINtools instance can be started via the /Start/Progams/ ... / LINtools Engineering Studio command.
Note ‘...’ indicates the file path of the installed software.
Use the ‘Open‘ command to find an existing LIN Database in the Computer and then select the required file
type and finally open, or simply double-click the LINtools Database file (.dbf), see LINtools OnLine Help for
details of LIN Database configuration and Online Reconfiguration procedures using the LINtools program.
Note If the instrument is currently running an automatically created LIN Database (_auto.dbf) it can
be copied to a Computer using the commands in the manufacturers Network Explorer, see ‘Uploading
an Instrument Control Strategy’ below.
UPLOADING AN INSTRUMENT CONTROL STRATEGY
Caution
On-line Reconfiguration changes may seriously effect the operation of your system.
When a LIN Database has been automatically generated it exists only within the instrument. The manufacturers Network Explorer running on a Computer allows the LIN Database to be stopped, and then saved, with an
appropriate filename. The copy to command can then be used to copy this LIN Database to an instrument
folder, so it can be edited using LINtools. Once the automatically generated LIN Database has been copied
and added to an instrument folder, it can be opened in LINtools.
LINtools displays a list of function blocks in order of creation, but this list can be converted in to a graphical representation to show the wiring between each function block clearly. The LIN Database file can now be
edited, and when satisfactory, saved and downloaded to the instrument (see Downloading Instrument Control
Strategy). If the LIN Database was edited before it was downloaded, a dialogue appears indicating that the LIN
Databases are not the same. Confirmation is required before the download can start.
Note: Once the copied LIN Database has been opened in LINtools, sufficient information is available to
allow LINtools to perform On-line Reconfiguration of the instrument LIN Database.
DOWNLOADING AN INSTRUMENT CONTROL STRATEGY
Any LIN Database currently running in an instrument can be edited using the On-line Reconfiguration (See
On-line Reconfiguration - section 5.2.2). However, the LIN Database file, .dbf, and any other files on the Computer included in the download list, can be downloaded at any time. Appropriate indication is displayed when
the LIN Database on the Computer and the Instrument LIN Database do not correspond, allowing the user to
decide whether to continue.
RECONFIGURING INSTRUMENT CONTROL STRATEGY
Note: On-line Reconfiguration only applies to LIN Database files, .dbf.
Using the ‘Apply’ command during On-line Reconfiguration causes changes in the running LIN Database to
be saved. Other files (e.g. Modbus Gateway file (.gwf), Sequential Function Chart file (.sdb),or User Screen
PageSets file (.ofl), etc.), that have been edited using the relevant Tools, or which are dependent on the LIN
Database at load, MUST be downloaded. After files have been downloaded and the strategy is stable, the application must be stopped and then loaded again, or the instrument must power-cycled.
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5.3 MODBUS TOOLS
This section refers to the Process Supervisor when operating in Modbus Slave mode. When operating as
a master, the Process Supervisor uses DCM blocks (e.g. D25-AI). For details, refer to the communications
manual HA028014.
Any LIN instrument can be configured as a Modbus Master communicating with one or more Modbus instruments. A LIN instrument may alternatively be configured as a Modbus Slave instrument.
Note This software application supports up to three Modbus Gateway configurations.
Modbus Tools defines the communications between LIN and Modbus instruments.
Modbus configuration data is defined in a Modbus Gateway File (.gwf) which is downloaded, with the LIN
Database (.dbf), into a LIN instrument. The data in the .gwf is used to define the transfer of data between LIN
and Modbus instruments.
This data defines:
1. The operating mode (i.e. Modbus Slave)
2. The serial line set-up (or TCP)
3. The mapping between fields in function blocks and the registers of a Modbus instrument
4.How field values are transferred between instruments (which Modbus functions to use, Modbus register
addresses and the format in which data is to be transferred).
5.3.1 Preparing to run Modbus Tools
As the Modbus Tools can be accessed from within the LINtools program it requires the same preparation as
LINtools, consisting of:
1.Connecting the instrument to a Computer.
2.Creating a Project folder.
The Modbus Tools OnLine Help should be referred to for details of Modbus Configuration procedures using
Modbus Tools.
5.3.2 Running Modbus Tools
An empty Modbus Tools window can be started via the ‘Start/ .../ LINtools Advanced/MODBUS Tools’ command. Use the ‘Open’ command to locate the required Instrument, select the required file type and open.
Alternatively, double-click the LIN MODBUS Database file (.ujg) from the required Instrument folder.
Note The Modbus Tools OnLine Help should be referred to for details of Modbus configuration procedures using Modbus Tools.
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Chapter 6 ERROR CONDITIONS & DIAGNOSTICS
This chapter describes the various ways to tell if a fault has occurred in the process supervisor, (not in the
process being supervised).
The main topics covered are:
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
Error indication types
Processor module front-panel error displays
Power-up failures
Power-on self-tests
Diagnostic blocks
Error numbers
6.1 ERROR INDICATION TYPES
Error indications include:
LEDs. The processor module LEDs are the most immediate source of error and instrument status information concerning basic I/O system (BIOS) start, watchdog functions and normal running. During
BIOS start, a number of the front panel LEDs are intermittently illuminated to indicate the BIOS
status. If a processor start fails, the pattern that these LEDs adopt prior to the failure is helpful
to service engineers, so it is recommended that this pattern is recorded (along with the unit serial
number) before a service call is made.
Error messages.
A large number of highly specific error messages are transmitted (mainly during start-up) by the
processor modules, which can be viewed if a VDU terminal is attached via the EIA232 CONFIG port
on the front of the processor unit.
POSTs. The results of power-on self-tests (POSTs) can be used to pinpoint error conditions in the instrument.
Diagnostic blocks.
A range of function blocks can be included in the running strategy database to provide diagnostic
information on various topics, including the redundancy mechanism, the ICM (inter-processor communications), the I/O interface, and others.
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6.2 PROCESSOR MODULE FRONT PANEL ERROR DISPLAYS
6.2.1 LEDs
Figure 6.2.1 shows the processor module front-panel LEDs. Table 6.2.1 specifies their functions.
Process Supervisor
Processor
Figure 6.2.1
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Processor module front panel
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6.2.1 LEDs (Cont.)
Power
Power A
Power B
backup ext
Alarms
backup int
rl1
rl2
System A
Comms
System B
I/O A
I/O B
Green...................... Main power input valid
Off........................... Main power input failed
Green...................... Auxiliary power input valid
Off........................... Auixiliary power input failed
Green...................... External battery power valid Off until start-up
Off........................... External battery power failed
complete
Green...................... Internal battery power valid Off until start-up
Off........................... Internal battery power failed
complete
Yellow..................... Alarm active
Off........................... Alarm not active
Yellow..................... Alarm active
Off........................... Alarm not active
Green...................... I/O B communications valid
Flashing Green/off.. Remote unit fault (Profibus comms. only)
Red......................... I/O B communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... I/O B communications cable fault
Off........................... I/O B communications not in use
Exp2 Tx / Rx Intermittent yellow... Communications taking place
Startup
Standby
wdog
Duplex
08
04
Green...................... System A communications valid
Red......................... System A communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... System A communications cable fault
Off........................... System A communications not in use
Green...................... System B communications valid
Red......................... System B communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... System B communications cable fault
Off........................... System B communications not in use
Green...................... I/O A communications valid
Red......................... I/O A communications hardware failure
Flashing Red/Off..... I/O A communications cable fault
Off........................... I/O A communications not in use
Exp1 Tx / Rx Intermittent yellow....Communications taking place
Primary
Diagnostic
Value
Green...................... This CPU is primary
Off........................... This CPU is not primary
Flashing...................Powered up but no database is running
Yellow......................This CPU is secondary and synchronised
Off........................... This CPU is not secondary synchronised
Flashing...................Synchronisation process in progress.
Rx = 20
Tx = 10
Rx = 80
Tx = 40
02
01
Green
Red
Red 25% Grn 75%
Red 75% Grn 25%
Normal running (including system boot)
Watchdog failure; CPU in reset
Instrument starting - system healthy
Instrument starting - system unhealthy (low supply
voltage or fan failure).
Orange
Instrument too hot
Green...................... Redundancy communications valid
Off........................... System in non-redundant mode
Red 50%/Grn 50%.. Inter CPU communications failed
Table 6.2.1 Processor LED functions
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6.2.2 Processor failure modes
The front-panel LEDs can indicate directly the following processor module failure or potential failure modes:
power loss, watchdog failure, desynchronisation, loss of primary status, database halt, communications failure,
and ICM failure.
When a processor, which is running as one of a redundant pair, fails, it usually changes its redundancy state in
response to the failure, e.g. from primary to secondary, or from synchronised to unsynchronised. Figure 6.2.2
maps out various ways in which a pair of processor modules might fail, and shows how they change redundancy state as a consequence.
In the figure, the boxes represent possible processor module states, and the arrowed lines between boxes
represent transitions from one state to another. Arrows are labelled with the fault conditions causing the
transition. ‘Primary processor module’ and ‘secondary processor module’ are abbreviated as ‘#1’ and #2’
respectively. The front panel LEDs help to identify what state each processor is in, as well as the nature of any
failure. (The ‘Comms’ LEDs will be on, off or flashing as indicated in table 6.2.1.)
Primary synching
Primary synch
LEDs: Power, Watchdog,
Primary (flash),
Comms.
LEDs: Power, Watchdog,
Primary, Comms.
#1 I/O comms failure
#1 LIN failure
ICM failure
Any #2 failure
Database halt
ICM failure
Any #2 failure
Database halt
Primary
unsynch
LEDs: Power, Watchdog,
Primary, Comms.
Any #1 failure
Any #1 failure
#1 power down
#1 watchdog failure
Secondary synch
LEDs: Power, Watchdog,
Standby, Comms.
ICM failure
#2 LIN failure
#2 I/O comms failure
Database halt
Secondary synching
LEDs: Power, Watchdog,
Standby (flash),
Comms.
ICM failure
#2 LIN failure
#2 I/O comms failure
Database halt
Secondary
unsynch
LEDs: Power, Watchdog,
Comms.
Figure 6.2.2 Processor unit failure modes
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6.2.3 Power failure
In the event of a power failure all the LEDs associated with the affected processor are extinguished and the
processor adopts the OFF state.
PRIMARY PROCESSOR MODULE
A power failure in the primary unit of a redundant pair, will cause the secondary unit to adopt the Primary
Unsynch state.
If the secondary was not synchronised at the time, the database halts. The new primary’s PRIMARY LED
flashes to show that the database is not running.
If the secondary was synchronised at the time of takeover, the database continues to run in the new primary
(PRIMARY LED on continuously).
SECONDARY PROCESSOR MODULE
A power failure in the secondary unit of a redundant pair, will cause the primary unit to enter the Primary
Unsynch state.
6.2.4 Watchdog failure
In the event of a watchdog failure of a processor module, the green watchdog LED is illuminated red and the
affected processor module enters a ‘Watchdog fail’ state.
In this state the indications given by the standby, primary, and comms LEDs are unreliable and should be ignored. Operation of the RESTART button resets the watchdog and restarts the CPU if this is possible.
On watchdog failure of a processor module in redundant mode, the surviving processor module adopts (or
maintains) the PRIMARY UNSYNCH state. And as in the case of power failures, the survivor runs the database
only if it was synchronised before takeover, halting it otherwise.
6.2.5 ICM (Inter-CPU Messaging for redundancy) failure
Note: An ICM failure is not associated with any single processor module, and so is not classed as either primary or secondary in figure 6.2.2.
An ICM failure is indicated by the standby and duplex LEDs when the primary and secondary processors can
no longer communicate with each other across the internal high-speed link, making database synchronisation
impossible to maintain. Figure 6.2.2 shows that an ICM fail causes desynchronisation of the processor modules, but no primary/secondary changeovers.
STANDBY LED:Off
Duplex LEDOff
No communications link established
Flashing red/greenCommunications possible, but not taking place (usually due to a ‘desynch’ request.)
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6.2.5 ICM FAILURE (Cont.)
ACTION IN THE EVENT OF ICM FAILURE
In the event of an ICM failure the processors desynchronise. The control strategy must be designed to present
the supervisory system with an appropriate alarm to annunciate this state. (E.G. use the RED_CTRL block’s
ICM_Ok status bit).
If the ICM does fail, the secondary processor module should be replaced. If this solves the problem re-synchronise the processors. If the fault persists, the running, primary processor module is the most likely cause
and should be replaced. Initially the original secondary should be re-fitted as it is unlikely to be faulty and will
still retain the current database in memory, with the parameter values existing at the time of desynchronisation. The faulty primary, should now be removed, this causing the secondary to take over as sole primary but
with a stopped database. If appropriate, restart the existing database by powering down and then up again.
Otherwise, reload a ‘default’ database and restart it in the new primary.
This last option is a cold start and requires manual supervision of the plant during the transition.
Note: A fault in the backplane is a possible but unlikely cause of ICM failure.
6.2.6 LIN failure
This occurs when a processor is not communicating over the LIN, because the cable is damaged or disconnected or there is a hardware (electronics) failure.
An interconnection failure causes the relevant comms LEDs associated with the affected processor module to
flash on and off. A hardware fault is indicated by the relevant System or i/o LED’s being illuminated continuously red.
A LIN failure in a synchronised primary processor module causes primary/secondary changeover and loss of
synchronisation, i.e. Primary synch adopts Secondary unsynch, and Secondary synch adopts Primary unsynch.
Figure 6.2.2 shows that if an unsynchronised primary processor module suffers a LIN failure no changes of
state occur (there are no arrows leading out of the PRIMARY UNSYNCH box).
In the event of a LIN failure in a synchronised secondary processor, it adopts the Secondary unsynch state
(yellow standby LED off), and the primary processor module correspondingly desynchronises to the Primary
unsynch state). If the secondary processor module was unsynchronised at the time of the failure, no change
of state occurs.
EFFECT OF LIN FAILURE ON REDUNDANCY MODE CONTROL
LIN failure affects the ability to synchronise processor modules. A LIN-failed secondary processor cannot successfully be synchronised with the primary by pressing the primary’s synch switch, for example. Attempts to
do this are inhibited by the redundancy control software, and this is indicated by the yellow standby LED’s lack
of response.
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6.2.7 Database stop
If the database in the primary processor stops running for any reason, the green primary LED starts to flash
and the processor modules desynchronise. Attempts to resynchronise are inhibited by the redundancy control
software. The yellow standby LED of the secondary processor is extinguished.
6.2.8 I/O Comms failure
This occurs if a processor detects a hardware or interconnection fault in the link to the I/O system(s) it is
attempting to communicate with. If a fault is detected, this is indicated by the relevant i/oA, i/oB, or System
LED’s going red; either continuous red (hardware fault) or flashing red/off (connection fault).
As shown in figure 6.2.2, if an I/O failure is detected with redundant processors in any state other than ‘unsync’, the two processors will go into their unsync states. If the failure is in the primary, then the secondary
will become the new primary and assume control, and the original primary will become the secondary. If the
failure is in the secondary, no change-over occurs.
6.3 POWER-UP FAILURE
6.3.1 Processor unit power-up routine
A number of error conditions can occur during the power-up phase of a processor module. This power-up
routine is described in Chapter 4, and this should be referred-to for detailed information. Various messages
are generated by the processor module during power-up, and these can be displayed on a VDU terminal attached to the front-panel EIA232 CONFIG connector (see chapter 2). These messages appear when configuration mode is accessed. Full lists of error messages are given in section 6.6 of this chapter.
Figure 6.3.1a charts the power-up routine in a simplified schematic form, and figure 6.3.1b shows the hot start
‘subroutine’ that may be called by the main power-up routine. The two flow diagrams also show various error
conditions.
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6.3.1 PROCESSOR UNIT POWER-UP ROUTINE (Cont.)
Power up
Was this
unit secondary
unsynch?
Y
Unsynchronised
secondary
Valid
shutdown
last time?
N
No database
running last time
N
Hot start
disabled
N
Database
filing system
mismatch
N
Y
switch
set to hot or
hot/cold?
Y
Extract last
known status
from memory
Does
last loaded data
base match Flash
Run file?
Y
Switch
N
set to cold or
hot/cold?
Run hot
start routine
(fig 6.3.1b)
Was
hot start
successful?
Y
Cold start
disabled
Y
Try to get .DBF file
that matches .RUN
file in Flash
N
Switch
set to Hot?
Y
Run data base
(Hot start)
N
Was
cold start
successful?
N
Y
Run data base
(Cold start)
Create
empty
database
Idle
Figure 6.3.1a
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6.3.1 PROCESSOR UNIT POWER-UP ROUTINE (Cont.)
Hot start called
Try to get .DBF file
that matches .RUN
file, from FLASH
Attempt
successful?
N
Return Fail
Relevant
error message
Y
Overlay
Tepid data
Is the
N
root block valid?
Return Fail
Root block is invalid
Y
Is the
N
real-time clock
valid?
Return Fail
Real-time clock not
running
Y
Is the
N
root block clock
healthy?
Return Fail
Root block clock not
running
Y
Extract last known
status from
memory
Cold start
Y
time exceeded?
Return Fail
Cold start time was
exceeded
N
Brown-out
Y
time exceeded?
N
Set Brownout
alarm in root block
Return success
Figure 6.3.1b
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6.4 POSTs (POWER ON SELF TESTS)
Whenever a processor module is powered-up, it automatically performs a series of diagnostic tests. The results
can be displayed on a VDU terminal plugged into the EIA232 CONFIG port in the processor front panel as
described in Chapter 5 of this manual.
Note: It is recommended that the terminal screen be cleared <Ctrl>+<W> prior to use. If the screen
has not been cleared the POST output may merge with the existing display and be unreadable.
At switch on, the Basic I/O system (BIOS) starts running and checks that the Central Processor Unit (CPU)*
is operating correctly. This stage of power-up is apparent by the intermittent lighting of what are called the
‘BIOS LEDs’ shown in figure 6.4, below. Should the CPU fail to initialise fully, the final pattern of these LEDs
may be of use to service engineers, but is not interpretable by the user.
* Note: This CPU is a part of the internal electronics of the ‘Processor Module’ and the two terms
should not be confused.
Process supervisor
Processor
e
Power
EUROTHERM
Alarms
08
04
Comms
10
20
40
80
primary
standby
02
01
config
An Invensys company
Figure 6.4 BIOS LEDs and their code values
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6.4 POWER-ON SELF TESTS (Cont.)
Once the CPU is running, it runs the Boot ROM (Flash disk) which enables the system monitor (SMON). If the
system monitor is not entered within one second, the start-up process continues with the loading of the application and system code from the FLASH ROM (accessible at the rear of the unit). At this point, a 1 second
entry point for a second monitor (the ‘M’ monitor) appears (10 seconds for TEST start-up). Refer to Section
8.4 for details of the monitors.
The POST now checks that all the electronic systems hardware is available for the Communications protocols*
required by the software. If not, this is deemed to be a ‘Serious Hardware Fault’, and although the power-up
sequence continues, the processor will not load a data base, and will stop with its Primary LED flashing on and
off, and the relevant Comms LED in its fault condition.
*Note: Checks are not carried out on Modbus.
The System now attempts to start the software, determining first whether the options switch (SW2) on the
backplane is set for redundant or non-redundant mode.
If redundant working is required, the primary/secondary status of each processor module is decided, according to the criteria in Section 4.4.1, if necessary, using ‘signature’ data relating to last-time’s power down, auto
synchronise states and so on.
A check is made to ensure that the ICM (inter-processor) communications are valid, and if so, the primary
processor continues-its power up sequence, according to the mode selected at the front panel switch. The
STANDBY LED starts flashing on and off when the primary starts to down load data to the secondary.
If the ICM test fails, or if non-redundant working is required, the processor(s) continue the power-up sequence, according to the mode selected at the front panel switch.
A diagnostic test result code appears at the bottom of the screen, with a value of 0000 (check successfully
completed), 0001 (only minor problems reported) or 0002 (major problem(s) reported). If the code is 0002,
the processor fails to power-up.
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6.4 POWER-ON SELF TESTS (Cont.)
ERROR TYPES
SERIOUS ERRORS.
Serious errors are reported if the unit’s operation is impaired, but still capable of running. These errors are:
1. ELIN/ALIN/Profibus hardware failure. Results in an inability to communicate with those systems using the
particular protocol. The relevant front panel LEDs are continuously red.
2. Less than 8 MB of memory in dynamic RAM.
3. No config.txt file (normally installed on the system FLASH device, or created via the monitor)
FATAL ERRORS.
A fatal error is one where the unit’s operation is impaired to the extent that it cannot continue to operate,
or cannot start up. In a redundant system, the processor modules will desynchronise. This type of error is
caused when Flash memory is not available due to a hardware fault.
6.5 DIAGNOSTIC BLOCKS
Several diagnostic function blocks are available from the DIAG category, that can be installed in the control
database at configuration time to help in diagnosing any error conditions that may arise in the running strategy. The VIEW facility in the LINtools package can then be used, via the LIN network, to look at the fields in
these blocks to find out what is happening. Alternatively a terminal emulation program running in a PC can
be used to access the processor module’s resident configurator, via the EIA232 CONFIG connector, to allow the
diagnostic block parameters to be viewed in inspection mode.
These diagnostic blocks are described in the LIN Product Manual (HA082375U999). The table below provides
a brief summary.
BLOCK
PS_TASK
ICM_DIAG
FUNCTION
Block server tasks timing information, in priority order.
ICM (Inter-CPU Messaging for Redundancy) diagnostics. Statistics on numbers and types of
message passing between redundant processor modules.
RED_CTRL
Redundancy control block. Shows Processor Redundancy Management Task (PRMT) parameters. Can also be used to trigger processor module synchronisation, desynchronisation, and
primary/secondary processor swap.
FTQ_DIAG
Low-level statistics on the queues maintained by the PRMT for interfacing with the various
processes occurring in the Unit controller/supervisor.
MDBDIAG
Modbus diagnostics.
PMC_DIAGSimple Profibus
PBUS_DIAGDetailed Profibus
TOD_DIAG
Time-of-day synchronisation diagnostic block. Statistics on broadcasts, requests, receipts,
rejections, etc.
SFC_DIAGSequence-related diagnostics and resource statistics. Number of configured and available resources.
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6.6 ERROR NUMBERS
This section lists the error messages that may be seen during the running of the Unit controller/supervisor
connected to a terminal — either via the EIA232 port or over other serial ports.
6.6.1 Error number structure
All error conditions have an associated 4-digit number, and usually a corresponding text message as well. Error numbers are hexadecimal 4-digit groups. The first two digits show the ‘package’ that was running when
the error occurred, and the last two specify the particular error associated with that package.
RUNNING PACKAGES
Packages are defined as:
82
File system (table 6.6.2a)
83Database system (table 6.6.2b)
85Objects system (table 6.6.2c)
86
Trend system (table 6.6.2d)
87Control config (table 6.6.2e)
89
Network error (table 6.6.2f)
8BSequence database system (table 6.6.2g)
8CSequence runtime system (table 6.6.2h)
8DStructured text system (table 6.6.2i)
8FPCLIN/PC I/F package (table 6.6.2j)
90
T1000 menu system (table 6.6.2k)
91Configuration files (table 6.6.2l)
99 External database (table 6.6.2m)
9A MODBUS codes (table 6.6.2n)
9B Xec codes (table 6.6.2p)
9CKernel items (table 6.6.2r)
9DObjects (table 6.6.2s)
9E Locks (table 6.6.2t)
A0 Machine Architecture Library (MAL) (table 6.6.2u)
A1 Application Master Comms (AMC) (table 6.6.2v)
A4 Modbus Master Comms (MMC) (table 6.6.2w)
A6 Asynchronous I/O (table 6.6.2x)
ADProfibus (table 6.6.2y)
6.6.2 Error messages
Table 6.6.2 lists error messages package by package. Note that this is a complete list of all error messages generated by LIN-based systems, and therefore includes errors that are additional to those which can be generated by the Process Supervisor.
The error code FFFF means “unknown”.
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6.6.2 ERROR MESSAGES (Cont.)
8201 Not mounted
8202 Invalid device
8203Physical error
8204 Not implemented
8205 Format error
8206 Not present
8207Device full
8208 File not found
8209 No handle
820ABad filename
820BVerify error
820C File locked
820D File read-only or No key fitted
820E Unable to perform file check
820F Unable to defer another file during synchronisation
8210 Illegal combination of open flags
8211Couldn’t complete file operation as synchronisation is in progress
8212 File cannot be modified
8213 Failed to duplicate file operation
8214 No handle to duplicate queue
8215 File systems no longer synchronised
8216Synchronisation aborted
8217Response length error
8218 File system timeout
8219 File synchronisation not requested
821ADuplicate on secondary rejected
821B Non specific error
821CSync fail due to .DBF check
821DSync fail due to .DBF load file name error
821EDrive letter already assigned
821F Filing out of memory
8220 Illegal link drive letter
8221 No such link exists
8222Read/write file transfer to large
8223Read file error
8224 Write file error
Table 6.2.2a File system error codes (82xx)
8301Bad template
8302Bad block number
8303 No free blocks
8304 No free database memory
8305 Not allowed by block create
8306 In use
8307Database already exists
8308 No spare databases
8309 Not enough memory
8320Bad library file
8321Bad template in library
8322Bad server
8323Cannot create EDB entry
8324Bad file version
8325Bad template spec
8326 Unable to make block remote
8327Bad parent
8328Corrupt data in .DBF file
8329Corrupt block spec
832ACorrupt block data
832BCorrupt pool data
832C No free resources
832D Template not found
832E Template resource fault
8330Cannot start
8331Cannot stop
8332 Empty database
8333Configurator in use or device busy
8340 .DBF file write failed
8341 More than one .RUN file found
8342 .RUN file not found
834AConnection Source is not an O/P
834B Multiple connection to same I/P
834CConnection Destination not I/P
834D No free connection resources
834EBad conn. src/dest block/field
834F Invalid connection destination
8350 Warmstart switch is disabled
8351 No database was running
8352Real-time clock is not running
8353Root block clock is not running
8354Coldstart time was exceeded
8355Root block is invalid
8356 Too many control loops
8357Coldstart switch is disabled
8360 Unsynchronised Block Types
8361DB/Filing system mismatch
8362 Unsynchronised Secondary
8363Operation forbidden whilst CPUs synchronising/
changing over
8364Pwr-up data inhibits run
8365POST hardware failure
8366 Not fixed function strategy
8367Default strategy missing
Table 6.6.2b Database system error codes (83xx)
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6.6.2 ERROR MESSAGES (Cont.)
8501Out of F RAM - DO NOT save file
8502Out of N RAM - DO NOT save file
Table 6.6.2c Objects system error codes (85xx)
8602Bad channel number
8603Bad type code
8611Bad handle or not hist
8613 File exists
8614 Exceeded global limit
8615 Unexpected end of file
8616Read error
8617 Write error
8619Bad filename
861ABad timestamp
Table 6.6.2d Trend system error codes (86xx)
8701 Unnamed blocks
8702Cannot save compounds
8703 No root block
8704 .GRF file write failed
8705Compounds too deep
8706 Unused GRF block - deleted
8707 Unused GRF connection - deleted
8708 Missing GRF block - added
8709 Missing GRF connection - added
870A Unknown DBF/GRF block mismatch
870B Unknown DBF/GRF connect mismatch
870CDBF/GRF file mismatch - use FIX
Table 6.6.2e Control config error codes (87xx)
8901 Network timeout
8902Rejected by local node
8903Rejected by remote node
8904 Not implemented
8905 Not active on local node
8906 Not active on remote node
8907 Transmit failure
8908 Failed to get memory
8909Decode packet
890ARemote file system busy
890B Illegal TEATT
890C Wrong TEATT
890D NServer is busy
890E TEATT not owned
890FDuplicate block
8910 TEATT rejected
8911Port disabled
8912 No port configuration
8913Bad network filename
8999 Network node invalid
8B01Object Overload
8B02 Text Overload
8B03 No Matching Step Name
8B04 No Matching Action Name
8B05Step already Exists
8B06 Action already Exists
8B07 Link already Exists
8B08 Leave a Bigger Gap
8B09Bad Time Format
8B0A File Read Error
8B0B File Write Error
8B0C File doesn’t Exist
8B0D File not Open
8B0ECreate Action ?
8B0F No Match with string
8B10 No More Matches
8B11 Match found in Transition
8B12 Match found in Action
8B13Changed - Are you sure ?
8B14 Link Already Exists
8B15 Illegal Chars in Name
8B16 Action Did Not Compile
8B17 Fatal Memory Overflow - Quit Now!
8B18Out of memory when compiling
8B19Root action must be SFC
8B1A Invalid actions found during compilation
8B1B Invalid DB name
8B1C No database loaded
8B1D Map is invalid
Table 6.6.2g
Sequence data base system error codes (8Bxx)
8C01Database not Running
8C02 No Sequences Loaded
8C03Sequence is being displayed
8C04Cannot find an SFC_DISP block
8C05Cannot find Source File
8C06Sequence Not Loaded
Table 6.6.2h Sequence runtime error codes (8Cxx)
Table 6.6.2f Network error codes (89xx)
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6.6.2 ERROR MESSAGES (Cont.)
8D01Syntax Error
8D02Statement expected
8D03 Assignment expected
8D04 THEN expected
8D05 no ELSE or END_IF
8D06 END_IF expected
8D07 “;”expected
8D08Bad bracket matching
8D09 Identifier too long
8D0ABad identifier
8D0B Unrecognised symbol
8D0CCode Buffer Full
8D0D Expression expected
8D0ECan’t find this name
8D0F “String” > 8 chars
8D10 End quotes expected
8D11Bad Number.
Table 6.6.2i Structured text error codes (8Dxx)
8F01PCLIN Card not responding
8F02PCLIN Request failed
8F04 EDB not known or not external
8F07 Unknown EDB
8F0A Unable to delete ED
8F14Bad block number
8F15 Template mismatch
8F16Block failed to attach
8F17Block failed to detach
9901 No EDB’s left
9902 EDB already exists
9903 Invalid EDB
Table 6.6.2m External data base errors (99xx)
9A01 Invalid Second Register
9A02 Not a 32 bit field type
9A03 Invalid Scan Count
9A04 Incorrect Modbus function types
9A05 Invalid register position
9A06Second register of 32 bit pair
9A07 Invalid register type
Table 6.6.2n MODBUS error codes (9Axx)
9B01 Illegal unique task id
9B02 Task id already being used
9B03 No more task control blocks
9B04Out of XEC memory
9B64 Task aborted
9B65 Task timeout
Table 6.6.2p Xec error codes (9Bxx)
Table 6.6.2j PCLIN/PC I/F package error codes (8Fxx)
9001 Invalid PIN
9002PINs do not match - unchanged
9003 Invalid PIN - reset to 1234
9004 Access denied
9005 Invalid default security info
9006 Invalid DTU A security info
9007 Invalid DTU B security info
Table 6.6.2k T1000 menu system error codes (90xx)
9100Couldn’t open config file
9101Section not found
9102Parameter not found
9103 Argument not found
9104Config area too small
9105Config file syntax error
9106Config header corrupted
9107 Not a number
9108Out of memory
Table 6.6.2l Configuration files error codes (91xx)
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6.6.2 ERROR MESSAGES (Cont.)
9C01 Already registered
9C02 Too many kernel users
9C03 Couldn’t allocate the local storage that was required
9C04 Error changing priority
9C05 Need to supply an instance name
9C06 Failed to get platform info
9C07Platform not known
9C33 Feature not implemented (QUE)
9C34 Insufficient memory supplied (QUE)
9C35Size of data for read or write invalid (QUE)
9C36 Unable to write to queue
9C37 Unable to read from queue
9C38 Unable to allocate memory (QUE)
9C65 No Kernel instance to make intra-signal unique
9C66Signal already exists
9C67 Failed to create signal
9C68 Failed to open signal
9C69 Failed to close signal
9C6A Timeout waiting on signal
Table 6.6.2r Kernel items (9Cxx)
9D01Object already exists
9D02Out of objects
9D03Object does not exist
9D04Bad invocation parameter
9D05Object handle is now stale
9D06Object handle is invalid
9D07 Too many users of object
Table 6.6.2s Objects error codes (9Dxx)
9E01 Lock has entered an inconsistent state and cannot be granted
9E02 Lock was not granted in the required mode
9E03 Timeout attempting to acquire
9E04 Unable to convert mode of lock
9E05 Already hold a read lock
9E06 Already hold a writer lock
9E07Do not hold a read lock
9E08Do not hold a writer lock
9E09 Write lock detected during read unlock
9E0AReader lock detected during write unlock
9E0B Unable to grant read to write conversion as a
conversion of this form is already in progress
9E0C Unable to represent user in lock control structures
9E0D lck_Unlock invoked but not enabled
9E0E Nesting requested but lock not a mutex
9E0FOverflow of nested mutex
9E10 Unable to convert a nested mutex
A001Could not create user’s event (MAL)
A002Could not open user’s event (MAL)
A003Could not set user’s event (MAL)
A004 Unable to grant system wide mutex due to it being in an inconsistent state
A005 Unable to grant system wide mutex due to a
timeout
A006 Unable to grant system wide mutex reason unknown
A007 Unable to grant system wide mutex as not created
A008 Unable to suspend user (MAL)
A009 Unable to allocate memory (MAL)
A00A Unable to change priority (MAL)
A00B Error waiting on signal (MAL)
A00C Error releasing signal waiters (MAL)
Table 6.6.2u MAL error codes (A0xx)
A101Cyclic comms enabled on node(s)
A102 No memory left
A103Bad info given
A104Data is referenced
A105 No data group installed
A106Pending message
A107 Fault external to AMC
A108 Not supported
A10AConflict
A10B Task not running
A10CBug
A10D Manual cyclic only (pmc reject)
A10ECannot add cyclic request
A10FSlave rejected cyclics
A110 No pmc callback
Table 6.6.2v AMC error codes (A1xx)
A401Out of / Bad resource(s)
A402Bad info supplied
A403Pending message
A404Problem external to MMC
A405 Not supported
A406 Timeout
A407 Frame parity error
A408Corrupt message
A409 Link protocol error
A40A Modbus exception recvd
A40B Tx fail
Table 6.6.2w MMC error codes (A4xx)
Table 6.6.2t Locks error codes (9Exx)
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6.6.2 ERROR MESSAGES (Cont.)
A601
A602
A603
A604
Asynchronous I/O in progress
No asynchronous I/O in progress
Not yet implemented
Tx operation complete but not all characters
transferred
A605Rx operation complete, but not all characters received
A606 Event not unique
A607 General CIO error
A608 No asynch. operation fetched
A609Out of serial lines
A60A Unable to allocate the requested line
A60B Failed to submit asynchronous I/O
A60C Input/output timed out
A60D Indeterminate error during fetch
A60E I/O timed out but failed to cancel operation in progress
Table 6.6.2x Asynchronous I/o error codes (A6xx)
AD01Cyclic data not available
AD02Cannot make cyclic into acyclic
AD03Profibus C1 not allowed
AD04Profibus C2 not allowed
AD05 Acyclic frag. limit exceeded
AD06Comms line requested is not Profibus
AD07Resource alloc failure
AD08PMC not initialised
AD09 No more cyclic data space
AD0A No more cyclic tag space
AD0B Attempt to append while running
AD0CData attribs. not set
AD0DData group size / type mismatch
AD0EData group size / type unknown
AD0FData group wrong line number
AD10Data group node addr. wrong
AD11Data group addresses not contiguous
AD12 Not in assembling mode
AD13Cyclics not configured
AD14Cyclics not running
AD15 Attempt to change card state
AD16Bad data group list
AD17Changeover not complete
AD18 Acyclics not ready
AD19 Too many diag. clients
AD1A Line already initialised
AD1BComms attribs ptr failure
AD1CComms attribs data failure
AD1DCannot achieve cycle time
AD1E Master baud rate not supported
AD1FCannot kill cards DB
AD20 Not used
AD21 Unable to set master protocol params.
AD22 Unable to set master comms params.
AD23 Unable to set slave comms params.
AD24 Failed to start Profibus line task
AD25 Failed to stop Profibus line task
AD26Bad slave diagnostic
AD27 Acyclics restarted
AD28 Master rejected acyclic req.
AD29 Master acyclic resp. error
AD2ASlave acyclic req. rejected
AD2BSlave acyclic resp error
AD2C Acyclic timeout
AD2D No slave acyclic resp.
AD2E Failed to get diags.
AD2F Failed to get slave diags.
AD30 No slave diags. available
AD31Bad pointer parameter
AD32Parameter out of range
AD33Slave cfg overflow
AD34Slave prm overflow
AD35C1 acyclic data too big
AD36C2 acyclic data too big
AD37Slave not running
AD38Pending acyclic
AD39C2 RW not supported by slave
AD3AC2 unexpected connection close
AD3B Master card startup error
AD3C Not used
AD3DCould not get slave IO data
AD3ESlave not running at changeover
Table 6.6.2y Profibus error codes (9Dxx)
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Chapter 7 TASK ORGANISATION & TUNING
All in-built and user-programmed instructions are performed serially, i.e. one at a time. The first section of
this chapter describes these various software functions (tasks) and their scheduling within the instrument.
The next section describes user tasks and their associated loops and servers. User task software structure and
server operation is also outlined. Finally, user task tuning, by varying minimum repeat rates, is described.
7.1 TASK SCHEDULING
7.1.1 Tasks
A task is a unit of software that is responsible for carrying out particular duties at certain times, usually while
the database is running. There are 24 recognisable tasks in the Process Supervisor. Most tasks are fixed and
cannot be varied by the user. Others, the user tasks, are programmable and are described in section 7.2,
below.
7.1.2 Priorities
Each task has a priority based on its importance to efficient and safe operation Priorities are numbered from
1 (highest) to 24 (lowest). A task, once started, will run to completion unless it is interrupted at any time by a
task of higher priority. In this case the lower priority task suspends activities until the higher priority task has
finished, at which point it resumes running. These interruptions are hierarchical; several tasks may be held in
suspension by higher priority tasks at any one time.
7.1.3 Task Functions
A complete list of task functions is given in table 7.1.3, below. The following paragraphs give explanatory
details.
NETWORK TASK
This task is repeat driven every 15 msec (approx.). The task performs 'housekeeping' for all transactions transmitted or received over LIN.
NFS TASK
This event driven (Network Filing System) task processes LIN filing system requests. Filing system requests get
a much larger share of CPU time when the database is halted. This is due to the low position of the NFS task in
the priority structure.
USER TASKS 1 TO 4
These tasks are responsible for running up to four user tasks. The tasks are repeat driven at the TaskRpt rate
set in the instrument header block, subject to the requested repeat rates not exceeding the maximum permitted CPU loading.
User task 1 has the highest priority, followed (in descending order) by user task 2, user task 3 and user task 4
(lowest priority).
CACHE SYNC SERVER
This task is used to maintain synchronisation of cached blocks. The task is repeat driven every 100 msec, but
this may be extended depending on the available CPU time available after servicing User Tasks.
CACHE CONN SERVER
This task is responsible for processing LIN network field writes into and out of cached blocks. The task is
repeat driven every 100 msec, but this may be extended depending on the available CPU time available after
servicing User Tasks.
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7.1.3 TASK FUNCTIONS (Cont.)
LLC TASK
This task runs every 100 msec. (approx.) and monitors the low level status of the LIN link. The task applies
timeouts to transmitted messages and reprograms the LIN hardware if error conditions are detected.
LOAD TASK
This event-driven task runs only when a remote request to load a database is received.
BGND TASK (Scan)
This task collates alarm information, and carries out sum-checking of the database, The task runs continuously as long as the database is running.
IDLE TASK
This purpose of this task is to provide a 'task environment' in which the CPU can run when there are no other
tasks running. The task is not run whilst the database is running.
1
Tick
Provides system clock.
Every 5 msec. (Note 1)
2
Rx_ICM
Processes messages received over the ICM.
Event driven
3
Rx_LIN
Processes messages received over the LIN.
Event driven
4
ICM_Mgr
Monitors ICM link low level status.
Applies timeouts to transmitted messages.
Reprograms ICM hardware if errors are detected.
Every 50 msec
5
PRMT
Process Redundancy Management Task.
Responsible for effecting and maintaining synchronisation
between redundant processors.
Every 100 msec (approx.)
6
Pr_Rx
Processes message received via PRP.
Applicable only when using ELIN.
Every 100 msec (approx.)
7 EDBserv
(x2)
Manages communications with external databases via cached
blocks.
Applicable only when using ELIN.
Every 10 msec (approx.)
8
Network
'Housekeeping' for all transactions over the LIN.
Event driven
NFS
Network Filing system. Processes LIN filing requests
Event Driven
Profibus Master Comms. Responsible for all transactions with
profibus devices.
Profibus cycle time
9
10 PMC
11 File Sync
12 Mod_Rx
Responsible for maintaining synchronisation of filing systems
on redundant systems.
Event driven
Processes messages received via GW Modbus
Event driven
13 Modserv
Modbus database management
Periodic
14 User Task
Runs user tasks 1 to 4
Every TaskRptn secs (Note 2)
15 Cache Sync
Server
Responsible for maintaining synchronisation of cached blocks
Every 100 msec (approx.)
Responsible for connections into cached blocks
(i.e. LIN network field writes)
Every 100 msec (approx.)
16 Cache Conn
Server
17 LLC
Monitors LIN link low level status.
Applies timeouts to transmitted messages.
Re-programs LIN hardware if errors are detected.
18 Pr_Maint
PRP database management (applicable only when using ELIN)
Every 500 msec (approx.)
19 Load
Loads a database on remote request
Event driven
20 AMC (x2)
Application master comms. Processes communications with
modbus or profibus devices via DCM blocks.
Event driven
Runs the terminal configurator
Event driven
Responsible for batch load operations
(e.g. loading or unloading an SFC).
Event driven
21 Config
22 BatLoad
23 Bgnd (scan)
24 Idle
Collates alarm information.
Performs database checksum testing.
'Null task'. Provides environment for CPU execution, whilst no
other tasks run.
Every 100 msec (approx.)
Event driven
Event driven
Note 1: Every 4 msec for units with sofware version prior to version 4/1
Note 2: or less often subject to CPU loading
Table 7.1.3 Task scheduling
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7.2 USER TASKS
7.2.1 Terminology
USER TASK
A user task is an element of strategy, (i.e. a piece of software, programmed into the instrument by the control
engineer), which is nominally associated with an element of control.
SERVER
A server is a fixed software task, within the Process Supervisor, that executes a user task, or processes cached
blocks.
7.2.2 User task servers
SERVER INTERACTIONS
There are six servers within the Process Supervisor, one for each of the user tasks, and two for the cached
blocks (see table 7.1.3). The servers are prioritised, repeat-rate driven, and fully coherent (as described in
section 7.4). The Processor Supervisor’s block structured database is completely compatible with that of the
T100/T1000 instruments, and supports cached blocks in the same way.
Server 1 has the highest priority, and server 6 the lowest. Interruption of one server by another of higher
priority has already been described in section 7.1.2, above. The user task servers are set to run no more than
once every task repeat time, as specified by the corresponding TaskRptn parameter.
Figure 7.2.2a shows schematically how the servers interact with each other according to their priorities. The
darker bars represent running tasks and the paler bars represent suspended tasks.
Priority
Task running
Task suspended
User task 1 repeat time
User task 1
User task 2
User task 3
User task 4
Cached sync server
Cached conn server
Time
Figure 7.2.2a User task server interactions
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7.2.2 USER TASK SERVERS (Cont.)
USER TASK SERVER OPERATION
A higher priority user task server always interrupts the running of a lower priority user task server. Thus,
whenever a given user task is running, all higher priority user tasks must have run to completion.
Figure 7.2.2b shows, schematically, the sequence of events that occurs during the running of a user task server.
These are as follows:
1. The user task is marked as ‘busy’. During this ‘busy’ period lower priority tasks are suspended.
2. All connections sourced from higher priority tasks are copied into their destination blocks in this user
task. This occurs as a single, indivisible, operation.
3. The blocks and their associated intra-task connections are then executed in order.
4. All connections sourced from this user task are now copied into their destination blocks in all higher priority user tasks, as a single, indivisible, operation.
5 The task ‘busy’ flag is removed.
Notes:
1. This structure results in the least work being carried out by the highest priority task.
2. Tasks may be suspended under the control of the strategy (via the Process Supervisor block’s UsrTaskn parameters) thereby allowing them to be event driven.
Connections
Mark task Input connects
from higher
as 'Busy'
priority tasks
Connections
Execute blocks
Output conMark task
nects to higher as 'Unbusy'
priority tasks
Coherent task body
Figure 7.2.2b User task server operation
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7.3 USER TASK TUNING
7.3.1 Repeat times & execution times
The Process Supervisor block’s parameters TaskRpt1 to TaskRpt4 allow the minimum repeat time for each user
task to be specified. When set to zero, the minimum repeat time is ‘as short as possible’.
At database startup, the execution time of each user task is estimated and these estimated times are compared with the requested TaskRptNs. An estimated percentage of total CPU power required for each task is
then derived. If the required CPU power exceeds what is available, the user task minimum repeat times are
increased to workable values.
Note: Many block types have execution times which vary according to operating parameter values, and
dynamic changes to LIN loading (for example, increasing numbers of remote instruments starting to
cache blocks within the local instrument). Such factors can reduce the accuracy of the original estimates.
7.3.2 Automatic dynamic tuning
To compensate for the variable nature of user task execution times, the spread of CPU loading across user
tasks and system tasks is monitored and user task repeat rates are altered, dynamically, to ensure a fair spread
of CPU allocation. This ‘dynamic tuning’ is adequate for most applications, but where task repeat timing is
critical, the TaskRptN values in the Process Supervisor block can be adjusted to achieve optimum performance.
Dynamic tuning attempts to adjust user task repeat rates to allow the Bgnd task to complete one database
scan typically every 2 seconds, but never less often than once every 4 seconds.
7.3.3 Manual tuning
The USERTASK block allows execution times and repeat times for all the user tasks and the cached block
server to be monitored. The PS_TASK block shows the percentage CPU usage by the various user and system
tasks in the instrument. The prioritised nature of the user tasks should be allowed for when adjusting repeat
rates (1 is the highest priority, 4 the lowest). The reported execution time for a user task may include a period
of suspension whilst higher priority tasks execute.
Rapidly fluctuating repeat times for the lower priority tasks usually indicates an attempt to allocate too much
total CPU time to the user tasks. A slight increase in some or all of the TaskRpN values should cure this.
The percentage CPU power allocated to the four user tasks should total approximately 80 to 90% (PS_TASK
displays units of 0.1%). If the sum is less than this it should be safe to reduce TaskRptN values.
Note: It is recommended that the engineer enters appropriate TaskRpN values. Setting unrealistic
values will cause erratic task repeat rates.
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7.4 DATA COHERENCE
7.4.1 Data flow between tasks
Coherence is an important aspect of control strategies involving more than one user task. Data flow is defined as being coherent if during any single execution of a task the data input into it from outside the task is
a ‘snapshot’ — unchanging during the execution of the task — and represents the values output from other
tasks that have completed their execution.
Data coherence, by definition, refers to connections that are ‘remote’ (i.e. linking different tasks). Connections that are limited to within a task (i.e. ‘local’), are simply dealt with by being copied from source to destination immediately before executing the destination block.
For any task, there are three important types of remote connection. These types, and the way in which data
coherence is ensured, are as follows.
CONNECTIONS INTO TASKS (FROM OTHER TASKS IN THE SAME INSTRUMENT (NODE))
In order to ensure that multiple uses (in this task) of the same value (from another task) always use the same
iteration of the value, such values are copied prior to the execution of all the executable blocks of this task —
i.e. a ‘snapshot’ is taken of all values external to this task.
Two types of connection apply — those from higher priority tasks to lower priority tasks, and those from
lower priority tasks to higher priority tasks:
1.Higher to lower priority. For coherence, whenever connections out of a task are used, all their values must
result from the same iteration of that task. Owing to the priority structuring of the tasks, any connections
from a higher priority task into a lower priority task meet this requirement. This is because a lower priority task cannot interrupt a higher priority task, which therefore always runs to completion. Hence, these
connections are dealt with by a ‘snapshot’ copying at the start of the lower priority task.
2. Lower to higher priority. A low priority task may be interrupted by a higher priority task before completion, and so be ‘caught’ with an incoherent set of output values. To avoid such invalid values being passed
on, the last action of task execution is for the lower priority task to copy its set of coherent connections
as a ‘snapshot’ to the higher priority task. In this way, the values passed on are always the last set of coherent values from a complete task execution.
CONNECTIONS INTO THIS TASK (FROM OTHER TASKS IN ANOTHER INSTRUMENT)
Connections between nodes are effected by the use of cached blocks. The process of cached block transmission, and reception at the destination end, is coherent for all the data within that block.
At the destination end, the cached block exists on a cached block server. Connections from this cached block
to other blocks effectively become inter-server connections within the same node, the coherence of which is
guaranteed (as described in 'Connections into tasks...', immediately above).
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7.4.1 DATAFLOW BETWEEN TASKS (Cont.)
CONNECTIONS OUT OF THIS TASK TO ANOTHER NODE
This type of connection results in data flow that is not coherent, because the data is transmitted across the
network as individual field writes, rather than as whole-block updates. If coherence is required, the block(s)
can be cached in the opposite direction, via an AN_CONN block for example. This is illustrated in Figure 7.4,
where block A coherently connects to block B across the LIN via the AN_CONN block (bold lines), but the
connection is non-coherent when routed via cached block B.
Node 1
A
(local)
Coherent
Non-coherent
AN_CONN
(local)
B
(Cached)
Coherent block
update
Non-coherent
field write
Node 2
AN_CONN
(cached)
Coherent
B
(local)
Figure 7.4 Coherent and non-coherent data flow across network
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Chapter 7
Page 7-8
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Chapter 8 SERVICE
Note: This section relates to Process supervisors with status levels of G6 or higher. For units with
lower status levels, please refer to the relevant earlier issue of this manual.
This section describes the regular preventive changing of filters, fans, back-up batteries etc., and shows how to
replace the flash memory card. Details of the M monitor and of the S monitor are also included
For details of how to update the Profibus board, and how to change the unit’s system software, boot ROM and
libraries, please contact the nearest manufacturer’s service centre.
Caution
All circuit boards associated with this unit are susceptible to damage due to static electrical discharges
of voltages as low as 60V. All relevant personnel must be aware of correct static handling procedures.
8.1 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
The following periods are recommended to guarantee maximum availability of the processor unit, for use in
what the manufacturer considers to be a normal environment. Should the environment be particularly dirty,
or particularly clean, then the relevant parts of the schedule may be adjusted accordingly. For example, the
fan filter may need replacing more frequently than every two years, if the unit is located in a dusty area.
The following are recommended:
1. A visual inspection of the chassis-mounted fan inlet (on the bottom plate of the unit) should be made
every 6 months. The filter (LA029122) should be replaced if any clogging is evident.
2. Every two to four years, the service consumables listed below should be replaced. The recommended
replacement period is a function of the average ambient temperature in which the unit operates. At an
ambient of 50 degrees Celsius, the recommended replacement period is two years. For an ambient of 20
degrees Celsius the recommended period is four years. The service consumables are available from the
manufacturer as a kit which has the part number LA029126.
Service consumables are:
a) Chassis fan and pack of five filters.
b) Fan/capacitor board.
Whenever the unit is ‘opened’, it is recommended that a visual inspection of be made, and any deposits of
dirt or dust removed using a low-pressure compressed ‘air duster’ such as are available from most electronics
distributors.
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8.2 REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES
Note: These procedures relate to Process supervisors with status levels of G6 or higher. For units with
lower status levels, please refer to the relevant earlier issue of this manual.
Figure 8.2 is a partial exploded view of the processor unit. The drawing shows one side plate removed, for
clarity, but this is not always necessary for the procedures below.
8.2.1 Chassis fan filter replacement
Refer to figure 8.2.1 as necessary.
1.Remove the relevant processor module from the backplane, as shown (for the connection module) in
Chapter 2 of this manual.
2. Turn the unit upside-down, so that the filter inlet is accessible.
3. Unclip the cover to reveal the filter.
4.Replace the filter, and refit the cover, ensuring that the slightly embossed face is towards the filter (i.e. the
smooth side faces outwards.
5.Re-fit the module to the backplane and secure using the jacking screws. Ensure that the connector is correctly mated before tightening the screws, a few turns at a time each, to a final torque of not more than
2.5 Nm.
Fan cover
Filter
Underside of processor unit
Figure 8.2.1 Filter replacement (view on underside of processor module)
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8.2 REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES (Cont.)
Plastic washer
(4 places)
Battery
(option)
C
F
Capacitor
board fan
Chassis Fan
C
E
E
A
E
C
E
B
D
F
A
B
Right-hand side
cover
A
B
Figure 8.2 Processor module - part explosion
8.2.2 Chassis Fan replacement
Note: When fitting the fan, ensure that it is oriented correctly, with the air-flow direction arrow pointing away from the filter - i.e., the airflow is into the unit. The arrow is to be found on the edge of the
fan body, adjacent to the wire aperture.
1.Remove the relevant processor module from the backplane, as shown (for the connection module) in
Chapter 2 of this manual.
2. Undo the six Torx-headed screws (B and C) which secure the right-hand side cover to the front and back
plates, and remove the right-hand side cover.
3. Lay the module on its left-hand side, and slide the lower panel (containing the external fan) out, disconnecting the fan connector (‘D’ in figure 8.2 above) as it becomes accessible.
4. Undo the four 4mm (7mm AF) fan securing nuts (‘E’), and ensuring all fixings are retained, remove the
nuts and washers, and lift the fan off its studs and discard it.
5. Make a visual inspection of the unit, and remove any deposits of dirt or dust using a low-pressure compressed ‘air duster’ such as are available from most electronics distributors.
6.Replacing all the washers previously removed, fit the new fan and secure it using the M4 nuts (‘E’).
7. Ensuring that the fan cable harness is not damaged in the process, slide the lower panel back into place,
remembering to re-make connector ‘D’.
8.Re-fit the right-hand side plate using the screws previously removed.
9.Re-fit the module to the backplane and use the jacking screws to secure it. Ensure that the connector is
correctly mated before tightening the screws, a few turns at a time each, to a final torque of not more
than 2.5 Nm.
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8.2.3 Capacitor board / capacitor board fan replacement
Battery
(option)
G
F
+
+
G
K
Fan securing nuts
must be this side
Heads of fan securing
screws (K) must be this side
H
G
K
G
F
J
Figure 8.2.3 Capacitor board fan access
Note: When fitting the fan, ensure that it is oriented correctly, with the air-flow direction arrow pointing towards the circuit board. The arrow is to be found on the edge of the fan body, adjacent to the
wire aperture.
Caution
Ensure that the fan securing screws (K) are oriented as shown in figure 3, above, with their heads bearing on the circuit board, and the associated clamping nuts bearing on the fan body. Incorrect screw
orientation will result in damage to the central processing unit on the CPU board.
1.Remove the relevant processor module from the backplane, as shown in Chapter 2 of this manual.
2. Undo the six Torx-headed screws ‘B’ and ‘C’ (figure 8.2) and remove the right-hand side cover.
3. Undo the three Torx-headed screws ‘A’ and carefully remove the front panel, releasing the ribbon cable
connector as it becomes accessible. Place the front panel in a static-safe environment.
4. For convenience, remove the jacking screws ‘F’ and place them to one side for later use in re-assembly.
5.Remove the four securing screws ‘G’, and carefully remove the capacitor board, disconnecting the ribbon
cable connector (H) and the fan connector (J) when accessible.
6.Removed the fan by undoing the two M3 nuts and bolts (K) that secure it to the circuit board.
To replace the fan only, continue at step 7. To replace the capacitor board only, continue at step 8.
7.Discard the old fan and fit the new one to the board, using the fixings (K) previously removed ensuring
correct orientation as described in the note above. Continue at step 9.
8. Fit the fan to the new capacitor board using the fixings (K) previously removed ensuring correct orientation as described in the Note and the Caution above.
9. Fit the capacitor board/fan assembly into the unit, ensuring that connectors H and J are re-connected
during the process. Secure the capacitor board using the four screws (G) previously removed.
10. Lay the instrument on its left side, and re-fit the jacking screws (F) and associated plastic washers.
11.Re-fit the front panel, ensuring that the jacking screws are correctly located and that the ribbon cable
connection is re-made.
12.Refit the right hand side plate, and secure the whole unit using screws A, B and C, previously removed.
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8.2.4 Battery fitting
Note: With the battery removed, and with the instrument powered off, real-time clock data is retained
by a ‘super-cap’ for at least 12 hours.
PROCEDURE
1.Remove the relevant processor module from the backplane, as shown (for the connection module) in
Chapter 2 of this manual.
2. Undo the six Torx-headed screws (B and C in figure 8.2) which secure the right-hand side cover to the
front and back plates, and remove the right-hand side cover.
3. The location of the battery (on the capacitor board) is as shown in figures 8.2 and 8.2.3.
4. Ensure, when fitting the battery that it is oriented correctly (as shown in figure 8.2.3), or the RTC data will
not be retained.
5.Dispose of exhausted batteries according to local regulations regarding Lithium thionyl chloride batteries.
6.Re-fit the right-hand side plate using screws B and C previously removed.
7.Re-fit the module to the backplane and use the jacking screws to secure it. Ensure that the connector is
correctly mated before tightening the screws, a few turns at a time each, to a final torque of not more
than 2.5 Nm.
8.2.5 Flash card Replacement
Figure 8.2.5 shows the replacement of the ‘Flash card’. This procedure allows data bases, user configurations
etc. to be transferred from one processor module to another, allowing the ‘Mean Time to Replace’ to be
reduced to a minimum.
1.At the rear of the instrument, lift the front edge of the card, and pull it out of its connector.
2.Fit the replacement card.
Figure 8.2.5 Flash card removal
8.2.6 Firmware upgrade
The manufacturer can supply replacement memory/flash cards pre-programmed with the latest firmware version. This allows the user to upgrade the unit just by replacing the card. In such cases, the user is responsible
for reloading configuration files in the unit.
Alternatively, the manufacturer’s agents can upgrade the firmware version with the card in situ thus retaining
the user configuration.
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8.3 PHYSICAL ARRANGEMENT INSIDE PROCESSOR MODULE
Figure 8.3 shows the arrangement of circuit boards etc. inside the processor module.
Battery*
PSU Board
System Board
Profibus Board*
ARCNET Board*
CPU Board
Capacitor Board
User interface board
* = Optional
Figure 8.3 Hardware organisation
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8.4 THE MONITOR
Note: The ‘M’ monitor is intended as a diagnostic tool for Commissioning and/or Service Engineers.
Access by other personnel is not recommended.
8.4.1 Top level (main) menu access
As described in chapter 4 above, the start up process can be monitored at a suitable computer terminal connected to the Processor unit ‘Config’ port. During the start-up sequence, the message “Press ‘m’ key to stop
auto-start” appears for one second (or for 10 seconds if this is a TEST start). Operation of the ‘m’ key stops
the start-up sequence and calls the top level menu depicted below. If the message is ignored, the booting-up
process continues.
Press ‘m’ key to stop auto-start
m
......Main menu
......Level 0
0: Quit
1: Help
2: Display saved system features
3: Diagnostic tests
4: Manual set-up
5: Automatic set-up
6: ‘S’ Monitor options
......Selection: _
8.4.2 Quit
Monitor is quitted, and the unit continues its start-up procedure
8.4.3 Help
To be issued later
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8.4.4 Display saved system features
This screen is accessed by typing ‘2’, then ‘Y’ or ‘y’ in response to the <Display?> enquiry. (Typing ‘N’ or ‘n’
returns to the main menu.) The display lists the current settings for the communications ports associated with
this processor unit.
Sys Ethernet -> Single
I/O Chan -> Single
I/O chan A configuration -> ArcNet
I/O chan B configuration -> Profibus
EXP chan A configuration -> Serial
EXP chan B configuration -> Serial
Sys EthernetDisplays either ‘Single’ or ‘Redundant’ as appropriate for the internal system
communications.
I/O Chan ADisplays either ‘Single’ or ‘Redundant’.
I/O chan A configurationCurrently, always set to ArcNet (ALIN)
I/O chan B configuration
Either ‘none’ or ‘Serial’ (Modbus) or Profibus
EXP chan A configuration
Either ‘none’ or ‘Serial’ (Modbus) or Profibus
EXP chan B configuration
Either ‘none’ or ‘Serial’ (Modbus) or Profibus
To return to the main menu, type ‘N’ or ‘n’ in response to the <Display?> enquiry.
8.4.5 Diagnostics menu
The diagnostics menu is accessed by typing ‘3’, in the main menu. The menu allows a number of checks to be
carried out, as detailed below.
Note: These checks can affect the machine’s ability to restart and should be used only to diagnose
faults or to clear the memory.
......Diag Menu
......Level 1
0: Quit
1: Automatic test sequence
2: PSE comm menu
3: Net menu
4: Profibus test
5: Led Test
......Selection: _
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8.4.5 DIAGNOSTICS MENU (Cont.)
AUTOMATIC TEST SEQUENCE
Accessed by typing ‘1’ in the diagnostics menu, this carries out a number of tests, and displays the results
either as ‘OK’ or ‘ERROR’, before returning to the Diagnostics menu.
RTC contents check ---> OK
Expansion serial comm port 1 ---> OK
Expansion serial comm port 2 ---> OK
Sys ethernet port 1 ---> OK
DRAM 0x3f00000 bytes = 66060288 bytes status ---> OK
I/O ArcNet port 1 ---> OK
I/O Profibus port 2 ---> OK
......Selection: _
PSE COMM TEST MENU
Accessed by typing ‘2’, this allows the Serial Communications to be checked. This test requires that a three- or
five-wire cable be connected between Exp1 and Exp2 ports, with a cross over between Rx and Tx lines.
......PSE Comm Test
......Level 2
0: Quit
1: Set 9600 Baud
2: Set 19200 Baud
3: Set 38400 Baud
4: Set 57600 Baud
5: Set Modbus Ch 1
6: Set Modbus Ch 2
7: Start loop test
8: Start loop test
......Selection: _
to Master
to Master
3W
5W
Baud RateSelect required Baud rate for this test as required, by typing ‘1’, ‘2’, ‘3’ or ‘4’. Baud rate is
reset after the monitor is quitted.
Master/Slave
Typing ‘5’ displays the message <Ch1 master?>... (Y,y,N,n). Typing ‘Y’ or ‘y’ sets EXP1 to
Master status. Typing ‘N’ or ‘n’ sets it to Slave status.
Typing ‘6’ is similar, but for EXP2 port.
Start loop test 3W (5W)
Typing ‘7’ or ‘8’ starts the loop test for 3-wire or 5-wire systems respectively, once the
number of repeats has been entered. Note that the number of repeats received should
be the same as the number of repeats requested before the start of the test. If this is
not the case, there is a problem with the communications link.
(Continued)
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8.4.5 DIAGNOSTICS MENU (Cont.)
PSE COMM TEST (Cont.)
Enter required number of repeats
<NrRepeats>...N
No. of errors detected in Comm 1
Err......Comm10
No. of errors detected in Comm 2
Err......Comm20
No. of repeats received in Comm 1
Rx......Comm1N
No. of repeats received in Comm 2
Rx......Comm2N
RX......buff1Contents
Contents of buffers at end of test.
Rx......buff2Contents
The PSE Comms test menu is re-displayed on the screen, allowing the user to quit the test, or to repeat it,
perhaps at a different Baud rate.
NET MENU
Not used with this version of software.
PROFIBUS TEST
Accessed by typing ‘4’, this allows profibus communications to be tested, starting with the following screen.
Profibus test
------------Looking for boards in address range CA000H..CC000H
Found board 1 at CA000H
Select terminal type:
1 ANSI-CRT
>>>
Typing <1> calls the Profibus test page, and typing <D> refreshes the page with current data, as shown below,
which shows, as an example, node 4 as being the only node on the network.
After positioning the cursor next to node 4, the space bar can be operated to call the master data page, or the
carriage return key can be used to call the slave data page, also illustrated below.
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8.4.5 DIAGNOSTICS MENU (Cont.)
PROFIBUS TEST (Cont.)
CYCLC | ACYCLIC | Maintaining
Network 1 Output 4500 | 4000 | cyclic ramp
-------------------------------------|---------|------------------------------- Input from node 2 non-existent | * |
3 non-existent | * |
>4 4000 | 100 | Y
5 non-existent | * |
6 non-existent | * |
7 non-existent | * |
8 non-existent | * |
9 non-existent | * |
10 non-existent | * |
11 non-existent | * |
12 non-existent | * |
13 non-existent | * |
14 non-existent | * |
15 non-existent | * | (^ = not activated)
16 non-existent | * | (* = fault
17 non-existent | * |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------[ ] - select page, C - copy node setup, X - remove node,
arrow - select node, P - paste node setup, sp - view master,
return - view node, A - paste to all, D - download & activate
MASTER DATA SCREEN
Board 1 at CA000H (^ = not activated)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Date 01.03.2001 Type/model 55/67
Device no. 10704090 O/S code
Serial no. 00000731 Firmware PB-COMBIC104-PB
DPRAM size 8 kBytes V01.058 29.05.01
------------------------------------------------------------------------------Baud 12000 kBits/s Cyclic ramp itv1 100 ms
TQUI 9 tBit Acyclic ramp itv1 2000 ms
TSET 16 tBit
Min TSDR 11 tBit
Max TSDR 800 tBit
TSL 1000 tBit
TTR 22923 tBit
GAP update 10 cycles
Min slave itv1 0.1 ms Protocol error
Data ctrl time 200 ms
Poll timeout 500 ms Error location
COM-flag not set
Protocol cycle 1 ms Bus errors
Watchdog ctrl 1000 ms Rejected telegrams
------------------------------------------------------------------------------D - download & activate,
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8.4.5 DIAGNOSTICS MENU (Cont.)
PROFIBUS TEST (Cont.)
SLAVE DATA SCREEN
Network 1 Node 4 (^ = not activated, * = fault)
Id:04B4 (IOS) Dpv1:Yes
------------------------------------------------------------------------------ OUT Type Len Idx ___Data___ | IN Type Len Idx ___Data___
Cyc |Cyc
1 ont1 u16 1 0 4500 | 1 ont1 u16 1 0 4000
2 rm_sp dp1 1 0 *0 | 2 L01_PV f32 1 0 0
3 | 3 Mod1PV f24u8 8 5 0 132
4 | 4
5 | 5
6 | 6
7 | 7
8 | 8
Acyc |Ayc
1 ont2 u16 1 0 6000 | 1 ont2 u16 1 0 100
2 | 2
3 | 3
4 | 4
5 | 5
------------------------------------------------------------------------------[ ] - select page, S - array scroll, D - download & activate,
C - copy node setup, X - remove node, digit - number/address entry
P (A) - paste (to all), sp - view master, other - popup menu
Note: Positioning the cursor under a field, and pressing any key, except those listed at the bottom of
the screen, (‘Q’ for example), a picklist of available entries appears. The required item is entered by
moving the cursor to it (by means of the up/down arrow keys) and pressing ‘Enter’ or ‘Return’.
Section 8
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8.4.5 DIAGNOSTICS MENU (Cont.)
LED TEST
Selecting ‘6’ from the Diagnostic menu allows an LED test sequence to be initiated, as described below. The
test is started by selecting ‘1’ from the LED sub menu.
The test sequence is as follows:
1.Duplex LED switched green, red, off.
2.Battery int LED switched green. (Off at step 16)
3.
battery ext LED switched green. (Off at step 17)
4.System A LED switched green, red, off.
5.System B LED switched green, red off.
6.
i/o A LED switched green, red, off.
7.
i/o B LED switched green, red, off
8.Standby LED switched yellow. (Off at step 18)
9.Primary LED switched green. (Off at step 19)
10. Exp1 Tx LED switched yellow. (Off at step 20)
Type 2<CR>
to stop test after step 25
11. Exp1 Rx LED switched yellow. (Off at step 21)
12. Exp2 Tx LED switched yellow. (Off at step 22)
13. Exp2 Rx LED switched yellow. (Off at step 23)
14. rl1 LED switched yellow. (Off at step 24)
15. rl2 LED switched yellow. (Off at step 25)
16. battery int LED switched off.
17. battery ext LED switched off.
18.Standby LED switched off.
19.Primary LED switched off.
20. Exp1 Tx LED switched off.
21. Exp1 Rx LED switched off.
22. Exp2 Tx LED switched off.
23. Exp1 Tx LED switched off.
24. rl1 LED switched off.
25. rl2 LED switched off.
If not stopped, by typing ‘2 <CR>’ during the above sequence, the test continues with the Primary, Standby
and Duplex LEDs flashing, and, at the same time, the following LEDs being switched on and off one after the
other in an endless loop:
int, sysA, sysB, i/oB, i/o A, ext, rl1, exp1 tx, exp2 tx, exp2 rx, exp1 rx, rl2.
This loop is stopped, and the LED sub-menu redisplayed, by typing ‘2’ <CR> but it should be noted that it will
continue until its next conclusion (rl2 off) which can take over 20 seconds.
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8.4.6 Manual set-up
This screen is accessed by typing ‘4’ in the main menu.
......Manual set-up menu
......Level 1
0: Quit
1: - SYS Ethernet
- I/O A Arcnet
- Two exp. serial lines
2: - SYS Ethernet
- I/O A Arcnet
- I/O B Profibus
- Two exp. serial lines
3: - SYS Ethernet
- I/O B Profibus
- Two exp. serial lines
4: - SYS Ethernet
- Redundant I/O Profibus
- Two exp. ArcNet line
......Selection: _
8.4.7 Automatic set-up
This screen is accessed by typing ‘5’ in the main menu, then when ready, <CR>.
The carriage return initiates the first of a number of tests, described below. Whilst the test is in progress the
message ‘testing....’ appears. When the test is complete, a further line appears allowing the user to quit
the test procedure, to repeat the previous test, or to move to the next test.
testing....
<ESC>to quit, <ENTER>to repeat, <SPACE>for next.
Each operation of the space bar (followed by a carriage return) initiates the next test.
Test 1 measures how long it takes to write data to flash. If this exceeds 140 ms, the Compact flash device
should be replaced because tepid data may not be stored successfully, causing subsequent hot/tepid start
failure.
Tests 2 to 4 check the operation of the three relays, by opening their contacts for one second, closing them
for 1 second, opening again for 1 second, closing again. Open status is indicated by an LED.
WATCHDOG RELAY TEST
Open/Close the watchdog relay twice at 1 second per state. Duplex LED illuminated whilst relay contacts
open.
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8.4.7 AUTOMATIC SET-UP (Cont.)
RL1 RELAY TEST
Open/Close the relay RL1 twice at 1 second per state. RL1 LED illuminated whilst relay contacts open.
RL2 RELAY TEST
Open/Close the relay RL2 twice at 1 second per state. RL2 LED illuminated whilst relay contacts open.
COMMUNICATIONS HARDWARE CHECK
The unit autodetects whether arcnet and Profibus cards are fitted, and creates a config.txt file.
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8.4.8 The ‘S’ Monitor
Note: The ‘S’ monitor is intended only as a diagnostic tool for Commissioning and/or Service Engineers. Because of the unit’s safety-critical requirements, access by other personnel is not recommended.
S MONITOR ACCESS
The S Monitor is accessed by typing <6> from the M Monitor main menu described in section 8.4.1 above.
......Main menu......level 0
0: Quit
1: Help
2: Display basic machine status
3: Display extended machine status
4: Diagnostic menu
5: Memory status
6: Show boot info
7: Date/Time set
......Selection: _
QUIT
Selecting ‘0’ in this menu quits the ‘S’ monitor. If the watchdog retry enable switch is set ‘on’ (section 2.4.2
above), the unit will re-start. If the switch is set off, the unit must be reset manually, or powered off, then
back on again.
HELP
To be issued later
Section 8
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8.4.8 S MONITOR (Cont.)
DISPLAY BASIC MACHINE STATUS
Accessed by typing <2> from the main menu, this page displays the following information:
<Display?>... (Y,y,N,n) Y<CR>
RTC power ->
CMOS checksum ->
Memory compare ->
CMOS time ->
<Display?>... (Y,y,N,n) N<CR>
......Main menu......level 0
etc.
Ok
Ok
Ok
Ok
(Real-time clock lost power)
(CMOS checksum is bad)
(Memory size compare error)
(CMOS time invalid)
DISPLAY EXTENDED MACHINE STATUS
Accessed by typing <3> from the main menu, this page displays the following information:
<Display?>... (Y,y,N,n) Y<CR>
Register 0x0F = Reason for shutdown =>>> 0 = 0
Register 0x10 = diskette0 set-up =>>> 1.44 M drive
Register 0x10 = diskette1 set-up =>>> None
Register 0x12 = HD0 disk set-up =>>> Disk type =>>> 1
Register 0x12 = HD1 disk set-up =>>> None type =>>> 0
Register 0x14,bit5/4 = Primary display =>>> EGA/VGA
Date =>>> DD/MM/YY
Time =>>> HH:MM:SS <Display?>... (Y,y,N,n) N<CR>
......Main menu......level 0
etc.
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8.4.8 S MONITOR (Cont.)
DIAGNOSTICS MENU
The diagnostics menu (depicted below) is called by typing ‘4’ from the top level menu above.
......Diag Menu
......Level 1
0: Quit
1: Watchdog register
2: System LED
3: I/O LED
4: Serial LED
5: ILOCK WRO Output
6: Read input status
7: Connect the interrupts (5,9,11,12,15)
WATCHDOG REGISTER
Accessed by selecting ‘1’ from the diagnostics menu, this page displays the following information:
......Watchdog menu
......Level 2
0: Quit
1: Bit 7 = Enable flash Vpp
2: Bit 6 = Flash write protection
3: Bit 5 = Redundancy interrupt
4: Bit 4 = Watchdog Relay
5: Bit 3 = Watchdog Pat
6: Bit 2 = Alarm relay 1
7: Bit 1 = alarm relay 2
......Selection
Notes:
1.Switching the alarm relays also switches their associated LED
2.Switching the watchdog relay has no effect on the watchdog LED
SYSTEM LED
Accessed by selecting ‘2’ from the diagnostics menu, this page allows the two ‘battery’ LEDs and the ‘Duplex’
LED to be exercised individually.
I/O LED
Accessed by selecting ‘3’ from the diagnostics menu, this page allows the Comms panel ‘system A’, and ‘B’
and i/o ‘A’ and ‘B’ LEDs to be exercised individually.
SERIAL LED
Accessed by selecting ‘4’ from the diagnostics menu, this page allows the Comms panel ‘exp1’ and ‘exp 2’ Rx
and Tx LEDs, the Alarm panel ‘rl1’ and ‘rl2’ LEDs and the ‘Primary’ and ‘Standby’ LEDs to be exercised individually.
Note: Setting the rl1 or rl2 LED on does not switch the associated relay on. Switching rl1 or rl2 on in
the watchdog menu (above) does cause the associated LED to be illuminated.
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8.4.8 S MONITOR (DIAGNOSTICS MENU) (Cont.)
ILOCK WR0
Accessed by selecting ‘5’ from the diagnostics menu, this redundancy control monitor page displays the following information:
......Ilock wr0
......Level 2
0: Quit
1: Bit 5 = Reset minor fault
2: Bit 2 = A request clocks
3: Bit 1 = A Ok
4: Bit 0 = A Req Primary
......Selection: _
READ INPUT STATUS
Accessed by selecting ‘6’ from the diagnostics menu, this page displays the following information:
<DISPLAY?>... (Y,y,N,y): Y<CR>
Byte 1 = ALIN address =>>> ffffff60 = -166
Byte 2 = ADDR_HIGH register
=>>> 88 = 136
Byte 2,bit7 = Power Fail =>>> 1
Byte 2,bit6 = RTC Battery Failure =>>> 0
Byte 2,bit5 = Over temperature =>>> 0
Byte 2,bit4 = CPU fan stall =>>> 0
Byte 2,bit3 = Main Batt failure =>>> 1
Byte 2,bit2 = Main fan stall =>>> 0
Byte 2,bit1 = Backplane SW2/2 =>>> 0
Byte 2,bit0 = /Loom detect =>>> 0
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
3 = DIL register =>>> 8c = 140
3,bit7 = Backplane SW2/6, SRD =>>> 1
3,bit6 = mode 4 (Hot=>Cold) =>>> 0
3,bit5 = Hardware Build Lev.1 =>>> 0
3,bit4 = Hardware Build Lev.0 =>>> 0
3,bit3 = Backplane SW2/5, MDB =>>> 1
3,bit2 = /Halt =>>> 1
3,bit1 = mode 2 (Hot) =>>> 0
3,bit0 = mode 1 (Cold) =>>> 0
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
4 = OPT register =>>> FF = 255
4,bit7 = Hardware Build Lev.4 =>>> 1
Note:
4,bit6 = Hardware Build Lev.3 =>>> 1
4,bit5 = Hardware Build Lev.2 =>>> 1
OPT register is not displayed for
4,bit4 = Power Fail interrupt =>>> 1
units with hardware build levels
4,bit3 = Backplane SW2/8 =>>> 1
0 or 1. In such cases, Bytes 4 and
4,bit2 = Backplane SW2/7 =>>> 1
5 are ILOCK_RD0 and ILOCK RD1
4,bit1 = Backplane SW2/4 =>>> 1
registers respectively.
4,bit0 = Backplane SW2/3 =>>> 1
Byte 5 = ILOCK_RD0 register
=>>> 24 = 36
Byte 6 = ILOCK_RD1 register =>>> 8 = 8
<DISPLAY?>... (Y,y,N,y): N<CR>
......Diag Menu
etc.
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8.4.8 ‘S’ MONITOR (Cont.)
CONNECT THE INTERRUPTS
Accessed by selecting ‘7’ in the diagnostics menu, this page is for use only by the Manufacturer.
MEMORY STATUS
This page is accessed by selecting item 5 from theS Monitor Main menu, and presents memory information as
follows:
<Display?>... (Y,y,N,n): Y<CR>
Register 0x15/16 = Base memory in kbyte =>>> 280 = 640
Register 0x33 = Extension memory in kbyte =>>> 80 = 128
Register 0x17/18 = Extension memory in kbyte =>>> fc00 = 64512
Total DRAM size in kbyte =>>> ff00 = 65280
<Display?>... (Y,y,N,n): n<CR>
......Main menu
etc.
SHOW BOOT INFO
This page is accessed by selecting item 6 from the Main menu, and presents boot information as follows:
<Display?>... (Y,y,N,n): Y<CR>
Boot device -> System A Net
Boot file -> /ide0/S/vxWorks
Host name -> host’s name
Target name -> PSE
Target IP addr -> 10.1.1.1
Host IP addr -> 0.0.0.0
Gateway IP addr ->
<Display?>... (Y,y,N,n): n<CR>
......Main menu
etc.
DATE /TIME SET
Accessed by selecting item 7 from the main menu, this allows the user to set the date and time.
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Chapter 9 SPECIFICATION AND ORDER CODES
INSTALLATION CATEGORY AND POLLUTION DEGREE
This product has been designed to conform to BS EN61010 installation category II and pollution degree 2.
These are defined as follows:
Installation category II
The rated impulse voltage for equipment on nominal 230V ac mains is 2500V.
Pollution degree 2
Normally, only non-conductive pollution occurs. Occasionally, however, a temporary conductivity caused by
condensation shall be expected.
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9.1 SPECIFICATION
This specification defines the Process supervisor components:
Backplane
Connection Module
Processor Module
Software
9.1.1 General specification
Physical
Dimensions
Backplane:
402mm wide x 180mm high x 24mm deep
Connection Module:
120mm wide x 180mm high x 126mm deep
Processor Module:
120mm wide x 182 mm high (including 2 mm for fan filter) x 186mm deep
Backplane fixing centres:
382 horizontal x 125 vertical
Weight
Backplane without modules:
2kg. max
Connection module:
1.1kg max.
Processor module:
2.4kg max. (each)
Environmental
TemperatureStorage:
-25 to +85˚C
Operation:
0 to + 50˚C
HumidityStorage/Operation:
5 to 95% RH (non-condensing)
RFI
EMC emissions:BS EN61326 2002-02
EMC immunity:BS EN61326 2002-02
Safety SpecificationBS EN61010-1/A2:1993
Vibration
To IEC1131-2 section 2.1.3
(0.075mm peak amplitude 10 to 57 Hz; 1g 57 to 150 Hz)
Power Requirements
Main supply
Surge Current
24V dc nom. (18 to 36Vdc) at 50W per processor module, maximum. Two supplies can be connected per processor module, to ensure continued operation should one supply fail.
8A max.
Backup supplies
External (option):
Internal (option):
2.4 to 5 Volt battery. Typical drain per processor = 300 µA at 3.4V.
1/2AA Lithium thionyl chloride. When fully charged, this maintains the real-time clock for approximately 10 years.
Fusing
24V supplies
External batteries:
3A Type T in each positive supply line
0.5A Type T in each positive supply line
9.1.2 Backplane specification
General
SwitchesSW1: ALIN address
SW2, segment 1: Watchdog retry (trip and try again mode)
SW2, segment 6:Redundant/non-redundant mode select (duplex/simplex)
SW2, segment 5: Modbus select
Safety earth connectionBy M4 earth stud on right hand flange of the backplane
Note: In order to comply with the Low Voltage Directive quoted in the Declaration of Conformity at
the beginning of this manual, neither the positive nor the negative supply line may exceed 40V peak,
with respect to Safety Earth potential.
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9.1.3 Connect module specification
ALIN ports
ConnectorsParallel wired pairs of shielded RJ45 connectors per processor unit.
Network medium ArcNet (screened twisted pair, 100 Ohm)
Network type Token bus
Speed 2.5 Mbits/sec.
Nº of nodes (max) 8, extendable by repeater
Line length (max) 100 metres, extendable by repeater
Isolation 50Vdc / 30V ac; 5.6kΩ to 0V
ELIN ports
ConnectorsPairs of shielded RJ45 connectors per processor unit.
Network medium Ethernet Cat5
Protocols LIN over Ethernet / IP (ELIN), Modbus TCP RTU slave, FTP.
Speed 10/100TX
Network TopologyStar connection to a hub
Line length (max): 100 metres, extendable by repeater
Allocation of IP address: Manual, Link-Local or BootP
Isolation 50V dc; 30V ac.
Modbus/Jbus (EIA422/485)
ConnectorsParallel wired pairs of shielded RJ45 connectors per processor unit.
Protocol MODBUS/JBUS RTU slave
Data rateSelectable between 600 and 38,400 Baud
Data format 8-bits, 1 or 2 stop bits, selectable parity
MODBUS data tables 16, configurable as registers or bits
Table length (max.) 200 registers or 999 bits
Memory allocated to tables 6000 bytes
Isolation 50Vdc / 30V ac
Modbus (DCM)
ConnectorsParallel wired pairs of shielded RJ45 connectors per processor unit.
Protocol MODBUS/JBUS RTU master
Data rateSelectable between 600 and 38,400 Baud
Data format 8-bits, 1 or 2 stop bits, selectable parity
Isolation 50Vdc / 30V ac
Profibus
ConnectorsParallel wired pairs of shielded RJ45 connectors per processor unit.
ProtocolProfibus DP/DP-V1
Data rateSelectable between 9600 and 12M Baud
Isolation 50Vdc / 30V ac; 1MΩ to Chassis
Other connections
Supply voltage: Two 2-way connectors per processor module for connection of 24V (nom.) supply.
Safety Earth:See backplane specification above
Battery backup: For each processor unit, one external battery can be connected using two terminals of an eight-way (relay) connector
block.
Relay connections: For each processor module there are one watchdog relay and two ‘alarm’ relays (operation configured by the user). For
each relay, only the common and normally open contacts are used, these being short circuit under normal operating
conditions, and open circuit under alarm or power-off conditions.
Relay specification
One watchdog and two user configurable relays per processor.
Contact rating (resistive) 30V ac/50V dc at 0.5 Amps
Isolation (Contact-to-ground) 30V ac (RMS) or 50V dc.
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9.1.4 Processor Module specification
General
CPU typePentium MMX; 266MHz
Flash memory >8 MByte
Serial Communications Non-isolated EIA232 terminal configuration port (RJ11 connector)
Panel Indicators
Light emitting diodes (LEDs) for:
Main supply (24V dc nom)
External battery (optional)
Internal battery (optional)
Alarm relay status
Serial communications
ALIN/Profibus status
Primary processor
Standby processor
Watchdog indicator
Duplex (redundant mode) indicator
Control switches
Push button switches for Watchdog Halt
Watchdog Restart
Processor module synchronisation/changeover
Processor module desynchronisation
Rotary switch forStart-up mode selection
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9.1.5 Software specification
LIN Block libraries (continuous database function block categories)
I/O: Analogue and digital input output manual override
Conditioning:Dynamic signal-processing and alarm collection
Control: Analogue control, simulation and communications
Timing: Timing, sequencing, totalisation and events.
Selector: Selection, switching, alarm and display page management
Logic:Boolean, latching, counting and comparison
maths: Mathematical functions and free-format expressions.
Config: Unit identity blocks
Diag:Diagnostics
Batch:Sequencing recipe/record and discrepancy checking.
Continuous database resources
Number of function blocks (maximum)
2048
Number of templates (maximum) 50
Number of libraries (maximum) 28
Number of EDBs (maximum) 32
Number of FEATTs (maximum) 1024
Number of TEATTs (maximum) 512
Number of Servers (maximum) 8
Number of connections 1024
Control database size (maximum) 400 kByte
Notes:
1. Apart from database memory sizes, the figures above are default maximums and are the recommended limits for typical situations. Subject
to note 2, below, it is possible to exceed some
of the above maxima, although if a database with more resources than the default maximum is
loaded, then the maximum is set to the new value and there may then be insufficient memory to
load the entire database. In such a case, the ‘connections’ disappear first. (FEATTs are not subject
to this problem, since when a database is saved, there are not normally any FEATTs present, so the
default maximum cannot be overridden.
2. The EDB maximum must not be exceeded. If it is, some EDBs will malfunction, and this is likely to
affect the LINtools VIEW facility.
Continuous database performance
To be issued later
Sequence Control Resources
Sequence memoryProgram data:
SFC Resources:
Nº of independent sequence tasks:
SFC actions:
Steps:
Action associations:
Actions:
Transitions:
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256 kBytes
512 kBytes
40 simultaneously active
130 (including root SFCs)
640
2400
1200
900
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9.2 ORDER CODES
9.2.1 Instrument order code
T940X
Base Processor 1
type
Comms
Processor 2
B a t t e r y Language
Comms
ENG
Bulkhead fixing backplane + connect module = BU
19" rack mounting backplane + connect module = 19
No base, no connect module = –
Elin + Profibus + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Elin + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Alin + Profibus + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Alin + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
EXPMM
EXXMM
XAPMM
XAXMM
XXXMM
Elin + Profibus + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Elin + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Alin + Profibus + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Alin + Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
Modbus master + Modbus Slave =
No 2nd processor – Blanking plate fitted =
No 2nd processor – No blanking plate =
EXPMM
EXXMM
XAPMM
XAXMM
XXXMM
BLK
–
Backup battery fitted = BAT
No backup battery fitted = –
English language = ENG
T310
Base Blanking
Language
type plate
ENG
Language
T320
ENG
Bulkhead fixing backplane + connect module = BU
19" rack mounting backplane + connect module = 19
Blanking plate fitted at 2nd processor position = BLK
No blanking plate required = –
English language = ENG
English language = ENG
Figure 9.2.1 Instrument ordering guide
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9.2.2 Spares and accessories
Battery................................................................................................................................................................... PA234093
Blanking Plate (EMC cover for unused backplane/processor connector)........................................ BA260496
Chassis fan assembly (on processor module lower panel).................................................................... LA260259
Filter for chassis fan assembly............................................................................................................. BH240476
Capacitor board (excluding fan)................................................................................................................... AH028035
Capacitor board fan (for cooling CPU) ........................................................................................... LA028125
Power supply (Input: mains; Output 24Vdc at 2.5 A. max.)................................................................. 2500P/2A5
Power supply (Input: mains; Output 24Vdc at 5 A. max.)..................................................................... 2500P/5A0
Power supply (Input: mains; Output 24Vdc at 10 A. max.)................................................................... 2500P/10A
External 4V battery........................................................................................................................................... S9537
Charger for external battery (Supply voltage = 24Vdc).............................................................. S9538/24V
Communications Isolator (EIA232 - EIA232) ............................................................................................ LA025519U101
ALIN Cables
1x RJ45 connector and ferrules for screw terminals..................................................................... S9508-5/1RJ45/xxx/RJ45 connectors both ends................................................................................................................... S9508-5/2RJ45/xxx/
Ferrules both ends.................................................................................................................................. S9508-5/2FER/xxx/RJ11 connector one end; RJ45 connector at other end............................................................... S9508-5/RJ11-45/xxx/Cable without termination.................................................................................................................... S9508-5/ - /xxx/
(xxx = cable length in 10 cm. increments to 100 metres max.)
(Final hyphen is “connector boot colour = default”. Consult factory for other colours)
Profibus in-cubicle cables
1x RJ45 connector and ferrules for screw terminals..................................................................... S9508-5/1RJ45/xxx/RJ45 connectors both ends................................................................................................................... S9508-5/2RJ45/xxx/
(xxx = cable length in 10 cm. increments to 100 metres max.)
(Final hyphen is “connector boot colour = default”. Consult factory for other colours)
Configuration terminal cables
RJ11 to 9-way D-type.............................................................................................................................. DN026484
Cable accessories
ALIN terminal-mounted line terminator.......................................................................................... LA082586U002
ArcNet/MODBUS line terminator (RJ45).......................................................................................... CI026528
Profibus line terminator (RJ45)............................................................................................................ CI026529
Feed-through adapter (RJ45)............................................................................................................... CI250407
Shielded RJ45 connector, unassembled............................................................................................ CI250449
RJ45 connector assembly handtool.................................................................................................... Consult factory
ALIN (ArcNet) hub.................................................................................................................................. S9576
Service consumables (battery board with fan, chassis fan, chassis fan filters)............................... LA029126
Chassis fan filter (pack of five)...................................................................................................................... LA029122
Previous models (Processor unit status levels prior to G6)
Service consumables (battery board, capacitor board with fan, chassis fan, chassis fan filter). LA028325
Battery board...................................................................................................................................................... AH261438
Battery board cable harness........................................................................................................................... DN261448
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9.3 COSHH
BACK-UP BATTERY
Product:
Part numbers:
PA234093
9.3.1 Lithium thionyl chloride batteries
HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS
Name
% Range
Lithium (Li)
TLV
Toxicological data
Not established
1.0ppm (4.9mg/m3)
Thionyl Chloride (Li-SOCl2)
2mg/m3
Aluminium Chloride (AlCl3)
Not established
Lithium Chloride
PHYSICAL DATA
Boiling point
Thionyl Chloride: 77˚C
Vapour pressure Thionyl Chloride: 92mm at 20˚C
Specific gravity
Thionyl Chloride: 1.63
Solubility in water
Thionyl Chloride decomposes
violently on contact with water.
Colour
Thionyl Chloride: colourless to
pale yellow
Thionyl Chloride: Pungent, irritant
Odour
FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA
Flash point (deg C) (Method used)
Extinguishing media
Special fire-fighting procedures
Not applicable
Lith-X powder, Class D fire
extinguisher, Dry lithium chloride or
carbon powder, Pyrene G-1.
FLAMMABLE LIMIT
LEL
UEL
Not applicable Not applicable
WATER MUST NOT BE USED. Do not use moist sand, CO2, or
Class A, B, C or soda ash extinguisher. A Self Contained Breathing
Apparatus (SCABA) or Air Purifying Respirator (APR) must be worn.
Cells may leak, vent or explode. If a bright, white flame
Unusual fire and explosion hazards is present, lithium content is present and on fire. Use
one of the extinguishing media recommended above.
HEALTH HAZARD DATA
Threshold limit value Not applicable
Not applicable
LD 50 Oral
LD 50 Dermal Not applicable
Skin and eye irritation Not applicable in normal use. Leakage material is corrosive.
There are no effects in normal use.
Over-exposure effects If leakage has occurred, vapours are very irritating to skin, eyes and
mucous membranes. Inhalation may lead to pulmonary œdema and
overexposure may lead to non-fibrotic lung injury.
See above. There are no risks in normal use.
Chemical nature
FIRST AID PROCEDURES
Flush with running cold water for at least 15 minutes. Hold eyelids apart. Seek immediate medical
attention mentioning thionyl chloride. Contact results in acidic burns.
Rinse with copious quantities of running cold water. Avoid hot water. Do not rub skin. If burns
develop, seek medical attention, mentioning thionyl chloride. Contact results in acidic burns.
Eyes
Skin
Seek immediate medical attention. If person is conscious, supply copious amounts of milk or water.
Do not induce vomiting. Do not attempt to administer anything by mouth to an unconscious person.
Ingestion
May result in pulmonary œdema. Remove to fresh air. If breathing is difficult, administer oxygen. If
breathing has stopped, administer artificial respiration.
Inhalation
REACTIVITY DATA
STABILITY
Stable
Conditions to avoid
Unstable
Yes
Do not short circuit, recharge, over discharge (i.e to below 0.0
Volts), puncture, crush or expose to temperatures above 120˚C.
do not store in high humidity environments for extended periods.
Hazardous
decomposition
products
Decomposes in water to give Sulphur Dioxide (SO2), Hydrogen
Chloride (HCl) and strongly acidic wastewater.
Hazardous
polymerisation
Will not occur
SPILL OR LEAK PROCEDURES
Internal contents are extremely hazardous. Leaking Fluid is corrosive. The cell may explode at
high temperatures.
Do not breath vapours, or touch liquids with bare hands (see first aid procedures above). Evacuate
area. If possible a trained person, wearing suitable breathing apparatus should attempt to stop or
contain the leak with soda lime, or baking soda (sodium bicarbonate NaHCO). Once contained, the
leaking battery and soda lime/baking soda should be sealed in a polythene bag and disposed of as
Hazardous waste
Contact should be avoided
DISPOSAL
Batteries must be disposed of according to current local regulations for Lithium thionyl
chloride batteries. They may not be disposed of as normal waste.
SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION
Respiratory
Not applicable in normal use
Ventilation
Not applicable in normal use
Protective clothing
Not applicable in normal use
Other
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ANNEX A CONFIGURATION
Note: This Annex is included for the sake of completeness. It is strongly recommended that configuration be carried out via LINtools rather than by the procedures outlined below.
The main topics of this chapter are:
A.1 Tools: The Configurator and LINtools
A.2Configurable items
A.3 Preparing to run the Configurator
A.4 Running the configurator
A.5 Database configuration
A.6 Configuring Communications (Modbus only).
A.1 TOOLS: THE CONFIGURATOR AND LINTOOLS
Most configuration will be done before despatch, using the LINtools component of the Eurotherm Project
Suite. This chapter explains how databases and communications parameters are configured for the unit using
the Configurator program resident within the processor unit(s). (In redundant mode the program is resident
only on the Primary processor).
The Configurator program is mainly for adjusting configurations on site, usually to accompany modifications
to the processing plant. The T500/550 LINtools Product Manual (HA082377U999) should be referred to for
details of the configuration procedure using the LINtools package.
The Configurator employs the standard LIN block-structured approach. The LIN Product Manual gives full
details of the software function blocks available for strategies, and how to configure their parameters. The
Configurator can also be used to load, start, stop, save and monitor databases, and to perform various filing
operations.
A.2 CONFIGURABLE ITEMS
The configurable items depend on whether the database or Modbus communications is to be configured. In
either case, it is a menu/item selection procedure. The LINtools package, by comparison, offers an icon-based
‘drawing’ capability.
Configuration of the database consists of carrying out one or more of the following:
1. Installing function blocks in the control strategy (MAKE)
2.Creating duplicates of existing blocks (COPY)
3.Deleting blocks (DELETE)
4. Inspecting and updating blocks (INSPECT)
5. Assigning LIN names and node addresses to external databases* (NETWORK)
6. Accessing the Utilities menu (UTILITIES), from which the user can START and STOP programs, SAVE and
LOAD databases and FILE pages, APPLY or UNDO changes and Access the ELIN setup page.
*Note: External databases (EDBs) are databases running in other LIN instruments.
Configuration of Serial Comms consists of carrying out one or more of the following
1.Setting the operating mode of the instrument to either Master or Slave(MODE)** .
2. Accessing the Tables list, which sets register mapping, and allows tables to be viewed (TABLE)
3. Accessing the Utilities menu (UTILITIES), from which you can SAVE or LOAD protocol configurations.
**Note: Master mode is not supported within the configurator.
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A.2.1 Configuration Access
The Configurator is accessed by connecting the instrument from its Configuration port on the front panel, to a
‘VT100’ compatible terminal (for example, an IBM-compatible PC running a terminal emulation package).
A.3 PREPARING TO RUN THE CONFIGURATOR
Getting ready to run the Configurator consists of two main steps:
1.Connecting the processor unit to a PC
2.Setting the control efficiency of the instrument.
A.3.1 Connecting to a PC
The CONFIG port on the primary processor front panel should be connected to the PC EIA232 port using a
cable fitted with an RJ11 connector at one end and (typically) a 9-way ‘D-type’ connector at the other (Eurotherm part no. DN026484). The connector pinouts are detailed in Chapter 2, Installation. If further details are
required, refer to the documentation supplied with the PC.
Notes:
1. To configure a redundant-mode instrument (dual synchronised processors), the terminal PC must be
linked to the primary processor, not the secondary.
2. It is recommended that if a mains-powered PC is to be used, that it be isolated from the Processor
Module by a Comms isolator. (For details, section 2.4.2 Processor Module, should be referred to).
A.3.2 Setting the control efficiency
If the Configurator is to be used without the database running, continue at section A.4.
Running the Configurator with the database running can affect the control efficiency of the instrument. The
control efficiency is the percentage of CPU time spent on control tasks (i.e. updating function blocks.) Any
diversion from this task will cause a fall in control efficiency.
100% efficiency can never be attained because there will always be minor ancillary tasks occupying the CPU’s
time but, under normal control activity with no major diversion, typical control efficiency will range from 80%
to 95%.
How much the efficiency falls due to diversion to configuration tasks depends upon whether the Supervisor is
set up as non-redundant or redundant.
NON-REDUNDANT (SIMPLEX)SYSTEM
The processor spends 80% of its time updating blocks in the control strategy, leaving a fixed 20% available for
configuration tasks.
REDUNDANT (DUPLEX)SYSTEM
The primary processor spends up to 70% of its time updating blocks in the control strategy. The synchronisation task leaves the configurator with a small percentage of time in which to run, between higher priority
tasks.
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A.4 RUNNING THE CONFIGURATOR
This section describes accessing and quitting the Configurator using HyperTerminal®. If a different terminal
program is being used, its user documentation should be consulted (if necessary) for the equivalent procedures.
Which screen appears at start-up depends on whether the Instrument is running before HyperTerminal ®
is running or, as described below, it is switched on after HyperTerminal®. In the former case, the ‘sign-on’
screen described below does not appear, neither does the 1 ANSI-CRT message. To get to the initial menu,
type <1> (one) and wait for the menu to be displayed.
Note: The sign-on screen also appears when quitting the terminal configurator.
A.4.1 Initial menu access
Note: The detail of the following procedure varies according to the Windows version in use.
1Power up the PC and start Hyperterminal® (All Programs/Accessories/Communications/Hyperterminal®).
After entering a name for the link (if necessary) and defining the computer port (e.g. COM1) enter the
port settings tab and set up the communications parameters as follows:
Baud rate = 9600, Data bits = 7, Stop bits = 1, Parity = ‘Even’, Flow control = Xon/Xoff.
2 When the hyperterminal starts, go into the file menu and click on ‘Properties’. In the ‘Settings’ tab select
‘Emulation’ = ‘VT100’, then click OK.
3.Power up the instrument. The sign-on screen appears. Figure A.4.1a, below shows a typical display. Type
<1> to call the ‘initial menu’.
T940X Process Supervisor - V5/1 - 51M at 266 MHz
(Hardware Build: 00001)
Profibus card: PB-COMBIC104-PB Version: T01.069a14.09.02
Ethernet (MAC) address = 00:30:59:01:86:E9
IP address = 10.1.1.2
Subnet mask = 255.255.255.0
Default gateway = 149.121.164.253
POST result (0000) = SUCCESS
Hotstart failed because: Warmstart switch is disabled
Last shutdown because: Successful Power Down
1 ANSI-CRT
>>>
Figure A.4.1a Typical sign-on screen
Ethernet (MAC) address Shows the address of the Ethernet interface. This value is unique and is permanently
fixed for an individual instrument.
IP address Gives the IP address currently assigned to this instrument. This address must be entered manually.
Subnet Mask Gives the subnet mask currently assigned to this instrument. An IP host uses the subnet mask, in conjunction with its own IP address, to determine if a remote IP address
is on the same subnet (in which case it can talk directly to it), or a different subnet
(in which case it must talk to it via the Default Gateway). Please see ‘IP Subnets’, below.
Default Gateway Gives the IP address of the Default Gateway. It is the address via which this instrument must talk in order to communicate with IP addresses on other subnets. If undefined then this instrument can talk only to other IP hosts on this same subnet.
® Hyperterminal is a trademark of Hilgraeve Inc.
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A.4.1 INITIAL MENU ACCESS (Cont.)
If Modbus is enabled, the configurator Initial menu appears, as shown in figure A.4.1b. If Modbus is disabled,
the Main menu appears instead, as shown in figure A.5. (Modbus in enabled/disabled by means of the Options switch (SW2) on the backplane as described in section 2.4.2.)
INIT
Choose option
(Running)
>DATABASE - General configuration
GATEWAY - MODBUS configuration
Figure A.4.1b
Configurator initial menu
Note: If the Initial or Main menu appears, this indicates that the Processor module has entered configuration mode.
Locate the cursor (>) at a menu item using the cursor keys, then press <Enter> to display the next level in
the menu hierarchy. This is called selecting an item. In general, to access the next lower level of the menu
hierarchy <Enter> is pressed. To return to the next higher level menu or close a ‘pop-up’ options menu the
<Escape> key is pressed. <PageUp> and <PageDown> allow hidden pages in long tables to be accessed.
For keyboards without cursor-control keys, equivalent ‘control’ character combinations may be used, as indicated in Table A.4.1. To use these, the <Ctrl> key is held down and the specified character typed.
FunctionKey combination
Clear screen
Cursor Up
Cursor Down
Cursor Left
Cursor Right
Page Up
Page Down
Stop automatic update
Table A.4.1
<Ctrl> + W
<Ctrl> + U
<Ctrl> + D
<Ctrl> + L
<Ctrl> + R
<Ctrl> + P
<Ctrl> + N
<Ctrl> + V
Cursor-control — equivalent key combinations
Some tables allow a value to be entered directly, or via a called-up menu. For direct entry, the first
character(s) of the chosen option is (are) typed, followed by <Enter>. Alternatively, the menu can be accessed
with <Enter> or <Tab> as the first character after the field is selected.
IP SUBNETS
The current IP address system is known as Classless Inter-domain Routing (CIDR). The process supervisor
predates this standard and divides the internet address space into a number of classes (see table A.4.1, below).
For this type of addressing the subnet masks are on byte (as opposed to bit) boundaries. Therefore a subnet
mask for a class C address such as 255.255.252.0 is converted to 255.255.255.0. In order to avoid misinterpretation of the information in the NETWORK.UNH always use valid pre-CIDR subnet masks.
Class
A
B
C
D
Address
0
network: 7 bits; host: 24 bits
10
network: 14 bits; host: 16bits
110 network: 21 bits; host: 8 bits
1110 multicast group ID: 28 bits
Example
90.1.2.3
128.0.1.2
192.0.0.1
224.0.0.1
Default subnet mask
255.0.0.0
255.255.0.0
255.255.255.0
None
Table A.4.1 Address space class definitions
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A.4.2 The Initial menu
The Initial menu (figure A.4.1 above) lists two options viz ‘Database’ and ‘Gateway’. Database allows access to
the Main menu for configuring a LIN database. This is described in section A.5, below. Gateway allows access
to the Gateway menu, for setting up a Modbus configuration, described in section A.6.
A.4.3 Quitting the terminal emulation program
Exit from configuration mode must be done from the terminal by pressing <Escape> repeatedly until the main
menu screen appears, then again to clear the screen. The processor is now out of configuration mode.
Note: It is not possible to stop/start/download/upload files via Network explorer (E-suite package) for
a processor in configuration mode. Any attempt to do so results in error 8333 (‘Configurator in use’)
being reported. Processor configuration mode must be quitted before these operations are attempted.
Caution
Always quit the primary processor from configurator mode after use. If this is not done, an operator
unaware that the Processor module is still in configurator mode might subsequently plug in a terminal
and type <Enter> <Enter> — hoping to see the version and power-up/shutdown messages. The result
could be totally unexpected because the configurator would react according to where it was left, e.g. if
last used to start a database it would execute the start sequence (twice).
A5 DATABASE CONFIGURATION
Figure A5 shows the Main menu.
MAIN MENU Select option
(Running)
>MAKE
- Create block
COPY
- Copy block
DELETE
- Delete block
INSPECT - Inspect block
NETWORK- Network setup
UTILITIES - Engineering utilities
ALARMS
- Current Alarms
Figure A.5
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A.5.1 MAKE
Notes
1 Every control strategy must contain a ‘header’ block; initially, the only LIN function block available
for a new control strategy.
2. Any function blocks added whilst the control strategy is running (online) are made as ‘tentative’.
Such blocks do not become part of the running control strategy until ‘TRY’ or ‘APPLY’ is selected
from the ‘Utilities’ menu.
3Blocks may not be configured if processor modules are synchronised
Installs function blocks in the control strategy. Select MAKE to display the SET MENU — the processor’s resident library of function block categories, detailed in the LIN Blocks Manual (HA082375U003). Figure A.5.1a
shows part of the screen display when LOGIC is selected, as an example.
LOGIC
Select type
>PULSE
AND4
OR4
XOR4
LATCH
COUNT
COMPARE
Figure A.5.1a
Logic category menu (upper part)
Select the block to be installed. The block Overview appears listing the block parameters, default values and
units in a double 3-column format. Figure A.5.1b shows the (default) overview for the PID block as an example.
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A.5.1 MAKE (Cont.)
BLOCK OVERVIEW
Refer to Figure A.5.1b, below, which shows the main features of a typical function block overview, used to
monitor and update function block parameters. (Overviews can also be accessed via the COPY and INSPECT
main menu options.) The overview is equivalent to a LINtools Object Properties pane and its fields have the
same meanings, although data entry is different. Note that parameters being updated by incoming connections from other function blocks are not specially indicated in a function block overview.
OVERVIEW Block: “NoName”
Type: PID
DBase:
--------------------------------------------------------------Tentative
|
Mode
AUTO
| Alarms
FallBack
AUTO
|
| HAA
100.0
Eng
PV
0.0
Eng
| LAA
0.0
Eng
SP
0.0
Eng
| HDA
100.0
Eng
OP
0.0
%
| LDA
100.0
Eng
SL
0.0
Eng
|
TrimSP
0.0
Eng
| TimeBase Secs
RemoteSP
0.0
Eng
| XP
100.0
%
Track
0.0
%
| TI
0.00
| TD
0.00
HR_SP
100.0 Eng
|
LR_SP
0.0
Eng
| Options
00001100
HL_SP
100.0 Eng
| SelMode
00000000
LL_SP
0.0
Eng
|
| ModeSel
00000000
HR_OP
100.0 %
| ModeAct
00000000
LR_OP
0.0
%
|
HL_OP
100.0 %
| FF_PID
50.0
%
LL_OP
0.0
%
| FB_OP
0.0
%
Title Bar
Tentative
indication
Data Fields
Underline
Cursor
Figure A.5.1b
Data Fields
Overview — PID block
TITLE BAR
Contains fields common to all overviews: Block, Type, and DBase. Details of these fields are to be found in the
LIN Blocks Reference Manual (HA082375U003)). A blank DBase field denotes that the LIN database is local.
Note: The function block is not installed into the control strategy until (at the minimum) its Block field
has been assigned a value — i.e. tagname — and either the database has been restarted or APPLY operated in the ‘Utilites’ menu.
OVERVIEW DATA FIELD ENTRY
To update a parameter field, move the flashing ‘underline’ cursor (_) to the field using the arrow keys, then
proceed as described next for the different data field types. Some data fields display further nested levels of
data when entered, as detailed in the following sections. Press <Enter> to access a deeper level; press <Escape> to return to a higher level.
Note: Refer to ‘Configurable items’ (section A.2 above) for Online Reconfiguration commands
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A.5.1 MAKE (Cont.)
1
User-defined names.
Type in a name (8 characters max.) and press <Enter> to overwrite existing data. To insert characters,
locate the cursor at the character to follow and type the insertions. A ‘beep’ warns that excess characters
have been typed. To abort the current entry and leave the LIN database unchanged, move the cursor to a
function block field above or below the current field before pressing <Enter>, or press the <Escape> key.
Note: Remote LIN database names entered in the DBase field must be prefixed by an ‘equals’ sign (=)
which is included in the character count.
Pressing <Enter> with the cursor on the first character of the Block or DBase fields (before starting to
type) accesses a Full Description page (Figure A.5.1c shows an example). This page gives general information about the block and has a common format.
FULL DESCRIPTION
Block: INP01
Type: ANIN
--------------------------------------------------------Request refresh
0.1040
Server number 5
DBase:
=Alpha
Rate ms
10
Execution time
1234
Figure A.5.1c
FULL DESCRIPTION page for block (example)
BlockBlock tagname (Read/write)
TypeBlock type (Read-only).
Request refreshConfigured time period (secs) for running the LIN function block. For a control function block the PID algorithm is not necessarily recalculated every time it is scheduled.
(Read-only).
Server number
The function block’s time scheduled task priority (Read/write). There are four User
Tasks numbered from User Task 1 (highest priority) to User Task 4 (lowest priority).
See Chapter 7 for more details.
DBase:
Name of the function block’s LIN database. A blank field means that the LIN database is local, i.e. resident in the current processor. (LIN Database names and their
LIN addresses are specified via the main menu NETWORK option, described in section
A.5.5.) (Read/write) Note that the LIN database name entered in the ‘DBase’ field
must be preceded by an ‘equals’ character (=).
Rate ms.
For cached function blocks:
Rate is the minimum update period (i.e. maximum rate) at which an individual cached
function block is transmitted across the Local Instrument Network (LIN). The default
is 10ms minimum, i.e. 100Hz maximum. Rate can be set between 10ms and 64s. Note
that rate values are minimum update times only, and heavily loaded networks may
not be able to reach the faster update rates.
For DCM blocks:
Rate is the target period at which the block’s data is to be updated via Modbus. A
minimum value of 1000 ms is normally needed. The default value of 100 ms is acceptable for Profibus working, but can cause problems with Modbus.
Execution time
This is the time taken in microseconds to execute a LIN function block (including connections etc.).
Note: If the control strategy is running (online), the ‘DBase’ and ‘Rate ms’ fields cannot be edited. Only
local function blocks can be ‘Made’.
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A.5.1 MAKE (Cont.)
2.Parameter values.
Type in a value and press <Enter> to update the LIN database. (Read-only parameters do not accept new
values.) The processor module automatically adds a following decimal point and padding zeros if needed,
but before a decimal point a zero must always be typed, e.g. 0.5, not .5.
Pressing <Enter> with the field selected, before starting to type, accesses a Full Description page for the
parameter (Figure A.5.1d shows an example).
FULL DESCRIPTION Field: PV
Block: PID_1
Type: ANIN
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Value 80.1
Real32
Input
SIM 1.OP
Figure A.5.1d
FULL DESCRIPTION page for parameter (example)
Field, Block, TypeRead-only fields.
Value Parameter value, editable as for the Overview. (Read/write)
Real32Value type (Real32 = floating point number) (Read Only)
InputDefines the source of any connection to the parameter from another function block,
as Block Tagname.Output Mnemonic. A blank function block field means no connection. To make or edit a connection, type in the source function block tagname and
output mnemonic (e.g. SIM 1.OP, or SEQ.DIGOUT.BIT3), then press <Enter>. Invalid data
is ‘beeped’ and is not accepted. The field is not case sensitive. To delete a connection,
type <space> then press <Enter>. (Read/write)
Note: See CONNECTION TYPES... (below) for information and advice on types of database connections.
3.Parameter units.
Type in a value and press <Enter>. All other related units in the LIN database automatically copy the
edited unit. Pressing <Enter> with the field selected, before starting to type, accesses the parameter Full
Description page (as for the value field).
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A.5.1 MAKE (Cont.)
4Options menu fields.
Press <Enter> to display a pop-up menu of options for the field. Figure A.5.1e shows an example (PID
Mode) in part of an overview page.
OVERVIEW Block: “NoName”
Type: PID
DBase:
--------------------------------------------------------------
|
>HOLD
Mode
AUTO
| Alarms
AUTO
TRACK
FallBack
|
| HAA
100.0
Eng
MANUAL
PV
Eng
| LAA
0.0
Eng
AUTO 0.0
SP
0.0
Eng
| HDA
100.0
Eng
REMOTE
OP
0.0
%
|
LDA
100.0
Eng
F_MAN
SL
0.0
Eng
|
F_AUTO
TrimSP
0.0
Eng
| TimeBase Secs
RemoteSP
0.0
Eng
| XP
100.0
%
Track
0.0
%
| TI
0.00
| TD
0.00
HR_SP
100.0 Eng
|
LR_SP
0.0
Eng
| Options
00101100
HL_SP
100.0 Eng
| SelMode
00000000
LL_SP
0.0
Eng
|
| ModeSel
01000001
HR_OP
100.0 %
| ModeAct
01000001
LR_OP
0.0
%
|
HL_OP
100.0 %
| FF_PID
50.0
%
LL_OP
0.0
%
| FB_OP
0.0
%
Figure A.5.1e
Pop-up options menu (example)
Using the ‘arrow’ keys, move the cursor (>) to a menu option and select it by pressing <Enter>. (Disabled
options may not respond to selection.) A quicker alternative to accessing the pop-up options menu is to
type the required option, or enough of its initial letters to uniquely specify it, directly into the selected
field and then press <Enter>. E.g. entering just H selects HOLD; entering F_M selects F_MAN (Forced
Manual).
5
Alarms field.
Press <Enter> to display a 4-column Alarms page listing alarm name (e.g. HighAbs), acknowledgement
(e.g. Unackd), status (e.g. Active), and priority (0 to 15). Update the acknowledgement or priority fields
(the only editable ones) by typing in a value and pressing <Enter>. (Any single letter can be used for the
acknowledgement field.) Figure A.5.1f shows an example Alarms page.
Alarms
Block: PID_1
Type: PID
---------------------------------------------------------------
Software
Unackd
Active
15
HighAbs
Unackd
Active
15
LowAbs
0
HighDev
Active
10
LowDev
2
Combined
0
Figure A.5.1f
Annex A
Page A-10
Alarms page (example)
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A.5.1 MAKE (Cont.)
6.Bitfields
Contain eight (or sixteen) binary digits showing the logic states of a corresponding set of up to eight (or
sixteen) parameters. To edit the bitfield directly, type in a bit-pattern then <Enter> it. Alternatively,
press <Enter> to display a Full Description page listing the parameter TRUE/FALSE or HIGH/LOW states
(in the same format used for LINtools Object Properties pane bitfields). Figure A.5.1g shows an example.
Alter a logic state by locating the cursor on the state, typing in T(rue) or F(alse), and pressing <Enter>. (A
bit may be read-only.)
FULL DESCRIPTION Field: ModeAct
Block: PID_1
Type:PID
-----------------------------------------------------------
NotRem
TRUE
HoldAct FALSE
TrackAct
FALSE
RemAct FALSE
AutoAct
FALSE
ManAct
FALSE
FAutoAct
TRUE
FManAct
FALSE
Figure A.5.1g
Full Description page for bitfield (example)
To connect an input to a bitfield, press the → key and type in the LIN function block name/field name from
which the connection is to be made. A connection can be deleted by replacing the LIN function block name/
field name in the bitfield, by a space.
CAUTION
Any connections deleted whilst the control strategy is running (online) are marked as ‘DeleteReq’. Such
connections can be further edited, but the new version will not become effective until ‘TRY’ or ‘APPLY’
is selected from the ‘Utilities’ menu described in section A.5.6.
Note: See CONNECTION TYPES... (below) for information and advice on types of database connections.
7
Two- and four-digit ‘combined’ hexadecimal status fields.
Hex fields are marked with a ‘>’ sign and have the same format and significance as those found in LINtools specification menus. The digits show the logic states of a corresponding set of parameters, up to
four per hex digit. To edit the field directly, type in new values then press <Enter>. Alternatively, press
<Enter> to display a Full Description page listing the parameter TRUE/FALSE states and edit this list (as
described for Bitfields, above).
CONNECTION TYPES IN A PROCESSOR MODULE DATABASE
There are three types of connection used in a LIN database: local connections, connections writing to a
cached function block, and connections from a cached function block to a local function block. The following
explains how and when they are evaluated.
1. Local connections.
These are connections between two function blocks that are both local to the LIN database. The connection is always evaluated immediately prior to the execution of the destination LIN function block’s
update procedure, regardless of whether the source data has changed between iterations. With this sort
of connection, any attempt to write to the connection destination is immediately ‘corrected’ by the next
connection evaluation.
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A.5.1 CONNECTION TYPES IN A PROCESSOR MODULE DATABASE (Cont.)
2.Connections writing to cached function block
These are connections whose destination function block is a cached copy of a function block in another
instrument. The source of the connection can be either a local function block or another cached function block. Such connections are evaluated only if the source and destination data do not match. All
cached function blocks in the LIN database are processed at regular intervals, and whenever a change is
detected, a single field write is performed over the communications link.
3.Connections from cached function block to local function block
These are connections where the source function block is a cached copy of a function block in another
instrument, and the destination function block is local to the LIN database. All cached function blocks
in the LIN database are tested at regular intervals, and if a change in the function block data is detected,
then all such connections out of the cached function block into local function blocks are evaluated. The
connections are not evaluated if the source data has not changed.
This third type of connection is unique to redundant (duplex) instruments. Such connections are evaluated in this way to minimise the load involved in synchronising the LIN databases of a duplex pair, whilst
ensuring the coherence of the data between the primary and secondary processor units.
Caution
With this third type of connection, tasks can write to the connection destination, leaving the source
and destination of the connection with different values. It should be ensured that the control strategy
in use does not write to connection destinations.
A.5.2 COPY command
Creates duplicates of existing function blocks. Select COPY from the main menu to display all the function
blocks in the control strategy, in semi-graphical format as shown in Figure A.5.2. The function blocks are displayed from left to right in order of creation. Move the cursor (>) to a function block and press <Enter>. The
function block is duplicated and added to the strategy, and its Overview page automatically appears ready for
parameterising. The duplicate retains all the original parameter values except for the Block field, which has
the default tagname “NoName”. Input connections are not copied; nor are I/O function block site numbers.
COPY
Select block
------------------------------------------------------ | >T940 | SIM_1
| TIC_100 | PID_1
| FIC_101 | B-23
------------------------------------------------------Figure A.5.2
COPY display (example)
Pressing <Escape> returns the COPY display, where the copied function block can be seen added to the list.
Press <Escape> again to return to the top level menu.
Note: Any function blocks copied whilst the control strategy is running (online) are made as ‘tentative’. Such function blocks do not become part of the running control strategy until ‘TRY’ or ‘APPLY’ is
selected from the ‘Utilities’ menu.
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A.5.3 DELETE command
Notes
1. Any function blocks deleted whilst the control strategy is running (online) are marked as ‘DeleteReq’. Such blocks are not deleted until ‘TRY’ or ‘APPLY’ is selected from the ‘Utilities’ menu.
2. A function block cannot be deleted unless its input connections have been cleared. This is achieved
by clearing the source fields of each affected connection
Deletes function blocks from the control strategy.
Select DELETE from the main menu to display all the function blocks in the control strategy, in the same format as for the COPY option described in section A.5.2, above. Select a function block and press <Enter>. The
function block and any connections from it are deleted, and the main menu returns to the screen.
A.5.4 INSPECT command
Allows function blocks in the control strategy to be inspected and updated. Select INSPECT from the main
menu to display all the function blocks in the control strategy, in the same format as for the COPY and DELETE
options already described. Select a function block and press <Enter> to display its overview page, ready for
monitoring or updating.
Pressing <Escape> returns the INSPECT display, where other blocks can be selected for inspection. Press <Escape> again to return to the top level menu.
A.5.5 NETWORK
Allows LIN databases to be assigned names and node addresses on the Local Instrument Network so that they
can be configured as ‘cached’ function blocks and run in a remote instrument. (The overview page of the
cached block DBase field specifies the remote database name.)
Note: It is good practice when using cached function blocks, to cache at least one block in each direction. This allows the status of the comms link between the nodes to be monitored from both ends via
the cached blocks’ software alarms. This ‘bidirectional caching’ also eliminates the fleeting software
alarms that may otherwise be seen during processor changeover in a redundant mode (duplex) system.
Select NETWORK from the main menu to display the Network setup page (initially blank). Figure A.5.5 shows
the top part of an example page with several databases already assigned.
Network setup
----------------------------------------------------------
Alpha
>01 |
Beta
>02 |
dBase_1
>03 |
Figure A.5.5
NETWORK setup page (example)
To assign a new database name and address, locate the underline cursor at the left hand column of a blank
row, type in a unique name (7 characters max.) and press <Enter>. The name appears added to the list together with a default node address >00. (Non-unique or invalid names are ‘beeped’ and not accepted. Do
not use 00 or FF as node addresses). Move the cursor to the default address and type in the required node
address (two hex digits). Press <Enter> to complete the assignation.
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A.5.5 NETWORK (Cont.)
To edit an existing name or address, locate the cursor at a field, type in the new value, and press <Enter>.
Invalid entries are not accepted.
To delete a complete name and address entry, edit its name field to a space character. Configurations downloaded from LINtools will have a Network page set up automatically.
A.5.6 UTILITIES
Allows program control, I/O calibration, and filing. Select UTILITIES from the main menu to display the Utilities options, shown in Figure A.5.6.
UTILITIES Select option
>START
STOP
SAVE
LOAD
FILE
TRY
UNTRY
APPLY
UNDO
ELIN - Start runtime system
- Stop runtime system
- Save database
- Load database
- File page
- Try Changes
- Untry Changes
- Apply Changes
- Undo Changes
- Elin Setup
Figure A.5.6
UTILITIES options menu
START, STOP COMMANDS
Select START or STOP from the UTILITIES options menu and press <Enter> to start or stop the control program running in the processor.
Note: When you START a LIN database in RAM it is automatically saved to the file in E: drive called
filename.DBF, where filename is indicated in the filename.RUN file. It is then reloaded and started.
SAVE COMMAND
Names and saves a control program to a specified memory area. Select SAVE from the UTILITIES options
menu — the default filename specification, E:T940.DBF is displayed. (The prefix E: directs the save to the local
E: drive area of the processor; this is the only available memory area. To save a database to a remote instrument, prefix the filename specification by the node address of the instrument separated by a double colon,
e.g. FC::E:T940.DBF).
Type in a new specification if needed, then press <Enter> to execute the save. After a short pause the processor module signals completion with the message: ‘Type a key to continue’. Typing any key returns the UTILITIES menu.
An invalid filename specification aborts the save, and an error message is sent, e.g. ‘Save failed — Invalid
device’.
Note: Modifications to a control database are carried out on the RAM image only, not directly to the
.DBF file in E: drive. They are copied to E: drive (overwriting the existing .DBF file) automatically as you
restart the database, or when you do a SAVE operation.
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A.5.6 UTILITIES (Cont.)
LOAD COMMAND
Retrieves a control program from a specified memory area and loads it to the processor RAM.
Note: A LOAD operation can be performed using the ‘Load Delta’ option during on line configuration.
Select LOAD from the UTILITIES options menu — the default filename specification, E:T940.DBF is displayed.
Edit the specification if needed (to alter the filename or its source, as described in ‘SAVE utility’ above), then
press <Enter>. After a short pause the processor signals completion as described for the SAVE option. Typing
any key returns the UTILITIES menu.
An invalid filename specification aborts the load, and an error message is sent, e.g. ‘Load failed — File not
found’.
FILE COMMAND
Permits access to the processor file page, allowing files to be deleted or copied, and the E: device to be formatted. The file page displays files in the E-device and also in a configurable remote ??::?: device. To access a
remote device, move the cursor to the ??::?: field and type in the required node and device letter, e.g. FA::M:.
Press <Enter> to display its files (up to a maximum of 20).
Move the cursor up and down the file list and tag files with an asterisk (*) using <Enter>. Then move the
cursor to the top column-head field and press <Enter> to display the function menu: Copy, Delete, Find, and
— for E-device only — Format. Finally, select a function and press <Enter> to carry it out. Press <Escape> to
return to the UTILITIES menu.
Note that the Find function has wild-card characters (?) to aid in locating filenames containing known
character strings.
TRY/UNTRY CHANGES COMMAND
LIN Database changes can be Tried and Untried on a running LIN Database from the Configurator. If the control strategy has ‘Tentative’ changes, ‘Changes’ appears below the first line in the Configurator, but will change
to ‘Trying’ when testing the strategy. Any such changes made whilst the LIN Database is running are ‘Tentative’, as indicated on the Configurator screen and are not applied until APPLY is selected. These ‘Tentative’
changes can be discarded by selecting UNTRY, before APPLY has been selected. UNTRY has no effect once
APPLY has been used.
Note. If changes have been applied, and a synchronisation is attempted, it will fail unless the LIN Database running in the primary instrument has been saved using either the root LIN function block’s full
save option, or it is stopped, saved and started from the Configurator program.
Select TRY or UNTRY from the UTILITIES options menu and press <Enter> to try or untry the ‘Tentative’
changes to the control strategy running in the instrument.
APPLY/UNDO COMMAND
LIN database changes can be executed on-line from the terminal configurator. Any such changes made whilst
the database is running are ‘Tentative’ and are not applied until APPLY is selected. ‘Tentative’ changes can
be discarded by selecting UNDO, before APPLY has been selected. UNDO has no effect once APPLY has been
used.
Note: If changes have been applied, and a sync. is attempted, it will fail unless either the primary LIN
database is saved using the root block’s full save option, or it is stopped, saved and started from the
configurator program.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Annex A
Page A-15
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
A.5.6 UTILITIES (Cont.)
APPLY/UNDO COMMAND (Cont.)
APPLY DCM BLOCKS
For DCM blocks, not only must the blocks themselves be added to the executing database, but also, the Communications parameters must be passed to the AMC data groups.
For Profibus blocks:
1. The DCM block must refer to a Profibus node that is already ‘known’ to the system. (I.E. There must
already be other, running, DCM blocks referring to the node.) If the node is not known, the DCM block
enters Config Alarm, and a suitable error message is added to the .UYC file.
2. The new communications parameters are added for Acyclic operation only. The database must be restarted, or a changeover must be forced on a synchronised unit in order to install the parameters for Cyclic
use.
The restrictions above do not apply to Modbus blocks.
ELIN SETUP PAGE COMMAND
This page allows the instrument’s network.unh file to be configured.
Note: The network configuration can be edited using the Instrument Properties dialogue via the
Project Environment or the instrument folder. The ‘network.unh’ file can also be edited using an appropriate text editor, e.g. ‘notepad.exe’.
Elin Setup (network.unh file)
--------------------------------------------------------------------
|
LIN PROTOCOL SETUP
| REMOTE SUBNET NODE LIST
|
Protocol Name
RKN
| 149.121.173.1
All Subnet Enable OFF
|
Elin Only Enable ON
|
LOCAL IP SETUP |
Get Address Method Fixed
|
IP Address
149.121.128.209 |
Subnet
255.255.252.0
|
Default Gateway 149.121.128.138 |
ELIN PARAMETERS
|
Unack Timeout
100 msec
|
Rmt Unack Timeout 1000 msec
|
No of retries
3
|
EDB Timeout used
5 sec
|
EDB Timeout Unused 30 sec
|
DBM Timeout TX conf2000 msec
|
LIN PROTOCOL SETUP
This area of the screen allows specification of those items in the “[LIN]” section
of the network.unh file.
LOCAL IP SETUP
Allows the specification of those items in the “[IP]” section of the network.
unh file. The IP address etc. is entered using data obtained from the network
administrator.
REMOTE SUBNET NODE LIST Allows the user to enter the IP addresses of all the nodes with which it is required to communicate. (The “[PR]” section of the network.unh file.)
Annex A
Page A-16
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
A.5.6 UTILITIES (Cont.)
ELIN SETUP PAGE COMMAND (Cont.)
Once all the required entries have been made, the ESC key should be operated. A confirmation message asks
if the network.unh file is to be updated. If ‘Y’, the file is updated and a power cycle is requested.
CROSS SUBNET WORKING
With ‘All Subnet Enable’ set ‘OFF’ (default), the instrument will not communicate ELIN cross subnet. This can
be overridden in the network.unh file by setting ‘All Subnet Enable’ to ‘ON’. This defines the behaviour when
the Process Supervisor powers on. The ability to communicate cross subnet can be modified at run time by
using the “Options.AllSubnt” bit in the instrument’s header block. Set to TRUE, this bit enables cross-subnet
working. When set to FALSE, cross-subnet working is disabled.
Note: This bit may be set FALSE, remotely, from a cross-subnet connection. If this is done, communications will be lost, and it will thus not be possible to reset it to TRUE from the cross-subnet connection.
LOCAL IP SETUP
Allows the IP address etc. to be set up for the instrument. Some of the information may need to be
ELIN PARAMETERS
Allows ELIN timeout and retry parameters to be edited
A.5.7 ALARMS
Select ALARMS to view the currently active alarms in the instrument. Move the cursor up and down the list.
Type <Enter> to acknowledge an individual alarm; Type <I> to inspect the block containing the alarm.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Annex A
Page A-17
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
A.6 MODBUS CONFIGURATION
Figure A.6 shows the Gateway menu.
Note: The resident Modbus configurator works in a similar way to the Modbus configurator in the
T500 LINtools package. Refer to the T500/T550 LINtools Product Manual (HA082377U999) for more
information.
GATEWAY
(Running)
MODBUS configuration
>MODE
- Operating mode
SETUP - Serial line
TABLES - Register & bit configuration
UTILITIES- File Load & Save
Figure A.6
Gateway menu
A.6.1 MODE
Displays the operating mode as ‘Master’ or ‘Slave’.
A.6.2 SETUP
Displays parameters for serial link operation. The items are not editable. Select SETUP to see a menu of items
— Baud rate, Parity, Stop bits, and Time out. The user can select new values for the parameters, but these
new values are not saved.
Baud rate.Displays the current setting. Highlight and ‘Enter’ this item to see a menu of possible
baud rates — 110, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 and 38400.
Parity.Displays current setting (None, Odd, or Even).
Stop bits. Displays the current setting (1 or 2).
Time out.Displays the Time out value, in the range 0 to 65.5 seconds. In slave mode, this parameter specifies a timeout period for all tables. That is, if a table has not been accessed for
Time out seconds, the Online bit in the slave mode diagnostic register for that particular
table resets to zero. In master mode, Time out specifies a maximum period between
the end of a master’s request for data to the start of the slave’s response. If this time is
exceeded, the Online bit in the master mode diagnostic register for the particular table
concerned resets to zero.
When SETUP viewing is complete, press <Escape> return to the Gateway menu. Any changes will be ignored.
Annex A
Page A-18
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
A.6.3 Tables
To view the tables list, highlight TABLES and press <Enter>.
TABLES LIST
The tables list provides an overview of the sixteen tables in the Modbus configuration, through which tables
are created and their types, offsets and sizes. The tables list also accesses individual table menus for detailed
configuration (database mapping) — see ‘TABLE MENUS’ below.
Figure A.6.3a shows an example tables list with Table 1 configured as a register table.
Table Type Offset Count
­ --------------------------------------------------------
1
Register 0 16
2
Unused
0 0
3
Unused
0 0
4
Unused
0 0
5
Unused
0 0
6
Unused
0 0
7
Unused
0 0
8
Unused
0 0
9
Unused
0 0
10
Unused
0 0
11
Unused
0 0
12
Unused
0 0
13
Unused
0 0
14
Unused
0 0
15
Unused
0 0
16
Unused
0 0
Figure A.6.3a
Modbus tables list
Table
Table number (non editable). The table menu (described below) for any table is accessed by highlighting the table number field and pressing <Enter>.
Type This field, which defaults to Unused, lets you create a new table or change the type of
an existing table. Enter a Type field, select a type, and press <Enter> . Other fields in
the tables list associated with your selection automatically adopt default values. The
Type options are:
Unused. The table is deleted.
Register. Maps LIN database parameters onto standard 16-bit Modbus registers.
Digital. Maps LIN digital, boolean or alarm values onto bits in the Modbus address space.
Diagnostic. This is a special table, similar to a register table, but the values in the table
have pre-defined values that are used to control Modbus operation, or present diagnostic information to the database.
Offset.Selects the start address of the table on the Modbus network. The values used here are
the actual values used in the address field of the Modbus messages, i.e. the ‘protocol
addresses’. Note that PLCs differ in the correspondence between their register or bit addresses and the protocol addresses.
Count.
This field specifies the number of registers or bits in a table. It allows the size of register
and digital tables to be changed from their default values of 64 registers or bits, respectively, to optimise the use of memory. Diagnostic tables are fixed at 32 registers.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Annex A
Page A-19
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
A.6.3 TABLES (Cont.)
TABLE MENUS
A table menu is accessed from the tables list by highlighting the required table number (in the first column
headed Table) and pressing <Enter>. To highlight fields you can move the arrow cursor around a table menu
using the mouse, or the PC’s <Home>, <End>, and cursor keys.
Table menus allow the mapping between the LIN database fields and the Modbus addresses to be configured.
Figure A.6.3b shows the default table menu for a register (or diagnostic) table. Note that table headings differ
for register and digital tables, but that some fields are common to both — Field, DB Write, and MOD Write.
Register
Field
DP Format DB Write MOD Write Value
---------------------------------------------------------
0
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
1
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
2
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
3
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
4
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
5
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
6
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
7
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
8
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
9
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
10
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
11
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
12 0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
13
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
14
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
15
0 Normal Enable Enable >0000
Figure A.6.3b
Register.
Digital
Field
DP
Annex A
Page A-20
Register table menu — default
(Register and diagnostic tables only) This column shows the Modbus address of the
particular register. The first register in the table takes its address from the Offset value
given to the table via the tables list (described above). The remaining (read-only) addresses follow on consecutively.
(Digital tables only) This column shows the Modbus address of the digital bit on that
particular line of the table. If the line contains a bitfield rather than a single bit, the address shown is that of the first bit in the bitfield. Mappings may be made for a single bit,
or for an 8- or 16-bit field, according to the value defined in the Width parameter (see
later). The very first bit address in the table takes its value from the Offset given to the
table via the tables list. The remaining (read-only) addresses follow on according to the
numbers of bits on each successive line of the table (1, 8, or 16).
This is the LIN database field which can be mapped onto the Modbus address, or left
blank. Select a field with the cursor and type in and enter a block name plus parameter
(and subfield if needed), separated by full stops (periods), e.g. PV1.Alarms.Software.
Note that if an attempt is made to enter an analogue parameter into a digital table Field,
the entry is ignored. Any type of parameter can, however, be entered into a register
(or diagnostic) table. Note also that in a digital table database parameters cannot be
entered or overwritten if to do so would force an entry lower down the table to change
its address (Digital value).
(Register and diagnostic tables only) This column can be used for either of two functions: specifying a decimal point position, or creating a 32-bit register.
Decimal point position. Represents the number of decimal places (0 to 4 inclusive) to be
used when converting floating point numbers to 16-bit Modbus registers.
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
A.6.3 TABLES (Cont.)
32-bit register
Format
Note:
(Register tables only) A 32-bit register is created by ‘joining’ a consecutive pair of 16-bit
registers, as described below. Note the restrictions that are applied to ensure that the
32-bit value created is transferred indivisibly:
a) The multiread function (3) and multiwrite function (16) must both be enabled.
b) The scan count must be even.
c) The first register of the pair must be at an even offset within the table.
d) The first register of the pair must not be the last register in the table.
e) The second register of the pair must not already be assigned to a database field.
f) The field type of the 32-bit register pair must be 32-bit long signed or unsigned, 32bit real or a string. For a string, only the first four characters are transferred.
To create a 32-bit register pair, enter ‘d’ or ‘D’ in the DP field of the first register of the
pair. This causes the register’s DP to adopt the value ‘D’, and the following register the
value ‘d’.
If any of the above restrictions are violated, the entry will be rejected.
When the first register of the 32-bit pair is assigned to a database field, the second
register automatically copies the same field name; assigning the name and the DP can be
done in either order. You can restore a 32-bit register pair to individual 16-bit registers
by changing the first register’s DP to 0 to 4.
(Register and diagnostic tables only) This column specifies the format of the data in the
register as normal or BCD (binary coded decimal). Normal format means that the data
is a simple 16-bit integer. In BCD format the value is first limited to the range 0 to 9999,
and then stored as four 4-bit nibbles in the register. The units are stored in the low order nibble, the tens in the second nibble, the hundreds in the third, and the thousands in
the high-order nibble. BCD format allows the data to be used with certain devices such
as displays.
Format is ignored in 32-bit registers.
Width
(Digital tables only) This column indicates the number of bits contained in the associated field. The default Width is 16, but it automatically updates when a parameter is
allocated to the field. Allocated field ‘widths’ are read-only, but the width of an unallocated field can be edited by highlighting its Width value and entering a number in the
range 1 to 16, (normally 1, 8, or 16). Note that a Width value cannot be edited if to do
so would force an entry lower down the table to change its address (Digital value).
DB Write
This column allows selected values in the LIN database to be protected from being
overwritten by values received across the serial link. Highlight the required DB Write
field and press <Enter>. Select ‘Protect’ to write-protect the LIN database parameter, or
‘Enable’ to allow overwriting.
Note: For a 32-bit register pair, DB Write applies only to the first register. The DB Write-value of the
second register is ignored.
MOD Write
This column allows the user to prevent selected values in the LIN database being written
to their associated Modbus registers or bits. Highlight the required MOD Write field and
press <Enter>. Select ‘Protect’ to write-protect the Modbus register/bit(s), or ‘Enable’ to
allow overwriting.
Notes:
1. The easiest way to protect an entire table in a gateway operating in master mode is to disable its
write function codes (5 and 15, or 6 and 16) in the tables list.
2. For a 32-bit register pair, MOD Write applies only to the first register. The MOD Write-value of the
second register is ignored.
Value
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
This column shows the current 16-bit value of the field in 4-digit hexadecimal representation. ‘Value’ is read-only.
Annex A
Page A-21
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
A.6.4 Utilities
The Utilities menu allows Modbus configurations to be saved and loaded. Files may be copied to and retrieved
from the local processor module, or from a remote instrument across the LIN. The Modbus configuration is
stored in a file with extension .GWF, and the root filename should be the same as that of the corresponding
database .DBF file.
Select UTILITIES in the Gateway menu to see the options shown in Figure A.6.4.
UTILITIES
(Running)
File Load & Save
>SAVE
LOAD - MODBUS Configuration
- MODBUS Configuration
Figure A.6.4
UTILITIES menu
SAVESelect SAVE and press <Enter> to see the default filename specification E:T940 .GWF. To
save the current Modbus configuration under the default filename press <Enter> again.
To save it under a different filename, edit the file name before carrying out the save
operation.
Note: An existing file with the same filename is overwritten without warning.
LOADSelect LOAD and edit the default E:T940.GWF if required to the filename to be loaded.
Press <Enter> to load the specified configuration.
An error message appears if the specified file cannot be found.
Note: The current Modbus configuration is overwritten without warning.
Annex A
Page A-22
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
INDEX
Symbols
C (Cont.)
24 Volt wiring ................................................................................2-15
32-bit register ............................................................................... A-21
.CPF file ............................................................................................ 4-4
.dbf file ............................................................................................5-11
.gwf file .................................................................................5-8, 5-11
.GWF file .........................................................................................2-20
.sdb file ............................................................................................. 5-8
.sto file .............................................................................................. 5-8
.stx file .............................................................................................. 5-8
.TPD file .............................................................................................4-3
.ujg file .............................................................................................. 5-8
Parameter file ............................................................................ 4-4
Comms
LEDs .............................................................................................4-10
Parameters (dumb terminal) ............................................... 2-17
Compound ...................................................................................... A-7
Conductive pollution .................................................................... 2-2
Configuration
Modbus ..................................................................................... A-18
Configuration Tools
Automatic I/O Build ................................................................ 5-8
LINtools ....................................................................................... 5-8
On-line Reconfiguration .................................................... 5-8
Preparing .................................................................................5-9
Configurator
Connection with PC ........................................................ 5-1, A-2
Running ..............................................................................5-1, A-3
Configuring strategies ................................................................2-19
CONFspd .......................................................................................... A-2
Connecting to a computer ..........................................................5-9
Connection module
Connectors ....................................................................... 2-9–2-20
Front panel ..................................................................................2-9
Specification ...............................................................................9-3
Connections ...............................................................2-8, A-9, A-13
Types in a database ............................................................... A-11
Control efficiency ......................................................................... A-2
Non-redundant system .......................................................... A-2
Redundant system ................................................................... A-2
COPY ......................................................................................A-1, A-12
COSHH data .................................................................................... 9-8
CPU loading .....................................................................................7-5
Creating a project folder .............................................................5-9
Cross subnet working ...................................................................5-7
Cursor-control, key combinations ................................. 5-3, A-4
A
Access to configuration ...............................................................5-1
Address
Clashes ..........................................................................................2-6
Switch ...........................................................................................2-6
Alarms
Field ............................................................................................ A-10
LEDs .............................................................................................. 3-4
View ........................................................................................... A-17
ALIN .................................................................................................. 6-6
Connectors ................................................................................ 2-12
Failure .......................................................................................... 6-6
Hubs .................................................................................. 2-8, 2-13
Loading .........................................................................................7-5
APPLY ................................................................................................ A-1
Automatic dynamic tuning .........................................................7-5
Automatic set-up .........................................................................8-14
Autosynchronisation .....................................................................4-9
B
Backplane switches .......................................................................2-6
Battery
External ......................................................................................2-15
Fuse value .................................................................... 2-15, 3-3
Internal .......................................................................................2-15
Fitting .......................................................................................8-5
Part number ...............................................................................9-7
Status LEDs ..................................................................................3-3
Baud rate .........................................................2-17, 5-2, A-3, A-18
BIOS LEDs .......................................................................................6-10
Bitfields .......................................................................................... A-11
Block .......................................................................................A-6, A-7
Servers ........................................................................................6-12
Structure, introduction ........................................................... 1-3
Support ........................................................................................ 1-3
Updates ........................................................................................ 7-7
C
Cables and accessories .................................................................9-7
Cached blocks .........................................................7-6, A-12, A-13
Circuit board layout ..................................................................... 8-6
Clock back-up duration .............................................................2-15
Coherence ........................................................................................7-6
Cold start ................................................................................3-9, 4-4
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
D
Daisy-chain connection .............................................................2-14
Database
Configuration .............................................................................5-5
Halt ................................................................................................6-5
Name and address ................................................................. A-13
Startup ..........................................................................................7-5
Stop ...............................................................................................6-7
Transfer between modules ....................................................8-5
Data bits . .....................................................................2-17, 5-2, A-3
Data coherence ..............................................................................7-6
DBase ................................................................................................ A-7
DB Write ........................................................................................ A-21
DC supply
Fusing ................................................................................ 2-15, 3-3
Wiring .........................................................................................2-15
Decimal point ................................................................................. A-9
Default gateway ....................................................................5-2, A-3
DELETE ...................................................................................A-1, A-13
Desynchronisation ............................................................. 6-5, 6-12
Desync switch ................................................................................ 3-6
Index
Page i
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
D (Cont.)
F (Cont.)
DIAG category ...............................................................................6-12
Diagnostics
Introduction ............................................................................... 1-2
Menu ............................................................................................ 8-8
Digital ............................................................................................. A-20
Downloading a strategy .............................................................5-10
DP A-20
Duplex
LED ............................................................................. 3-8, 4-9, 6-5
Mode .............................................................................................4-1
Dynamic tuning ..............................................................................7-5
Format ................................................................................ A-15, A-21
Front panel
Annunciation, introduction ................................................... 1-2
Connection module .................................................................2-9
Error displays ..............................................................................6-2
Processor module ................................................. 3-1, 4-6, 6-2
FTQ_DIAG ......................................................................................6-12
Function Block ..............................................................................5-11
Function blocks ............................................................................. A-6
Fusing .................................................................................................3-3
E
Electrical installation ....................................................................2-8
ELIN connectors ........................................................................... 2-11
ELIN parameters ............................................................................ 5-6
ELIN setup page ................................................................. 5-6, A-16
Error
Codes
AMC (A1xx) ...........................................................................6-17
Asynchronous (A6xx) ........................................................6-18
Config files (91xx) ...............................................................6-16
Control config (87xx) ........................................................6-15
Database (83xx) ..................................................................6-14
Kernal items (9Cxx) ............................................................6-17
Locks (9Exx) .........................................................................6-17
MAL (A0xx) ...........................................................................6-17
MMC (A4xx) .........................................................................6-17
MODBUS (94xx) ..................................................................6-16
Network (89xx) ...................................................................6-15
Objects (9Dxx) .....................................................................6-17
Object system (85xx) .........................................................6-15
PCLIN/PC I/F (8Fxx) ...........................................................6-16
Profibus (ADxx) ...................................................................6-18
Sequence database (8Bxx) ...............................................6-15
Sequence runtime (8Cxx) ................................................6-15
Structured text (8Dxx) ......................................................6-16
T1000 menu system (90xx) .............................................6-16
Trend system (86xx) ..........................................................6-15
Xec (9Bxx) .............................................................................6-16
Conditions/diagnostics ............................................................6-1
Displays ......................................................................................6-10
Fatal .............................................................................................6-12
Messages .......................................................................... 6-1, 6-13
E:T940.DBF .................................................................................... A-14
Ethernet MAC address ........................................................5-2, A-3
Eurotherm Project Studio ..........................................................2-19
Execution times ..............................................................................7-5
Exp1/exp2 LEDs ................................................................... 3-5, 4-10
External battery connection .....................................................2-15
G
Gateway menu ............................................................................. A-18
H
Halt switch .......................................................................................3-9
Handling precautions ...................................................................2-3
Hardware layout ............................................................................ 8-6
Health monitoring ......................................................................... 1-2
Hexadecimal fields ..................................................................... A-11
Hot/cold start .................................................................................4-5
Hot/Cold start .................................................................................3-9
Hot start ........................................................................3-9, 4-3, 6-7
Hyperterminal .......................................................................5-2, A-3
I
ICM
Action on fail ............................................................................. 6-6
Diagnostics ................................................................................6-12
Failure ...........................................................................................6-5
Input . ................................................................................................ A-9
INSPECT ................................................................................A-1, A-13
Installation
Category ......................................................................................9-1
Electrical ......................................................................................2-8
Mechanical ..................................................................................2-3
Safety requirements ................................................................. 2-2
Internal battery ............................................................................2-15
Inter-server connections .............................................................7-6
I/O
Calibration .......................................................................5-5, A-14
Connectors (i/oA, i/oB) ........................................................ 2-12
Connectors (SysA, SysB) ....................................................... 2-11
Failure ...........................................................................................6-7
Introduction ............................................................................... 1-3
LEDs (i/oA, i/oB) ........................................................... 3-5, 4-10
IP address ...............................................................................5-2, A-3
IP Address ........................................................................................ 5-6
IP Subnets .............................................................................. 5-4, A-4
F
K
Fan replacement .............................................................................8-3
Field ................................................................................................. A-20
Field writes ....................................................................................... 7-7
Filename specification ............................................................... A-14
Filter replacement .........................................................................8-2
Firmware upgrade .........................................................................8-5
Flash card replacement ................................................................8-5
Flow control ...........................................................................5-2, A-3
Keeping the product safe ............................................................ 2-2
Index
Page ii
L
Labelling ...........................................................................................2-3
LED
Alarm ........................................................................................... 3-4
Battery int/ext ...........................................................................3-3
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
LED (Cont.)
O
Communications ........................................................... 3-5, 4-10
Duplex .......................................................... 3-8, 4-9, 4-10, 6-5
exp1/2 ............................................................................... 3-5, 4-10
Indication at start up (BIOS) .....................................4-6, 6-10
i/o A/B .............................................................................. 3-5, 4-10
Power A/B ....................................................................... 3-3, 4-10
Primary ...................................................................3-6, 4-10, 6-5
Rl1/Rl2 ......................................................................................... 3-4
Standby .................................................................... 3-6, 4-9, 6-5
Start-up fault indicator .........................................................4-10
System .............................................................................. 3-5, 4-10
Test ..............................................................................................8-13
Watchdog (wdog) .........................................................3-8, 4-10
LIN A -13
Protocol setup ........................................................................... 5-6
LINfiler .............................................................................................. 5-4
LINtools ............................................................................................ 5-8
Action .......................................................................................... 5-8
.sto file ..................................................................................... 5-8
.stx file ..................................................................................... 5-8
Database
.dbf file ...................................................................................5-11
Modbus Gateway Configuration .......................................... 5-8
.gwf file ........................................................................5-8, 5-11
Modbus Gateway File .............................................................5-11
Sequence
.sdb file .................................................................................... 5-8
LOAD ..................................................................................... A-1, A-22
Local IP setup ................................................................................. 5-6
Logic states ................................................................................... A-11
On-line reconfiguration .............................................................. 5-8
On-line Reconfiguration ............................................................. 5-8
Options switch (SW2) ................................................................... 2-7
Order codes .................................................................................... 9-6
M
MAC address .........................................................................5-2, A-3
Maintenance schedule .................................................................8-1
MAKE ...................................................................................... A-1, A-6
Manual tuning .................................................................................7-5
MDBDIAG .......................................................................................6-12
MDB switch ...................................................................................... 2-7
Mechanical installation ................................................................2-3
Misuse of equipment .................................................................... 2-2
M Monitor ................................................................. 4-11, 6-11, 8-7
Modbus ...........................................................................................5-11
Configuration .......................................................................... A-18
Configuration editor
Gateway (.gwf) File ............................................................5-11
Mdbtools ...............................................................................5-11
.ujg file 5-8
Enable Switch ............................................................................. 2-7
Tools ............................................................................................5-11
MODE ................................................................................... A-1, A-18
Module removal/replacement ...................................................2-5
MOD Write .................................................................................... A-21
Monitor .............................................................................................8-7
M ...................................................................................... 4-11, 6-11
System (‘S’ mon) .....................................................................6-11
N
Network ................................................................................A-1, A-13
Setup page ............................................................................... A-13
Non-coherent data transmission .............................................. 7-7
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
P
Package
Contents .......................................................................................2-3
Definition ...................................................................................6-13
Parameter
Database .....................................................................................A-8
Units ............................................................................................. A-9
Values .......................................................................................... A-9
Parity .................................................................2-17, 5-2, A-3, A-18
PBUS_DIAG ....................................................................................6-12
PMC_DIAG .....................................................................................6-12
Pollution degree .............................................................................9-1
POST ....................................................................................... 6-1, 6-10
Power
Fail .................................................................................................6-5
LEDs ................................................................................... 3-3, 4-10
Supply fuses .................................................................... 2-15, 3-3
Power on self-tests ......................................................................6-10
Power up failure .............................................................................6-7
Primary
LED .......................................................................................3-6, 6-5
Synch state ..................................................................................6-5
Unsynch state ................................................................... 4-7, 6-5
Primary/secondary
Changeover .....................................................................6-6, 6-12
Criteria ......................................................................................... 4-8
Priorities (task) ............................................................................... 7-1
Processor module
Failure modes ............................................................................ 6-4
Front panel .............................................................. 3-1, 4-6, 6-2
Front panel LEDs .......................................................................6-3
Specification .............................................................................. 9-4
Profibus
Redundancy decisions ...........................................................4-12
Redundant mode working ...................................................4-12
R
Reconfiguration, on-line ............................................................. 5-8
Reconfiguring a strategy ............................................................5-10
RED_CTRL ......................................................................................6-12
Redundancy
Control block ...........................................................................6-12
Decisions ....................................................................................4-12
Enable switch .............................................................................. 2-7
Modes ...........................................................................................4-1
States ........................................................................................... 6-4
Refresh rate ....................................................................................A-8
Register .......................................................................................... A-20
Relay
Specification ...............................................................................9-3
Wiring .........................................................................................2-16
Remote device ............................................................................. A-15
Remote subnet node list ............................................................ 5-6
Repeat times ....................................................................................7-5
Index
Page iii
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
R (Cont.)
S (Cont.)
Replacement procedure
Battery (internal) ......................................................................8-5
Cooling fans ................................................................................8-3
Filter ..............................................................................................8-2
Restart switch ..................................................................................3-9
RJ45 Connectors ...........................................................................2-14
Running
LINTools .....................................................................................5-10
Modbus tools ...........................................................................5-11
Synchronisation .................................................................... 3-7, 4-9
Time to achieve ............................................................... 3-7, 4-9
Sync switch . .................................................................................... 3-6
Syntax (.cpf) ................................................................................... 4-4
System
LEDs ...............................................................................................3-5
System A/B LEDs ................................................................ 3-5, 4-10
System monitor ............................................................................6-11
S
Safety earth connection ............................................................2-19
Safety requirements ...................................................................... 2-2
SAVE .......................................................................... A-1, A-14, A-22
SDX_IDLC .......................................................................................6-12
SDX_RSRC ......................................................................................6-12
Secondary
Synch state ................................................................................. 6-6
Unsynch state ............................................................................ 6-6
Serial line set-up ..........................................................................5-11
Server ................................................................................................ 7-3
SETUP ............................................................................................. A-18
SFC_DIAG .......................................................................................6-12
SFC disable ....................................................................................... 2-7
Simplex mode .................................................................................4-1
S Monitor ............................................................................ 6-11, 8-16
Spare parts .......................................................................................9-7
Specification
Connection Module .................................................................9-3
General .........................................................................................9-2
Processor Module .................................................................... 9-4
Relay ..............................................................................................9-3
Software ......................................................................................9-5
Standby LED ................................................................. 3-6, 4-9, 6-5
START .....................................................................................A-1, A-14
Start bits ......................................................................................... 2-17
Starting state .................................................................................. 4-6
Start up
Mode ................................................................................... 3-9, 4-1
Switch .......................................................................................3-9
Sequence
Duplex (redundant) systems ............................................ 4-8
Simplex (non-redundant) systems ................................. 4-6
With config terminal ..............................................................4-11
With server stall ......................................................................4-11
STOP .......................................................................................A-1, A-14
Stop bits ...........................................................2-17, 5-2, A-3, A-18
ST user-algorithms ......................................................................... 1-3
Subnet mask ..........................................................................5-2, A-3
Supply fuses ......................................................................... 2-15, 3-3
Supply wiring .................................................................................2-15
SW1 location ...................................................................................2-6
SW2 location ................................................................................... 2-7
Switch
Desync ......................................................................................... 3-6
Halt ................................................................................................3-9
Restart ..........................................................................................3-9
Sync .............................................................................................. 3-6
Switches
Location of backplane .............................................................2-6
Index
Page iv
T
TABLE ................................................................................................ A-1
Tables (Modbus) ......................................................................... A-19
Talk-thru .........................................................................................2-20
Task
Functions ..................................................................................... 7-1
Priorities ....................................................................................... 7-1
Server ...........................................................................................7-4
Tuning ...........................................................................................7-5
TCP ...................................................................................................5-11
Tepid data ........................................................................................4-3
Terminal configurator restrictions .........................................2-19
Termination assemblies ...............................................................2-8
Test start ................................................................................. 3-9, 4-5
Time
Maintaining during power down ........................................2-15
To achieve synchronisation .......................................... 3-7, 4-9
Timeout .......................................................................................... A-18
TMA ..................................................................................................2-20
TOD_DIAG .....................................................................................6-12
Transparent Modbus Access .....................................................2-20
Tuning ................................................................................................7-5
Type ................................................................................................... A-7
U
UNDO ............................................................................................... A-1
Unpacking ........................................................................................ 2-2
Update period ................................................................................ A-8
Uploading a strategy ...................................................................5-10
User
Defined names .......................................................................... A-8
Task ................................................................................................ 7-3
Server operation ...................................................................7-4
Tuning .......................................................................................7-5
Utilities
Options menu ......................................................................... A-14
Utilities menu ..................................................................... A-1, A-22
V
VDU package, quitting ...................................................... 5-4, A-5
W
Wall-mounted enclosure .............................................................2-3
Watchdog
Failure ...........................................................................................6-5
Indications ...................................................................................4-7
Introduction ............................................................................... 1-3
LED (wdog) ............................................................3-8, 4-6, 4-10
Relay .................................................................................. 2-16, 4-7
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
Watchdog (Cont.)
Restart ..........................................................................................6-5
Retry switch ................................................................................ 2-7
WDR ................................................................................................... 2-7
Width .............................................................................................. A-21
Wild character ............................................................................. A-15
Wiring
And connections .......................................................................2-8
Min/max size ............................................................................2-15
Relay ............................................................................................2-16
Safety earth ..............................................................................2-19
X
Xon/Xoff .................................................................................5-2, A-3
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
Index
Page v
PROCESS SUPERVISOR HANDBOOK
This page is deliberately left blank
Index
Page vi
HA028225
Issue 8 Feb 12
International sales and service
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©Copyright Invensys Systems, Inc 2012
ArchestrA, Eurotherm, the Invensys Wonderware logo, EurothermSuite, Eycon, EurothermSuite, Invensys, InTouch, Wonderware and Wonderware Logger
are trademarks of Invensys plc, its subsidiaries and affiliates. All other brands may be trademarks of their respective owners.
All rights are strictly reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, modified or transmitted in any form by any means, neither may it be stored in
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Invensys Systems, Inc pursues a policy of continuous development and product improvement. The specifications in this document may therefore be
changed without notice. The information in this document is given in good faith, but is intended for guidance only. Invensys Systems, Inc will accept no
responsibility for any losses arising from errors in this document.
HA028225 (CN28186)
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